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Jewish Press of Tampa
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Tampa, FL
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Jim and Karen Dawkins
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
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United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa
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27.90731 x -82.744957

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University of Florida
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PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAIDThe Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc.The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc. Jewish Press of Pinellas County P. O. Box 6970 Clearwater, FL 33758-6970 Just a nosh.. Just a nosh..Complied from JTA news service www.jewishpresstampa.com VOL. 30, NO. 16 TAMPA, FLORIDA MARCH 9 22, 2018 20 PAGES By BOB FRYER Jewish PressWords matter, and choosing them carefully can mean the difference between diatribe and discourse, guest speaker Frank Luntz told a packed house at the Tampa JCCs and Federations 15th annual Presidents Dinner on Feb. 25. Luntz, a nationally known political pundit and pioneer of the instant response focus group technique that can monitor in real time an audiences reaction to a speech, came to Tampa to talk about Words that Work: Combatting anti-Semitism and Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions. On college campuses in particular, but also among other groups, Israel is losing support, Luntz said, and if the trend continues, it could mean big problems for Israel, and in time for Jews in America. He said the political divide between Democrats and Republicans is harmful. Luntz cited a variety of statistics from surveys showing the pro-Palestinian view gaining ground and the pro-Israel contingent shrinking. He even cited a survey that showed 34 percent not sure Israel had a right to exist as a Jewish state. Two other shocking statistics Presidents Dinner speaker: In war of words for hearts and minds, choose carefully To Hedy Lamarr, beauty was only skin deepBy MICHAEL FOX Special to the Jewish PressIn 1933, the Viennese actress Hedy Keisler sparked an international furor by swimming nude in a provocative melodrama called Ecstasy. Alas, it was the tragic fate of Hedy Lamarr, as she was renamed when she arrived in Hollywood, to be perpetually judged by her face and A splendid study of an extraordinarily compliBombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story recounts the actress and inventors litany of innovations The 22nd Annual Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival is March 21-25.BOMBSHELL: T HE HEDY LAMARR STORY By BOB FRYER Jewish PressWhen the opportunity came along to enter into a long-term lease of the long-vacant and decaying Fort Homer Hesterly Armory and turn it into a second JCC, the decision to go ahead with the project was not by any means a slam dunk obvious proposition. The Federation already had a wonderful JCC on the 22-acre Maureen and Douglas Cohn Campus off Gunn Highway in Citrus Park. There had to be careful consideration of whether the Federation needed or could sustain two JCCs and whether the Federation could raise the funds for the new project. But Sue Schoenbaum was Federation president at the time and that made a big difference, according to the current Federation President, Joe Probasco as he announced Schoenbaum as Sue Schoenbaum is Tikkun Olam Award winner Related Column, Page 3A federal grand jury in Orlando has indicted Michael Ron David Kadar, 19, who holds dual United States and Israeli citizenship, with hate crimes as a result of threatening calls he made to Jewish Community Centers in the state including four to the Tampa JCCs and Federation preschools in January and February 2017. Kadar, who is currently in custody in Israel where he also faces charges, was initially charged in criminal complaints last July. The grand jurys 32-count indictment charges against Kadar for obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs. Those hate crime charges each carry a maximum penalty of 20 years imprisonment. According to the indictment, Kadar is alleged to have made threats to the Tampa JCC Preschool North on Jan. 5, 2017 and to the JCC Preschool South on Jan. 5, Jan. 9 and Feb. 20, 2017. In addition, the threats mostly claiming there was a bomb in the facility but also making active shooter threats were against Chabad South Orlando, Jewish Academy and Roth JCC in Orlando and Jewish Community Alliance of Jacksonville. Besides the new Florida charges, an indictment handed down in the District of Columbia charges Kadar with threatening the Israeli Embassy and the Anti-Defamation League in Washington, D.C. Although these were only a fraction of the Jewish buildings around the country that were threatened in the wave of hoax calls that Kadar is believed responsible, they are the only ones in which he has been formally charged in the U.S. Threats, intimidation, or violence perpetrated against anyone because of their beliefs, their faith, or how they choose to worship is intolerable, said U.S. Attorney Maria Chapa Lopez for the Middle District of Florida. Individuals should be free to exercise these rights without fear. We will continue to use our resources to enforce these precious rights for all individuals. Investigators for the case included the FBI Tampa Division, Middle District of Florida; and the Justice Departments Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section and Civil Rights Division. Federal authorities also acknowledge the assistance and the investigative efforts of the Israeli National Police.Threat charges against Israeli/American teen raised to hate crimesS By BOB FRYER Jewish PressAn effort is under way to raise $20,000 and send at least 30 local Jewish teens and adult chaperones from the Tampa Bay area to the March for Our Lives in Washington D.C. on Saturday, March 24. The march to end gun violence was organized by high school students following the Feb. 14 slaying of 17 teens and faculty members at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. As of Friday, March 9, $9,900 had been raised through donations to local temples and a GoFundMe website, said Dani Gamson, director of education and youth at Temple Bnai Israel in Clearwater. Gamson started the GoFundMe effort after members of her youth group said they wanted to participate in the national march. Gamson said that as of March 8 a total of 22 teens and eight adult from her temple, Temple Beth-El in St. Petersburg and Congregation Beth-Am in Tampa all Reto Washington for the march. She said that included four from Beth Am and the rest split pretty evenly between her temple and Beth-El. The next day Rabbi Gary Klein at Temple Ahavat Shalom in Palm Harbor, just back from an AIPAC conference, learned Funds sought to send local teens to DC gun marchRussian President Vladimir Putin said Jews or other minorities might have been behind attempts to interfere in the 2016 American presidential elections. In an interview with NBC News, Putin denied charges by U.S. intelligence services that he ordered meddling in the elections, saying the 13 Russian nationals and three counsel Robert Mueller last month do not represent the interests of the Russian state. Maybe theyre not even Russians, he said. Maybe theyre Ukrainians, Tatars, Jews, just with Russian citizenship. Even that needs to be checked. Maybe they have dual citizenship. Or maybe a green card. Maybe it was the Americans who paid them for this work. How do you know? I dont know. The American Jewish Committee condemned Putins remarks. President Putin suggesting that Russian Federation minorities, be they Ukrainian, Tatar, or Jewish, were behind U.S. election is eerily reminiscent of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. He should clarify his comments at the earliest opportunity, the AJC tweeted. Jewish university. Modeled after Yeshiva University in the United States, the Jewish University of Moscow is a private institution with a student body of 200 whose budget comes mostly from donors and the Russian Federation of Jewish Communities, dean Alexander Lebedev told JTA. It will open next month. The university whose faculties include economics, law, humanities and Jewish studies comprises two existing Jewish community colleges one for men and the other for women. Their reconstitution as campuses of a history, according to Lebedev. In the new institution, students will have the possibility to observe Torah, kosher food, Jewish holidays and Shabbat, he said. First Jewish university to open in Russia Russian rm names ice cream Poor Jew Jews in Russias Tatarstan region are objecting to a new ice cream called Poor Jew. The ice cream cone, announced last month by the Slavitsa company in Naberezhnye Chelny, 600 miles east of Moscow, is wrapped in an image of Israels Leonid Shteinberg, a leader of the Jewish community in Naberezhnye Chelny, has called the name racist and demanded its production and sale be halted, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty reported. The city prosecutors In a social media post, the company describes the ice Putin: Jews may be behind meddling

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PAGE 2 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 The Jewish Press assumes no responsibility for the opinions of columnists, letter writers, claims of advertisers, nor does the paper guarantee the kashruth of products & services advertised or mentioned otherwise. P.O. BOX 6970, CLEARWATER, FL 33758-6970(6416 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, FL 33707)Telephone: (813) 871-2332 Fax: (727) 440-6037 E -mail: jewishpress@aol.comAlso publisher of the Jewish Press of Pinellas County of TAMPAAn independent, bi-weekly newspaper owned by THE JEWISH PRESS GROUP of TAMPA BAY, INC. www.jewishpresstampa.com THE TAMPA JCCS & FEDERATION M AINTAINS THE MAIL ING LIST FOR THE JEWISH PRESS.The Jewish Press of Tampa is privately owned, but published in cooperation with the the Tampa JCCs & Federation as a community newspaper. The JCCs & Federation underwrites home delivery of the paper to to promote Jewish community cohesiveness and identity.To RECEIVE THE PAPER or for ADDRESS CHANGES, E-mail at info@jewishtampa.com Call (813) 264-9000 Go to www.jewishtampa.comThe Jewish Press is mailed STANDARD CLASS. Standard Class DOES NOT include a speedy delivery guarantee. Date of delivery varies depending on your Standard Class Postage Permit: TA MP A PI #3763 The Jewish Press is a subscriber to JTA, The Global Jewish News Source.JIM D AWKINSPublisher & Co-OwnerKAREN D AWKINSManaging Editor & Co-Owner Advertising Sales GARY POLIN TORI GEE GALE TARNOFSKY-ABERCROMBIE Staff Writer & Editor BOB FRYER Ad Design & Graphics REY VILLALBA DAVID HERSHMANSocial Columnist DIANE TINDELLEditorial Assistant GAIL WISEBERGSTAFFPUBLIC AT ION & DEADLINE D ATE S MARCH 23passover editionPress Release ..........Mar 9 Advertising .............Mar 13APRIL 6Press Release ........Mar 23 Advertising .............Mar 27APRIL 20Press Release ..........Apr 6 Advertising .............Apr 10 RALPH BOBOArea/Branch ManagerNMLS ID 432371 State Lic. L025098 3903 Northdale Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33624C: 813.781.1024 Ralph.bobo@caliberhomeloans.com www.RalphBobo.com DR. RON PROSSTHE MAIMONIDES SOCIETY OF TAMPA & ITS CHAIR, DR. STEPHEN KREITZERCORDIALLY INVITE ALL COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO ATTEND A RECEPTION AND PROGRAMSAVE THE DATETUESDAY, MAY 1, 2018BRYAN GLAZER FAMILY JCC522 NORTH HOWARD AVENUE TAMPA, FLORIDA 336066:30 PM COCKTAILS 7:15 PM PROGRAMRSVPs ARE REQUESTED FOR CATERING PURPOSES. FREE TO ALL DONORS OF THE FEDERATION. $25 NON DONORS.FOR HIS OUTSTANDING COMMITMENT TO THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY & FEDERATION, THE TAMPA MAIMONIDES LEADERSHIP AWARD IS BEING PRESENTED TORESERVATIONS CAN BE MADE ONLINE AT JEWISHTAMPA.COM/MAIMONIDES OR BY CONTACTING LONI LINDSAY AT 813.769.2802. SPONSORED BY: of Tampa Bay JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATION Tampa ByRON KAMPEAS JTA news serviceWASHINGTON Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declined to say whether he now believes in a two-state solution, saying it was up to the Palestinians to prove that a sovereign state would not threaten Israel. I want a solution where they have all the power they need to govern themselves but none of the powers to threaten, Netanyahu said Wednesday, March 7, addressing The Economic Club of Washington. Does that comport with full sovereignty? I dont know, but its what we need to live. nal status deal have not changed: He said as he has in the past that it is critical that Israel retain overriding security control in the West Bank, and that it control airspace. If you say Israels airspace stops at Ben Gurion Airport, well, were dead, Netanyahu said, noting how close Israels international Bibi: Solution may not include full Palestinian sovereigntyairport is to the West Bank. However, in his remarks echoing a similar conversation he had two days earlier with Israeli journalists following his meeting with President Donald Trump Netanyahu retreated from forecasting a two-state solution, language he had previously embraced. In a 2009 speech delivered at the behest of the Obama administration, Netanyahu declared, We will be ready in a future peace agreement to reach a solution where a demilitarized Palestinian state exists alongside the Jewish state. But soon after assuming the presidency last year, Trump retreated from U.S. policy embracing two states, and since then Netanyahu has avoided mentioning two states. Trump, who wants to revive Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, has said the ultimate contours of a deal should be up to the parties. The two-state outcome. A year ago Netanyahu disavowed a Likud party statement that he no longer believed in two states, but did not recommit to the premise. His comments in recent acknowledged that his preferred outcome might not result in Palestinian statehood. cause under Netanyahus previous formulation, a sovereign Palestine could still conduct an independent foreign and trade policy, however demilitarized it was. Most people would agree to an arrangement of the kind youre talking about if the Palestinians wanted a state next to Israel, Netanyahu told his host, David Rubenstein, the president of The Economic Club, which brings together the Washington, D.C., business community with diplomats. tant and philanthropist, had asked about a two-state solution. The Palestinians want a state in place of Israel, Netanyahu said. The Palestinian Authority emphatically denies the claim. Netanyahu also said the media overstated his tensions with former President Barack Obama, but also acknowledged he had better relations with Trump, who has embraced Netanyahus rejection of the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. I had very good relations with all three of them but I disagreed with them on Israeli national security issues, Netanyahu said, describing his interactions with Obama, Trump and Bill Clinton. He cited Obamas deal with Israel guaranteeing it $38 billion over 10 years in defense assistance as an instance where he deeply appreciated the previous president. With President Trump, I have fewer disagreements, he said. Its fair to say I dont have any disagreements.

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 3 MARCH 9 22, 2018 Macaroon & Candy Platter A CUSTOMER PASSOVER FAVORITE! Send our best-selling kosher assortment as a gift for Passover or any occasion. Makes a great hostess gift or the perfect addition to your own seder table. Serves 6-8. Hurry, while quantities last! SPECIAL OFFER! S ave over 20% and FREE Shipping Reg. $44.99 Now Only$34.99& FREE SHIPPING Save over 20% and FREE ShippingNow Only $34.99 (reg $44.99 ) and FREE ShippingCall 1-888-239-2545 or Visit ChallahConnection.com/welcome5Offer ends March 30, 2018 or until supplies last.Creating kvells since 2002 Norwalk, CT 06855 CERTIFIEDKOSHERfor Passover By BEN SALES JTA news serviceWASHINGTON A poll last year by the American Jewish Committee showed that 77 percent of American Jews disapproved of President Donald Trumps job perfor mance. American Jews had voted 70 per cent to 25 percent in favor of Hillary Clin ton over Trump. With the exception of the Orthodox, majorities of all the major Jewish denominations voted for Clinton. So how did it feel for anti-Trump Jews to hear the president cheered again and again at this years annual conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee? pants told JTA. rie Silverman of Maryland. People like myself who are ardent Zionists are confused because we love what Nikki Haley is doing, and moving the embassy we love ... but we were disappointed with [Trumps] character The president himself did not appear at the AIPAC event earlier this month, but his administration was well represented and his name was cheered often. Vice President Mike Pence called him the most pro-Isra el president ever, to applause. One of the stars, U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, got 12 standing ovations. Israeli Prime Minis ter Benjamin Netanyahu, in a well-received speech the next day, lauded Trump. Speakers from both parties repeatedly praised Trumps recognition of Jerusalem as Israels capital, and his plans to move the U.S. Embassy there in May. They thanked him for standing up to Iran and vowing to amend or withdraw from the Iran nu clear deal. They applauded the administra tions standing up for Israel at the United Nations. Thanks to the presidents leadership, the alliance between America and Israel cheers. America stands with Israel today, Several conference participants suggest ed that it was possible to compartmentalize appreciating the presidents actions on Israel while not endorsing him in general. AIPAC is, after all, a single-issue lobby that does not purport to speak for the Jews or their broader agenda items, including civil rights, immigration, womens rights, reliMany who attend the conference say the mere act of showing up is a statement of support for Israel and partisan politics are for other settings. If I can make myself not look at any thing else about him, then I think what hes nis, a conference delegate from Maryland. Im not quite there yet. I just think the way he behaves and some of the things he tweets and his past with women I just dont have meanwhile, were pleased with the reception for the presidents name. For some it was a home for pro-Israel Americans. And even though a few had reservations about some of Trumps conduct, they saw that as a small price to pay for a pro-Israel administration. To me, hes a neighbor and New Yorker ton. Hes crazy like a lot of New Yorkers are, but hes so pro-Israel and pro-U.S., I love what hes doing. If he kept his mouth shut and kept off Twitter, it would be a lot The participants also said they believed the applause was for policy, not the per son. Jeremy Burton, executive director of of Greater Boston, also thought that those who were perceived as closer to Trump, like Pence, were given less applause. administration will do that are things we will appreciate. Look at the differing levels of applause. Nikki Haley got resounding and over whelming applause, and maybe other peo ple who are perceived as closer to him on a Throughout the conference, AIPAC em phasized the importance of both biparti sanship and attracting progressives to the pro-Israel movement. Left-wing speakers talked about Israels unions and diverse civil society. Two years ago, the lobbys policy confer ence spurred controversy when then-can didate Trump received heavy applause for cheering the end of Obamas term; AIPAC abstained from criticizing Trump from the tisanship should end when it comes to sup porting Israel. In that vein, some liberal participants said they had no problem with an event ap time to address the conference, regardless from Oakland, CA, said he had perceived AIPAC as right wing. But he felt the confer ence did a good job respecting Trump while still appealing to people across the political spectrum. I wouldnt have voted for Trump, but I vice president. Its important to be respect ful and cordial if you want any sort of bipar Most US Jews oppose Trump, but he was cheered at AIPAC. Awkward? JTA ) Egalitarian Jewish prayer is a protected right in the area set aside for it at the southern end of the Western Wall, Israels attorney general told the countrys Supreme Court. The pronouncement means that the state sons Arch set aside for egalitarian prayer an   The Jerusalem Post reported. Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit said in his submission to the Supreme Court that ate should oversee the site, which would better protect non-Orthodox prayer rights there, according to the report. Making provisions for non-Orthodox prayer and freedom of access in the area designated for it at the site falls under the   area are for egalitarian prayer, which would not be well preserved by someone, such as prayer. Last month, construction began to upgrade the area set aside for egalitarian prayer. The work, which has a budget of more than $7 million, comes more than a year after a more comprehensive plan was approved, and more than half a year after the plan was frozen. In June, the Cabinet suspended the deal passed in 2016 as a result of negotiations bements, the Women of the Wall, the Jewish Agency for Israel and the Israeli government. The suspension came after the governments haredi Orthodox coalition partners pressured Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to scrap the agreement.   The plan also would have included a common entrance to the Western Wall plaza for all three sections and a public board to oversee the egalitarian prayer space and would include representa tives of the non-Orthodox movements and Women of the Wall. Israels Supreme Court has indicated that physical upgrades to the section set aside for egalitarian prayer is key to satisfying the governments suspended agreement with the liberal Jewish groups.Israels attorney general says egalitarian prayer a protected right in special section of the Wall

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PAGE 4 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 r Blazing fast Internet is available and can be yours with fntbtbt With speeds starting at 60 Mbps r $ per mo. for 12 mos when bundled* rfrnt CONTACT Y OUR L OCAL AU THORIZED RETA ILER855-738-9969*Bu ndle price f or TV Select, Int ern et and Voice is $89.97/mo. f or ye ar 1; standard rates apply after year 1. Available Internet spe eds may va ry by a ddres s. WiFi: E quipment, a ctiva tion and installation fees apply. Services subject to all applicable service terms and conditions, subject to change. Services not available in all areas. Restrictions apply. All Rights Reserved. Charter Communications. $8997ftb f bfSPECTRUM TRIPLE PLAYTMTV, INTERNET AND VOICEBy CURT SCHLEIER JTA news serviceItzhak Perlman, arguably the most famous violinist in the world, has heard plenty of questions in his 50-year career. But when asked if his religious heritage has affected his playing, he sounds stumped. Im a violinist. Im Jewish, so that makes me a Jewish musician, he tells JTA on the phone recently from Singer Island, near Palm Beach, where he is to perform at a to be Jewish. When I play klezmer ... cause he is interrupted by Toby, his wife of more than 50 years. I think thats not true, she says in the background. I think youre the embodimentary, Itzhak, which will be shown as part of the Tampa Jewish Film Festival on Sunday, March 25 at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC. His Jewishness is not front and center in Israel and early struggle with polio, to his appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, to the enormous concerts he has played around the world but it inevitably appears. In one scene, he shares a Shabbat meal with his children and grandchildren. (He never travels or performs on Friday evenings.) In another, shot in Israel, he takes the in Israeli and Jewish history. Then theres a visitor, a friend from Boston, who worries that the pickles she brought as a gift dont have the Kosher K on their label. Perlman in private moments, often in conversation with Toby. The pair met at a music Toby went to Itzhaks bunk and proposed to the Israeli virtuoso, then 17. I was hopelessly in love with him, she friend after that, but eventually came back to her, and they have been married since 1967. that a note he played was out of tune. About his playing, nobody else is going to be honest with him, she tells JTA. Everyone is going to tell him youre so great. Im going to say youre so great, too. Do I think hes the greatest? Yes. But if hes sharp, or I believe I see a bad habit that [has] creeped into his playing, Ill tell him Im truthful. Perlman hasnt encountered much criticism of his playing over the decades. The strument at the age of 3, when he heard the legendary Jewish violinist Jascha Heifetz playing on the radio. Its very interesting what makes kids who study instruments choose the instrument. Its what speaks to you. The sound said in the phone interview. But Perlman has faced hardships: He contracted polio at 4. It was the late 1940s, Israel was in its infancy as a nation and had limited medical facilities. Many died from the disease, even in the most advanced nations. Part of his treatment involved inhaling the smoke of burning parchment on which religious sayings had been written. Perlman survived, with paralyzed legs, and went on to reveal musical brilliance. Still, many experts saw his disability and discouraged thoughts of a music career. His huge break came at 13, when he caught the Itzhak Perlman with his wife, Toby, in a scene from Itzhak.Itzhak Perlmans inspiring musical journey and his delightful 50-year marriage captured in a documentary eye of Sullivan who sent talent scouts to Israel to look for acts for his immensely popular variety show and eventually visited the Jewish state himself. In the documentary, Perlman admits he suspects Sullivan brought him to New York as much for the inspirational impact of his disability as for his skill. Nevertheless, he was a hit after performing on the program in 1958. From there, the rest is history he has performed at the White House, in concert with Billy Joel, before a New York Mets playoff game and with countless orchestras around the world. After winning the 2016 Genesis Prize known as the Jewish Nobel he directed the $1 million in prize money toward the with disabilities in Jewish life, Israeli society and classical music. generous Perlman is. While visiting a friend who tunes up his violin before a tour and teaching gifted students in one of his many workshops, he comes across less like a classical music Beatle than a peer. (One of those programs is The Perlman Music Program Sarasota Winter Residency, which Perlman and wife, Toby, founded 14 years ago. The couple also winter in the area.) He is not a fan of giving interviews, though, and when Toby voices her opinion, Perlman sees a way out. Youve asked enough questions, he says at one point, and asks Toby to pick up the phone. Fortunately, she is an astute observer of the seasoned maestro. He doesnt know a lot of things about himself because so much of it comes so naturally, she says. Its like breathing. We dont think about breathing, and thats the way he plays. There is one thing Perlman is acutely aware of: He has a gift that cant be taught. You can teach almost everything with one exception: the magic that makes performances special. You can have two people both great play the same piece, and one will move you and one wont, he said.Photo courtesy of Greenwich EntertainmentSCHOENBAUM winner of the Federations most prestigious honor the Tikkun Olam Award. His comments about Schoenbaum came during the Feb. 25 Annual Presidents Dinner at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC. Each year the Tikkun Olam Award is a closely guarded secret until it is announced at the dinner, so following tradition, Probasco listed the winners many achievements before naming the recipient. But by the time he said, This years honoree was the president of the Tampa JCCs and Federation when we made the critical decision to move forward and acquire what was at the time the dilapidated Homer Hesterly Armory and now is the spectacular Bryan Glazer Family JCC, virtually all in the room knew he was speaking of Schonebaum. Many people on our board as well as Gary Gould [Federation CEO] have said on more than one occasion that they would have been hesitant about moving forward honoree at the helm. Her strategic thinking, credibility and leadership skills were instrumental in our decision to move forward with this beautiful facility you are sitting in tonight. Probisco described Schoenbaum as somewhat under the radar in her leader ship style in comparison to some others, but added, She has quietly and calmly worked strategically and tirelessly to ensure we move our community forward in very meaningful ways noting that she has been quietly sowing the seeds to ensure Jewish Tampas tomorrow is brighter than today. His comments included a long list of positions Schoenbaum had held in the Jewish community, including: Founding chair of the 1818 Giving Circle; Tampa, the Tampa JCCs and Federations award winning weekly e-news letter; and Federation for two years and co-president for another year Currently serving as co-chair of the ect with the potential to generate substantial the relationship between Tampa and Israel. Probisco concluded his remarks by praising Schoenbaum for leading the community with her warmth, kindness, and vision, and she and her family have been tremendously generous to many different Jewish philanthropic causes and organizations.

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 5 MARCH 9 22, 2018 By RON KAMPEAS JTA news serviceWASHINGTON The White House is convening a meeting of stakeholders to improve life in the Gaza Strip, said the top Trump administration Middle East peace negotiator. In response to the burgeoning humani tarian situation in Gaza, key countries and stakeholders are preparing to act: There was a meeting in Cairo on Thursday, (March 8) and there will be a brainstorming session solutions to the problems that Hamas has caused, Jason Greenblatt wrote in an oped in the Washington Post. the meeting. A spokesman for Greenblatt declined to say who the stakeholders and countries are. Its not clear who took part in the Cairo meeting, although Hamas of to discuss reconciliation with the Palestin ian Authority. However, there are a number of possible players who might balk at participating in the talks should they be public. Addition ally, there are potential parties whose par ticipation could embarrass the Trump ad ministration. The Palestinian Authority, for instance, has formally retreated from efforts by the Trump administration to reconvene peace talks, citing President Donald Trumps recognition in December of Jerusalem as Israels capital. Hamas, the group control ling the Gaza Strip, is designated by the U.S. State Department as a terrorist group. Qatar, a country that has been involved in attempts to better the lives of Palestinians in Gaza, is being shunned by a key U.S. ally, Saudi Arabia. And Turkey, which also has been deeply involved in Gaza in the past, currently has tense relations with the United States over U.S. backing for Kurds in Syrias civil war. Greenblatts op-ed mostly blasted Hamas for neglecting the population in the terri tory with its perpetuation of terrorism, but also held out the possibility that Hamas could come into the fold should it take the requisite steps. Hamas must not be permitted to partici pate in any future government until it ad heres to the conditions of the Middle East Quartet the United States, Russia, Euro pean Union and United Nations including by explicitly committing to nonviolence, recognizing the state of Israel, and accept ing previous agreements and obligations between the parties, Greenblatt wrote. It must disarm and commit to peaceful negotiations. Hamas must also address an other humanitarian issue and return miss ing Israel Defense Forces soldiers who were taken by Hamas, as well as Israeli civilians. There is a way out for Gaza, if only Hamas has the courage to admit failure and chart a new course.White House to convene brainstorming session to help improve lives on Gaza StripJason Greenblatt, in gray shirt, the Trump administration Mideast negotiator, visiting a military base near the Gaza border in August. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

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Cong. Schaarai ZedekPassover Tot Shabbat: Little ones will learn about the seder, Moses, matzah and more through songs, stories and blessings at a Passover Tot Shabbat on Friday, March 23 at 5:30 p.m. This is for families with children 5 and younger and their siblings of all ages. The program will be followed by a complimentary child-friendly Shabbat dinner. RSVP by Thursday, March 22 by going to www. Deli night: The Brotherhood will hold its ninth annual Deli Night on Saturday, March 24 at 6 p.m. at the temple. The evening will feature deli brought in from Bens Deli of New York and Boca Raton. There will be an open bar, dessert buffet and live entertainment. Individual tickets are $49 per person for Schaarai Zedek members; $59 for nonmembers. Sponsorship levels are also available. For Interfaith study: Congregation Schaarai Zedek will join with Palma Ceia Presbyterian Church to engage in an interfaith study program ences. Pastors John DeBevois, Nicole Abdenour, and Will Wellman along with Rabbis Richard Birnholz and Nathan Farb will participate in the weekly sessions from 7-8:30 p.m. The March 20 and 28 classes at Palma Ceia Presbyterian Church, 3501 W. San Jose St., will deal with Jesus arrest ancient rabbis had to say about Jesus; the kind of Messiah Jesus considered himself and his teachings Honoring Rabbi Birnholz: The awardJason Hewlett will present Stand-Up Comedy for a Stand-Out Guy on Saturday, April 28 at 7 p.m. as congregants pay tribute to Rabbi Richard Birnholz, who is retiring. Comedy, music, impressions and standing ovations are common in Hewletts one-man shows and that makes him the perfect choice for audiencesof-all-ages. There is no charge for this event but an RSVP is required. For more information, contact Cong Beth Shalom BrandonShabbat with challah: Welcome the Sabbath on Friday, March 23 at 7:45 p.m. when the service will feature a challah bake-off Shabbat Sha-Challah. An oneg, nosh and mingle follows. All are invited to bring their favorite loaf and recipe for all to enjoy before Passover. RSVP to Shiela Fishman this event. Page Turners: Come, eat and discuss this months book, A Two Family House, on Monday, March 19 at 6 p.m. A light dinner will be provided.Cong. Beth AmAuthor to speak: The Beth Am Brotherhood will present a program, Escape from Nazi Austria with author Robert Josef Konig on Sunday March 18 at 3 p.m. in the temple sanctuary. The 90-minute program will include a screening of the documenHaven The Dramatic Story of 1000 WWII Refugees and How They Came to America. Konig will also discuss his novel Of Good and Evil: Prelude to the Holocaust the Holocaust. There is no charge, but donations are welcome. Complimentary light fare and refreshments will be provided and there will be a full bar with setups with suggested donations for adult beverages. After the presentation there will be a meet and greet and book signing with Konig. A portion of sales of his book will go to the congregation. Band concert: The Sisterhood will present an encore performance of the Tampa Community Band on Wednesday, March 21 at 7:30 p.m. at Beth Am. Once again, Conductor John Van De Putte will share his knowledge of music along with his sense of humor as he conducts Tampas Musical Treasure in a diversity of musical styles. As a member of the band since its inception 30 years ago, congregant Maxine Gourse will be featured on the bass clarinet. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Contact Victoria Cain for more information. Tot Shabbat: Every third Friday of the month there is a Tot Shabbat service at 6:30 for tots up to age 5 and their families as they welcome in Shabbat with music, prayer and a story. This casual service is followed by an oneg Shabbat. Israeli dancing: Lessons in Israeli dancing are offered every Tuesday at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Irma Polster PAGE 6 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 Reform 1115 E. Del Webb Blvd., Sun City Center Congregation BETH AM nd rd ConservativeCongregation Congregation CHA 1 Campus Jewish Renewal Conservative Reform ReformTemple ConservativeTemple Congregations Rabbinically Speaking Rabbinically SpeakingAccording to the 2015 study Caregiving in the U.S. conducted by the National Alliance for Caregiving and the AARP Public Policy Institute, nearly 40 million Americans provided unpaid care to an adult in the last year, and people caring for a spouse or partner provided an average of 44.6 hours a week. The study found that 40 per cent of caregivers are male and that nearly 1 in 10 caregivers is 75 or older. The study indicated that 40 percent of caregivers report providing a high burden of care, and when asked if they had a choice in taking on their caregiving role, 50 percent of the respondents said No. lain, I have seen the challenges family members face who are caring for a loved one with a life-limiting illness. Caregiving is hard. It can be physically and emotionally demanding. Sometimes caregivers feel trapped by their circumstances. They lose the ability to enjoy their own lives as they become consumed caring for another. Caregiving can sometimes can feel interminable. Sometimes caregivers feel resentful for the burdens that have been placed upon them, and then they feel guilty for feeling these very human emotions. Quite often caregivers suffer in silence as they struggle to do all they can to help their loved one. Without adequate support, caregivers can become isolated and alone. Debbie Perlman,zl, was a composer of modern, original Psalms and the Resident Psalmist at Beth Emet The Free Synagogue in Evanston, Gulfside Hospice and Pasco Palliative CareCaring for the caregiverIL. While I do not disregard the traditional Psalms from the Bible, her heartfelt writings offer sacred In her book Flames to Heaven: New Psalms for Healing & Praise Perlman wrote a Psalm for Caregivers that I have found to be particularly meaningful. For those of you who may be struggling as you care for a loved one, may the words of Debbie Perlman bring you comfort and hope: TWENTY-EIGHT For the Caregivers Show me how to offer hope. Open Your hand with the colors of faith To strengthen anothers life. Show me how to offer comfort. Point out Your nesting place, Feathered against the adversities That wound those I love. Show me the direction When I am lost, Searching to help Show me tolerance, When I weary of helping, And a long dreary day Stretches toward a restless night. You place before us life and love; Show us endurance. You place before us healing and hope; Show us persistence. Reach deep within me, Eternal Strength, And bring my strength to consciousness. Pull it around us: Let it radiate with Your power, Let it guide our way. Rabbinically Speaking is published as a public service by the Jewish Press in cooperation with the Tampa Rabbinical Association, which assigns the column on a rotating basis. Shabbat Candle Lighting Times

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA CongregationsMARCH 9 22, 2018 Anton Legal Group Stock Broker DisputesS. David Anton, Esq. Since 1985 Cong. Rodeph SholomShabbat for every generation: Join Congregation Rodeph Sholom for a casual and lively Shabbat evening service for all ages on Friday, March 23 from 6-7 p.m. Children in grades 3-5 will lead the services and there will be light bites in the lobby at 5:30 p.m. Adult education: Rabbi Josh Hearshen will teach Torah study on Thursdays at 11 a.m. and Talmud study on Thursdays at noon. At 7 p.m. on Thursdays he teaches a class titled Embracing Judaism.Passover service schedule: On Friday, March 30 there will be a Taanit Bechorim First Born Siyyum, followed by breakfast at 7:30 a.m. There will also be an erev Passover/Shabbat service that evening at 6:30. On Saturday, March 31, there will be Passover services at 9:30 a.m., followed by kiddush. On Sunday, April 1 there will be Passover services at 9:30 a.m., followed by kiddush. Erev Passover seventh day services begijn at 6:30 p.m, Thursday, April 5 and on Friday, April 6, at 9:30 a.m., Passover seventh day services followed by Kiddush. At 6:30 p.m., erev Passover eighth day services/ Shabbat service will be held and on Saturday, April 7 at 9:30 a.m. there will be eighth day Passover services including Yizkor, followed by kiddush, and at 8:30 p.m., Passover concluding services. LChaim: A class, Sharing Lifes Lessons, is offered on Tuesdays from 11 a.m. to noon. Topics, readings and a different leader are chosen for each weekly session. Talmud: A Talmud study class with Rabbi Howard Siegel is offered on Thursdays from 10:30 11:30 a.m. Jewish law confronts everything from capital punishment to how to make rain. This is open to everyone Jewish ethics: Rabbi Siegel leads a course in Jewish ethics on Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to noon. This course will use Pirke Avot: Ethics of Our Ancestors as a springboard to discussion and debate on issues of the day in the light of Jewish moral/ethical demands. There will be no class on March 21. Knitting time: The Sisterhood Needle Workers hold weekly knitting sessions on Tuesdays from 1:30 3 p.m. in the boardroom. The knitters make fabric quilt wall hangings and knitting and crocheting squares to make quilts. These are then donated to a group that provides housing for local teens aging out of foster Rabbi Noam Katz, considered influential voices in contemporary Jewish music, will bring his high-energy and soulful melodies to Congregation Schaarai Zedek April 6-8. As the temples artist-in-res idence, he will sing at Shabbat services, hold a Torah study, coffeehouse style concert and be featured at a Yom HaShoah commemoration. A longtime song leader and educator, Rabbi Katz has performed for Jewish and interfaith audiences across North America, Africa and Israel including at Union of Reform Judaism conventions, countless summer camps and congregations. He currently serves as the Rabbi/ Dean of Jewish Living at the Leo Baeck Day School in Toronto, Ontario. The rabbi traveled to Uganda in late 2003 to meet and teach the African Jews, or Abayudaya, and spirit of his music. As an Educator in Residence, he was there to welcome two members of the Abayudaya community to Camp Coleman years later. Rabbi Katzs debut album in cludes 12 original melodies ideal for Shabbat and Havdalah services. His second album, Mirembe, Salaam VShalom, features musicians from Africa and the Middle East, and includes his Ugandan-inspired Am Yisrael Chai. His third release, A Drum in Hand, blends Jewish prayers with the energy of a drum circle. His newest album, After the Flood, includes 14 new songs that focus on resilience and remembrance. On Friday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m., the rabbi will be joined by the Scharaai Zedeks Koleinu Choir to sing a unique Shabbat service. Saturday morning at 9 a.m., Rabbi Katz will hold a Torah study class. At 7 p.m. Saturday, the Sisterhood and Brotherhood will sponsor an informal coffee house concert. Specialty coffees plus wine, beer, cheese and dessert will be available. There is no cost to attend, but an RSVP is required. On Sunday, April 8 at 2 p.m., Rabbi Katz will sing songs of resilience and renewal during this years Holocaust Remembrance program. Congregation Schaarai Zedek is located at 3303 W. Swann Ave., Tampa. For more information, call 2377.Artist in Residence brings stories and music to Schaarai Zedek care, as well as other charities. For more information, Cong. Bais Menacham ChabadTorah class: Join a weekly Torah class on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. at the University of Tampa. rah perspective. For more information, contact Rabbi Levi Rivkin gmail.com. Practical kabbalah: Enrich the soul and mind with a touch of kabbalah. Learn practical spirituality for everyday life. Classes are held on Wednesdays, 6:15 7 p.m.Cong. Mekor ShalomGame night: Come to bunco night at the synagogue and roll, laugh, throw, chat and repeat on Passover prayers: A Minha minyan before Passover will he held on Friday, March 30 at 5 p.m. Come help make minyan at this brief afternoon service in advance of your Passover seder celebration. Visit us on both sides of the Bay Shipping and Gift Wrapping Available Hyde Park Village St. Petersburg 1619 W Snow Circle Tampa, FL 33606 813.831.2111 Shabbat Candlesticks Hamsa Necklace 300 Beach Drive NE St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727.894.2111 www.shapirogallery.com You can also shop online! COMMUNITY SEDER LISTINGS, See Page 15As the makeup of the Jewish community becomes more diverse, how does a congregation keep pace in the 21st century? How do you handle the oldsters vs the hipsters? Rabbi Hayim Herring, will present stories of synagogues that have re-imagined and engaged their congregations within our changing Jewish community during Congregation Kol Amis Rabbi Joel Wasser Memorial Scholar-inResidence Weekend. On the weekend of April 13-15, Rabbi Herring will present lectures based on his book, Leading Connected World: Platforms, People and Purpose, and new research from his forthcoming book on what it means to be a multigenerational community. Many congregations across the United States are grappling with a similar set of issues: seeking to innovate without disenfranchising members who are content with the congregations current programity with new models of membership ties and values; and recruiting new volunteers who are not interested in hearing from veterans about why things have to be done in a certain way. On Friday, April 13 at 6 p.m., Rabbi Herring will provide a broad overview of the changed landscape of the Jewish community with the program Who Moved my Jewish Community? The Jewish community has changed in fundamental ways. Discussions about Israel in the past used to mobilize congregants, but today they can be equally polarizing. Over one-third of Jewish households contain at least one person who is not Jewish. Younger generations bring a different value set toward civic and congregational involvement. Even baby boomers, who used to be reliable mainstays of congre gational life, are increasingly questioning the value of contributing time and money to congregations. The presentation will lay the groundwork for the Shabbat morning dvar torah/presentation. Saturday, April 14 at 9:30 a.m., the rabbi introduces his program on Your Role in Transitioning to an Engaged Congregation. The ways in which congregations were structured in the past are not up to todays challenges of becoming an engaged congregation. Congregations still need board and committee members, but transitioning to an engaged congregation means each member is empowered to rethink how a congregation conducts its work so it can be more inclusive of new ideas and possibilities. In this presentation, participants will learn some proven principles of engagement that work in a congregational setting. On Sunday, April 15, the Rabbi will present a two-hour workshop, Inspiring Community Through Practices of Enagagement, beginning at 10 a.m. Participants will draw upon the congregations recently-revised mission statement and insights from the Shabbat presentations as a framework for reenvisioning Congregation Kol Ami as an engaged congregation. Congregants will work in small groups to creatively generate potential identify new opportunities to help the congregation grow. Rabbi Herring, Ph.D., is an author, presenter and nonprofit organizational futurist, with a specialty in congregations and Jewish nonprofit organizations. The trademarked mantra on his website, www.hayimherring.com, is Preparing Todays Leaders for Tomorrows Organizations. Since moving to Minneapolis in 1985, he has served as a rabbi of Beth El synagogue, a senior feddirector at S.T.A.R. (Synagogues: Transformation and Renewal). Hayim has worked with more than 300 rabbis and congregations of all sizes and denominations throughout North America on a wide range of issues, including continuing rabbinic education, volunteer leadership develop ment, governance, strategic planning, organizational foresight and innovation. Other of Rabbi Herrings recent publications are Keeping Faith in Rabbis: A Community Conversation on Rabbinical Education; To morrows Synagogue Today: A Guide for Study and Action; To morrows Synagogue Today: Creating Vibrant Centers of Jewish Life. Each presentation will stand on its own, but congregation members are encouraged to attend all three presentations. The lectures are open to the community. For more at (813) 962-6338.Scholar-in-Residence theme: The Engaged Congregation

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PAGE 8 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 Thank you for making the fifteenth Annual Presidents Dinner a success!Todah Rabah! PRESENTING SPONSOR PRESIDENTS ADVISOR PRESIDENTS CABINET PRESIDENTS CIRCLE PRESIDENTS FRIENDS EVENT COMMITTEE PATRONS TABLE COORDINATORS TABLE PATRONS IN KINDMaureen Cohn Honorary Chair Carol Jaffe & David Rosenbach, MD Event Chairs Harry Cohen Rochelle Gross Janet Kass Merrill Marx Lynne Merriam Lois Older Ann Rosenbach Alice Rosenthal Deborah Rosenthal Cherie Silberman Cindy Spahn Bomstein and Fleischman Families Judy Genshaft & Steven Greenbaum Shanna & Bryan Glazer Hope Barnett Leslie Barnett Jeffrey Berger Monroe Berkman Suzette Berkman Harry Cohen Gina DAngelo Francine Dobkin Richard Dobkin Beth Gemunder David Gemunder Phyllis Gould Rhonda Hogan Carol Jaffe Mark Jaffe Susan Johnson Joel Karpay Joyce H. Karpay Audio Visual Support Services (AVSS) Bryan Glazer Family JCC Duncan McClellan Gallery Janet Kass Michael Kass Susan Kessler Barry Levine David Linsky Mark Linsky Nancy Linsky Merrill Marx Beverly Maurer Harold Maurer Ellyne Myers Ann Rosenbach David Rosenbach Alice Rosenthal Deborah Rosenthal Mark Rosenthal Stanley Rosenthal Deborah Roth Floral Impressions IM Events Maddock Photography Richard Rudolph Walter Sanders Jerome Schine Michael Schine Elizabeth Shalett Steven Specter Bernard Stein Sharon Stein Herbert Swarzman Joyce Swarzman Gary Teblum Lisa Teblum Rochelle Walk Steven Walk Rande Weissman Steven Weissman Brown & Brown Insurance Bush Ross, P.A. Ferman Motor Car Company Kuhn Automotive Group Lynne & Fred Merriam Publix Super Market Charities Reeves Import Motorcars RFLP Group Harvey & Cherie Schonbrun Sharp Business Systems Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP Tampa Bay Trane TECO United Janitorial Solutions, Inc. Air Animal Pet MoversConstangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLPEXOS Stacy & Michael Leeds Michele & Mark Miller Susie & Mitchell Rice Tampa General Hospital Lisa & Steven Zaritsky Andrew Cohen Gary Cohen Congregation Schaarai Zedek Susan & Tom Freeman Sandy & Steve Gersten Kip Goulder Hillel Academy Family/Fink Susan Kessler & Jeffrey Berger Joyce Hartmann Karpay Janet & Michael Kass Ed Leibowitz Lois & Jay Older Barbara & Marty Port Ann & David Rosenbach Judith Rosenkranz Alice & Stanley Rosenthal Sue & Jeff Schoenbaum Ashley Simon Cindy Spahn Randie & Steven Specter Bev & Arnie Tannenbaum Lisa & Gary Teblum Rochelle & Steven Walk Event Chairs David Rosenbach and Carol Jaffe, with Guest Speaker Frank Luntz, lead another successful event Blossom Leibowitz Karen & Jonathan Levy Ross and Scher Families Nearly 40 Lion of Judah attended the fifteenth Annual Presidents Dinner Rabbi Richard Birnholz asks the community for their support Nearly 600 people attended the Annual Presidents Dinner Martin Gutkin and Deborah Roth with Frank Luntz SongDaddy performs the National Anthem Cantorial Soloist Sandy Santucci sings Hatikva & Hamotzi Joseph Probasco, Tampa JCCs & Federation president presents the Tikkun Olam Award to Sue Schoenbaum Maureen Cohn, Honorary Event Chair, with Frank Luntz and Doug Cohn Event Chairs David Rosenbach and Carol Jaffe, with Joseph Probasco, Tampa JCCs & Federation president Maureen Cohn, Honorary Event Chair, Nearly 40 Lion of Judah attended the Rabbi Richard Birnholz asks Nearly 600 people attended Martin Gutkin and Deborah Roth with Frank Luntz SongDaddy performs the National Anthem Cantorial Soloist Sandy Santucci sings Hatikva & Hamotzi

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 9 MARCH 9 22, 2018 This coupon is not valid in combination with any other coupon, special, promotional offer or team member discount. Coupon only valid at the Whole Foods Market Carrollwood, Clearwater and Tampa locations. No duplications, copies, facsimiles or mobile coupons will be accepted. This coupon may not be used towards the purchase of a Whole Foods Market Gift Card. No cash value. Please, only one coupon per household per day. Coupon good for $10 off total one-time purchase of $50 or more. Coupon valid through 4/8/2018. Register at www.pmdalliance.org or 800.256.0966. For people impacted by PARKINSONS Learn. Live. Connect. Parkinsons ConferenceJoin us to learn more about Parkinsons disease research, medications, and treatments.555 N Westshore Blvd, Tampa, FL 33609 Prof. Freda DeKeyser Ganz, a Hadassah nurse from Israel, was the keynote speaker at a recent program presented by the St. Petersburg, Lylah, North Pinellas and Tampa Ameet chapters of Hadassah. She presented a historical look at nursing and healthcare in Israel. In addition, the attendees recognized the nurses who were present, (L-R) Front row : Nancy Rapoport, National Nurses Council co-chair; Laura Freed, Alice Ettinger, Sabrina Smith; Back row: Susan Lafer, National Nurses Council co-chair, Linda Reimer, Shelley Gars, Prof. Freda DeKeyser Ganz, guest speaker; Sally Nurses honored High school and college-aged students interested in attending programs in Israel that will strengthen their knowledge of Judaism and Israeli culture are encouraged to apply for a scholarship administered by the Tampa Orlando Pinellas Jewish Foundation (TOP). Last summer, four individuals from Pinellas and Hillsborough counties received scholarships to attend programs in Israel through the help of the Stevan and Marilyn Simon Family Scholarship Endowment Fund. Students attended diverse programs such as the Young Judaea WUJS, Ramah Israel Seminar, Onward Israel Hillel International Internship, and USY Eastern Europe Israel Pilgrimage. TOP administers the funds annual scholarship process, working closely with Simon family members on the Scholarship Committee through the application process. These experiences were possible because of the vision of the late Stevan and Marilyn Simon, who created a legacy to perpetuate Judaism in the Diaspora. Arielle Radin, originally from Seminole, received a Simon scholarship to participate in a Young Judaea internship last summer in Tel Aviv. I learned about my Jewish identity, my peoples history in the land of Israel, and strengthened my connection to Jewish young adults around the world. Not only was I able to delve deep into my spirituality and culture, but also make great strides in professional development through my research internship at a Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Tel Aviv University, said Radin. Karen Stanley, Stevan and Marilyn Simons granddaughter, who sits on the scholparents legacy. My grandparents believed that it was their responsibility and privilege to continue giving back to the State of Israel and the Jewish community at large, Stanley said. They wanted to help future generations to know their heritage, appreciate their history, and reinforce their Jewish identity. Upon the scholarship recipients return from Israel, it was my grandparents hope that the students continue to give back and share their experiences, thereby furthering the impact to the Jewish community at large. Interested individuals should visit the Scholarships section of TOPs website, www.topjewishfoundation.org, for an application. The application deadline is March 30. For additional information, contact Ellen Weiss at Ellen@topjewishfoundation. org. About TOP tions since 1980, TOP Jewish Foundation manages a portfolio of $50m and has distributed over $100 million to Jewish and TOPs Simon Scholarship Fund sends teens and young adults to Israel; seeks 2018 applicantsU.S. Representatives Charlie Crist (DSt. Petersburg) and Mike Johnson (R-LA) introduced the United States-Israel Joint Drone Detection Cooperation Act on Feb. 27, legislation establishing a strategic partnership between the United States and Israel to combat drone attacks from Iran and other adversaries. The bill is meant to increase research initiatives between the two countries. The impetus for the bill is the Iranian launch of a drone from Syria into Israel airspace for 90 seconds before being shot cials stated that the unmanned aerial vehicle was an advanced piece of technology. Representatives Crist and Johnson want the ability to keep tabs on that kind of technology and study how it can be used against the U.S. and Israel to prepare for any future incidents. In the face of this new and growing threat, we have the opportunity to share our U.S. and Israeli security, said Crist. We call on Congress to act swiftly and strongly to fend off Iranian aggression and that of other adversaries in the region. As of last week, the bill was included in the more comprehensive U.S.-Israeli Secuby Florida Representatives Ileana RosLehtinen (R-Miami) and Ted Deutch (DBoca Raton). of supplying funds to Israel for enhanced security projects, legislation that was put in place under the Obama administration in 2016. Under the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. and Israel, the U.S. has committed to allot $3.8 billion a year for 10 years to help Israel combat rising security threats in the region. Florida Representatives Stephanie Murphy (D-Winter Park) and Brian Mast (RHutchinson Island) also introduced a bill, Deterring and Defeating Rocket and Missile Threats to Israel Act on Feb. 28, which above the $3.8 billion a year cap put forth in the Memorandum of Understanding, if Israels security needs warrant it, and it turns the memorandum into law. U.S. House members from Florida show bipartisan support for Israel in proposed legislation(JTA ) The U.S. Holocaust Memorial and Museum in Washington, D.C.has rescinded a human rights award it gave to Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the former political prisoner and democracy activist and now the civilian leader of Myanmar. The museum said it is taking back the Elie Wiesel Award given in 2012 because of what it calls Aung San Suu Kyis failure to oppose the ethnic cleansing and possible genocide of Myanmars Rohingya minority. We had hoped that you as someone we and many others have celebrated for your commitment to human dignity and universal human rights would have done something to condemn and stop the militarys brutal campaign and to express solidarity with the targeted Rohingya population, read the museums letter to Aung San Suu Kyi sent March 7. The letter charges that her party has instead refused to cooperate with United Nations investigators, promulgated hateful rhetoric against the Rohingya community, and denied access to and cracked down on journalists trying to uncover the scope of the crimes in Rakhine State. Aung San Suu Kyi was the second person to receive the Elie Wiesel Award, after only Wiesel himself. Named after the late Holocaust survivor and author who won the genocide and advanced human dignity. Its most recent recipient is German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Aung San Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest for 15 years for opposing the countrys military dictatorship. She was internationally celebrated during that time as a pro-democratic icon. In 2015, as part of Myanmars transition to democracy, she was elected state counselor, a position akin to prime minister. for failing to speak out and oppose the countrys military campaign against the Rohingya, a persecuted Muslim minority in Myanmar. The military has killed thousands of Rohingya and forced an approximate The New York Times. The military has burned their villages and buried the dead in mass graves. The Holocaust museum encouraged Aung San Suu Kyi to cooperate with U.N. efforts to examine and prevent the campaign, and rights, which they do not have.Museum strips Myanmar leader of Elie Wiesel Award

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PAGE 10 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANY Wednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the film HEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLD Thursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10 LONGING Thursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature Audience SAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE ME Thursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 THE LAST SUIT Thursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership with BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY Thursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 THE CAKEMAKER Friday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the film IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership with THE TESTAMENT Saturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 AND THEN SHE ARRIVED Thursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature Audience BUDAPEST NOIR Friday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceTHE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the filmBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership withTO SUPPORT THE TBJFF, VISIT TBJFF.ORG BOX OFFICE OPENS ONE HOUR PRIOR TO SHOWTIMETAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL GREAT FILMS. BUT JEWISH-ER. OPENING NIGHT EVENT MARCH 21FILMS SHOWING IN TAMPA BAY THROUGH MARCH 25FOR FILM & TICKET INFO VISIT TBJFF.ORG OR CALL 813.769.4725 Sponsors as of 2-6-18 THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 Sponsors as of 2 16 18DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content CELEBRATING 22 YEARS IN FILM MARCH 20-25, 2018 TAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVALFEATURED AT THE SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION GASPARILLA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Herman Forbes Charitable Trust JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATIONTampaSara and David Scher AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FAMILY FILM AWARD

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MARCH 9 22, 2018 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 11 OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the film IN BETWEEN Saturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content SCANDAL IN IVANSK Sunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per person ITZHAK Sunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAEL Sunday, March 25 | 4:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10 THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUER Sunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership with THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMAS Sunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content AN ISRAELI LOVE STORY Saturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceTHE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the filmBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership withTO SUPPORT THE TBJFF, VISIT TBJFF.ORG BOX OFFICE OPENS ONE HOUR PRIOR TO SHOWTIMETAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL GREAT FILMS. BUT JEWISH-ER. OPENING NIGHT EVENT MARCH 21FILMS SHOWING IN TAMPA BAY THROUGH MARCH 25FOR FILM & TICKET INFO VISIT TBJFF.ORG OR CALL 813.769.4725 Sponsors as of 2-6-18 THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 Sponsors as of 2 16 18 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content CELEBRATING 22 YEARS IN FILM MARCH 20-25, 2018TAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVALFEATURED AT THE SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION GASPARILLA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Herman Forbes Charitable Trust JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATION Tampa Sara and David Scher AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FAMILY FILM AWARD

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PAGE 12 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY MENORAH MANOR JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 9 FEBRUARY 23 MARCH 8, 2017 www.menorahmanor.org (727) 345-2775 Two Menorah Manor employees received the CNA and LPN Awards of Excellence at the Florida Association Directors of Nursing Administration (FADONA) 31st Annual Conference. The awards, which were presented during the organizations awards banquet at the Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort on February 7, recognize certied nursing assistants (CNAs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) who demonstrate exceptional commitment to their profession and the residents they serve. Sadeta Kabilovic received 1st place for the CNA Award of Excellence, and Annette Jackson received 2nd place for the LPN Award of Excellence. Sadeta and Annette are dedicated and compassionate individuals who go above and beyond for our residents, said Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer of Menorah Manor. They are always striving to provide the best care possible, and it shows.Menorah Manor Wins Two Nursing Awards at Annual FADONA ConferenceOn Monday, February 19th, Menorah Manor donors and Trustees gathered together to celebrate the rededication of a beautiful donor recognition wall that is now located in the Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence. Menorah Manor Chair Barry Kanner, whose parents lived in the Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence, gave a heartfelt welcome at the gathering. I know rsthand that Toby Weinman is a truly special place where the residents are cared for and loved, and I couldnt be happier that this magnicent donor wall has landed here, he said. The gathering also included messages from Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer; Dell Krug, Menorah Manor former Board Chair; and guests of honor Beverly and Chip Weinman.Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer of Menorah Manor, speaks to donors and Trustees at the rededication gathering.Menorah Manor Celebrates Donor Wall Rededication (L-R) Beverly and Chip Weinman speak to donors and trustees at the rededication gathering. The Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence is named in memory of Chip Weinmans mother, Toby. (L-R): Chief Executive Ofcer Rob Goldstein poses with award winners Sadeta Kabilovic and Annette Jackson during a celebration at Menorah Manor. WORDShe tossed out, 48 percent trust the Palestinian government more than the Israeli government, and 54 percent are not sure if Hamas is a terrorist organization. The hottest debate to sway minds for or against Israel or Palestine seems to be on college campuses, Luntz said. It is the job of all to stand up for Israel and for the older adults to teach Millennials the right words and phrases. The point is to use to engage ways to have a reasoned discussion and ultimately change hateful attitudes. Luntz used a power point presentation and urged all to take notes as he began with What Millennials Want to Hear: principal. street. national solution. and we both must learn to live together. social justice, equality and fairness. When pro-Palestinians speak on campus, there is a lot of shouting and hatred expressed, but Luntz said if you argue with them, you will not change their hearts. If you engage with them with respect and a willingness to listen to their views, they may return the respect and listen to yours, he said. He acknowledged that life is miserable for many Palestinians, many live in abject poverty and are taught hatred of Jews from an early age. But Luntz noted points of common ground, where pro-Israelis can agree that No child deserves to live like this. He advised to steer clear of religious/biblical arguments. Be the smartest voice in the room, not the loudest, Luntz said, adding that listening is often more important than speaking. He said folks should not argue over the problems, but look for solutions and ask rhetorical questions that bring people into a conversation. Using phrases like I hear you or I get it also foster better dialogue. Luntz also suggested people learn about their audience before they speak and cited examples of words or phrases that resonate more or less with people depending on party evokes more positive reactions from Republicans than Democrats and the phrase protect human rights resonates more with Democrats. cussion, not isolation and ignorance. effort, not hate and hysteria. tions from the audience and when asked about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netahyahu, he predicted he will be re-elected, and indicted. He warned about the trend by Netanyahu and President Donald Trump to demonize the media and said the world needs a strong fourth estate. He also bemoaned the lack of tolerance in our society, saying it is growing worse, not better. The most important thing I can say to you is if we lose our tolerance, we lose our freedom. He said he is scared by the attacks on agreements are inevitable, but people need to return to speaking out with respect and decency. Given his history of conducting political polls, Luntz was asked about future election, he said in coming elections the two groups he will watch closely to see how they will vote are folks who make their livings by their hands folks who largely voted for group that largely shifted from Democrat to Republican in the last presidential election. He said that group loves the tax cuts and demeanor and tweets, so it will be interesting to see what sways them. man Douglas shootings are bringing us to a will happen this time. It may not be the change you want, though.

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 13 MARCH 9 22, 2018 For 7 WEEKS leading up to April 22nd, the community will enjoy reading thoughtful tidbits about Israel in Shalom Tampa and on the Jewishtampa.com website. For 7 DAYS leading up to April 22nd, the community can indulge in Israeli themed activities all across the Tampa area! MONDAY, APRIL 16 | 7:00 8:00 PM STORIES AND SIPS : Enjoy tales of real life Israeli experiences while sipping Israeli wine. Martin Fletcher has been covering world events for forty years, mostly for NBC News. Martin will be joining us via Skype. Local guest speaker, Malka Isaac, will moderate and share tales of real life experiences during the foundling of Israel. Bryan Glazer Family JCC | Hesterly Salon TUESDAY, APRIL 17 | 5:30 6:30 PM HUMMUS...SO MANY WAYS! Cooking demonstration and tasting by Sylvia Cohen. This hands on experience will be enjoyed by all ages! JCC on the Cohn Campus | Auditorium WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 | 6:30 PM MOVIE: THE MATCHMAKER: Arik, a teenage boy growing up in Haifa in 1968, gets a job working for Yankele Bride, a matchmaker. Yankele, a mysterious Holocaust survivor, has an office in back of a movie theater that shows only love stories, run by a family of seven Romanian dwarves in the seedy area by the port. Yankele introduces Arik to a new world, built on the ruins of an old one. Villagio Cinemas Carrollwood. THURSDAY, APRIL 19 | 4:00 5:30 PM PAINT YOUR HEART OUT ISRAELI FLAG: Join your friends for an afternoon filled with painting and pita! Leave with your Israel@ 70 canvas memory. Ages 8+. JCC on the Cohn Campus seating limited. Register at brandy.gold@jewishtampa.com FRIDAY, APRIL 20 TOT SHABBAT CELEBRATING ISRAEL! JCC on the Cohn Campus | 9:30 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC | 3:30 PM Sing, dance, play and pray! Open to all families and their tots. SATURDAY, APRIL 21 FAMILY NIGHT AT HOME: Visit fun links at www.jewishtampa.com/IID that the entire family will enjoy. All events are open to the community and FREE to attend. Limited space available please RSVP. SUNDAY, APRIL 22 CELEBRATING ISRAEL @ 70. 10:30 AM 3:30 PM | JCC on the Cohn Campus 13009 Community Campus Drive | Tampa, Florida FREE admission on day of event | $5 Per Car parking fee Food and Fare available for a FEE CASH or CREDIT accepted ( no checks please ) Join the community at the Maureen and Douglas Cohn Jewish Community Campus for a fun-filled day celebrating Israel@ 70. 10:30 AM 12:00 PM | Adult Activity | Auditorium Sip & Skype with author, Randy Susan Meyers, The Widow of Wall Street Includes spirits to sip and a nosh. 11:00 AM 12:00 PM | Youth & Family Activity | Roth Hall PJ Library Goes to Israel! Geared toward ages 6 months 6 years. The community wide Israel Independence Day Celebration will have a special time set aside for our PJ Library friends to celebrate Israels 70th Birthday! Enjoy age appropriate crafts, games, songs and the featured PJ Library story Dinosaur Goes to Israel & 3 Falafels in my Pita 12:00 12:30 PM | All Ages | Celebrate the opening of the Judy Cohn Plaza and the Jack Roth Garden with a ceremonial ribbon cutting The festivities will continue with the singing of Hatikvah and the National Anthem accompanied by the local War Veterans presenting our colors. The JCC Preschool and Club J students will perform in a Zum Gali Gali choral concert. The rock painting tent will be open for all to create well-wishes. 12:30 1:30 PM | Youth Activity | Auditorium Movie: Shalom Sesame: Welcome to Israel and Adventures in Israel 12:30 3:30 PM | Enjoy Israeli food and fare! Falafel, Pita & Hummus, Barekas, Israeli Salad and Biseli/Bomba and so much more! $ Fees apply 12:30 3:30 PM | Youth & Family Activity | Dance Party with DJ John Wendelken! Enjoy arts & crafts, rides, bounce house & obstacle course, balloon twisting, face-painting and rock wall climbing. 1:00 3:00 PM | Adult Activity | Israeli wine & beer tasting. 1:30 3:00 PM | Family Activity | Auditorium Movie: Israeli Cuisine Enjoy the movie with popcorn. 3:15 PM | Happy Birthday to Israel Cupcake Extravaganza! For more information, visit www.jewishtampa.com / IID or contact Brandy Gold at 813.769.4725. SPONSORED BY:Bryan Glazer Family JCC 522 N. Howard Avenue Tampa, Florida JCC on the Cohn Campus 13009 Community Campus Drive Tampa, Florida7 Weeks. 7 Days. CelebratingCOMMUNITY EVENTS | APRIL 16 22, 2018 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATION Tampa

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PAGE 14 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 Israel Bonds honoreesPhoto by Peter Halmagyi At Israel Bonds annual International Prime Ministers Club Dinner in Miami Beach on Feb. 11, the Tampa Bay honorees were Rabbi Jacob Luski and his wife Joanne, of Congregation Bnai Israel in St. Petersburg. From left are Israel Bonds President and CEO Israel Maimon, Rabbi Luski, Joanne Luski, Finance Minister of Israel Moshe Kahlon and Israel Bonds Board Chairman Richard L. Hirsch. The Luskis were presented with the Israel70 award for their commitment and dedication to Israel and Jewish causes. They joined 18 others receiving the award, representing Dallas, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Miami, New Orleans, Cleveland, Boca Raton, Mexico City, Beverly Hills, CA; Chicago and Washington, D.C. Israel bond investments attributable to the dinner totaled $265 million.HEDY LAMARRONTINUED from FRONT PAGE and achievements alongside her frustrations and failures. The documentary, which screens March 22 as part of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival, is most fascinating when it shifts from Lamarrs ambivalence toward Hollywood glamour to her wartime invention of a secure communication system. The beloved daughter of a Jewish banker, Hedy had a comfortable childhood before gravitating to the theater and movies. Fleeing a youthful marriage to a Jewish fascist who made arms for the Nazis, as well as the gathering storm in Europe, she purchased passage on an ocean liner. Aboard ship, she parlayed her bravado and striking good looks into an introduction to MGM executives and, eventually, studio mogul Louis B. Mayer in Los Angeles. in a very similar fashion, on a boat where he met someone from Samuel Goldwyns shop and ended up in Hollywood and it saved his life, Dean said in an interview last summer when Bombshell screened at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival. He became a very powerful individual, and he did not like having been victimized by the Nazis and he kind of whitewashed that entire episode in his life. He didnt think of himself as a victim and he didnt want to think of his family or his tribe as victims, so being Jewish was a complicated thing for him. Dean, a journalist who produced newsmagazine segments for Bill Moyers and PBS and documentaries for Bloomberg as well as Businessweek magazine, saw in Lamarr a similar ground or circumstances. She also had the same kind of complicated relationship with being a woman, Dean asserts. She wanted to be Louis B. Mayer, she wanted to be Cecil B. DeMille. She didnt want to identify as a woman and she didnt want to identify as a Jew. Of course, it creates a schism in your psyche. It means your roots are cut off from you, and in some rootless. And what does that do to Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. [ ]Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible.Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. you? I think if you dont understand her relationship with being Jewish you dont understand why she was such a broken person. Dean asserts that Lamarrs Jewishness was directly related to her development of a system for ships to communicate that the Nazis couldnt jam, an invention the Navy rejected during World War II but later proved valuable. The actress wasnt allowed to be open about her identity in her day job because Mayer believed that audiences wouldnt fantasize a base but key aspect of moviegoing about a Jew. At the same time, the Nazis were blowing up ships in the Atlantic with European Jewish children. Oh, and Lamarrs mother still needed to get to America. The mother converted to Catholicism in 1938 in Vienna, and Dean had assumed that her motivation was to make it easier to escape the Nazis. Then she discovered a letter that Hedy had written saying, Please do this for me, because I in Hollywood. The psychological effect of Lamarrs subterfuge mingled with her sorrow for the destruction calculate, but it subsequently manifested itself in the insistence to her children that she wasnt Jewish. In fact, Dean was compelled to confront Lamarrs offspring with their grandfathers death certificate, evidence of his burial in a Jewish cemetery and, of course, their grandmothers conversion papers. Deans greatest challenge in Bombshell was conveying Lamarrs many contradictions: strength and shallowness, altruism and cruelty, desire and despair. The unexpected yet utterly relevant in its portrayal of a woman stymied in her efforts to win respect on her terms. People are very quick to dislike Hedy Lamarr, Dean says. It appalled me, and made me extremely sad that people wouldnt give her any leeway to express herself. So I struggled to give her enough of a leash, in the way that she described herself and interacted with other people, that people would understand her and allow her to be a complicated person but still like her.

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 15 MARCH 9 22, 2018 Community Passover SedersInformation received as of press time:TAMPAFirst Night CH AA B AA D CH AA I OF SOUTH T AMPAAMPA will host a First Night Seder Friday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC, 522 N. Howard Ave. Covert: adult $40; young adult, $36, child, $25; sponsor, $360. The Seder, led by Rabbi Mendy Dubrowski, will include special activities for the children designed by Dina or go to www.chabadchaicenter. com/Seder. CH AA B AA D JEWISH STUDENT CENTER at the Uni versity of Tampa, 1319 W. North B. St., will hold a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 7 p.m. The Seder is free for students. Contact Rabbi Levi bmchabad@gmail.com to RSVP or more information. CONGREG AA TION OR AA H AA V AA H will hold a First Night Seder on F riday, March 30. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. and the Seder begins at 7 p.m. The meal is vegetarian friendly seniors, $18; $36 for adult guests, free for those under 18. The address will be given with RSVP. For questions and to RSVP by March 26, email orahavahtampa@gmail. com. First Night & Second Night YOUNG ISR AA EL OF T AMPAAMPA 13207 North 52nd St., will hold a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 8:30 p.m., and Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 8:30 p.m. Suggested donation is $25 per person per Seder, USF students are free. For more information call 3018. CH AA B AA D HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER AA T USF, 13287 Arbor Point Circle, will hold a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 8 p.m., and Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 8 p.m. Suggested donation is $36 per person per Seder, USF students are free. For more information call Rabbi CH AA B AA D LUB AA VITCH OF T AMPAAMPA B AA Y, will hold F irst and Second Night Seders at the home of Rabbi Yossie and Sulha Dubrowski, 4717 Grainary Ave. on Friday, March 30 and Saturday, March 31 at 8:30 p.m. each evening. Suggested donation is adult $35, child $18, family $100 and sponsors $360.00. Second Night B AA IS D AA VID CH AA B AA D, 2001 W. Swann Ave., will hold a Second Night Seder for the community on Saturday, March 31 at 8 p.m. The cost is $50 per person. RSVP to Rebbetzin Devorah Rivkin at (813) CONGREG AA TION SCH AAAA R AA I ZEDEK, 3303 W. Swann Ave., will host a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 5 p.m. Member prices: $33 per adult, $18 free. Paid advanced reservations are required by Monday, March 26. CONGREG AA TION BETH AMAM 2030 W. Fletcher Ave., will hold a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31at 6 p.m. Cost had not been set as of press time. RSVP by Admin@BethAmTampa.org or call The 20S/30S CONNECTION group will hold a multimedia interactive Seder experience on Saturday, March 31 at 8 p.m. at Congregation Schaarai Zedek, 3303 W. Swann Ave. The cost is $20 per person and reservations are a must. old. For questions, contact Lindsey Dewey at ldewey@zedek.org or www.zedek.org/20s30s.BR AA NDONFirst Night CH AA B AA D OF BR AA NDON/ JEWISH DISCOVER Y CENTER, 1578 Bloomingdale Ave., Valrico, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 7 p.m., led by Rabbi Mendel Rubashkin. Open to the community, space is limited. Cost is $36 per person, $118 per family and sponsorships are available. However, no one will be turned away for lack of funds. For more information or to RSVP, call jewishbrandon.com/rsvp, or email discoveryrabbi@jewishbrandon. com. Second Night CONGREG AA TION BETH SH AA LO MM 706 Bryan Road, Brandon, will hold a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 6 p.m. Cantor Moshe Friedler will lead the Seder. Cost for adults is $36, and 5 are free. Seating is limited and reservations are required by March email cbsadmin@hotmail.com. PP A scoSCO C ountyOUNTY First Night CH AA B AA D JEWISH CENTRE AA T WIREGR AA SS, 2124 Ashley Oaks Circle, Wesley Chapel, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 8:15 p.m. led by Rabbi Mendy Yarmush. All are welcome. Suggested donation, $30 per person; $100 for family; $250 sponsor. For more information and online to www.ChabadatWiregrass. com. PP OLK COUNTYSecond Night TE MPMP LE BETH SH AA LO MM 1029 Br adbury Road, Winter Haven, will hold a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 6 p.m. Open to the community, the cost for members is $35 per person, Reservations are required by March 19, your check is your reservation. Mail to Temple Beth Shalom, P. O. Box 313, Winter Haven, FL 33882.It has become a Passover tradition in the Tampa Bay area for a group to put on a parody Seder performance that they call Greater Seder always off color enough to qualify for adult only audiences, with a different theme every year. This years audience pleaser is The Music Mensch and will be performed on Saturday, March 31 at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC, 522 N. Howard Ave., Tampa. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the Seder begins at 7 p.m. The Greater Seder has been going on for 13 years, billed as an The creators of the event were a collection of lawyers, educators and a realtor. Their goal was to offer a real Seder, but with heavy doses of humor, song and enter tainment, in the tradition of Purim shpiels. When 72 folks attended four times chai they knew it was a good start. Over the years the titles for their Greater Seders have ranged from Matzoh-lot, Schlep through TV Land, Star Drek, Seder-day Night Chai and The Sound of Moses. The characters of God, Moses, Pharaoh and the Jewish people are the stars of every Greater Seder. The meal is always a traditional Passover Seder with a Haggadah full of singalong songs and Passover prayers. The proceeds from the Greater Seder have always gone to good causes and in recent years have gone to the Tampa Jewish Family Services food bank. Last year alone more than $6,000 was raised. The event has grown over the years and last year more than 300 attended. The event is no but is an alternative Seder for many in the Bay area. New residents, young adults and seasoned grownups, as well as too-tiredto-cook a second Seder folks are among those who attend. Throughout the years many of event are still putting on the annual event, including Jerry Slutzky, Lynn Heller, Cindy Spahn, Cynthia Gornbein and organizer Rande Friedman. Other performers this year include Elaine and Geoffrey Gross, Dana and Norman Melnick, Suzy Duic, Robin Golin, Paula Pennington, Fred Lasday and Rob Norman. The cast calls itself the Kosher Hams and every Greater Seder is closed with the song, There is no Seder like our Seder, sung to the tune of There is no Business like Show Business. Tickets are $65 for general admission and $80 for patrons (who get priority seating) or $750 for a table of 8 (for best seating). There are also opportunities for sponsorships like the buy a dog a shank bone Seder plate item, buy a plague or a more conventional donation toward production costs or the purchase of a tzedakah tick et for someone who cannot afford one. Tickets and donations may be purchased at www.GreaterSeder. com.Greater Seders show tradition continuesJoshua David Selig, son of Charyn Selig and the late Glenn Selig, of Tampa, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, March 24 at Congregation Mekor Shalom. The service will be held at the Tampa Airport Marriott. A seventh-grade honors student at Hillel Academy, Joshua is a member of the National Junior Honor Society and was invited to participate in tative for Hillels student government. Charyn Selig and Gloria Friedman will host a celebration at the Air port Marriot on Saturday, March 24. Special guests will include grandmother Gloria Friedman from New Jersey, grandparents Herb and Lucille Selig from Los Angeles, along with family and friends from Columbus, Boston and Chicago.Joshua David Selig Bnai MitzvahCorey Mitchell Roos, son of Wendy and Larry Roos of Odessa, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, March 17 at Temple Ahavat Shalom in Palm Harbor. A seventh-grade honors student at Walker Middle Magnet School, Corey plays the bass clarinet and recently participated in the All County Band. Active in tennis, Corey also enjoys playing chess and cooking. For his mitzvah project Corey is a volunteer at St. Francis Cat Rescue at Petsmart. He also enjoys being a camper in the summer at Six Points Sci-Tech Camp in Massachusetts. Wendy and Larry Roos will host a celebration at Ruth Eckerd Hall on Saturday, March 17. Special guests will include Deanna and Ed Roos from West Palm Beach.Corey Mitchell Roos Bar/Bat Mitzvah announcements are published one to two weks before the celebration if possible. Announcement forms are available at synagogues, oncharge to cover the cost of reproducing the photo. Mail to the Jewish Press,

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Business & Professional Directory PAGE 16 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 ADVERTISE in the Business & Professional Directoryfor as little as $38 per issue 813-871-2332 CLASSIFIEDS ADS advertising. The paper accepts no responsibility for services and merchandise advertised, nor screens advertisers. All ads must be submitted in writing. Mail to PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758; fax (727) 5303039 or e-mail: jewishpress@aol.com Rates: $10 for 15 words, 10 each additional word. ORACLEINSURANCE Marc D. Ostroff Agency Principal 2605 S. MacDill Ave. Tampa, FL 33692 P | 813.259.9600 F | 813.259.9602marc@trustoracle.com www.trustoracle.com Home | Auto | Commercial | Life POSITION AVAILABLE 14007 N. Dale Mabry Hwy. Tampa, Florida 33618 Cell: (813) 220-7171 Ph: (813) 908-8500 Fax: (813) 908-9840franstar@tampabay.rr.comFRAN SCHWARTZRealtor OBITUARIES of Jewish community members, both local residents and individuals whose survivors live in the area, are published as a FREE public service in the Jewish Press of Pinellas County, based on information supplied by the family to the funeral home. Informaiton may also be submitted directly in writing to the Jewish Press. Email to jewishpress@ aol.com or send to PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758. Be sure to include contact information. The information contained in the published obituary is at the discretion of the Jewish Press. Obituaries 813-500-5078 (O) 908-930-9331 (C) 813-443-6639 (F)700 SOUTH HARBOUR ISLAND BLVD. SUITE #703 TAMPA, FLORIDA 33602ALLEN J. STRAUSS, CPABUSINESS & INDIVIDUAL TAX PREPARATIONAJSCPAS@AOL.COMJEWISH PRESS has OPENINGS for:SUMMER INTERNS College student with journalism major preferred. Duties will include writing assignments and clerical work. Paid position. Parttime. Flexible hours. Must have transportation. S end resume with clips, if available.Karen Dawkins, managing editor PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758 email: jewishpress@aol.com. or call, (727) 535-4400 or (813) 871-2332. SERVICESREADY FOR A R ELATIONSHIP? Know someone who is? Tampa Bay MatchMakers www.TampaBayMatchMakers.com. ACCOUNTANT SINGER CONSULTING: Robert S inger, Accountant. Personal & Corporate Tax Preparation. Corporate rsingertampa@aol.com. 727-773-0855Fax: 727-785-74693905 Tampa Rd, #2764 Oldsmar, FL 34677 JerryBrownstein@hotmail.com J ERRY B ROWNSTEIN& ASSOCIATES Life insurance specialist MARILYN (LYN) JOAN BASKIN, 84, of Tampa, died Feb. 22. She was previously from Pittsburgh. Survivors include her husband of 66 years Norton (Norty); daughter Jan; son Scott; two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family suggests memorials to the dog rescue group of your choice. (Segal Funeral Home, Beth David Chapel) DONALD STANLEY GOLDEN, 87, of Tampa, died March 2. Born in Philadelphia, he moved to Tampa 28 years ago. He was a United States Coast Guard veteran, serving during the Korean War. Survivors include his wife of 63 years Geraldine; three daughters and sons-in-law; Beverly and Mark Gruensfelder, Renee and Steven Bernstein, and great-grandchildren. The family suggests memorials to your favorite charity. (Segal funeral Home, Beth David Chapel) BEVERLY LEVINE, 91, a lifelong resident of Cincinnati, died Feb. 17. Survivors include her daughter and son-in-law, Iris and Steven Pastor; grandsons; Sam Pastor and Harry Cohen, all of family suggests memorials to Congregation Rodeph Sholom in Tampa. (Weil Funeral Home) BESSIE LEDERMAN SCHAFFEL SELEVAN, 97, of Tampa, died March 7. Born in Pittsburgh, she lived there until 1961 when the family relocated to North Miami Beach. Active in the Pittsburgh area in the 1950s, she helped found and lead Brownie and Girl Scout Troops, insisting that her groups include girls of all races and nationalities. In her later years in South Florida she collected and preserved Yiddish literature. She was active in documenting the remembrances of Holocaust survivors and was lauded for her work by National Public Radio in a series sponsored by Steven Spielberg. A member of Temple Beth Torah for more than 50 years, she was active in the Sisterhood. Survivors include her children; Gary and Diane Schaffel, Joan Schaffel Massre, Martin and Mary Ann Schaffel; brother and sister-in-law Rabbi Louis and Anita Lederman; four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. (Segal Funeral Home, Beth David Chapel)WASHINGTON (JTA) Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, that she was like a tsunami of fresh air at the body. I wanted to tell you how much we appreciate the defense of Israel and the truth that the president and you bring into these cloistered halls that are so damp, you know, with anti-Israel venom, Netanyahu said March 8 in his meeting with Haley at the United Nations in New York. Its not a breath of fresh air, its like a tsunami of fresh air. The U.S. and Israeli delegations to the United Nations have worked closely for decades to combat the institutions anti-Israel bias, but Haley, with President Donald Trumps blessing, has made it a focus of her ambassadorship. Haley has blocked the appointment of Palpulled the U.S. out of the world bodys cultural arm for failing to recognize the Western Wall as holy to Jews and vocally pushed back against bias in a number of forums. Its amazing, Haley told Netanyahu. I mean, really, it was just abusive before, and I think Ive told you that before. I mean, I feel bad for [Israeli Ambassador] Danny [Danon] and what hes had to put up with but it was abusive before, she said. But its actually starting to get a little bit better. I mean, they dont want to get yelled at, right? So they just realized that, she said. Haley was also one of the stars of the annual American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) conference in Washington, D.C., where she received 12 standing ovations during her speech.Netanyahu calls Nikki Haley a tsunami of fresh air at UN

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 17 MARCH 9 22, 2018 Organizations Jill NeumanREALTOR 813.503.0707jillkaren.neuman@gmail.com jillneuman.com 1208 E. Kennedy Blvd. Suite 231, Tampa, FL 33602I love what I do and youll love the results. Bnai BrithHorsing around fundraiser: Greater Tampa Bay Bnai Brith will be going to Tampa Bay Downs on Sunday, March 25 at 11 a.m. for its annual fundraiser. A full brunch will be offered from noon to 3 p.m. The cost is $50 per person and includes admission to the track, racing program, brunch and gratuities. RSVP to Arlene Berger by Marth 11. For RSVP information, call Berger at (727) 726-9579.Genealogical SocietyMembers helping members: The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday April 8 at 2 p.m. for a hands-on working session for individual research using the Internet and library resources of the society. Experienced society mentors will be on hand to provide guidance and assistance. Free access to Ancestry.com and to MyHeritage. com (Premium), will be offered on several computers and available for use. Attendees are asked to bring their own research materials and information and their own laptop computer if they have one. A pre-session social with refreshments and library access begins at 1:30 p.m. For information about the organization or directions to the meeting, call Bruce Hadburg at (727) 796-7981.Young Adults#Gather offers a mix of social and interactive activities designed to help young adults connect. It is open to young adults of all faiths and backgrounds. For more information or to RSVP for any #Gather events, visit: www.bryanglazerfamilyjcc.com/gather or contact Lisa Robbins at lisa.robbins@jewishtampa.com or (813) 769-4723. Dinner and a movie: The #Gather group will meet on Thursday, March 22 at 6 p.m. for dinner at the Cask Social Kitchen, 208 S. Howard Ave., then travel to the Bryan Glazer Family JCC to watch Longing as part of the Tampa Bay A middle-aged bachelors world is upended when a former college girlfriend tells him she had a son by him, and the teenage son just died. The cost is $10 for the movie and participants will pay their own cost for dinner. Job-LinksMonday Morning Links: Free sessions of Monday Morning Links are offered at the Jack Roth Center for Career Development at TampaBay-Job-Links, 4100 W. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 206, Tampa from 9:30 11 a.m. On March 19 topic is Linked-in From a Recruiter Perspective and the March 26 topic is Staying Motivated During Career Transition. Monday Morning Links is supported by the Vinik Family Foundation. Job-search aids: The next Success workshop will be Thursday, April 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The topic is Customize Your Resume for the Job You Want. The workshops are free for TampaBay Job-Links full program participants and $15 for guests. Reservations required for all programs. To RSVP, call (813) 344-0200, email RSVP@ TBJL.org. Special event: On March 22 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., photographer Allie Serrano will be on-hand for a photo shoot for job seekers. Jewish War VeteransVolunteers needed: The Jewish War Veterans Post 373 is seeking members who would like to help ill and disabled veterans. Contact Commander Jack Rudowsky at (813) 598-8061 or email rochelletsr@gmail.com. Active AdultsAll programs listed are either at the Maureen & Douglas Cohn Jewish Community Campus, 13009 Community Campus Drive, or at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC at 522 N. Howard Ave. To RSVP or for more information on programs at either center, contact Pnina Levermore at (813) 291-2253 or pnina.levermore@ JewishTampa.com. All registrations should be completed before events begin. Advance registration is also required through the USF Osher Lifelong Learning Institute for Osher classes offered at either JCC. For more information on those classes, contact the institute at (813) 974-8036, Plugged in workshop: on Monday, March 19 from 4-5 p.m. at the Glazer JCC there will be a discussion on smart phones, tablets and the Internet. This is a free program. Discover Opera: Experience Discover Opera at the Straz Center for Performing Arts Morsani Hall on Sunday, March 18 from 12:304 p.m., preceded by lunch in the Sono Caf. Discover Opera is an interactive forum designed to enrich the publics opera experience. It features the operas managing director, choral master, stage director and principals who will perform arias from Opera Tampas production of Macbeth. The event is free, but the cost of lunch is not included. Transportation is available. Bridge lessons: Those who want to learn how to play bridge or improve their game can take bridge class at the Glazer JCC Fridays from now through April 6. This is for players at any level and sessions are from 1-2:30 p.m. The cost is $50 for members; $60 for non-members. Floridas forgotten heroes: Learn about some of the states little known luminaries in a class at the Glazer JCC, led by Lynne Mormino, on Wednesdays, March 21 and 28 from 10-11:30 a.m. Cost is $20 for the two sessions. This is an Osher class offered through USF. Mens Club: This group will meet on Tuesday, March 27 from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Glazer JCC for men to gather in relaxed and friendly surroundings. Potential activities include poker, billiards, or camping, community volunteering or discussions. All that Jazz: The Culture Caf at the Glazer JCC will offer a Beginners Guide to Jazz on Wednesday, March 28 from 7-8:30 p.m. at a cost of $10 for members and $15 for guests. The whole enchilada: Take a class at the Glazer JCC that Wednesdays, April 4 25 from 10 a.m. to noon, taught by June Kittay and Eric Pfeiffer. Combine the advantages of physical and exceptional fun and enhanced health. The cost is $40. This is an Osher class offered through USF. Biblical literature: This course, which meets at the Cohn campus every other Wednesday from 1:30 2:30 p.m., provides an opportunity to see the Bible not from a religious perspective but as a piece of remarkable writing. The next class is March 28. This is a discussion course with participation open to people of all faiths and backgrounds. Bring your own Bible so participants can compare different translations. Cost is $3 for members and $4 for guests Canasta: Meet in the senior lounge at the Cohn campus every Friday from 3-4:30 p.m. for friendly games of canasta. Movie matinee: Enjoy a classic movie and popcorn on the 10 a.m. to noon on the Cohn campus. There is no charge to attend. On April 4, the movie will be Daniel. Yiddish nostalgia: Join Ruth Weston and other Yiddish enthusiasts on Thursday, March. 22 from 12:45-1:45 p.m. at the Cohn campus to share favorite expressions and reminisce. This program is free. Crochet lessons: Learn crochet with Judy Balber every Monday on the Cohn campus from 10:30 a.m. to noon. Bring yarn, crochet hooks and any pattern you want. Cost is $25 for members; $30 for non-members with prorating options available. Mah jongg: Folks can play at both JCCs. At the Cohn campus, there will be open play sessions every Tuesday and Thursday from 1:30 3:30 p.m. Also, at that location there will be guided instruction to learn the basics on Mondays from 1:30-3 p.m. at a cost of $5 for members and $10 for guests. At the Glazer JCC, drop-in sessions are offered on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-3 p.m. This is free for all members. Novices and experienced players are welcome. Also at the Glazer JCC, lessons will be offered on Sundays, March 18 through April 15 from 9:30-11:30 a.m. The cost is $65 for members and $70 for non-members, with advanced registration required. Call the Glazer JCC for more information. JetSetters: The Phyllis Borrell JetSetters social group for adults of all ages meets at both JCCs for an hour-long program followed by lunch. The JetSetters group meets on the Cohn campus on the fourth Thursday of the month from 11 a.m. to noon. On March 22 meeting will feature singing along to vaudeville tunes with Joy Katzen-Guthrie. The lunch is free for members, though a donation of $5 is suggested. At the Glazer JCC, JetSetters meet on the second Wednesday of the month from 11 a.m. to noon. The lunch is free for members, but donations are welcome. On April 11 there will be a presentation on From Russia with Love. News talk: This discussion group, meeting at both JCCs, is led by Pat Renfroe and explores hot button issues of the day. Upcoming News Talk sessions at the Glazer JCC are Tuesdays from 7-8:30 p.m. On March 20 the discussion will be on American values that have been set aside and on March 27 there will be a discussion of evaluating and rethinking those values. These sessions are free. The group at the Cohn campus, meets the second and fourth Friday from 10:30 a.m. to noon. The topic on March 23 is voting in America. There is no charge to attend. Support groupsAlzheimers caregiver group: Menorah Manor offers a support group meeting in the Samson Nursing Center at Menorah Manor, 255 59th St. N., St. Petersmonth from 3:30-5 p.m. For more information, call Gwen Kaldenberg at (727) 302-3750. Gathering for funAt #Gather Art Night, participants worked with local artist Sara Scher in her Hyde Park studio to create self-portraits out of fabric. (LR) Sarah Rowe, Andrea Cohen, Loren Anderson, Aleksandrina Vodenicharska, Lisa Robbins and Robin Viders. #Gather, an initiative of the Tampa JCCs for young adults, hosted a Bark in the Park, which brought together pups and their owners at the Davis Islands dog beach in early February. (L-R) Benjamin Feldman and Katara, Becky Preston and Finley, Matt Auster and Biscuit, Katie Fischman and Macy, and Monica Sanchez and Astro.

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PAGE 18 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 By JOSEFIN DOLSTEN JTA news serviceThroughout his senior year in high school, Ryan Deitsch has stayed busy. A month ago, the of classes performing with animprovisational theater group he started at his school, producing TV content for the schools newsroom and working as a busboy at a local restaurant. to lawmakers and organizations, doing interviews with media outlets and visiting other high schools to organize people who want to get politically involved. Deitsch is a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and was inside when a former student stalked its killing 17 students and staff members on Feb. 14. Deitsch hid with other students in a closet during the massacre. As police came to evacuate the school, Deitschs journalistic inwhat was happening on his phone, sharing it on Twitter. The footage showed students being marched through the halls, their hands raised over their heads at the request of the police, and then running as they neared the exit. Being at school during the shooting was awful, he told JTA in a phone interview on March 6. ation. I did not feel so much in the ing you can feel a lot of things. Now Deitsch, among a handful of students leading the Never Again movement which seeks to prevent future school shootings, advocates for gun reform and is organizing the March for Our Lives in Washington, D.C., later this month. As part of Never Again, Deitsch does community outreach. He calls himself part of the B-team, and says hes the goto person when organizers Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg or Cameron Kasky are out of town. Deitsch says knowing that his classmates and teachers were killed is what keeps him going. Among the victims was Carmen Schentrup, 16, whom he knew through the schools a cappella group. The clearest motivation is that 17 individuals lost their lives and they shouldnt have, he said. It was a very preventable death, and we are here to make sure none of this has to happen again. Deitsch wakes up each day at 5 or 6 a.m. and doesnt go to bed until around 3 the next morning. In addition to attending school, he organizes trips and speaking engagements for the Never Again team and answers social media messages. Sometimes he misses classes to speak about his experience at events across the country. He also tries to squeeze in things he did before the shooting, like spending time with his girlfriend, friends and family. Thats still important, I cant just not have my own life, he said. Last month, his comments to Sen. Marco Rubio, R-FL, at a CNN town hall received wide media coverage. Deitsch asked Rubio, Why do we have to march on Washington, just to save innocent lives? His siblings are also involved in the movement. Matt, 20, met with Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, to discuss policy change, and Samantha, 15, penned a poem about her expePhoto by Don Juan Moore/Getty ImagesRyan Deitsch speaking at the Florida State Capitol building in Tallahassee, Feb. 21.This Jewish Parkland survivor hid in a closet; now he advocates for gun reformrience at the school that went viral on social media. Deitsch tries to balance his newfound passion with attending school and mourning the lives of those who died in the shooting. I try to attend school as much as I can, he said. About a week ago, he and other hours at the makeshift memorial for the shooting to grieve. Prior to the tragedy, Deitsch or journalist. But the way the media covered the event, including crying at funerals, has left him sick to my stomach. Though the shooting propelled him to become politically involved, Deitsch isnt sure if he wants to pursue political activism in the long term. He plans to attend college in the fall; hes still waiting to hear from schools before making his decision. Judaism has taught Deitsch, whose family belongs to Congregation Kol Tikvah in Parkland, to ask questions a quality he said that helps him in his activism. I feel that Judaism has really supported my need to just be that one guy in the room to just be like, Hey, this is wrong, why is it this way?, and if they dont have a good enough answer for why, weve got to change it, he said. to attend services at his synagogue following the shooting. The Guttenberg family, whose daughter Jamie was killed in the shooting, are members of the Reform congregation. I cannot stay in any place that has had a funeral for somebody I know for too long, so right now that synagogue seems like a place of death, he said. In addition to organizing for Never Again, Deitsch said he will use his vote to make his point. Im gonna vote out anybody who has just been so heartless dur ing this entire debacle, he said. Deitsch said he feels obligated to continue his work. The point is that we have to do this, he said.By EMILY BURACK JTA news serviceAfter a gunman took the lives of 17 students and staff at their high school in Parkland, Florida, students there launched a national campaign to promote gun control. They called for a major protest in Washington, D.C., on March 24, and are encouraging similar protests and student walkouts across the country. And they took a name for their campaign, #NeverAgain, that has long been linked to Holocaust commemoration. Parkland junior Cameron Kasky is credited with coining the hashtag.   A T witter account for the movement,   NeverAgainMSD, is described as For survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting, by survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting. Some supporters of the students efforts are put off by their use of Never Again. Lily Herman,     its very uncomfortable to watch a term youve used to talk about your family and peoples own heritage and history be taken away overnight. Malka Goldberg, a digital communications specialist in Maryland, tweeted, When I saw theyre using #NeverAgain for the campaign it bothered me, b/c many Jews strongly [associate] that phrase w/ the Holocaust specultural appropriation, but I doubt the kids knew this or did it inten tionally. Hasia Diner,   a professor of American Jewish history at New York University, is unfazed by the students use of the phrase. While some may object to the phrase Never Again being reappropriated for gun control, it does not mean that reaction is appropriate or reasonable, she told JTA. in reference to the Holocaust is murky, but most likely began in postwar Israel. The phrase was used in secular kibbutzim there a   Swedish documentary on the Holocaust   But the phrase gained currency in English thanks in large part to Meir Kahane, the militant rabbi who   popularized it in America when he created the Jewish Demanifesto.   After Kahanes assasthe American Jewish Committee, Sholom Comay,   said, Despite our considerable differences, Meir Kahane must always be remembered for the slogan Never Again, which for so many became the battle cry of post-Holocaust Jewry. For Kahane, Never Again was an implicitly violent call to arms and a rebuke of passivity and inactivity. The shame surrounding the alleged passivity of the Jews in the face of their destruction became a cornerstone of the JDL. As Kahane said, the motto Never Again does not mean that it [a holocaust] will never happen again. That would be nonsense. It means that if it happens again, it wont happen in the same way. Last time, the Jews behaved like sheep. In the anthem of the Jewish Defense League, members recited, To our slaughtered brethren and lonely widows: Never again will our peoples blood be shed by water, Never again will such things be heard in Judea. Later, however, Kahanes violent call for action was adapted by American Jewish establishment groups and Holocaust commemoration institutions as a call for peace, tolerance and heeding the warning signs of genocide. These days, when the phrase is used to invoke the Holocaust, it can be either particular or univer sal. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tends toward the particular when he uses it to speak about the need for a strong Jewish state in the wake of the Holocaust. I promise, as head of the Jewish state, that never again will we allow the hand of evil to sever the life of our people and our state, he   said   in a speech at the site of the former Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp marking International Holocaust Memorial Day in 2010. But Netanyahu has also used the phrase in its universal sense of preventing all genocides. After visiting a memorial to the Rwanda genocide victims in 2010, he and his wife, Sara, wrote in the guestbook, We are deeply moved by the memorial to the victims of one historys greatest crimes and reminded of the haunting similarities to the genocide of our own people. Never again. Then-President   Barack Obama also used the phrase in its univer sal sense in marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day in 2011. We are reminded to remain ever-vigilant against the possibility of genocide, and to ensure that Never Again is not just a phrase but a principled cause, he said in a statement. Thats similar to how the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum uses the phrase. In choosing the name   Never Again   as the theme of its 2013 Days of Remembrance, it used the term as a call to study the genocide of the Jews in order to   respond to the warning signs of genocides happening anywhere. And Elie W iesel, the Holocaust survivor and author who came to be associated with the phrase, also used it in the univer sal sense. Never again becomes more than a slogan: Its a prayer, a promise, a vow   never again dark violence, the Nobel   laureate wrote in 2012. Never Again is a phrase that keeps on evolving. It was used in protests   against the Muslim ban   and in   support of refugees, in remembrance of   Japanese intern ment during World War II   and   recalling the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. And now the phrase is taking on yet another life: in the Shaul Magid, a professor of Jewish studies at Indiana Univer sity who is presently a visiting scholar at the Center for Jewish History in New York, told JTA, For Kahane, Never Again was a call to militancy as the only act of prevention. In Parkland it is a call for gun control. In a way, a call for anti-militancy. Its doubtful Kahane would have appreciated the term being co-opted by a gun control campaign. His second most-famous slogan was Every Jew a .22. Students protesting against gun violence on Capitol Hill, Feb. 21, 2018Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesHow Never Again evolved from a Holocaust slogan to a universal call for [ll in the blank]

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JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA PAGE 19 MARCH 9 22, 2018 of the plans and said he wanted members of his temple youth group to go. Although he and the temple youth director have prior commitments and cant accom pany teens from the temple, Rabbi Klein said Gamson graciously agreed that any teens from Ahavat Shalom could join the others for ing is secured. Gamson said the original deadline for signing up to go to the march was March 2 and that while she wants as many local Jewish teens as possible to make the trip, just to send the initial group of 30. The hope was to keep the personal cost to each teen at $300, but Gamfor any additional participants more funds are raised. Adding more people means more hotel rooms, more buses, but we are trying to make all of this work out, she said, noting that the original goal of $10,000 had to be doubled due to the higher estimat ed costs including continual rising airfares. I am going to empty my discretionary fund and I already this morning got a $500 commitment from our Social Action Committee to help send our kids to Washington and I plan to make an appeal for funds during services tonight and to send an email to our congregants to help our kids get to the march, Rabbi Klein said. He also plans to encourage those who could not attend the Washington march to join local March for Our Lives events in Tampa or St. Petersburg. I cannot go to Washington with our kids, but I will be at one or the other of the local marches, the rabbi said. The local marches The Tampa March for Our Lives will be at Kiley Garden/Curtis Hixon Park, 400 N. Ashley Drive, in downtown Tampa at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 24, and the one in St. Petersburg will be at the same time in front of the Pinellas County Courthouse at Sixth Street North and Mirror Lake Drive. Hopefully with our teens behind this effort, we will see progress made in creating a safer society through the reduction in the number and type of guns that are allowed to be owned, Rabbi Klein said. At Congregation Schaarai Zedek in Tampa the youth group decided rather than try to get to Washington, they would go to the Tampa March for Our Lives event. Rabbi Richard Birnholz at Schaarai Zedek said he expects between 25 to 50 members of the youth group to attend the Tampa march and other members would be going to Parkland for a March for Our Lives there. We will try to draw our own legislators attention here, Rabbi Birnholz said, adding that the idea was that the teens could make more of a show of support for gun violence prevention at less of a cost. One of the Tampa march organizers, Brooke Shapiro, is a mem ber of Schaarai Zedek. When the shooting occurred in Parkland, I felt a personal connection because I was born in Coral Springs and if I had not moved to Tampa, I would have been district ed to Marjory Stoneman Douglas, said Shapiro, a senior at Plant High. My childhood friends were at the school that day and thankwith the victims they could have been my sister, my friends, my teachers, or me. I couldnt just return to school the next day and pretend nothing had happened. When the Stoneman Douglas students began organizing the national march and called for sister marches, Shapiro saw that as her cue to organize a march in Tampa. The march is necessary because we need to keep the momentum and the conversation going. We are scared to sit in our classrooms. Students want a future and we want to have a say in that future. Shapiro said she is hoping to have a student from Stoneman Douglas speak at the Tampa march during a rally at 10 a.m. before the march in downtown Tampa beginning at 11 a.m. For more information about either local march, visit their Facebook page. Other inspiration to march The impetus for sending teens to the national march was a trip that 50 Reform Jewish teens from the Tampa Bay area made to Washington last month as part of the Religious Action Centers LTaken Social Justice program. On Feb. 12 two days before the Parkland shootings the teens lobbied Congressional representatives and staff members to support legisla tion that was important to them: immigration reform, LGBTQ+ equality, climate change, womens reproductive rights and gun violence prevention. Gamson said some of those same teens came to her after the shootings and after hearing about the national march, saying they wanted to return to Washington. The Parkland slayings deeply impacted many local teens because they knew teens from Parkland through NFTY (North American Federation of Temple Youth) activities or shared experiences at Camp Coleman, a Reform movement Jewish summer camp in north Georgia, said Lisa Cohen, youth director at Beth Am. Rachel Buksbaum of Beth Am met and quickly became friends with Alyssa Alhadeff, one of the slain teens, at Camp Coleman. How to donate Donations to send the Bay Area teens to Washington can be made by going to GoFundMe.com and searching for March for Our Lives Tampa Bay. In addition, tax deductible donations (with a clear note designating the donation is for the march) can be made to: Temple Bnai Israel, c/o March for Our Lives Donation, 1685 S. Belcher Road, Clearwater, FL 33764, or by calling the temple at (727) 531-5829. In Tampa donations can be made to Congregation Beth Am, c/o March for our Lives Donation, 2030 W. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612, or by calling (813) 968-8511. Temple Beth-El has not for mally set up a donation system, but Gamson said those who want to donate through that synagogue should contact Rabbi Michael Torop at (727) 347-6136. The effort to raise funds to support the Temple Ahavat Shalom teens did not materialize until March 9, so those wishing to support those teens should contact that temple at (727) 785-8811. Calls were made to several local Conservative congregations in the area to see if their youth groups had formally organized MARCHCONTINUED from FRONT PAGE $370* rf rr f Savings amounts are averages based on information from The Hartfords AARP Auto Insurance Program customers who became new policyholders between 1/1/16 and 12/31/16 and provided data regarding their savings and prior carrier. Your savings may vary. AARP and its af liates are not insurers. Paid endorsement. The Hartford pays royalty fees to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP membership is required for Program eligibility in most states. The AARP Automobile Insurance Program from The Hartford is underwritten by Hartford Fire Insurance Company and its af liates, One Hartford Plaza, Hartford, CT 06155. Auto program is currently unavailable in Massachusetts, Canada and U.S. Territories or possessions. Speci c features, credits and discounts may vary and may not be available in all states in accordance with state lings and applicable law. Applicants are individually underwritten and some may not qualify.nnftb fbtn ntrrntbbbbbnbbbttbb bbtbb n tbnbtbn bn bb to make the trip to Washington. One indicated no plans and two were not available for comment. Dana Shepard at Congregation Beth Shalom in Clearwater said the national United Synagogues of Conservative Judaism supports the national march and is raising funds to help house and feed kids going to the march. She added that that at least one Conservative synagogue in Washington will allow people going to the march to sleep there. (A major Reform synagogue in Washington has made a similar offer.) Shepard said she recently sent an email to her youth group members to gauge their interest in the march but had not received responses yet. Brooke Shapiro, a member of Congregation Schaarai Zedek, is one of the organizers of the Tampa March for Our Lives.

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PAGE 20 JEWISH PRESS of TAMPA MARCH 9 22, 2018 By BOB FRYER Jewish PressIn 2017, organizers of the inaugural Tampa Bay Jewish Food Festival at Temple Bnai Israel in Clearwater were hoping for hundreds and about 2,000 showed up. The supply of food ran out long before the festival ended, so for this years event they planned for 4,000 and still ran out of food. While organizer Barbara Bloom thinks the Largo Police estimate of 5,000 to 6,000 attendees might be a little on the high side, she knows for sure the crowd at the Feb. 25 event was a lot bigger than the one this year was chopped liver. Bob Levine made 60 pounds of it and they tell me it was a spiritual experience. It was all gone by 11:50 a.m., Bloom said. Bloom, who is director of membership engagement at the temple, said she thinks word of how quickly festival had folks coming early this year. The festival started at 10 a.m. Food Festival again proves theres big appetite for Jewish cuisine and everyone seemed to come then, with coolers and backpacks, and loaded up. I guess they were deter mined this time they would get to eat, Bloom said. We added new items and tripled what we made last time and still were running food that easily that reminds them of their culture. cabbage, made by Liz Greenfold and Melissa Brahm, and they sold out of 300 servings of it. Ali Curtiss made 1,500 latkes also a new item on the menu and those went quickly. Honey cakes and chocolate babka were among other new foods this year and were scooped up quickly, too. The featured foods once again were the corned beef and pastrami sandwiches from Carnegie Deli in New York and both years they were crowd favorites. Other offer ings included homemade matzoh ball soup, bagels with the works, kugel, falafel and sour pickles on a stick. A Nosh-to-go area was set up where take-out orders were sold for folks to take home and heat up. Craft brewed beer and a wide assortments of wines were offered. This year volunteers boosted the quantity of hamantashen made to 1,500 yet those were still all gone by 12:15 p.m. It took nearly 200 volunteers to pull off the event, with months of advanced planning. Along with Bloom, temple administrator Angela Wachter handled the internal building needs, and Sharon Finkelstein served as festival chair. Finkelstein said one goal was not only to reach many members of the local Jewish community, but to reach out to our non-Jewish neighbors to learn and be a part of this celebration of our culture. That seemed to be the case if random sampling of those in attendance is to be trusted. The event drew more from Hillsborough county and beyond this time, including one couple from Orlando who took in a shrimp and crab festival in Hudson the day before, then came to the Jewish Food Festival. They said they are thinking of moving to the Tampa Bay area. Others from Pasco County, Lake land and Tampa mingled with the local Pinellas folks. The festival grounds were hopping all day, with music inside and outdoors, many new areas, includ ing a beverage area for soft drinks, beer and wine, under giant tents to keep the bright sun at bay. The number of vendors also increased this year to 58, about triple the number from last year. Items for sale at the booths included clothing, jewelry, Judaica, health and beauty products, honey and other items. Eighteen of the vendor booths were for Jewish organizations from throughout the community and in between purchasing food, desserts and drinks and eating, folks roamed the grounds. They listened and sometimes danced to music by the Chai Notes band or a harmonica band. For the younger set, the Kidz Zone was a hit, with bounce houses, face painting, craft making, balloon art or taking time to dance to other throbbing music provided by Bash Entertainment, featuring a sound system and DJs. Last year parking became a problem. This year the temple added buses provided by two senior living facilities and the Jolly Trolley to shuttle festivalgoers from remote parking lots, and again this year St. Johns Episcopal Church and Hope Presbyterian, both across the street from the temple, allowed folks to use their grounds for parkBloom said. We are already working on next year. We will meet soon to kick around new ideas as to how we can make it even better, and next year we hope to solve the problem of running out of food, Bloom said. All in all, not a bad problem to have for an event only two years old and already a major fundraiser for the temple.Huge tents were set up so folks could eat in the shade at the food festival. (L-R) Lisa Morett of Tarpon Springs, Don Litov of Palm Harbor, and Mary Lieberman of Clearwater enjoy falafel. Kids do the Whip and Nay Nay in the Kidz Zone. Delilah Brahm, 5, shows off her face paint and a Star of David she created. Photos by Bob Fryer