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Title:
L'CHAYIM
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte
Coordinates:
26.500215 x -81.911403

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID FT. MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 1759701 Commerce Center Court Fort Myers, Florida 33908 DELIVER TO CURRENT RESIDENT OR POSTMASTER: DATED RELIGIOUS NEWS ITEMS. TIME SENSITIVE PLEASE EXPEDITE! www.JewishFederationLCC.org Vol. 40, No. 10 June 2018 / 5778 Photos courtesy Michael Shapiro Rozzi Ostermans speech at Federation's Annual meeting Rozzi Osterman I grew up in Washington State and Northern California in a very traditional Jewish home, but there were only three Jewish families in our school. So we were always the ones asked to explain Hanukkah, bring in the menorah and latkes, explain Pass over and matzah, the bread that we didnt have time to wait for because we were rushing out of Egypt. When I got to Israel at 19 (why Israel, why 19? a story for another evening), everybody already knew the Hanukkah story, matzah was in the supermarkets, Friday night was Shab bat...my job was done. In Israel, living on Kibbutz Gvar Am, I met John Osterman, a very cute Jewish boy from Toledo, Ohio. We milked cows together never thinking the Jewish Federation to get a sense of the Jewish community. It so happened that the week we were in town was the week of Major Gifts. Helene Kramer, the Executive Director, invited us to come. So, we were under the impression that every month or so, Federation donors dressed up and met speakers like Ed Koch and Elie Wiesel. We moved to Fort Myers and we found the community to be warm and inviting. I joined the Federation board and even agreed to take a few solicitation cards. For a few years, my only cards were the Siegels Barb and Alan and the Zuckers Sherri and Ira. I would call them for their gifts and they would thank me! event, I thought that all people would always thank me for taking the time to ask for money. So why such a long commitment to the Federation? And why am I somewhat awkward at being honored? Because, my relationship with the Federation has always been a natural tion, promoting the Jewish values of benevolence, repairing the world and taking responsibility for one another, is the same mission that John and I share The people involved are likeminded. Many of my dearest friends are on the board. They are thoughtful and generous of their time and talents. When I attend an event, it feels like family. And when I speak with you, I feel the love. Being chosen as a leader is a gift. I have traveled to Ukraine to visit with elderly Holocaust survivors, witnessed Aliyah made by young families from Israelis in absorption centers, hospitals and afterschool programs for kids-atrisk, as well as artists and teachers, all while representing you. I have learned about special needs in our community and been inspired by so many of our members who are leaders in the sym phony, theater, Habitat for Humanity, art and universities. I love collaborating with our tal a candy store when we start creating and thoughtful lady. And Alan is the brother I never had, whom I admire and annoy at the same time! I especially treasure the experience of sharing the importance of leadership and Jewish values with my children. Thank you for honoring me. When you honor me, you honor John and our belief in benevolence, repairing the world and taking responsibility for one another. Happy birthday Israel thousands of years old, 70 years young!By Leni Sack, Federation Program DirectorO ver 400 people came together on Sunday, April 15 at the Heights Center to celebrate this milestone in Israels history. Hash em was surely watching out for us as was over. Despite the strong wind, the shuk vendors were able to display their wares, and attendees were able to enjoy the entertainment, delicious food and shuk shopping. Thank you to our entertainers: The Shalom Band from Miami, The Big Yarmulkes (a band from right here in raeli dancers led by Marsha Kistler. Also thanks to Saundra Falk for leading everyone in the singing of the National leading Hatikvah. Thank you to Nir Cohen and Ilan Dahan and their families, who cooked and served the food. They worked very hard and we owe them a lot of thanks. Thank you to the local synagogues and organizations and all their volunteers who supported this event along with the Jewish Federation: Temple Beth Shalom, Congregation Bat Yam, The Community Free Synagogue, Shaple Judea and BBYO. Also, thank you to Miromar Outlets, one of our com munity arts & culture sponsors. Israeli music and dancing, Israeli wine tasting, Israeli food and Israeli art and jewelry for sale, along with a vari ety of other items and activities, added to the fun of the afternoon. Thank you to the vendors and to everyone who attended and showed their support for the State of Israel.The Shalom Bands music added a lot of spirit to the afternoon T-shirts celebrating Israels 70th birthday were for sale The Shalom Israeli dancers always put on a good show A few of the BBYO teens who volunteered at the BBYO booth, which supported Israels Lone Soldier project Shuk vendors displayed a variety of items for sale Face painting is always a hit with the kids

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2 LCHAYIM invites correspondence on subjects of interest to Jewish people. Partisan political opinions will not be published, welcome. All inquiries regarding copy for LCHAYIM should be directed to the editor. All news material must be very clearly printed or typed (not in all-capital letters) and double-spaced. Electronic submissions encouraged. The editor reserves the right to edit for space and content. Photographs should be clear, black-and-white or color prints. If you wish a photograph returned, include a stamped, self-addressed envelope of appropriate size. The Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties disclaims responsibility or endorsement of the views expressed by the writers and claims by advertisers. Jewish news published monthly byJewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties9701 Commerce Center Court, Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 481-4449 Fax: (239) 481-0139 Online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org June 2018 Volume 40, Number 10 President: Brian Simon Board: Paul Bartrop Jack Esformes Karen Fine Andi Horowitz Linda Idelson Marsha Kistler Sara Krivisky Michele Laboda Rozzi Osterman Barbara Siegel Sylvia Simko Sherri Zucker Executive Director: Alan Isaacs Program Director : Leni Sack Executive Assistant: Lori Ramos Jewish Family Services: Jodi Cohen Editor/Designer: Ted Epstein (239) 249-0699 Advertising: Jim Lewin (239) 634-6923 JULY ISSUE EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Tuesday, June 5 OUR FEDERATION In this issue: 7 Our Community 9 Jewish Interest 14 Marketplace 15 Israel & the Jewish World 17 Commentary 18 From the Bimah 20 Focus on Youth 21 Organizations 22 Community Directory 23 Temple News Grow your business with LCHAYIM. Reach 5,000 local Jewish residents through this paper.For more information or to place an ad, call Jim at 239.634.6923 or send an email to JamesLewin@jfedLCC.org. For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. Program notes Leni Sack I want to thank Temple Beth El, The Community grams held this past year. And a special thank you to Temple Judeas shlicha, Zohar ben Hamu, for lead ing all the programs and introducing young families to the celebration of holidays, had by all. Food pantry A special thank you and shout out also go to the Fort Myers High School National Honor Society students, who conducted a food drive that benfood pantry. Their high school faculty advisor, Elisa Grossman, was thrilled that the students not only committed to collecting the food, they also committed to loading their cars and bringing the food directly to the food pantry. In fact, the project was originally scheduled to end in December, but students asked if they could continue through the end of the school year. The students showed the commitment and character of the members of the National Honor Society while supporting families in need. I hope they inspired all of you to keep the food pantry in mind throughout the year! Author events By the time you read this, Carolyn Gora and I will have just returned from our annual trip to the Jewish Book Council Conference in New York City, where we get to hear over 200 authors pitch their books to those of us who arrange for authors to speak in our communities each year. The criteria for presenting is that the content of the book has a Jewish theme and/ or the author is Jewish. It is an intensive three days of workshops and author presentations for us, but Caro lyn and I love bringing interesting and engaging au thors here. I hope you cant wait to hear who will be coming for the 2018-2019 calendar year! Jewish Film Festival Not only are we starting to plan for author events, Florida. For all you snowbirds who may want to make your reservations to come down in time for it, the fes tival will begin January 10, 2019. We expect to again through February 12. Israel Scouts Another annual favorite for our community is the Israel Scouts Friendship Caravan. The group of ten Israeli teens bring their lively singing and dancing performance to Temple Judea on Monday, June 18 at 7:00 p.m. The free family concert is open to all and is sponsored by Temple Judea, Temple Beth El and the Jewish Federation. This talented and inspirational group of teenagers represents the best of Israel. What a great way to start the summer! And as I think about the summer, I have to take a moment to kvell. In just a couple of weeks, I will th grade graduation of our oldest grandson from his Jewish Day School. I across the stage. I wish everyone a good and safe summer.By Leni Sack, Federation Program DirectorHolocaust Memorial ServiceThe annual Holocaust Memorial Service was held on Sunday, April 8 at Temple Beth Shalom in Cape Coral. Over 150 people attended the moving service, highlighted by a video sharing the story of the survivors who were at the service. Rozzi Osterman, past president of the Jewish Federation and an experienced project of the Temple Judea Religious School and using footage from the Holocaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida, edited the video. Thank you to Temple Beth Shalom for hosting the event this year and to the Temple Beth Shalom choir for their beautiful music. Special thanks to all the clergy and lay leaders who participated: Rabbi Devora Buchen, Temple Beth Shalom; Rabbi Michael Scho rin, Gulf Coast Hospital Chaplain; ard Bessman, Temple Beth El; Rabbi Marc Sack, Temple Judea; Rabbi Ste phen Fuchs, Congregation Bat Yam; Rabbi Bruce Diamond, The Commu nity Free Synagogue. ry Fulmer, Congregation Bat Yam; Joyce and George Rosinger, Temple Judea; Harvey Wolfson, President of Temple Beth Shalom. Holocaust survivor Francoise Onufer aided by Temple Beth Shalom President Harvey Wolfson Temple Beth Shalom choir directed by Rabbi Devora Buchen Holocaust survivor Carla Beninga Holocaust survivor Peter Simenauer Holocaust survivor Paul Simko Holocaust survivor Lore RosenstrauchPhotos courtesy Michael Shapiro

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3 OUR FEDERATION Program notes Holocaust Memorial Service furthering our mission 2017 Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties Honor Roll Howard & Brenda Sheridan Advanced Pain Management & Spine Specialists Morton & Beth Crane Sheryl Lipman Gene & Lee Seidler John & Martha Wolf Ron Wallace & Naomi Bloom Charles Weisinger Max Jacobs James & JoAnn Lewin Barbara Siegel Ronny & Marie Taschner Barry & Barbara Epstein Richard & Renee Lane Howard & Judith Mayer Robert & Lynne Mogell Elizabeth Shevach Marsha Weiner Kenneth & Gwenda Asher Stuart & Juli Bobman Shirley Boscov Harvey & Barbara Goldberg Jacob Goldberger Melvin & Sheila Goldstein Alvin & Miriam Kaplan Jonas & Neena Kushner Stuart Meyers Miromar Outlets Cathy Reiman & Jay Rosman Steve & Lana Royal Temple Beth El Temple Judea Miles & Joan Thomson Howard & Nancy Barrow Jorge & Helene Glocer Carolyn Gora Shirlene Grasgreen Bruce & Kathy Greenberg Steven & Julie Guterman Alan & Harriet Josephson Michael & Marsha Kistler Ron & Lin Klein Elaine London Barry & Amy Marz Stuart & Toni Morgenstein Norman & Joan Newman PCC Tile Herbert Brenner Jerry Williamson & Pauline Chusid Larry & Terri Eisenfeld William & Andi Horowitz Lynn & Lory Kirby Gerald & Sheila Laboda Judith Leeder Clive & Sonya Lubner John & Rozzi Osterman Judi Roth Jerry & Barbara Snyderman Paul Weinstein $500 $999 $1 $1 $500 $1 Marvin & Lesley Porter Lloyd & Midge Rauch Robert & Reina Schlager Ruth Segel Adam & Elise Sewall Brian & Mindi Simon Sidney & Ruth Steiner Jerry & Judith Stephens TBE: North Carolina Judy Williams $1 $499 21st Century CARE Andrea Abrams John & Marlene Adler Rabbi Solomon & Arline Agin Shelly Albert Beatrice Allen Barbara Amar Amazon Smile Earl & Barbara Anderson Steve & Adel Anish Nancy Armocida Joel & Eve Aron Marvin & Mona Aronow Bernard & Phyllis Aronson Celia Atun Tricia Aulls Barry & Rona Axelrod Arlene Bachman Sorelle Baldwin Koch Joel & Barbara Barlow Stan & Sharon Barton Robert & Roberta Jo Belin Joyce Bell Jerry & Pat Ben Rabbi Steven & Rhonda Bernstein Sharon Berry Barbara Bertman Melvin & Shirley Bleiberg Bari Marvin & Lillian Bloom Nathan & Wendy Blyveis Richard & Shari Bornfreund Cynthia Boyer Harvey & Carol Brand Harold & Renee Bretner Craig Brotheim Bonnie Bursten Michele Callif Handler Thomas Cardone Lane & Barbara Carlin Rochelle Catz Sanford & Sandra Cohen Harvey Cohen William & Wendy Cohen Jodi Cohen Steve & Carol Cohen Sheila Cohen Harry & Bea Colter Paul Cornez Joseph & Sheila Cramer Ron & Paula Creed Barry & Susan Ebbets Herb & Marge Gallop Glen & Rita Gardberg Joe & Hillary Gates Jay Ginsburg Ginny Gioia Joan Glaser Susan Glasser Howard & Jane Gold Joseph & Marcia Goldberg Patricia Goldberg Morton Goldberg Luda Goldenberg Shelly Goldenberg Claire Goldhagen Paul & Marilyn Goldstein Michael & Cheryl Goldstein Leon Goldstein Elaine Goldwater Steve & Toni Goodman Milton & Andrea Goodman Stan & Helen Goodman Newton Gordon Marsha Gray Joan Green Arthur & Lori Greenberg Norman & Vivian Greenberg Jerry Greene Richard & Joyce Greenwald Luba Grossman Marcia Hanwit Avi & Hannah Harpaz Gary & Sandra Harrell Roger & Jean Harris Sidney & Rita Harris Robert & Marilyn Harris Heidi Hazelcorn Carol Heligman Neil & Barbara Henry Michael & Tanya Hochschild Ginger Horton Bruce & Robin Jacobs Celia Jacoby Gloria Joseph Maurice & Carol Kabili John & Sandra Kampner Rheta Kanen Yale & Jean Kanter Jerry & Susanne Kantor Louis & Sharon Kapp Bonnie Kasdan Gerald Kash Arlene Keller Carlson Joseph & Bernice Kelley Robin Kessler Selma Kestelman Jed & Jan Klein Hartley & Adair Kleinberg Jerry & Hilary Kobrin Michele Komito Rebecca Kon Harry Sparling & Harriet Jo Kotlar Marcelle Kouser Jean Kramer Steven & June Kruger Sherwin & Susan Kruger Gerald Kumin Gloria Kummins ferschmid Bert Kurland Marty & Janice Labell Lani Laboda Gerald & Phyllis Langberg Roberta Lawrence Aaron & Leatrice Lebowitz Helen Leddy Phyllis Lee Paul & Robin Lesser Yale & Anna Levin Stanford Levin Shirley Levine Robert & Carol Levine Linda Levine Stephanie Levine Abe & Pat Levy Max & Karen Liberles Harry Lichtcsien Marshall & Barbara Lieberman Robert Lipshutz Robert & Leslie Loscher Alvin & Elaine Lubiner Roberto & Rachelle Luna Joel Rosenberg & Sandra Lurey Steve & Paula Machlin Gary & Marlena Maisel Natalie Manning Ruth Margolin Shelia Marquardt Arthur & Sandy Mason Beverly Meisel Bernie & Beverly Melmed Steen & Eileen Metz Rhoda Miller Thomas Miller Melvin & Jacqueline Milstein Beverly Leah Mitchell Linda Moon Laurie Morris Toby Moss Arthur & Reba Nassau Wilbert Needleman Alice Nerenstone Seymour Nodell Charles & Nancy Olender Roz Owitz Ross & Tina Pegler Julia Perry Steven & Amy Phillips Julie Phillips Steve Pilzer Paul Policella Marsha Poster PJ & Cindy Prechtel Carol Price Paula Raboy Laurene Rapport Robert & Melinda Rayder Katherine Renas Janet Richardson Gail & Michael Richter Myra Roberts Michael & Carol Rosenberg Norma Rosenberg Susan Rosenberg Lore Rosenstrauch Jan Rosenthal George & Joyce Rosinger Barry Roth Larry & Eileen Roth Michael & Lynda Rubenstein Jacob Rubin Herb & Barb Rubinstein Richard & Sharon Safron Wendy Salita Al & Joan Saltz Toby & Sandi Sauls Jacob & Vanessa Sax Manis Sax Janet Bailin & Eugene Scarzafava Carol Schapiro Harold Schechter Eugene Scheel Philip & Carol Scheiber Eilene Schiller Marc & Monica Schneider Jerome & Elaine Schnur Lowell & Michelle Schoenfeld Lawrence & Leslie Schoenfeld Jill Schreidell Lionel & Marcia Schuman Alvin & Eileen Schwartz Gary Schwartz Lewis Schwartz Richard & Karen Schwartz Marcia Schwarz Lana Segal Rosalie Segal James & Millie Sernovitz Joel Shapiro Samuel Shapiro Harry Shapiro Jane Shaw Judith Sherman Philip & Carla Sherwin Rosalyn Shraiar Lois Shulman Karen Siegel Robert & Carolyn Siegel Howard & Verna Siegel Bernard & Harlene Siegel Howard Silverman Harold & Carol Silverman Richard & Pamela Simon Al & Judith Simon Joseph & Yvonne Simon Gene & Andrea Sipe Adrienne Sires Robert & Elaine Sless Judy Sloane Herb & Myrnalee Smith Stanley Smulyan Richard & Helen Sobel Barry & Jay Solomon Stan & Judith Spiegel Leo & Jill Stanley Gary & Alicia Starr Joan Steele Stuart & Stephanie Stern Aaron Stern Paula Streeter Marcia Strumwater Joel & Renee Sugar Oscar Sussmann Linda Sweet Ronald & Lynn Talone Elizabeth Greco & Arthur Tanenbaum Joel & Sylvia Taub Marlene Tehrani Temple Bat Yam Temple Shalom Paul & Marilyn Tenenbaum Robert Tholemeier Ken & Lisa Tolep Lisa & Paul Tritel Hy Tuchman Tues Mellow Mah Jongg Shlomo & Sheila Ullmann Svetlana Vogel Arnie & Leslie Vollmer Alice Walzer Ruth Wassermann Carlos & Jill Weil Marvin & Judy Weiner Hy & Hannah Weiner Howard Weisberg Max & Anita Weisglass Stephen & Susan Wener Ed & Judy Wessel Sylvia White Gloria Whitesman Stephen & Esther Wiener Arthur & Johanna Willner Walter & Arnee Winshall

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4 OUR FEDERATION Sunday March 1st The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. Y O U R S U P P O R T P r o m o t e K I N D N E S S S h a r e y o u r M I T Z V A H S t r e n g t h e n & e n r i c h J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y H o n o r / R e m e m b e r A L O V E D O N E This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or in memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with our community. Community L CHAYIM Non Needs Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grants Available The Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grant is available through the Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. The grant may be used for travel to Israel to participate in programs that are volunteer or educational in nature. Our hope is that these programs will enhance Jewish knowledge and identity in preparation for participation in American Jewish life. This grant is for Jewish residents of either county who are 25 years old or younger and can demonstrate a financial need. Academic standing and community involvement may also be considered. For more information or an application, please visit our website at www.JewishFederationLCC.org or contact the Federation at 239 481 4449, ext. 4 or email loriramos@jfedlcc.org. TRIBUTESIn honor of Rona & Barry Axelrod from Ron & Lynn Talone Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Tributes. Please send them to Lori Ramos at the Federation at loriramos@jfedlcc.org. T o g e t h e r w e C A N M a k e a D i f f e r e n c e FOOD PANTRYTemple Beth El Temple Judea Shalom Life Center Mellow Mah Jongg Jay Scott Victor Gold Sara Krivisky INDIGENT FUNDShalom Dancers Marty & Judy Freling Jack & Ellen Esformes The Jewish Federation thanks our GENEROUS DONORS Brian Simon Herb Goldenberg Boni Raitt Phyllis Henkel Ruth Lefberg Howard Silverman Gene & Andrea Sipe Ron & Lynn Talone Temple Judea S e n d a n e m a i l t o a m y p a d i ll a @ j f e d l c c o r g GET THE LATEST INFORMATION ON UPCOMING COMMUNITY EVENTS, CULTURAL ACTIVITIES, BREAKING NEWS, UPDATES FROM ISRAEL & MORE. STAY IN TOUCH Sign up for e-blasts! Send an email to lenibsack@jfedlcc.org

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5 OUR FEDERATION Sunday March 1st The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. Y O U R S U P P O R T P r o m o t e K I N D N E S S S h a r e y o u r M I T Z V A H S t r e n g t h e n & e n r i c h J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y H o n o r / R e m e m b e r A L O V E D O N E This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or in memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with our community. Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grants Available The Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grant is available through the Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. The grant may be used for travel to Israel to participate in programs that are volunteer or educational in nature. Our hope is that these programs will enhance Jewish knowledge and identity in preparation for participation in American Jewish life. This grant is for Jewish residents of either county who are 25 years old or younger and can demonstrate a financial need. Academic standing and community involvement may also be considered. For more information or an application, please visit our website at www.JewishFederationLCC.org or contact the Federation at 239 481 4449, ext. 4 or email loriramos@jfedlcc.org. F R E E F A M I L Y C O N C E R T M O N D A Y J U N E 1 8 7 P M | T E M P L E J U D E A 1 4 4 8 6 A & W B U L B R D F O R T M Y E R S F L I n f o : 2 3 9 4 3 3 0 2 0 1 t j s w f l @ g m a i l c o m By Rabbi Marc SackT he Fort Myers Jewish community will once again host a troupe of Israeli scouts for an evening of singing and dancing. Spon and Charlotte Counties, Temple Beth El and Temple Judea, Caravan Dekel will perform at Temple Judea on Mon day, June 18 at 7:00 p.m. The program is free and open to the entire commu nity. This years troupe features Scouts from a wide range of backgrounds. What they have in common is that each of them has taken on leadership roles of younger Scouts and counselors. They are multitalented teenagers who proudly represent the spirit of Israel. Gali Goldbergied ballet and modern dance since 4 th younger counselors. Adi Mesika, 17, is athletic and loves scuba diving, recently passing the Open Water Diver course. He is responsible for 40 children and four Roni Lamdan, 17, leads a troupe of Scouts her own age for which she creates materials to teach her peers. Roni has been playing piano since 3 rd grade. Amir Ron for three years with his family. In Tzo troupe of 8 th graders. Shai Birnbaum, 17, was born in Cincinnati. Her father is currently the CEO of SodaStream International. In addition to working toward her black belt in karate, she created a Facebook group called Peace Intifada, which now has more than 2,500 members. Avi Rata, 17, was born in Gonder, Ethiopia. He is a 7th grade counselor in tices Krav Maga. Sharon Gabriel 17, who studies th grade and accompanied American teenagers visiting Israel. Amit Zaga, 17, who leads a group th grade boys, loves camping and the outdoors. He also participated in a Space Olympics competition, leading a team of junior scientists that came in third place in the national Israeli competition. Shira Yehidi, 17, also studies act Shira volunteers in a kindergarten for refugee children in south Tel Aviv. Amit Inbar, 17, was a counselor for a 12-year-old boy with autism, meeting with him every week. Now he th grade boys. In his spare time, Amit plays piano. Yuval Ettinger, 23, one of the madrikhim, group leaders, established dren in her community. For her mili controller for the IAF. Yuval was, her self, a member of the caravan in 2012. Amir Shoval, 24, the other group leader, was in Scouts for nine years. After high school, together with seven friends, he postponed military service for one year to work in a small town building new scouting troupes. Amir that in his future. We look forward to welcoming and celebrating with Caravan De kel, 2018s troupe of Israel Scouts in Southwest Florida. 239 481 ( ) (

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6 OUR FEDERATION This publication is brought to you each month thanks to the support of our advertisers. Please be sure to use their products and services, and mention that you found them in LCHAYIM. This months advertisersAdvanced Pain Management....24 Advanced Physical Therapy.....10 Alliance Financial Group.........14 Hal Arkin, Realtor..................14 Art of Fashion and Moore.........14 Dr. Daniel Bendetowicz............14 Cypress Cove.........................9,13 Harold Eskin, Attorney..............14 FGCU.......................................21 FineMark Natl. Bank & Trust....19 Florida Specialists in Urology...14 Susan Glasser, Realtor..............8 Gordons Pool & Spa Service....14 Gulf Coast Orthodontics.............5 Dr. David Heligman....................7 Henderson Franklin...................14 Higginson Tax & Accounting....14 Hodges Funeral Home.................7 Charles Massie, CPA, CFP.....14 Michael Shapiro Photography...20 Paragon Pools...........................14 PCC Tile...................................14 Alan J. Rubinstein, Attorney.....14 Senior Housing Solutions.........11 Seniors Helping Seniors............14 Snydermans Shoes...................14 Douglas Spiegel, Attorney........14 Bob Vinikoor, Realtor.............14 Paul Weinstein, CFP................14 Ronny S Taschner DDS Active Member of the American Academy of Periodontology Jennifer Taschner DDS MMSc Diplomat e of the American Board of Peri o dontology 1645 Medical Lane Fort Myers, FL Phone 239 9360635 Visit Our Website www.taschnerperio.com By Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach Coordinator Senior Lunch Bunch update Jodi Cohen The Federation's April luncheon was hosted by Temple Beth Shalom, with food provided by our community partner, Jason's Deli. As seems to be the trend, we welcomed new faces into the mix and everyone's voices blended to create boisterous sounds throughout the lunch. The octave in the room was in the key of joy. The volunteers swooped in and did a fabulous job greeting people, setting things up, keeping everything moving and helping with the cleanup work. It takes a village to walk into a place and set up a village! Volunteer and photographer extraordinaire Helene Glocer facilitated a wonderful storytelling program after lunch, inviting people to talk about meaningful experiences. Stories ranged from a couple getting married on a bus kids at a trade show in Italy, to how the community gathered around a family during tragedy and loss. We laughed, we cried and, of course, we ate. The free monthly senior luncheon is a chance for Jewish seniors to get together to meet new people, deepen friendships, learn a little something and enjoy a meal together. People attend 'buddies' and everyone is warm and welcoming. People who don't drive are given rides by the fabulous volunteers. big celebration every month, and there is always a place at the table for anyone interested in joining. NEXT SENIOR LUNCH:Thursday, June 14 at 12:30 p.m. The Palms, 2674 Winkler Avenue, Fort Myers Space for 35 people RSVP by Friday, June 8 to Jodi Cohen at 239.481.4449 x6 or jodicohen@jfedlcc.org The Heart Remembers project updateBy Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach CoordinatorC eramics schools, artists and teachers were invited to take part in The Heart Remem bers project, an international artistic exhibition meant to commemorate fall en IDF soldiers. The project saw the creation of 23,545 ceramic red hearts (one for each fallen soldier) that were placed along the road leading up to and inside Tel Aviv's Yitzhak Rabin Center. The hearts were placed just prior to Yom HaZikaron, Memorial Day for Israels Fallen Soldiers. The Heart Remembers is a project of Partnership2gether (P2G), a suc cessful Jewish Agency model for gen erating ongoing, direct and meaningful partnerships between Jewish world communities and Israeli communities on an individual, organizational and whole-community level. Six Fort Myers artists met in Janice Heligmans garage/studio to decorate the hearts that Janice generously creat ed in preparation for our working session. The photos show the process of creating the hearts and also the hearts in the Yitzhak Rabin Center, includ ing a special photo noting the work of the Fort Myers artists: Carolyn Gora, Janice Heligman, Celeste Borah, Jodi Cohen, Juli Bobman and Elise Sewall. Holocaust Museum updateBy Susan Suarez, Executive Director LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.

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7 OUR COMMUNITY NEXT SENIOR LUNCH:Thursday, June 14 at 12:30 p.m. The Palms, 2674 Winkler Avenue, Fort Myers Space for 35 people RSVP by Friday, June 8 to Jodi Cohen at 239.481.4449 x6 or jodicohen@jfedlcc.orgHolocaust Museum updateBy Susan Suarez, Executive Director Susan Suarez Rabbi Adam Miller gives a blessing A large crowd of invited guests and dignitaries, including Collier County Commissioner Penny Taylor, celebrated the symbolic ground breaking for the future home of the Ho locaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida in North Naples. Wearing hardhats and wielding mini-sledgehammers, Museum board members and Capital CamDonor Janet Guttman Cohen broke through a wall joining two large spaces which will house the Museums main exhibit space. Following the ceremony, at 975 Imperial Golf Drive, North Na ples. The Museum will remain open at North in Naples, until the end of 2018, when it will relocate to its new home. Rabbi Adam Miller of Temple Shalom gave the introductory blessing, saying, May all who enter this space in the years to come be partners in creating a world of shalom, peace and wholeness. This community impact is the goal of the Museums mission and Education programs teach the lessons of the Holocaust to inspire action against bigotry, hatred and violence. Board Chair Herb Berkeley noted this day was a long dreamt-of goal for the community leaders who founded the Museum in 2001. They hoped someday to own a permanent space with adequate room to present exhibits, hold com munity events and, most importantly, educate students and the public about the history and lessons of the Holocaust. Many of those involved in the Museums early years were among the guests. They carried with them the spirits of those who were instrumental in the Museums creation and development. People like the late Holocaust survivors Ann Jacobson and Abe Price, who were instrumental with Golden Gate Middle School teachers David Bell Out of the Ashes classroom project erators like the late Peter Thomas who, because of his wartime experiences, understood the importance of teaching future generations the importance of respect for others and the consequences of hate. Community members like Diana and the late Homer Helter and the survivors, liberators and other dedicated people who helped build the Museums permanent collection of unique artifacts and original photographs. Also in attendance were Holocaust survivors Renee Beddouk, Rosette Gerbosi, Rob Nossen and Michael Eisenstadt. Mrs. Gerbosi addressed the guests, relating how she became involved with the Museum. The audience also included children of survivors, dedicated volunteers, former board nembers, community supporters and generous benefactors. The Museum was also honored to have Janet Guttman Cohen attend the event. Mrs. Cohen noted in her remarks that she was pleased to be in a position to support an organization that is close to her heart and has an important impact in the community. In recognition of her generous gift, the Museum will be named the Holocaust Museum & Janet G. and Harvey D. Cohen Education Center in honor of Mrs. Cohen and her late husband, Harvey. In addition to being a Finalist (for the second year in a row!) in the 2018 Best of the Gulfshore readers poll in Gulfshore Life magazine, the Museum recently was ranked by TripAdvisor as jump up from our previous position of #11 of 122 Things to Do in Naples. Thanks to all who have submitted a TripAdvisor review or spoken about a Museum visit to family and friends. You helped us crack the Top 10 list! This years annual Teacher Educa teacher schedules: June 11, July 23 or August 3. The one-day, 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. workshop is open to currently We hope you will save the following dates on your calendars for two impor tant Museum events: Thursday, December 13 The Resort in Naples Monday, March 4, 2019 Triumph 2019 Annual Fundraising Event at Grey Oaks Country Club in Naples Executive Director Susan Suarez, Board Chair Herb Berkeley, Donor Janet Guttman Cohen Specializing in knee replacement LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.

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8 OUR COMMUNITY For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. Susan Glasser, RealtorJohn R. Wood Properties 15065 McGregor Blvd. #105 Fort Myers, FL 33908 In front of Gulf HarbourSusanLGlasser@gmail.com Mobile: (239) 281-3105 For All Your Southwest Florida Real Estate NeedsLee County resident for more than 20 years Studying family history brings more than just historical knowledge, EVERYONE WELCOME. Jewish Genealogy SIG (Special Interest Group) Studying family history brings more than just historical knowledge, EVERYONE WELCOME. Jewish Genealogy SIG (Special Interest Group) Community Free Synagogue events and programsBrown Bag Movie Night The next Community Free Synagogue p.m. on Thursday, June 14. Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer stars Richard Gere in the title role with a special appear ance by Steve Buscemi as Rabbi Blumenthal. "Persistent wheeler-dealer Norman falls in with an Israeli politician on the rise. When the politician is elected prime minister, Norman rises in esteem with the New York Jewish community, even though his social connections might only be a sham." (Rotten Toma"Norman Oppenheimer is the President of New York-based Oppenheimer Strategies. His word-of-mouth business is consulting work largely in American-Israeli business and politics, that focus due to being Jewish. Most of others don't want to do and with which ed. In reality, Norman is a shyster, and comprised of his cell phone and whatusually slung over his shoulder as he wanders the streets..." (IMDb) Pack your dinner and join us in the way, Fort Myers. Admission and soft drinks are complimentary. Sabbath Eve dinners The Community Free Synagogue Sab bath Eve dinners continue through out the summer and are open all at no kosher-style meals begin with kindling the Sabbath lights, proclaiming its sanctity (Qiddush ) with a cup of wine, and the traditional blessing by parents of their children and by spouses of each other, sharing homemade artisan hallah. They end with the thanksgiving prayers, the Birqat Hamazohn. Participants may bring a salad or a dish of their choosing as long as it is non-dairy and conforms to the Torah meat regulations. Wine is also always welcome! Reservations are never required. Please join us in the Community Hall, BAR MITZVAHAsher Emil Pincus, son of Suzanna and David Pincus, will be called to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Sabbath morning, June 23 at The Community Free Synagogue. Asher excels in language arts, science th leading team in the Southwest Florida Junior Basof his sisters, Ariel and Talia, who also studied with Rabbi Bruce Diamond and were also called to the Torah as Bnot Mitzvah at The Community Free Synagogue. Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Life Cycle events births, Bnai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, anniversaries and obituaries. For Bnai Mitzvah, please include up to 150 words about your child. Submit your events to LChayim36@gmail.com. Photos are appreciated; please e-mail as JPGs at 300dpi. WEDDINGNicole Lynn Fuller and Jonathan Lawrence Cohen of The Community Free Synagogue will be married on Saturday, June 2 at the Plantation Country Club, with Rabbi Bruce DiaBIRTHDAYEdna Josephson celebrated her 101st birthday in April. Edna, an award-winning per formance artist, accomplished musician and Solitaire maven, is a Community Free Synagogue pioneer and was part of its musical group. She shares a home with daughter Dr. Judy Piesco. (Edna is pictured with Rabbi Bruce Diamond.) Stars of DavidThe Second Jewish Solo and More Solo: A Star Wars Story, which opens on Friday, May 25, is described as a Solos early days as a smuggler and his friendship with Chewbacca, a wookie. Clarissian. ALDEN EHRENREICH, 28, plays Solo, with Donald Glover playing Clarissian. Ehrenreich, who was discovered at a bar mitzvah reception by STEVEN SPIELBERG, told Collider.com that the young Solo was more of an ideal He also added that he consulted with the original Solo, HARRISON FORD, now 75, about how to play the role. (Fords late mother was Jewish). The script is by LAWRENCE KASDAN JONATHAN KASDAN 38. The elder Kasdan previously co-wrote two of the best The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and The Return of the Jedi (1983). The younger Kasdan has a small role in Solo as Tag Greenly, and JON FAVREAU 51, provides the voice of Rio Durant (described as a very cool publicity). Tag opening on Friday, June 15, is based on a true story. Its about a group of old friends who meet up once a year for a rousing game of tag. Of course, mental games also go on. Co-stars include RASHIDA JONES and ISLA FISHER, both 42. Cable and Streaming Remember PAIGE DAVIS? This musi-

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9 JEWISH INTEREST Stars of DavidBy Nate Bloom, Contributing Columnist Editors note: Persons in BOLD CAPS are deemed by Nate Bloom to be Jewish for the purpose of the column. Persons identified as Jewish have at least one Jewish parent and were not raised in a faith other than Judaism and dont identify with a faith other than Judaism as an adult. Converts Nate Bloom (see column at le) has become a family history expert in 10 years of doing his celebrity column, and he has expert friends who can help when called on. Most family history experts charge $1,000 or more to do a full family-tree search. However, Bloom knows that most people want to start with a limited search of one family line.So heres the deal:Write Bloom at nteibloom@aol.com and enclose a phone number. Nate will then contact you about starting a limited search. If that goes well, additional and more extensive searches are possible. The rst search fee is no more than $100. No upfront cost. Also, several of this newspapers readers have asked Bloom to locate friends and family members from their past, and thats worked out great for them. So contact him about this as well.Interested in Your Familys History? The Second Jewish Solo and More Solo: A Star Wars Story which opens on Friday, May 25, is described as a Solos early days as a smuggler and his friendship with Chewbacca, a wookie. Clarissian. ALDEN EHRENREICH, 28, plays Solo, with Donald Glover playing Clarissian. Ehrenreich, who was discovered at a bar mitzvah reception by STEVEN SPIELBERG told Collider.com that the young Solo was more of an ideal He also added that he consulted with the original Solo, HARRISON FORD, now 75, about how to play the role. (Fords late mother was Jewish). The script is by LAWRENCE KASDAN JONATHAN KASDAN 38. The elder Kasdan previously co-wrote two of the best The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and The Return of the Jedi (1983). The younger Kasdan has a small role in Solo as Tag Greenly, and JON FAVREAU 51, provides the voice of Rio Durant (described as a very cool publicity). Tag opening on Friday, June 15, is based on a true story. Its about a group of old friends who meet up once a year for a rousing game of tag. Of course, mental games also go on. Co-stars include RASHIDA JONES and ISLA FISHER both 42. Cable and Streaming Remember PAIGE DAVIS? This musical actress was the perky host and star Trading Spaces for most of its original run (2000-2009). Early in April, the show was rebooted 8:00 p.m.). Davis, 48, is again the host, and the premise is the same: couples swap homes and have a limited budget to redo each others homes with the help of a designer. seasona of The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinklemated series. The show functioned on two levels. It worked as a childrens show, but frequently made references and jokes that were directed at adults (often hip, well-read adults). Two Jewish actors voiced a lot of the series iconic characters. PAUL FREES (1920the voice of baddie Boris Badanov and Captain Wrongway Peachfuzz. JUNE FORAY (1917-2017) was the voice of Rocky, baddie Natasha Fatale and every other female character in the show (including distinct cartoons within the show, like Dudley Do-Right). Foray (born Forer) was the daughter French Canadian mother who converted voice roles she created during a career that lasted 70 years. Foray was the greatest female voice actor of all time. Her only competition for the greatest, male or female, is MEL BLANC (1908Reasonable people can differ on whether they like the usually dirty stand-up humor of GILBERT GOTTFRIEDfrieds humor dirty or not and sometimes he doesnt amuse me at all. However, I was charmed and touched Gilbert, which was released in 2017 and is now streaming on Hulu. He wed his girlfriend of ten years, DARA KRAVITZ, now 48, in 2007, and they now have two lovable young children. top record promotion executive. She is the perfect wife for Gilbert a miracle really. Shes smart, funny, nurturing and tolerant of his huge quirks would turn off many other women. Gilberts wife and kids clearly adore him and just seem to accept his quirks and his absences due to frequent road trips. The unexpected continues as we see how kind Gilbert is to his sisters (lots of home movie stuff) and how they, too, adore him. Forget whether you like his comedy. This is a great and oddly heartwarming Jewish family story. Michelle Wolf The now-famous comedian Michelle Wolf is not Jewish. The Times of Is rael, while mentioning her tour of Is rael a few years back, stated she is not Jewish. Also, LARISA KLEBE the Deputy Director of the Jewish Womens Archive, a quite good website, says she asked Wolf if she was Jewish by messaging her via Instagram last year and Wolf replied that she isnt Jewish. wrote about Wolf. The most recent one is a smart exploration of how the criticism of Wolf often veers into antiSemitic tropes. What do you think? Need to reach the editor of LCHAYIM ? Send an email to LChayim36@gmail.com.

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10 JEWISH INTEREST LCHAYIM is a monthly nonprot newspaper supported by generous readers, committed advertisers and the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. ELIMINATE YOUR PAIN RESTORE YOUR MOBILITY REGAIN YOUR QUALITY OF LIFEThomas S. Zeller, DPT & Associateswww.YourBestTherapy.comFort Myers 239-432-0556 Cape Coral 239-772-2363 All physical therapy is not the same Thank you for letting us show you what sets us apart from the rest! AWARDED SW FLORIDAS BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY & REHABILITATION CENTER 5 YEARS IN A ROW! One-on-one care with all patients You will always receive the personalized care you deserve Highly skilled and licensed therapists Relaxed, friendly and encouraging atmosphere Therapist-owned private practice Best of Southwest Florida recipientWe invest ourselves personally in every patients progress and goals. This is all part of having a true commitment and passion for what we do. REHABILITATION CENTER 5 YEARS IN A ROW! THE RESULTS YOU WANT. THE CARE YOU DESERVE. Phil Jason Book review by Philip K. Jason, Special to LCHAYIM Highly original novel explores the damage The Kabbalah Master, 202 pages. Trade paperback $15.95. B esserman has penned a fascinating portrait of an insecure Jewish woman, Sharon Berg, who in her mid-thirties becomes infatuated with a somewhat charismatic spiritual leader. Rabbi Albert Joachim is the head of The Center for Mystical Judaism. Sharon studies there and becomes a slave to her Kabbalah Master. She works long hours for little pay and scant attention. Sharons life had run aground. Divorced, with two children, and with few prospects, she is easy prey to her own imagination. Her needs are projected on an imagined version of a caring Rabbi Joachim who seems to be simply using her. Sharon fantasizes that he will return her love. Perhaps divorce his wife and marry her. Unable to properly parent her chil dren, she had invited her mother to move in and help out. This situation has an upside and a downside. Set in Brooklyns Coney Island and other sections of New York, The Kabbalah Master taste. Its temporal setting is 1972, a time of social change and continuing Rabbi Joachim? Wont she always seem an old lady in his circle of friends? Rabbi Joachim is not present for a substantial part of the wife and children in Israel. Jewish mysticism, however, continues to be represented by a neighborhood occult book store owned and run by Seymour Priceman. He is also Rabbi Joachims publisher. An astute businessman, he admits to having absolutely no personal interest in the concerns of the books he sells and publishes. Ms. Besserman, through Pricemans stance, suggests that most who dabble in mysticism, Jewish or other wise, are charlatans. Clearly enough, in the authors view, many are. And in that group, perhaps, is Rabbi Joachim, whose writings on the curative powers of herbs are under attack. The clover cure has caught the attention of the FDA. And yet Priceman, who is as publisher is likely to be sued, is willing to believe that Rabbi Joachim is sincere, although misguided in his enthusiasms. There is a lot to like about this book. Many chapters read like detachable vignettes of New York life, the main characters peripheral to others who populate these scenes. These sections are not at all distracting; rather, they set Sharon into a larger, richer and more complex cultural environment. Moreover, though the storys main thrust aligns with serious current concerns about false, manipulating gurus taking advantage of women, readers The book is rich with a wise and unexpected humor. Will Sharon be able to build a new life for herself? Read the book and make your own decision. About the author Recipient of the Theodore Hoepfner Fiction Award and past writer-inresidence at the Mishkenot Shaananim Artists Colony in Jerusalem, Pushcart Prize-nominee Perle Besserman was praised by Isaac Bashevis Singer for the clarity and feeling for mystic lore of her writing, and by Publishers Weekly for its wisdom [that] points to a universal practice of the heart. Houghton novel Pilgrimage has appeared in The Southern Humanities Review, AGNI, Transatlantic Review, Nebraska Review, Southerly, North American Review and Bamboo Ridge among others. Her books have been recorded and released in both audio and e-book versions and translated into over ten languages. Her most recent A New Zen for Women (Palgrave Macmillan) and Zen Radicals, Rebels, and Reformers, coauthored with Manfred Steger (Wisdom Books). Two novels, Kabuki Boy and Widow Zion, and Yeshiva Girl, a story collection, are available from Aqueous Books, Pinyon Publishing and Homebound Publishing, respectively. Perle Besserman knows the territory and handles it with authority. Sharon, a somewhat time-worn, nice Jewish girl, is desperate for vali dation. Enter Junior Cantana. Junior is seven years younger than Sharon much younger than that. Their meeting is fortuitous. To Sharons eyes, he has movie-star looks. He is polite, caring, and alternates between seeming vul nerable and sure of himself. There is a genuine attraction between this couple. However, they have backgrounds that put pressure on a possible rela tionship. What is Sharon doing, she younger man. She wonders herself. The mind, his gravitas, learning and remarkable allure so much in contrast to Jusmelled pleasantly of trees in the rain. Sharon has always believed her destiny is to marry a Jewish man, to raise Jewish children, and to deepen her Jewish knowledge and identity. She already attempted that life, and though the Jewish children are still there, the husband is gone. ship with this Italian-American Vietnam War veteran? Is her attraction to him a counterbalance to her adoration of A Q&A with Perle Besserman, author of The Kabbalah Master: A Novel When did you start writing? What inspired you? I was trained as an actor, singer and dancer from an early age, so my life characters and situations calling for expression. Where do those characters and stories come from? They are enacted on the stage of my imagination, my dreams and my memo ries, similarly to what William Butler Yeats described as a sort of mediumistic trance. What was your childhood like? My parents were both storytellers. Books, movies and the arts in general were the basis for the life drama enacted at home a perfect maelstrom of love ish orthodoxy. Why write about Kabbalah? It was part of my spiritual search. I also made trips around the world and wrote books about Oriental Mysticism and womens spirituality (The Way of Witch es How do you feel about writing in the digital age? I start out with a problem, so I cant answer that question objectively. Years was antithetical to computers and most digital devices. Things got so crazy, when I was teaching at Illinois State University, that my department chair was killing the list serve, and why my syllabi couldnt get downloaded. Any way, the IT people tested me (a couple problem years before) and found that I was among 4 % of the population with all I can say is that my creative urge, the characters and situations demand ing to be written, are still alive and well despite my fraught relationship with the digital age. Who are among your favorite au thors? James Joyce, Flaubert, Dickens, the Brontes, Alice Munro, W.B. Yeats, Homer... In spite of his solipsism and sexism, I kind of like Karl Ove Knaus gaard, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez, to name a few. Where do you get your material? with characters and stories needing to be told. I tune in and listen. Sometimes that stage is bare, so I have to stay quiet and respectfully wait for the characters and their stories to enter. Philip K. Jason is Professor Emeritus of English from the United States Na val Academy. He reviews regularly for Florida Weekly, Jewish Book World, and other publications. Please visit Phils website at www.philjason.wordpress.com. Perle Besserman Dr. Paul Bartrop Read the current and recent issues of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org.

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11 JEWISH INTEREST LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org. Dr. Paul BartropThe boxer who caredBy Paul R. Bartrop, PhDE xactly eighty years ago, on June 22, 1938, arguably the most famous boxing match in history took place at Yankee Stadium, New York, when the German heavyweight champion, Max Schmeling, confronted defeat at the hands of Max Baer before a loss was deemed a racial and cultural disgrace in Germany, where it was considered outrageous that Schmeling Aryan. Baers father was Jewish, and Baer himself fought wearing shorts emblazoned with a Star of David. By this stage Schmeling was viewed as a something of a Nazi puppet. On March 10, 1935, he fought and knocked out American Steve Hamas in Hamburg, and the 25,000 spectators spontaneously stood and sang the Horst Wessel (the Nazi anthem), with arms raised in the Hitler salute. This caused outrage in the United States, with Schmeling now being publicized in Germany as the very model of Aryan supremacy and Nazi racial superiority, something he would detest all his life. The American public was desperate for Schmeling to return to the United the young American hero, the Brown As Schmelings record of late had not been strong, he was a 10-1 underdog, and many people thought that at 30 years of age he was past his prime. technique closely and found a weakness in his defense. In the 12th round, he scored what some consider the upset of the century, when he sensationally Nazi press to Schmelings dismay boasted that the victory represented white Aryan supremacy. When he returned to Berlin, he was invited by Hitler to join him for lunch. The rematch, at Yankee Stadium on June 22, 1938, became a cultural and political event. It was billed as a battle of the Aryan versus the Negro, a struggle of evil against good. Held before a crowd of over 70,000, the match saw a determined and highly-motivated two minutes and four seconds of the Schmeling said later he was relieved to have lost, as the defeat removed Nazi expectations of his abilities. It made it easier for him to refuse to act as a Nazi, and he was shunned by Hitler and the Nazi hierarchy for having shamed the Aryan Superman ideal. Hitler never On the night of November 9, 1938, as anti-Semitic mobs were sacking Jewish property throughout the Reich during the Kristallnacht, Schmelings opposition to Nazism was tested as never before. One of his Jewish friends, for Schmeling to shelter his two sons, Heinz (14) and Werner (15). Without hesitation, Schmeling took them to his room in the downtown Excelsior Hotel and kept them there for three days, tell ing the desk clerk that he was ill and must not be disturbed. Risking his life to save the two brothers, he then helped them escape Berlin. After things settled down, he drove them to his house for further hiding. Waiting another two days, he then delivered them safely to their father. In 1939, Schmeling helped the fam went to the United States where Heinz (now Henri) became a prominent hotel During World War II a still enraged Adolf Hitler saw to it that at the age of 35, Schmeling would be drafted into the he served during the Battle of Crete in May 1941. It was said that the Fhrer took a personal interest in seeing to it that the former champion would be sent on suicide missions. After the war and in retirement, Schmeling became one of Germanys most revered and respected sports in Germany, but also in America. He became friends with many of his former foes, particularly his old opponent, Joe him financially, and their friendship racial policies of Nazism. The degree of resistance he showed was built around a sense of what it was to be a decent hu man being. On February 2, 2005, he died at age 99, at his home in Hollenstedt, near Hamburg. Dr. Paul Bartrop is Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Ju daic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. He can be reached at pbartrop@fgcu.edu. Arlene Stolnitz The YMCA Jerusalem Youth ChorusBy Arlene StolnitzB rowsing through music websites on the Internet is one of my favorite preoccupations. Thats what becomes of a wanna-be writer with a focus on the Judaic music world! Recently, I happened upon a unique group that caught my attention. The incredible power of music is evident in this wonderful group of young singers who are destined to be come the leaders of peace in their communities. They are known as the will be the younger generation who will be on the forefront of repairing the world. For starters, their home page is written in three languages: English, Hebrew and Arabic! That says a lot in itself, since the goal of the program is to en courage understanding through song and dialogue among Israeli and Palestinian youth in Jerusalem. Their mission states, Through the co-creation of music and the sharing of stories, the chorus seeks to empower youth in Jerusalem to become leaders in their communities and inspire singers and listeners around the world to work for peace. The singers are young people, high school students, ages 14-19, from East and West Jerusalem, who come together in a common experience and, in the process, experience understanding, community and a shared identity. Their music can be described as somewhere between Pop, Arabic Classical, Hip-Hop and Chant. In the words of a description in their album Home, braving violence and fear, the singers, both Israeli and Palestinian alike, support each other in creating a space that is a home for all, and in doing so show what Jerusalem can be. The group was established in 2012 by Founder and Director Micah Hen dler, an award-winning singer and music director from Yale University who has studied the intersection between music spent years developing this model based on his paper, I Am a Seed of Peace: Music and Israeli-Arab Peacemaking. Much of this writing and other papers he has authored are the basis for the YMCA Jerusalem Youth Chorus model. International YMCA and the Jerusalem Foundation, an independent community foundation that supports an equitable and open place where people from all walks of life can feel comfortable. The chorus current director is Nizar Alkhater, an Israeli classical pianist and composer who brings a wealth of musical experience to the group, both from his work in Israel and throughout Europe. He has specialized in organizing projects for youth music education and youth orchestra. In addition to the YMCA Youth Chorus, he directs a choir for people with physical limitations and special needs. The chorus has about 30 singers with an equal balance between Arab and Jewish membership. The Arab members are roughly one-third Christian and two-thirds Muslim with a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds among them. The repertoire is diverse, sung in several languages, including English, Arabic, Hebrew and others. The music is a type of East-West musical fusion with a mix of creative and innovative arrangements. One number is an ar are held weekly and run for three and a half hours, mostly in English except for necessary translations for speakers of Arabic and Hebrew. Here are some of the comments from the singers themselves: You get to know the other side you get to be together, you get to see than you. Avital, Israeli singer The choir is beautiful and we enjoy it because we are Arabs and Jews together at the same time. Ameer, Palestinian singer I only knew Israelis. I had never met any Arabs before I came here. I wasnt sure what I expected, but what I realized was we are all the same. Shifra, Israeli singer I live in Israel, Im an Arab, theres Jewish people but I never talked to them I never knew their opinion. After joining this choir it changed my life. It made me know what they think. It made them know what I think. Samia, East Jerusalem I urge you to visit the YMCA Jerusalem Youth Chorus website at www. ymca.jerusalemyouthchorus.org. As with me, you will be blown away. I promise. You may even buy their CD. Arlene Stolnitz, founder of the Sara sota Jewish Chorale, is a member of the Jewish Congregation of Venice. A retired educator from Rochester, New York, she has sung in choral groups for over 25 years and also sings in Venices Chorale (formerly Exsultate!). Her interest in choral music has led to this series of articles on Jewish folk music in the Diaspora. Honest, caring and knowledgable advice about assisted living options at no cost to you!Personal and professional advice for you or a loved one when you need it the mostBruce B. Rosenblatt, Owner Senior Housing Expert239.595.0207 www.SeniorHousingSolutions.net

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12 JEWISH INTEREST facebook.com/jfedsrq CONNEC T with your Jewish Community www.facebook.com/ JewishFederationLCC Like us on Facebook! The French pronounce it Terr-WAHBy The Wine Whisperer Jerry T erroir. Its a word from the wine world, and like most of them, its French. And like most French words, it means more than just land or dirt. In winespeak, terroir refers to the grown. But, as mentioned above, its much more than that. In the widest sense, it means everything about that the soil, eleva tion, drainage, the direction the vineyard faces, how the fog from the ocean keeps the grapes cool in the morning, and what time it a way, even the winemaking traditions of the particular area. In many regions, the soil is very vein of limestone running beneath it, which imparts certain qualities to the grapes grown there. My neighbors vineyard, just a few feet on the other side of the cart path, doesnt have any limestone. Thats why I get $5,000 a ton for my grapes, and he has to sell his for only $2,000. The concept of terroir varies in imon the country and region. In the Old World (France, Spain, Italy, Germany) its critical. Grapes grown in a certain region, vineyard, and even a particular part of a vineyard are carefully and tablish and promote geographic indications. We dont do it with broccoli or asparagus. In Florida, we do it with oranges. But theres some indication that the idea of giving winegrowing reis more of a marketing ploy than a designation of quality. According to a recent article in Forbes magazine, this whole idea of a link between location and quality is a big sticking point in international trade disputes. The question is, should we, as wine lovers, care about this? Wellyes. wealthy vineyard owners lobbied for special designations of qualityfor their own properties, of course. From this, regulations were established about which grapes could be grown where, and other laws about how the wine must be made. Today, its much more complex than that. In Europe, and especially in France, there are government ministries, like wine police, that decree which vineyards are in the St. Julien appellation, for example, and why the vineyards 100 feet away across the cart path arent. And these decrees are strictly enforced. In the U.S., the delin eation of American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) is controlled by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms and Explosives. This gives me the giggles every time I think about it. Nevertheless, knowing where your wine comes from can be important. Certain grapes grow best in certain cially in the price) whether your Cabernet Sauvignon comes from Napa or the river or ocean, the kind of yeast that grows on the grapesits everything. Now for this weeks new favor ites Guigal Ctes du Rhne Blanc 2015 ($10) The Guigal family doesnt make every single wine in the northern Rhone. It just seems like it. This valuepriced white is the traditional blend of Viognier, Roussanne and Marsanne. on the sweet side, but quite pleasant. Great value. WW 88. Guigal Ctes du Rhne Red 2013 ($9) Very true to type, this traditional blend of Grenache and Syrah (and per haps a few others) gives you a lightbodied treat of black cherry, blueberry good selection for weekday enjoyment. WW 89 Ask the Wine Whisperer PRYH\003VXO\277WHV\003IURP\003ZLQH\021\003,V\003WKDW\003WUXH"\003 Steve N., New York by-product of fermentation, so youll tive, and in fact only about 1% of the population is actually allergic to them. More people experience headaches or other discomfort from histamines in wine and, of course, from the alcohol. er. He is Creative Director of Green Director of the international Direct Cellars wine club. His book, Secrets of the Wine Whisperer is available through his website. Read his other writings at www.winewhisperer.com. Israel: 70 years of history through food recipe by Dalia Hemed Personal Chef Dalia Hemed can be reached at daliahemed@msn.com. J oin me on a journey through the last 70 years to honor how Israel has become one of the most creative and innovative countries as well as a rising food capital. Israels story is a phenomenal one. Its the story of a country that was founded 70 years ago in the middle of a desert, with few natural resources, and a backdrop of relentless war and terror. And yet, against all odds, Israel managed to build a nation that is not only strong and democratic, but also one of the most innovative and creative nations of the world today. And over the past few years, Israel has become somewhat of a culinary capital, boast ing several high-class boutique restau rants in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and other cities, which serve a fusion of typical Israeli street food and much more than just falafel. Most people start tasting and even smelling falafel the very second they land in Israel. Most people arrive in the beautiful White City of Tel Aviv, or the workaholic and beautiful green-land after dropping their bags is the nearest and tastiest falafel spot. But theres much more to Israeli food than just these spectacular fried balls of chickpea dough. Oh yes, Israel is one heck of a place to come to if youre into eating good food! There is such a variety of amazingly delicious foods available in Israel, largely due to the huge melting pot of culture and immigrants from 120 by the choices. Id like to take this opportunity to share with you today and for the next few months some Israeli recipes that you dont want to miss on your next visit to the land of milk and honey. So put that drooling tongue away and wash those hands theres no need for knives and forks with these delights! Since we are all familiar with the falafel, Israels National Food, I am more than happy to start our journey by introducing the recipe of the Israeli national dessert, malabi (Israeli milk pudding). If you like creamy, sweet things, slide a spoon into the softly yielding white mass and put it in your mouth. and a light, creamy texture that keeps you dipping your spoon back in until the pudding is all gone. Malabi is made in 10 minutes. It sounds like a dessert for children, and children naturally do love it, but mala bi has been served in restaurants and at dinner parties. As a little girl in Israel, one of the ily was malabi. It is served in one big dish and everybody scoops the malabi in every little kiosk or restaurant you pass as you wander the streets of Old very simply, usually in a plastic container with some desiccated coconut, chopped walnuts and red syrup on top. But dont let the modest exterior fool you. Its one of my most treasured, favorite sweet dishes. As a chef, I wanted to create a modern interpretation of the classic malabi, so every element has received an upgrade. You can either go for the modern-style version and serve it in individual ramekins with all the fancy toppings, or do it my family's way one big bowl and everyone digs in with their spoon. In either case, you can revert to the traditional simple toppings. My heart belongs to both. Ingredients: Malabi 3/4 cups milk 1 cups whipping cream cup sugar 4 tbsp cornstarch, diluted in cup water 1 tsp rosewater Walnut brittle Red sweet syrup Walnut brittle cup walnuts cup sugar Red syrup 1 tsp red food coloring 1 tsp rose water cup water cup sugar Directions: To make the malabi, set aside cup of the milk. Pour the rest into a heavy-bottomed saucepan with the cream and sugar, and simmer, stirring gently until the sugar has dissolved. Add the cornstarch to the milk you have set aside along with the rose water, and stir until thoroughly blended and there are no lumps of cornstarch left. The as its the only way to ensure that the malabi has a smooth texture. When the creamy milk boils, give adding it to the saucepan of creamy milk. Simmer over a low heat until the mixture begins to thicken, stir ring constantly to make sure there are no lumps. This should take no longer than 2 minutes. Once thickened, pour the mixture either into 4 individual ramekins, or a large bowl if youre going family-style. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to cool to room temperature, and then chill in the fridge for a couple of hours. The malabi can be kept in the fridge for up to three days. Now make the toppings. To make red syrup, bring sugar and water to a boil in a 1-qt. saucepan. Stir in the rose water and food col oring to make syrup. To make the walnut brittle, preheat your oven to 350 F. Spread the walnuts out on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for 7 minutes. To make the caramel for the wal nut brittle, heat a heavy-bottomed nonstick pan over a low heat and add the sugar in one even layer. The most important thing here is not to stir. If youre worried about burning, add a couple of drops of water, but otherwise let it be. Once all the sugar has melted and you have a golden caramel, take the walnuts and then transfer to a tray to cool completely, and then chop \277QHO\)65.1 (\021\003 To serve malabi, top each pudding with the rose water syrup, walnut brittle and coconut, and enjoy the Look for Chef Dalia Hemeds recipes each month in the pages of LCHAYIM. An unforgettable three hours with a veteran named Joe

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13 JEWISH INTEREST An unforgettable three hours with a veteran named JoeAs remembered by Robert PellerI m Bob and I am Jewish. As such, I have always been driven to try to understand Hitlers incorrigible hatred of the Jews and his passion to exterminate them. In 1995 I was 47 years old and still hadnt learned the answer. We were liv ing in Northern New Jersey, in a small borough named Wanaque. One Sunday while reading the local Wayne Today newspaper, I spotted an article about a group of WWII American war veterans who had just returned from a reunion in Europe to mark their liberation of a Nazi Concentration Camp in southern Germany 50 years earlier. One veteran, Joe, lived in our town. I phoned him, and he eagerly accepted my dinner invitation. He said he would share his military experiences (and un known to me at the time, his personal horror story). A week later, Joe arrived at my house and he wasnt an aver age Joe. He was a lot taller and bigger he was Catholic. He did not have much of a history with Jewish people before his military service or throughout most of the war. After dinner, Joe told us the story of his WWII experiences, starting as a Military Policeman in France. He found this boring and kept requesting a transfer for more action. He regret ted this because he was sent into ac Nazis for several years, peace was at hand. In the spring of 1945, his Army Company was assigned the mission of liberating a Concentration Camp in southern Germany. He and his fellow soldiers asked their captain what ex actly a Concentration Camp was. The prison camp for political prisoners. Joe and the other soldiers followed railroad tracks which they were told led directly to the camp. Along the way, the remaining Nazi troops defending the area around the camp. They pushed the Nazis back and continued unscathed up the tracks. Upon reaching the Camp, they were surprised by well-manicured lawns with shrub beds. They knew this could not be a prison facility and thought they were lost. The captain reviewed the map and determined they were indeed at the cor rect location. The soldiers proceeded through the barbed wire gates into the camp. They found the camp deserted. Not one prisoner or German soldier was in sight. The only things they saw were many long buildings. Everything appeared to be dirty and in disrepair. The captain divided the platoon into several groups of six men. Each had the task of entering the buildings and report what they had seen. They were advised to use caution because enemy soldiers could be hiding inside. enter the building. He opened the door and saw a sight which he told me that he still sees when he shuts his eyes at night (50 years later). He hadnt slept a peaceful night in 50 years, ever since he and his Army buddies had liberated that Concentration Camp in 1945. They saw the skin and bones of men, some dead, some barely alive, laying on long racks. It was dead quiet inside as the prisoners did not understand who these soldiers were. They had never seen an American soldier before and were not able to understand their language. Each side was frozen in fear. The soldiers blood drained from their exposed skin. They became pale as white snow. battled-hardened soldiers ran from the building and rejoined the captain and other men, sobbing uncontrollably and hysterically as they ran. After Joe attempted to tell the captain what was inside the building, the captain ordered his men to regroup. The captain went inside the building, saw what his men had seen and tried unsuccessfully to communicate with the prisoners, who were still cowering in fear. He left the barracks and tried to restore order with his men who were visibly in shock, many shaking and crying. When some semblance of calm was restored, Joe and the other groups reentered the buildings and attempted to assure the prisoners they meant them no harm, and were there to set them free. The captain determined that the prisoners were primarily Jewish because of their language. Coinciden tally, two of the soldiers spoke some Yiddish and could communicate with these poor souls. They were told the story of their incarceration; their being starved and worked to death; the losses of their entire families; the constant fear and dread; the hopelessness; the brutal treatment by the guards; and the daily executions. They hadnt seen their Nazi guards in days, but were afraid to leave their barracks because they didnt know where to go. Each survivor had bones protrude from their skin. Their eyes bulged from their sockets. Their clothes worn and ragged. Sores on their faces and bodies. Caved-in faces. Joe said these were the living dead, stripped of their humanity. Joe and others tried some barely alive, food, but the army medic advised not to feed them, less they perish from eating something their frail bodies could not process. While other soldiers outside AL9630Cypress Cove at HealthPark Florida is a non-prot organization sponsored by Lee Healthcare Resources, a support organization to Lee Health. Located on a beautiful 48-acre campus, Cypress Cove offers a full complement of quality living options committed to the health and well-being of its residents.Changing the Course of Memory Care State-of-the-Art Award-Winning Person-CenteredTour today: 239-734-824310600 Cypress Cove Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33908 TheCottageAtCypressCove.com 239-734-8243 searched the camp area for escaping German guards, Joe and the other men slowly evacuated the buildings with the survivors. The captain had to deal with another problem which required immediate resolution. The soldiers were hell-bent on wreaking unbridled, medieval revenge on any of the Ger man guards they captured. The captain admonished his men, stating that kill ing a captive German soldier would be soldier would face a court martial. Joe said several of the soldiers did not obey the captains orders and took matters into their own hands. The soldiers were not prepared to treat and support the massive number of survivors. The captain radioed for additional troops, medical personnel and supplies, which arrived in short or der. The survivors were treated for their problems, mostly malnutrition, as best as possible, and then transported to a medivac holding area. Joe bonded with one of the survivors and they became lifelong friends. This survivor eventu ally immigrated to the U.S. and became a prominent industrialist in Cleveland. Joe and this survivor kept in touch regu larly through the years. It was this sur vivor who paid for Joe and his wifes trip to Europe for the 50th reunion of the Concentration Camps liberation. Joe said it took years after his army discharge to achieve some sense of nor malcy after being an eyewitness to the unforgettable horrors he encountered. My story ends here, but the memo ries of that night with a veteran named Joe will never be forgotten. We all should never forget the story he told and remain vigilant that it will never happen again. Robert Peller lives in Estero.

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14 MARKETPLACE Paul Weinstein, CFPManaging Partner, WWFG Branch Manager, RJFS 13720 Six Mile Cypress Pkwy #1 Fort Myers, FL 33912 239-768-1490 888-768-1490 Toll Free 239-768-1935 Fax paul.weinstein@raymondjames.com Securities oered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPCRAYMOND JAMES PATTERSON, ESKIN & BALLHAROLD S. ESKIN, P.A.ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW CERTIFIED FAMILY LAW MEDIATOR CERTIFIED CIVIL LAW MEDIATOR1420 S.E. 47TH STREET, CAPE CORAL (239) 549-5551 FAX (239) 549-4834 E-mail: haleskin@legalsurrogacy.com E-mail: haleskin@earthlink.net Janet Astrin Sales Associate 14360 S. Tamiami Trail Fort Myers, Florida 33912 (239) 482-3001 Fax (239) 482-8846 leelightingflorida.com Like us on Facebook Rubinstein, Holz & King P.A.Family Law Attorneys Alan J. Rubinstein 1375 Jackson St., Ste. 304 (239) 332-3400 Fort Myers, FL 33901 Fax (239) 332-5078 henlaw.com 239.344.1100 Divorce, Marital & Family LawJennifer Siegal-MillerBusiness & Tax PlanningGuy E. Whitesman Florida Bar Board Certi ed Tax AttorneyWills, Trusts & EstatesEric Gurgold Florida Bar Board Certi ed Wills, Trust and Estate Attorney Florida Repairs Salt Chlorine Generators Heat Pumps A r t o f F a s h i o n a n d M o o r e Sylish Comfortable Different The Art of Fashion and Moore(in the Arcade in historic downtown Ft. Myers) Teri Moore, Owner (239) 204-9759 2267 1st. St., Suite 12 info@artoffashionandmoore.com Ft. Myers, FL 33901 www.artoffashionandmoore.com Brian Simon, ChFC, CLUFinancial Advisor, Park Avenue Securities, LLC 15671 San Carlos Blvd. Ste 201 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.cpamassie.com O: 239-768-2171 F: 239-768-6074 charlesm@cpamassie.com Charles Abels Massie CPA, CFP NFLPA Registered Player Financial Advisor We Save Your Income for You to Enjoy Your Outcome RICK SNYDERMANLicensed Pedorthist 1900 Trailwinds Dr. Fort Myers, FL 33907 Ph: (239) 939-2239 Fax: (239) 939-7792We Specialize In All Widths We Will Ship AnywhereFIT SERVICE QUALITY FORT MYERS www.gskattorneys.com rf ntbf bfbnnbLowell S. SchoenfeldFlorida Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney w w w li v in g h ap p il y o rg 2 3 9 2 0 8 2 2 1 7 1 5 0 5 0 E l de rbe rry L an e Su it e 4 F t M y e rs I n s u ran c e an d M e di c are A c c e p t e d L i s a B e n d e t o w i c z L C S W M i c h e l l e S c h o e n f e l d L C S W DANIEL BENDETOWICZ, M.D., P.A. 6840 International Center Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33912Located in Plantation Professional Center next to the CenturyLink Sports ComplexINTERNIST OF THE YEAR AWARD Presented by the Florida Chapter of the American College of PhysiciansCall us today. Now accepting new patients.985-1050 www.doctorben.net P: 239.333.0500 F: 239.333.0501 doug@leejustice.com www.leejustice.com1625 Hendry Street, Suite 102 Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Attorney at Law Higginson Tax & A ccounting, L LC Tax P reparation P lanning A udit R epresentation E ric H i g g i n s on C er tified Publ ic A ccountan t 239.935.6950 www.higginson tax.com The Jewish Federation thanks all our advertisers for their continued support! Without them we would be unable to provide our readers with LCHAYIM We invite other businesses in our community to explore this valuable advertising opportunity. For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or jameslewin@jfedlcc.org. PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO SUPPORT OUR FEDERATION

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15 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD BRIEFS continued on next page Sundays at 4:00 P.M. ISRAELI DANCING IS FOR ALL AGES to Marsha Kistler marshatemple2012@gmail.com 9701 Commerce Center Ct. Fort Myers 33908 Israels population nears 9 millionIsraels population stands at 8.84 million on the eve of its 70 th birthday, and there are 8,000 active high-tech companies.I sraels population on the eve of the countrys 70th birthday stands at 8.84 million according to the Central Bureau of Statistics, 10 times more than it was in May 1948, when the population Arab population is 1.85 million (20.9%), and others (Christians or members of of the population. Over the last year, Israels popula28,000 of them new immigrants to the country. Since Israel was founded, more than 3.2 million people have immigrated to the country most arriving in the 1950s, when the population doubled within four years, and then again in the 1990s, as nearly one million immigrants from the former Soviet Union made their way to Israel. Over the last 70 years, Israel has undergone massive societal changes. In 1948, the average life expectancy in 80.7 years for men and 84.2 years for women. In the UN World Happiness Report earlier this year, Israel was ranked Korea, Switzerland and Italy. In the same report, Israel came in at 11th place in overall happiness. In 1948, 43% of the population owned their own homes, and just 3% their own homes, and 70% own at least one vehicle. Tourism has also seen tenfold growth, rising from 33,100 tourists in love to travel out of the country. In 1948, the population made some 30,000 trips abroad. In 2017, they made a staggering 7,597,400 trips overseas. Today, 44% of Israelis live in the countrys 15 largest cities, and Jerusa lem is the largest of them all with some 882,000 residents. By 2048, Israels population is pre dicted to reach 15.2 million. In the high-tech industry, there are now 8,000 active high-tech companies operating in Israel, according to Israel Venture Capital Research Center. The center also reported there are 1,487 life science companies, 505 cyber security TOURISM TO ISRAEL KEEPS SMASHING RECORDSFebruary was a record month for tour ism in Israel and 2017 was a record 29% from the same quarter in 2017. The biggest increases in March came from Poland, Sweden, Spain, Germany and France. (Sarah Moosaza deh, Atlanta Jewish Times) ISRAEL EARMARKS $5.6 MILLION FOR TECHNOLOGY PARKS IN ARAB TOWNSThe Knesset committee for Arab af the creation of technology parks within Arab towns in Israel. "The plan is expected to create conditions for the creation of thou sands of new jobs" for Arabs in the high-tech sphere, the Prime Minister's of many growth indicators in Arab society," said Social Equality Minister Gila Gamliel. These include more Arab students taking high school matriculation exams, more Arab students enrolled in higher education programs, and higher employment rates. (Shoshanna Solomon, Times of Israel)EXPOSING IRAN'S NUCLEAR ARCHIVE: A FANTASTIC INTELLIGENCE FEATThe Israeli intelligence community has once again proved it has extraordinary capabilities. Reaching the secret Iranian nuclear archives, stored in an ordinary building so as not to attract attention, entering the facility and transferring the contents to Israel are all abilities that will identify any Iranian attempt to deviate from the framework of the nuclear accord. The Iranians should internalize that they have been penetrated, that Israel has the ability to reach the most sensitive places in Tehran, and that they should think twice before they act. (Maj.-Gen. (ret.) Yaakov Amidror, former National Security Advisor to the Prime Minister of Israel and for mer Head of Israel's National Security Council, Israel Hayom)SOME OF THE 70 REASONS I LOVE ISRAELIsrael helped 30 countries foil terror ist attacks in 2017. Israeli technology helped identify the terrorists on the overwhelming output of the surveil lance cameras at the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. For daily news stories related to Israel & the Jewish world, visit the Federations website at www.JewishFederationLCC.org.

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16 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD Israel versus Hamas: The case for moral clarityTwo centuries ago, the great German poet Goethe said, The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes. Its as true today as it was then. The difference between Hamas and Israel couldnt be greater, yet you wouldnt know it when listening to some observers. For them, whether its Turkish President Erdogan or Swedish Foreign Minister Wallstrm, its basically all about Gazas innocence and Israels guilt. With nothing else to do but consider how to provoke peaceful, serene, Hamas-ruled Gaza, the big, bad Israelis local residents. For a fair share of the media, its at the hands of Israels military machine. This is a perfect illustration of reverse causality. Hamas threatens and harasses Israel, but it is only Israels response that warrants close attention and scrutiny. Indeed, Goethe was right. There are those who cant, or wont, see whats right in front of them. Ideological blinders get in the way. Or a failure of imagination about the true nature of Hamas. Or a gullibility that allows people to believe whatever the Hamas propaganda machine churns out. Or, in some cases, downright hostility to anything that Israel, the Jewish state, does. Its high time for moral clarity, not moral fog. Hamas is a terrorist organization. United States, the European Union, Australia, Canada and others. Israel is a democratic country with an independent judiciary, the rule of law, free and fair elections, and a robust civil society. Hamas is anti-Western, anti-Semitic, anti-gay, misogynist and antiintellectual. Israel is the exact opposite. Hamas has territorial ambitions on Israel. In fact, thats putting it too mildly: it would like to replace Israel in its entirety with a Muslim Brotherhoodruled state. Israel has no territorial ambitions Anti-Semitism in EuropeThere was an interesting, very telling poll published in the New York Jewish Press. According to a Pew Research Center survey: percent of Central, Eastern Europeans do not accept Jews as fellow citizens. Within this grouping, 32 percent of Armenians, Romanians, 19 percent of Czechs, 18 and 14 percent of Russians do not accept Jews as fellow citizens. To some, such statistics are unfathomable given the 21st century as a backdrop, but in reality theyre not. Anti-Semitism in Europe has existed for the better part of two millennia. It has waxed and waned dependent upon the largess of a given ruler during a particular point in time. However, never proportion of the European body politic been far below the surface. From Jewish hatred espoused by the Patristic Fathers in the 5th century to the massacres of thousands of Jews at the hands of Polish Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky in the 17th century, Europe has never been a true homeland with equal rights for the Jewish people. From the blood libel claiming Jews kidnapped and murdered Christian children for their blood to the Spanish Inquisition, What does exceptional senior living mean to you? At The Palms of Fort Myers it means a lifestyle where 24-hour Five Star service meets a world of opportunities. Savor a delicious meal prepared for you by our culinary team or whip up something special in your own kitchen. Take an exercise class with your neighbors or start your day with our Coffee and Crosswords group. Our lifestyle is designed for the way you live. DISCOVER: Month-to-month rental community Five Star Dining Experience, featuring Signature recipes Lifestyle360 program offering a full-schedule of activities Variety of in-house religious services Scheduled local transportation for medical appointments and shopping 24-hour care available, should your needs change Exceptional senior living experiencesCall to see how you can live the exceptional life today! DISCOVERWHATITSLIKETOHAVEANEXCEPTIONALDAY, EVERYDAY. DISCOVERWHATITSLIKETOHAVEANEXCEPTIONALDAY, EVERYDAY. 2674 Winkler Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-275-7800www.ThePalmsAtFortMyers.com INDEPENDENT LIVING ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE REHABILITATION Assisted Living Facility License #AL072692018 Five Star Senior Living Pet Friendly Each Tuesday afternoon, an open session of Mah Jongg is held at the Jewish Federation. Players must be at least advanced beginners, as no lessons are given. DAY: Tuesdays, 12:30~3:30 P.M. FEE: $1 per week for more information call Rona Strausberg at 239.949.9003 continued from previous page BRIEFS90% of our wastewater is recycled. Spain is No. 2 with 20%. 93% of Israeli homes use solar energy for water heating, the highest percentage in the world. Israel has the largest percentage of vegans per capita in the world 5% of the population. Over 500 million birds migrate through the skies of Israel twice a year, but a researcher, using radar, a motor ized glider, drones and a network of birdwatchers, planned alternate commercial air routes, reducing bird-plane Israelis have more children than any other Western democracy. Of Israeli moms with four or more children, time. According to Startup Genome, Tel Aviv has more start-ups per capita than nies on NASDAQ. That's more than Europe, Japan, Korea and China combined. Israel has the highest percentage of start-ups in the world and is second only to the U.S. in absolute terms. (Barbara Sofer, Jerusalem Post)JEWISH-ARAB DEMOGRAPHY DEFIES CONVENTIONAL WISDOM Jewish woman in Israel compared with 3.11 per Arab woman. Almost all Arab girls in Israel and the West Bank now complete high school, and increasingly enroll in colleges and universities, a process that has delayed the wedding age. According to the Population Reference Bureau, women in the Palestin ian Authority rank second (72%) following Morocco (78%) and together with Jordan (70%) among Muslim users of contraceptives and general avoidance of pregnancy. Furthermore, an intense urbaniza tion process has transformed Arabs in the West Bank from a 70% rural ety from a society which provided a convenient environment for a multi tude of children who were considered an essential labor force, to a society which does not require many children. Indeed, a dramatic decline in Islamic fertility rate has taken place throughout the Muslim world. Moreover, there has been an Arab net-emigration from the West Bank of around 20,000 annually in recent years. In 2017, the share of Jewish births Jewish fertility rate is due to the secular Jewish sector, including the yuppies of Tel Aviv a derivative of the high level of optimism and patriotism, the attach ment to national roots, and a sense of collective-communal responsibility. Palestinian numbers which are regur gitated without due diligence, there 1.85 million Israeli Arabs and 1.85 mil lion Arabs in the West Bank. (Yoram Ettinger, a member of the AmericanIsrael Demographic Research Group, Jewish Policy Center)ISRAEL'S DEMOGRAPHIC MIRACLE: MAINSTREAM, EDUCATED, MIDDLECLASS ISRAELIS ARE HAVING CHILDREN Today, the Jewish birthrate in Israel outpaces that of Arabs both in Israel and in the West Bank, and even in most Arab and Muslim countries. Modern society is indeed characterized by a trend of declining fertility rates that is particularly marked in developed coun tries. In 2015, the average fertility rate of women in the 35-member OECD the length of her childbearing years below the average "replacement rate" of 2.1. However, in the last generation, higher educational and income levels among Israeli Jews have correlated with a marked rise in fertility. In 2015, Israel's fertility rate in both Jewish and Arab sectors was 3.13. In 2000, Israeli Arab fertility was 4.5, while the Jewish rate continues to rise, with an estimate IRU\003\025\023\024\032\003R\I\003\026\021\024\031\021 Since the beginning of the 21 st century, fertility has risen by 15-20% among most sectors of Israeli Jewish society. It is attributable to the com bined decisions by millions of Jewish women and men of all Israeli social groups, variously described as tradi tionalist, non-religious or even secular, who have chosen to have many more torian and political theorist, and vice president of the Herzl Institute in Jeru salem, Mosaic) What do you think?LCHAYIM wants to know!Send your letters & comments to LChayim36@gmail.com.Letters PolicyLetters must include the writers full name, full address and daytime phone. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for length and/ or accuracy. Letters do not necessarily reect the viewpoint of LCHAYIM nor its advertisers. We cannot acknowledge or publish every letter received.

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17 COMMENTARY The AJC West Coast Florida oce, located in Sarasota, can be reached at 941.365.4955. COMMENTARY BRIEFS Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Israel versus Hamas: The case for moral clarity Two centuries ago, the great German poet Goethe said, The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes. Its as true today as it was then. The difference between Hamas and Israel couldnt be greater, yet you wouldnt know it when listening to some observers. For them, whether its Turkish President Erdogan or Swedish Foreign Minister Wallstrm, its basically all about Gazas innocence and Israels guilt. With nothing else to do but con sider how to provoke peaceful, serene, Hamas-ruled Gaza, the big, bad Israelis local residents. For a fair share of the media, its at the hands of Israels military machine. This is a perfect illustration of reverse causality. Hamas threatens and harasses Israel, but it is only Israels response that warrants close attention and scrutiny. Indeed, Goethe was right. There are those who cant, or wont, see whats right in front of them. Ideological blinders get in the way. Or a failure of imagination about the true nature of Hamas. Or a gullibility that allows people to believe whatever the Hamas propaganda machine churns out. Or, in some cases, downright hos tility to anything that Israel, the Jewish state, does. Its high time for moral clarity, not moral fog. Hamas is a terrorist organization. United States, the European Union, Australia, Canada and others. Israel is a democratic country with an independent judiciary, the rule of law, free and fair elections, and a robust civil society. Hamas is anti-Western, anti-Semitic, anti-gay, misogynist and antiintellectual. Israel is the exact opposite. Hamas has territorial ambitions on Israel. In fact, thats putting it too mildly: it would like to replace Israel in its entirety with a Muslim Brotherhoodruled state. Israel has no territorial ambitions on Hamas-ruled Gaza. To the contrary, Israel left it totally 13 years ago, with the hope of never having to return. Hamas has a vested interest in using its Gaza base for permanent confronta tion with Israel. Israel, which, alas, cant change its geography, has a vested interest in a peaceful, moderate and developing state on its border. Hamas, the sole ruler of Gaza since 2007, has used the last 11 years to smuggle in weaponry and develop military punch, rather than building the foundation of a responsible state. Knowing this arsenal has been stockpiled for the sole purpose of being used against it, Israel seeks, as any nation would, to prevent Hamas from attaining its lethal goal. Hamas has no compunction about deploying terrorist cells and weapons in the midst of civilian population centers in Gaza, or, most recently, deploying people along the border and encouraging breaches, fully aware that Israel would have no choice but to appear to be targeting innocent people. Israel goes to unprecedented lengths to avoid falling into the Hamas trap, even phoning and dropping leaflets in advance to warn civilians to leave target areas. Hamas cynically tells the civilian population to stay put, not to react to Israeli warnings about imminent strikes. The more Palestinian casualties, the better, as far as Hamas is concerned, including women and children. entire population, Jewish, Christian and Muslim, to Hamas missile strikes and move people into shelters as quickly as possible. Hamas uses mosques for storing arms. Israel uses houses of worship, including mosques, solely for prayer. Hamas uses schools as weapons depots. Israel uses schools solely to edu cate its children, Jewish, Christian and Muslim. Hamas uses hospitals as terrorist redoubts. Israel uses its hospitals solely to cure the ill and injured, including resicare there. Hamas aspires to kill as many Israenately in all directions. Israel seeks out only the Hamas terrorist infrastructure, and has aborted many operations when the risks of civilian casualties were too great. Hamas, as the record amply shows, has no qualms about falsifying informa tion, doctoring photos, staging scenes to the outside world. Israel, by contrast, goes to great lengths, even to the point of sometimes losing the edge in the media race, to verify information that it presents about its operations. Hamas supporters explode in paroxysms of glee when Israeli targets are hit. Israelis dont honk horns, shoot in the air and pass out candy for doing what they wished they didnt have to do the inevitable mistakes in warfare occur. Hamas wouldnt know how to spell the words international humanitarian law, much less adhere to it. Israels defense forces have special ists in international humanitarian law even as Hamas leaders call for Israels annihilation and refer to Jews as targets to be exterminated. Hamas celebrates death, something few people of good will can understand. Israel celebrates life, something all people of good will should understand. Anti-Semitism in EuropeBy Jerrold L. Sobel, ZOA of SWFL PresidentT here was an interesting, very telling poll published in the New York Jewish Press According to a Pew Research Center survey: percent of Central, Eastern Europeans do not accept Jews as fellow citizens. Within this grouping, 32 percent of Armenians, Romanians, 19 percent of Czechs, 18 and 14 percent of Russians do not accept Jews as fellow citizens. To some, such statistics are unfathomable given the 21 st century as a backdrop, but in reality theyre not. Anti-Semitism in Europe has existed for the better part of two millennia. It has waxed and waned dependent upon the largess of a given ruler during a particular point in time. However, never proportion of the European body politic been far below the surface. From Jewish hatred espoused by the Patristic Fathers in the 5 th century to the massacres of thousands of Jews at the hands of Polish Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky in the 17 th century, Europe has never been a true homeland with equal rights for the Jewish people. From the blood libel claiming Jews kidnapped and murdered Christian children for their blood to the Spanish Inquisition, to mass expulsions and ghettoization throughout the Middle Ages, the list of cruelty and deprivation is unending. Rational thinking would surmise that enlightenment and industrialization from the 18th to 20th centuries would have reversed such primitive thinking, but three waves of pogroms in Eastern Europe and Russia (1882-1922) culminating in the Holocaust proved otherwise. Taken in context to all this the veracity of the aforementioned Pew poll can become axiomatic. Melanie Phillips, famed British journalist, author and commentator, likewise agrees. In an article written for the April 12, 2018 edition of the Jerusalem Post entitled The Toxic Reality of anti-Semitism, she states, Anti-Semitism in Europe has become mainstream and normalized at a level not seen since the Second World War. Agreeing with this premise, the president of the European Jewish Congress, Dr. Moshe Kantor, stated, There has been an increase in open, unashamed and explicit hatred directed against Jews. Fortunately, Jews in Europe have an the State of Israel. No doubt the time may be prudent, as the saying goes, to get out while the getting is good. THE SILENCING OF PRO-ISRAEL STUDENTS ON CAMPUSCampus anti-Israelism does not operate like a genuinely academic movement governed by ordinary intellectual norms (such as objectivity, rigor, and the pur suit of truth) and moral or social norms (such as civility and respect). A movement governed by those norms would favor freedom of speech and welcome the diversity of views. But campus anti-Israelists refuse even to consider the possibility that Israel is not entirely evil and that Israeli Jews, being not entirely demonic, have their own legitimate claim to selfdetermination. No, anti-Israelism particularly in its invasions, disruptions and personal attacks is about something much darker. Not dialogue, debate and free exchange of ideas; not openness, pluralism and diversity, and the pursuit of knowledge that (ought to) character ize the Western university, as well as the civilization of which the univer sity is the heart but rather: Silencing. (Andrew Pessin and Doron Ben-Atar, Tablet)HAMAS ATTACKS ISRAEL AND THE WORLD CONDEMNS ISRAELWith hundreds of Palestinians chant ing, We are going to Jerusalem, mil lions of martyrs, Hamas leaders made clear that their March of Return is destroy Israel. However, that hasnt convinced much of the global com munity to abandon its comfortable narrative of a peace-loving Palestin ian people in Gaza driven to violence by an iron-fisted Israel. However to breach its borders and attack its SHRSOH\017\003,VUDHO\003\277QGV\003LWVHOI\003IDOVHO\\000SRU trayed, second-guessed and ultimately condemned. Palestine and Jerusalem belong to us, top Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh declared recently. Maybe Israels critics dont realize that with their one-sided condemnations, theyre emboldening senior fellow at the American Foreign Policy Council, served as senior com munications director for Vice President Al Gore, The Hill) SNOWBIRDS newspapers dont fly however, your address will! Going North? Dont forget to contact us with your change of address to continue receiving LCHAYIM. Send address changes to: loriramos@jfedlcc.org or call: 239.481.4449 ext 4 Safe Travels

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18 COMMENTARY / FROM THE BIMAH Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. When telling the story of our life, what truly matters? Rabbi Nicole LunaWhen looking back on our lives we tend to focus on dates and places: where we grew up, when we graduated from colCounty. But the rabbis of the Talmud are not so concerned with the details of history. Over and over they shift the focus away from a historical narrative toward a more spiritual story. Think of Hanukkah and the Maccabees. While Hanukkah celebrates the successful Maccabean revolt, the Talmudic rabbis do not mention the war, but instead tell the story of the miracle of oil lasting for eight days. They also attribute the Great Revolt against the Romans, which led to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 CE, to sinat chinam, baseless hatred, tell ing a story about two men named Kamza and Bar Kamza, whose invitations to a party got mixed up and ultimately led to betrayal. The death of thousands from the Bar Kokhba revolt in 132 CE is reimagined as a plague of disease There is an unhappy feeling of rage building up. Dont feed it. There is a growing sense of injustice. Dont go along. A new civil rights museum just opened in Alabama. It documents lynchings of blacks. Dont invoke an eye for an eye. There is a ter rible loss of being protected. Dont add to the insecurity. There is a new shame about being American. Dont quickly surrender our history. But what are we to do? All your recommendations are negative actions, all we should not do, what we were told again and again as children, mir tur nicht Not so. What we are being asked to do is two tasks. First, not to make We are all in this togetherS ome religious traditions refer to this verse as the Golden Rule. Rabbi Akiva called it the great principle of the Torah. And Mr. Rog ers, of television fame, made it the cen tral principle of his show, Mister Rogers Neighborhood. So, what makes this rule so special? First, lets take a look at the verse itself. We read it in the Chapter 19:18: You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your to be pretty clear. Whether we get dis appointed, or angered, by our neigh bors or by our relatives, we are not allowed to get back at them, physically or emotionally. From a logical point of view, this hardly makes sense. If my neighbor cuts down a tree on my side of the property line or never reim burses me for the sugar and eggs she is always borrowing, why do I have to be the more mature one? There is obviously a reason why we need this mitzvah, this command ment. We can all want to behave, from the McCoys. But Judaism calls us to a higher belief and practice. When we left Egypt behind, there was a religious revolution. We gave up the power politics of Egypt and we also gave up the idea of being totally separate from our neighbors. We are all in this together. Part of the idea of the covenant is that we are all directly linked to one power source, which is God. Each member of the covenant then is as protected, and as special, as we are. To retaliate against a member of the Tribe, so to Hashem. As we come to the last words of the verse, as yourself, we have another lesson to learn. The text says that my neighbor is like me. Is that possible? She cut down my tree, he didnt repay my eggs, sugar and whatever else he borrowed. How can my neighbor be like me? My neighbor, whether I like it or not, has the same spark of the Divine, as I do. Sometimes I behave from my lower self and sometimes from my higher self. And that is exactly what my neighbor does as well. The lesson is not about who can be the more mature person, but about how much our ego predominates. When Yom Kippur rolls around, I will pray for my neighbors sins to be forgiven, along with mine. So how can I add to that list of sins for both of us? The sag es had a wonderful saying: Kol Yis rael aravim zeh bzeh . Each Israelite is responsible for every other Israelite. As one of my friends says, We are all in this together. Maybe that is why this verse is called the Golden Rule. Now all we have to do is learn to live by it. Rabbi Dr. Michael J. Schorin, MAPC, BCC is a Chaplain in Lee Healths Department of Spiritual Services, and ministers at the Gulf Coast Medical Center. Rabbi Michael J. Schorin So, who created God?M Who Created compiled and edited by Suand available at amazon.com at https:// tinyurl.com/y9tawrln The subject is one I have pondered my entire life. The title emanates from an inci dent that occurred very beginning of my rabbinical studies. As the years have gone by, I have questioned what God is and what God is not with increasing intensity. brew Union College-Jewish Institute conducted Friday night worship at the Flora Terrace Convalescent Home on Pico Boulevard. I led Shabbat Eve worship and then visited patients in their rooms. I earned $10 for each visit. Considering my preparation and the time I spent at Flora Terrace each week, I might have earned $2 an hour. I did not care. I would have paid them for the experience One Friday night, not long after I began leading worship there, the attendant greeted me with, Rabbi, you have a new congregant. Rabbi Rosenfeld, an 85-year-old Orthodox rabbi is with us, and he will be at your service. What?! I thought to myself. An Orthodox rabbi is coming to MY service! Many Orthodox rabbis hold Reform Judaism in disdain. Omigosh! What will he think? How will he react? These thoughts played on my mind during the service. Rabbi Rosenfeld sat there, alert but impassive. There was a large black kipah on his head and the Union Prayer Book from which we prayed sat tightly shut in his hands the whole time. After the service I made my rounds and approached his room with trepida tion. Rabbi Stephen Fuchs Fort Myers Prayer Breakfast Rabbi Marc Sack I would never have known that Rick Rigsby was an ordained minister had I not read the bio on the back of his book, Lessons from a Third Grade Dropout where it says that he was the chaplain for the Texas A & M football team, and the founder of Rick Rigsby Ministries. Dr. Rigsby was introduced at the Fort Myers Prayer Breakfast as the president of Rick Rigsby Communications. His ministry was never mentioned. Not once in his 30-minute presentation did he refer to his Christian faith. Instead he spoke of unity. He said that love of God must translate into love of other people. Using what we Jews know as the Shma as his text, Rigsby spoke of having Gods words on the doorposts of our homes and on our gates. To him (and to us) that means remembering to act in a godly way every time we leave our homes and every time we enter them. Tying the themes of unity and love together, Dr. Rigsby made the point that we must love all of Gods children, not just the ones like us. As an African-American man, he was emphatic in saying that all lives matter. His message was intended for everyone in the room, people of all end Shafer, working with Mayor Randy Henderson and the members of his congregation, made that happen. This years Prayer Breakfast was a service for everyone. We must acknowledge the work of Rabbis Sol Agin and Yitzchok Minkowicz, who, for many years, sat on the Prayer Breakfast committee, making sure there was a Jewish voice at the this years greater Jewish participation in the program. A door has been opened wide and I think the Jewish community should run through it. We should publicize the program and encourage our members to attend. We should encourage our members to be part of the volunteer corps. With our attendance and support, we should say, As committed Jews, we will join with you in building community in Fort Myers. Count us in! Reverend Shafer has a vision of a strong interfaith community in Fort Myers, and he made that vision real in this years Prayer Breakfast. This a vision I share. Our participation will be good for our community and, just as importantly, good for Fort Myers. Rabbi Marc Sack serves at Temple Judea in Fort Myers. He was most gracious. He said the service was nice (I breathed a deep sigh of relief), and he suggested that when I make a blessing like the Kiddush over the wine or the motzi over the challah, I should have everyone join me. The he told me a story. I am 85 years old, he said, and I have been studying Torah my whole life. And yet I still feel like I am at the beginning of my studies. How is that? I asked. When I was six years old, my teacher handed me a Chumash (text of the Five books of the Torah in book form) and said, Read! So I read (in In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Then, I looked up and asked, If in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, so, who created God? And WHAM! I got such a slap across the face that I still feel it, so I always feel I am at the beginning of my studies. In studying Torah, Who created God? is as appropriate a question as, What was the (unnamed, and no where does it say apple) fruit that led to Adam and Eves expulsion from Eden? In traditional Jewish life, one who has strayed from religious observance but returns to the fold is considered one who, hozer btshuvah returns in phrase means, one who returns with answers. The late renowned Rabbi Harold Schulweis taught he felt greater admi ration for one sheh hozer bsheelah one who returns with questions. Questions are the lifeblood of learning. In the study of Torah, no questions should be out of bounds. So, Who created God? I pray I never stop asking the question. Rabbi Stephen Lewis Fuchs serves at Bat Yam Temple of the Islands on Sani bel Island. for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. June 25, 201 July 23, 2018 for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. June 25, 201 July 23, 2018 for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. June 25, 201 July 23, 2018

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19 FROM THE BIMAH PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO HELP MAKE LCHAYIM POSSIBLE. Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers.The Yeshivah of FlatbushMy mother, may she live long and be well, who turns 90 next month, is the oldest of three, with two younger brothers. Mom during the war and entered Brooklyn College at the age of 17. But it wasnt quite that smooth for her middle brother Gerald, a.k.a. Jijee. As Eastern European Jews go, Jijee, may he rest in peace, was relatively big at a hair over six feet, with a robust frame to match. He also was pretty aggressive and sometimes coln High School, he more than met his match with the Italian boys in the schoolyard and one day came home with a broken arm. So fearing for her youngest son, Grandma Celia, may she also rest in peace, sent the more frail Herbert (alav hashalom) to the Yeshivah of Flatbush to keep him safe from the shtarker Talaynas had been through pogroms in Russia and was taking no chances. Thus the die was cast, so when our times came, mom sent me and then my brothers to the same yeshivah for 12 years. Now back then, the Yeshivah of Flatbush was probably the most elite, preeminent primary and secondary Jewish school in America and perhaps the world. It was also relatively progressive since the classes were taught in Hebrew and not Yiddish, it was coed and arch-Zionist. (For those of you who care about these sorts of things, Joseph Telushkin and I spent the 12 years in the same class, and then Dennis Prager joined us in high school.) But it was, nevertheless, strictly Orthodox, and we were not. We were more on the traditional side, keeping a reasonably kosher home but going out for Chinese, driving and shopping on Shabbes, etc. We belonged to a Con servative shul, often davened at Young Israel, and we were sent to Ramah and Massad Jewish summer camps. So while by most standards we were fairly immersed in Jewish liv ing, the level of our Jewish observance was nowhere near what we were be ing taught in yeshivah. You might say I was a Reverse Marrano, having to ligious life in private. Uncle Herbie, zl, was in the same boat 10 years before me, so maybe you can see why he chose to become a Reform Rabbi in order to resolve the contradictions. And since he was like a big brother to me and my personal hero at the time, you wouldn't be too surprised to learn that I followed in his footsteps into the Reform Rabbinate (even though I never stepped foot into a Reform temple until I was 23 and had to lead one!). But here's the point: my future turned on a simple twist of fate, or better said, a twist of Uncle Jijees arm before I was even born! If it wasnt for that tough Italian kid who showed him who's boss, who knows what my life would have been like. On the balance, I suppose I owe that bulvan a debt of gratitude. But in this way, is my life any dif ferent than yours in this respect? Rabbi Bruce Diamond serves at The Community Free Synagogue in Fort Myers. When telling the story of o ur life, what truly matters? Rabbi Bruce Diamond W hen looking back on our lives we tend to focus on dates and places: where we grew up, when we graduated from col County. But the rabbis of the Talmud are not so concerned with the details of history. Over and over they shift the focus away from a historical narrative toward a more spiritual story. Think of Hanukkah and the Maccabees. While Hanukkah celebrates the successful Maccabean revolt, the Tal mudic rabbis do not mention the war, but instead tell the story of the miracle of oil lasting for eight days. They also attribute the Great Revolt against the Romans, which led to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in 70 CE, to sinat chinam, baseless hatred, tell ing a story about two men named Ka mza and Bar Kamza, whose invitations to a party got mixed up and ultimately led to betrayal. The death of thousands from the Bar Kokhba revolt in 132 CE is reimagined as a plague of disease due to Rabbi Akivas students not act ing respectfully. On one hand, this shift from war to moral lessons could be because the Talmudic rabbis are fearful and cautious about glorifying or even mention ing rebellion, while still living under Roman rule. Yet there is a greater message at play here as well. The rabbis understand that what matters and what lasts is not historical context. The lessons they want to share are eternal and or 132 CE. The triumph of lasting light and the dangers of baseless hatred and disrespect are the lessons of the Talmud. The details of the history the time and place are not as central as how human beings relate to each other. The Talmud encourages us to think deeper about our lives: what lessons did we learn from our hometown, who are we still friends with from college, job, how did we create a life here in our life, what truly matters? As we rea story of light, kindness and respect. Amen. Rabbi Nicole Luna serves at Temple Beth El in Fort Myers. An interesting thoughtT he late Justice Felix Frankfurter once addressed an audience of doctors at the Harvard Medical School. He began his address with this striking question: Have you broken out of jail lately? He went on to explain that people allow themselves to be imprisoned in mental and spiritual cells with very stout walls, and there is no communication with the outside world. The truth is that people with closed minds are living in a kind of jail. One of the ways we con the same things, we live the same way day after day, and thereby deny our selves the freedom of new experiences, and the excitement of doing things dif ferently. Some workers take the same route to work every day. They would not think of changing their route for anything short of a street detour. They deprive themselves of new and varied sights. Some men and women wear the same style of shoe year after year. They fear that if they change the design they Some people choose the same color every time they purchase a new car, thus denying themselves the opportunity of a change of pace. Some of us retain the same circle of friends. We deeply fear to break out and make new friends. In this way we deny ourselves the pleasures and excitements of experiencing new human beings. So the question still remains, Have you broken out of jail lately? Rabbi Solomon Agin serves at Temple Shalom in Port Charlotte. Rabbi Solomon Agin Unexpected request for liberal JewsT here is an unhappy feeling of rage building up. Dont feed it. There is a growing sense of injustice. Dont go along. A new civil rights museum just opened in Alabama. It documents lynchings of blacks. Dont invoke an eye for an eye. There is a ter rible loss of being protected. Dont add to the insecurity. There is a new shame about being American. Dont quickly surrender our history. But what are we to do? All your recommendations are negative actions, all we should not do, what we were told again and again as children, mir tur nicht Not so. What we are being asked to do is two tasks. First, not to make matters worse by adding to the general hysteria. Second and more important, the role we are asked to play is for divine intervention. It is doubly critical it is not only preparatory but also collab orative. place? To demonstrate what He can do and what we cannot and should not revenge, despair and death. God has to be given the chance to be God no matter how long it takes or what unexpected forms it may take. Our task is to help that happen by not presuming to know Gods view on revenge or losing our faith in His ulti mate divine justice. ly and dramatically from all the chaos, is God simple, serene, benign and one. And you helped make it possible. Rabbi Devora Buchen serves at Temple Beth Shalom in Cape Coral. Rabbi Devora Buchen FM N B T is proud to consistently earn a 5-star rating from Bauer Financial, the nations leading independent bank rating rm*. We attribute our success to the meaningful relationships we build with our clients. e better we know you, the better we can serve you. Fort Myers Bonita Springs Charleston Estero Naples Palm Beach Scottsdale We are all in this togetherthe more mature person, but about how much our ego predominates. When Yom Kippur rolls around, I will pray for my neighbors sins to be forgiven, along with mine. So how can I add to that list of sins for both of us? The sages had a wonderful saying: Kol Yisrael aravim zeh bzeh. Each Israelite is responsible for every other Israelite. As one of my friends says, We are all in this together. Maybe that is why this verse is called the Golden Rule. Now all we have to do is learn to live by it. Rabbi Dr. Michael J. Schorin, MAPC, BCC is a Chaplain in Lee Healths Department of Spiritual Services, and ministers at the Gulf Coast Medical Center.

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20 FOCUS ON YOUTH HUMANISTIC JEWISH HAVURAHof Southwest Florida (239) 495-8484 in Southwest Florida Paula Creed Humanistic Judaism was founded in trained in Reform Judaism, and a group of Detroit Jews wanting to create a new community where their Jewish identity and heritage could be maintained and celebrated in conformity with their secular beliefs. Jewish communities, springing up throughout North America, created the Society for Humanistic Judaism (SHJ) as its national organization. Currently there are 30 communities in North America, the most northerly in Toronto, Canada, the most southerly here in Southwest Florida, and from coast to coast across the United States. We have Foreseeing the necessity to train leaders for this modern philosophy, in 1985 Rabbi Wine and other scholars formed the International Institute for Secular Humanistic Judaism at a meet ing in Jerusalem. The Institute main tains a campus in Israel and in North America. Since its inception, the North American Section has ordained over 40 leaders/ madrikhim/vegvazers and rabbis. Many years later, Rabbi Dan Friedman, a colleague of Rabbi Wine, spoke to the Naples-Marco Section of the National Council of Jewish Women. Attending this event and perceiving the Language development in childrenBy Joann Goldman, Director, Temple Judea Preschoolanguage employs symbols words, gestures or spoken words to represent objects and ideas. It is important that we, as teach ers, know the developmental mile stones in language development. If we have the knowledge of appropriate language development, we can provide to aide in their development. Toddler: from one to two years of age: Children this age experience the world through the physical senses. cludes using two-word combinations, taking turns speaking and listening, using the word no often, and using gestures to express needs and desires. Preschooler: from age three to Children this age expand their word combinations and are able to speak in sentences, use correct grammatical patterns, use pronouns, articu late sounds clearly, and rapidly increase their working vocabulary. Preschool children may also understand words they do not use themselves. It is important to know that language development in children depends on how we present it. When communicat ing with children we need to remember that they are little people with feelings. Some basic guidelines to remember are: Use words that the children under stand Always state what you want from the children (make it clear) Create opportunities for the chil dren to interact (speak) Give a warning before any transi tion A fun way to accomplish some of the guidelines listed would be to com municate through stories, games, songs and discussion. Show pictures to children and ask ing questions about the picture: What type of bird is this? What color is the bird? Even if children do not know the answers, you will provide the answers and they will either take it in or repeat what you have said. With older chil dren you can expand upon the topic by asking challenging questions depend ing on the development of the child. Always keep communication open and encourage conversation. DISCOVER THE FUN! RECEIVE THE GIFT OF FREE JEWISH CHILDREN S BOOKS MAILED TO YOUR HOME EVERY MONTH! SHARE the experience of reading with your children as they grow with PJ Library books. SIGN UP TODAY! Enrollment is open to Jewish families with children between the ages of six months to eight years living in Lee & Charlotte Counties. Funded by the Roth Family Foundation & Asher Family Foundation More information, contact Leni Sack 239.481.4449 ext. 3 lenibsack@jfedlcc.org Candle lighting times:June 1: 7:59 June 8: 8:02 June 15: 8:04 June 22: 8:06 June 29: 8:07 P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E Bar / Bat Mitzvah SpecialistChoosing the right photographer is an important decision. Michael Shapiro has more than 30 years experience in media and journalism. He is able to capture images that are unique, unexpected and spontaneous.Other Services: Weddings / Family Portraits / Events239.770.6860mike@shapiro-photography.com www.shapiro-photography.com Earn CAS Credits The Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties is interested in hearing from teenagers in high school who might like to earn CAS credits though various work in the Jewish community. If you are interested, please send the following information to LeniBSack@jfedlcc.org: Name Address Phone # Age Grade School Preferred volunteer hours (e.g. 2 5P.M. Sundays)

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21 ORGANIZATIONS HADASSAHCollier/Lee Chapter (239) 301-0509 Hadassah update: Volunteerism Shelley Skelton We are volunteers. We are fundrais ers. We are winners! As our season in Southwest Florida winds down and many of our friends and colleagues begin traveling elsewhere, those of us who live here year-round are hard at work preparing for next season, when all return and the cycle begins again. Thanks to computers, technology, cell phones, webinars, etc., we are all in constant touch with one another, a phe nomenon that some take for granted but continues to amaze me on a daily basis. By the time the so-called lazy, hazy days of summer have passed, we will have signed contracts with guest speakers, planned programs and, at the very least, a good guesstimate on just how much of the monetary goal, set forth for us by National Ha dassah, we can expect to reach. In past years, we have exceeded our goals thanks to the hard work, diligence and ongoing support of you, our members. As volunteers, our greatest rewards are in seeing the results of our labors, the truly wonderful things that happen on a daily basis at Hadassah Hospital the wonder of research, the magic of education, the inspiration of discovery, the value of volunteering your time so that goals can be met. Yes, we are a fundraising organization. Without the funds we could not exist. Without the support of so many we could not continue to provide the programs, education and services so vital to the extraor dinary work of Hadassah. In addition, we enjoy well-planned social events, we have formed lifetime friendships and we share in our commitment to create a more productive and rewarding life. In keeping with the successful outcome of so many Hadassah projects, in March of this year, a medical outreach was done by Hadassah to Ethiopia entitled Hadassahs Scoliosis Surgery and Education Campaign to undertake complex spine surgery. For the Ethiopi this surgery, the bar was raised high to show the level of surgery that could be accomplished right in their own oper ating rooms. For the Hadassah team, it was an achievement to demonstrate that the high level of surgery they are famous for can be exported to the most needy patients. The medical research we do today can change the world tomorrow. Diseases that once decimated entire populations no longer exist. Will we be able to say that, one day soon, about cancer, heart disease and diabetes? Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) is internationally recognized for decades of leadership in stem cell research, and for immunotherapies that use the The Henrietta Szold HadassahHebrew University School of Nursing was established in 1918. This year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Nursing School and the women and men who study, teach and do research in the broad areas of nursing. In honor of this celebration, on December 8, 2018, the evening prior to our Major Gifts/Keepers Brunch, The Collier/ special program devoted to the nurses in our community. Our distinguished guest, Dianne Gottlieb, a nurse-mid wife and Hadassah vice president, will HUMANISTIC JEWISH HAVURAHof Southwest Florida (239) 495-8484 in Southwest Florida Paula Creed Humanistic Judaism was founded in trained in Reform Judaism, and a group of Detroit Jews wanting to create a new community where their Jewish identity and heritage could be maintained and celebrated in conformity with their secular beliefs. Jewish communities, springing up throughout North America, created the Society for Humanistic Judaism (SHJ) as its national organization. Currently there are 30 communities in North America, the most northerly in Toron to, Canada, the most southerly here in Southwest Florida, and from coast to coast across the United States. We have madrikhim/vegvazers and rabbis. Many years later, Rabbi Dan Friedman, a colleague of Rabbi Wine, spoke to the Naples-Marco Section of the Na tional Council of Jewish Women. At tending this event and perceiving the positive audience reaction to Rabbi Friedmans description of how he came to be a Humanistic Rabbi, I stood up during of those who would like to explore the idea of having such a community here. Starting with those names, support from Miriam Jerris, SHJs rabbi, and members of the Sarasota Congregation for Humanistic Judaism, we organized in 2008 and became a 501(c)(3) orgaAlso crucial to our strong beginning was the encouragement we received from David Willens, then Executive Director of the Jewish Federation of Collier County, his assistant, Melissa Keel, and Ted Epstein, editor of the Federation Star. Its been 10 years since the Humanistic Jewish Havurah of Southwest Florida was formed. We attract unafship with like-minded people. We represent a growing segment of Jews who are Jews either by birth or by choice, who believe that: Judaism is the historic culture of the Jewish people and religion is only one part of that culture Jewish identity is best preserved in a free, pluralistic environment People possess the power and responsibility to shape their own lives independent of supernatural authority Ethics and morality should serve human needs, and choices should be based upon consideration of the consequences of actions rather than pre-ordained commandments Jewish history, like all history, is a human saga, a testament to the human responsibility. Biblical and other traditional texts are products of human activity and are best understood through archaeology and The freedom and dignity of the Jewish people must go hand in hand with the freedom and dignity of every human being we gather to celebrate Shabbat. We cel ebrate Jewish holidays for the lessons of humanism they each represent. Yom Kippur climaxes the self-examination begun on Rosh Hashanah and is a time of self-forgiveness and forgiveness of others. As this holiday ends, we con duct a Nizkor serve the memory of those who have died. Chanukah extols courage. Pass over is a time to celebrate the modern, as well as the ancient quest for freedom alongside a celebration of spring re newal and rebirth. istic Jewish values to the community on the third Sunday during the winter months. If you are attracted to our phi losophy, a membership form is avail SHALOM LIFE CENTER Fort Myers(239) 218-3433 Lawrence & Robin Dermer Families are complicated. Not only our modern families, but ancient ones depicted in our Torah certainly had their share of dysfunctional challenges. There was plenty of sibling rivalry be tween Joseph and his brothers, couples connected and broke up, there was love, loyalty and happiness as well as deceit and jealousy. Through these fa milial bonds and challenges the Jewish people were born. Our Torah rests on the strong foundation of family, our ability to see that were all connected, part of one big Eitz Chayim the tree of life. Family, for better or worse is the core of who we are as a Jewish people. The pow er of love and togetherness begot the the twelve tribes of Israel. The Jewish people as a whole are described as Bnei Yisrael -The Children of Israel, not descendants of the land, but of our patriarch Jacob, the grandson of Abraham. All the children of Israel, all of us, are part of one connected extended family. Our family relationships teach us how to better understand each other and ourselves. Family is where we learning about joy and happiness. In Hebrew we say mishpacha, which means a Jewish family or social unit that includes both close and distant relatives. Simply put, were all mishpacha, were all family and family is the ditional spiritual community or kehilla is one where everyone is made to feel welcome. Its an environment where our leadership continuously stresses the values of love, compassion, inclu sion and acceptance, constantly encouraging a culture of positivity where we lift each other up and rely on one cult ones. The future of our Jewish extended family depends on unity, stability and strong leadership. The Talmud tells us all Jews are responsible for each other. Hillel said, If I am not for myself who will be for me? If I am only for myself what am I? As a family, were all one link in a chain that stretches back a hundred generations. Were a bridge between the past and the future over which the survival of our people will pass. Family is what will anchor us on either shore. The actions we take today will allow our children to decide whether they care enough to build their own bridge. From Breishit in the beginning, to present day, a family, with all its ups and downs, is forever. Families dont need written commitments or term contracts; theyre connected to each other for the long haul. They are bound by something much deeper, an often unexplainable relationship, unfathomable feeling love. In a world of chaos and distraction, calm and con centration, our beautiful and deeply rooted ancient traditions and family sweet spirituality for us to share with our Jewish community, our extended family. Join us for summertime Shabbat evening services every Friday at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings for To rah study at 10:00 a.m. Our clubs run throughout summer while we are pre paring to ensure the Southwest Florida Jewish Community 5779 High Holiday incomparable. Our choir will be back along with our incredible symphonic ensemble and world-renowned concert prayer is inspirational, meaningful and musical. For more information on our many clubs, programs and special events, please visit www.shalomlifecenter.org, call 239.218.3433 or email info@sha lomlifecenter.org. Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide StudiesDedicated to educating all sectors of society about Jewish civilization, the Holocaust, and genocide through: scholarship outreach inquiry sharing knowledge preserving the record helping teachers encouraging studentsVisit www.fgcu.edu/hc/ Dr. Paul Bartrop, Director

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22 ORGANIZATIONS Send updates and changes to the Directory below to loriramos@jfedlcc.org. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUE REFORM 10868 Metro Parkway, South Fort Myers (The Southwest Florida Masonic Center) P.O. Box 07144, Fort Myers, FL 33919 Rabbi Bruce Diamond (bdiamond5@comcast.net) Coordinator: Natalie Fulton Adult Educator: Jessica Evers Phone: (239) 466 6671 E mail: comfreesyn@gmail.com Web site: www.fortmyerssynagogue.com Community Sabbath eve dinner each Friday at 6:30 p.m. Sabbath eve worship every Friday at 7:30 p.m. Light breakfast and Torah study with the rabbi every Saturday morning from 9:30 11:30 a.m. TEMPLE JUDEA CONSERVATIVE 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, FL 33908 Rabbi Marc Sack E mail: rabbi@tjswfl.org President: Jennifer Manekin Director of Congregational Learning: Elizabeth Singer Preschool Director: Joann Goldman templejudeapreschool@gmail.com Phone: 433 0201 Fax: 433 3371 E mail: tjswfl@gmail.com Web site: www.tjswfl.org Services: 6:15 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday Minyan: 9:00 a.m. Monday Religious School: Sun. 9:30 a.m. noon; Wed. 4:306 p.m. Early childhood education: Preschool, M F, ages 18 months 5 years; Mommy & Me, months 2 years Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism CHABAD OF BONITA SPRINGS/ ESTERO ORTHODOX 24850 Old 41 Road, Suite 20 (in the Bernwood Centre) Bonita Springs, FL 34135 7024 Rabbi Mendy Greenberg Phone: 949 6900 Web site: www.JewishBonita.com Services: Saturday at 10 a.m., followed by a kiddush TEMPLE BETH EL REFORM 16225 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, FL 33908 Rabbi Nicole Luna E mail: rabbiluna@templebethel.com Temple educator: Dale Cohen, Ma.Ed., R.J.E Preschool director: Jesyca Virnig President: Ellis Rabinowitz Phone: 433 0018 Fax: 433 3235 Web site: www.templebethel.com Shabbat services: 7:30 p.m. Friday; Torah study 9:00 a.m. Saturday; B nai Mitzah 10:30 a.m. Saturday Religious School: 9:30 a.m. noon Sunday Hebrew School: 5:00 6:30 p.m Wednesday Judaica Gift Gallery Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE BETH SHALOM REFORM 702 S.E. 24th Ave., Cape Coral, FL 33990 Rabbi Devora Buchen President: Arnie Schwartz Phone: 772 4555 Fax: 772 4625 E mail: office@templebethshalomcc.org Web site: www.templebethshalomcc.org Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday Religious School: Thursday 4:00 6:30 p.m. Torah study with Rabbi Buchen: Shabbat 10:30 a.m. Organizations: Brotherhood, Sisterhood, Family Service (1st Friday of the month at 7:30 p.m.) BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS REFORM Meets at Sanibel Congregational Church 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island Rabbi Stephen L. Fuchs President: Alan Lessack Phone: 239 579 0296 (Oct Apr) 773251 8862 (May Sept) Email: batyamsanibel@gmail.com Cantor: Murray Simon Web site: www.batyam.org Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday (Nov Apr) 7:00 p.m. Friday (May Oct) Adult Education: Saturday, 9:00 11:30 a.m. (Nov Apr) Jewish Current Events: Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. (Nov Apr) Write: P.O. Box 84, Sanibel, FL 33957 Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE SHALOM CHARLOTTE HARBOR AND THE GULF ISLANDS REFORM 23190 Utica Ave., P.O. Box 494675 Port Charlotte, FL 33949 4675 Rabbi Solomon Agin President: Gary Wein Phone: (941) 625 2116 E mail: shalom06@netzero.com Web site: templeshalomfl.com Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday Religious school: Sunday 10 a.m. Beginning Hebrew: Tuesday 4:15 5:15 p.m. Advanced Hebrew: Thursday 4:15 5:15 p.m. Organizations: Sisterhood Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism CHABAD OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY ORTHODOX 204 E Mckenzie St Unit B, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 Rabbi Simon Jacobson Phone: (941) 833 3381 E mail: chabadpg@yahoo.com Web site: www.chabadofcharlottecounty.com Services: Saturday at 10 a.m. followed by a kiddush Torah study: Wednesday at 8 p.m. CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road Fort Myers, FL 33919 Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz Phone: 4337708 Fax: 481 9109 E mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 5:15 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday & Thursday 7:00 a.m. CHABAD JEWISH CENTER OF CAPE CORAL ORTHODOX 1716 Cape Coral Pkwy. W., Cape Coral, FL 33914 Rabbi Yossi Labkowski Phone: 963 4770 E mail: info@chabadcape.com Web site: www.chabadcape.com Services: Friday Evening 7:30 p.m. Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. followed by Kiddush luncheon Sunday morning 8:00 a.m. Monday Friday morning 7:00 a.m. JLI Courses: Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. Weekly Torah Study: Tuesday evening 7:30 p.m. Hebrew School: Sunday 10:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Jgirls: Tuesday 6:00 7:00 p.m. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS Shalom Life Center Lawrence Dermer, Spiritual Leader 218 -3433 AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee): Jacki Waksman (954) 653 -9053 AJC (American Jewish Committee): Brian Lipton (941) 365 -4955 Anti -Defamation League: (561) 988 -2900 B Nai B rith International: (941) 302 -4500 Chevra Kadisha: Gene Sipe 841 -4615 Generations of the Shoah SWFL: 963 -9347 Hadassah Collier/Lee Chapter: Lynn Weiner 598 -1009 Hadassah Sharon Chapter (Charlotte County): Odette Port (941) 505 -1409 Hazak 55+ Chapter: Joyce Rosinger 437 -1566 Humanistic Jewish Havurah: Paula Creed 495 -8484 Israel Bonds: Regional Headquarters: (800) 622 -8017 Jewish Community Services: 481 -4449 Jewish National Fund: (727) 536 -5263 Memorial Tree Planting in Israel 1 -800 -542 -8733 Jewish War Veterans: Post 400: Commander Harvey Charter 246 -3151 Mikvah Bashka of Southwest Florida: Nechamie Minkowicz 822 -2784 ORT Gulf Beaches Chapter Marina Berkovich 566 -1771 IN LEE & CHARLOTTE COUNTIES BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDSSanibel (773) 251-8862 www.batyam.orgThanks to volunteer congregants, Friday evening Shabbat services take place every week at 7:00 p.m. (not 7:30 p.m.) in Fellowship Hall from May 4 until Rabbi Stephen Fuchs returns in early September for Rosh Hashanah. It is a devoted and congenial group of area Jews who gather togeth er for dinner at a local restaurant and then religious observance each Friday. Whoever leads the Shabbat service determines the order and content, includ ing the mix of Hebrew and English and the melodies. The result is that each of the leader and worthy of attendance. session of Saturday morning Adult Education is the opportunity to consider topics and speakers for next November when classes begin again. On April HAZAK 55+ CHAPTER at Temple Judea(239) 433-0201Jan Klein Are you 55 or over and looking for a fun and friendly group to join? If you answered yes, then HAZAK of Southwest Florida is for you. HAZAK has monthly programs with movies, guest speakers and outings. If you would like more information, please email HAZAK at tjhazak@gmail.com. Someone will get in touch with you. Join HAZAK on Sunday, June 10 at 4:00 p.m. at Temple Judea in Fort Myers. Enjoy the movie Captain Corellis Mandolin starring Nicolas Cage, Penelope Cruz and John Hurt. This movie takes places during WWII. Corelli is the leader of the inva sion force that controls the Greek island of Cephalonia. He is assigned to live in the home of a local doctor where he falls in love with the physicians daughter, even though she There is a fee of $5 for nonmem bers and $3 for members. This cost covers the movie, snacks and soft drinks. After the movie join the group for dinner at Sweet Tomatoes. Other movies are being planned for the sum mer. If you have a request, please email tjhazak@gmail.com. GENERATIONS OF THE SHOAH SOUTHWEST FLORIDA(239) 963-9347 The Museum of Jewish Heritage and our areas Holocaust Museum Ida Margolis I was in New York City recently vis iting the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Our daughter told us there were three exhibits featured that we would not want to miss and she was correct. They were amazing. Before we left I told the person at the desk how fascinated we were with the exhibits. I then told her that I would share the information with newsletter and article in our Federation newspaper. She was very interested to learn about this group but even more interested to learn that we have a Holo caust Museum in Naples. I know that many people are sur prised when they learn about the Ho locaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida and all it does. I have heard from so many people how impressed they are with our little gem. No wonder it won Gulfshore Life s Best Museum designation and gets such high ratings on TripAdvisor. But more importantly, its programs reach over 15,000 students annually. How wonderful that through the gen erosity of Janice Cohen and others, our area will have a new and even larger Holocaust Museum and, hopefully, Whenever I see a Holocaust Memorial or visit a Holocaust Museum in the U.S., I am always so sad thinking about all of the innocents who were slaughtered, but at the same time I am grateful to live in a country where we can have these museums and a Constitution to protect our freedoms. As a big fan of museums, I like to visit many watch Mysteries at the Museum each week. So, when our daughter told us about the current exhibits at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, my husband and I decided it merited a trip to New York City. As I stated in the beginning of this article, the special exhibits were amazing, not to say that the core exhibits are not. The core exhibition always on display includes a multimedia Ago:1880-1930, The War Against the Jews:1930-1945 and Jewish Renewal:1945-Present. This alone is worth the trip. However, imagine being able to have virtual conversations with Holocaust survivors. Made possible by specialized recording and display technologies, as well as nextgeneration natural language processing, New Dimensions in Testimony allows visitors to ask questions and the life-like projections answer in real accounts of their experiences. The sur vivors in this installation present the world premiere of the testimony of the stepdaughter of Otto Frank and survivor of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentra tion camp, Eva Schloss, as well as Pinchas Gutter, a survivor of six German Nazi concentration camps. More than 200 photographs taken in the 1940s are on display in Mem tographs of Henryk Ross. As an act of resistance, Ross created a photographic The Number on Great-Grandpas Arm, PDWLRQ\003LV\003LQ\003WKH\003\277OP\017\003DUH\003WKH\003QH[W\003VSH cial exhibit. The conversation between a 10-year-old and his 90-year-old great grandfather, an Auschwitz survivor, is an outstanding introduction to Holo caust history and the power of story. If you cannot get to the Museum New York, you can go online and learn about the Museum at mjhnyc.org. You can watch The Number on GreatGrandpas Arm at www.HBO.com. The hologram of Holocaust survivor Pinchas at the Museum of Jewish Heritage

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23 TEMPLE NEWSEve & Joel Aron were called to the Torah, with Rabbi Bruce Diamond, in celebration of Joels 90th birthday BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDSSanibel (773) 251-8862 www.batyam.org Thanks to volunteer congregants, Fri day evening Shabbat services take place every week at 7:00 p.m. (not 7:30 p.m.) in Fellowship Hall from May 4 until Rabbi Stephen Fuchs re turns in early September for Rosh Ha shanah. It is a devoted and congenial group of area Jews who gather togeth er for dinner at a local restaurant and then religious observance each Friday. Whoever leads the Shabbat service de termines the order and content, includ ing the mix of Hebrew and English and the melodies. The result is that each of the leader and worthy of attendance. session of Saturday morning Adult Ed ucation is the opportunity to consider topics and speakers for next November when classes begin again. On April 28, about 25 regular attendees gathered to enjoy a potluck brunch and discussion. It was also an opportunity to thank many years as the coor dinator and creative spark of the congregant hour, and to welcome Vickie Fuchs who graciously agreed to take the challenge. A review of the other activities and events at Bat Yam this past season, since the arrival of Rabbi Fuchs and Cantor Murray Simon, leaves one almost breathless but happy. An improvised sukkah was the scene of a Sukkot service with members of our hosts, the Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ (UCC). Rabbi Fuchs managed to unroll our Torah for all to see on Simchat Torah. Rabbi Paul Citrin journeyed from New Mexico to conduct the formal installation of the Rabbi and Cantor. Chanukah was again observed together with the Sanibel Congregational UCC members. Rabbi Fuchs and Reverend Dr. John Danner of the UCC co-taught a series of classes on a Bible topic. Rabbi Ronald Kronish was a special guest speaker about the necessity for interre ligious understanding. The Purim ser vice included congregants acting and singing the Megillah in rhyme. A Bat Yam group attended a Boston Red Sox game. Cantor Simon presented a wonage about the great cantors including singing. Journalist Marvin Kalb came to Bat Yam and spoke about his new his comments about the current state of nity Seder exceeded all expectations. Rabbi Fuchs and other Bat Yam mem bers participated in the Federations Holocaust Remembrance Day and Israels 70th birthday celebration. It was a busy season. On May 13, Rabbi and Vickie Fuchs left for Germany where they er about the Shoah in high schools. In addition, Rabbi Fuchs will speak in seminar for rabbinical students at the Abraham Geiger College in Berlin. One of the highlights will be to cel ebrate Shavuot in Friedrichsstadt, the city where, in 2015, Rabbi Fuchs con city since Kristallnacht in 1938. Since time goes by quickly in Southwest Florida, it is important to note that the High Holy Days are early this year. Selichot is September 1 and Erev Rosh Hashanah is September 9. Kol Nidre is September 18 and Yom Kippur is September 19. Mark your calendars accordingly. The snowbirds have scattered around the country and around the world. Driving on Sanibel is much easier. Come to Bat Yam on Friday evenings at 7:00 p.m. for a Shabbat service held in Fellowship Hall on the campus of the Sanibel Congregational UCC at 2050 Periwinkle Way on Sani bel. Members of the community, guests and visitors are always welcome to join with congregants. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUEFort Myers (239) 466-6671 www.fortmyerssynagogue.com Heartfelt condolences to Miriam Berg er and her family at the passing of her Berger. Marvin and Miriam, often ac companied by their visiting son, Haz zan Brian, have been longtime commit ted participants in the Rabbis weekly Sabbath morning Torah classes. Mazal Tov to Jonathan Cohen and Nicole Fuller on their June 2 wedding conducted by the Rabbi in Fort Myers. Nicole and Jon worship with us most every Sabbath eve. We are thrilled that Asher Pincus time as a Bar Mitsvah on Sabbath morn ing, June 23. Asher, who has grown up in our congregation and has been studying with follows his older sisters, Ariel and Talia, who also celebrated becom ing Bnot Mitsvah at The Community Free Synagogue. Yasher Koah (more power to you) to Joel Aron, who was called to the Torah with his wife, Eve, in cel ebration of his 90th birthday. Joel and Eve were C.F.S. pioneers. Bis hundert und tsvantsik! nville for her invaluable help editing the Rabbis 5th revision of The Community Free Synagogue prayerbook. The new siddur more closely follows the traditional Qabalat Shabbat, the Friday evening liturgy, while expanding the range of older and newer Sabbath songs enjoyed by the worshippers. A downloadable public domain copy of this new Sabbath Eve siddur can be found on the C.F.S. website at www. fortmyerssynagogue.com, along with a broad range of Jewish worship texts and a ketuba created for C.F.S. that are free for the taking! Our next Brown Bag Movie Night 14 in the Community Hall, featuring Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer starring Richard Gere. For more information, see the article elsewhere in this issue. TEMPLE JUDEAFort Myers (239) 433-0201 Temple Judea is hosting the Israel Monday, June 18 at 7:00 p.m. Every summer, groups of Israeli teens tour the United States bringing an energetic and entertaining show of singing and dancing, sharing their love of their homeland and their appreciation for our support. To see who is in the group coming to Fort Myers this year, check out the ad and article elsewhere in this issue. This event is co-sponsored each year by Temple Judea, Temple Beth El and the Jewish Federation. Admission is free! This is a show for all ages. Join old friends and new from Temple Judea and beyond for a new look at Israels culture, terrain, innovations and traditions. Temple Judeas Israel Revisited Trip, scheduled for May 2019, is a travel experience for those who have been to Israel before and want to par ticipate in its lively music, art and theater, eat in the best restaurants of the country, see the best archaeology, and meet Israelis who make the country the vibrant place it is. Some of the highlights of the trip include: meeting with artists and craftsmen from Tel Aviv, attending a theater performance in Tel Aviv, exploring Mahane Yehuda alongside an Israeli chef, visiting a gourmet spice farm in the Galilee, touring SodaStreams high-tech production facility in the Negev, and so much more! Rabbi Marc Sack will be taking the group to out-of-the-way places and exploring parts of Israel that arent ususeers. Information about the trip is now available. Call Rabbi Sack for more information about this new adventure. Our monthly volunteering at the Salvation Armys Meals with Compassion (formerly Sallys Caf) continues. Volunteers are needed for Sundays, June 3 and 24. If you would like to vollindaidelson8@gmail.com. Rabbi Sacks Torah study will meet Myers and Brettholtz and Company. It is an hour of open discussion of Torah and Judaism where all levels of background and all questions are encour aged. Everyone is welcome and there is no cost to attend. A wine and cheese reception is vices. Its a great time for members to enjoy socializing and to greet prospec tive new members and those visiting the synagogue. For more information about Tem ple Judea or upcoming programs, call Regular scheduled events: Friday evening Shabbat services at Saturday morning Shabbat services at 9:30 a.m. month. Morning minyan every Monday at 9:00 a.m. The Community Free Synagogue serves a traditional Sabbath dinner. It is free and reservations are never required. At 7:30 p.m. the Sabbath is welcomed with prayer and song. A cof fee hour follows worship. Every Saturday at 9:30 a.m., C.F.S. lively discussion of the weeks Torah portion until 11:30 a.m., when the Mourners Qaddish is recited. Now in its 13th year, The Commu nity Free Synagogue is an independent synagogue and valued community re ligious resource. All of its events and programs, including youth and adult Jewish education, are open to all and always free. The purpose of The Community Free Synagogue, led by Rabbi Dia mond, is Study, Worship and Benevo lent Acts (Pirqay Avot 1:2), following progressive Jewish values while ob serving essential Jewish traditions. TEMPLE BETH ELFort Myers (239) 433-0018 www.templebethel.com Temple Beth Els Cemetery Com mittee invites everyone to our annual Jewish War Veterans Post 400 Memo rial Day Service on Sunday, May 27 at 9:30 a.m., to be held at TBEs Garden of Memories cemetery, 3200 Michigan Avenue, Fort Myers (within the Fort Myers Cemetery). Please call Pam Ar kin at 239.772.0024 for further infor mation or directions. TBEs Francophone group, consisting of Jewish people who speak monthly meetings throughout the sum mer. All Francophones are invited. For more information, call Rachelle at 757.440.1734. class of 2018 includes Jalen Goodman, Jared Olitzky, Jeremy Summers and Jensen Weisinger. As part of their education, these busy ninth-graders volunteered opmentally disabled adults in Cape Coral, Shy Wolf Sanctuary in Naples, and Evas Closet & Foundation (evasfoundation.org) in Fort Myers. was a fantastic event. Congregants, guests and newcomers mingled while enjoying a glass of their favorite varietal and an array of cheeses. If you missed out on this preneg, watch for more in the coming months. In its second training session with tees ongoing caring visitors program trained folks to visit congregants who are unable to get to temple for whatever reason: surgery, inability to drive at night or inability to drive at all, for example. Caring visits by trained volunteers will continue. Small but mighty, TBEs Mitzvah Day was a day of service and fellowship. Among the organizations served were Hearts & Homes for Vets, Dress for Success, the Guadalupe Center, Health. We cleaned the temple, beauti Community Cooperative, made arts & crafts for various organizations, and donated blood. By the numbers: six (impacting between twelve and eigh created for the Israel Defense Forces; 53 origami cranes created for Health ated for the Jewish Federations Senior assembled, bagged and delivered to Community Cooperative in Fort My ers; carloads of clothing delivered to the Guadalupe Center and to Dress for Success; donations of all kinds de livered to Hearts & Homes for Vets; Kavod HaMet (honoring the dead) by beautifying the cemetery. ope Cruz and John Hurt. This movie takes places during WWII. Corelli is the leader of the invasion force that controls the Greek island of Cephalonia. He is assigned to live in the home of a local doctor where he falls in love with the physicians daughter, even though she There is a fee of $5 for nonmem bers and $3 for members. This cost covers the movie, snacks and soft drinks. After the movie join the group for dinner at Sweet Tomatoes. Other movies are being planned for the summer. If you have a request, please email tjhazak@gmail.com.

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