Citation
L'CHAYIM

Material Information

Title:
L'CHAYIM
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte
Coordinates:
26.500215 x -81.911403

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

VISIT THE FEDERATION ONLINE AT: NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID FT. MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 1759701 Commerce Center Court Fort Myers, Florida 33908 DELIVER TO CURRENT RESIDENT OR POSTMASTER: DATED RELIGIOUS NEWS ITEMS. TIME SENSITIVE PLEASE EXPEDITE! www.JewishFederationLCC.org Vol. 41, No. 2 October 2018 / 5779 L CHAYIM Temple Judea Preschools new library Federations Senior Lunch Bunch update A year after Harvey a JFNA reportINSIDE THIS ISSUE: 6 Our Community 8 Jewish Interest 12 Marketplace 14 Israel & the Jewish World 15 Commentary 16 From the Bimah 18 Focus on Youth 20 Organizations 21 Community Directory 22 Temple NewsFalafel superstar recipe by Chef Dalia Hemed Brian Simon By Brian Simon, Federation PresidentImproving on the work we doIve been meeting with friends in the Jewish community over the past few weeks to talk about Federation. I went to them asking for input what they think of us, what were doing well, where were lacking. The feedback has been honest. In the theme of the High Holidays, the comments read like the confessional prayer Al Het. The Federation has missed opportunities to provide some of the services our community needs. We have missed opportunities to be more integrated with the synagogues. We have failed to get our message out so that everyone at least is aware of what good we are doing. Its exactly what I was hoping to hear. I think there are actionable ideas that will come from these meetings. 1) Jewish cultural events, 2) Jewish Family Services, and 3) Israel advocacy. What Im hearing is that people want more opportunities to interact with other Jews in a non-religious, social setting (Jewish cultural events). People want more help from Jewish Family Services, and they want oppor tunities to help others. These are good problems to have. In the coming weeks, we will be putting into action some of the ideas that came from these meetings. Im excited to see what happens. Im very pleased with the work that Executive Director Alan Isaacs, Programming Director Debbie Sanford and all of our were all doing a tremendous amount of good in the community. Id like to ask for your continued help in improving on the work we do. Please help us spread the word about the programs you enjoy. Please help us to identify people in need. Please share your feedback on what were doing well and not as well. You are wel come to leave a message for me at the at brian.simon@utexas.edu. I look for ward to hearing from you. A MUSICAL JOURNEY THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF LEE & CHARLOTTE COUNTIES Y o u a r e c o r d i a l l y i n v i t e d t o o u r S u n d a y 1 0 : 0 0 A M D e c e m b e r 9 2 0 1 8 I n v i t a t i o n t o f o l l o w A L O N B E N G U R I O N P A C E S E T T E R S A N D M A J O R G I F T S N o v e m b e r 1 4 2 0 1 8 A N E V E N I N G W I T H A L O N B E N G U R I O N Join us as Alon shares historic al and personal stories about his grandfather, the late Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and the establishment of Israel. S P E C I A L F E A T U R E F I L M : B E N G U R I O N E P I L O G U E F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a c t D e b b i e S a n f o r d 2 3 9 4 8 1 4 4 4 9 o r d e b b i e s a n f o r d @ j f e d l c c o r g S A V E T H E D A T E 10 3 19 5

PAGE 2

2 L CHAYIM LCHAYIM invites correspondence on subjects of interest to Jewish people. Partisan political opinions will not be published, LCHAYIM should be Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties October 2018 Volume 41, Number 2 President: Board: Executive Director: Alan Isaacs Program Director : Debbie Sanford Executive Assistant: Jewish Family Services: Jodi Cohen Editor/Designer: Advertising: NOVEMBER ISSUE EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Friday, October 5 OUR FEDERATION Grow your business with LCHAYIM. Reach 5,000 local Jewish residents through this paper.For more information or to place an ad, call Jim at 239.634.6923 or send an email to JamesLewin@jfedLCC.org. For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. By Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach & Food Pantry Coordinator O U R M I S S I O N To strengthen and enrich the Jewish Community by providing and supporting philanthropic, educational and social service programs locally, in Israel and throughout the world. O U R V I S I O N A Jewish Community that is based on Jewish values such as Tzedakah (benevolence), Tikkun Olam (repairing the world) and Klal Yisrael (taking responsibility for one another). To donate to the Federations Annual Campaign, call 239.481.4449 or visit JewishFederationLCC.org Don t forget to sign up for my weekly Just send me your email address to get up to date 215 Rosh Hashanah Read Wednesday . An and of Israel. .M. A Opening Day is Gray a Jewish Federation Community Room 9701 Commerce Center Ct., Fort Myers 33908 All ages & levels of dance experience are welcome. Wear comfortable shoes, bring a water bottle AND A FRIEND! RSVP a MUST to Marsha Kistler marshatemple2012@gmail.com S u n d a y s a t 4 : 0 0 P M 9/30, 10/14, 10/28, 11/4 and 11/11

PAGE 3

3 OUR FEDERATION By Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach & Food Pantry CoordinatorSenior Lunch Bunch updateB rookdale Independent Living on College Parkway hosted its second annual Jewish Federation senior luncheon in August. We are grateful for the warm welcome and at tention to detail for our seniors, includ ing valet parking. WINK meteorol ogist Brooke Silverang was the guest speaker and shared information about hurricane preparation and safety. The Q&A following well as stories about Hurricane Irma. hurricane preparation kits complete The Federation appreciates having such a dedicated community partner in Brookdale and would like to thank Executive Director Randall Johnston and Marketing Director Susan Scott for their support. We continue to welcome new people to the Senior Lunch Bunch every month, and its always a pleasure to watch the group widen the circle so that everyone is included. The free monthly luncheons are a chance for Jewish seniors to be in community together so they can socialize, have a meal, make new friends and stay connected with old friends. The vibe is friendly, from the moment you walk in and get your name tag, to the goodbyes at the end. While we rotate venues each month, the joy and camaraderie amongst everyone remains steadfast. If youd like to attend but dont drive, we have volunteers who provide rides. If youd like to volunteer to help out at the luncheon, please contact Sherri Zucker at 239.980.5760 or sherriz 62@aol.com. NEXT SENIOR LUNCH BUNCH:Thursday, October 11 at noon Temple Beth Shalom, 702 SE 24th Ave., Cape Coral RSVP by October 8 to Jodi Cohen at 239.481.4449 x2 or jodicohen@jfedlcc.org Jodi Cohen Jewish Federation Community Room 9701 Commerce Center Ct., Fort Myers 33908 All ages & levels of dance experience are welcome. Wear comfortable shoes, bring a water bottle AND A FRIEND! RSVP a MUST to Marsha Kistler marshatemple2012@gmail.com S u n d a y s a t 4 : 0 0 P M 9/30, 10/14, 10/28, 11/4 and 11/11 U P C O M I N G F E D E R A T I O N S T A Y T U N E D M O R E I N F O T O F O L L O W 2 0 1 9 O C T 1 7 R e a d t h e B o o k ; S k y p e t h e A u t h o r Author Martin Fletcher Promised Land Free and open to the community. A light dairy dinner will be served. O C T 3 0 C o m m u n i t y L e a d e r s h i p E v e n t N O V 1 4 P a c e s e t t e r s / M a j o r G i f t s An Evening with Alon Ben-Gurion, grandson of the late Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion. D E C 9 C o m m u n i t y B r e a k f a s t A Musical Journey featuring your favorite music from Jewish Artists. D E C 1 9 R e a d t h e B o o k ; S k y p e t h e A u t h o r Author Peter Golden, Nothing is Forgotten Free and open to the community. A light dairy dinner will be served. J A N 1 3 2 0 1 9 J e w i s h F i l m F e s t i v a l O p e n i n g D a y E v e n t Jewish Film Festival, Regal Cinemas at Bell Towers Special Guest: Author Beverly Gray, Seduced by Mrs. Robinson. Feature film, The Graduate. Special VIP Sponsor Rece ption. Sponsorship Opportunities Available. J A N 1 5 J e w i s h F i l m F e s t i v a l Showings are Tuesdays & Thursdays. F E B 1 2 F E B 1 8 P J L i b r a r y Presidents Day Fun Day F E B 2 0 R e a d t h e B o o k ; S k y p e t h e A u t h o r TBD Free and open to the community. A light dairy dinner will be served. F E B 2 6 A u t h o r E v e n t Alyson Richman, Lakes Library M A R 5 L i o n o f J u d a h Program and Speaker TBD M A R 1 6 Q u e e n E s t h e r ( A d u l t s O n l y ) M a s q u e r a d e B a l l A P R 1 4 P J L i b r a r y Pre-Pesach Party M A R 2 8 A u t h o r E v e n t B.A. Shapiro, The Collectors Apprentice The Alliance for the Arts A P R 2 8 Y o m H a S h o a h E v e n t M A Y 8 A n n u a l M e e t i n g Honest, caring and knowledgable advice about assisted living options at no cost to you!Personal and professional advice for you or a loved one when you need it the mostBruce B. Rosenblatt, Owner Senior Housing Expert239.595.0207 www.SeniorHousingSolutions.net

PAGE 4

4 OUR FEDERATION Community L CHAYIM Non Needs TRIBUTESWell wishes for a speedy recovery to Leah Warshaw from the Tuesday Mellow Mah Jong ladies Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Tributes. Please send them to Lori Ramos at the Federation at loriramos@jfedlcc.org. The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious, we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with the community. YOU MAKE IT HAPPEN T h e J o s e p h H o r o w i t z I s r a e l T r a v e l G r a n t i s a v a i l a b l e t h r o u g h t h e C o m m u n i t y F o u n d a t i o n o f t h e J e w i s h F e d e r a t i o n o f L e e a n d C h a r l o t t e C o u n t i e s The grant may be used for travel to Israel to participate in programs that are volunteer or educational in nature. T H I S G R A N T is for Jewish residents of either county who are 25 years old or younger and c an demonstrate a financial need. Academic standi ng and community involvement may also be considered O U R H O P E is that these progr ams will enhance Je wish knowledge and identity i n preparati on for participati on i n American Je wish life. F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o r a n a p p l i c a t i o n v i s i t o u r w e b s i t e a t J e w i s h F e d e r a t i o n L C C o r g facebook.com/jfedsrq CONNEC T with your Jewish Community www.facebook.com/ JewishFederationLCC Like us on Facebook! Thanks to the following supporters of LCHAYIM for their contribution to help underwrite the cost of bringing news of the local, national and international Jewish community to your mailbox every month!EDITORS:Jerey & Roberta KushnerREPORTERS:Stan Zell T o g e t h e r w e C A N M a k e a D i f f e r e n c e LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.

PAGE 5

5 OUR FEDERATION The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious, we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with the community. YOU MAKE IT HAPPEN This publication is brought to you each month thanks to the support of our advertisers. Please be sure to use their products and services, and mention that you found them in LCHAYIM. This months advertisersAdvanced Physical Therapy......14 Alliance Financial Group.........12 Hal Arkin, Realtor..................12 Art of Fashion and Moore........12 Dr. Daniel Bendetowicz............12 Cypress Cove............................11 Harold Eskin, Attorney..............12 FGCU.......................................22 FineMark Natl. Bank & Trust...16 Florida Specialists in Urology...12 Fort Myers Memorial Gardens.13 Susan Glasser, Realtor............14 Gordons Pool & Spa Service....12 Green Schoenfeld & Kyle, LLP..12 Gulf Coast Orthodontics...........19 Dr. David Heligman....................6 Henderson Franklin...................12 Higginson Tax & Accounting....12 Lee Lighting..............................12 Living Happily Counseling.......12 Michael Shapiro Photography...18 Paragon Pools...........................12 PCC Tile...................................12 Alan J. Rubinstein, Attorney.....12 Senior Housing Solutions...........3 Seniors Helping Seniors............12 Shell Point.................................24 Snydermans Shoes...................12 Douglas Spiegel, Attorney........12 Taschner Periodontics...............14 Temple Judea.........................7,15 The Bagel Factory.....................12 The Palms at Fort Myers.............9 The Terraces at Bonita Springs..13 The Westin Cape Coral.............17 Bob Vinikoor, Realtor.............12 Paul Weinstein, CFP................12 A year after HarveyLast summer saw Hurricanes Harvey, Maria and, here locally, Irma. Our Jew ish community joined other communities around the country to help hurricane victims. These funds were directed to our national agency, The Jewish Fed erations of North America (JFNA) for disbursement in distressed areas. JFNA works with relief organizations such as the American Red Cross, Nechama and more to assess the needs of the victims and provide support to those who need it most. Here is JFNAs report on Houston, one year later.O ne year ago, on August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey bore down on Houston, unloading 19 trillion gallons of water on the city more than a years worth of rain in and seven major Jew ish institutions suffered extensive or catastrophic damage, including two of the largest synagogues, a day school, the JCC and a senior care center. And Federation was there. Communities from around North America sprung to action to help immediately following the storm and throughout the rebuilding Repairing Homes, Restoring Lives We were all raised with the value that we should give back to the com munity. But I never thought wed be asking for help, said Margaret Lewis, assistance, furniture and appliance grants, and much more. Federations also provided Houston with countless packages of essential supplies, including air mattresses, clothing and more. In addition to their donations, Federation lay and professional leaders from around North America also traveled to Houston in the storms aftermath to help the local Federation manage operations and fundraising during this time of great need, as well as to volunteer cations of property damage and having a place to go when the hurricane hits, but you dont often think about the longterm damages people have to live with, said Gail Norry, the Philadelphia-based chair of JFNAs Emergency Committee, who traveled to Houston to assist. One area of notable, ongoing need has been mental health care. Even a year later, an estimated 18 percent of from post-Harvey psychological distress and each new storm that occurs brings these issues to the surface. In response, local Federations contributed to vital mental health recovery Harvey, grief and trauma counselors from the Israel Trauma Coalition have been brought in to train hundreds of school administrators and teachers, in their community. Supporting Jewish Life In addition to the immediate, life-saving it also continues to support the ongoing rebuilding of Jewish institutions and continuity of Jewish life in Houston. Individual Federations across North America have given generously to sustain Houstons vibrant Jewish life. By helping with synagogue dues, summer camp scholarships, day school tuition and Israel experiences, no family in Houston has to choose between rebuilding their home and investing in powerful investments that help ensure a bright Jewish future in Houston. I never really appreciated that our Federation also gives to other cities and other places in need. And now, when were asking for help, I get it. Were taking care of our own people, said Lewis. I understand the power of the community and the power that the Federation has to support all of us. Looking Forward While Federation has helped the community come a long way, Houston is far from fully recovered. Almost a year later, the future of many of Houstons Jewish institutions remains uncertain, and countless families are still displaced tinue to support the ongoing needs that will arise as families and institutions work to make long-term decisions. The Hurricane Harvey recovery Klal Yisrael, the Jewish collective. That continued support, which has endured over the millennia of Jewish history, remains essential as Houston continues to work to rebuild. Donors ask Why give to an um brella? Why not give directly to the Kol Israel Arevim Zeh La Zeh each of us is responsible for one another. It happened to Houston and it can happen to anyone. I think we need to be mindful and take care of each other. Each Tuesday afternoon, an open session of Mah Jongg is held at the Jewish Federation. Players must be at least advanced beginners, as no lessons are given. DAY: Tuesdays, 12:30~3:30 P.M. FEE: $1 per week for more information call Rona Strausberg at 239.949.9003 By Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach & Food Pantry Coordinator Introducing the Community Friends ProgramTo make a long story relatively short, which is usually not my style, Id like to share my most rewarding volunteer experience. Back in Madison, Wisconsin, I was the newsletter editor at the congregation I belonged to. One day when the I asked him what he did all day. I listened and several verbs later I asked Rabbi Brian, So when do you ever stroke your imaginary beard and study Torah? which is what I imagined (male) rabbis did. Brian and his wife Debbie both worked part-time and they had a two-year-old daughter, so he answered that there was no time. I had met his daughter one day when she was running around outside the synagogue in a pink tutu, and the next thing I knew we were running and hiding from someone together. We bonded with Liora on Wednesday nights so the rabbi could study, go shopping, or even spend time with Debbie outside the house. I had the commodity of time to night for one year. It was a triple mitz supporting my community by giving the rabbi time and space, and I created bonds with three people who are still dear friends 19 years later. Although my experience was about helping a young family, the prinintuitively knew that I could help out and provide a resource where it was needed. It was a weekly commitment of about three hours, it provided me some serious play time, and the people I was helping were deeply grateful. It takes a village to raise a family, run a monthly luncheon, and care for the elders in our community. As the monthly senior luncheon attendance grows, as the list of people who receive a holiday gift bag lengthens, the Fed eration recognizes that the needs of se niors in our community are also chang ing and growing. In order to address those needs, the Federation is starting a Community Friends Program. We will begin on a small scale to match volun teers with people who would like a vis itor, need help going grocery shopping, or perhaps need a ride somewhere, to state a few examples. If you are interested in volunteering for the Community Friends Program, please contact me at 239.481.4449 x2 or jodicohen@jfedlcc.org. You will be asked to complete an application and have a conversation so we can learn about you, your interests and what you would like to do. We will endeavor to honor the stat ed vision of the Jewish Federation of Tzedakah (benevolence), Tikkun Olam (repairing the world) and Klal Yisrael (taking responsibility for one another). LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org. Read the current and recent issues of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org.

PAGE 6

6 OUR COMMUNITY BNAI MITZVAHBenjamin Stanley Manekin, son of Jennifer and Lawrence Manekin, older brother of Allison, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, October 6 at Temple Judea. Benjamin is a 7th-grader at Cypress Lake Middle School. Benjamin enjoys playing the bass in Chamber Or chestra and is a member of the Southwest Florida Symphony Youth Symphony. Benvideo games and everything related to nature and animals. Benjamin is thankful to Rabbi Marc Sack, Diane Seidenstein, Tab Scribner and his religious school teachers in helping him prepare for this milestone. He looks forward to sharing this special occasion with his family and friends. Mother and daughter Arlene and Samantha Gallentine will be called to read from the Torah as Bnot Mitzvah on Friday, October 19 during regular Shabbat services at The Community Free Synagogue. Originally from Maryland, Arlene and Sam moved to Fort Myers four years ago. This an exceptional achievement for Arlene, who has recently been designated legally blind. She recently retired from retail work. Sam works at Lakes Regional Library. They began their adult Hebrew education at Community Free Synagogues Auxiliary Rabbi Tom Miess Hebrew Reading Ulpan and continued their preparation for this special moment with C.F.S. Auxiliary Rabbi Terri Goldberg. They are very excited and would like to invite the community to share this experience with them. Maya Renee Shuster, daughter of Anna and Adam Shuster, older sister of Zachary, will be called to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, October 27. The Shusters have been Temple Beth El members since moving to Fort Myers from Michigan in 2010. A seventh-grade honor student at the Canter bury School, Maya enjoys singing and playing tennis and golf. Maya has been taking She loves spending time with her friends, family and dogs, and watching scary movies with them. Maya believes she is very fortunate and understands the importance of giving back to the community. She volunteers at Saint Vincent de Paul. The Shuster family feels blessed and grateful to Dale Cohen for all the hours of coaching and teaching in preparation for this special day, which could not have happened without her. Special thanks to Mayas religious school teachers and to Rabbi Luna. The Shuster family is very proud and thankful to be a part of Temple Beth El and this great Jewish community. Maya is excited to celebrate this day with her family, friends from near and far, her temple and her teachers. Colin Narayan Taschner, son of Kavitha and Brian Taschner, brother to Aidan Taschner, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, November 10. Colin is proud to follow in the footsteps of his father who became a Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth El in 1986, and his brother who became a Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth El in 2015. Colins hobbies include swimming, baking, playing basketball and taking care of his beloved dog, Teton. He is a seventh-grade student at Cypress Lake Middle school. He is a great student and is a mem ber of the math team. Colins mitzvah project is to volunteer at the Humane Society. He has a special way with animals and is looking for ward to helping socialize kittens and puppies to help them become ready for adoption. Colin is very excited to share this special day with his friends and family. He would also like to thank Morah Dale and Rabbi Luna for all their help in preparing for his Bar Mitzvah. Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Life Cycle events births, Bnai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, anniversaries and obituaries. For Bnai Mitzvah, please include up to 150 words about your child. Submit your events to LChayim36@gmail.com. Photos are appreciated; please e-mail as JPGs at 300dpi. Stay connected @ www.JewishFederationLCC.orgHolocaust Museum & Cohen Education Center updateBy Susan Suarez, President & CEO 239 481 Community Free Synagogue events and programsBrown Bag Movie Night The next C.F.S. Brown Bag Movie Night features Menashe p.m. on Thursday October 18 in the C.F.S. Community Hall, 10868 Metro Parkway, Fort Myers. \021\003KLV\003WRXFKLQJ\003\277OP\017\003VKRW\003LQ\003
PAGE 7

7 OUR COMMUNITY Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Life Cycle events births, Bnai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, anniversaries and obituaries. For Bnai Mitzvah, please include up to 150 words about your child. Submit your events to LChayim36@gmail.com. Photos are appreciated; please e-mail as JPGs at 300dpi. Stay connected @ www.JewishFederationLCC.org Holocaust Museum & Cohen Education Center updateBy Susan Suarez, President & CEO The World Federation of Jewish Child Survivors of the Holocaust & Descendants will hold its 30th Annual International Conference of Child Survivors, Second and Third Generations, Spouses and Families in Cooperation with the Kinder transport, and Generations of the Shoah, in West Palm Beach this year. The 2018 conference will be held from Friday, November 9 to Monday, November 12. For conference information and registration, visit www.holocaustchild.org or call Susan at 818.606.0793. Conference for child survivors and their descendants to be held in Florida Susan Suarez F all greetings from the Holocaust Museum and the Janet G. and Harvey D. Cohen Education Center! We enter the new 2018-2019 season boosted by the record-breaking year just past! Beginning with the land mark capital gift from lead gift donor Janet G. Cohen and purchase of our new building, we also reached two additional milestones. Over 30,000 students, teachers and visitors were educated by our outreach efforts, which means that since our founding in 2001, over 200,000 people have now participated in our Education and Museum program ming and events! When you combine all the SWFL students weve served with the visitors from all 50 states and 45 countries, the enormous. If each of them tells just one other person about the importance of respect for others, thousands upon thou sands of other people may be inspired to act against bigotry, hatred and violence. Thank you to everyone who has made this possible our generous support ers, Museum members and volunteers. None of this would have been possible without your help! The capital campaign for our future home continues to make great progress. We will remain operating in our present location until Spring 2019, when we will move into our new location at 975 Imperial Golf Course Blvd., Naples. We anticipate holding the formal dedication ceremony during Fall 2019. ing of Operation Finale at the Paragon Pavilion Theaters was a great success! cation programs. Thanks to all who supported the event by purchasing tickets and to those braved the stormy weather to attend! Our October calendar is already both here at the Museum and onsite at schools. We will also be hosting a number of Group Tours. If your group or organization is interested in information on scheduling a private tour, please contact David Nelson at david@ HolocaustMuseumSWFL.org. We are excited to invite you to par ticipate this fall in the new Movies That Matter SWFL series, a community-wide issues. The Museum is a partner in the Human Rights Film Coalition of SWFL, whose mission is to Educate, engage and facilitate discussion around human Four documentaries (described below) will be presented and moderated by a recognized authority or guest panel will follow each film. Reservations throughout Naples. Sponsor ships and reserved seating are also available for the series. While there is no cost to attend, donations help cover the costs of providing tickets to our community members, regardless of ability to pay. To RSVP, to make a donation, and for sponsorship and reserved seating information, please visit www. HolocaustMuseumSWFL.org and click on the Events page. Please note that donations will not be accepted at the South Regional Library venue. Here are I Am Jane Doe Thursday, October 18, 6:30 p.m. Temple Shalom, 4630 Pine Ridge Road, Naples A gripping tale chronicling the battle that mothers waged on behalf of their daughters who were victims of sex Southwest Florida Freedom to Marry Thursday, November 1, 7:00 p.m. Temple Shalom, 4630 Pine Ridge Road, Naples An intimate yet major documentary that goes behind the scenes to show the historic civil rights struggle that led to the legal battle before the U.S. Supreme Court. Film Sponsor: PFLAG Naples John Lewis Get in the Way Tuesday, November 13, 7:00 p.m. ings Park, 120 Moorings Park Dr., Naples umentary of the legislator, activist and civil rights leader considered by many to be the conscience of Congress. Venue Sponsor: Moorings Park Bending the Arc Monday, December 10, 6:00 p.m. South Regional Library, 8065 Lely Cultural Pkwy, Naples The story of Dr. Paul Farmer and oth ers who work on the frontlines of the ence that dedicated professionals can make in what may seem to be hopeless situations. Venue Sponsor: South Regional Library No donations accepted at this venue We will hold our annual Volunteer Welcome Back event on Monday, No Skillets in the Bed Bath and Beyond Plaza in Naples. RSVP to info@Holo caustMuseumSWFL.org Thanks to our volunteers for all they do! Asaf Romirowsky is an adjunct scholar at the Foundation for Defense for Democracies, and the Middle East Forum. Asaf is a former Israel Defense Force (IDF) International Relations liaison officer in the West Bank, currently serves as an IDF reserve liaison officer to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. He holds a B.A. in Middle East Affairs and Contemporary Jewish History and from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an M.A. in International Relations and Middle East Affairs from Villanova University, where he focused on the differences and similarities between the Mitchell Report in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland. He has traveled widely in Egypt, Turkey, Jordan, Tunisia, Israel, and the Palestinian Territories. cordially invites you to theCombating the Delegitimization of IsraelFeaturingAsaf Romirowsky, PhD Executive Director of Scholars for Peace in the Middle EastWednesday, October 24, 2018 7:00 P.M. Temple Judea 14486 A&W Bulb Rd. Fort MyersTo register please visit www.aipac.org/templejudea *This event is off the record and closed to the press.THE AMERICAN ISRAEL PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Beit Midrash Adult Jewish Learning at Temple Judea Begins Monday, October 8 6:15pm 7:30pm Overview of Jewish Practice, Thought & History Learn about: Beliefs & Prayer Shabbat Holidays and Dietary Laws Ethics and Values History and Modern Communities A prerequisite for people who are considering conversion Begins Monday, October 8 7:45pm 8:45pm Modern Israeli Life and American Jews Begins Monday, October 8 6:15pm 7:30pm The X rated side of Jewish Mysticism Begins Monday, October 8 7:45pm 8:45pm Memory system for learning Jewish Culture and Modern Hebrew rabbi@tjswfl.org 14486 A and W Bulb Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 tjswfl@gmail.com 239 481

PAGE 8

8 JEWISH INTEREST Phil Jason Book review by Philip K. Jason, Special to LCHAYIM in the 18 th and 19th century United States T heres the story of the rabbi who went to a Jewish community center mixer to welcome newcomers. When someone asked him what kind of rabbi he was, he answered, Jewish. Im a Jewish rabbi. Was he making a joke? Didnt to know if he was Orthodox, Conser vative, Reform, Reconstructionist, Hasidic or some other variation of the religious spectrum? Of course, he knew. It was a serious answer, but with a bit of a wink. The story that Steven R. Weisman tells in The Chosen Wars is, among other things, the story of the search for about a Jewish future. Its the story of growing opportunities for Jews to enter cultural mainstreams and the costs and told with power and precision. After sketching the earliest arrivals of Jews in New Amsterdam (1654) and examining Jewish life in the Colonial period, Weisman explores the peaks and valleys of migration most often peaks that occurred in the 18 th and 19th centuries. He details the early prominence of Charleston, South Carolina, as a place ents for a single brand of or American Judaism. He takes us through the many conferences where attempts were made, mostly with good intentions, to bargain and to vote up or down which pieces of Jewish baggage to unload. Biblical Hebrew? Longing for the restoration of the Temple? The Messiah? The dietary laws (was the Trefa standing or was it a purposeful, insulting act of rebellion)? Observance of the Sabbath? Literal understandings of Old Testament fables? The stigma of being a chosen people? And what about the circumscribed traditional roles of Jewish women? in all respects? Dealmakers came and went. Congregations merged and separated. From it all, something emerged that can be called American Juda ism. It was shaped by people like Rabbi Isaac Wise, Isaac Leeser, Felix Adler, David Einhorn and scores of others. They fought over almost everything, including which prayers to be extracted from the new Judaisms prayerbooks and whether or not to continue the traditions of wearing head coverings and prayer shawls. They The Chosen Wars: How Judaism Became an American Religion by Steven R. Weisman. Simon & Schuster. 368 pages. Hardcover $30.00. where immigrant Jews could build a vibrant community. He examines the interplay between becoming an American with almost unimaginable rights and holding on to the traditional responsibilities of Jewish life as it had existed in past centuries. Along the way, Weisman explores the vying strands of Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish culture. to do with imitating what Americans expected in houses of worship. To that end, many synagogues echoed the grandeur of churches, particularly Presbyterian churches. But how did Jews make the transition from various corners of Europe, where they were so often victims of persecution, to an unaccustomed security and even prominence in the land of the free? Weisman presents the saga in its many parts, drawing on a series of fascinating characters and stressful crises. How did the Civil munities and individual Jewish lives? Weisman reveals the answers. How did the huge in19th century impinge upon Jews already here Weisman also presents the key issues of the Jewish Enlightenment in Europe (the search for rational religion) and its parallels in the United States. He shows readers how the major players, spiritual leaders and lay leaders of congregations fought over the ingredi edited and published rival Jewish newspapers to promulgate their posi tions. They took turns praising and demonizing one another. In most cases, these were giant person alities; in many cases, they had giant egos. Weisman writes in a straightforward, accessible style. His decisions about the major and minor divi sions of his enormous body The Chosen Wars is no doubt the ings about the Jewish experience in the United States since Jonathan D. Sarnas American Judaism: A His tory (2004). It makes the issues come what ways can a people who strive to be part of wider society reconcile the historical reality born of both choice and coercion of being apart from it? Originally published in the Washington Independent Review of Books. Re printed by permission. Philip K. Jason is Professor Emeri tus of English from the United States Naval Academy. He reviews regularly for Florida Weekly, Washington Inde pendent Review of Books, Southern Literary Review, other publications and the Jewish Book Council Please visit Phils website at www.philjason.word press.com. M a r t i n F l e t c h e r a n N B C N e w s B u r e a u C h i e f i n T e l A v i v h a s w o n m a n y b o o k a w a r d s a n d 5 E m m y s W e d n e s d a y O c t o b e r 1 7 t h 2 0 1 8 6 : 0 0 7 : 3 0 P M 9 7 0 1 C o m m e r c e C e n t e r C t F o r t M y e r s F l 3 3 9 0 8 RSVP is Required 239.481.4449 Or email: debbiesanford@jfedlcc.org Free & open to the community. A light dairy dinner will be served & is sponsored by: Changing your address? Keep LCHAYIM coming to your home. Email loriramos@jfedlcc.org.

PAGE 9

9 JEWISH INTEREST edited and published rival Jewish newspapers to promulgate their positions. They took turns praising and demonizing one another. In most cases, these were giant personalities; in many cases, they had giant egos. Weisman writes in a straightforward, accessible style. His decisions about the major and minor divisions of his enormous body to be consistently fair-minded. The Chosen Wars is no doubt the ings about the Jewish experience in the United States since Jonathan D. Sarnas American Judaism: A History (2004). It makes the issues come what ways can a people who strive to be part of wider society reconcile the historical reality born of both choice and coercion of being apart from it? Originally published in the Washington Independent Review of Books. Reprinted by permission. Philip K. Jason is Professor Emeritus of English from the United States Naval Academy. He reviews regularly for Florida Weekly Washington Independent Review of Books, Southern Literary Review, other publications and the Jewish Book Council Please visit Phils website at www.philjason.word press.com. Dr. Paul BartropBlack Sabbath in RomeBy Paul R. Bartrop, PhDS on October 16, 1943, a roundup of the Jews of Rome began. Early on that Saturday morning, Romes ghetto was surrounded by German forces, prior to a thorough door-to-door search for Jews. The Germans were carrying prepared lists of names and addresses, and knew exactly who to target. With only a few minutes to pre pare themselves, the Jews who had been taken in the razzia (roundup) were conveyed to the Col legio Militaire (Military College), there to await their fate. At the outset of World War II, Italy had a population of over 44 million, of whom some 52,000 were Jewish. A Jewish presence in the country dated back well over 2,000 years, and with such longevity the community became completely integrated within Italian society and culture. Italians in general did not exhibit open anti-Semitism, and unlike National Socialism in Germany, Italian fascism was not predicated on theories of ethnic and racial hierarchies or anti-Semitism. Indeed, until the Ital ian National Assembly passed a series of anti-Semitic laws in 1938, Jews were even permitted membership in the Fas cist Party. As Italys dictator, Benito Mussolini, tied his nation closer to Germany, however, he came under increased pres sure to crack down on Italian Jews. The anti-Jewish laws of 1938, when they were introduced, were watered-down versions of Germanys Nuremberg in the military and from certain profes sions; Jews were not permitted to hold government positions or to work in radio and journalism; marriage between Jews and non-Jews was prohibited; and resident alien Jews were placed in internment camps. Often, however, local authorities only half-heartedly enforced these measures, and in some instances simply ignored them altogether. This does not mean that Italian Jews were passed, however, and a number left Italy, choosing to live in the Americas or elsewhere. Italy entered World War II in June In pursuit of Mussolinis grand visions of a new Roman Empire, Italy would eventually establish military occupa tions in southern France, Albania, Greece and Yugoslavia. German of and deport Jews in those areas, but most with mass murder or deportations. As a result, during 1941-1943, thousands of on May 16, 1943. On July 25, 1943, Benito Mussolini was deposed by the Fascist Grand Council as Prime Minister and arrested on order of King Victor Emmanuel II. Mussolinis successor, Marshal Pietro Badoglio, then began secret negotiations for Italys surrender. On September 3, the Italian main land was invaded. The same day, General Giuseppe Castellano signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in Cassibile. The agreement was made public on September 8, and the Germans, increasingly desperate to safeguarded as well as to be done with vacillation regarding the implementa tion of the Final Solution hastened full-scale invasion of Italy. There is little doubt that the Ger mans felt frustrated over the fact that the Final Solution had, as they saw it, been endangered by the actions of some Italians. Italy was, after all, Germanys closest ally in Europe, and it was in Europe that the war against the Jews was being played out. mans now decided to impose a grinding occupation on the Italians overall and the raid on the Rome ghetto on October 16, Jews were taken in regardless of age, sex or health. Some managed to escape. In the days leading up to Vatican had learned of the possibility of such an action and managed to persuade Pope Pius XII to order the opening of Romes monasteries and convents as sanctuaries. Several thousand were sheltered this way, which only served to anger the Germans all the more. On October 16, however, well over 1,000 Jews were caught by the Germans, with others in succeeding weeks. Building on this start, throughout October and November of 1943, German occupation authorities commenced a roundup of Jews in all of Italys large cities. The plan was to concentrate them at several points and then transport them to the death camps in Poland, but in many cases Italian the operation in advance. Sometimes, they went so far as to hide Jews they knew, or give shelter to those seeking help. On the other hand, the majority of all those arrested were deported to Auschwitz, where most died. Overall, it has been estimated that over 7,000 Italian Jews became victims of the Holocaust. The Black Sabbath, as book of that title published in 1969, saw the start of the great ordeal for the Jews of Rome, and then all Italy. Although there had been a Jewish presence in Italy since the days of the Roman Empire, it now faced one of its greatest challenges. October 1943 75 years ago this month is yet another time for deep of what it means to be free. Dr. Paul Bartrop is Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. He can be reached at pbartrop@fgcu.edu. What does exceptional senior living mean to you? At The Palms of Fort Myers it means a lifestyle where 24-hour Five Star service meets a world of opportunities. Savor a delicious meal prepared for you by our culinary team or whip up something special in your own kitchen. Take an exercise class with your neighbors or start your day with our Coffee and Crosswords group. Our lifestyle is designed for the way you live. DISCOVER: Month-to-month rental community Five Star Dining Experience, featuring Signature recipes Lifestyle360 program offering a full-schedule of activities Variety of in-house religious services Scheduled local transportation for medical appointments and shopping 24-hour care available, should your needs change Exceptional senior living experiencesCall to see how you can live the exceptional life today! DISCOVERWHATITSLIKETOHAVEANEXCEPTIONALDAY, EVERYDAY. DISCOVERWHATITSLIKETOHAVEANEXCEPTIONALDAY, EVERYDAY. 2674 Winkler Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-275-7800www.ThePalmsAtFortMyers.com INDEPENDENT LIVING ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE REHABILITATION Assisted Living Facility License #AL072692018 Five Star Senior Living Pet Friendly Changing your address? Keep LCHAYIM coming to your home. Email loriramos@jfedlcc.org.There is little doubt that the Germans felt frustrated over the fact that the Final Solution had, as they saw it, been endangered by the actions of some Italians.

PAGE 10

10 JEWISH INTEREST What makes a wine kosher?By The Wine Whisperer Jerry I ve written about kosher wines in the past, but its probably not a bad idea to revisit the topic and refresh our memories. Not long ago, kosher wine was considered the cough syrup of the wine made from nasty Concord grapes and often annoyingly sweet. Those of us who are at a certain age certainly remember the old Mogen David and Manischewitz of days gone by. But today many kosher wines, made from classic grapes, are complex and full of character. In fact, sales of kosher wines are growing fast. While no one tracks buyer demographics, some producers claim that up to half arent even mem bers of the Jewish faith theyre just preparation, which guarantees purity. Kosher wines, like fashionable organic products, avoid pesticides and other chemicals. And, as we all know, many Jewish holy day traditions include wine, including the four cups we drink at Passover, and the Kiddush before our Sabbath meals. Kosher comes from the Hebrew kashrut, the strict Jewish dietary code, naturally kosher foods such as fruit and vegetables; foods not kosher by nature, but can be made so by processing under strict supervision; and foods that arent kosher and can never be, usually bear a U symbol (for Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations) or a K (for Organized Kashrut Laborato ries). The kosher process is exacting. It must be strictly supervised, usually by a rabbi, and none of the work can be done on a holy day. Only Jews who observe the Sabbath can handle the wine, and even after its poured into barrels and given a rabbinical seal, a shomer (watchman) has to guard it. Kosher wine is essentially made the same way as other wine, except that no leavens, wheat or animal products can be used. The yeasts must be certi pended particles before bottling, kosuch as the agent bentonite or kosher There are actually two categories of kosher wine for consuming at rehandled and served only by Sabbathobservant Jews. The second variety (called mevushal or boiled) can be handled by anyone and still maintain its integrity. That spiritual robustness is due to temperature of the wine is brought from 15C to 90C and back again, all in about ten seconds. This is believed to strengthen the wines spiritual essence and to make heathens so they wouldnt use the wine in their own rituals. Unfortunately, it has also frightened away serious wine drinkers and given kosher wine a poor reputation. If the heating process is done incorrectly, it can create an unwanted cooked character. However, with modern technology and correct it actually enhances the wines aromat ics and stabilizes its tannins, fruit and color. Some of the worlds leading pro lire; Champagnes Laurent-Perrier; and Beaujolais vintner Georges Du boeuf. From the New World, Hagafen Cellars in California and Rodrigues Markland Cottage Winery in New foundland. Yarden, Israels premium kosher wine, has won medals at Vin expo, the annual wine Olympics held in France. Many of these wines are worth drinking, whether or not you keep kosher. And be sure to raise a glass with the traditional Jewish toast of Lchaim to life! er. He is Creative Director of Green Director of the international Direct Cellars wine club. His book, Secrets of the Wine Whisperer is available through his website. Read his other writings at www.winewhisperer.com. Falafel superstar recipe by Dalia Personal Chef Dalia Hemed can be reached at daliahemed@msn.com. A s the Jewish year comes to a close, lets take a look at the most popular food of the year. With the advent of a new year comes the inevitable deluge of bestof and worst-of lists, and the culinary world is no exception. Using reports released from the National Restaurant Association, which surveyed more than 700 chefs, and the Food Network Kitchen prognosticators, as well as a major supermarket chain, we find a that is rising to the top of the list of the food trends in 2018. Foods like hum mus, tahini, pita and shakshuka, and zaatar are showing up on mainstream menus. But the winner of the year, undoubtedly is falafel. This humble Israeli fried snack is poised to become a trend-forward star! Biting into falafel is one of those experiences that makes eating such a pleasure insanely crispy on the outside that magical combination that makes it craveable, too. Falafel is a plant-based superstar with a delightful texture, customiz relatively inexpensive and delicious to make at home, and chefs can create signature versions to keep customers Falafel is a Middle Eastern dish that incorporates mashed chickpeas and spices. The falafel is formed into balls or fritters, fried (can also be baked) and usually pocketed tortilla (or corn tortilla for those prefer ring a gluten-free option). Toppings paired with falafel include hummus, Israeli salad (chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, onions), pickled white/red cabbage and tahini sauce (ground-up sesame seeds). There are a few countries Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Palestine and even India. However, it is one of the most popular, if not the dish of Israel! Falafel was introduced by Yemeni Jews in the 1950s. They also introduced the idea of serving falafel in pita bread. Although there are many influences from surrounding countries, lets get seriousfalafel will always be a traditional Israeli dish! Today, you can East to the Far West because falafel is so delicious regardless of where you are from. I have created a gluten-free, baked recipe, trying to incorporate spices and ingredients that are trending this year. Gluten-Free Baked Falafel with Tahini Aioli Ingredients: 1 lb dry chickpeas/garbanzo beans 1 small onion, roughly chopped 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley 3-5 cloves garlic 3 tbsp potato starch 1 tbsp salt 1 tbsp cumin 1 tsp ground coriander 1/4 tsp black pepper 1/4 tsp harissa 1/2 tsp turmeric 1/2 tsp zaatar 1/2 tsp baking soda 1 egg Olive oil spray Instructions: Pour the chickpeas into a large bowl and cover them with about 3 inches of cold water. Let them soak overnight. They will double in size as they soak. Drain and rinse the garbanzo beans well. Pour them into your food processor along with the chopped onion, garlic cloves, parsley, potato starch, salt, cumin, ground corian der, black pepper, turmeric, harissa, zaatar and egg. Pulse all ingredients together until a rough, coarse meal forms. You want the mixture to hold together, and a more paste-like consistency will help with that. But dont over process, as you dont want it turning into hummus! Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1-2 hours. After the mixture is chilled, pre-heat your oven to 375F. Form falafel mixture into round balls or slidershaped patties using wet hands or a falafel scoop. I usually use about 2 tbsp of mixture per falafel. You can make them smaller or larger depending on your personal prefer ence. The balls will stick together Place on a greased baking sheet or greased mini cupcake pan. Spray with olive oil on top of the falafel balls. Bake for 25-30 minutes. Increase oven temperature to a 500F broil. Broil falafel for 3-5 minutes (or lon ger) until the tops are golden brown. Here is my favorite way to serve a falafel taco. Start with a layer of hum if gluten-free), and then add the falafel, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles. Top with a thin layer of tahini aioli. Tahini Aioli Ingredients: 1/4 cup tahini 1/4 cup mayonnaise Juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup water Instructions: Combine all ingredients in a small food processor and blend until smooth. Aioli will keep in the fridge for up to 2 weeks in an airtight container. Serve alongside falafel. Stars of DavidNew TV Shows: Jewish Connections Here are the new TV shows/miniseries that premiered in September, or will start in early-to-mid October, that have a major Jewish connection. The Good Cop is a ten-episode com on Friday, September 21. It is based on an Israeli TV series. The American version (which may have a 2nd season if viewers like it) was created by ANDY BRECKMAN, 63. He was the creator of Monk and it remains his biggest hit. Tony Danza plays a disgraced former rules. Josh Groban (who isnt Jewish) plays Danzas straight-arrow son, an NYPD detective. The two become unofEmma Stone and JONAH HILL, 34, co-star in Maniac series that premiered on Friday, September 21. They play two strangers with mental problems who are drawn to the late stages of a mysterious pharmaceu tical trial. They hope the drug used in the trial will cure their problems almost instantly. Appearing in recurring roles are JULIA GARNER, 24, (Ozark) and JEMIMA KIRKE, 33 (Girls). Single Parents premiered on ABC on Wednesday, September 26. Its a comedy about Will Cooper (Taram Killiam), a single father of a young daughter. His friends urge him to get back in the dating game. BRAD GARRETT, 58, (Robert on Everybody Loves Raymond) has a regular role as Douglas, a wealthy widower with two young twin daughters. He urges Cooper to hire a NEEDED TO LABEL CHAYIM JOIN US for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call Debbie Sanford 481.4449 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the ma iling date and you can let us know if you are available to help label LCHAYIM. Time: 9:30 A.M. Monday October 22, 2018 Monday November 26, 2018 Wednesday December 26, 2018 NEEDED TO LABEL CHAYIM JOIN US for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call Debbie Sanford 481.4449 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the ma iling date and you can let us know if you are available to help label LCHAYIM. Time: 9:30 A.M. Monday October 22, 2018 Monday November 26, 2018 Wednesday December 26, 2018 NEEDED TO LABEL CHAYIM JOIN US for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call Debbie Sanford 481.4449 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the ma iling date and you can let us know if you are available to help label LCHAYIM. Time: 9:30 A.M. Monday October 22, 2018 Monday November 26, 2018 Wednesday December 26, 2018

PAGE 11

11 JEWISH INTEREST What do you think? Need to reach the editor of LCHAYIM ? Send an email to LChayim36@gmail.com. Personal Chef Dalia Hemed can be reached at daliahemed@msn.com.Stars of DavidBy Nate Bloom, Contributing Columnist Editors note: Persons in BOLD CAPS are deemed by Nate Bloom to be Jewish for the purpose of the column. Persons identified as Jewish have at least one Jewish parent and were not raised in a faith other than Judaism and dont identify with a faith other than Judaism as an adult. Converts Nate Bloom (see column at le) has become a family history expert in 10 years of doing his celebrity column, and he has expert friends who can help when called on. Most family history experts charge $1,000 or more to do a full family-tree search. However, Bloom knows that most people want to start with a limited search of one family line.So heres the deal:Write Bloom at nteibloom@aol.com and enclose a phone number. Nate will then contact you about starting a limited search. If that goes well, additional and more extensive searches are possible. The rst search fee is no more than $100. No upfront cost. Also, several of this newspapers readers have asked Bloom to locate friends and family members from their past, and thats worked out great for them. So contact him about this as well.Interested in Your Familys History? New TV Shows: Jewish Connections Here are the new TV shows/min iseries that premiered in September, or will start in early-to-mid October, that have a major Jewish connection. The Good Cop is a ten-episode com on Friday, September 21. It is based on an Israeli TV series. The American version (which may have a 2 nd season if viewers like it) was created by ANDY BRECKMAN 63. He was the creator of Monk and it remains his biggest hit. Tony Danza plays a disgraced former rules. Josh Groban (who isnt Jewish) plays Danzas straight-arrow son, an NYPD detective. The two become unof JONAH HILL, 34, co-star in Maniac series that premiered on Friday, Sep tember 21. They play two strangers with mental problems who are drawn to the late stages of a mysterious pharmaceu tical trial. They hope the drug used in the trial will cure their problems almost instantly. Appearing in recurring roles are JULIA GARNER, 24, (Ozark) and JEMIMA KIRKE 33 (Girls). Single Parents premiered on ABC on Wednesday, September 26. Its a comedy about Will Cooper (Taram Killiam), a single father of a young daughter. His friends urge him to get back in the dating game. BRAD GARRETT 58, (Robert on Everybody Loves Raymond ) has a regular role as Douglas, a wealthy widower with two young tw in daughters. He urges Cooper to hire a babysitter and get out there. The Neighborhood, a comedy/ drama, begins on Monday, October 1 on CBS. MAX GREENFIELD (Schmidt on New Girl) stars as Dave Johnson. Things get dicey when Johnson, who is described as the nicest guy in the Midwest, moves his family to a tough L.A. neighborhood. Many people there dont appreciate his extreme neighborliness. Star Wars: Resistance starts on the Disney Channel on Sunday, October 7. This series is set decades after the events in the Return of the Jedi and six months before the events of The Force Awakens. Resistance follows Kazuda Xiono, a pilot who is recruited to spy on the growing threat of the First Order. JOSH BRENER 33, (Nelson Big Head Bighetti on Silicon Valley ) is a series regular. is an eight-episode anthology series that begins streaming on Amazon on Friday, October 12. Its about people around the globe who believe themselves to be descendants of the Russian royal family. The premthis series would romanticize the Roterrible record of anti-Semitism and a lot of Jewish blood was/is on their hands. Their cruel bigotry is often glossed-over or simply overwhelmed, in a sense, by the brutal way in which the last Tsar, a However, then I read that the creator and writer of the series is MATTHEW WEINER, 53. He gets historical details right and his new show may be great. Weiner was a major writer for The Sopranos and the creator and writer of Mad Men. Mad Men has to be ranked among the best TV series of all-time. The enseen it, stay with Mad Men season and youll be hooked. Stars in a episode include PAUL REISER, 62, COREY STOLL, 42, NOAH WYLE, 47, JON TENNEY, 56, and AMANDA PEET, 46. Camping is a comedy that starts on Sunday, October 14 on HBO. It follows Walt (David Tennant), whose 45th birthday was supposed to be a delightful back to nature weekend. It was organized by his aggressively controlling wife Kathryn (Jennifer Garner). Well, of course everything that can go wrong does. Based on a Brit TV series, the American version is written and produced by LENA DUNHAM, 32, (Girls) and JENNI KONNER, 47 (Girls). Series regulars include BRETT GELMAN, 41, and IONE SYKE 47. Remember her from the s romantic classic Say Anything ? Her father is Donovan, the famous s Scottish folk rocker. Her mother is an American Jew. Her hus band, rocker BEN LEE 39, is Jewish. Last, but not least is The Con nors which starts on ABC on Tuesday, October 16. It is the latest iteration of Roseanne the TV series. The character Roseanne (Connor), co-star John Good man recently disclosed, is supposed to die in pilot episode (for reasons every body in America knows). The Jewish cast members include SARA GILBERT 43, as Darlene, the younger daughter, and MICHAEL FISHMAN 36, as D.J., the Connors son.

PAGE 12

12 MARKETPLACE Meteor Festival in Israel: a visionary and cutting-edge musical journey Paul Weinstein, CFPManaging Partner, WWFG Branch Manager, RJFS 13720 Six Mile Cypress Pkwy #1 Fort Myers, FL 33912 239-768-1490 888-768-1490 Toll Free 239-768-1935 Fax paul.weinstein@raymondjames.com Securities oered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPCRAYMOND JAMES PATTERSON, ESKIN & BALLHAROLD S. ESKIN, P.A.ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW CERTIFIED FAMILY LAW MEDIATOR CERTIFIED CIVIL LAW MEDIATOR1420 S.E. 47TH STREET, CAPE CORAL (239) 549-5551 FAX (239) 549-4834 E-mail: haleskin@legalsurrogacy.com E-mail: haleskin@earthlink.net Janet Astrin Sales Associate 14360 S. Tamiami Trail Fort Myers, Florida 33912 (239) 482-3001 Fax (239) 482-8846 leelightingflorida.com Like us on Facebook Rubinstein, Holz & King P.A.Family Law Attorneys Alan J. Rubinstein 1375 Jackson St., Ste. 304 (239) 332-3400 Fort Myers, FL 33901 Fax (239) 332-5078 henlaw.com 239.344.1100 Divorce, Marital & Family LawJennifer Siegal-MillerBusiness & Tax PlanningGuy E. Whitesman Florida Bar Board Certi ed Tax AttorneyWills, Trusts & EstatesEric Gurgold Florida Bar Board Certi ed Wills, Trust and Estate Attorney Lake Suzy Florida (941) 627-2001 Repairs Salt Chlorine Generators Heat Pumps A r t o f F a s h i o n a n d M o o r e Sylish Comfortable Different The Art of Fashion and Moore(in the Arcade in historic downtown Ft. Myers) Teri Moore, Owner (239) 204-9759 2267 1st. St., Suite 12 info@artoffashionandmoore.com Ft. Myers, FL 33901 www.artoffashionandmoore.com Brian Simon, ChFC, CLUFinancial Advisor, Park Avenue Securities, LLC RICK SNYDERMANLicensed Pedorthist 1900 Trailwinds Dr. Fort Myers, FL 33907 Ph: (239) 939-2239 Fax: (239) 939-7792We Specialize In All Widths We Will Ship AnywhereFIT SERVICE QUALITY FORT MYERS www.gskattorneys.com rf ntbf bfbnnbLowell S. SchoenfeldFlorida Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney w w w li v in g h ap p il y o rg 2 3 9 2 0 8 2 2 1 7 1 5 0 5 0 E l de rbe rry L an e Su it e 4 F t M y e rs I n s u ran c e an d M e di c are A c c e p t e d L i s a B e n d e t o w i c z L C S W M i c h e l l e S c h o e n f e l d L C S W DANIEL BENDETOWICZ, M.D., P.A. 6840 International Center Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33912Located in Plantation Professional Center next to the CenturyLink Sports ComplexINTERNIST OF THE YEAR AWARD Presented by the Florida Chapter of the American College of PhysiciansCall us today. Now accepting new patients.985-1050 www.doctorben.net P: 239.333.0500 F: 239.333.0501 doug@leejustice.com www.leejustice.com1625 Hendry Street, Suite 102 Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Attorney at Law Higginson Tax & A ccounting, L LC Tax P reparation P lanning A udit R epresentation E ric H i g g i n s on C er tified Publ ic A ccountan t 239.935.6950 www.higginson tax.com The Jewish Federation thanks all our advertisers for their continued support! Without them we would be unable to provide our readers with LCHAYIM We invite other businesses in our community to explore this valuable advertising opportunity. For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or jameslewin@jfedlcc.org. PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO SUPPORT OUR FEDERATION rffntbnfrntbbn

PAGE 13

13 JEWISH INTEREST Read the current and recent issues of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org. Meteor Festival in Israel: a visionary and cutting-edge musical journeyBy Arlene StolnitzT his year, between the end of summer and the onset of Rosh Hashanah, an event of note took place in Israel which I thought was worth noting. Readers of my column know that I am all about promoting peace (shalom bayit) and in my belief that the power of music is one way to achieve at least the start of a dialogue. The Meteor Festival, as it was called, took place from Thursday, September 6 through Saturday, September 8 in Pecan Park, Lehavot HaBashan* in the Upper Galilee in Israel. For three days and two nights, more than 50 international acts and as many local artists performed, presenting a wide range of styles to audiences that spanned several generations. The format to the funky jazz beat of the multicultural ensemble Quarter to Africa, each group I listened to on YouTube never failed to amaze me with their originality. In the month prior to the festival, the organized BDS movement had targeted dozens of musical acts who had planned to participate. (See my article published in LCHAYIM Israeli Music Scene and the Cultural Boycott.) Many dropped out in order not to lend their name to what they call art-washing Israels crimes against Palestinians. Some South African groups had declined to participate in solidarity with the apartheid movement. Others, however, chose to perform, ignoring the political implications of their appear ance in the festival. Once again I refer to my April article in which I wrote, It would do us well to remember the words of Sir Elton John, who wrote in 2010, Musicians spread love and peace, and bring people together. I believe in this wholeheartedly and will continue to write about it in my future columns. I am continually looking for groups that promote this idea and you will be reading about such groups in my future writings. *Lehavot HaBashan (in Hebrew, Flames of the Bashan) is a kibbutz in the Hula Valley near Kiryat Shmona. Located in the Upper Galilee, it has a population of about 860. The village was established in 1945 by immigrants from Germany and Poland and brought to Eretz Israel by Youth Aliyah. They specialize in the production of fire Arlene Stolnitz, founder of the Sarasota Jewish Chorale, is a member of the Jewish Congregation of Venice. A retired educator from Rochester, New York, she has sung in choral groups for over 25 years and also sings in Venices Chorale (formerly Exsultate!). Her interest in choral music has led to this series of articles on Jewish folk music in the Diaspora. Retirement?Its elegant, comfortable surroundings and a vibrant, carefree lifestyle. Its impeccable service and hospitality, and never having to worry about future health care needs.AL License #12385 COA #08075Call: 239-319-4042 Visit: TheTerracesAtBonitaSprings.com 26455 S. Tamiami Trail Bonita Springs, FL 34134What is a beautiful e Terraces at Bonita Springs Bonita Springs Only Continuing Care Retirement Community Independently owned, family oriented Together we celebrate tradition1589 Colonial Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33907 fortmyersmemorial.com 239-936-0555 877-936-0555

PAGE 14

14 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD BRIEFS Ronny S Taschner DDS Active Member of the American Academy of Periodontology Jennifer Taschner DDS MMSc Diplomat e of the American Board of Peri o dontology 1645 Medical Lane Fort Myers, FL Phone 239 9360635 Visit Our Website www.taschnerperio.com Susan Glasser, RealtorJohn R. Wood Properties 15065 McGregor Blvd. #105 Fort Myers, FL 33908 In front of Gulf HarbourSusanLGlasser@gmail.com Mobile: (239) 281-3105 For All Your Southwest Florida Real Estate NeedsLee County resident for more than 20 years ELIMINATE YOUR PAIN RESTORE YOUR MOBILITY REGAIN YOUR QUALITY OF LIFEThomas S. Zeller, DPT & Associateswww.YourBestTherapy.comFort Myers 239-432-0556 Cape Coral 239-772-2363 All physical therapy is not the same Thank you for letting us show you what sets us apart from the rest! AWARDED SW FLORIDAS BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION CENTER 5 YEARS IN A ROW! One-on-one care with all patients You will always receive the personalized care you deserve Highly skilled and licensed therapists Relaxed, friendly and encouraging atmosphere Therapist-owned private practice Best of Southwest Florida recipientWe invest ourselves personally in every patients progress and goals. This is all part of having a true commitment and passion for what we do. REHABILITATION CENTER 5 YEARS IN A ROW! THE RESULTS YOU WANT. THE CARE YOU DESERVE. ISRAELS UNSUNG HUMANITARIAN MISSION SAVED THOUSANDS OF SYRIAN LIVES As the Assad regime completes its takeover of southern Syria, Israel is winding down its humanitarian and medical operation that saved thou sands of Syrian lives throughout the civil war. Israeli hospitals have treated 4,800 Syrian civilians since 2011, half in the Golan Heights treated 6,000 Syr ian civilians since last year. Brig.-Gen. (res.) Yossi Kup erwasser, former IDF Military Intel ligence research division chief, said the Syrians are much more aware than they were in the past that Israel is a force for good. In the past, due to education programs, Syrians perceived Israel as a demon that wants to expand, and which poses many dangers. Today, the Syrian public knows that Israel is a power that tried to help it, at least on the humanitarian level, during years of war. They know Israel provided extraordinary care for the sick and wounded near the border. And beyond that, that a variety of Israeli humanitar ian organizations provided aid. That will remain in the Syrian public awareness. Syrian-Druze civilians living near the Israeli border have also become more friendly toward Israel, Kuper wasser assessed. They see Hizbullah [which fought alongside the Assad regime] as hostile. There has been an attempt to force the Syrian-Druze in the southwest village of As-Suwayda to join Hizbullah. But they have resisted this. The Assad regime is also trying to forcibly recruit them, but they refused this as well. (Yaakov Lappin, Investigative Project on Terrorism)STUDY: ISRAELS EXPORTS TO GULF STATES WORTH $1 BILLIONIsraels exports to Gulf Arab states were worth nearly $1 billion in 2016, a new analysis of trade data suggests, despite their refusal to recognize Israel or have diplomatic relations with it. The Tony Blair Institute for Global ing between third countries suggests the true amount of Israels direct trade in recent years with Saudi Arabia and the UAE is close to $1 billion. The tiny fraction of the trades potential. The institute said the true value of current trade is hidden in export statistics of trade with third countries. These goods are then resold to the Gulf. The institute estimates that the level of trade is greater than Israel has with Egypt and Jordan combined, despite having peace treaties with both. (Jacob Atkins, i24News)U.S. ENDS ASSISTANCE TO UNRWAState Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert said Friday, August 31, The Administration has carefully reviewed the issue and determined that the United States will not make additional contributions to UNRWA...The fundamen that have marked UNRWA for years tied to UNRWAs endlessly and exponentially expanding community of sustainable...The United States will no longer commit further funding to this LUUHGHHPDEO\\000\300DZHG\003RSHUDWLRQ\021\021\021\3DO estinians, wherever they live, deserve better than an endlessly crisis-driven service provision model. They deserve to be able to plan for the future. Accordingly, the United States will intensify dialogue with the United Nations, host governments and inter national stakeholders about new mod els and new approaches, which may include direct bilateral assistance from the United States and other partners, that can provide todays Palestinian children with a more durable and de pendable path toward a brighter tomor row. (U.S. State Department)U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADOPTS NEW DEFINITION OF ANTISEMITISM IN SCHOOLS The U.S. Department of Education is changing how it investigates allega tions of discrimination against Jew ish students. Kenneth Marcus, who Rights, outlined the policy change in a letter last month in which he re-opened a 2011 investigation into Rutgers Uni versity in connection with alleged dis crimination against Jewish students. Marcus wrote that the Education Department would adopt the work which demonizing or delegitimizing Israel, or holding it to a double stan dard not expected of other democratic nations, are deemed anti-Semitic. In 2016, the Senate overwhelm ingly passed bipartisan legislation that would have forced the department to evaluating discrimination complaints. (Michael Stratford, Politico )ISRAELI WATER FILTERS DONATED TO CAMEROON TO FIGHT CHOLERA company NUFiltration were donated WR\003&DPHURRQ\003WR\003KHOS\003\277JKW\003D\003FKROHUD\003 epidemic there. L]HV\003XVHG\003NLGQH\\000GLDO\\000VLV\003\277OWHUV\003WKDW\003 would otherwise be discarded and UHSXUSRVHV\003WKHP\003LQ\003VHYHUDO\003\277OWUDWLRQ\003 products. One of these products, meant espe cially for hard-to-reach rural areas of continued on next page

PAGE 15

15 COMMENTARY The AJC West Coast Florida oce, located in Sarasota, can be reached at 941.365.4955. ISRAEL REVISITED of the Way Gems A new look at culture, terrain, innovations and traditions A travel experience for those who have been to Israel before and want to participate in its lively culture, eat in the best restaurants, see the best archaeology, meet Israelis who make the country the vibrant place it is http://authenticisrael.com/templejudeaisrael/ For additional information and registration visit: May 12 May 26, 2019 Or contact Rabbi Marc Sack at 239/433 0201 Why are Palestinian refugees different from all other refugees?By David Harris, CEO of the American Jewish Committee (AJC), August 30, 2018W hy indeed? News reports suggest the U.S. administration is conwho is and is not a Palestinian refugee. I hope the reports are true. A change is long overdue and could actually help the search for peace long-term. Tragically, there have been countless refugees in the annals of history. In the 20th century alone, tens of millions of refugees, if not more, were of world wars, border adjustments, pop ulation transfers, political demagoguery and social pathologies. The 1923 Treaty of Lausanne codiand Turks, totaling more than 1.5 mil lion people. Huge numbers of Hindus and Muslims moved because of the partition of the sub-continent into two independent nations India and Pakistan. Refugees by the millions, unable to return to their countries, were created as a result of the 12-year Third Reich. The exodus from Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam after the victory of com munist and rebel forces was massive. and tribal wars have been constant. Yemenis were kicked out of Saudi Arabia by the hundreds of thousands Serbian aggression. And this is just the tip of the refugee iceberg. In fact, I dont have to look far to understand the unending refugee crises of our times or the trauma they have created. My mother, father and wife were all refugees. Yet, instead of wal lowing in victimization or becoming consumed by hatred and revenge, they started anew, grateful to their adopted lands for making it possible. This past May, the UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) counted 19.9 million refugees in its jurisdiction, with the largest populations being from Syria, South Sudan, Somalia, Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. that it has assisted 50 million refugees to help restart their lives. And yet, of all the worlds refugees, one group the Palestinians are treated Indeed, the 1951 Refugee Convention explicitly does not apply to Palestinians, who fall within the purview of the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA). anyone else in the world. covers all descendants, without limit, of those deemed refugees in 1948. This tupled since 1950. Unlike UNHCR, UNRWA does not seek to resettle Palestinian refugees, but rather provides social services while, in And despite the crocodile tears shed by Arab countries about the plight of their Palestinian brethren, they have been among the most miserly donors to UNRWA. They assert that it is not their responsibility to care for refugees created by the decisions of others. The have been the U.S. and European governments. By the way, I should hasten to clarify that only those Palestinians seen given this special treatment. when Kuwait sent packing 400,000 Palestinians for their alleged backing much reaction from the international community. And more recently, while thousands of Palestinians have been dislocated by the Syrian civil war, again theres silence. Arab violations of Arabs human rights are seemingly viewed dif ferently, if theyre noticed at all. And in Lebanon, with its large Palestinian population under UNRWA auspices, the government has long imposed strict restrictions on Palestinians is the outcry? So, we are confronted by something unprecedented. refugee population, but their leadership long-term solution. Think about it. In 1947, the UN offered a two-state plan to address competing national claims. The Jews accepted it; the Arabs rejected it. Or in UN-speak, the proposed Arab State failed to materialize. Had it been otherwise, two states could have emerged, and with any luck, learned to coexist. Apropos, to this day, that two-state concept remains the most feasible outcome. Instead, the Arab side went to war. Has there been any war without refugees? Yet, in a case of reverse causality, Israel is blamed for the refugees resultArab countries. produced even more Jewish refugees from the Arab world (and Iran). They, however, resettled elsewhere with little fanfare and no attention whatsoever from the UN. Then, by design, the Palestinian refugees, and their descendants ad into serve as permanent reminders of the impermanence of their situation. Taught to focus their hatred on Israel, and to believe they will one day return, theyve been denied chances for new lives. And theyve been used to create the single biggest stumbling block to achieving peace the Palestinian fantasy of ending Jewish sovereignty in Israel. Even now, 13 years after Israel totally withdrew from Gaza, astonishingly, over 500,000 Palestinians continue to live in UNRWA camps there. Why? Gaza is under Palestinian rule, not Israeli. While the Palestinians are among the worlds largest per capita aid re cipients, much of that assistance has around and seek more funds for their allegedly neglected people. Its the same absurd logic that Hamas deploys when it decries en ergy shortages, while trying to shell the Israeli power plants that provide elec tricity to Gaza. The whole process is abetted by an elaborate, well-funded UN apparatus, encompassing more than just UNRWA, created by a majority of member states to support the Palestinians. By contrast, among others, Kurds, who have a com pelling case for statehood, and Cypriots, who have lived on a divided island due to Turkish occupation, have no compa rable UN bodies to advance their causes. This is not to say that Palestinians have had easy lives. They havent. It is to say that their leaders, with the com continued from previous page BRIEFSdeveloping nations, is a portable crankoperated machine capable of taking water from a polluted source such as a river and purifying up to 500 liters per hour enough to supply all the daily water needs of 300 to 400 people. Last May, Israeli Ambassador to Cameroon Ran Gidor displayed NUFiltrations portable unit at a public event showcasing innovative Israeli products Gidor worked with the Israeli Foreign Ministrys MASHAV Agency for International Development Cooperation to arrange a donation of $15,000 worth According to ReliefWeb, a cholera outbreak in Cameroon has claimed at least a dozen lives and sent hundreds of people, many of them children, to hospitals since May. The World Health Organization says cholera is primarily WHU\003DQG\003DGHTX\DWH\003VDQLWDWLRQ\ Our aim is to share our techno logical advances in the domain of wa partners, said Gidor. With simple, cheap Israeli technology we can assist those communities in Cameroon that KDYH\003EHHQ\003DrwL\FWHG\003E\\000FKROH\UD\021\264 UN-approved NUFiltration sys tems also are deployed in Ecuador, Colombia, Peru, the Fiji Islands, Cam bodia, Vietnam, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ke nya, Tanzania, Mali and Nigeria. They function for three years before needing ISRAEL21c.org)

PAGE 16

16 COMMENTARY / FROM THE BIMAH Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Seeds of gratitudeI t is traditional to eat a pomegran ate on Rosh Hashanah. Our sages believed there were 613 seeds in number of mitzvot (commandments) we observe. And, if youre up for a challenge, try and count every seed in this fruit! Maybe there are even too many seeds to count and the rabbis gave up at 613 so they the pomegranate? But instead of counting up our mitzvot, maybe we could see each seed of the pomegranate as a seed of grati tude. What can we be grateful for? Join me in enumerating what you and I can homes mentioned above Everything is a gift. The degree to which we are awake to this truth is a measure of our gratefulness, and grate fulness is a measure of our aliveness. So how alive are you? Whenever you spend a moment in gratitude, whether you are grateful for something small or large, it is as if you are sending a thank you note to Hashem. And Elie Wiesel, zl, had this to hour is grace. And I feel gratitude in my heart each time I can meet someone and look at his or her smile. As the month of Tishrei dawns ute to be grateful for Rosh Hashanah and the New Year. And I hope you will be grateful for Yom Kippur and doing well with your fast. And as we enter the holiday of Sukkot, the holiday of pure joy, I hope you will feel the joy of harvesting all of these seeds and fruits of gratitude. As Brother David is gratefulness. It is not joy that makes us grateful. It is gratitude that makes us joyful. Wishing you all a Happy, Healthy and Joyous New Year! Rabbi Dr. Michael J. Schorin, MAPC, BCC is a Chaplain in Lee Healths Department of Spiritual Services, and ministers at the Gulf Coast Medical Center. Rabbi Michael J. Schorin Dealing with lossLate last summer, Melinda and I were bicycling around The Forest when she noticed a tiny turtle hatchling entirely drawn in on the hot pavement. We immediately brought him home and placed him in a small tub of properly treated water with a basking rock, water sanitizer. (We stored away from when we rescued another little Peninsula Cooter hatchling we found on our step three years ago, aptly named Cooter, who is now eight pounds and thriving in a 75-gallon tank in the courtyard.) We named him Harvey, after the hurricane that was ravishing the Houston area. Melinda soon pointed out to me that this little guy, no larger than ured some bird had grabbed it by that paddle when he and his nest mates had hatched, but dropped the hatchling having others to care for him. Having learned the ropes about raising turtles with Cooter, Harvey had it made and eventually graduated to a ins. Then, just last Shabbes morning Torah study and breakfast, it occurred to me that Harvey needed more swimming room, so I pushed his basking rock (these turtles need to sun them selves a lot to dry out and absorb Vita min D) to the side of the tank so hed have more room to exercise. When we came home three hours later, his tank was empty and he was in the pool, scarcely moving. Apparently, he had used the rock to climb out the and scurried into the pool. Now while I dont keep too many chemicals in the pool, certainly not enough to harm a turtle, the temperature in our small champagne pool in the courtyard was set to 104F, since it is used as a spa. As you probably know, as cold blooded reptiles, turtles have no way of regulating their body temperatures, and Harvey was beyond what he could endure. nursing him as best I could, prayed at lot and remained hopeful. I read every thing I could, tried everything I could, and rejoiced whenever he showed a bit of motion, which he was doing for a while. That night I left him on his favor ite basking rock with a warming lamp to keep him comfortable. In my heart I him scurrying around like his old self. When I went out to check on him early next morning, I found that he was cov ered by a blue wash cloth that Melinda placed over him when she found him dead on the bottom of the tank. I took little Harvey out back and buried him next to Mau-Mau, an inter esting black cat with whom I shared 17 years that I buried back there 14 years ago. I then spent the rest of the day in bed since it was Labor Day. Why am I sharing this with you? makes me feel a little better, and maybe thats enough of a reason. Youd think Id be better at dealing with this little loss considering what I do for work. As you might have heard, my people and I tend to have very close connections, some longer than 20 years. I try not to be too aloof or hide behind titles and status. Most of all, when I am needed, I try to give everything Ive got to give. But, no matter how deeply I feel, I cant let myself properly grieve, espe cially when people are passing on and Im counted on to help hold things to gether. So Im thinking it all gets stored up somewhere inside of me waiting for a time to come out. Well, its coming out now. Thanks, Harvey. I was lucky to know you! Rabbi Bruce Diamond serves at The Community Free Synagogue in Fort Myers. Rabbi Bruce Diamond Visitors to the synagogue Rabbi Marc Sack Heres a regular occurrence in the lives of rabbis and congregations. A woman Ive never seen before shows up at synagogue on a Friday night. After asking her name, I ask if shes new to town. Shes not, she says. Is she saying Kaddish for someone or observing a yahrzeit? Shes not. She just wanted to be in synagogue. From the pulpit, I saw the woman singing along with Lkha Dodi. She remembered this. She picked up our people went up and spoke with her. Im glad you came here, I said. Let us know how we can help you. She never came back. Did we fail? Perhaps, but I doubt it. She seemed to genuinely enjoy the experience of my congregation. She was one of the last to leave the Kiddush. My synagogue is located on what has become a major thoroughfare. Its easy to know we are here. But, as a newcomer to the synagogue, the woman had to look at our website or call the service would be. Her attendance was more than an impulse. Something drew her to the synagogue that night. All of us want and need people to join our congregations. We want people to be so touched by their expe rience at our synagogue that they want more, that theyll come back, that some pen. What does happen is that some Jew has a longing and feels some where in their soul that the synagogue is their touchstone. Its a place of com fort. They show up at my synagogue or in years. They sing the familiar words. need. Theres a Chasidic tale commonly told at High Holiday time. Its about the synagogue on Yom Kippur but is illiterate. So, during the height of prayer, he whistles. Its all he knows. Everyone in the synagogue is angry that the boy interrupted the service, but the boys whistle was his prayer and sincerity. Our synagogues regularly get visi tors who come to us because they want to pray. Being available to them is a great mitzvah. Its one of the reasons were here. Rabbi Marc Sack serves at Temple Judea in Fort Myers. LCHAYIM is a monthly nonprot newspaper supported by generous readers, committed advertisers and the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. FINEMARK NATIONAL BANK & TRUST IS PROUD TO CONSISTENTLY EARN A 5-STAR RATING FROM BAUER FINANCIAL, THE NATIONS LEADING INDEPENDENT BANK RATING FIRM*.We attribute our success to delivering unparalleled Fort Myers Bonita Springs Charleston Estero Naples Palm Beach Scottsdalewww.finemarkbank.com 239-461-5900 Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender Trust and Investment Services are not FDIC insured, are not guaranteed by the bank and may lose value.

PAGE 17

17 FROM THE BIMAH Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz Caring for othersA tzadik in peltz, i.e., a righteous person in a warm, fur coat. This is one way of describing Noah, whose story we read about in this months Torah portion on Shabbat Noah. There are various ways to warm oneself when in a cold room. One way A second method is to bundle oneself up warmly. If one builds a becomes warm and all of the people in If, however, he just wraps himself up all cozy and snug, he is The Zohar explains that one of Noahs greatest faults was that, though his own behavior was righteous, he did generation, everyone except his own family, was totally immoral. G-d informed Noah that He would destroy only Noahs family. Yet, Noah did not argue with G-d. Instead, he withdrew into his own little world, building the ark and continuing in his own personal righteous ways. Only when people ap proached and asked what he was doing, did he tell them about the impending disaster. ferred to in the Bible as the Waters of Noah. Noah could have averted the disaster if he had reached out to his fellow man. But he clothed himself warmly in his righteous deeds, un concerned with the bitter cold from When we see another Jew in the cold, we must not just bundle ourselves up even more warmly. Rather, we must LQYLWH\003KLP\003LQ\003DQG\003EXLOG\003D\003\277UH\017\003KHOSLQJ\003 fan the spark within every Jew into a EXUQLQJ\003\300DPH\021 Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz serves at Chabad Lubavitch of Southwest Flor ida. Its a new year, so ask lots of questions My mother made me a scientist without ever intending it. Every other Jewish mother in Brooklyn would ask would say, did you ence asking good become a scientist! Isidor I. Rabi, Nobel laureate As we begin to read the Torah again each year on Simchat Torah, I Union College-Jewish Institute of Re ligions Los Angeles campus, I con ducted Friday night Shabbat worship at a convalescent home in the city. After the service, I visited patients in their rooms, earning $10 for each visit. One Friday night, not long after I began, the homes attendant greet new congregant. Rabbi Rosenfeld, an 85-year-old Orthodox rabbi is with us and he will attend your service. What?! I thought to myself. An Orthodox rabbi is coming to my ser vice! What will he think? How will he react? These thoughts played on in my mind throughout the service as an alert but impassive Rabbi Rosenfeld sat in the congregation, a large black kippah on his head and a copy of the Union Prayer Book clutched tightly and un opened in his hands. After the service, I made my rounds Rabbi Stephen Fuchs to visit with residents, approaching his room with trepidation. He was most gracious and he told said, and I have been studying Torah my whole life. And yet I still feel like I am at the beginning of my studies. How is that? I asked. When I was 6 years old, my teach er handed me a Chumash (text of the and said, Read! So I read in Hebrew beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. Then, I looked up and asked, If in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, then who created God? And wham! I got such a slap across the face that I still feel it, so I always feel I am at the beginning of my studies. From my perspective, when studycreated God? is a most appropriate In traditional Jewish life, one who has strayed from religious observance but returns to the fold is considered to be hozer btshuvah (one who returns in repentance), but the literal translation of the phrase is one who returns with answers. The late Rabbi Harold Schulweis taught that he felt greater admiration for a sheh hozer bsheelah (one who of learning, and there is no better time to ask them than now, as we begin anew, with fresh eyes, our annual cycle of reading the Torah. Rabbi Stephen Lewis Fuchs serves at Bat Yam Temple of the Islands on Sanibel Island. Yom HaAliyah Rabbi Nicole Luna O nce the High Holy Days are over you might think we have no Jewish holidays until Hanukkah. This month in the Jewish cal endar, Cheshvan, is even traditionally called Mar Cheshvan, meaning bitter Cheshvan, because there are no ma jor Jewish holidays. But in the summer of 2016, the Israeli Knesset added a new holiday on the 7th of Chesvan Yom HaAliyah Aliyah Day, a day recognizing and celebrating immigration to the land of Israel and honoring all those who made aliyah. The day falls during the week when we read the Torah portion Lech-Lecha, when God tells Abraham and Sarah to go forth to a new land, the Promised Land. Yom HaAliyah is also celebrated in the spring, on the 10 th of Nisan, when the biblical Israelites crossed over into the land of Israel. My great-aunt made aliyah on January 1, 1951, and Ive been reading let ters that she and family members wrote to each other from 1951-1959. While the letters tell of ordinary life events about children, jobs, etc., they also give incredible insight into kibbutz life scribes Israel as in a state of becoma straw mattress, no pillow, wooden shacks without heating, strange food, crowded tables of strangers speaking a strange language, tedious work washing dishes eight hours a day, and no real place of comfort to come to when also describes the awe of visiting bibli Saul was murdered by the Philistines, swimming in a Roman pool with the water as clear as Ive ever seen water in my life, and digging up some pottery and glass from the Byzantine period in the ruins of a Roman theatre in Beit Shahn. Yom HaAliyah falls this year on Tuesday, October 16. May we all take time on that day to honor those who on how we can continue to support the Rabbi Nicole Luna serves at Temple Beth El in Fort Myers. rfntbbrbbb tbnbtbrbb tbtbtt btbbnbt bnr nnbbbtb ntbb bntbrnb bbbnbtt bnr bbrrr br Dealing with lossAll of us want and need people to join our congregations. We want people to be so touched by their experience at our synagogue that they want more, that theyll come back, that some pen. What does happen is that some Jew has a longing and feels somewhere in their soul that the synagogue is their touchstone. Its a place of comfort. They show up at my synagogue or in years. They sing the familiar words. need. Theres a Chasidic tale commonly told at High Holiday time. Its about the synagogue on Yom Kippur but is illiterate. So, during the height of prayer, he whistles. Its all he knows. Everyone in the synagogue is angry that the boy interrupted the service, but the boys whistle was his prayer and sincerity. Our synagogues regularly get visitors who come to us because they want to pray. Being available to them is a great mitzvah. Its one of the reasons were here. Rabbi Marc Sack serves at Temple Judea in Fort Myers. What do you think?LCHAYIM wants to know!Send your letters & comments to LChayim36@gmail.comLetters PolicyLetters must include the writers full name, full address and daytime phone. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for length and/ or accuracy. Letters do not necessarily reect the viewpoint of LCHAYIM nor its advertisers. We cannot acknowledge or publish every letter received. LCHAYIM is a monthly nonprot newspaper supported by generous readers, committed advertisers and the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties.

PAGE 18

18 FOCUS ON YOUTH P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E TEMPLE BETH EL SCHOOLSFort MyersDale M.Cohen, R.J.E. M.A. Ed. Religious School Director Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. It was amazing to see so many of our Religious School students and families participating in our Neilah Service. It brings great joy to all of us here to have such active participation to conclude the Yom Kippur service. We are so thankful and blessed to have our students. We could not be more proud of you. I must thank our exceptional Torah readers during our Rosh Hashanah and Spiegel, Shayne Seiser, Jack Calder and Ella Laboda. Mazel tov to all of you on a job well done. Yasher koach. Todah rabah to Larry Schoenfeld for his wonderful reading of the Torah for our students during their Junior Congregations. We are blessed to have such wonderful teachers who lead our Junior Congregations Morah Amy Shinbaum, Mackenzie Sax, Evan Kagan and our wonderful volunteers. We are so grateful to all of you. Our next two Junior Congregations will be held on Saturdays, September a.m. in the sanctuary with Morah Dale. This is a mandatory part of our curriculum for grades 4-7. This is a wonderful opportunity to become familiarized with and pro Maya Shuster will be called to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, October 27. We are so proud of Maya and all of her accomplishments on one of the most meaningful days of her life. During this time in our country to see the silver lining inside of the FORXGV\017\003ZLWK\003DOO\003RI\003WKH\003\277UHV\017\003ZHDWKHU\003 tragedies, shootings, etc. Hopefully they will bring to the forefront some very important conversations that need to happen. Perhaps these conversations will bring people closer together. Performing mitzvot is crucial for us as Jews. It is an integral part of who we are and how contributing and re pairing the world (tikkun olam ) is truly one of our greatest attributes. On Sun day, October 7, we will have a canned food drive because we take seriously the mitzvah of feeding the poor. Our nations to the Harry Chapin Food Bank during the next few weeks. All of the food will be distributed shortly before the Thanksgiving holiday to help make peoples celebrations more special. Temple Beth El Religious School values creating Jewish adults! DISCOVER THE FUN! RECEIVE THE GIFT OF FREE JEWISH CHILDRENS BOOKS MAILED TO YOUR HOME EVERY MONTH! SHARE the experience of reading with your children as they grow with PJ Library books. SIGN UP TODAY! Enrollment is open to Jewish families with children between the ages of six months to eight years living in Lee & Charlotte Counties. Funded by the Roth Family Foundation & Asher Family Foundation More information, contact Debbie Sanford 239.481.4449 ext. 3 debbiesanford@jfedlcc.org Candle lighting times:October 5: 6:52 October 12: 6:44 October 19: 6:38 October 26: 6:32 Earn CAS Credits The Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties is interested in hearing from teenagers in high school who might like to earn CAS credits though various work in the Jewish community. If you are interested, please send the following information to debbiesanford@jfedlcc.org: Name Address Phone # Age Grade School Preferred volunteer hours (e.g. 2 5P.M. Sundays) Bar / Bat Mitzvah SpecialistChoosing the right photographer is an important decision. Michael Shapiro has more than 30 years experience in media and journalism. He is able to capture images that are unique, unexpected and spontaneous.Other Services: Weddings / Family Portraits / Events239.770.6860mike@shapiro-photography.com www.shapiro-photography.com

PAGE 19

19 FOCUS ON YOUTH Read the current and previous editions of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org. P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E a.m. in the sanctuary with Morah Dale. This is a mandatory part of our curriculum for grades 4-7. This is a wonderful opportunity to become familiarized with and proMaya Shuster will be called to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, October 27. We are so proud of Maya and all of her accomplishments on one of the most meaningful days of her life. During this time in our country to see the silver lining inside of the tragedies, shootings, etc. Hopefully they will bring to the forefront some very important conversations that need to happen. Perhaps these conversations will bring people closer together. Performing mitzvot is crucial for us as Jews. It is an integral part of who we are and how contributing and repairing the world (tikkun olam) is truly one of our greatest attributes. On Sunday, October 7, we will have a canned food drive because we take seriously the mitzvah of feeding the poor. Our nations to the Harry Chapin Food Bank during the next few weeks. All of the food will be distributed shortly before the Thanksgiving holiday to help make peoples celebrations more special. Temple Beth El Religious School values creating Jewish adults! Earn CAS Credits TEMPLE JUDEA SCHOOLSFort Myers For our kids, only the best Tab Scribner, Director of Congregational Learning The buzz at Temple Judea is all about our kids! On Sunday, August 26, we year. With the call that we are now boarding TJRS Flight 5779, students and families assembled for a formal from the notion that our religious school is an immersion experience, where our classroom spaces serve as a little slice of Israel. When students ar rive at TJRS, they are entering another place, surrounded by and engulfed in Judaism and Jewish life. On Sunday, with their own captains wings and their very own TJRS darcon, or passport, that was stamped throughout the day as the children engaged in learn ing. The darcon will stay with the child throughout the year, marking their achievements, attendance, and partici pation in school activities, community events and congregational services. In the classrooms (named after Israeli cities), it was a day of non-stop engagement and learning, highlighted by a schoolwide Hebrew name game celebrating their Hebrew names. Find ing a new friend who is named after a patriarch or who has a Hebrew name that is the same as their English name and more, guided students into getting to know others in the school who were not in their same class. We also introduced new childrens siddurim Written by Alex Weinberg, Siddur Sholom presents our prayers in a kid-friendly, colorful context. Key words are color-coded, matching the Hebrew text with the English transla tions. Additional guiding discussion are presented for each prayer. It is not enough to say the words. We want our children to have an understanding and personal connection to the liturgy. The childrens siddur is also aligned with the congregational siddur to which the children will graduate as they prepare for their bar or bat mitzvah. Its a new year at Temple Judea Religious School. We believe that our engaging revamped curriculum is a valulife skills in preparation for committed connection to, and involvement with, the State of Israel with our kid-friendly shlichah, Zohar Ben Hamu. To support grate Hebrew into our Judaica instruction. With our post-bar/bat mitzvah program, we ensure that our students will be engaged with our community and the Jewish people long after bnei mitzvah. Our high school program is truly a blending of generations. In addition to taking classes from our rabbi and congregational leaders, our high schoolers also serve in the religious school as madrichim, partnering with a class and bonding with a younger buddy to help mentor throughout their studies. We believe that the connection across generations is essential to being part of a community. In addition to learning all the Hebrew, we will study in chevruta (pairs) across age groups, to extract meaning and cultivate ly Torah parshah and other Jewish texts. We will celebrate holidays and life cycle events as an extension of the home, with services, meals and, most of all, the camaraderie of our Temple Judea family. This is where lifelong friendships will come to be. If you missed our opening day, I welcome you to book your reservation to join us by contacting me to discuss your child(ren)s religious education needs. Of course, theres more to Temple Judea than education, although nothing more important. Our kids are our future. We welcome you to join us * Joann Goldman, Temple Judea Preschool Director Autumn will explode in our classroom during the month of October. We will learn about the Jewish holidays through story time, discussions and creative art. We will also discover the colors of autumn through themes such as leaves and pumpkins. As we celebrate the new year, the children will have a chance on working together, sharing and helping others. We explain that we are like a colony just like the bees. We discuss how the bees make honey and how apples grow on trees. We dip apples in honey to celebrate a new year with a sweet taste to it. We focus on others and how to help the less fortunate, and how we can improve relationships with friends and family. October is also Fire Safety Month. and safety, we are eagerly anticipat We all need to remind our children/ grandchildren and others visiting our home about safety rules. It is a time to remember the importance of learning Young children are particularly YXOQHUDEOH\003WR\003WKH\003WKUHDW\003RI\003\277UH\017\003ZLWK\003 FKLOGUHQ\003XQGHU\003\277YH\003VXruHULQJ\003D\003\277UH\003 death rate of more than twice the na tional average. We can help change these frightening statistics by teaching cape plan with your whole family and choose a meeting place outside. We look forward to learning about a variety of animals such as woodland animals and farm animals. We cant wait to get our hands inside of a pump kin and take out all the seeds. Our preschool has a brand new beautiful library that all our children can enjoy. We are very grateful to our parents and the community that sup ported us in creating this special room. The children will be able to check out books each week and have a special reading time with their family. Teacher graduate school scholarship available The Helen & Edward Brancati Teacher Development Scholarship Fund awards standards and dedication to the teaching profession. The award can be used by classroom teachers seeking post graduate education, money for post graduate classes that will lead to an administrative position remov ing them from the classroom. The award is available to any teacher employed by an accredited school in the United States who is a U.S. citizen. We are pleased to announce that applications may be submitted electronically or via the mail. Applications must be post marked by October 31, 2018. For more

PAGE 20

20 GENERATIONS OF THE SHOAH SOUTHWEST FLORIDA(239) 963-9347 GenShoah begins 2018-19 season with Movies That Matter Ida Margolis The GenShoah Steering Committee has selected programs this year that relate to all aspects of the mission of education and human rights, preserva tion of the history and memories of the Holocaust, connection of the Second Generation to one another, and support of the Holocaust Museum & Cohen Education Center. The annual Kristall nacht Commemoration will be held on Sunday, at Temple Shalom in Naples. All Second Generation (2gs) are encouraged to attend. If you are a 2g and are able to attend, please email me at genshoah. The World Federation of Jewish Child Survivors of the Holocaust & Descendants 30th Annual International Conference of Child Survivors, Second and Third Generations, Spouses and Families in Cooperation with the Kindertransport and Generations of the Shoah will be holding its annual conference in West Palm Beach this year. The 2018 conference will take place from Friday, November 9 to Monday, November 12. For conference infor mation and registration, visit www. holocaustchild.org or call Susan at 818.606.0793. Members of GenShoah SWFL will discuss the book Violins of Hope at its annual pot luck on Sunday, December 16. Space is very limited for this event and RSVPs to shirleybesikof@gmail. com The Holocaust Museum will present programs relating to Violins of Hope in December. The Museum can be contacted for more information about these programs and the information will be in Museum newsletters and the GenShoah monthly newsletter. Since of the Holocaust Museum and does not ed that all those who receive the Gen Shoah newsletter and are interested in GenShoah programs become members of the Holocaust Museum. Contact the Museum at 239.263.9200 or visit www.HolocaustMuseumSWFL.org For more information about GenShoah, email SHALOM LIFE CENTER Fort Myers(239) 218-3433 Lawrence & Robin Dermer Unlike the elaborate environment that weve constructed for ourselves, the sukkah creates no illusions. It gives us a healthy dose of reality and shows us the truth. Its simple roof made of a canopy of leaves is open to the sky. This frail and temporary hut calls us to realize that a physical structure with a roof can protect us but can also limit us. How often do we obsess about past events or worry about what has not yet even occurred in the future? The tem porary status of the sukkah teaches us that each moment is precious. All we really have is the present and this gift should not be wasted living in the past or trying to predict the future. By ap preciating and making the most of this very moment, we are doing all we can to bring a brighter future for our selves, our families and the entire world. The sukkah calls us to the truth and the truth is material things will never bring us lasting happiness. The strongest buildings made of brick and steel will eventually crumble. The joy that we experience being with friends and family, the love we feel for each other and our love of G-d is the only path to of being together in the sukkah. Gazing through the open roof that exposes us to wind and rain makes us vulnerable. This vulnerability is not weakness. It can actually be our greatest power. days you must live in sukkotthat your descendants may know that it was in booths that I made the Israelites live when I brought them out of Egypt. I the Lord am your G-d. We were vulnerable when we jour neyed out of Egyptian bondage, and only in this letting go and trusting G-d as our true guiding light were we able to see the promised land. By abandoning our dependence on the physical we can come to realize that our great est strength comes only from our faith in G-d. Sukkot is the time of our rejoicing where we gather in our sukkah, eating, drinking, celebrating and learning together, giving us an opportunity to externally express our faith and renewed commitment to G-d. Like the openness of the sukkah, we are open to both sunshine and rain, joy and pain, good times and times of great challenge. Every year, right after Yom Kippur we rebuild this shaky and temporary hut to remind ourselves that our lives this to be reminded that sometimes all we have is our faith, the real founda tion upon which we rebuild. Our true dignity and worth comes from the Di vine spirit and not from our material possessions. In 5779 may the sukkah we dwell in remind us of what we can always count on. If our Jewish foundation is strong and solid we can survive any storm. The Torah is our Tree of Life and G-d is our rock, our foundation and our salvation! We are thrilled to be entering into our fourth season as one Shalom Life Center family and we promise to con tinue to bring even more wonderful and inspiring services, special events and concerts during the 2018/2019 season. For more information, please visit www.shalomlifecenter.org, call 239.218.3433 or email info@shalom lifecenter.org. ORGANIZATIONS HADASSAHCollier/Lee Chapter (239) 301-0509 Lynn Wilner I hope you all enjoyed your summer and are ready for a wonderful season! Please mark your calendars and join us to meet your friends and make new ones at our Welcome Back Lun a.m. at Audubon Golf and Country Club. We will have a delicious lunch and hear from our guest speaker, Dr. Karen Ezrine, National Vice Chair of Hadassah Medical Organization. We will also be presenting and voting on contact Carol Finn at carolthompson@ mylegaledge.com or 708. 289.5181. Here are some interesting facts about Hadassah you might like to know! What child would want to be wheeled into the operating room on a hospital bed if instead he or she could arrive at the operating room in Hadassahs new ride-on car? Three-year-old Dan Synett did just that as he rode to surgery in style! Dans mother said, Dan received excellent care at Hadassah. Riding to the operat ing room in a car like grandpas ence even better. Hadassah is honoring nurses as part of the celebration of 100 years of the Henrietta Szold HadassahHebrew University School of Nursing. On any given day you might see a clown at Hadassah Hospital working with a young patient to help them laugh and feel comfortable. Hadassah clowns have training in certain medical procedures so they can make the hospital experience a pleasant one for the children. Why not see Israel for yourself? Hadassah has a variety of Missions to Israel for you and your family. Missions in 2019 include Explore, RePurim Mission (March 17-27), The dassah Youth Aliyah Mission (March 26-April 5), Celebration Across the turn to Israel (September 4-15), Taking It Easy Mission (October 30-November 10), The Land, The Heart & (December 2-13) and Hadassah & Jewish National Fund Israel Family Bnai Mitzvah in Israel (December 25, 2019-January 2, 2020). For more information, contact Ayelet Tours at www.ayelet.com or 800.237.1517. If you are planning a trip to Israel, we can arrange a tour of Hadassah Hospital for you. Are you looking for a book group, study group, evening activities, Knowl edge & Nosh, advocacy/volunteer/ fundraising opportunities, luncheons, Annual Mahj, Card and Game Day, educational programs or just want to have fun and get to know people? Then Hadassah is the place for you! To learn more about Hadassah, contact me at 239.598.1009 or lynninaples@yahoo. com, or Shelley at 239.301.0509 or shellskel@ gmail.com. If you would like to join Hadassah, upgrade to Life Membership or become sah), please contact Carol Hirsch at 239.631.6828 or chirsch1951@gmail. com, or Donna Goldblatt at mom443@ aol.com See you at Hadassah! HUMANISTIC JEWISH HAVURAHof Southwest Florida (239) 495-8484 Jaspers bar mitzvah ceremony Paula Creed This summer our oldest grandchild, Jasper, celebrated his bar mitzvah in Maryland, where his family maintains its membership in Machar, The Wash ington Congregation for Humanistic Judaism (www.machar.org). Rabbinic Judaism and the informal men and women, husbands and wives, fathers and mothers, sons and daugh ters. These rigid guidelines became the heart of an ethical system that re mained unchanged until modern times. The Secular Revolution, with its century. Thirteen-year-old girls did not obtain this privilege until well into the twentieth century (since, in rabbinic Judaism, participation in Torah reading was reserved for males). Just as this coming-of-age ceremo ny has changed through the centuries, Humanistic Judaism has adapted it to the conditions of contemporary Jewish life. Not only the ceremony but its In classical Judaism, before the age of thirteen a boy was presumed to be under his parents control. After his thirteenth birthday, the obligation to obey the commandments of the Torah was his own. He was considered part of the adult community a son of the commandments. In modern American society, age thirteen no longer represents the beginning of adulthood. For Humanistic Jews, the bar or bat mitzvah marks the advent of adolescence, a period of searching for ones identity and life path. Thirteen-year-olds can respond to more challenging tasks than were expected of them as children. They can demonstrate greater independence and a depth of thought, competence and commitment. A Humanistic bar or bat mitzvah provides public encouragement and recognition of the development of these capacities on the road to matusire to become more responsible for his or her own decisions and actions, and to identify with the many previous generations of the Jewish people who have done so. For Humanistic Jews, then, bar or bat mitzvah means son or daughter of responsibility. How do Humanistic Jews mark this rite of passage? One way is for the young person to choose a Torah portion (not necessarily the prescribed portion of the week) and to read it, along with an original interpretative address. A more radical departure, but one in keeping both with humanistic principles and with the meaning of the occasion, is for the child to study of the life of a humanistic or Jewish hero, or another appropriate topic. An adult tu tor, sometimes the students parent, su pervises the research and the presenta tion of a paper and a speech summing up its conclusions. This preparation for a Humanistic bar or bat mitzvah gives a young per son the opportunity to grow intellec tually, emotionally and spiritually; to to experience a meaningful connection to the Jewish people and to human kind. The event provides an opportu nity for family and community to join in celebrating and applauding those

PAGE 21

21 HAZAK 55+ CHAPTER at Temple Judea(239) 433-0201Jan Klein Join HAZAK on Sunday, October 7 at Hall to hear a wonderful presentation Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia. Our speakers are Marsha and Mike Kistler and Andy Abrams, three Temple Judea members who traveled to Africa this year. After the program join us for dinner at Sweet Tomatoes on US 41. Reserva with HAZAK. RSVP by Thursday, October 4 to tjhazak@gmail.com. All are welcome to attend the p.m. to help plan future activities. this to be reminded that sometimes all we have is our faith, the real foundation upon which we rebuild. Our true dignity and worth comes from the Divine spirit and not from our material possessions. In 5779 may the sukkah we dwell in remind us of what we can always count on. If our Jewish foundation is strong and solid we can survive any storm. The Torah is our Tree of Life and G-d is our rock, our foundation and our salvation! We are thrilled to be entering into our fourth season as one Shalom Life Center family and we promise to continue to bring even more wonderful and inspiring services, special events and concerts during the 2018/2019 season. For more information, please visit www.shalomlifecenter.org, call 239.218.3433 or email info@shalom lifecenter.org. ORGANIZATIONS information, contact Ayelet Tours at www.ayelet.com or 800.237.1517. If you are planning a trip to Israel, we can arrange a tour of Hadassah Hospital for you. Are you looking for a book group, study group, evening activities, Knowledge & Nosh, advocacy/volunteer/ fundraising opportunities, luncheons, Annual Mahj, Card and Game Day, educational programs or just want to have fun and get to know people? Then Hadassah is the place for you! To learn more about Hadassah, contact me at 239.598.1009 or lynninaples@yahoo. com, or Shelley at 239.301.0509 or shellskel@ gmail.com. If you would like to join Hadassah, upgrade to Life Membership or become sah), please contact Carol Hirsch at 239.631.6828 or chirsch1951@gmail. com, or Donna Goldblatt at mom443@ aol.com See you at Hadassah! Between us Jews Marina Berkovich From the very beginning of the Jew ish Historical Society of Southwest Florida journey, the organization re ceived the encouragement and support of the Jewish population of our region, many of whom had been waiting to share their own experiences. Soon the non-Jewish community found the So cietys mission interesting and impor tant, and joined in. I am very delighted that Floridas Jewish history matters to everyone, not only to the Jews, who undoubtedly constitute the majority of our members, and whose support and membership are essential to the orga nization. Since the Roman War and the Jewish Diaspora that followed, Jews have both mingled with the local population of their destinations and tried to isolate from the local population, the more at tention they drew to themselves. Many who had undergone assimilation tried to hide their Jewish identity. This was often the case in Southwest Florida, which, as is well known now, was not a safe har bor for Jews. Yet, just as others before them, our SWFL Jewish predeces sors have weathered the storms. Some of their history, I am very glad to report, is continuing to be documented everyone who already takes the eyewitness historical preservation mission seriously, as well as all future and potential volunteers, members, sponsors and donors. We are looking forward to a fantastic season and hope you will join us for as many of the fabulous programs we have prepared. On Sunday, October 28, at the Jewish Congregation of Marco Island, the Society will present two important stories in the Southwest Florida Jewish Pioneers series When Destiny Calls and The Greensteins of Marco Island, about Elena Rosner, one of the JCMIs founding members, and Lenore Greenstein, widow of a JCMI rabbi and best known now as Director of WCA South. The Jewish Congregation of Marco Island (991 Winterberry Drive) is generously sponsoring this event and the lowing the screening. On Wednesday, November 7 at ida Jewish History will be presented by invitation of the Collier County Museum, located at 3331 Tamiami Trail about this events details to the Museum or sign up for the JHSSWF email The Society will be celebrating Annual Florida Jewish History Month verspot Cinema at Mercato with Naples extraordinary longtime residents Judith and Samuel Friedland, whose lives will move you to tears and whose many achievements will most likely be an incredible discovery to many guests attending this celebration, even if they had known the Friedlands for years. We are continuing our work with the Virtual Museum of Southwest Florida Jewish History at collection expands, we are very short of volunteers who understand how to use modern technology. Alternatively, employee, whose primary duties will include the Virtual Museum. Please reach out to me if you are able to con tribute or know someone who has this skillset and is willing to become a vol unteer. Please note our contact informa The Jewish Historical Society of Southwest Florida 8805 Tamiami Trail North Suite # 255 Naples FL 34108 833-547-7935 www.jhsswf.org The Jewish Historical Society of Southwest Florida is a section 501(c) (3) charitable organization. Contribu tions are deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA(239) 566-1771 Send updates and changes to the Directory below to loriramos@jfedlcc.org. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUE REFORM 10868 Metro Parkway, South Fo rt M yers (The Southwest Florida Masonic Center) P.O. Box 07144, Fort M yers, FL 339 19 Rabbi Bru ce Diamond (bdiamond5@comcast.net) Coordinator: Natalie Fulton Adult E ducator: Jes sica E vers Phone: ( 239) 466 6671 E mail: com freesyn@gmail.com Web site: www.fortmyerssynagogue.com Community S abbath e ve dinner eac h Fri day at 6:30 p.m. Sabbath e ve worship ev ery Friday at 7:30 p.m. Light breakfast and T or ah study w ith t he rabbi every S aturday mo rning from 9: 30 11:30 a.m. TEMPLE JUDEA CONSERVATIVE 1448 6 A&W Bu lb Road, Fort M yer s, FL 339 08 Rabbi Marc Sack E mail: r abbi@tjswfl.org President: Dan Fox Director of C ongregational Learnin g: Tab Scribner Preschool Director: Joan n Goldman templejudeapreschool@gmail.com Phone: 433 0201 Fax: 433 3371 E mail: t jswfl@gmail.com Web site: www.tjswfl.org Services: 6: 15 p.m. Friday and 9: 30 a.m. Saturday M inyan: 9: 00 a.m. Monday Religious School: S un. 9:30 a.m. noon; Wed. 4:30 6 p.m. Early child hood ed ucation: Preschool, M F, ages 1 8 m onths 5 years; Mommy & Me, months 2 years Affiliated: U nited Synagogue of C onservative Judaism CHABAD OF BONITA SPRINGS/ ESTERO ORTHODOX 24850 Old 41 Road, Suite 20 (in t he Bernwood Centre) Bonita Springs, FL 341 35 7024 Rabbi Mendy G reenberg Phone: 949 6900 Web site: www.JewishBonita.com Services: S aturday at 10 a.m., followed by a kiddush TEMPLE BETH EL REFORM 16225 W inkler Road, Fort Myers, FL 339 08 Rabbi Nicole Luna E mail: r abbiluna@templebethel.com Temple educator: Dale Cohen, Ma.Ed., R.J.E Preschool director: Jes yca V irnig President: E llis Rabinowitz Phone: 433 0018 Fax: 433 3235 Web site: www.templebethel.com Shabbat services: 7: 30 p.m. Friday; T orah study 9:00 a.m. Saturday; B n ai Mitzah 10:30 a.m. Saturday Religious School: 9: 30 a.m. noon S unday Hebrew S chool: 5: 00 6:30 p.m W ednesday Judaica G ift Gallery Affiliated: U nion for Ref orm Judaism TEMPLE BETH SHALOM REFORM 702 S.E. 24th A ve., Cape Coral, FL 339 90 Rabbi Devora Buchen President: Arnie Schwartz Phone: 772 4555 Fax: 772 4625 E mail: of fice@templebethshalomcc.org Web site: www.templebethshalomcc.org Services: 7: 30 p.m. Friday Religious School: T hursday 4: 00 6:30 p.m. Torah study w ith Rabb i Buchen: S habb at 10:30 a.m. Organizations: Br otherhood, Sisterhood, Family S ervice (1st Friday of t h e month a t 7: 30 p.m.) BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS REFORM Meets at Sanibel Congregational Church 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island Rabbi Stephen L. Fuchs President: Alan Lessack Phone: 239-579-0296 (Oct-Apr) 773251 8862 (May Sept) Email: batyamsanibel@gmail.com Cantor: Murray Simon Web site: www.batyam.org Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday (Oct Apr) 7:00 p.m. Friday (May Sept) Adult Education: Saturday, 9:00 11:30 a.m. (Nov Apr) Jewish Current Events: Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. (Nov Apr) Write: P.O. Box 84, Sanibel, FL 33957 Affiliated: Union for Reform JudaismTEMPLE SHALOM CHARLOTTE HARBOR AND THE GULF ISLANDS REFORM 23190 Utica A ve., P.O Bo x 494675 Port Ch arlotte, FL 339 49 4675 Rabbi Solomon Agin President: G ary W ein Phone: ( 941) 625 2116 E mail: shalo m06@netzero.com Web site: t empleshalomfl.com Services: 7: 30 p.m. Friday Religious school: S unday 10 a.m. Beginning He brew: T uesday 4: 15 5:15 p.m. Ad vanced Hebrew: Thursday 4: 15 5:15 p.m. Organizations: S isterhood Affiliated: U nion for Ref orm Judaism CHABAD OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY ORTHODOX 204 E M ckenzie St Un it B, Punt a Gorda, FL 339 50 Rabbi Simon Jaco bson Phone: ( 941) 833 3381 E mail: chab adpg@yahoo.com Web site: www.chabadofcharlottecounty.com Services: S aturday at 10 a.m. followed by a kiddush Torah study: W ednesday a t 8 p.m. CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road Fort Myers, FL 33919 Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz Phone: 433-7708 Fax: 481-9109 E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 5:15 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush a t n oon Minyan: Monday & Thursday 7:00 a.m. CHABAD JEWISH CENTER OF CAPE CORAL ORTHODOX 1716 Cape Coral Pkwy. W., Cape Coral, FL 339 14 Rabbi Yo ssi Labkowski Phone: 963 4770 E mail: inf o@chabadcape.com Web site: www.chabadcape.com Services: Frida y E vening 7 :30 p.m. Saturday m orning 9: 30 a.m. followed b y Kiddush lun cheon Sunday m orning 8: 00 a.m. Monday Friday m orning 7: 00 a.m. JLI Courses: M onday e vening at 7:00 p.m. Weekly T orah Study: T uesday e vening 7: 30 p.m. Hebrew S chool: S unday 10 :00 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Jgirls: T uesday 6: 00 7:00 p.m. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS Shalom Life Center Lawrence Dermer, Spiritual Leader 218 -3433 AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee): Jacki Waksman (954) 653 -9053 AJC (American Jewish Committee):Brian Lipton (941) 365 4955 Anti -Defamation League: (561) 988 -2900 B Nai B rith International: (941) 302 -4500 Chevra Kadisha: Gene Sipe 841 -4615 Generations of the Shoah SWFL: 963 -9347 Hadassah Collier/Lee Chapter: Lynn Weiner 598 -1009 Hadassah Sharon Chapter (Charlotte County): Odette Port (941) 505 -1409 Hazak 55+ Chapter: Joyce Rosinger 437 -1566 Humanistic Jewish Havurah: Paula Creed 495 -8484 Israel Bonds: Regional Headquarters: (800) 622 -8017 Jewish Community Services: 481 -4449 Jewish National Fund: (727) 536 5263Memorial Tree Planting in Israel 1 -800 -542 -8733 Jewish War Veterans: Post 400: Commander Harvey Charter 246 -3151 Mikvah Bashka of Southwest Florida: Nechamie Minkowicz 822 -2784 ORT Gulf Beaches Chapter Marina Berkovich 566 -1771IN LEE & CHARLOTTE COUNTIES

PAGE 22

22 TEMPLE NEWS TEMPLE BETH SHALOMCape Coral (239) 772-4555 www.templebethshalomcc.org For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUEFort Myers (239) 466-6671 www.fortmyerssynagogue.com Heartfelt thanks to the very many C.F.S. volunteers who transform our spacious Community Hall into a won derful Days of Awe place of worship for hundreds of worshippers, to those who help with the hospitality at the Rabbis Rosh Hashanah open house and the break-the-fast at the end of Yom Kippur, and to our inspired mu sicians and vocalists, both volunteer and professional, who help us take our prayers to new heights. Special thanks to Rosh Hashanah Torah readers Ashlie Clopein, Linda Shuster, Luba Grossman and Nancy Schwartz who read Torah for the con gregation on Rosh Hashanah morning. All are graduates of C.F.S. Adult He brew Reading Ulpanim and had been called to the Torah as Bnot Mitsvah during the year. We are also indebted to our skilled sukkah builders and those who help or ganize our festive Feast of Tabernacles send abundant blessing and success to all their undertakings together with all of Israel their people, and say we all, Amen! The Community Free Synagogue is pleased to welcome Joseph Brauer to its Sabbath Eve musical ensemble Yedid Nephesh. Brauer is a professional musician and actor who works with Florida Repertory Theatre, Gulfshore Playhouse, the Bonita Springs Centers for the Performing Arts, and TheatreZone. He is also the Director of Music for All Faiths Unitarian Congregation. Joseph developed his diverse keyboard skill through Torontos Royal Conservatory of Music, as well as playing with ensembles such as Canadian Celtic folk band Crooked Jack and North Dakota alt-rock band Books About Ships. Having grown up in Northern Manitoba, Canada, he completed his BFA at North Dakota State University/Challey School of Music. ville and vocalists Richard McConville and Traci Pavel. Torah Study is postponed on Sabbath morning, October 6 while Rabbi Diamond is the visiting scholar at Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation in New Hampshire. The next C.F.S. Brown Bag MovThursday, October 18. It features Menashe (2017), the story of a Hassid in Brooklyn trying to raise a son on his own and the many traditional obstacles he faces. Pack your dinner; admission and soft drinks are free. Mother and daughter Arline and Samantha Gallentine will be called to the Torah as adult Bnot Mitzvah dur ing Sabbath eve worship on Friday, October 19. They are graduates of Auxiliary Rabbi Thomas Miess Hebrew Reading Ulpan and have gone on to study with Auxiliary Rabbi Terry Goldberg for this special occasion. Our June 4-15, 2019, Israel Pilgrimage with the Rabbi is starting to limit our group size to 26 participants, so please be sure to get your applica tion in if you are planning to join us. For more details and to download your application, visit the C.F.S. website at www.fortmyerssynagogue.com or email pilgrimage coordinator Arnie The Community Free Synagogue serves a traditional Sabbath dinner. It is free and reservations are never re welcomed with prayer and song. A cof fee hour follows worship. lively discussion of the weeks Torah SRUWLRQ\003XQWLO\003\024\024\035\026\023\003D\021P\021\017\003ZKHQ\003WKH\003 Mourners Qaddish is recited. Now in its 14th year, The Commu nity Free Synagogue is an independent synagogue and valued community re ligious resource. All of its events and programs, including youth and adult Jewish education, are open to all and always free. The foundation of The Community Free Synagogue is Study, Worship and Benevolent Acts, generally fol lowing progressive Jewish traditions. C.F.S.s founder and leader, Rabbi Bruce Diamond, D.D., a distinguished ordainee of the Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute of Religion in Cincin nati, marks his 21st year of leadership in the Fort Myers Jewish community. He is also a Super Adjunct Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University, focusing on community ethics and activism. Rabbi Diamond is assisted by Aux iliary Rabbis Thomas Meiss and Terri Goldberg, graduates of C.F.S.s 3-year Community Rabbi Program. The synagogue meets at the South west Florida Masonic Center, 10868 Metro Parkway in South Fort Myers. For more information, please visit www.fortmyerssynagogue.com. TEMPLE BETH ELFort Myers (239) 433-0018 www.templebethel.comFor children, Jewish learning can be an edge of Judaisms values and traditions in a playful manner. Its never too early hood is not soon forgotten. The Talmud Two of Rabbi Lunas programs, Babies and Bagels and Tot Shabbat, allow parents and their youngsters to share warm emotional experiences while becoming familiar with prayers, songs and rituals in a safe and nurturing setting. Supporting a strong Jewish identity, engaging young and interfaith families with their youngsters paves their way to future involve ment in synagogue life. Often, childrens love of music leads them to attend Friday night ser vices. Hannah, for example, has been attending services since she was a baby. During services, her grandmother would pat her back as she fell asleep to Jewish music. Now nine years old, Hannah attends on Friday nights because, she says, I love to see everyone and I enjoy being Jewish. My mom is in the choir, and I like singing Jewish songs. Sunday school students. Morah Randy It seems strange, as you read this, that the holidays will soon be over, but as I write, they have just begun. We slowed down a little over the summer to catch our breath before going full steam ahead as the new year begins. In reality, members of the congregation didnt just kick back over the summer and relax. Many members met to plan activities, make repairs on the building and grounds, organize the High Holiday services, break the fast, create fundraisers and more. have two Bar Mitzvahs coming up; our trip to the Broadway Palm to see Lets Joseph Brauer BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDSSanibel (773) 251-8862 www.batyam.org As is customary with small Jewish or ganizations, it is volunteers who make Lessack, Annette Pacyga, Sue Danford, Peter Spohr, Barry Fulmer, Michael Hochschild, Tanya Hochschild, Barry Epstein, Barbara Epstein, Marcia Rudin, James Rudin, Bob Schoen, Caren Schoen, Miriam Renee Minsky, Lois Lorsch, Howard Lorsch, Garry Weiss, Beth Weiss, Norma Kohn, Jack Kohn, Marty Packard, Enid Packard, Tobi Mackler, Steve Fischer, Jeanette Keyser, Al Kaplan, Mickie Kaplan, Paula Raboy, Paulette Lotstein, James Lotstein, Kathy Zoss, Michael Samet, Elissa Karasin Samet, Esta Berger, David Berger, Myra Klahr, Mel Bleiberg, Allan Sacks, Sallie Sacks, Bonnie Kasdan, Renee Sugar, Joel Sugar, Barry Litofsky, Barry Solomon, Jay Solomon, Vickie Fuchs, Toby Simon, Peggy Siegel, Frank Siegel, Evelyn Clark, Herb Clark, Judith Mayer, Howard Mayer, Shirley Frank, Byron Frank, Helene Smith, Alan Smith, Sandy Berke, Stuart Berke, Stan Zell, Susan Rosenberg, Ken Gerson, Bluma Herman, Don Herman, Irene Skolnick, Leon Skolnick, Salessa Berk, Marvin Berk, Arlen Stein, Irwin Stein, Shir ley Boscov, Andrea Smith, Jan Smith, Linda Edinburg, Joel Edinburg, Patti Levine, Stan Levine, Ed Greenberg, Nancy Greenberg, Alan Parker, Linda Parker, Phyllis Pachman, Ben Yokel, Bernie Lubetkin, Beverly Lubetkin, Adele Anish, Steve Anish, Mary Kay Sadighi, Parvis Sadighi, Sharon Bar ton, Stan Barton, Linda Drasnin, Bar ry Roth, Ying Przybyszewski, Carol Schieber, Phil Schieber, Louise Freeman, Deborah Gurman, Don Breiter, Judith Adler, Louise Freeman, Judy Wald, Michael Feingold, Ellen Feingold, Leah Friedman, Mickey Nathanson, Gay Adelstein, Morton Levy, Roselyn Kraus, Margie Peppercorn, Mark Peppercorn, Peter Saltz, Jocelyn Saltz and others. the guidance of Rabbi Stephen Fuchs and Cantor Murray Simon. Therefore, a great big thank you very much, to dah rabah (Hebrew), merci beau coup (French), muchas gracias (Spanish), danke schoen (German), grazie mille (Italian), bolshoye spasibo (Russian), feichang ganxie ni (Chinese), tashakkor mikonam (Persian) and dziekujebardzo (Pol ish) to everyone. Although those of you who live in Southwest Florida year-round dont need a reminder, it was just over a year ago that Hurricane Irma struck the re gion. This year, it is many colors of toxic algae that are harming the envi ronment and inhabitants of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caloosahatchee River. The Bat Yam Social Action Committee in the lives of those who struggle on Sanibel and surrounding communities. The High Holy Days, Sukkot and Simchat Torah are behind us. No mat ter whether you worshipped and cele brated with the Bat Yam family or your family and friends elsewhere, may the year ahead be healthy and peaceful for all of us. Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide StudiesDedicated to educating all sectors of society about Jewish civilization, the Holocaust, and genocide through: scholarship outreach inquiry sharing knowledge preserving the record helping teachers encouraging studentsVisit www.fgcu.edu/hc/ Dr. Paul Bartrop, Director S e n d a n e m a i l t o a m y p a d i ll a @ j f e d l c c o r g GET THE LATEST INFORMATION ON UPCOMING COMMUNITY EVENTS, CULTURAL ACTIVITIES, BREAKING NEWS, UPDATES FROM ISRAEL & MORE. STAY IN TOUCH Sign up for e-blasts! Send an email to debbiesanford@jfedlcc.org

PAGE 23

23 TEMPLE NEWS TEMPLE BETH SHALOMCape Coral (239) 772-4555 www.templebethshalomcc.org TEMPLE JUDEAFort Myers (239) 433-0201 Temple Judea. On Friday evening, September 28 the congregation will celebrate the Consecration of thirdgrade religious school students during Shabbat evening services, followed by a dinner in the sukkah. The service is open to all; reservations are needed for the dinner. Please call the synagogue Temple Judea follows the Israeli calendar for festival observance. On Sunday evening, September 30, we will celebrate Simchat Torah with a spaghetti dinner and then a lively and fun service. Music and dancing will ac company the end of reading the Torah, with the start of reading it again. The following morning,Yizkor will be said during Simchat Torah services. Last year, congregants Marsha and Mike Kistler and Andi Abrams went to Africa. They will share experi ences from their trip with HAZAK on temple. Participants are invited to join everyone at Sweet Tomatoes for dinner after the presentation. To RSVP, email tjhazak@ gmail.com. Adult Education classes begin on Monday, October 8 and will continue for eight weeks. Rabbi Sack will teach two classes. for anyone considering conversion, but also open to those just wanting to learn more about Jewish practice, p.m., participants will be reading and discussing Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor by Yossi Klein Halevi. That same night, Rabbi Michael Schorin will teach The Mystery of Love by Marc Gafni, the x-rated side of Jewish mysticism. Rabbi Schorins Fried will teach Crazy Herbs Hebrew Words a memory system for learn ing Jewish culture and modern Hebrew. The Adult Education classes are open to the community. If you are interested in attending, please call the Chaverot, Temple Judeas Sister hood, is beginning a monthly Rosh Hodesh program. This Holiday for Women that celebrates the beginning p.m. at the home of Mindi Simon. It will be an evening of learning, laughter and light refreshments. RSVP by Thursday, October 4 to Jan Klein. Our shlicha, Zohar ben Hamu, will lead a Young Leadership program for high school students. The purpose of the program is to prepare the teens to transition from the local Jewish community to college, to teach them about Israel and the Middle East, and to enrich them with skills that will help them in their adult lives. The program will meet every two weeks on a Thursday tion building. There will be eight sessions, with the last session being held at the Israel embassy in Miami. It is an exciting and important program open to all Jewish teenagers in the commu for more information. Zohar will also teach an Israeli cooking class beginning on Thursday, October 25. The class is sponsored by you are interested in participating. There will be an AIPAC-sponsored program at Temple Judea on WednesRomirowsky, PHD, Executive Director of Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, will be the featured speaker. His topic is Combating the Delegitimiza tion of Israel. There is no cost to at tend. To register, please visit www. aipac.org/templejudea. Rabbi Sacks monthly lunchtime Torah study begins again on Thursday, ers and Brettholtz and Company. It is an hour of open discussion of Torah and Judaism, where all levels of back aged. Everyone is welcome and there is no cost to attend. Our monthly serving of meals at the Salvation Armys Meals with Compassion continues. Meals are now served on Monday evenings and vol unteers are need for Mondays, October 8 and October 22. Please contact Linda at lindaidelson8@gmail.com to help. Regular scheduled events: Friday evening Shabbat services with a wine and cheese reception VWDUWLQJ\003DW\003\031\035\023\023\003S\021P\021 Saturday morning Shabbat servic dush luncheon Lunchtime Torah Study with Rab month Morning minyan every Monday at is free and reservations are never rewelcomed with prayer and song. A coffee hour follows worship. lively discussion of the weeks Torah Mourners Qaddish is recited. Now in its 14th year, The Community Free Synagogue is an independent synagogue and valued community religious resource. All of its events and programs, including youth and adult Jewish education, are open to all and always free. The foundation of The Community Free Synagogue is Study, Worship and Benevolent Acts, generally following progressive Jewish traditions. C.F.S.s founder and leader, Rabbi Bruce Diamond, D.D., a distinguished ordainee of the Hebrew Union CollegeJewish Institute of Religion in Cincin nati, marks his 21st year of leadership in the Fort Myers Jewish community. He is also a Super Adjunct Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University, focusing on community ethics and activism. Rabbi Diamond is assisted by Auxiliary Rabbis Thomas Meiss and Terri Goldberg, graduates of C.F.S.s 3-year Community Rabbi Program. The synagogue meets at the Southwest Florida Masonic Center, 10868 Metro Parkway in South Fort Myers. For more information, please visit www.fortmyerssynagogue.com. TEMPLE BETH ELFort Myers (239) 433-0018 www.templebethel.com For children, Jewish learning can be an edge of Judaisms values and traditions in a playful manner. Its never too early Sunday school students. Morah Randy Kashi teaches age-appropriate music for the kids to sing, emphasizing songs their parents knew from their childhood so families can enjoy singing together at home. ones to more traditional songs with older kids, they learn how to sing in front of the congregation and to lead services approaching their bar/bat chanting Torah before the congrega tion. For more information about these programs and about Sunday school, call Temple Beth El at 239.433.0018. In Lee County, Temple Beth El is the largest congregation and the only member synagogue of the Union for Reform Judaism. Temple Beth El is the oldest Jewish congregation in Southwest Florida, established in 1954, and boasts the only ordained rabbi who is a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbis. Our ordained cantor has lifelong cantorial training and is an ACC (American Conference of Cantors) member. The profound knowledge and experience of our clergy is the reason our members enjoy authentic worship services, festivals and life cycle events. September 1 saw dozens of congregants and guests gathered in the Dubin Center (social hall) of Temple Beth El to partake of a festive, pre-Selichot assortment of mouthwatering cakes, pastries, home-made chocolate-dipped coconut macaroons and cookies. A meaningful Havdalah service was held just prior to the Selichot service. The colorful everyday Torah covers were changed to the High Holy Days traditional white mantles, adorned with freshly polished silver adornments. Why white? White is seen as the color of joy, and we rejoice on Erev Yom be forgiven (~Responsa in a Moment, Sept. 2015). Temple Beth El is privileged to own seven beautiful Torahs, several of which have been donated by TBE families over its long history in Southwest Florida. Mantle changes were made by mother-daughter teams plus new and established members of the congregation. Preparation for Selichot, individuals to make it joyous and suc cessful. Todah rabah to the entire TBE and Bob Ruberto; Carolyn Gora; the Torah mantle changers and Torah car riers; Randy Kashi; Phyllis and Berny Aronson; Cantor Bessman; and Rabbi Luna. Extra special thanks to Jay Sax, who removed all the Torahs from the Ark and then replaced them. It seems strange, as you read this, that the holidays will soon be over, but as I write, they have just begun. We slowed down a little over the summer to catch our breath before going full steam ahead as the new year begins. In reality, members of the congregation didnt just kick back over the summer and relax. Many members met to plan activities, make repairs on the building and grounds, organize the High Holi day services, break the fast, create fun draisers and more. have two Bar Mitzvahs coming up; our trip to the Broadway Palm to see Lets Go To the Movies. Sister hood has planned a Purse & Jewelry Auction on Sunday, November 4. Football fans of all ages, come participate in our very successful fundraiser. Last year we were able to gather enough funds to repair our sound system. You pick four pro football teams for the week and if they win, you win. The cost is $5 per week. If you have please contact Arnie Schwartz at ar nienature@hotmail.com. As always we welcome guests to all of our social and fundraising events, as well as Torah Study on Saturday mornings, brown bag lunch every other Wednesday, bowling on Sundays, religious school for the children, and more information. While we look forward to all of the fun and educational events of the season, we like to emphasize that we are a warm and nurturing community where all are welcome. Come see what we of our family. Send an email to debbiesanford@jfedlcc.org LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.

PAGE 24

24 rfntbrfntbrnbrfnrtbb rffntbbtt Location. Location. Shell Point. rfntbr tbIt Feels Like Homernrf nfff nf nrn ffffnn n fbf SLS-3728-18 L'Chayim Ad Oct.indd 1 9/11/18 4:23 PM