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Jewish Press of Pinellas County

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Jewish Press of Pinellas County
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Clearwater, FL
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Jim and Karen Dawkins
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
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United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
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27.90731 x -82.744957

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Jewish Press of Pinellas County. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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PRESORTED STANDARD U.S. POSTAGE PAIDThe Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc.The Jewish Press Group of Tampa Bay, Inc. Jewish Press of Pinellas County P. O. Box 6970 Clearwater, FL 33758-6970 Just a nosh.. Just a nosh..Complied from JTA news service ADVERTISEMENT www.jewishpresspinellas.com VOL. 32, NO. 16 ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA MARCH 9 22, 2018 20 PAGES MARCH continued on PAGE 19 Join our page @ www.facebook.com/jfed.pinellas Meet Bob and Myra Sann, Did you know?active members of the Jewish Film Festivals Pinellas committee and recipients of the fests prestigious Starr Award. The Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival will offer showings across Pinellas between March 22 and 25. Check out the full schedule in this paper or at tbjff.org. The Jewish FederationOF PINELLAS & PASCO COUNTIES, FL DO GOOD EVERYWHERE. FROM ANYWHERE. rfntfb fnnf nf tttt By BOB FRYER Jewish PressWords matter, and choosing them carefully can mean the difference between diatribe and discourse, guest speaker Frank Luntz told a packed house at the Tampa JCCs and Federations 15th annual Presidents Dinner on Feb. 25. Luntz, a nationally known political pundit and pioneer of the instant response focus group technique that can monitor in real time an audiences reaction to a speech, came to Tampa to talk about Words that Work: Combatting anti-Semitism and Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions. On college campuses in particular, but also among other groups, Israel is losing support, Luntz said, and if the trend continues, it could mean big problems for Israel, and in time for Jews in America. He said the political divide between Democrats and Republicans is harmful. Luntz cited a variety of statistics from surveys showing the pro-Palestinian view gaining ground and the pro-Israel contingent shrinking. He even cited a survey that showed 34 percent not sure Israel had a right to exist as a Jewish state. Two other shocking statistics In war of words, choose carefully, speaker saysWith this year marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel, the Jewish community of Pinellas and Paso Counties will gather to celebrate Israel Independence Day on Sunday, April 15. Hosted by the Jewish Federation of Pinellas and Pasco Counties, the free celebration will be held at the Creative Pinellas/Pinewood Cultural Center, 12211 Walsingham Road, Largo, from 1 to 4 p.m. There will be something for everyone, especially all those who love the Jewish state. For adults, a lecture series is being developed featuring local authors and educators. The photography work of Israeli photographer, Erez Kaganovitz, will be on display with the exhibit entitled Humans of Tel Aviv. April 15: Were going to party like its 1948 To Hedy Lamarr, beauty was only skin deepBy MICHAEL FOX Special to the Jewish PressIn 1933, the Viennese actress Hedy Keisler sparked an international furor by swimming nude in a provocative melodrama called Ecstasy. Alas, it was the tragic fate of Hedy Lamarr, as she was renamed when she arrived in Hollywood, to be perpetually judged by her face and A splendid study of an extraordinarily compliBombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story recounts the actress and inventors litany of innovations HEDY LAMARR continued on PAGE14 PARTY continued on PAGE 17 WORDS continued on PAGE 12The 22nd Annual Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival is March 21-25.BOMBSHELL: T HE HEDY LAMARR STORY For story, see Back Page.Calling Jewish food loversRussian rm names ice cream Poor Jew Jews in Russias Tatarstan region are objecting to a new ice cream called Poor Jew. The ice cream cone, announced last month by the Slavitsa company in Naberezhnye Chelny, 600 miles east of Moscow, is wrapped in an image of Israels Leonid Shteinberg, a leader of the Jewish community in Naberezhnye Chelny, has called the name racist and demanded its production and sale be halted, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty reported. The city prosecutors In a social media post, the company describes the ice The Slavitsa company has been criticized previously for creating a chocolate ice cream named after thenPresident Barack Obama, which had a wrapper depicting an African boy, and for naming another ice cream with an ethnic slur for Ukrainians. By BOB FRYER Jewish PressAn effort is under way to raise $20,000 and send at least 30 local Jewish teens and adult chaperones from the Tampa Bay area to the March for Our Lives in Washington D.C. on Saturday, March 24. The march to end gun violence was organized by high school students following the Feb. 14 slaying of 17 teens and faculty members at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. As of Friday, March 9, $9,900 had been raised through donations to local temples and a GoFundMe website, said Dani Gamson, director of education and youth at Temple Bnai Israel in Clearwater. Gamson started the GoFundMe effort after members of her youth group said they wanted to participate in the national march. Gamson said that as of March 8 a total of 22 teens and eight adult from her temple, Temple Beth-El in St. Petersburg and Congregation Beth-Am in Tampa all Reto Washington for the march. She said that included four from Beth Am and the rest split pretty evenly between her temple and Beth-El. The next day Rabbi Gary Klein at Temple Ahavat Shalom in Palm Harbor, just back from an AIPAC conference, learned Funds sought to send local teens to DC gun marchRussian President Vladimir Putin said Jews or other minorities might have been behind attempts to interfere in the 2016 American presidential elections. In an interview with NBC News, Putin denied charges by U.S. intelligence services that he ordered meddling in the elections, saying the 13 Russian nationals and three counsel Robert Mueller last month do not represent the interests of the Russian state. Maybe theyre not even Russians, he said. Maybe theyre Ukrainians, Tatars, Jews, just with Russian citizenship. Even that needs to be checked. Maybe they have dual citizenship. Or maybe a green card. Maybe it was the Americans who paid them for this work. How do you know? I dont know. The American Jewish Committee condemned Putins remarks. President Putin suggesting that Russian Federation minorities, be they Ukrainian, Tatar, or Jewish, were behind U.S. election is eerily reminiscent of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. He should clarify his comments at the earliest opportunity, the AJC tweeted.Putin: Jews may be behind meddling Jewish university. Modeled after Yeshiva University in the United States, the Jewish University of Moscow is a private institution with a student body of 200 whose budget comes mostly from donors and the Russian Federation of Jewish Communities, dean Alexander Lebedev told JTA. It will open next month. The university whose faculties include economics, law, humanities and Jewish studies comprises two existing Jewish community colleges one for men and the other for women. Their reconstitution as campuses of a history, according to Lebedev. In the new institution, students will have the possibility to observe Torah, kosher food, Jewish holidays and Shabbat, he said. First Jewish university to open in Russia

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PAGE 2 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 The Jewish Press assumes no responsibility for the opinions of columnists, letter writers, claims of advertisers, nor does the paper guarantee the kashruth of products & services advertised or mentioned otherwise. P.O. BOX 6970, CLEARWATER, FL 33758-6970(6416 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, FL 33707)T elephone: (727) 535-4400 Fax: (727) 440-6037 E -mail: jewishpress@aol.comThe Jewish Press is mailed STANDARD CLASS. Standard Class DOES NOT include a speedy delivery guarantee. Date of delivery varies depending on your Standard Class Postage Permit: TA MP A PI #3763The Jewish Press of Pinellas County is a privately owned, community newspaper published in cooperation with the Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties. The Federation underwrites home Pinellas County (approx.4,500), to promote Jewish community cohesiveness and identity.The Jewish Press is a subscriber to JTA, The Global Jewish News Source.JIM DAWKINSPublisher & Co-OwnerKAREN DAWKINSManaging Editor & Co-Owner Advertising Sales GARY POLIN TORI GEE GALE TARNOFSKY-ABERCROMBIE Staff Writer & Editor BOB FRYER Ad Design & Graphics REY VILLALBA DAVID HERSHMAN Social Columnist JUDY LUDIN Editorial Assistant GAIL WISEBERGPUBLIC AT ION & DEADLINE D ATE SAlso publisher of the Jewish Press of Tampa of PINELLAS COUNTY An independent, bi-weekly newspaper owned by THE JEWISH PRESS GROUP of TAMPA BAY, INC. www.jewishpresspinellas.com STAFF THE FEDERATION MAINTAINS THE MAIL ING LIST FOR THE JEWISH PRESS.To RECEIVE THE PAPER or for ADDRESS CHANGES, Call (727) 530-3223 Go to info@jewishpinellas.orgMARCH 23passover editionPress Release ..........Mar 9 Advertising .............Mar 13APRIL 6Press Release ........Mar 23 Advertising .............Mar 27APRIL 20Press Release ..........Apr 6 Advertising .............Apr 10 Community Integrity Compassion Responsibility Courage Tenacity JEWIShCOMMUNITYCAMP jewishcommunitycamp.com awesome adventures!Swimming 3 times per week Field trips include Rays vs. Yankees game, Boat to Anclote Island, Horsepower for Kids, Clearwater Pirate Ship, Splash Harbour, a luau, and more!Summer ScheduleTASTE OF CAMP: Tuesday, May 29 Friday, June 1 SESSION 1: Monday, June 4 Friday, June 22 SESSION 2: Monday, June 26 Friday, July 13 SESSION 3: Monday, July 16 Friday, August 3 Transportation available from St. Pete and Palm Harbor and discounts for siblings and full-summer campers www.JewishPinellas.org Check Out These Events! Check Out Save These Dates! Save These CAMP CAMP SAVElDATE Sonya Miller Award Ceremony APRIL 29 TH TEMPLE BETH EL rfrn tfrn jewishcommunitycamp.com JCC spring break campMarch 26-30 Mar 10 YAD Purim Pub CrawlMar 11 Congregation Bnai Israel Chaivana Nights Gala Mar 13 Community Womens SederMar 20 YAD Happy Hour, Safety HarborMar 20-25 Tampa Bay Jewish Film FestivalMar 24 Gulf Coast Golf Like a Rock StarApr 13. YAD Shabbat at Home, Land OLakesApr 15 Jewish Heritage Festival Israel@70Apr 22 YAD Mini-Golf OutingApr 29 Sonya Miller Women of DistinctionMay 12 YAD Lag BOmer Boat BashYoung Adult Division (YAD) Events: See facebook.com/pinellasyad for full details

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 3 MARCH 9 22, 2018 Perspective PerspectiveEmilie SocashExecutive Director, Jewish Federation of Pinellas & Pasco Counties As I write this column, Im sitting in the airport in Raleigh/Durham, What I learned? stant pursuit of tikkun olam What I learned? What I learned? chutzpah too! Liked it? Loathed it? Want to react? I would welcome your feedback and can be reached at emilie@jewishpinellas.org.Today, I learned of the men as well as women from across the region to Jewish Press Newly renamed Sonya Miller Women of Distinction event April 29 women of all ages a way to connect with their Jewish community eration to support the host of local Luncheon for top tiers of women philanthropists is April 19 tion to Israel is through his wife, on Israel with particular emphasis on what Its impact on humanity

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PAGE 4 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 Macaroon & Candy Platter A CUSTOMER PASSOVER FAVORITE! Send our best-selling kosher assortment as a gift for Passover or any occasion. Makes a great hostess gift or the perfect addition to your own seder table. Serves 6-8. Hurry, while quantities last! SPECIAL OFFER! S ave over 20% and FREE Shipping Reg. $44.99 Now Only$34.99& FREE SHIPPING Save over 20% and FREE ShippingNow Only $34.99 (reg $44.99 ) and FREE ShippingCall 1-888-239-2545 or Visit ChallahConnection.com/welcome5Offer ends March 30, 2018 or until supplies last.Creating kvells since 2002 Norwalk, CT 06855 CERTIFIEDKOSHERfor Passover 6940 22nd Avenue North 727.345.7040 2220 4th Street North 727.822.2000 12670 Starkey Road, Largo Between Bryan Dairy and Ulmerton 727.518.8888OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK LUNCH & DINNER SERVEDwww.atheniangardens.comFamily owned since 19776940 22nd Avenue North 727.345.7040 2220 4th Street North 727.822.2000 12670 Starkey Road, LargoBetween Bryan Dairy and Ulmerton727.518.8888 Where Everything is Homemade Where Everything is Homemade Lunch tab over $20Get $3 OffNot valid with other offers. Must present ad. Exp. 7/31/14 Dinner tab over $30Get $6 OffNot valid with other offers. Must present ad. Exp. 7/31/14 6940 22nd Avenue North 727.345.7040 2220 4th Street North 727.822.2000OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK LUNCH & DINNER SERVEDwww.atheniangardens.comFamily owned since 19776940 22nd Avenue North 727.345.7040 2220 4th Street North 727.822.2000 Where Everything is Homemade Where Everything is Homemade Lunch tab over $30Get $4 OffNot valid with other offers. Must present ad. Dinner tab over $50Get $6 OffNot valid with other offers. Must present ad. Whether your kids like manatees or dinosaurs, are ready for a challenge or prefer ish Community Camp in Pinellas County planned. As in the camps inaugural summer, Homosassa State Park, the Museum of Scifed, mustering their courage on a high ers learn to ride horses and also offers hay Dinosaur World to dig for fossils, Tarpon Island. In addition to the regularly scheduled Pasco Counties and is housed in facilities at summer program that is open to all, and munitycamp.org.Jewish Community Camp will again go day tripping for fun and adventure offered in 2017.

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 5 MARCH 9 22, 2018 OPEN: MonThurs 11 am 10 pm Fri Sat 11 am 11 pm Sun 4 pm 10 pm211 2nd St. S. St. Pete gratzzigrille.com Call now to reserve: 727.623.9037 New Early Dinner Special $15 per person 4 pm 5:30 pm everydayincludes soup or salad, choice of entree, and dessert. House wine, beer, well drinks all $3.50 Following a successful inaugural year when the Florida-Israel Business Accelerator (FIBA) brought eight companies from Israel to Tampa to meet potential investors and customers, FIBA has selected four new Israeli companies to help get established here. The new companies are in the conscious construction, cyber security, and the medical device industry. Bryan Glazer Family JCC in Tampa, is becoming a leader in usher ing innovative Israeli companies into the U.S. market, with many of Tampa Bay area. All four of the Israeli companies are innovators in their industries. With goals of improving patient care, protecting coastlines while preserving marine life and secur ing companies systems and data, these companies will lead the way with their groundbreaking technologies. Beginning on Feb. 12, each of the companies brought key management representatives to Tampa for four weeks. The entrepreneurs will study the U.S. market, identify business opportunities, receive coaching on sales and marketing, and immerse themselves in the Tampa community and business environment. They will return in June for two weeks to prepare for and present at FIBAs second annual Innovation Fusion event which will be held at the Bryan Glazer Family JCC on June 13. Additionally, FIBA will select four more Israeli companies by the end of March to participate in the second round of the 2018 program. FIBA celebrated the recent success of two of the eight companies that participated in last years program. Last month, WeissBeerger, a beverage consumption analytics company, was acquired by Anheuser-Busch InBev SA/NV, the worlds largest beer brewer, for a reported $80 million. WeissBeerger developed a unique mixture of hardware, software, and data analysis for the beverage industry. With the acquisition from Anheuser-Busch, WeissBeerger is set to become Anheuser-Busch InBevs research and development center in Israel. The sale of Weissbeerger to InBev illustrates the caliber of companies that FIBA is attracting to its program and the possibility for investment oppor tunities and establishing a Florida presence for these exciting companies, said Rachel Marks Feinman, executive director of FIBA. In December, StemRad, an Israeli company that makes a per sonal radiation shield to protect ar power plant workers from deadly high-energy gamma radiation landed a $6 million investment led by Tampas investor Jeff Vinik. Other companies from FIBAs 2017 cohort continue to gain traction in the Tampa Bay market, and FIBA anticipates additional successes for these companies. FIBA negotiates individual agreements with each of the companies in the program. There are some companies in which the JCC a small equity stake. The new companies are: BetterCare This company develops a realtime communication and care management platform for caregivers, nurses and professional staff in order to improve care at skilled nursing facilities. The platform is simple, user-friendly, customizable and comprehensive. It enables standardized reporting and a continuum of care. We are excited to bring Better Care to Tampa and expose them to the Florida market, where skilled nursing facilities are abundant and the BetterCare product can sigWe were introduced to BetterCare through our partnership with CDI Negev, an established Israeli accelerator program in partnership with Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, said Rachel Marks Feinman, executive director of FIBA. The companys web address is www.bettercare.co.il ECOncrete This company provides sciencebased construction solutions that are designed to decrease the ecological footprint of concrete structures like ports, breakwaters and piers, while improving their structural performance. They have developed a revolutionary approach to eco-engineering of coastal and marine infrastructure, providing cost-effective concrete solutions for the ever-growing global climate-change threats such as sealevel rise and superstorms. CEO Shirmrit Perkol-Finkel, says ECOncrete is excited to work with FIBA on business development, networking, and mar ket penetration in Florida. The company web address is www.econcretetech.com Nucleon This companys focus is on identifying and analyzing cyber threats. With those threats growing every day and cyber attacks becoming more common and more powerful, Nucleon hopes its innovative technology with tools built to work autonomously on the Internet, 24/7 will be the solution to Internet security. With so much activity in the Business accelerator picks 4 new Israeli companies to spread wings hereOn a tour of the University of Tampa, (L-R) Andrew Rella, CEO of ECOncrete US; sales director at UC-Care cyber security space these days, we continue to pursue companies that bring unique solutions to the cyber threat that applies to all industries. We selected Nucleon because they have shown some early traction and are exploring Florida as their base for their U.S. operation, Feinman said. The company web address is www.nucleon.sh UC-Care This company develops, manufactures, and sells two products aimed at improved detection and treatment of prostate cancer. UCCare created the Navigo System, a fusion MRI navigation system for prostate biopsies, and the SmartBx System, a prostate biopsy preserving download device. With prostate cancer being the most common cancer in men in the U.S. after skin cancer, the unique, patented and FDA-approved systems by UC-Care improve visibility and accuracy and reduce risk. UC-Care CEO Shaike Schatzberger sayd, We hope for close cooperation with the FIBA team and the Tampa community and we are very happy to start the program. The company web address is www.uc-care.com About FIBA The Florida-Israel Business Accelerator is a Florida-based business development and community engagement project designed to establish and grow successful Israeli tech ventures in the Tampa technologies that can solve busigaps for Florida corporations and provides a soft landing for companies that are ready to enter the U.S. market. FIBA offers entre preneurs strategic alignment with corporate partners, consults on product localization and expansion and provides guidance on developing go-to-market strategies. FIBA also facilitates introductions to prospective customers, strategic partners and investors and assists with sales and development of customer leads. FIBA encourages the Israeli companies to establish operations in the Tampa Bay area. For more information, go to www. FIBA.io Five teens from St. Petersburg were among 2,500 from around the world who converged on New York City on the last weekend of February at CTeens International Shabbaton. I was completely blown away. I have never experienced anything like this in my life, said Jake Weiss of St. Petersburg. Added Max Baker, another local participant, Meeting all these teens from all over the world, and they were all Jews.   Seeing how we are all connected to each otherthat was pretty cool.   The weekend was sponsored by CTeens, the Chabad Lubavitchs organization for high school students, and included a traditional Shabbat experience in the heart of Crown Heights, a Hasidic neighborhood of Brooklyn; a Torah completion ceremony in Times Square, and a performance by Jewish rapper Nissim Black and Israeli singer Gad Elbaz. The theme of the Shabbaton was to empower teens to overcome the challenges of Jewish identity in public. A tribute to the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School took place at the Closing Ceremony with the teens being urged to take on mitz vot, (acts of goodness and kindness) in honor of the lost lives. Four students from the school in Parkland and their CTeen leader, Rabbi Shaya Denburg, attended the Shabbaton. Its equally humbling and thrilling to know that we gave such an unbelievable experience to the teens, said Rabbi Alter Korf, director of CTeen of St. Petersburg.   What the teens experienced this weekend is unparalleled to any other Jewish event in the world. For more information, contact Rabbi Korf, (727) 344-4900, go to www.ChabadSP.com or email, info@chabadsp.com.St. Pete teens attend CTeens International Shabbaton who came with Rabbi Alter Korf of Chabad Jewish Center of Greater St. Petersburg for the Shabbaton in New York City, (L-R) Amy Singh, Jake Weiss, Max Baker,   Rabbi Korf, Ilan Kohan and Erin Singh.  

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Temple Ahavat Shalom Palm HarborMens Night Out: Enjoy a night out with the Brotherhood at Mugs & Jugs, 40737 U.S. Hwy 19 N., Tarpon Springs on Tuesday, March 20 at 7 p.m. Lunch n learn: Congregant Susan Segal teaches a Torah study class on Thursdays from noon to 1:15 p.m. Bring a lunch, and of course, opinions. No prior knowledge or attendance is required. The class will use the book The Torah: A Womans Commentary. Misfortune and grief: An adult education class is underway on Tuesdays at 11 a.m. with Rabbi Gary Klein focusing on misfortune and grief. He will attempt to provide tools from the social sciences and from our Jewish tradition that will help us cope with our own suffering and help us assist others in dealing with theirs. He will use, as primary text the book, Option B, by Facebook (727) 785-8811 to join. Judaism basics: An Introduction to Judaism class is offered on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. This class, taught by Rabbi Klein, is appropriate for considering adopting Judaism as their faith, and those who are already Jewish who wish to enhance their knowledge of Judaism. New students are welcome anytime. Cost is $100 per person or couPoker tourney: The Brotherhood will sponsor the 2nd Annual Texas Hold em Poker Tournament on Saturday, April 7 at 7 p.m. The evening will include food, drinks and prizes for the winners. Buy-in is $40. For more informatoion or to RSVP, contact Scott Alalof at (904) 994-3820 or visit http://ahavatshalom.org/navigation-3/ brotherhood Toddler time: There will be an hour of activities incorporating music, literacy, Judaics and snacks for children ages 1-4 on Sunday, April 8 at 10 a.m. Tots are invited to bring a special adult with them. Temple Bnai Israel ClearwaterTrivia Night: Tickets are now on sale for Trivia Night on Saturday, April 21 at 5:30 p.m. The cost is $36 for adults and $18 for kids. Tickets include dinner and two drinks. Bible study: Explore the Second Book of Samuel and discover a unique period of Jewish history. Rabbi Daniel Treiser leads the classes on Wednesdays from 7-8 p.m. There is no fee for Sunday funday: Preschoolers and their parents can enjoy playtime on Sunday, March 18 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. when the children can meet one another and engage in fun activities. Non-members are welcome. Call the temple of(727) 531-5829. Adult playtime: Play mah jongg, Mexican Train Dominoes or Bridge on Thursdays at 1 p.m. Join active seniors and play the game of your choice. Coffee and cake is served. For more information, contact Linda White at linda33217@ gmail.com or (727) 688-0626.Cong. Beth Shalom ClearwaterCultural caravan: Gather in the synagogue parking lot on Sunday, March 25 at 12:30 p.m. to carpool to an Art in Bloom presentation at the Museum of Fine Arts in downtown St. Petersburg. Dont miss the chance to see this annual collaborainspire them. All are welcome. RSVP to Martha Margolis at (727) 409-5557. Book talk: A discussion of the book The Storyteller by Jodi Picault, a story about a baker and a Nazi, will be led by Roxanna Levin on Sunday, March 18 at 10:30 in the library. Tea time: The Sisterhood will hold its Torah Fund Tea on Sunday, March 18 at 1 p.m. Talmud classes: On Mondays and most Wednesdays, explore ancient legal tradition with Dr. Priscilla Nathanson The class is open to all levels of knowledge. The Monday class is held after minyan from 10 11:15 a.m. and the WednesLox & Learn: Led by Rabbi David Weizman, explore the weekly Torah portion every Thursday following minyan. Breakfast begins at 9:45 a.m. and the study session at 10 a.m. Haftarot study: This study will be led by Johanna Bromberg in the synagogue library on Wednesday, March 21 at 10 a.m. Meditation series: Rabbi Danielle Upbin, leads a course that combines guided meditation, meets next on Thursday, March 22 at 12:30 p.m. These sessions offer the Jewish tools to nurture self-growth and spiritual awareness. New parto RSVP. Shabbat Meditation Circle: Join Rabbi Upbin for a meditative Shabbat after Haftarah on Saturday, March 24 at 11 a.m. Torah study: Take part in an interactive conversation with Jason Palmer about the weekly Torah portion, incorporating both historical and contemporary reference material, on Saturday, March 24 at 12:30 p.m. Chabad of ClearwaterModel matzah bakery: Save the date for this annual program on Sunday, March 18 at 1 p.m. Torah and tea: Rebbetzin Miriam Hodakov leads a Torah and Tea exclusively for women on Wednesdays at 11:15 a.m. There is no charge to attend. RSVP to MiriamHodakov@ gmail.com or (727) 265-2770. Pray, eat, watch video: On Sundays from 9-10 a.m., feed your body and soul with a bagel short video presentation. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome. Study groups: Probe the ideas and issues presented in each weeks Torah portion on Mondays from 7-8 p.m. The Torah studies classes offer timely lessons for living. The class is free. Tanya class: A new weekly Tanya class, A Tale of Two Souls, meets on Saturdays from 10:15-11 a.m. The Tanya offers a roadmap for emotional healthy living. The in-depth study will ask such questions as What is a soul? What is our purpose here on earth? The class is free.Temple Beth-El St. PetersburgShabbat Wonder: A program designed to engage preschool age children and their families will be held on Sunday, March 18 at 9:30 a.m. This months program is a family-friendly celebration of Passover featuring songs, crafts and treats. RSVP to Molly Auld at mollyauld@gmail.com. Mah jongg: The Sisterhood is seeking mah jongg players and teachers. Games are held on Sundays from 10 a.m. to noon in the social hall. Those interested in a little healthy competition or learning a new game should contact Lisa Kingsley at purplegypsy10@yahoo.com or (727) 422-1663. Movie time: The Seniors for Arts, Growth and Education group will meet Monday, March 19 at 11 a.m. in the all-purpose room to watch West Bank Story. The movie captures the essence of the interpersonal relationships and challenges faced in Israel in a light-hearted, yet serious manner. There will be a discussion after the movie. Lunch will be $8 if you want it supplied, or you can bring your own for free. RSVP to Pamela Siskin at prsiskin@gmail.com.Chabad of St. PetersburgWomens Book Club: Chaya Korf leads a roundtable discussion every Tuesday from 10:3011:30 a.m., about the book for this year, Towards a Meaningful Life, by Simon Jacobson. The group wi ll share strategies for not only discovering where your true meaning lies, but also in actually making it a part of your daily life. Coffee, fruit and homemade pastries will be served at these free sessions. Walk-ins are welcome. This group will not meet on March 27 or April 3. RSVP to Chaya@ ChabadSP.com. PAGE 6 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 Congregations PINELLAS COUNTYReformTemple AHAVAT SHALOM 1575 Curlew Rd., Temple BETH CHAI DAVID Temple BETH-EL Congregation BNAI EMMUNAH 57 Read Temple BNAI ISRAEL ConservativeCongregation BETH SHALOM Congregation BETH SHOLOM Congregation BNAI ISRAEL OrthodoxCHABAD of CLEARWATER CHABAD JEWISH CENTER OF GREATER ST P ETERSBURG CHABAD of PINELLAS COUNTY Road, Palm Harbor, 34683 PASCO COUNTY ConservativeBETH TEFILLAH/JCC OF WEST PASCO OrthodoxCHABAD OF WEST P ASCO HERNANDO COUNTY Reform Temple BETH DAVID Religious Directory Rabbinically Speaking Rabbinically Speaking Shabbat Candle Lighting Times The Jewish tradition has its own calendar made up of 12 months that follow the lunar calendar. Every month has not only a unique name with a unique message attached to it but also a special energy that if we plug into it can provide us with the ability to achieve something special during the 30 days of the month. The Jewish month of Nissan, which falls out in the early spring around March and April, is a space in time, within which we enter as the access to a unique energy that allows for development and growth in the sphere of freedom. Freedom from both perceived or actual inhibitions, those that exist from within or without. Inhibitions which hold us back from personal growth, happiness and being the holiest Jew we can be, especially with the incessant news cycle and addiction to social media that overwhelm us. The month of Nissan provides us with a spiritualenergy boost to overcome them, to grow and climb higher and higher. As in the days of the Exodus when G-d redeemed the Jewish People with an outstretched arm, we have By RABBI YOSSI EBER Chabad of West PascoThe Jewish month of liberationthe ability to relive that by seeing ourselves as if G-d is personally taking us out of our personal enslavement and Egypt. By connecting to G-d, the creator and sustainer of all, the provider of our life and spirit within our hearts, we are able to experience true freedom. The liberation of being whole, by being one with our very essence, our creator and life itself. preparation for its climax on Passover, the 15th day of the month. At the seder when we gather with family, friends and strangers we reenact and simultaneously relive the freedom of our ancestors and as well as our own. As Jews we are all connected and are each considered a part of the whole body. Just as the health of one limb effects the rest of the body, so to if even one Jew is not celebrating the freedom we are incomplete. Therefore we have a responsibility to look out for each other, and that is one of the ways how we achieve our personal redemption. Have a Happy and Liberating Passover. The Rabbinically Speaking column is provided as a public service by the Jewish Press. Columns are assigned on a rotating basis by the Pinellas County Board of Rabbis. The views expressed in this guest column are those of the rabbi and do not necessarily the Board of Rabbis.

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When mentioning the Dead Sea, what comes to mind surface of the sea. till this day. I was a child, maybe 4 or 5, and I had a skin condition. My parents took me and my brothers all the way from the kibbutz to the Dead Sea, about a two-hour drive just for me to get treated by the amazing minerals that the place has to offer for free. I remember going in and immediately starting to cry. All I wanted to do was mom wouldnt let me. According to my mom (to be honest, this part I dont remember), my skin condition got better and slowly disappeared from that point on. Next time I went there was as an adult, but this time I had no skin problems and I was just extremely excited such ease and I know that I wasnt the only one who felt this way. For decades no holiday in the Holy Land or Jordan has been complete without the iconic photo of the bather sitting bolt upright on the surface, usually reading a newspaper to emphasize the extraordinary properties of the water. But now, theres a threat that might harm the continuing of this tradition since the Dead Sea is gradually shrinking under the heat of the Middle Eastern sun. The Dead Sea is located in the eastern Judean Desert, at an altitude of 1,380 feet below sea level. Its name is derived from the high concentration of salt in it: about 33 percent, compared to 3 percent in the Mediterranean Sea. Its name, The Dead Sea implies that theres no life in it but it is not accurate, since it has certain forms of microbiological life blossoms. The Dead Sea is divided into two basins the northern, deeper basin, and the shallower southern basin. Until the mid-1970s, the two basins were interconnected by the Lynch Straits. Nowadays, since its all dried up it is referred to as The Lisan Peninsula, which is a large spit of land that now separates the North and the South basins of the Dead Sea. So, what are the reasons for this shrinking? In recent years, the rate of output water from the Dead Sea is increasing, more than the rate of input water. This phenomenon occurs due to two main causes. First, people have increased their water consumption for various purposes, and water sources that once reached the Dead Sea, no longer arrive. Another reason is the pumping of the northern basin water of the Dead Sea into the evaporation ponds of potash plants in Israel and in Jordan. The activity of the industrial plants contributes to an annual decline of approximately 16 inches in the Dead Sea level. Besides having to walk a longer distance from the hotel till you reach the sea, there are other crucial and dangerous implications. Not only has the decline in the sea level led to the separation of the two basins, but in fact, the southern basin is dried up. Today, the southern basin pools of the production plants. The plants pump water and transfer them to the pools of the southern basin by a canal, for evaporation of the water and mining of the quarries. About half of this water is going back to the northern basin. Another phenomenon that began to happen near the Dead Sea back in the s is the sinkholes. Sinkholes are underground pits along the shores of the Dead Sea, which result from a gradual collapse of the surface due to the dissolving of a salt layer in the ground. In the last decade, some 1,000 sinkholes have been formed along the Dead Sea coast, concentrated in about 40 sites. The sinkholes pose a danger because of the suddenness of the gap they form and because of their size: the largest measured to date has a depth of 36 feet and a circumference of 82 feet. Due to the phenomenon of sinkholes and the decline of the drainage to rivers, infrastructure and roads are damaged. In addition, springs that are located around the Dead Sea are damaged as well. These places have natural cant asset for tourists and people who come to the area for medical purposes (such as psoriasis treatment). These issues are not being unattended. In recent years, several government decisions have been made regarding the handling of issues related to the Dead Sea. The government of Israel has appropriated a 4.5 million NIS budget for research of the Dead Sea. Ways to balance between industrial activity and tourism activity are also being examined, all taking into consideration the settings of the environmental uniqueness of the region. One alternative is to form a canal all the way from the Gulf of Eilat. This requires planning, which will take several years and considerable investment. The Dead Sea is still a must-see destination for many tourists, even Conan OBrien went there for his talk newspaper. The Dead Sea, like many places around the world, is affected by human behavior, but now, thanks to technology and advanced studies, it seems we can help prevent more damage from happening than ever before. JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 Congregations Mor About Israel Mor About IsraelYAEL MORIsrael Shlicha [Emissary] Yael Mors yearlong visit to the community is sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Pinellas and Pasco Counties. She can be reached at (727) 530-3223 or by email at yael@jewishpinellas.org Moshiach meal: Join in a traditional Moshiach meal on the last day of Passover, Saturday, April 7 at 7:15 p.m. The Haftorah reading for this day describes the promised future era of universal peace and divine perfection. A meal will be served, complete with salmon, salads, wine and matzah. All are welcome and there is no charge. RSVP is appreciated at info@ ChabadSP.com. Cong. Bnai Israel St. PetersburgSunday Music Soiree: There will be a lecture and discussion with Professor Joan Epstein, chair of the Eckerd College Department of Music, accompanied by cello instructor Fred Gratta, on Sunday, March 18 at 10 a.m. Engage in a discussion about the Jewish connections behind Max Bruchs Kol Nidre. RSVP to Maureen Sechan at dll@cbistpete.org or call the synagogue. This is part of the Kavanah Lifelong Learning series and is free and open to the community. Passover BBQ: Leave the Passover cooking to someone else for the night at CBIs annual Passover BBQ hosted by the Mitzvah Mens Club on Wednesday, April 4 at 6p.m. On the menu are hot dogs, hamburgers and chicken or grilled vegetables. Sides include garden salad, potatoes, all the matza you can eat, assorted condiments, dessert and beverages. Cost is $20 per adult, $10 per child. RSVP to Alan Gross at (727) 327-0100 by Friday, March 30. Walk-in availability will be limited. Talmud Made Easy: On Tuesdays, at 5 p.m., Steve Wein will lead a study of Talmudic text and selected commentaries. All materials will be provided. The class involves textual analysis, lively discussion 381-4900 or info@cbistpete.org for details. Dialogue with the rabbi: Come prepared on Saturday, March 24 at 9 a.m. with your best questions about Jewish life and religious practice for a Dialogue with the Rabbi. Stay after services for lunch and join a monthly Torah discussion facilitated by members of the congregation. Port RicheyUnderstanding prayer: A class focused on the history, meaning, and relevance of Shabbat service prayers meets on Wednesdays through May at 7 p.m. Knowledge of Hebrew is not required. There is no fee, and all are welcome.Chabad of West PascoFor the kids: There are arts and crafts and Jewish learning for children 5-10 on Mondays from 5-6 p.m. On March 30, the topic will be Shabbat. For more information go to www.chabadwp.org or call (727) 376-3366. Classes with the rabbi: Rabbi Yossi Eber will teach classes on Mondays at 7 p.m. The classes alternate between Torah study and the Tanya. Pray, eat, watch video: On Sundays from 9-10 a.m., feed your body and soul with a bagel and lox plus tation. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome. Tanya class: A new weekly Tanya class, A Tale of Two Souls, meets on Saturdays from 10:15-11 a.m. The Tanya offers a roadmap for emotional healthy living. The in-depth study will ask such questions as What is a soul? What is our purpose here on earth? The class is free.Temple Beth David Spring HillFood Festival: The Sisterhood of Temple Beth David will hold its annual Jewish Food Festival on Sunday, March 18 from noon to 4 p.m. The menu will include blintzes, chopped liver, knishes, kugel, matzo ball soup, latkes and stuffed cabbage. There also will be lots of bake shop goodies. Dont miss out on vendors, childrens activities and more. For more information, call (352) 592-4930. Torah study: Rabbi Paul Schreiber conducts Torah study classes on Mondays at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Free for members and $5 per class for nonmembers. Judaism class: A free Judaism conversion class will be held on Saturdays at 1 p.m., conducted by Rabbi Schreiber. Talmud for beginners: This class, already under way, is held every Wednesday at 8 p.m., except for the third Wednesday of the month. It is free for members and $5 per class for non-members.Chabad of Spring HillTorah studies: The community is invited to attend Torah study classes,on Wednesdays from noon to 1 p.m. The classes, taught by Rabbi Chaim Lipszyc, are not sequential, so drop-ins are welcome. Bagesl For more information, call Ro Kerschner at (352) 746-6258.The Dead Sea: Its problems are more than skin deep A view of the Dead Sea, showing how its receded. COMMUNITY SEDER LISTINGS, See Page 15

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PAGE 8 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 Authentic Middle Eastern Cuisine With a Modern Flair! 727.498.8627 MEZE119.COM 119 2nd Street North, St. PeteInvite us to your simcha, well bring the food! Our catering services can be customized to suit all of your needs.SUNDAY THURSDAY: 11 AM 9 PM FRIDAY SATURDAY: 11 AM 10 PMHeartfelt thanks from the Hershkowitz Family, for all of your ongoing support Serving Tampa Bays Best Kosher-Style Dairy Mediterranean-Inspired Cuisine. Nearly 80 were part of the action at Chabad of Clearwaters Purim in the Stadium. A baseball throwing speed cage, a basketball free throw competition and a visit from Tampa Bay Lightning Mascot ThunderBug kept young and old entertained. Photos by Douglas R. CliffordChabad of Clearwater Menachem Mendel Hodakov meets the Lightnings ThunderBug. Batya Amnony and Jayla Teshouva enjoy snow cones. Purim in picturesThe Hodakov team: Rabbi Levi and Rebbetzin Miriam Hodakov and their children.Photos by Hannah HartungChabad of Greater St. Petersburg (L-R) Adam Esquer and Rabbi Alter Korf The Sorkin family (L-R) Mitch, Richard and Liliana Rabbi Alter Korf reads the megillah at Freedom Square senior residence with the assistance of an animated version of the Book of Esther.Following the megillah reading and dinner, a Jews in Sports video was shown.Federation and Cong. Beth Tellah/ JCC of West Pasco celebrate Purim The Jewish Federation of Pinellas and Pasco Counties teamed up JCC of West Pasco in Port Richey for a Purim celebration on Sunday, March 4. With over 60 people in attendance, ranging in age from 1 years old to 90, the festivities included a bounce house, huge ga-ga ball pit, face painting, carnival games, and crafts. The congregation provided a costume boutique for those who needed help with their disguise. Lots of hamantashen were consumed. The event culminated in a traditional Purim costume parade and contest. Purim is the perfect holiday to reach out to members of our Pasco County community who may not know that the Federation is here for them. said Maxine Kaufman, Director of Arts and Culture at the Federation. Eileen Hochstadt, president of a success, proven by the miles of smiles on all the kinders faces as they bounced in the bouncy house, putted at the miniature golf game, dripped jelly on their creative Purim costumes from the delicious hamantaschen they gobbled down. Congregation President Eileen Hochstadt in costume. Winners of the costume contest Gauge Goldberg, Starla Goldberg and Isabella Cascone The Land family dressed up for PurimI am proud to have been part of this wonderful day.

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 9 MARCH 9 22, 2018 This coupon is not valid in combination with any other coupon, special, promotional offer or team member discount. Coupon only valid at the Whole Foods Market Carrollwood, Clearwater and Tampa locations. No duplications, copies, facsimiles or mobile coupons will be accepted. This coupon may not be used towards the purchase of a Whole Foods Market Gift Card. No cash value. Please, only one coupon per household per day. Coupon good for $10 off total one-time purchase of $50 or more. Coupon valid through 4/8/2018. Register at www.pmdalliance.org or 800.256.0966. For people impacted by PARKINSONS Learn. Live. Connect. Parkinsons ConferenceJoin us to learn more about Parkinsons disease research, medications, and treatments.555 N Westshore Blvd, Tampa, FL 33609 Prof. Freda DeKeyser Ganz, a Hadassah nurse from Israel, was the keynote speaker at a recent program presented by the St. Petersburg, Lylah, North Pinellas and Tampa Ameet chapters of Hadassah. She presented a historical look at nursing and healthcare in Israel. In addition, the attendees recognized the nurses who were present, (L-R) Front row : Nancy Rapoport, National Nurses Council co-chair; Laura Freed, Alice Ettinger, Sabrina Smith; Back row: Susan Lafer, National Nurses Council co-chair, Linda Reimer, Shelley Gars, Prof. Freda DeKeyser Ganz, guest speaker; Sally Nurses honored High school and college-aged students interested in attending programs in Israel that will strengthen their knowledge of Judaism and Israeli culture are encouraged to apply for a scholarship administered by the Tampa Orlando Pinellas Jewish Foundation (TOP). Last summer, four individuals from Pinellas and Hillsborough counties received scholarships to attend programs in Israel through the help of the Stevan and Marilyn Simon Family Scholarship Endowment Fund. Students attended diverse programs such as the Young Judaea WUJS, Ramah Israel Seminar, Onward Israel Hillel International Internship, and USY Eastern Europe Israel Pilgrimage. TOP administers the funds annual scholarship process, working closely with Simon family members on the Scholarship Committee through the application process. These experiences were possible because of the vision of the late Stevan and Marilyn Simon, who created a legacy to perpetuate Judaism in the Diaspora. Arielle Radin, originally from Seminole, received a Simon scholarship to participate in a Young Judaea internship last summer in Tel Aviv. I learned about my Jewish identity, my peoples history in the land of Israel, and strengthened my connection to Jewish young adults around the world. Not only was I able to delve deep into my spirituality and culture, but also make great strides in professional development through my research internship at a Neuroimmunology Laboratory at Tel Aviv University, said Radin. Karen Stanley, Stevan and Marilyn Simons granddaughter, who sits on the scholparents legacy. My grandparents believed that it was their responsibility and privilege to continue giving back to the State of Israel and the Jewish community at large, Stanley said. They wanted to help future generations to know their heritage, appreciate their history, and reinforce their Jewish identity. Upon the scholarship recipients return from Israel, it was my grandparents hope that the students continue to give back and share their experiences, thereby furthering the impact to the Jewish community at large. Interested individuals should visit the Scholarships section of TOPs website, www.topjewishfoundation.org, for an application. The application deadline is March 30. For additional information, contact Ellen Weiss at Ellen@topjewishfoundation. org. About TOP tions since 1980, TOP Jewish Foundation manages a portfolio of $50m and has distributed over $100 million to Jewish and TOPs Simon Scholarship Fund sends teens and young adults to Israel; seeks 2018 applicantsU.S. Representatives Charlie Crist (DSt. Petersburg) and Mike Johnson (R-LA) introduced the United States-Israel Joint Drone Detection Cooperation Act on Feb. 27, legislation establishing a strategic partnership between the United States and Israel to combat drone attacks from Iran and other adversaries. The bill is meant to increase research initiatives between the two countries. The impetus for the bill is the Iranian launch of a drone from Syria into Israel airspace for 90 seconds before being shot cials stated that the unmanned aerial vehicle was an advanced piece of technology. Representatives Crist and Johnson want the ability to keep tabs on that kind of technology and study how it can be used against the U.S. and Israel to prepare for any future incidents. In the face of this new and growing threat, we have the opportunity to share our U.S. and Israeli security, said Crist. We call on Congress to act swiftly and strongly to fend off Iranian aggression and that of other adversaries in the region. As of last week, the bill was included in the more comprehensive U.S.-Israeli Secuby Florida Representatives Ileana RosLehtinen (R-Miami) and Ted Deutch (DBoca Raton). of supplying funds to Israel for enhanced security projects, legislation that was put in place under the Obama administration in 2016. Under the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. and Israel, the U.S. has committed to allot $3.8 billion a year for 10 years to help Israel combat rising security threats in the region. Florida Representatives Stephanie Murphy (D-Winter Park) and Brian Mast (RHutchinson Island) also introduced a bill, Deterring and Defeating Rocket and Missile Threats to Israel Act on Feb. 28, which above the $3.8 billion a year cap put forth in the Memorandum of Understanding, if Israels security needs warrant it, and it turns the memorandum into law. U.S. House members from Florida show bipartisan support for Israel in proposed legislation(JTA ) The U.S. Holocaust Memorial and Museum in Washington, D.C.has rescinded a human rights award it gave to Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the former political prisoner and democracy activist and now the civilian leader of Myanmar. The museum said it is taking back the Elie Wiesel Award given in 2012 because of what it calls Aung San Suu Kyis failure to oppose the ethnic cleansing and possible genocide of Myanmars Rohingya minority. We had hoped that you as someone we and many others have celebrated for your commitment to human dignity and universal human rights would have done something to condemn and stop the militarys brutal campaign and to express solidarity with the targeted Rohingya population, read the museums letter to Aung San Suu Kyi sent March 7. The letter charges that her party has instead refused to cooperate with United Nations investigators, promulgated hateful rhetoric against the Rohingya community, and denied access to and cracked down on journalists trying to uncover the scope of the crimes in Rakhine State. Aung San Suu Kyi was the second person to receive the Elie Wiesel Award, after only Wiesel himself. Named after the late Holocaust survivor and author who won the genocide and advanced human dignity. Its most recent recipient is German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Aung San Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest for 15 years for opposing the countrys military dictatorship. She was internationally celebrated during that time as a pro-democratic icon. In 2015, as part of Myanmars transition to democracy, she was elected state counselor, a position akin to prime minister. for failing to speak out and oppose the countrys military campaign against the Rohingya, a persecuted Muslim minority in Myanmar. The military has killed thousands of Rohingya and forced an approximate The New York Times. The military has burned their villages and buried the dead in mass graves. The Holocaust museum encouraged Aung San Suu Kyi to cooperate with U.N. efforts to examine and prevent the campaign, and rights, which they do not have.Museum strips Myanmar leader of Elie Wiesel Award

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PAGE 10 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANY Wednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the film HEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLD Thursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10 LONGING Thursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature Audience SAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE ME Thursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 THE LAST SUIT Thursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership with BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY Thursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 THE CAKEMAKER Friday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the film IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership with THE TESTAMENT Saturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 AND THEN SHE ARRIVED Thursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature Audience BUDAPEST NOIR Friday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceTHE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the filmBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership withTO SUPPORT THE TBJFF, VISIT TBJFF.ORG BOX OFFICE OPENS ONE HOUR PRIOR TO SHOWTIMETAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL GREAT FILMS. BUT JEWISH-ER. OPENING NIGHT EVENT MARCH 21FILMS SHOWING IN TAMPA BAY THROUGH MARCH 25FOR FILM & TICKET INFO VISIT TBJFF.ORG OR CALL 813.769.4725 Sponsors as of 2-6-18 THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 Sponsors as of 2 16 18DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content CELEBRATING 22 YEARS IN FILM MARCH 20-25, 2018 TAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVALFEATURED AT THE SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION GASPARILLA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Herman Forbes Charitable Trust JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATIONTampaSara and David Scher AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FAMILY FILM AWARD

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MARCH 9 22, 2018 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 11 OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the film IN BETWEEN Saturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content SCANDAL IN IVANSK Sunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per person ITZHAK Sunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAEL Sunday, March 25 | 4:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10 THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUER Sunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership with THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMAS Sunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content AN ISRAELI LOVE STORY Saturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content OPENING NIGHT EVENT BYE BYE GERMANYWednesday, March 21 Cocktail Hour | 6:00 PM Theater Doors Open | 7:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Ballroom Running Time 102 minutes | Genre Narrative Year 2017 | Language German, English with Subtitles Admission $36 | Includes Hors doeuvres, Cocktails and Dessert Reception following the filmHEATHER BOOTH: CHANGING THE WORLDThursday, March 22 | 6:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 An open discussion with Heather Booth immediately following the film Running Time 60 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission $10LONGINGThursday, March 22 | 8:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceSAMMY DAVIS JR.: IVE GOTTA BE METhursday, March 22 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 100 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10THE LAST SUITThursday, March 22 | 7:00 PM Central Park Performing Arts Center A Mens Club Special Engagement Running Time 86 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Spanish, German, Polish, Yiddish with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Dessert Reception following the film In Partnership withBOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORYThursday, March 22 | 1:00 PM Carrollwood Villagio Cinemas Running Time 90 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AND THEN SHE ARRIVEDThursday, March 22 | 11:00 AM Carollwood Villagio Cinemas Friday, March 23 | 11:00 AM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 104 minutes Genre Romantic Comedy, Family Year 2017 | Language Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Mature AudienceTHE CAKEMAKERFriday, March 23 | 1:30 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language German, Hebrew with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Includes Cake & Coffee after the filmBUDAPEST NOIRFriday, March 23 | 4:00 PM AMC Classic Palm Harbor 10 Friday, March 23 | 5:00 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 95 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2017 Language Hungarian with English Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content IN BETWEENSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language Arabic, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult ContentSCANDAL IN IVANSKSunday, March 25 | 10:45 AM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 78 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10 Kosher Chinese Buffet Lunch before the film Sunday, March 25 | 12:00 1:00 PM $12 per personITZHAKSunday, March 25 | 2:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 83 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English, Hebrew with Subtitles Admission $10HEADING HOME: THE TALE OF TEAM ISRAELSunday, March 25 | 4:00 PMBryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2Q&A with surprise guests from Team Israel and Israel Baseball, including the Arizona Diamondbacks Scout and architect of Team Israels roster, Alex Jacobs. Moderated by Jonathan Mayo, MLB.coms draft and prospect expert | 5:30 PM Running Time 85 minutes | Genre Documentary Year 2017 | Language English Admission: Children $5 | Adults $10THE PEOPLE VS. FRITZ BAUERSunday, March 25 | 6:00 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 1 Running Time 105 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2015 Language English, German, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 In Partnership withTO SUPPORT THE TBJFF, VISIT TBJFF.ORG BOX OFFICE OPENS ONE HOUR PRIOR TO SHOWTIMETAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL GREAT FILMS. BUT JEWISH-ER. OPENING NIGHT EVENT MARCH 21FILMS SHOWING IN TAMPA BAY THROUGH MARCH 25FOR FILM & TICKET INFO VISIT TBJFF.ORG OR CALL 813.769.4725 Sponsors as of 2-6-18 THE TESTAMENTSaturday, March 24 | 7:30 PM AMC Classic Centro Ybor 10 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2018 Language English, German, Hebrew, Yiddish with Subtitles Admission $10 Sponsors as of 2 16 18 DREAMING OF A JEWISH CHRISTMASSunday, March 25 | 1:30 PM Bryan Glazer Family JCC Theater 2 Running Time 52 minutes Genre Documentary | Year 2017 Language English Admission $10AN ISRAELI LOVE STORYSaturday, March 24 | 9:30 PM AMC Sundial 20 Running Time 96 minutes Genre Narrative | Year 2016 Language English, Hebrew, Arabic with Subtitles Admission $10 | Adult Content CELEBRATING 22 YEARS IN FILM MARCH 20-25, 2018TAMPA BAY JEWISH FILM FESTIVALFEATURED AT THE SUNCOAST CREDIT UNION GASPARILLA INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL Herman Forbes Charitable Trust JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS & FEDERATION Tampa Sara and David Scher AUDIENCE CHOICE AWARD FAMILY FILM AWARD

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PAGE 12 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY MENORAH MANOR JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 9 FEBRUARY 23 MARCH 8, 2017 www.menorahmanor.org (727) 345-2775 Two Menorah Manor employees received the CNA and LPN Awards of Excellence at the Florida Association Directors of Nursing Administration (FADONA) 31st Annual Conference. The awards, which were presented during the organizations awards banquet at the Hilton Daytona Beach Oceanfront Resort on February 7, recognize certied nursing assistants (CNAs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) who demonstrate exceptional commitment to their profession and the residents they serve. Sadeta Kabilovic received 1st place for the CNA Award of Excellence, and Annette Jackson received 2nd place for the LPN Award of Excellence. Sadeta and Annette are dedicated and compassionate individuals who go above and beyond for our residents, said Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer of Menorah Manor. They are always striving to provide the best care possible, and it shows.Menorah Manor Wins Two Nursing Awards at Annual FADONA ConferenceOn Monday, February 19th, Menorah Manor donors and Trustees gathered together to celebrate the rededication of a beautiful donor recognition wall that is now located in the Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence. Menorah Manor Chair Barry Kanner, whose parents lived in the Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence, gave a heartfelt welcome at the gathering. I know rsthand that Toby Weinman is a truly special place where the residents are cared for and loved, and I couldnt be happier that this magnicent donor wall has landed here, he said. The gathering also included messages from Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer; Dell Krug, Menorah Manor former Board Chair; and guests of honor Beverly and Chip Weinman.Rob Goldstein, chief executive ofcer of Menorah Manor, speaks to donors and Trustees at the rededication gathering.Menorah Manor Celebrates Donor Wall Rededication (L-R) Beverly and Chip Weinman speak to donors and trustees at the rededication gathering. The Toby Weinman Assisted Living Residence is named in memory of Chip Weinmans mother, Toby. (L-R): Chief Executive Ofcer Rob Goldstein poses with award winners Sadeta Kabilovic and Annette Jackson during a celebration at Menorah Manor. WORDShe tossed out, 48 percent trust the Palestinian government more than the Israeli government, and 54 percent are not sure if Hamas is a terrorist organization. The hottest debate to sway minds for or against Israel or Palestine seems to be on college campuses, Luntz said. It is the job of all to stand up for Israel and for the older adults to teach Millennials the right words and phrases. The point is to use to engage ways to have a reasoned discussion and ultimately change hateful attitudes. Luntz used a power point presentation and urged all to take notes as he began with What Millennials Want to Hear: principal. street. national solution. and we both must learn to live together. social justice, equality and fairness. When pro-Palestinians speak on campus, there is a lot of shouting and hatred expressed, but Luntz said if you argue with them, you will not change their hearts. If you engage with them with respect and a willingness to listen to their views, they may return the respect and listen to yours, he said. He acknowledged that life is miserable for many Palestinians, many live in abject poverty and are taught hatred of Jews from an early age. But Luntz noted points of common ground, where pro-Israelis can agree that No child deserves to live like this. He advised to steer clear of religious/biblical arguments. Be the smartest voice in the room, not the loudest, Luntz said, adding that listening is often more important than speaking. He said folks should not argue over the problems, but look for solutions and ask rhetorical questions that bring people into a conversation. Using phrases like I hear you or I get it also foster better dialogue. Luntz also suggested people learn about their audience before they speak and cited examples of words or phrases that resonate more or less with people depending on party evokes more positive reactions from Republicans than Democrats and the phrase protect human rights resonates more with Democrats. cussion, not isolation and ignorance. effort, not hate and hysteria. tions from the audience and when asked about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netahyahu, he predicted he will be re-elected, and indicted. He warned about the trend by Netanyahu and President Donald Trump to demonize the media and said the world needs a strong fourth estate. He also bemoaned the lack of tolerance in our society, saying it is growing worse, not better. The most important thing I can say to you is if we lose our tolerance, we lose our freedom. He said he is scared by the attacks on agreements are inevitable, but people need to return to speaking out with respect and decency. Given his history of conducting political polls, Luntz was asked about future election, he said in coming elections the two groups he will watch closely to see how they will vote are folks who make their livings by their hands folks who largely voted for group that largely shifted from Democrat to Republican in the last presidential election. He said that group loves the tax cuts and demeanor and tweets, so it will be interesting to see what sways them. man Douglas shootings are bringing us to a will happen this time. It may not be the change you want, though.

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 13 MARCH 9 22, 2018Potato LatkeLees Travel Park Keith A. Warshofsky, P.A. Englander Family Hillel Academy of Tampa Scott & Marcy Daniels Coldwell Banker Real Estate Menorah ManorKasha KnishTodd & Shelia Siegel Preserve of Clearwater Melitta Coffee Coffee Sponsor Dr. Jeffrey Ellenberg Family Dentistry Dr. Brett Finkelstein, Animal Assoc. & Highland Animal Hospital IN KIND SPONSORS SUNDAY2018FEB. 25thTEMPLE BNAI ISRAELCLEARWATER10:00AM-3PM THE TAM PA B AY TEMPLE BNAI ISRAELRabbi Daniel Treiser Cantorial Soloist Laura Berkson 1685 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33764 727.531.5829www.TBIclearwater.orgVOLUNTEERSSeeded RyeBruce & Joan Levine Countryside Foot & Ankle Mark Wall Hill Ward Henderson THANK YOUSSPONSORS Deli MasterJewishtFederationtoftPinellast&tPascotCounty Big SchmearArthur Rutenberg Homes Everything BagelJonathan Morgan Facial Aesthetics Center Toasted BialyBruce H. Bokor, Esq. and Joan M. Vecchioli, Esq. of Johnson Pope Bokor Ruppel & Burns, LLP TBI Brotherhood Dr. Shawn Hollander Safety Harbor Optical Judith & Barry Alpert Drs. Jay & Sandy Epstein Gulf Wind Homes Michael A. Hano Family Foundation Brian Rolfe The Rolfe Group of Wells Fargo Robert Weinstock The Eye Institute of West Florida Bash Entertainment Brooklyn Knish Chai Notes Klezmer Band Gulf Port Sr. Citizens Harmonica Club Jewish Press Jo-Els Kosher Deli Johnnys Restaurant Kevin Schauer Lennys Restaurant Mana Mana Restaurant Marcia & Mitchell Miller Sheila & Ron Miller Shlomo Schwersky Sunday Simcha Three Daughters Brewery Rick Weil Event Signs Thank You to ALL our Sponsors and Volunteers whose generosity and efforts ensured GREAT SUCCESS!Eric Adler Gloria Adler Terry Adler Judith Alpert Barry Alpert Devani Alpert Gregg Bachman Dave Backhaut Signe Backhaut Barbara Baughman Vivian Benci Raymond Bishop Katie Blaxberg Ira Blumstein Vivian Blumstein Joanne Bokor Shirley Botkin Dani Brahm Kevin Brahm Melissa Brahm Fran Brickman Joe Brickman Joel Broida Sandi Broida Warren Buchholz Rick Buchwalter Rosemary Buchwalter Wendy Capelin Ray Cepko Rachel Cepko Lisa Cercek Pam Cody Paulette Cohen Ali Curtis Marcy Daniels Scott Daniels Ruth Dobkin Barry Debowsky Helene Debowsky Yael Ellis Jessi Englehard Andrea Feldman Richard Feldman Linda Fine Brett Finkelstein SHARON FINKELSTEIN Barb Fox Greg Fox Dani Gamson Stan Ginsberg Joyce Golden Eileen Gomory Pamela Granoff Julian Greengold Liz Greengold Paul Gross Joel Gurian Lisa Harris Willie Harris Hiliary Hemmins Bonnie Hertzberg Audrey Hollander Shawn Hollander Shelly Johnson Marianne Kaufman Barbara Kessler Denise Kirschbaum Amy Klein Judy Klein Barry Kraus Polly Kraus Bob Kunkis Lois Kunkis Madeline Leone Richard Leone Saul Lerner Bruce Levine Bob Levine Debra Levine Joan Levine Zach Levine Bernice Lipman Lore Lynn Evan Madow Kathy Madow Lenny Mankin Leslie Mankin Lynda McBrayer Stephanie Messler Elaine Miller Lisa Miller Sheila Miller Bob Mintz Carolyn Mintz Roberta Mockenstrum Margaret Morgan Sarah Ellis Morgan Enid Newmark Scott Newmark Allison North Jay North Jennifer Palmer Genia Pandorf Warren Pandorf Ellen Petracco Jeff Petracco Carolann Parker Van Cleve Carolee Pezzuti Robin Post Carol Rael Judy Resnick Howard Rodetsky Irene Rodnizki Jorge Rodnizki Brian Rolfe Kelli Rolfe Sheila Rolfe Ron Rosenbaum Karen Roth Mara Roth Mike Roth Debbie Segal William Segal Lynne Safriel Rachel Safriel Andy Salzman Bernie Sapperstein Marilyn Sapperstein Ben Schaffer Ceril Shagrin Iris Shalit Rick Siegel Shelia Siegel Lisa Singer Marci Sperber Matt Sperber Vicki Stewart Sandi Sunter Pete Tanner Sherrie Teddy Becca Teider Rachel Treiser Stefanie Von Harten Joan Vecchioli Michael Vereb Stacey Vereb Sarah Von Harten Brian Wachtler Sue Wall Keith Warshofsky Dan Warshofsky Nina Warshofsky Randell Weinberg Jean Weisman Adrienne Weiss Alex Weiss Linda White Sherri Young Faidra Zeldin Felice Zeldin Lloyd ZeldinNames in bold served as committee chairsany names omitted were by error...we thank you too Save the Date for the 3rd Annual Event Feb. 24, 2019

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PAGE 14 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 Israel Bonds honoreesPhoto by Peter Halmagyi At Israel Bonds annual International Prime Ministers Club Dinner in Miami Beach on Feb. 11, the Tampa Bay honorees were Rabbi Jacob Luski and his wife Joanne, of Congregation Bnai Israel in St. Petersburg. From left are Israel Bonds President and CEO Israel Maimon, Rabbi Luski, Joanne Luski, Finance Minister of Israel Moshe Kahlon and Israel Bonds Board Chairman Richard L. Hirsch. The Luskis were presented with the Israel70 award for their commitment and dedication to Israel and Jewish causes. They joined 18 others receiving the award, representing Dallas, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Miami, New Orleans, Cleveland, Boca Raton, Mexico City, Beverly Hills, CA; Chicago and Washington, D.C. Israel bond investments attributable to the dinner totaled $265 million.HEDY LAMARRONTINUED from FRONT PAGE and achievements alongside her frustrations and failures. The documentary, which screens March 22 as part of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival, is most fascinating when it shifts from Lamarrs ambivalence toward Hollywood glamour to her wartime invention of a secure communication system. The beloved daughter of a Jewish banker, Hedy had a comfortable childhood before gravitating to the theater and movies. Fleeing a youthful marriage to a Jewish fascist who made arms for the Nazis, as well as the gathering storm in Europe, she purchased passage on an ocean liner. Aboard ship, she parlayed her bravado and striking good looks into an introduction to MGM executives and, eventually, studio mogul Louis B. Mayer in Los Angeles. in a very similar fashion, on a boat where he met someone from Samuel Goldwyns shop and ended up in Hollywood and it saved his life, Dean said in an interview last summer when Bombshell screened at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival. He became a very powerful individual, and he did not like having been victimized by the Nazis and he kind of whitewashed that entire episode in his life. He didnt think of himself as a victim and he didnt want to think of his family or his tribe as victims, so being Jewish was a complicated thing for him. Dean, a journalist who produced newsmagazine segments for Bill Moyers and PBS and documentaries for Bloomberg as well as Businessweek magazine, saw in Lamarr a similar ground or circumstances. She also had the same kind of complicated relationship with being a woman, Dean asserts. She wanted to be Louis B. Mayer, she wanted to be Cecil B. DeMille. She didnt want to identify as a woman and she didnt want to identify as a Jew. Of course, it creates a schism in your psyche. It means your roots are cut off from you, and in some rootless. And what does that do to Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. [ ]Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible.Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. Support Our Advertisers!They help make the Jewish Press possible. you? I think if you dont understand her relationship with being Jewish you dont understand why she was such a broken person. Dean asserts that Lamarrs Jewishness was directly related to her development of a system for ships to communicate that the Nazis couldnt jam, an invention the Navy rejected during World War II but later proved valuable. The actress wasnt allowed to be open about her identity in her day job because Mayer believed that audiences wouldnt fantasize a base but key aspect of moviegoing about a Jew. At the same time, the Nazis were blowing up ships in the Atlantic with European Jewish children. Oh, and Lamarrs mother still needed to get to America. The mother converted to Catholicism in 1938 in Vienna, and Dean had assumed that her motivation was to make it easier to escape the Nazis. Then she discovered a letter that Hedy had written saying, Please do this for me, because I in Hollywood. The psychological effect of Lamarrs subterfuge mingled with her sorrow for the destruction calculate, but it subsequently manifested itself in the insistence to her children that she wasnt Jewish. In fact, Dean was compelled to confront Lamarrs offspring with their grandfathers death certificate, evidence of his burial in a Jewish cemetery and, of course, their grandmothers conversion papers. Deans greatest challenge in Bombshell was conveying Lamarrs many contradictions: strength and shallowness, altruism and cruelty, desire and despair. The unexpected yet utterly relevant in its portrayal of a woman stymied in her efforts to win respect on her terms. People are very quick to dislike Hedy Lamarr, Dean says. It appalled me, and made me extremely sad that people wouldnt give her any leeway to express herself. So I struggled to give her enough of a leash, in the way that she described herself and interacted with other people, that people would understand her and allow her to be a complicated person but still like her.

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 15 MARCH 9 22, 2018 Bnai Mitzvah Lenny s Lenny s 21220 U.S. 19 NorthJust south of Drew St. and north of S.R. 60727.799.0402Curing hunger...one meal at a time for 30+ yearsHome of the almighty danish basket!Best Breakfast in Clearwater! s Serving Breakfast & Lunch Anytime 6am 3pm ~ 7 days a week Jewish-style deli & much more! MATZAH BALLS, BASEBALL for more than 3 decades ST. PETERS BURGFirst Night CHABAD JEWISH CENTER OF ST. PETERSBURG, 4010 Park St., St. Petersburg, will hold a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 7:15 p.m. The family friendly Seder will include hand-baked matzah. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Cost is $50 per adult, $30 for children 3-12. After March 20 cost will be $55 per adult; children, $36 To RSVP, call (727) 3444900, or go online at www.ChabadSP.com. CONGREGATION BNAI ISRAEL, 300 58th St. N., St. Petersburg, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 6 p.m., led by Rabbi Jacob Luski and Cantor Jonathan Schultz. Traditional, kosher Seder foods will be served with a vegetarian option avaialable. Cost is $54 for adults; $18 for children 12 and under. Reservations are required by March 23 to Pam Askin at (727) 381CONGREGATION BETH SHOLOM OF GULFPORT, 1844 54th St. S., Gulfport, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30, at 6 p.m. The Seder will include a kosher for Passover meal. Cost for adult members is $45, non-members, $50; children under 12, $22.50. To RSVP call, Joan Chase at (727) 733-7771. CL EAR WA TERFirst Night CHABAD OF CLEAR WA TER will hold a First Night Seder at the Tabacinic Chabad Center, 2280 Belleair Road, Clearwater, on Friday, March 30 at 7:15 p.m., hosted by Rabbi Levi and Rebbetzin Miriam Hodakov. Open to the community, the Seder will include handmade Shmura Matzah and a traditional Pesach meal. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Cost is $40 per adult; $20 for children 3-12; sponsorships are available, $360. After March 25, cost will be $50 per adult. To RSVP, call (727) 265-2770 or go to www.JewishClearwater.com. CONGREGATION BETH SHALOM, 1325 S. Belcher Road, Clearwater, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 6:30 p.m. Rabbi David Weizman and Rabbi Danielle Upbin will lead the Seder. Cost is $50 per adult, $18 per child (12 and under) RSVP by March www.cbsclearwater.org. Second Night TEMPLE B NAI ISRAEL 1685 S. Belcher Road, Clearwater, will hold a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31, at 5 p.m. The Seder will include a catered traditional Passover dinner. Reservations are required. Cost for members is $25 for adults, $18 for children; nonmembers are $35 for adults and $28 for children. RSVP, CommunitytPassovertSedersInformation received as of press time:PALM HA RBORFirst Night TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM, 1575 Curlew Road, Palm Harbor, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30. Led by Rabbi Gary Klein, the Seder will begin at 6 p.m. Open to the community, the cost for members and their guests is: adults, $40; children 12 and under, $20; non-members: adults, $50; children, $30. RSVP required. Call (727) 785-8811 for more information or for reservations. CHABAD OF PINELLAS COUNTY, 3696 Fisher Road, Palm Harbor, will hold a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. The family friendly Seder will include a traditional Pesach dinner. Cost is $50 per adult, $25 for children. Reservations are required, call (727) 789-0408 or online at yichabad.com/Seder yichabad.com. PASCO COUNTYFirst Night CHABAD OF WEST P ASCO, 10733 Maple Creek Drive, Suite 101, will host a First Night Seder on Friday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. The family friendly Seder will include a traditional Pesach dinner. Open to the community, reservations are necessary as space is limited. Cost is; adults, $36 and children, 4-11, $25. After March 20, cost will be $45 per person. To RSVP call (727) 376-3366 or online at 222.ChabadWP.com. Second Night CONGREGATION BETH TEFILLAH/JCC OF WEST PASCO, 9841 Scenic Drive, Port Richey, will host a Second Night Seder on Saturday, March 31 at 6:30 p.m. Reservations are required. Cost for members, $36, nonmembers, $50. Children under 13 are free. For more information and to RSVP, call (727) 847-3814. HERNANDO COUNTYFirst Night CHABAD SPRING HILL, 13576 Hunters Point St., Spring Hill, will host a traditional Seder, on Friday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. Cost for members: adults, $25; children, $18; family, $65; sponsor, $360. RSVP (352) 600-2779, or ChabadSpringHill.com.TAMPASecond Night The 20S/30S CONNECTION group will hold a Multimedia Interactive Young Adult Seder Experience on Saturday, March 31 at 8 p.m. at Congregation Schaarai Zedek, 3303 W. Swann Ave. The cost is $20 per person and reservations are a must. This event is for those 21-39 years old. For questions contact Lindsey 221, RSVP at www.zedek.org/20s30s. 727.279.5415 20SHEKELS.COM1877 DREW STREET, CLEARWATER Visit us on both sides of the Bay Shipping and Gift Wrapping Available Hyde Park Village St. Petersburg 1619 W Snow Circle Tampa, FL 33606 813.831.2111 Shabbat Candlesticks Hamsa Necklace 300 Beach Drive NE St. Petersburg, FL 33701 727.894.2111 www.shapirogallery.com You can also shop online! Corey Mitchell Roos, son of Wendy and Larry Roos of Odessa, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, March 17 at Temple Ahavat Shalom in Palm Harbor. A seventh-grade honors student at Walker Middle Magnet School, Corey plays the bass clarinet and recently participated in the All County Band. Active in tennis, Corey also enjoys playing chess and cooking. For his mitzvah project Corey is a volunteer at St. Francis Cat Rescue at Petsmart. He also enjoys being a camper in the summer at Six Points Sci-Tech Camp in Massachusetts. Wendy and Larry Roos will host a celebration at Ruth Eckerd Hall on Saturday, March 17. Special guests will include Deanna and Ed Roos from West Palm Beach.Corey Mitchell Roos Jake MandellJake Mandell, son of DeeDee and Eric Mandell of St. Petersburg, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, March 17 at Temple Beth-El in St. Petersburg. Jake is a seventh-grade student at Walden Miderman and is a master Lego builder. He enjoys coin collecting, playing chess and is a check and Pokmon enthusiast. The Mandell family will host a luncheon at Temple Beth-El on Saturday, March 17. Special guests will include grandparents Marcia and Larry Mandell and Drs. Herman, along with family and friends from France, Canada, Ohio, Michigan and Alabama. As the time nears for your childs Bar/Bat Mitzvah, you will want to let the community know by announcing it in the Jewish Press. There is a $5 charge to cover the cost of reproducing the photo. The Jewish Press prints the announcement one to two weeks before the celebration, if possible. Mail to the Jewish Press, PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758. It has become a Passover tradition in the Tampa Bay area for a group to put on a parody Seder performance that they call Greater Seder always off color enough to qualify for adult only audiences, with a different theme every year. This years audience pleaser is The Music Mensch and will be performed on Saturday, March 31 in thr ballroom of Bryan Glazer Family JCC, 522 N. Howard Ave., Tampa. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the Seder and show begins at 7 p.m. The Greater Seder has been going on for 13 years, creators of the event were a collection of lawyers, educators and a realtor. Their goal was to offer a real Seder, but with heavy doses of humor, song and entertainment, in the tradition of Purim shpiels. When 72 folks attended four times chai they knew it was a good start. Over the years the titles for their Greater Seders have ranged from Matzoh-lot, Schlep through TV Land, Star Drek, Seder-day Night Chai and The Sound of Moses. The characters of God, Moses, Pharaoh and the Jewish people are the stars of every Greater Seder. The meal is always a traditional Passover Seder with a Haggadah full of singalong songs and Passover prayers. The proceeds from the Greater Seder have always gone to good causes and in recent years have gone to the Tampa Jewish Family Services food bank. Last year alone more than $6,000 was raised. The event has grown over the years and last year more than 300 attended. The event is no longer just many in the Bay area. New residents, young adults and seasoned grownups, as well as too-tired-to-cook a second Seder folks are among those who attend. Throughout the years many of the cast members event, including Jerry Slutzky, Lynn Heller, Cindy Spahn, Cynthia Gornbein and organizer Rande Friedman. Other performers this year include Elaine and Geoffrey Gross, Dana and Norman Melnick, Suzy Duic, Robin Golin, Paula Pennington, Fred Lasday and Rob Norman. The cast calls itself the Kosher Hams and every Greater Seder is closed with the song, There is no Seder like our Seder, sung to the tune of There is no Business like Show Business. Tickets are $65 for general admission and $80 for patrons (who get priority seating) or $750 for a table of 8 (for best seating). There are also opportunities for sponsorships like the buy a dog a shank bone Seder plate item, buy a plague or a more conventional donation toward production costs or the purchase of a tzedakah ticket for someone who cannot afford one. Tickets and donations may be purchased at www. GreaterSeder.com.Tradition continues with Greater Seders The Music Mensch

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Business Professional Directory& PAGE 16 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY FEBRUARY 9 22, 2018Advertise in the JEWISH PRESSBusiness & Professional Directoryfor as little as $38 per issue. For more information, call 535-4400 CEMETERY LOTS WANTED: Adults with a desire to befriend a Jewish youngster. As a mentor/role model Community Services, (727) 450-7278. COMMUNITY SERVICES VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIESCOULD YOUR CHILD USE ANOTHER ADULT IN THEIR LIFE? Do you have children between the ages 6 who would at (727) 450-7278, for more information. CLASSIFIEDS ADS services and merchandise advertised, nor screens advertisers. All ads must be submitted in writing. $10 for 15 words, 10 each additional word. Residential Real Estate Inc.Ready to buy your condo on the beach or home in Pinellas County?Call: Marcy & Scott DanielsColdwell Banker Real Estate#1 Sales Team Clearwater & Clearwater Beach ofces www.marcydaniels.com727-560-8080 or 727-480-3515 Organizations 3 Home Visits $210 NOW $180.00 SAVINGS=$30! FL Lic.#43925 RELAX RECUPERATE REHABILITATE POSITION AVAILABLEJEWISH PRESS has OPENINGS for:SUMMER INTERNS include writing assignments and Karen Dawkins, managing editor PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758 email: jewishpress@aol.com. or call, (727) 535-4400 or (813) 871-2332. SERVICESR eadyEADY forFOR aA relationshiRELATIONSHI P? Know ACCOUNTANT SINGER CONSULTING: T woWO L awnAWN C ryRY P tsTS :     HadassahMah jongg fundraiser: The Lylah Pinellas Chapter of Hadassah will have a fundraising mah jongg event on Wednesday, April 25 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Countryside Country Club, 3001 Countryside Blvd., Clearwater. The event will include a salad buffet luncheon and the cost is $25 per per son. To make arrangements for payment and to RSVP contact   Lynne Brubaker at   lynnebru@aol.com   or (727) 782-3086. If you can, bring your card and your game. Meet the author: The North Pinellas Chapter of Hadassah will meet on Monday, March 19 at 11:30 a.m. at Temple Ahavat Shalom, 1575 Curlew Road, Palm Harbor, to hear author Marilyn Whelan, speak about her book, Caviar Living on Fish Stick Money. This book is a guide to home-spun lessons from a life well-lived. She will offer some ideas to help you stretch your money and enjoy life to the fullest. Bring your lunch. Drinks and desserts will be served. For more information, call Janice Caine at (727) 726-3735.Bnai BrithHorsing around fundraiser: Greater Tampa Bay Bnai Brith will be going to Tampa Bay Downs on Sunday, March 25 at 11 a.m. for its annual fundraiser. A full brunch will be offered from noon to 3 p.m. The cost is $50 per person and   includes admission to the track, racing program, brunch and gratuities.   RSVP to Arlene Berger immediately. For RSVP information, call Berger at (727) 726-9579.JWIFor the kids: Jewish Women Inter national North Pinellas will enjoy brunch as they hold a fundraiser for the Childrens Home on Sunday, April 22 at 10:30 a.m. with a Table for Two demonstration by Chef Warren Caterson. The event will be at East Lake Woodlands Country Club, with valet parking. The cost is $38 per person.   For more information, contact Amy Richman at   richman.amy52@gmail.com or (727) 543-0108.Genealogical SocietyMembers helping members: The Jewish Genealogical Society of Tampa Bay will meet on Sunday April 8 at 2 p.m. for a hands-on working session for individual research using the Internet and library resources of the society. Experienced society mentors will be on hand to provide guidance and assistance. Free access to Ancestry.com and to MyHeritage.com (Premium), will be available on several computers, which will be available for use. Attendees are asked to bring their own research materials and information and their own laptop computer if they have one. A pre-session social with refreshments and library access begins at 1:30 p.m. For information about the organization or directions to the meeting, call Bruce Hadburg at (727) 796-7981.Young Adults#Gather offers a mix of social and interac tive activities designed to help young adults connect. It is open to young adults of all faiths and backgrounds. For more information or to RSVP for any #Gather events, visit: www. bryanglazerfamilyjcc.com/gather or contact Lisa Robbins at lisa.robbins@jewishtampa. com or (813) 769-4723. Dinner and a movie: The #Gather group will meet on Thursday, March 22 at 6 p.m. for dinner at the Cask Social Kitchen, 208 S. Howard Ave., then travel to the Bryan Glazer Family JCC to watch Longing as part of the Tampa Bay Jewish Film Festival. In upended when a former college girlfriend tells him she had a son by him, and the teenage son just died. The cost is $10 for the movie and participants will pay their own cost for dinner. Job-LinksMonday Morning Links: Free sessions of Monday Morning Links are offered at the Jack Roth Center for Career Development at TampaBay-Job-Links, 4100 W. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 206, Tampa from 9:30 11 a.m. The March 19 topic is Linked-in From a Recruiter Perspective and the March 26 topic is Staying Motivated During Career Transition. Monday Morning Links is supported by the Vinik Family Foundation.   Job-search aids: The next Success workshop will be April 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The topic is Customize Your Resume for the Job You Want.   The work shops are free for   TampaBay Job-Links   full pr ogram participants and $15 for guests. Reservations required for all programs. To RSVP, call (813) 344-0200, email   RSVP@ TBJL.org.   Special event: On March 22 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., photographer Allie Serrano for be on-hand for a photo shoot for job seekers.   Support groupsAlzheimers caregiver group: Menorah Manor offers a support group meeting in the Samson Nursing Center at Menorah Manor, 255 59th St. N., St. Petersburg, on the   For more information, call Gwen Kalden berg at (727) 302-3750.

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Seniors actingLinda Goldman and her troupe from SAGES Seniors Acting Guild and Educational Services probably didnt say the traditional break a leg to one another when they premiered her original play, Denying Gravity, to an SRO crowd of 500 seniors in February at the Pinellas Park Performing Arts Center. The play, written by Goldman, is meant to stimulate discussion on fall prevention. The performance was co-sponsored by the Fall Prevention Coalition of Better Living for Seniors and the Pinellas Park Fire Department. Goldman is founder and president of SAGES, which had its start at more about SAGES or schedule a performance of Denying Gravity, contact SAGES at (727) 5367076 or email SAGESclearwater@gmail.com. JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 17 MARCH 9 22, 2018 727.789.2000 dwd tyb hrwbq tyb A Sacred Trust Michael, Mandi, David, Pati and Steven GrossDAVID C. GROSSFUNERAL HOMES 6366 Central Avenue St. Petersburg Fl 33707(727) 381-4911Reform Conservative OrthodoxGeneration to Generation, our reputation for superior service and fair pricing has made us the areas most often chosen Jewish funeral provider.THE JEWISH FUNERAL HOMES OF PINELLAS & PASCO COUNTIES830 N. Belcher Road Clearwater, Fl 33765 Michael, Mandi, David, Pati and Steven Gross P.S. As always, Im looking forward to hearing about all your family simchas. Photos are welcome, too. Send information to: Sincerely Yours, P.O. Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758, or e-mail jewishpress@aol.com.Jewish Press obituary policyThe Jewish Press publishes obituaries of Jewish community members, both local residents and individuals whose survivors live in the area, as a FREE public service, based on information supplied by the family to the funeral home. Informaiton may also be submitted directly in writing to the Jewish Press. Email to jewishpress@aol.com or send to PO Box 6970, Clearwater, FL 33758. Obituaries 12905 Wild Acres Rd. Largo, FL 33773 Serving the Pinellas County Jewish Community since 1968The Jewish Burial Society of Pinellas County Inc. dba Chapel Hill Memorial Park is a 501 (c) (3) non-prot corporation licensed by the State of Florida ROBERT EISENOFF, 91, of Largo, died Feb. 25. He was born in Jamaica, NY and was a veteran of the United States Army. He worked as a real estate broker for many years. Survivors include his wife Corrine. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, Clearwater Chapel) JOEL GLASSER, 71, of Largo, died Feb. 24. He was born in Brooklyn, NY and worked as a real estate agent for many years. The family suggests memorials be made to Chabad of Clearwater. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, Clearwater Chapel) SUMNER EDWARD ISRAELSON, 84, of Largo died March 4. Previously from Peabody, MA, he was known as The TV Man, as he owned for debody. He served in the United States Army National Guard for 20 years and was a leader and member of the many years. Survivors include his wife Jean; son and daughter-in-law Richdaughters and sons-in-law, Jodi and Kirk Haskell, and Lori and Antonio Salema, all of Stratham, NJ; step-daughter, Susan Bowes, Jacksonville; brother Arthur Israelson; and seven grandchildren. The family suggests memorials to the American Heart/Stroke Association in Waltham, MA, Attn: Tedys Team/Haskell. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, Clearwater Chapel) TERRY L. LACY, 72, of St. Petersburg, died Feb. 21. He was a United States Marine Corps veteran, serving in the Vietnam War as an MP, sergeant and platoon commander and was present at the fall of Khesanh and participated in the TET Offensive. He worked for many years at the Empire Detroit Steel Mill and retired from the Northwest School System. He was a member of the American Legion, the Marine Corp League, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Greater Southern Ohio Tri-State Baseball/Softball Hall of Fame. Survivors include his daughter and son-in-law Kristy and Steve Bellamy, Brandon; son and daughter-in-law Brett and Melynda Lacy, Ellenton; his siblings and their spouses; Pat Lacy, Gail and Dan Davis, Cathy Binion, Mark Lacy, Bryan Lacy, Steve and Gail Lacy, Elaine and Martin Baker, Eve and Rene Baldrich; and one grandson. The family suggests memorials be made to SOMC Hospice or the Salvation Army. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, St. Petersburg Chapel) ZIV ZISKIN MOTZNE, 52, of St. Pete Beach, died Feb. 23. Survivors include his father Josef Motzne; sisters Raduns, and Mira and Michael Steinberg. The family suggests memorials to Care of Lone Soldier Center, 1500 Broadway, Suite 903, New York, NY 10036. (Segal Funeral Home, Beth David Chapel) PHYLLIS L. SILVERSTEIN, 85, of Treasure Island, died Feb. 22. Born in Cleveland, she graduated from Glenville High School and married her high school sweetheart Eddie Silverstein. They moved to St. Petersburg in 1971, where they operated their business, Professional Adjustment Corporation and stayed together for 25 years. Later she met her life partner, Danny Krisemen, and they were together until his death in 2003. She was an active volunteer with many organizations including Menorah Manor, Suncoast Hostion and the National Alliance on Mental Illness Pinellas Country Chapter, often accompanied by her poodles, Sasha and Mitzi. Survivors include sons Murray Silverstein (Kim), Jay Silverstein (Loriejean Duffy); son-in-law Steven Feld; step-children Rick Kriseman (Kerry), and Nancy Kriseman (Cynthia); sister Joni Spitz, of Cleveland; six grandchildren and one great-grandson. The family suggests memorials be made to Menorah Manor or Suncoast Hospice. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, St. Petersburg Chapel) NAN HILLARY WILCOX 60, of Clearwater died March 5. Originally from New Brunswick, NJ, she worked for many years as an executive assistant in the telecommunications industry. The family suggests memorials be made to the V Foundation for Cancer Research, www.jimmyv.org. (David C. Gross Funeral Homes, Clearwater Chapel)PARTYFor younger people, an archeological dig, crafts, a sing-a-long and bounce houses will be offered. For all ages, there will be Krav Maga self defense demonstrations, Israeli dancing and Israeli and traditional Jewish food. A committee of individuals representing synagogues and agencies has worked to create a day of fun and celebration for everyone, said Federations Director of Arts, Culture, and Education Maxine Kaufman. This is a very special year for Israel, and were bringing together the entire community in recognition of this big event! The venue will offer both indoor and outdoor space for the festivals activities. The event is being sponsored by the Florida Arts and Culture Division. More information about the Israel Independence Day celebration can be found on the Federations website, www.jewishpinellas.org or by calling (727) 530-3223. A federal grand jury in Orlando has indicted Michael Ron David Kadar, 19, who holds dual United States and Israeli citizenship, with hate crimes as a result of threatening calls he made to Jewish Community Centers in the state including four to the Tampa JCCs and Federation preschools in January and February 2017. Kadar, who is currently in custody in Israel where he also faces charges, was initially charged in criminal complaints last July. The grand jurys 32-count against Kadar for obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs. Those hate crime charges each carry a maximum penalty of 20 years imprisonment. According to the indictment, Kadar is alleged to have made threats to the Tampa JCC Preschool North on Jan. 5, 2017 and to the JCC Preschool South on Jan. 5, Jan. 9 and Feb. 20, 2017. In addition, the threats mostly claiming there was a bomb in the facility but also making active shooter threats were against Chabad South Orlando, Jewish Academy and Roth JCC in Orlando and Jewish Community Alliance of Jacksonville. Besides the new Florida charges, an indictment handed down in the District of Columbia charges Kadar with threatening the Israeli Embassy and the AntiDefamation League in Washington, D.C. Although these were only a fraction of the Jewish buildings around the country that were threatened in the wave of hoax calls that Kadar is believed responsible, they are the only ones in which he has been formally charged in the U.S. Threats, intimidation, or violence perpetrated against anyone because of their beliefs, their faith, or how they choose to worship is intolerable, said U.S. Attorney Maria Chapa Lopez for the Middle District of Florida. Individuals should be free to exercise these rights without fear. We will continue to use our resources to enforce these precious rights for all individuals. Investigators for the case included the FBI Tampa District of Florida; and the Justice Departments Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section and Civil Rights Division. Federal authorities also acknowledge the assistance and the investigative efforts of the Israeli National Police.Threat charges against Israeli/American teen raised to hate crimes

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PAGE 18 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 By JOSEFIN DOLSTEN JTA news serviceThroughout his senior year in high school, Ryan Deitsch has stayed busy. A month ago, the of classes performing with animprovisational theater group he started at his school, producing TV content for the schools newsroom and working as a busboy at a local restaurant. to lawmakers and organizations, doing interviews with media outlets and visiting other high schools to organize people who want to get politically involved. Deitsch is a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and was inside when a former student stalked its killing 17 students and staff members on Feb. 14. Deitsch hid with other students in a closet during the massacre. As police came to evacuate the school, Deitschs journalistic inwhat was happening on his phone, sharing it on Twitter. The footage showed students being marched through the halls, their hands raised over their heads at the request of the police, and then running as they neared the exit. Being at school during the shooting was awful, he told JTA in a phone interview on March 6. ation. I did not feel so much in the ing you can feel a lot of things. Now Deitsch, among a handful of students leading the Never Again movement which seeks to prevent future school shootings, advocates for gun reform and is organizing the March for Our Lives in Washington, D.C., later this month. As part of Never Again, Deitsch does community outreach. He calls himself part of the B-team, and says hes the goto person when organizers Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg or Cameron Kasky are out of town. Deitsch says knowing that his classmates and teachers were killed is what keeps him going. Among the victims was Carmen Schentrup, 16, whom he knew through the schools a cappella group. The clearest motivation is that 17 individuals lost their lives and they shouldnt have, he said. It was a very preventable death, and we are here to make sure none of this has to happen again. Deitsch wakes up each day at 5 or 6 a.m. and doesnt go to bed until around 3 the next morning. In addition to attending school, he organizes trips and speaking engagements for the Never Again team and answers social media messages. Sometimes he misses classes to speak about his experience at events across the country. He also tries to squeeze in things he did before the shooting, like spending time with his girlfriend, friends and family. Thats still important, I cant just not have my own life, he said. Last month, his comments to Sen. Marco Rubio, R-FL, at a CNN town hall received wide media coverage. Deitsch asked Rubio, Why do we have to march on Washington, just to save innocent lives? His siblings are also involved in the movement. Matt, 20, met with Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, to discuss policy change, and Samantha, 15, penned a poem about her expePhoto by Don Juan Moore/Getty ImagesRyan Deitsch speaking at the Florida State Capitol building in Tallahassee, Feb. 21.This Jewish Parkland survivor hid in a closet; now he advocates for gun reformrience at the school that went viral on social media. Deitsch tries to balance his newfound passion with attending school and mourning the lives of those who died in the shooting. I try to attend school as much as I can, he said. About a week ago, he and other hours at the makeshift memorial for the shooting to grieve. Prior to the tragedy, Deitsch or journalist. But the way the media covered the event, including crying at funerals, has left him sick to my stomach. Though the shooting propelled him to become politically involved, Deitsch isnt sure if he wants to pursue political activism in the long term. He plans to attend college in the fall; hes still waiting to hear from schools before making his decision. Judaism has taught Deitsch, whose family belongs to Congregation Kol Tikvah in Parkland, to ask questions a quality he said that helps him in his activism. I feel that Judaism has really supported my need to just be that one guy in the room to just be like, Hey, this is wrong, why is it this way?, and if they dont have a good enough answer for why, weve got to change it, he said. to attend services at his synagogue following the shooting. The Guttenberg family, whose daughter Jamie was killed in the shooting, are members of the Reform congregation. I cannot stay in any place that has had a funeral for somebody I know for too long, so right now that synagogue seems like a place of death, he said. In addition to organizing for Never Again, Deitsch said he will use his vote to make his point. Im gonna vote out anybody who has just been so heartless dur ing this entire debacle, he said. Deitsch said he feels obligated to continue his work. The point is that we have to do this, he said.By EMILY BURACK JTA news serviceAfter a gunman took the lives of 17 students and staff at their high school in Parkland, Florida, students there launched a national campaign to promote gun control. They called for a major protest in Washington, D.C., on March 24, and are encouraging similar protests and student walkouts across the country. And they took a name for their campaign, #NeverAgain, that has long been linked to Holocaust commemoration. Parkland junior Cameron Kasky is credited with coining the hashtag.   A T witter account for the movement,   NeverAgainMSD, is described as For survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting, by survivors of the Stoneman Douglas Shooting. Some supporters of the students efforts are put off by their use of Never Again. Lily Herman,     its very uncomfortable to watch a term youve used to talk about your family and peoples own heritage and history be taken away overnight. Malka Goldberg, a digital communications specialist in Maryland, tweeted, When I saw theyre using #NeverAgain for the campaign it bothered me, b/c many Jews strongly [associate] that phrase w/ the Holocaust specultural appropriation, but I doubt the kids knew this or did it inten tionally. Hasia Diner,   a professor of American Jewish history at New York University, is unfazed by the students use of the phrase. While some may object to the phrase Never Again being reappropriated for gun control, it does not mean that reaction is appropriate or reasonable, she told JTA. in reference to the Holocaust is murky, but most likely began in postwar Israel. The phrase was used in secular kibbutzim there a   Swedish documentary on the Holocaust   But the phrase gained currency in English thanks in large part to Meir Kahane, the militant rabbi who   popularized it in America when he created the Jewish Demanifesto.   After Kahanes assasthe American Jewish Committee, Sholom Comay,   said, Despite our considerable differences, Meir Kahane must always be remembered for the slogan Never Again, which for so many became the battle cry of post-Holocaust Jewry. For Kahane, Never Again was an implicitly violent call to arms and a rebuke of passivity and inactivity. The shame surrounding the alleged passivity of the Jews in the face of their destruction became a cornerstone of the JDL. As Kahane said, the motto Never Again does not mean that it [a holocaust] will never happen again. That would be nonsense. It means that if it happens again, it wont happen in the same way. Last time, the Jews behaved like sheep. In the anthem of the Jewish Defense League, members recited, To our slaughtered brethren and lonely widows: Never again will our peoples blood be shed by water, Never again will such things be heard in Judea. Later, however, Kahanes violent call for action was adapted by American Jewish establishment groups and Holocaust commemoration institutions as a call for peace, tolerance and heeding the warning signs of genocide. These days, when the phrase is used to invoke the Holocaust, it can be either particular or univer sal. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tends toward the particular when he uses it to speak about the need for a strong Jewish state in the wake of the Holocaust. I promise, as head of the Jewish state, that never again will we allow the hand of evil to sever the life of our people and our state, he   said   in a speech at the site of the former Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp marking International Holocaust Memorial Day in 2010. But Netanyahu has also used the phrase in its universal sense of preventing all genocides. After visiting a memorial to the Rwanda genocide victims in 2010, he and his wife, Sara, wrote in the guestbook, We are deeply moved by the memorial to the victims of one historys greatest crimes and reminded of the haunting similarities to the genocide of our own people. Never again. Then-President   Barack Obama also used the phrase in its univer sal sense in marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day in 2011. We are reminded to remain ever-vigilant against the possibility of genocide, and to ensure that Never Again is not just a phrase but a principled cause, he said in a statement. Thats similar to how the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum uses the phrase. In choosing the name   Never Again   as the theme of its 2013 Days of Remembrance, it used the term as a call to study the genocide of the Jews in order to   respond to the warning signs of genocides happening anywhere. And Elie W iesel, the Holocaust survivor and author who came to be associated with the phrase, also used it in the univer sal sense. Never again becomes more than a slogan: Its a prayer, a promise, a vow   never again dark violence, the Nobel   laureate wrote in 2012. Never Again is a phrase that keeps on evolving. It was used in protests   against the Muslim ban   and in   support of refugees, in remembrance of   Japanese intern ment during World War II   and   recalling the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. And now the phrase is taking on yet another life: in the Shaul Magid, a professor of Jewish studies at Indiana Univer sity who is presently a visiting scholar at the Center for Jewish History in New York, told JTA, For Kahane, Never Again was a call to militancy as the only act of prevention. In Parkland it is a call for gun control. In a way, a call for anti-militancy. Its doubtful Kahane would have appreciated the term being co-opted by a gun control campaign. His second most-famous slogan was Every Jew a .22. Students protesting against gun violence on Capitol Hill, Feb. 21, 2018Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesHow Never Again evolved from a Holocaust slogan to a universal call for [ll in the blank]

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JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY PAGE 19 MARCH 9 22, 2018 of the plans and said he wanted members of his temple youth group to go. Although he and the temple youth director have prior commitments and cant accom pany teens from the temple, Rabbi Klein said Gamson graciously agreed that any teens from Ahavat Shalom could join the others for ing is secured. Gamson said the original deadline for signing up to go to the march was March 2 and that while she wants as many local Jewish teens as possible to make the trip, just to send the initial group of 30. The hope was to keep the personal cost to each teen at $300, but Gamfor any additional participants more funds are raised. Adding more people means more hotel rooms, more buses, but we are trying to make all of this work out, she said, noting that the original goal of $10,000 had to be doubled due to the higher estimat ed costs including continual rising airfares. I am going to empty my discretionary fund and I already this morning got a $500 commitment from our Social Action Committee to help send our kids to Washington and I plan to make an appeal for funds during services tonight and to send an email to our congregants to help our kids get to the march, Rabbi Klein said. He also plans to encourage those who could not attend the Washington march to join local March for Our Lives events in Tampa or St. Petersburg. I cannot go to Washington with our kids, but I will be at one or the other of the local marches, the rabbi said. The local marches The Tampa March for Our Lives will be at Kiley Garden/Curtis Hixon Park, 400 N. Ashley Drive, in downtown Tampa at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 24, and the one in St. Petersburg will be at the same time in front of the Pinellas County Courthouse at Sixth Street North and Mirror Lake Drive. Hopefully with our teens behind this effort, we will see progress made in creating a safer society through the reduction in the number and type of guns that are allowed to be owned, Rabbi Klein said. At Congregation Schaarai Zedek in Tampa the youth group decided rather than try to get to Washington, they would go to the Tampa March for Our Lives event. Rabbi Richard Birnholz at Schaarai Zedek said he expects between 25 to 50 members of the youth group to attend the Tampa march and other members would be going to Parkland for a March for Our Lives there. We will try to draw our own legislators attention here, Rabbi Birnholz said, adding that the idea was that the teens could make more of a show of support for gun violence prevention at less of a cost. One of the Tampa march organizers, Brooke Shapiro, is a mem ber of Schaarai Zedek. When the shooting occurred in Parkland, I felt a personal connection because I was born in Coral Springs and if I had not moved to Tampa, I would have been district ed to Marjory Stoneman Douglas, said Shapiro, a senior at Plant High. My childhood friends were at the school that day and thankwith the victims they could have been my sister, my friends, my teachers, or me. I couldnt just return to school the next day and pretend nothing had happened. When the Stoneman Douglas students began organizing the national march and called for sister marches, Shapiro saw that as her cue to organize a march in Tampa. The march is necessary because we need to keep the momentum and the conversation going. We are scared to sit in our classrooms. Students want a future and we want to have a say in that future. Shapiro said she is hoping to have a student from Stoneman Douglas speak at the Tampa march during a rally at 10 a.m. before the march in downtown Tampa beginning at 11 a.m. For more information about either local march, visit their Facebook page. Other inspiration to march The impetus for sending teens to the national march was a trip that 50 Reform Jewish teens from the Tampa Bay area made to Washington last month as part of the Religious Action Centers LTaken Social Justice program. On Feb. 12 two days before the Parkland shootings the teens lobbied Congressional representatives and staff members to support legisla tion that was important to them: immigration reform, LGBTQ+ equality, climate change, womens reproductive rights and gun violence prevention. Gamson said some of those same teens came to her after the shootings and after hearing about the national march, saying they wanted to return to Washington. The Parkland slayings deeply impacted many local teens because they knew teens from Parkland through NFTY (North American Federation of Temple Youth) activities or shared experiences at Camp Coleman, a Reform movement Jewish summer camp in north Georgia, said Lisa Cohen, youth director at Beth Am. Rachel Buksbaum of Beth Am met and quickly became friends with Alyssa Alhadeff, one of the slain teens, at Camp Coleman. How to donate Donations to send the Bay Area teens to Washington can be made by going to GoFundMe.com and searching for March for Our Lives Tampa Bay. In addition, tax deductible donations (with a clear note designating the donation is for the march) can be made to: Temple Bnai Israel, c/o March for Our Lives Donation, 1685 S. Belcher Road, Clearwater, FL 33764, or by calling the temple at (727) 531-5829. In Tampa donations can be made to Congregation Beth Am, c/o March for our Lives Donation, 2030 W. Fletcher Ave., Tampa, FL 33612, or by calling (813) 968-8511. Temple Beth-El has not for mally set up a donation system, but Gamson said those who want to donate through that synagogue should contact Rabbi Michael Torop at (727) 347-6136. The effort to raise funds to support the Temple Ahavat Shalom teens did not materialize until March 9, so those wishing to support those teens should contact that temple at (727) 785-8811. Calls were made to several local Conservative congregations in the area to see if their youth groups had formally organized MARCHCONTINUED from FRONT PAGE $370* rf rr f Savings amounts are averages based on information from The Hartfords AARP Auto Insurance Program customers who became new policyholders between 1/1/16 and 12/31/16 and provided data regarding their savings and prior carrier. Your savings may vary. AARP and its af liates are not insurers. Paid endorsement. The Hartford pays royalty fees to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP membership is required for Program eligibility in most states. The AARP Automobile Insurance Program from The Hartford is underwritten by Hartford Fire Insurance Company and its af liates, One Hartford Plaza, Hartford, CT 06155. Auto program is currently unavailable in Massachusetts, Canada and U.S. Territories or possessions. Speci c features, credits and discounts may vary and may not be available in all states in accordance with state lings and applicable law. Applicants are individually underwritten and some may not qualify.nnftb fbtn ntrrntbbbbbnbbbttbb bbtbb n tbnbtbn bn bb to make the trip to Washington. One indicated no plans and two were not available for comment. Dana Shepard at Congregation Beth Shalom in Clearwater said the national United Synagogues of Conservative Judaism supports the national march and is raising funds to help house and feed kids going to the march. She added that that at least one Conservative synagogue in Washington will allow people going to the march to sleep there. (A major Reform synagogue in Washington has made a similar offer.) Shepard said she recently sent an email to her youth group members to gauge their interest in the march but had not received responses yet. Brooke Shapiro, a member of Congregation Schaarai Zedek, is one of the organizers of the Tampa March for Our Lives.

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PAGE 20 JEWISH PRESS of PINELLAS COUNTY MARCH 9 22, 2018 By BOB FRYER Jewish PressIn 2017, organizers of the inaugural Tampa Bay Jewish Food Festival at Temple Bnai Israel in Clearwater were hoping for hundreds and about 2,000 showed up. The supply of food ran out long before the festival ended, so for this years event they planned for 4,000 and still ran out of food. While organizer Barbara Bloom thinks the Largo Police estimate of 5,000 to 6,000 attendees might be a little on the high side, she knows for sure the crowd at the Feb. 25 event was a lot bigger than the one this year was chopped liver. Bob Levine made 60 pounds of it and they tell me it was a spiritual experience. It was all gone by 11:50 a.m., Bloom said. Bloom, who is director of membership engagement at the temple, said she thinks word of how quickly festival had folks coming early this year. The festival started at 10 a.m. Food Festival again proves theres big appetite for Jewish cuisine and everyone seemed to come then, with coolers and backpacks, and loaded up. I guess they were deter mined this time they would get to eat, Bloom said. We added new items and tripled what we made last time and still were running food that easily that reminds them of their culture. cabbage, made by Liz Greenfold and Melissa Brahm, and they sold out of 300 servings of it. Ali Curtiss made 1,500 latkes also a new item on the menu and those went quickly. Honey cakes and chocolate babka were among other new foods this year and were scooped up quickly, too. The featured foods once again were the corned beef and pastrami sandwiches from Carnegie Deli in New York and both years they were crowd favorites. Other offer ings included homemade matzoh ball soup, bagels with the works, kugel, falafel and sour pickles on a stick. A Nosh-to-go area was set up where take-out orders were sold for folks to take home and heat up. Craft brewed beer and a wide assortments of wines were offered. This year volunteers boosted the quantity of hamantashen made to 1,500 yet those were still all gone by 12:15 p.m. It took nearly 200 volunteers to pull off the event, with months of advanced planning. Along with Bloom, temple administrator Angela Wachter handled the internal building needs, and Sharon Finkelstein served as festival chair. Finkelstein said one goal was not only to reach many members of the local Jewish community, but to reach out to our non-Jewish neighbors to learn and be a part of this celebration of our culture. That seemed to be the case if random sampling of those in attendance is to be trusted. The event drew more from Hillsborough county and beyond this time, including one couple from Orlando who took in a shrimp and crab festival in Hudson the day before, then came to the Jewish Food Festival. They said they are thinking of moving to the Tampa Bay area. Others from Pasco County, Lake land and Tampa mingled with the local Pinellas folks. The festival grounds were hopping all day, with music inside and outdoors, many new areas, includ ing a beverage area for soft drinks, beer and wine, under giant tents to keep the bright sun at bay. The number of vendors also increased this year to 58, about triple the number from last year. Items for sale at the booths included clothing, jewelry, Judaica, health and beauty products, honey and other items. Eighteen of the vendor booths were for Jewish organizations from throughout the community and in between purchasing food, desserts and drinks and eating, folks roamed the grounds. They listened and sometimes danced to music by the Chai Notes band or a harmonica band. For the younger set, the Kidz Zone was a hit, with bounce houses, face painting, craft making, balloon art or taking time to dance to other throbbing music provided by Bash Entertainment, featuring a sound system and DJs. Last year parking became a problem. This year the temple added buses provided by two senior living facilities and the Jolly Trolley to shuttle festivalgoers from remote parking lots, and again this year St. Johns Episcopal Church and Hope Presbyterian, both across the street from the temple, allowed folks to use their grounds for parkBloom said. We are already working on next year. We will meet soon to kick around new ideas as to how we can make it even better, and next year we hope to solve the problem of running out of food, Bloom said. All in all, not a bad problem to have for an event only two years old and already a major fundraiser for the temple.Huge tents were set up so folks could eat in the shade at the food festival. (L-R) Lisa Morett of Tarpon Springs, Don Litov of Palm Harbor, and Mary Lieberman of Clearwater enjoy falafel. Kids do the Whip and Nay Nay in the Kidz Zone. Delilah Brahm, 5, shows off her face paint and a Star of David she created. Photos by Bob Fryer