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Title:
L'CHAYIM
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte
Coordinates:
26.500215 x -81.911403

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID FT. MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 1759701 Commerce Center Court Fort Myers, Florida 33908 DELIVER TO CURRENT RESIDENT OR POSTMASTER: DATED RELIGIOUS NEWS ITEMS. TIME SENSITIVE PLEASE EXPEDITE! continued on page 2 www.JewishFederationLCC.org Vol. 40, No. 6 February 2018 / 5778 Senior Lunch Bunch updateBy Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach Coordinator Jodi Cohen I s it possible for 65 people to all fall for someone at the same time? I have to answer with a resounding yes after Temple Judea shlicha, Zohar Ben Hamu, gave a presentation about her life in Israel and the work she is doing in and around Fort Myers. Zohar shared photos that portray her love for her family, teaching and dressing up as an enter tainer. Zohar also talked about her life here in Fort Myers, where she teaches at Temple Judea Sunday School and does outreach to students at FGCU. Zohar had been in Fort Myers for only three days when Hurricane Irma hit. Afterwards, she helped clean up the water at Temple Judea and spoke of getting to know congregants by meet ing over the mop, which she said is very Israeli. We were delighted to welcome some new faces to the group. Temple Beth Shalom of Cape Coral hosted the December lunch and, as always, the volunteers are what make the world and the lunch go round. Jasons Deli is our ever-wonderful community partner and provided the delicious lunch. The Senior Lunch Bunch is a monthly get-together for Jewish seniors to visit with each other, catch up on whats happening, make new connections, eat a lit tle something, and learn a little something. The spirit of the group simply sizzles. People are warm and welcoming to each other, whether someone is a newcomer or a regular. Everyone is invited and there is always room for more. The next lunch is Thursday, February 22 at noon at The Community Free Synagogue, 10868 Metro Pkwy, Fort Myers. Make your reservation by Sunday, February 18 by contacting me at 239.481.4449 x6 or jodi cohen@jfedlcc.org. Please let me know if you will need a ride to the lunch, time attending. The Senior Lunch Bunch is the place to be, and we look forward to seeing you soon! Program notes Leni Sack Sheila and Jerry Laboda were moved to Lee County. They came to Fort Myers from Philadelphia, via Albuquerque in 1965. Jerry was the glades and Sarasota. His mother and her friend started the local Hadassah Chapter. Sheila, with the help of others in the Jewish community, started the Jewish Federation. Come hear their story about the growth and changes in Jewish life in Lee County over the past 50+ years on Sunday, February 18 at 2:00 p.m. at Temple Beth El. Their story is part Southwest Florida, by the Jewish His torical Society of Southwest Florida. makers, Marina Berkovich and Alex Goldstein, will be on hand to answer TXHVWLRQV\003DIWHU\003WKH\003\277OP\021\003KHUH\003ZLOO\003 also be a dessert reception hosted by the TBE Sisterhood. There is no cost to attend. The event is sponsored by the Federation and Temple Beth El Sisterhood. PJ Library programs Families with children ages two through eight dont forget our PJ Li brary programs on Thursday, February 22 at 5:00 p.m. at The Community Free Synagogue, and on Tuesday, March 6 at 5:00 p.m. at Shalom Life Center. By Leni Sack, Program Director

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2 LCHAYIM invites correspondence on subjects of interest to Jewish people. Partisan political opinions will not be published, LCHAYIM should be Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties February 2018 Volume 40, Number 6 Co-Presidents: Board: Executive Director: Alan Isaacs Program Director : Executive Assistant: Jewish Family Services: Jodi Cohen Editor/Designer: Advertising: MARCH ISSUE EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Monday, February 5 OUR FEDERATION In this issue: 5 Our Community 6 Jewish Film Festival 11 Jewish Interest 17 Israel & the Jewish World 22 Marketplace 23 Commentary 24 From the Bimah 26 Focus on Youth 28 Organizations 30 Community Directory 30 Temple News Grow your business with LCHAYIM. Reach 5,000 local Jewish residents through this paper.For more information or to place an ad, call Jim at 239.634.6923 or send an email to JamesLewin@jfedLCC.org.Program notes...continued from previous page 1 Following is a list of staples always in need at the food pantry: P e a n u t b u t t e r a n d j e l l y P a s t a s a u c e ( p a s t a n o t n e e d e d ) R i c e a n d b e a n s C a n n e d v e g e t a b l e s a n d f r u i t s C e r e a l C a n n e d m e a t s C o n d i m e n t s T o i l e t r i e s f o r a d u l t s & c h i l d r e n Gift cards to places like Publix, Walmart, Target, etc., as well as cash donations, are also appreciated. Jewish Family Services helps seniors, individuals and families with a variety of needs. J E W I S H F E D E R A T I O N F O O D P A N T R Y There will be music, stories and arts and crafts for your children in celebration of upcoming holidays, as well as food to keep them happy! Its a fun way to spend a Jewish hour with your children. Activi ties will be led by Temple Judeas shlicha, Zohar Ben Hamu. RSVP to me! More information can be found in the ad in this issue. Author event at Alliance for the Arts From the dawn of the twentieth century to the devastation of World War II, Stolen Beauty a novel of love, war, art and family, gives voice to two extraordinary women and brings to life the true story behind the creations and near destruction of Gustav Klimts most remarkable paintings. Laurie Lico Albanese, author of Stolen Beauty, will be at the Alliance for the Arts on Wednesday, February 21 at 7:00 p.m. to talk about her compelling book at an event co-sponsored by the Jewish Federation and the Alliance for the Arts. Ms. Albanese will share insights into her wellresearched account of the Viennese art world during Klimts time. If you enjoy a good novel, if you like to learn about art history, or if reading about Jewish history appeals to you, then you wont want to miss this author event. Space is limited. To register, go to www.artinlee.org. The cost is $10. Stolen Beauty will also be for sale that evening or bring your own copy for Laurie to autograph after the program. Womens Philanthropy event On a lighter note, there is a Womens Philanthropy author event coming up on Tuesday, March 13. Hot Pants in Hollywood is a show biz memoir and much more by author Susan Silver. Ms. Silver was one of shows like The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Maude and Bob Newhart, among others. As the lyrics from the iconic Mary Tyler Moore Show said, She made it after all! From Milwaukee, with all its s values and nor malcy, Susan went on to fame and fortune in Hollyprominent arenas in New York. Through a continual search for a productive life, her re-connection with Jewish roots, and deep involvement with Israel, Susan found a bigger purpose. She ran the Speakers Bureau for the ADL, was UN Observer for the Wiesenthal Center, and is currently connected to Friends of Is rael Defense Forces. Along the way she worked with Ho locaust-related organizations and adopted three Israeli soldiers by sending them to college. Susan is living a full and rewarding life, and as she says, life aint over yet! Join us on Tuesday, March 13 at 7:30 p.m. at FineMark Bank (12681 Creekside Lane, Fort Myers) for an evening of fun and laughter, and hear Susan dish about the highs and lows of her career. Enjoy a deli cious dessert and open bar reception, and receive a copy of her book, which she will be happy to auto graph. The cost is $36. RSVP to me at 239.481.4449 x3 or lenibsack@jfedlcc.org. Holocaust Memorial Service On Sunday, April 8, we will have our annual Holo caust Memorial Service at 3:00 p.m. at Temple Beth Shalom, 702 SE 24th Avenue, Cape Coral. Please join with other community members as we honor those who died and those who were victims of the Holo caust, by remembering them. Plans are underway for the community celebra tion of Israels 70th birthday on Sunday, April 15. The event will be held at the Heights Center at 15570 Hagie Dr., Fort Myers, from 2:30 to 5:00 p.m. Great entertainment, great food and great fun are all be ing planned, but well need the help of volunteers to Jewish Film Festival GD\\000HYHQLQJ\003WKURXJK\003\\024\026\021\003.XGRV\003WR\003WKH\003\277OP\003 festival committee for choosing another set of out and attendees for making the festival another big suc cess! Happy Tu BShevat (January 31 / 15th of Shevat)! Sundays at 4:00 P.M. ISRAELI DANCING IS FOR ALL AGES to Marsha Kistler marshatemple2012@gmail.com 9701 Commerce Center Ct. Fort Myers 33908 Susan Silver

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3 OUR FEDERATION Following is a list of staples always in need at the food pantry: P e a n u t b u t t e r a n d j e l l y P a s t a s a u c e ( p a s t a n o t n e e d e d ) R i c e a n d b e a n s C a n n e d v e g e t a b l e s a n d f r u i t s C e r e a l C a n n e d m e a t s C o n d i m e n t s T o i l e t r i e s f o r a d u l t s & c h i l d r e n Gift cards to places like Publix, Walmart, Target, etc., as well as cash donations, are also appreciated. Jewish Family Services helps seniors, individuals and families with a variety of needs. J E W I S H F E D E R A T I O N F O O D P A N T R Y U P C O M I N G F E D E R A T I O N S T A Y T U N E D M O R E I N F O T O F O L L O W F E B 1 3 J A N 1 1 J e w i s h F i l m F e s t i v a l The Annual Jewish Film Festival of SW Florida is proud to present another premier lineup of outstanding and highly diverse films that will excite, delight, enlighten and provoke our audience. F E B 2 1 A u t h o r E v e n t a t A l l i a n c e f o r t h e A r t s Laurie Lico Albaneses book, Stolen Beauty, combines European Jewish historical fiction with art. M A R 1 3 W o m e n s P h i l a n t h r o p y / L i o n o f J u d a h One of the original writers on Susan Silver, will make us laugh and kvell as she talks about her search for a productive life, a re connection to her Jewish roots and her deep involvement with Israel. A P R 0 8 H o l o c a u s t M e m o r i a l S e r v i c e This annual event is about honoring the memory of the victims of the Holocaust, as well as fulfilling the promise to never forget. A P R 1 5 I s r a e l a t 7 0 F e s t Hard to believe, but Israel is turning 70 years old! Join us as we celebrate a year of recognizing Israels innovative spirit with a big birthday bash! Community Breakfast recapT he Federations annual Community Breakfast, held on December 10, was a wonderful event. More than 120 attendees enjoyed a delicious breakfast at The Landings and were entertained by Peter Gethers stories of his mother and her career as a gourmet chef. Peters book, My Mothers Kitchen was a moving tribute to his mother and her fascinating life mentoring and cooking with some of todays bestknown chefs. Photos courtesy Mike Shapiro PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO SUPPORT OUR FEDERATION & HELP MAKE LCHAYIM POSSIBLE.

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4 OUR FEDERATION Sunday March 1st The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. Y O U R S U P P O R T P r o m o t e K I N D N E S S S h a r e y o u r M I T Z V A H S t r e n g t h e n & e n r i c h J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y H o n o r / R e m e m b e r A L O V E D O N E This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or in memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with our community. Community L CHAYIM Non Needs Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grants Available The Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grant is available through the Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. The grant may be used for travel to Israel to participate in programs that are volunteer or educational in nature. Our hope is that these programs will enhance Jewish knowledge and identity in preparation for participation in American Jewish life. This grant is for Jewish residents of either county who are 25 years old or younger and can demonstrate a financial need. Academic standing and community involvement may also be considered. For more information or an application, please visit our website at www.JewishFederationLCC.org or contact the Federation at 239 481 4449, ext. 4 or email loriramos@jfedlcc.org. For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. Each Tuesday afternoon, an open session of Mah Jongg is held at the Jewish Federation. Players must be at least advanced beginners, as no lessons are given. DAY: Tuesdays, 12:30~3:30 P.M. FEE: $1 per week for more information call Rona Strausberg at 239.949.9003 T o g e t h e r w e C A N M a k e a D i f f e r e n c e FOOD PANTRYTemple Beth El Boni Raitt Temple Judea Brenda & Jacob Buck Shalom Life Center Phyllis Silver Henkel Mellow Mah Jongg Temple Beth Shalom Nancy & Eric Linkov Victor Gold Jim & Betty Rubenstein Community Free Synagogue INDIGENT FUNDShalom Dancers Barry & Cheryl Fulmer First Assembly of God Joseph & Sheila Cramer Lauretta Hubbard Robert & Carolyn Siegel Byron & Shirley Frank Douglas Garde & Linda Hill Gene & Andrea Sipe Bruce & Kathy Greenberg Iona Hope Episcopal Church Interfaith Thanksgiving Service The Jewish Federation thanks our GENEROUS DONORS

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5 OUR COMMUNITY Sunday March 1st The Jewish Federation Annual Campaign provides the resources to strengthen and enrich our Jewish community locally, in Israel and around the world. Y O U R S U P P O R T P r o m o t e K I N D N E S S S h a r e y o u r M I T Z V A H S t r e n g t h e n & e n r i c h J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y H o n o r / R e m e m b e r A L O V E D O N E This year please consider making an additional campaign contribution in honor or in memory of a loved one. Because kindness is contagious we would like to highlight your generosity in LCHAYIM and notify personally those whom you honor. You may choose how your generosity is noted and how we share your mitzvah with our community. Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grants Available The Joseph Horowitz Israel Travel Grant is available through the Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties. The grant may be used for travel to Israel to participate in programs that are volunteer or educational in nature. Our hope is that these programs will enhance Jewish knowledge and identity in preparation for participation in American Jewish life. This grant is for Jewish residents of either county who are 25 years old or younger and can demonstrate a financial need. Academic standing and community involvement may also be considered. For more information or an application, please visit our website at www.JewishFederationLCC.org or contact the Federation at 239 481 4449, ext. 4 or email loriramos@jfedlcc.org. Holocaust Museum updateBy Susan Suarez, Executive Director Susan Suarez 2 cation Department is busy hosting school Field Trips groups at the Museum, as well as conducting oncampus school programs and moving the Boxcar exhibit to several counties in Southwest Florida. We have had visitors from all over the U.S. and even as far away as Romania, Switzerland and Venezuela! This now brings the total number of countries represented by Museum visitors to over 40! All were impressed and inspired by the Museum and its mission, and will carry home what they learned here that one person bigotry, hatred and violence. We invite you to visit the Museums newest exhibit, Resettling and Rebuild ing: The Displaced Persons in Post-War Europe Opened in January, it explores the enormous dilemma facing the Al lies and refugees following World War II. Literally millions of people across the continent were left without homes and the basic necessities of life. To help manage the transient populations working their way back home and provide for their survival, the Allies created a series of Displaced Persons camps in their Occupation Zones. They used whatever facilities were available to house people, even former concentration camps and Nazi barracks. The exhibit contains artifacts from the Museums permanent collection donated by residents of various DP camps, as well as people born in DP camps. One of our Docents has loaned to the exhibit a variety of documentation acquired by his family following their liberation, placement in a DP camp and immigration to the U.S. This exhibit is quite timely, as there are parallels with the problems faced by todays refugees, who have left their own homes in war-torn countries with little more than the clothes on their backs and a hope for a better life elsewhere. One of the student activities based on Resettling and Rebuilding is to list would bring if you had to leave your home forever at a moments notice. While they still list things to entertain themselves, perhaps because of their recent experiences during Hurricane Irma, students realize the value of clean water, food and important documents. What would be on your list? Write us and tell us. Put What Id Bring in the subject line and email it to info@HolocaustMuseumSWFL.org. We will publish the results in a future newsletter. There is a wonderful link between Resettling and Rebuilding and our upcoming annual fundraising event, Triumph 2018, on Monday, March 5 at Club Pelican Bay in Naples. Our featured speaker is David Eisenhower, Director of the Institute for Public Service at the Annenberg Public Policy Center and grandson of the late General and President, Dwight D. Eisenhower. We will also honor the 20th anniversary of the Out of the Ashes project on the Holocaust created by teachers and students at Golden Gate Middle School. This project was the genesis of the Museums founding in 2001. General Eisenhower ordered the tion of the survivors and conditions in the newly-liberated Ohrdruf camp he visited with his Generals in 1945. He did so to refute the future claims he felt sure would arise that the Holocaust never happened. He wasnt going to allow people to forget the Holocaust and its lessons. And, when word came that Holocaust survivors were unbelievably still facing anti-Semitism in their DP camps, he instructed that special camps be set up for the survivors and that their rations be increased. We are proud of those who created carry on the work General Eisenhower started, and so pleased to be able to share this with his grandson, David. Please contact the Museum if you or someone you know worked on Out of the Ashes. Triumph 2018 Sponsor ships and tickets are now available. For more information, please contact Development Specialist Tim Morrison at 239.263.9200 or Tim@Holocaust MuseumSWFL.org. Since our last column, we received the sad news that Holocaust survivor Rose Nortman passed away. The mother of board member Jack Nortman, Rose was well known not only at the Mu seum, but by anyone who has seen our traveling Boxcar exhibit. At last count, this means over 90,000 people in SWFL have seen her photo on the plaque on entrance to the boxcar. The car is similar to the one in which she was transported to Siberia at the end of World War II. In 2007, Jack located the boxcar in Europe and had it brought to Naples, as a way to honor his mother and other family mem bers involved in the Holocaust, many of whom were killed. Our condolences to the Nortman family on her passing. AspireStart living beautifully today:Call 239-319-4042 eTerracesAtBonitaSprings.com 26455 S. Tamiami Trail A SantaFe Senior Living Community e Terraces at Bonita SpringsTour our little slice of the Mediterranean.Make sure your plan for the future includes living beautifully at the only continuing care retirement community in Bonita Springs.To A Beautiful Retirement TBS_21-Ad1_L'Chayim_10.25x9.25_VF.indd 1 12/5/2017 2:15:49 PM Read the current and recent issues of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org.

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6 OUR COMMUNITY The Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties Presents the 22nd Annual Jewish Film Festival of Southwest FloridaThank You to these Sponsors of the Jewish Film Festival: Principal Sponsor Dr. Brian and Sara Krivisky Linda & Charles Idelson The Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties thanks the members of the 2018 Jewish Film Festival Committee for their help in reviewing and selecting lms: Sara Krivisky, Chair Carolyn Gora, Lynn Talone, Helene Glocer, Irwin Kash Jan Klein, Elissa Grossman Claire Goldhagen, Susie Ferkel Thursday, February 8 at 7:15 p.m. RESTORING TOMORROWIn these divided times, religious institutions are losing young members and even closing their doors at an alarming rate. Director Aaron Wolfs personal journey of rediscovery comes alive in Restoring Tomorrow, a universal story of hope, as a treasured local temple near demise is lifted up by a communitys determination to achieve the impossible. Wolfs journey explores how when any community puts its mind to it, the impossible becomes possible. Wilshire Boulevard Temple, a Los Angeles treasure built by the original Hollywood moguls, needs to raise millions to restore its majesty and vibrancy, thus also restoring the future of the Jewish community, the greater Los Angeles commu nity and, on a personal level, Wolf himself. Language: English Running Time: 1 hr. 22 min.Martha & John Wolf Helene & Jorge Glocer AN ACT OF DEFIANCEIn this riveting historical drama, ten political activists, including Nelson Mandela and his inner circle of Black and Jewish supporters, face a possible death sentence for conspiracy to commit sabotage after they are arrested by the apart heid South African government during a raid in the town of Rivonia during the summer of 1963. Bram Fischer, a sympathetic lawyer, risks his career and freedom to defend these men, attempting to hide the fact that he, too, frequently convened on the farm where they were arrested. Language: English, Afrikaans w/ English subtitles Running Time: 2 hr. 4 min.Tuesday, February 6 at 7:15 p.m. THE TESTAMENTYoel, a senior Holocaust researcher, is in the middle of a widely covered legal battle with powerful forces in Austria, concerning a brutal massacre of Jews that took place toward the end of WWII in an Austrian village. While investigating he didnt know existed. In it, she confesses to a substantial secret from her trapped between walls of silence on one side denial of the Holocaust, and on the other, his mothers silence regarding her past. Language: Hebrew, German, English, Yiddish w/English subtitles Running Time: 1 hr. 33 min.Thursday, February 1 at 7:15 p.m. IVE GOT TO BE MESammy Davis, Jr.: Ive Got to Be Me examine Daviss vast talent and his journey for identity through the shifting tides of civil rights and racial progress during 20th century America. Sammy strove to achieve the American Dream in a time of racial prejudice and shifting politics. He was the veteran of increasingly outdated show business traditions trying to stay relevant; he frequently found himself bracketed by the bigotry of to embrace Judaism, thereby sealing his identity to another persecuted minor ity. The documentary features interviews with stars like Billy Crystal, Norman Lear, Jerry Lewis, Whoopi Goldberg and Kim Novak. Language: English Running Time: 1 hr. 40 min.Tuesday, February 13 at 7:15 p.m. Ear, Nose & roat Specialist of Florida Howard N. Barrow, MD Lin & Ron Klein Barbara & Barry Epstein Sylvia & Paul Simko Reeva & Ian Shaer Cheryl & Michael Goldstein Marsha & Mike Kistler Judi & Richard H. Davis Linda & Je Shuster Shirley & Byron Frank Harriet & Alan Josephson Carol & Irwin Friedman Andrea & Milton Goodman JoAnn & Jim Lewin Lynda & Michael Rubenstein Zelda Dubin Fund Tuesday, January 30 at 7:15 p.m. THE WEDDING PLAN nounces he doesnt love her. Crushed, yet determined to get married anyway, the lonely Michal decides to keep her planned wedding date which is just 22 days away, on the eighth night of Hanukkah. She pays the owner of the banquet hall already reserved, sends out wedding invitations and puts her faith in God that a suitable groom will appear in time. The Wedding Plan is more than a romantic comedy, it is a tale of belief, endurance, family and belonging. Language: Hebrew w/English subtitles Running Time: 1 hr. 50 min. All lms will be screened at the Regal Belltower Stadium 20.Open seating at all lms for general admission tickets. To order tickets for the remaining lms, please call Leni Sack at 239.481.4449 x3.

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7 OUR COMMUNITY JOIN US FOR AN AUTHOR EVENT with Laurie Lico Albanese author of STOLEN BEAUTY Wednesday, February 21 at 7:00 p.m. Co Ms. Albanese will do a book signing ArtFest Fort Myers Celebrate the Creative! 1 4 4 8 6 A a n d W B u l b R d F o r t M y e r s F L 3 3 9 0 8 F o r i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l : 2 3 9 / 4 3 3 0 2 0 1 w w w t j s w f l o r g A L O N N E C H U S H T A N A N D H I S I S R A E L I J A Z Z T R I O TEMPLE JUDEA FEBRUARY 4, 2017 4:30 P.M. OPEN TO PUBLIC RECOMMENDED DONATION: $10.00 A rtFest Fort Myers is the place to be in downtown Fort Myers on February 3 and 4 with an Opening Night featuring 65 festival artists on Friday night, February 2. Take time to visit with the artists, explains Judy Weiner, Board Chairman of ArtFest Fort Myers. Our participat ing artists have traveled from 33 states just to share their incredible talent with our community. Be sure to arrive early to enjoy original oils and acrylics, vi brant watercolor, unique sculpture, dazzling jewelry, decorative ceramics, glittering glass, imaginative mixed me dia and so much more. The diversity of over 200 artists provides something for everyone. From the beginning collec to bring into your life. Elisa Grossman, co-chairman of the ArtFest Art Under 20 High School Exhibit and Competition, hopes that entire families will plan to attend this time teacher, I am happy to be a part of an organization that values nurturing the creative spirit in our children. The Art Under 20 Competition showcases the artwork of hundreds of talented high school students, awarding $8,000 in prize money. Did you know that chil dren who are engaged with the arts are more likely to develop the discipline, that can help them succeed across the board? And the Publix Art Yard and Youth Stage are full of opportunities for children of all ages to get involved in a fanciful Public Art Project creating oversized rollie pollie characters and critters, while enjoying a variety of great performances. Publix brings the art of food to ArtFest Fort Myers, by teaching children how to create fun and healthy snacks, which they can carry along in their own personally decorated shopping bag. The Young Art Collec tors Gallery is a Kids Only shopping zone where every piece of festival artists artwork is priced at $5. Join us at this fun family event! Combine health and ture on Sunday morning, with the Publix Run to the Arts, a fun 5K race, that will begin and end in the heart of ArtFest Fort Myers. Be part of the challenge, as we run/ Fast Facts: WHAT: turing 206 national artists, high school art competition, high school sidewalk chalk competition, interactive arts, FKLOGUHQ\266V\003FUDIWV\017\003\277QH\003IRRG\003DQG\003HQWHU tainment. WHEN: ArtFest Fort Myers, Feb 2, 3 & 4; Friday Opening Night 6 9pm, Saturday & Sunday, 10am 5pm WHERE: Downtown Fort Myers on Edwards Drive in the River District COST: Free admission PARKING: Adjacent parking lots, street parking and City Garages are open. Look for our directional signs walk through scenic downtown, over the Edison Bridge and back. Enjoy an artful experience, vie for great prizes, and get healthy with friends and fam ily over the festival weekend. For race details, visit www.RunToTheArts.com. Your $125 per person membership in the VIP Experience means reserved weekend parking, admission to the Fri day Night Opening VIP Tent with deli cious food and drinks, plus unlimited access to the VIP Experience Tent with breakfast treats, a delightful lunch, and beverages all weekend long. For more information, please visit us at www.ArtFestFortMyers.com Like Us on Facebook Connect with us on Linkedin Tag us #artfestfm

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8 OUR COMMUNITY This publication is brought to you each month thanks to the support of our advertisers. Please be sure to use their products and services, and mention that you found them in LCHAYIM. This months advertisersAdvanced Pain Management....32 Alliance Financial Group.........23 Art of Fashion and Moore.........23 ArtFest Fort Myers................9,11 Gwen Baker, Realtor..............23 Dr. Daniel Bendetowicz............22 Cypress Cove............................13 Harold Eskin, Attorney..............22 FineMark Natl. Bank & Trust....12 Florida Gulf Coast University..31 Florida Specialists in Urology...22 Susan Glasser, Realtor............14 Gordons Pool & Spa Service....22 Green Schoenfeld & Kyle, LLP..23 Gulf Coast Orthodontics..........15 Gulf Coast Symphony..............11 Dr. David Heligman..................20 Henderson Franklin...................22 Higginson Tax & Accounting....22 Hodges Funeral Home..............18 JNF...........................................19 Lee Lighting..............................22 Living Happily Counseling.......23 Charles Massie, CPA, CFP.....23 Mathematics Tutoring...............27 Michael Shapiro Photography...25 Miromar Outlets........................15 Paragon Pools...........................22 PCC Tile...................................22 Alan J. Rubinstein, Attorney.....22 Senior Housing Solutions.........19 Seniors Helping Seniors............23 Shell Point.................................17 Snydermans Shoes...................23 Douglas Spiegel, Attorney........23 Southwest Florida Symphony...14 Taschner Periodontics.................9 Temple Judea...........................7,8 The Palms of Fort Myers..........21 The Terraces at Bonita Springs....5 Top of the Line Concierge........23 Bob Vinikoor, Realtor.............23 Adrienne Weiner, Realtor.......23 Paul Weinstein, CFP................22 Community Free Synagogue events and programsThe Community Free Synagogues 3-week adult education series on American anti-Semitism Between the World Wars continues on Sunday mornings, February 4 and 11 from 10:30 a.m. to noon in the congrega tions Community Hall, 10868 Metro Parkway, Fort Myers. Taught by FGCU Adjunct Professor of American History Jessica Evers, Associate Director of the universitys Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, the course will examine a broad-based American ant-Semitism that reached into the highest echelons of government, media and business. This and all Community Free Synagogue events and programs are free and open to the public. * The Community Free Synagogues next installment of its very popular Brown Bag Movie Night features a star-studded cast headed by Dustin Patten, Ben Stiller and Emma Thompson in The Meyerowitz Stories, directed by Noah Baumbach. Its a story of adult of their self-absorbed aging father. Join us at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 22. Pack your dinner. Admission and soft drinks are free. * Community Free Synagogue Aux iliary Rabbi Thomas Miess is once acy Ulpan on Sun days, February 18 and 25 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (including a pizza lunch break). Miesss highlymethod will enable the novice to read prayerbook Hebrew in just two weeks. Those wishing to continue will be taught how to chant a Torah portion and surrounding prayers in May as adult Bnot and Bnai Mitz vah. Please email synfree@comcast. net to let us know you are coming. Free and open to all. Mazel Tov to Cydney Chasky and Rusty Coe, who will be married by Rabbi Bruce Diamond in Sebring, Florida, on Sunday, February 11. Cydney and Rusty are the rabbis former students at Florida Gulf Coast University and are Community Free Synagogue participants. WEDDINGS Each month, LCHAYIM will list your Life Cycle events births, Bnai Mitzvah, engagements, weddings, anniversaries and obituaries. For Bnai Mitzvah, please include up to 200 words about your child. Submit your events to LChayim36@gmail.com. Photos are appreciated; please e-mail as JPGs at 300dpi. ANNUAL PASSOVER VISITS TO SENIORS Do a mitzvah and help pack and/or deliver our PESACH bags to the Jewish THIS IS A GREAT WAY FOR STUDENTS TO EARN VOLUNTEER HOURS OR TO DO A MITZVAH PROJECT FOR THEIR BAR/BAT MITZVAH Bags will be packed on Wednesday, March 14. Bags will be delivered on Sunday, March 18. to pick up the bags to deliver. (Other pick From babies to bubbes, this is a mitzvah 481Volunteers Needed Senior Housing Solutions Who we are and what we doSenior Housing Solutions provides concierge-level senior housing advice to people researching senior housing for them selves or for a loved one. We proudly serve both Collier and Lee counties. Bruce Rosenblatt, owner and senior housing expert, has over 30 years of experience in the senior housing industry and is familiar with all the senior housing options in the area. Bruce has overseen 75 senior living communities throughout the country, including three in our area, and has insightful knowledge on how these communities oper ate and important questions you should ask when researching. In 2008, Senior Housing Solutions was formed to be a resource for people who are considering moving to a senior living community. The personal service his company provides is a cor nerstone of his company. We help people every step of the way, states Bruce. I truly understand cess can become, and how important it is to have someone in their corner during this process. Should someone be considering a move to an assisted living facility, Senior Housing Solutions provides 100% free advice to its clients. We are famil iar with all the options in the area and stay current on pricing, availability, resident satisfaction, operational issues

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9 OUR COMMUNITY r f r f n n t b b r t b b b f t r r This months advertisersCommunity Free Synagogue events and programsby Noah Baumbach. Its a story of adult of their self-absorbed aging father. Join us at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 22. Pack your dinner. Admission and soft drinks are free. * Community Free Synagogue Auxiliary Rabbi Thomas Miess is once acy Ulpan on Sundays, February 18 and 25 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (including a pizza lunch break). Miesss highlymethod will enable the novice to read prayerbook Hebrew in just two weeks. Those wishing to continue will be taught how to chant a Torah portion and surrounding prayers in May as adult Bnot and Bnai Mitzvah. Please email synfree@comcast. net to let us know you are coming. Free and open to all.Pope Pius XII lecture at FGCU Holocaust CenterO n Monday, February 12, the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University will host Profes sor Michael Dickerman from Stockton University, New Jersey. The event will take place in the Cohen Center, room CC 213, between 10:30 a.m. and noon. Professor Dickermans topic will focus on the controversial 1963 play The Deputy by Rolf Hochhuth. When controversy that continues to this day. The play often met by demonstrations and riots wherever it was produced portrays Pope Pius XII as a moral failure who turned his back on the Jews during the Holocaust. The play asks why it was that Pius XII never mentioned the Jews in any of his many pronouncements during the years of the Holocaust, never denounced Hitler for the Final Solution, and never ordered Catholics worldwide to oppose the Nazi regime, this despite the fact that he had full knowledge that Jews were being exterminated by the thousands for each hour he remained silent. This lecture will summarize the was based on it, and use it to frame the questions: Did Pope Pius XII do all that he could have and should have done for the Jews during the Holocaust? If not, why not? All FGCU students, faculty and guests are also invited, to join with the FGCU community in learning about this remarkable story. The event is free; no registration or RSVP is necessary. Those coming from outside should obtain a parking permit from the Welcome Kiosk at the university entrance located at 10501 FGCU Blvd., Fort Myers. For further details, please contact the Center Director, Dr. Paul Bartrop (pbartrop@fgcu.edu), or the Associate Director, Jessica Evers (jevers@fgcu. edu). Senior Housing Solutions Who we are and what we doS enior Housing Solutions provides concierge-level senior housing advice to people researching senior housing for them selves or for a loved one. We proudly serve both Collier and Lee counties. Bruce Rosenblatt, owner and senior housing expert, has over 30 years of experience in the senior housing in dustry and is familiar with all the senior housing options in the area. Bruce has overseen 75 senior living communities throughout the country, including three in our area, and has insightful knowl edge on how these communities oper ate and important questions you should ask when researching. In 2008, Senior Housing Solutions was formed to be a resource for people who are considering moving to a se nior living community. The personal service his company provides is a cor nerstone of his company. We help people every step of the way, states Bruce. I truly understand community. Bruce has served on the board of Jewish Family Services and works closely with the Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties. Senior Housing Solutions is an advertiser in LCHAYIM and the Federation Star, and was a sponsor of the Third Annual Collier County Jewish Book Festivals opening event. For more information, please visit www.seniorhousingsolutions.net or call 239.595.0207. Studying family history brings more than just historical knowledge, EVERYONE WELCOME. Jewish Genealogy SIG (Special Interest Group) Ronny S Taschner DDS Active Member of the American Academy of Periodontology Jennifer Taschner DDS MMSc Diplomat e of the American Board of Peri o dontology 1645 Medical Lane Fort Myers, FL Phone 239 9360635 Visit Our Website www.taschnerperio.com SAVE THE DATE Sunday, April 15 2:30 5:00 p.m. COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Happy Birthday, Israel!

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10 OUR COMMUNITY Stars of DavidBy Nate Bloom, Contributing Columnist Editors note: Persons in BOLD CAPS are deemed by Nate Bloom to be Jewish for the purpose of the column. Persons identified as Jewish have at least one Jewish parent and were not raised in a faith other than Judaism and dont identify with a faith other than Judaism as an adult. Converts Golden Globe Recap and More Congratulations to the Jewish winners of the 2018 Globe Globes. JAMES FRANCO, 39 (The Disaster Artist), won best actor in a musical or comedy BENJ PASEK and Justin Paul, both 32, won best original motion picture song (This is Me from The Greatest Showman); LEE UNKRICH, 50, is the director of Coco, the best AMY SHERMANPALLADINO, 52, is the creator/producer of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the best TV comedy series winner. Worthy of note: Rachel Brosnahan, who isnt Jewish, won best actress in a comedy series Globe for playing Mrs. Maisel, a really cool and funny Jewish character. Look for my Oscars coverage in the next issue. This year the nominations are announced in time for me to make press deadlines and the Oscar ceremony is March 4, so look at your issue right away! Almost everyone praised Seth Meyers for his skillful hosting of this years politically-charged Golden Globe awards. Meyers appeared on The Ellen Show a few days before the Globes and talked about his 2-year-old son, ASHE. As Ive written before, Meyers, who had one Jewish grandfather, wed attorney ALEXI ASHE, 33, in a Jewish ceremony in 2013. I gather the couple is raising Ashe in his mothers faith, because Meyers talked about their Hanukkah celebration with Ashe. lish yet, let alone Hebrew, but the cute toddler tries hard. Meyers showed the TICKETS: 239.481.4849 GulfCoastSymphony.org SYMPHONY OFFICE: 239.277.1700Saturday, February 24, 7PM Sunday, February 25, 2PM & 7PMTickets From $45 a Sponsored in part by MEDIA MOGULS: Rabbi Bruce Diamond John & Martha Wolf Betty & Jim Rubenstein Ira & Ailene Stein Paul Weinstein PUBLISHERS:Barry & Cheryl Fulmer Jack Cohen Jacob Rubin Stuart Meyers Scott & Sonia Swartz Dr. Edwin L. Lyons David & Dalia Hemed Naomi Bloom & Ron Wallace Brian & Amy Fox Wilbert Needleman Harold SchechterEDITORS:Daniel & Celia Dosoretz Julia Perry Judith Leeder Arlene Foreman Lesley & Marvin Porter Howard & Brenda Sheridan Steve & Vicki Zellner Eliz Dosoretz Fred & Marsha Marcus Ronny & Marie Taschner Mark & Lynn Messer Paula Raboy Clive & Sonya Lubner Richard & Dee OlitskyREPORTERS:Terri & Larry Eisenfeld Svietlana Vogel Al & Eileen Schwartz Carol & Harvey Brand Diane Feik Howard & Deborah Baum Merrill & Steve Paletsky Jerry & Barbara Snyderman Lewis Schwartz Myra Roberts Stuart & Toni Morgenstein Richard & Joan Davis Jeannette Keyser Barbara Siegel Gail & Dick Foster Marvin & Judy Weiner Gail & Michael Richter Don & Sandy Komito Marsha & Mike Kistler Jorge & Helene Glocer Linda Sweet Irwin & Helen Rappaport Robert & Dotti Ruberto Frank Hecker Michael & Tanya Hochschild Betty & Charles Massie Eugene Scheel Barry & Jay Solomon Lane & Barbara Carlin Barry & Emilye Semansky Robert & Bette Batson Betty Seidel Paul & Sylvia Simko Dina Shein Allen & Elizabeth Shevach Soerlle Baldwin Koch Marsha Poster Arlyn & Irwin Stein Byron & Shirley Frank Arnee & Walter Winshall Harvey & Bobbi Goldberg Lana & Stephen Royal Arthur & Johanna Willner Phyllis & Berny Aronson Candace Patton Robert & Isabel Bernson Vanessa & Jay Sax Rona & Barry Axelrod Robin Kessler Luda Goldenberg Phyllis & Gerald Langberg Carolyn Gora Jay H. Ginsberg Beverly & Edward Drucker Sheila & Jerry Laboda Sandi Falk Philip N. SherwinSUBSCRIBERS:Oscar & Patricia Sussmann Barbara Goldberg Rich Bornfreund Carol Price Newton Gordon Je Avon Eve & Joel Aron Suzanne Zoss Pauline Chusid & Jerry Williamson Marlene Tehrani Sheila Cohen Stanley Smulyan Paula & Ira Zlatkin Jerry Razowsky Harry & Bea Colter Janice Nord & Robert Tholemeier Elaine Friedman Paul & Marilyn Tenenbaum Janet Richardson Diane Goukler Stephen Wiener Beverly Banks Melvin & Sheila Goldstein Jean & Herbert Marks Lillian Bloom Howard & Judith Mayer Stan Zell Brian & Mindi Simon Rochelle Catz Bernice Kelley Faye & Larry Kirch Jill Schreidell Judi Roth Herbert Gallop Celia Jacoby Kent & Freda Confeld Marcelle Kouser Ida & Je Margolis Marilyn Gottlieb Phyllis Lee Bonnie Bursten Robert Loscher Doreen Kostel Earl & Barbara Anderson Reeva & Ian Shaer Al Saltz Howard Silverman Celia Atun Dolly Roth John & Sandy Kampner Jewel & Joseph Faerber Marcia Hanwit Shirley Krivisky Judy Pennock Barbara Amar Helen Leddy Candace Patton Tricia & Frank Aulls Lubov Ruvinskaya Diane Greene Martin & Betteann Sherman Hilary & Jerry Kobrin Judith & Andrew Wol Albert & Fran Silver Alice Walzer John & Marlene Adler Karen Siegel Adele Anish Rhoda Miller Melvin Bleiberg Joyce & George Rosinger Beatrice Allen Natalie Manning Gloria Joseph Selma Young Howard & Soa Parish Herb & Myrnalee Rosinsky Charles & Elizabeth Bakst Paula & Bennett Agranove Anonymous Marion Iglecia Marvin & Mona Aronow Louis Kapp Stephanie Levine Marc & Cindy Melser Jill & Jeery Bisker Linda Moon Hal Bozof Joyce & Richard Greenwald Emily Loub David & Jodi Gutstein Neil Henry Elaine Schnur-Ackerman Sari Rutt Cynthia Boyer Sheila Vihnaek Alice Nerenstone Barbara Lieberman Linda Levine Harvey Cohen Toni & Steve Goodman Gloria Whitesman Paul Shaw Dorit Fisher Sandi C. Sauls Marty & Judy Freling Robert & Carol Levine Suzi & Howie Imanuel Howard Siegel Francine & Howard Chester Shirley Schiman A. Francoise Onufer Hy Tuchman Rosalyn Shraiar Rhoda Ives Roberta Mitnick Paula Raboy Claire Goldhagen Irwin & Carol Friedman Beverly Meisel Leonard & Renee Minsky Robert & Marilyn Harris Roberto Luna Susan Glasser Ronnie Lamm Marc & Monica Schneider Samuel Shapiro Linda & Fred Tepper Richard & Pamela Simon Norma Rosenberg Alexander & Ayala Farkash Julie Phillips Rabbi Solomon & Arline Agin Lore Rosenstrauch Ellen & Jack Esformes Ilya Zeldes Rheta Kanen Rich Hendler Daniel & Lisa Bendetowicz Jeannie Moskin Richard & Sharon Safron Roberta Mitnick Sheryl Lipman Susan Ebbets Bruce & Robin Jacobs Carol & Steve Cohen Gary & Marlena Maisel Charlotte & Phillip Lefton Tino Martinez Roz Owitz Nancy & Henry Olender Ruth Segel Thomas Cardone Shelly Komito & Abbe Forman Stephen & Susan Wener Luba Grossman Arlene Bachman Marcia Goldberg Wendy Salita Judith Spiegel Arthur & Sandy Mason Jacki & David Dearie Arthur & Lorraine GreenbergAcknowledgments will continue in subsequent issues for those contributions that arrived after this issues deadline.Thank you to the following supporters of LCHAYIM for their contributions to help underwrite the cost of bringing news of the local, national and international Jewish community to your mailbox every month!

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11 JEWISH INTEREST Have an item youd like to share? Need to reach the editor of LCHAYIM? Send an email to LChayim36@gmail.com. Stars of DavidBy Nate Bloom, Contributing Columnist Editors note: Persons in BOLD CAPS are deemed by Nate Bloom to be Jewish for the purpose of the column. Persons identified as Jewish have at least one Jewish parent and were not raised in a faith other than Judaism and dont identify with a faith other than Judaism as an adult. Converts Nate Bloom (see column at le) has become a family history expert in 10 years of doing his celebrity column, and he has expert friends who can help when called on. Most family history experts charge $1,000 or more to do a full family-tree search. However, Bloom knows that most people want to start with a limited search of one family line.So heres the deal:Write Bloom at nteibloom@aol.com and enclose a phone number. Nate will then contact you about starting a limited search. If that goes well, additional and more extensive searches are possible. The rst search fee is no more than $100. No upfront cost. Also, several of this newspapers readers have asked Bloom to locate friends and family members from their past, and thats worked out great for them. So contact him about this as well.Interested in Your Familys History? r f n r t rf r f r f n t t b f r r Golden Globe Recap and More Congratulations to the Jewish winners of the 2018 Globe Globes. JAMES FRANCO 39 (The Disaster Artist), won best actor in a musical or comedy BENJ PASEK and Justin Paul, both 32, won best original motion picture song (This is Me from The Greatest Showman ); LEE UNKRICH, 50, is the director of Coco, the best AMY SHERMANPALLADINO 52, is the creator/producer of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the best TV comedy series winner. Worthy of note: Rachel Brosnahan, who isnt Jewish, won best actress in a comedy series Globe for playing Mrs. Maisel, a really cool and funny Jewish character. Look for my Oscars coverage in the next issue. This year the nominations are announced in time for me to make press deadlines and the Oscar ceremony is March 4, so look at your issue right away! Almost everyone praised Seth Meyers for his skillful hosting of this years politically-charged Golden Globe awards. Meyers appeared on The Ellen Show a few days before the Globes and talked about his 2-year-old son, ASHE As Ive written before, Meyers, who had one Jewish grandfather, wed attorney ALEXI ASHE, 33, in a Jewish ceremony in 2013. I gather the couple is raising Ashe in his mothers faith, because Meyers talked about their Hanukkah celebration with Ashe. lish yet, let alone Hebrew, but the cute toddler tries hard. Meyers showed the Ellen audience a home video in which Alexi was lighting the 8th night Hanukkah candles as Ashe sang the blessing. He sang nonsense syllables that captured the rhythm of the prayer, even if he didnt really know the Hebrew words. (Enter Seth Meyers Son is a Hanukkah Pro in the YouTube search engine.) The couple is now expecting a second child. Meyers said he knows it will be a boy and he is happy because his best friend is his brother, comedian Josh Meyers. He wants Ashe to be able to have the same experience. By the way, in October, Meyers dropped this bit of Jewish geography: Alexis family attends the same New Mexico synagogue as World Series hero ALEX BREGMAN, 23, the Houston Astros third baseman. series on the history of famous toys (The Toys that Made Us). The heavily Jewish history of G.I. Joe and Barbie is the focus of two of the episodes. Godless, released last November, got pretty good reviews and ended up on some critics best ten of 2017 lists. It gets kudos from me for plausibly depicting the heroism of frontier women. It takes place in a mining town after almost all the men are killed in an explosion. The women show unethical businessmen and kill-crazy outlaws. Godless was written and directed by SCOTT FRANK, 57. Godless is his directing debut, but he has a long list of top screenwriting credits, includ ing Get Shorty and Minority Report. I recently caught up with an interview Frank did with TERRY GROSS, 66, the host of Fresh Air on NPR. Frank was asked about the moving last scene of the series in which a pastor recites a beautiful prayer for those killed saving their mining town. Frank surprised Gross by saying that it was a poem, Tis a Fearful Thing, by JUDAH HALEVI (1075-1141), the famous Spanish Jewish physician, poet and philosopher. He came across it years ago and knew it would work in this scene. Heres the poem. Save it for the right time. Tis a fearful thing to love what death can touch./A fearful thing to love, to hope, to dream, to be /to be, And oh, to lose./A thing for fools, this/ And a holy thing, a holy thing to love./ For your life has lived in me, your laugh once lifted me, your word was gift to me./To remember this brings painful joy. In January, the engagement of AL EXA DELL, 24, and HARRISON REFOUA 40, was announced. The engagement made a splash because Alexa is the daughter of Dell Computer founder MICHAEL DELL 52. Alexa stoked tabloid stories by displaying her 12-carat diamond engagement ring (could be worth $3M). Refoua, a real estate investor, is Jewish probably Persian Jewish. Finally, many have asked, so heres my answer about the hot-selling au thor today: MICHAEL WOLFF 64, the author of Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House is the son of a Jewish father and a Presbyterian mother. I dont know how he was raised TICKETS: 239.481.4849 GulfCoastSymphony.org SYMPHONY OFFICE: 239.277.1700Saturday, February 24, 7PM Sunday, February 25, 2PM & 7PMTickets From $45 a Sponsored in part by

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12 JEWISH INTEREST An accidental Messiah Phil Jason Book review by Philip K. Jason, Special to LCHAYIM Tu BShevat Dried Fruit-WalnutAlmond Cake recipe by Dalia HemedTu BShevat, also known as New Year for the Trees, takes place on the 15th of Shevat in the Hebrew calendar (begin at Sundown on Tuesday, January 30, 2018). Tu BShevat marks the beginning of spring in Israel. It is one of four annual New Years described in the Mishnah. Its a time to celebrate the natural world. Gratitude is given for the fruits of the earth and everything that grows. Traditionally, a bounty of fruits and vegetables grace the Tu BShevat holiday table. In some parts of the world, Jews partake in a Tu BShevat Seder meal, complete with prayers and food blessings. Others celebrate by having a picnic under the trees or simply making a meal featuring all the fruits of the season. Jewish schools often hold outdoor parades; students wear with fruit. In Israel, people are encour aged to plant trees and give back to the earth. Typical foods served on Tu BShevat include fruits, nuts, grains and vegetables. The almond trees bloom at this time of year, so almondladen foods often make an appearance on the holiday table. With Tu BShevat around the cor ner, I went looking for inspiration for a dish with relevant ingredients that touch on the seven species. dishes that have traditionally been prepared for Tu BShevat, the custom of serving dishes that contain fruits and nuts has emerged. There is also the custom of consuming the Shevah Minim two grains found in the land of Israel. The seven species are either eaten in JEWISH FEDERATION BOOK CLUB Upcoming events: Alliance for the Arts Event Stolen Beauty by Laurie Lico Albanese Hot Pants in Hollywood by Susan Silver Women s Philanthropy Event contact Leni at lenibsack@jfedlcc.org 239 481 4449 Ext. 3 T his is the second book in Dan Sofers highly imaginative, comically visionary Dry Bones Society series. The setting is Jerusalem today. The premise is that the Final Redemption is at hand. An Unexpected Afterlife follows the remarkable second chance given to Moshe Karlin man literally reborn. Yes, dead and then back again. As you might expect, Moshe has trouble convincing anyone of his status even without a navel. However, when more and more dead Israelis become undead, the question becomes what to do with them. For the returnee, the question becomes how do they reconnect to their prior lives? Or do they? The present installment brings include the learned but modest Rabbi Yosef, who has become a leader of the Dry Bones Society, which is quickly morphing into a significant political party as the reborn population swells. Government leaders and politicians must decide whether to accept or dis credit this new force a force whose presence signals for many that the end of days is at hand. Moshe is still striving to recapture the love of his former wife, Galit, whom regain her trust and bring her once again the Old Testament), the End of Days will involve a Resurrec tion of the Dead, a Messiah King, an Ingathering of Exiles, a Rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem, a World War, great upheavals, and a very in the very least, one very large You have here the content and tone of the whole. As one might expect, the Redeemer as represented in the novel is a false Messiah. However, he easily attracts followers. Indeed, the wish for the Messianic age is so powerful that an other wise level-headed per son like Rabbi Yosef is temporarily swept away. Sofers dazzling and sometimes zany exploration of his key what ifs is handled prose style. The book is teaming, per esting characters. It keeps an engaging balance between the serious and humor ous perspectives that the subject invites. It brings contemporary Jerusalem to life on all levels: the physical-sensory, the cultural and the spiritual. About Dan Sofer Dan was born under the sunny blue skies of South Africa in 1976. A traditional Jewish up bringing and warm community moved Dan to study and volun teer in Israel as an adult. In 2001, Dan made Jerusalem his home, and the citys sights, sounds, leg stories. When not writing tales of romantic misadventure, he creates software for large corporations. Dan Sofer is a pen name of Daniel J. Miller. Dan writes tales of romantic misad venture imbued with magical realism. Many of these take place in Jerusalem. His earlier novel, A Love and Beyond won the 2016 Best Books Award for Religious Fiction. An Unexpected Af terlife (reviewed in April 2017) was presented as Book I of The Dry Bones Society series. Following An Accidental Messiah the author plans to bring out A Premature Apocalypse book three in the series. Dan Sofers books are readily avail able in print and ebook editions via the Philip K. Jason is Professor Emeritus of English from the United States Na val Academy. He reviews regularly for Florida Weekly, Jewish Book World, Southern Literary Review and other publications. Please visit Phils website at www.philjason.wordpress.com. An Accidental Messiah, by Dan Sofer. Self-published. 354 pages. Trade paperback $11.97. to the chuppah? Not if his former friend, Avi, mad with jealousy, continues to undermine and betray him. Then there is Eli Katz, aka Elijah the Prophet. Is he an eternal preor Redemption, or a madman with alternative selves? Sofer keeps this ambiguity provocatively alive throughout the narrative. And what about Elis sometimes girlfriend and budding scholar, Noga, whose research suggests that part of Israels Arab population can be genetically traced back to Jewish priests of ancient times? Indeed, there is an Arab character in the story who seems to be one of the returnees. A number of lesser characters are offspring of Russian immigrants, another strong faction in the Israeli population. Largely represented as ruffians and mobsters, they are colorful and wellMuch of the fun of the novel and there is plenty of fun comes out of Sofers parody of Israels political culture. Its exciting and absurdly hucial interest parties vying for a chance to link up with the new Dry Bones Society political entity. But Moshe is careful about what kind of deals he will make. He is seeking true unity, not merely unstable alliances. Rebranding his group Restart, he wants the new image to be not only a name for the born-again Israelis but also a shared hope for the future of Israeli society. The authors press material gives the best overview: The Final Redemp tion is here. What took so long? According to Jewish traditions (based on Dan Sofer Fort Myers Bonita Springs Charleston Estero Naples Palm Beach Scottsdale239-461-5900 Equal Housing Lender FineMark National Bank & Trust is proud to consistently earn a 5-star rating from Bauer Financial, the nations leading independent bank rating rm*. We attribute our success to the meaningful relationships we build with our clients. e better we know you, the better we can serve you. for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. February 26 2018 March 26 2018 for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. February 26 2018 March 26 2018 for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. February 26 2018 March 26 2018

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13 JEWISH INTEREST Tu BShevat Dried Fruit-WalnutAlmond Cake recipe by Dalia Hemed Personal Chef Dalia Hemed can be reached at daliahemed@msn.com. T u BShevat, also known as New Year for the Trees, takes place on the 15th of Shevat in the Hebrew calendar (begin at Sun down on Tuesday, January 30, 2018). Tu BShevat marks the beginning of spring in Israel. It is one of four an nual New Years described in the Mishnah. Its a time to celebrate the natural world. Gratitude is given for the fruits of the earth and everything that grows. Traditionally, a bounty of fruits and vegetables grace the Tu BShevat holi day table. In some parts of the world, Jews partake in a Tu BShevat Seder meal, complete with prayers and food blessings. Others celebrate by hav ing a picnic under the trees or simply making a meal featuring all the fruits of the season. Jewish schools often hold outdoor parades; students wear with fruit. In Israel, people are encour aged to plant trees and give back to the earth. Typical foods served on Tu BShevat include fruits, nuts, grains and vegetables. The almond trees bloom at this time of year, so almondladen foods often make an appearance on the holiday table. With Tu BShevat around the cor ner, I went looking for inspiration for a dish with relevant ingredients that touch on the seven species. dishes that have traditionally been pre pared for Tu BShevat, the custom of serving dishes that contain fruits and nuts has emerged. There is also the cus tom of consuming the Shevah Minim two grains found in the land of Israel. The seven species are either eaten in the order in which theyre mentioned in Deuteronomy, namely wheat, barley, dates, or in order of their importance in ancient Israel, wheat, barley, olives and pomegranates. Some people also eat fruits such as apples, quinces, walnuts, pistachios and carob, which are mentioned in the Bible or have come to be associated with Israel. With the various ingredients that one can choose to include on their table for Tu BShevat, there is room for much creativity and the possibilities what I wanted to share with you here, when there were so many recipes I wanted to make. I decided on the dried fruit recipe because not only does it provide a delectable showcase for the ingredients customarily eaten on this holiday, but the cake is also simple, quick to prepare and, most important, this Tu BShevat cake its a sweet tradition in our home. This is a unique cake having a buttery melt-in-your-mouth sweetness with fruits that celebrate Tu BShevat. Ingredients: cup butter substitute (like Smart Balance made with olive oil) 1 cup sugar 3 eggs 1 tbsp. baking powder 1 cup ricotta cheese 1 cup dried fruits chopped (dates, and raisins) cup walnuts chopped cup brandy Oil spray (to coat the cake pan) Powdered sugar (for serving) Dried fruits: Start with the dried fruits. I chose ple and raisins. Of course, you may choose any dried fruits you prefer. cubes. Add cup of brandy on top of the fruits and mix lightly. Set aside and allow the dried fruits to soak in the brandy for at least an hour. Meanwhile, chop the walnuts and the almonds. Chop roughly and set them aside. You will need: Food processor to get the job done quickly Start with soft butter substitute. Pulse for a few seconds and then add sugar gradually. Continue processing until the mixAdd the eggs one at a time. Pulse mixture. separate bowl. Gradually add alternating with the ricotta cheese. pulsing shortly after each time. Do not overblend the batter pulse Add the walnuts, almonds and the brandy-soaked dried fruits. Blend to spread equally into the batter. GENEROUSLY spray a cake pan with some oil. I emphasize generously because one time when I didnt, the cake got stuck and I had a hard time getting it out without breaking it a littleor a lot I use a round Bundt pan, but you can use any shape you like. Pour the batter into the cake pan. The batter is thick, so use a spatula to level it evenly. Bake in a 330 F preheated oven for about an hour. Allow the cake to cool outside the oven for about 30 minutes before you try to get it out of the pan. To release the cake, use a knife to gen tly loosen the sides a bit. Place a once. To have the top facing up we serving plate on top of the cake and again will be facing up. Sift some powdered sugar on top. Allow the cake to set and cool completely before cutting a piece. Enjoy! Look for Chef Dalia Hemeds recipes each month in the pages of LCHAYIM. JEWISH FEDERATION BOOK CLUB Upcoming events: Alliance for the Arts Event Stolen Beauty by Laurie Lico Albanese Hot Pants in Hollywood by Susan Silver Women s Philanthropy Event contact Leni at lenibsack@jfedlcc.org 239 481 4449 Ext. 3 for coffee, bagels and the simple satisfaction that comes from meeting and making friends with other volunteers, as we help keep thousands of local readers informed about local, national and international Jewish news. Call 481.4449 ext. 3 to add your name to the phone list. Each month we will call to confirm the mailing date and you can let us know if you are available to help label L CHAYIM. February 26 2018 March 26 2018

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14 JEWISH INTEREST The dilemma of Jewish women in Jewish musicBy Arlene Stolnitz SNOWBIRDS, newspapers dont fly however, your address will! Coming South? Dont forget to contact us with your change of address to continue receiving LCHAYIM. Send address changes to: loriramos@jfedlcc.org or call: 239.481.4449 ext 4 Safe Travels T wenty-three names of female Jewish musicians; I could have named over a hundred! Randomly, I picked out only a few with the idea of showing and diverse these women are, and what a fabulous contribution they have made to the Jewish and secular music world in America and elsewhere. Bonnie Abrams, Chava Albertson, Sara Aroeste, Marsha Bryan Edelman, Benjie Schiller, Debbie Friedman, Joy Katzen-Guthrie, Nurit Hirsch, Linda Hirschhorn, Flory Jagoda, Rachel Musleah, Neshama Carlebach, Roberta Peters, Molly Picon, Pink, Beth Schafer, Naomi Shemer, Dinah Shore, Beverly Sills, Carly Simon, Peri Smilow, Barbra Streisand, Sophie Tucker. For centuries, female singers such as balladeers and minstrels were con simchas The injunction against kol ishah (womans voice) limited the singing of women in religious liturgy from Talmudic times. As a result, Jewish women had their own separate places of song often in their homes and at private celebrations. However, there is plenty of evidence showing that there were women musicians present in biblical days. Many passages from the Bible quote the presence of women as instrumentalists and singers. In ancient Yemenite and other Middle Eastern cultures it was typical for women to provide the wailing at funerals. Much later, in Eastern Europe dur ing the spread of the Haskalah Enlight enment period, when Yiddish culture dours and klezmorim remained largely the avenue of male entertainers. But in the late 1800s, Abraham Goldfaden developed a new genre of musical entertainment. Called the operetta, actors and singers traveled to Jewish communities in Russia, Austria, Romania and Poland with their performances. Young women were featured in roles previously reserved for male singers, paving the way later for womens roles seen as an essential element in the development of Yiddish musical theater in America. In an article titled Jewish Women and Jewish Music in America, Block Adrienne Fried wrote: American Jewish music has expanded vastly in variety, range and quality of activities. Jews brought to America their secularfolk and sacred-liturgical musical heritage. There has been a renascence of age-old traditions that have become means of self-expression for Jewish women. Religious freedom in the United States has been nourishing to Jewish womens creativity as they increasingly make their marks as composers, organists, singers, instrumentalists, educators and patrons. Indeed, they are integral to what constitutes an extraordinarily rich American musical environment. I understand the risk of being overly simplistic in a long and complicated chronology. And I respectfully under stand those restrictions in Orthodox and traditional congregations that do not allow men and women in prayer or otherwise to sing or pray together. Based on scriptural passages which consider the voice of a woman to be distracting to men in prayer, similar ideas existed in Christian churches when women were also advised to remain silent. It is also well known that in Catholic churches, choirs were composed exclusively of men and/or boys. And in mainstream Rabbinic Judaism, the voice of women was censored for centuries. But by the twentieth century, Jewish women in the Reform and Conservative Movements had made inroads that no longer barred them from participation. by the Reform Movement and 11 years later, the Conservative Movement followed suit. Several of the women on ing the synagogue repertoire. Debbie Friedman and Linda Hirschhorn are two names that everyone recognizes. Others are cantors and composers. And, of course, many will recognize names of talented Jewish women who have made their mark in secular music circles. Joshua Jacobson, renowned Professor of Music at Northeastern University and Founder and Artistic Director of the Zamir Chorale of Boston, poses the following questions: In a society in which music is considered to be a feminine pursuit, why are there so few published compositions by women? Why are women still excluded from the domain of some sacred mu sic? Should the female cantor only sing the repertoire of her male counterpart or will a body of music emerge written spe According to Jacobson, these are questions we will grapple with in years to come. Interesting questions to ponder, yet we have evolved in more ways than anyone from yesteryear would have ever dreamed. Arlene Stolnitz, founder of the Sara sota Jewish Chorale, is a member of the Jewish Congregation of Venice. A retired educator from Rochester, New York, she has sung in choral groups for over 25 years and also sings in Venices Chorale (formerly Exsultate!). Her interest in choral music has led to this series of articles on Jewish folk music in the Diaspora. By Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach Coordinator Susan Glasser, RealtorJohn R. Wood Properties 15065 McGregor Blvd. #105 Fort Myers, FL 33908 In front of Gulf HarbourSusanLGlasser@gmail.com Mobile: (239) 281-3105 For All Your Southwest Florida Real Estate NeedsLee County resident for more than 20 years PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO SUPPORT OUR FEDERATION & HELP MAKE LCHAYIM POSSIBLE.

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15 JEWISH INTEREST The dilemma of Jewish women in Jewish music In a society in which music is considered to be a feminine pursuit, why are there so few published compositions by women? Why are women still excluded from the domain of some sacred music? Should the female cantor only sing the repertoire of her male counterpart or will a body of music emerge written spe According to Jacobson, these are questions we will grapple with in years to come. Interesting questions to ponder, yet we have evolved in more ways than anyone from yesteryear would have ever dreamed. Arlene Stolnitz, founder of the Sarasota Jewish Chorale, is a member of the Jewish Congregation of Venice. A retired educator from Rochester, New York, she has sung in choral groups for over 25 years and also sings in Venices Chorale (formerly Exsultate!). Her interest in choral music has led to this series of articles on Jewish folk music in the Diaspora.The other AussiesBy The Wine Whisperer Jerry T he wine world knows all about the Australians. Big bold reds zingy whites. But what about the other Aussiesthe Austrians? Even though theyre also making bold reds and zingy whites, this countrys wines havent resonated with American consumers as much as they deserve to. That needs to change. Problem is, the Austrians faced extreme hardship in the mid-1980s when several wineries were discovered diluting their wines (and you really dont want to know with what). The scandal virtually destroyed the countrys wine market, but good things come from bad. Stringent new laws were passed and enforced so Austrian wines are not only better than they used to be, theyre well up to in ternational quality. Its also a bit confusing to American consumers that Austrian wines are labeled with much the same system sweetness, then by the region of ori gin, and then by quality, from ordinary table wine to the higher-end versions. So if you see a label that reads Velich Welschriesling Trockenbeerenauslese Neusiedlersee, nobody would blame you if you stood there scratching your head. Today, however, the Austrians have climbed aboard the international bandwagon in a big way. Theyve simgrape on the bottle, and directed their The major winegrowing regions are all located in the agricultural eastern part of the country. The premier ar eas are Wachau, along with Burgenland and Styria, all of which are divided into several sub-regions. As mentioned before, the wines to us in the New World, so look for the Qualittswein designation. Not sur prisingly, it means quality wine, and it will come from a single district. The bottle top will have a red and white seal. One level up from that is Kabinett, which is Qualittswein and then some. About those grapes: theyre not your typical international varietals with names we all know and love. Even though the Austrians are becoming internationally minded in their marketing and labeling, the grapes they grow are very much their own. And thats a good thing. For white wines, aside from the sweet ones, Grner Veltliner is well worth a try. Its generally dry, with tropical fruit overtones, and we enjoy it with Indian food, Thai and similar dishes that are hard to match with conventional wines. Of course, they grow Riesling, and another white grape known as Mller-Thurgau (dont forget the umlaut), though youre not likely to see it bottled as a single varietal. The reds are big. While they do grow international varietals like Pinot Noir, the real interest is in the native grapes like Blaufrnkisch, Zweigelt and St. Laurent. For me, the St. Laurent grape is capable of producing wines of true elegance and power. However, about half the red wine produced in Austria comes from the Zweigelt grape, and thats not a bad thing. Zweigelt is an easy-drinking wine, not too tannic, that usually displays Cabernet, only lighter. Blaufrnkisch is more structured, more powerful and capable of aging. The cherry and cassis notes are there, but youll get more including blackberry, earth and spice. (SidebarAustria is also the home of the Riedel family who, as all wine wine glasses in the world. They come in a staggering array of shapes and sizes for all kinds of wine. The family stays in business not only because of the quality of their glassware, but also because of the fragility. Riedel glass es will explode into glittering crystal shards if you so much as look at them the wrong way.) My new favorite Austrian wine is a blend of several international vari etals and some characteristic Austrian grapes. Its Weingut Kadlec Lyss Ex cellence 2011 mostly Blaufrnkisch and Zweigelt, but with a dash of Mer lot and Cabernet, just for fun. The wine spends two years in large oak barrels, where it develops complexity along with notes of raspberry, chocolate, tannic structure. Its about $45, and well worth a try. er. He is Creative Director of Green Director of the international Direct Cellars wine club, His book, Secrets of the Wine Whisperer is now available through his website. Read his other writings at www.winewhisperer.com. MIROMAR OUTLETSUP TO 70% OFF RETAIL PRICES*Subject to monthly maintenance fee. Terms and Conditions of the Card Agreement are set forth at MiromarOutlets.com. Copyright 2018, Miromar Development Corporation. Miromar Outlets is a registered service mark of Miromar Development Corporation. 0218-3217MiromarOutlets.com I-75, Exit 123 (239) 948-3766 COMPANY STORE Over Top Designer and Brand Name Outlet Stores and Restaurants140 GIFT CARDS MAKE THEPerfect Gift Voted the Best Shopping Mall and Best Factory Outlet Mall in Southwest Florida Visit the Mall Ofce or the Information Kiosk to receive your FREE VIP Savings Brochure Jews and storytellingBy Jodi Cohen, Senior Outreach CoordinatorM y mother collected people: The woman whose car she hit by accident ended up teaching her how to knit; the woman she sat next to on the hour-long bus ride from Skokie to downtown Chi cago became a good friend. My mother invented stories, like the time she was pulled over, didnt have her drivers license, and began a ticket because, She would get in big trouble if her husband ever found out. Her life was full of material that made for good stories. For instance, her friend Harriet dropped a bottle of Manischewitz while walking out of the grocery store. My mother and Harriet threw all of the glass into the sidewalk garbage can and then the manager said he would replace the bottle if Harriet brought in the bottle top. My mother held onto Harriet, the taller of the two, as she reached into the garbage can, but my mother could not hold on tight enough and Harriet fell in. My mother was an animated, gifted storyteller who inspired me to fan tasize about my ideal job where people would call up to hear about a movie and specify, short, medium or long. A short description would be, A man falls in love with someone who doesnt have long to live, the houses and sets are elegant, the costumes divine, and everyone is almost beautiful, whereas a long description would begin, The scene opens on a tiny, sleepy village in Italy. Speaking of movies, we are coming to the end of the Jewish Film Festi val, the most popular of all Federation programs. Why do we love movies so much? Is it because we love seeing big screen? Or do we love seeing lives Poet Muriel Rukeyser wrote, The universe is made of stories, not atoms. tellers. Many years ago, I took a class on women in the Torah that was taught by a woman; there were seven of us altogether. We had a blast, and I subtitled the class, As the Torah Turns, because there was so much drama in the stories we read. As Jews we answer questions with questions; we dont always answer questions in a linear way, we often tell a story. One of my favorite sentences is, That reminds me of The Jewish Film Festival is showFederation was able to rent a second on Tuesday, February 13, Sammy Davis, Jr.: Ive Got to Be Me, because the your tickets by calling Leni Sack at 239.481.4449 x3. ends we are invited to a screening of Jewish Pioneers life in Lee County as seen through the eyes of Sheila and Jerry Laboda. Talk the Jewish Historical Society of Southwest Florida and we will have the opMarina Berkovich and Alex Goldstein, afterwards. How lucky are we to live in a city where we celebrate stories, we tell stories, and we create stories together, as Jews, as mortals trying to Susan Glasser, RealtorJohn R. Wood Properties 15065 McGregor Blvd. #105 Fort Myers, FL 33908 In front of Gulf HarbourSusanLGlasser@gmail.com Mobile: (239) 281-3105 For All Your Southwest Florida Real Estate NeedsLee County resident for more than 20 years PLEASE SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO SUPPORT OUR FEDERATION & HELP MAKE LCHAYIM POSSIBLE.

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16 JEWISH INTEREST An anti-Nazi protest in Berlin Dr. Paul BartropBy Paul R. Bartrop, PhDS month, between February 27 and March 6, 1943, a large demonstration of non-Jewish women protested outside the local Jewish community building at Rosenstrasse 2-4, Berlin. Inside this building, nearly two thousand Jewish men married to non-Jewish partners, together with their male children, had been detained by German police and SS troops. On February 27, 1943, the so-called Factory Action ( Fabrikaktion) took place in Berlin, in line with an order from Nazi Propa ganda Minister Josef Goebbels that the city should become Jew-free. SS and Gestapo began seizing Jews wherever onto trucks and taken to the three-story former Jewish Social Welfare building at Rosenstrasse 2-4, in central Berlin. The operation called for the capture of Jews with German spouses and their children of mixed background, known as Mischlinge. Up to now these Jews had not been targeted by the Nazis. Aktion some 1,500 men were rounded up, with others to follow subsequently. Little provision had been made for their welfare while in the building. Local housewife Charlotte Israels husband, Julius, was one of those arrested. When she had not heard from him after a few hours, she contacted the police only to be told that he had been arrested and taken to Rosenstrasse. By the time she arrived, a crowd of other women, also concerned about their husbands and sons, had spontaneously begun to assemble. They brought with them food and other personal items to pass to their loved ones, but there was no their husbands or children were actually inside. As a result, the rapidly-growing crowd refused to disperse until they received some sort of indication as to the fate of their men. Armed SS troops guarded the buildings only entrance. Furious, the women stood from dawn until dusk chanting Give us back our husbands. Inside, crammed into 40 rooms, the men waited. Some could see their wives and children outside, while others managed, through various ruses, to send messages out. Julius sent Charlotte a message on the back of his ration card saying, I am well. By the second day, over 600 women were protesting; by the third, the SS guards were given orders to train their By March 4, and with no end in sight, women. Many ran for cover, but others, including Charlotte, remained. They loudly. The unnerved SS had expected complete acquiescence. They lowered their weapons, in what was rapidly becoming an unprecedented phenomenon in the heart of the Nazi capital. Throughout the week of the protests the SS thus threatened several times to shoot the women, and from time to time, scattered the crowd into nearby door ways only to see them soon return and continue their chants of Give us back our husbands. Inside the building, one commented to those detained that they were showing true German loyalty to their men. The protest eventually expanded to include German women and men not in mixed marriages, with the overall number of protesters nearing one thousand. Joseph Goebbels, who was also Gauleiter (Nazi administrative chief) of Berlin, tried to staunch the demonstration by closing down public transport to simply walked the longer distance in order to get to the protest. After a week of demonstrations, he saw no alterna tive but to let the prisoners go, and on March 6 most of the imprisoned Jews, including Julius Israel, were released. been sent to Auschwitz, were sent back to Berlin on a regular passenger train. At Rosenstrasse, confronted by popular protest in the capital, the Nazi lating to what would later be termed people power. It was, as someone observed, the day Hitler blinked. The regime that terrorized occupied Europe was successfully challenged in its own capital. The very act of protesting was radical, and came as the culmination of a history of Jewish humiliation, dis crimination, intimidation and threats of violence dating back to the Nuremberg Laws of 1935. Quite simply, once their Jewish husbands and children were taken from them, the German women of Berlin said that enough was enough, and let the Nazi regime know it in the most strident manner possible at the time. Goebbels and those around him knew, moreover, that if they did not accede to the womens demands now, a culture of popular protest demanding other concessions could develop. It was either that, or they would have to shoot the women something which certainly would not be tolerated by the citizens of Berlin. On March 7, 1943, the remaining prisoners were released. Charlotte Israel had been reunited with Julius the day before. Her experience of resistance, like that of the other women, was com pletely spontaneous and unplanned. Tested beyond endurance, they decided to do something when confronted by what they considered to be the ultimate in indignity and personal torment. Those who were present at Rosenstrasse showed that even under totalitarian con ditions, successful resistance is some times possible. Julius Israel died in 1976. After the war, Charlotte spoke on a number of occasions to school and other groups about the days of the Rosenstrasse pro test, and her testimony was an important link to those days. In the mid-1990s she was still active in providing her ac count of what happened, but after then she dropped from view. All subsequent attempts to locate her proved unsuc cessful. Dr. Paul Bartrop is Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Ju daic, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. He can be reached at pbartrop@fgcu.edu. J e w i s h F e d e r a t i o n a n d T e m p l e B e t h E l S i s t e r h o o d invite you to a screening of J E W I S H P I O N E E R S A i l m a b o u t J e w i s h l i f e i n L e e C o u n t y a s s e e n t h r o u g h t h e e y e s o f S h e i l a & J e r r y L a b o d a S U N D A Y F E B R U A R Y 1 8 2 : 0 0 P M T e m p l e B e t h E l D u b i n C e n t e r 1 6 2 2 5 W i n k l e r R d 481 FIDF delivers hundreds of thousands of sufganiyot to Israeli soldiers for HanukkahTZEELIM, Israel, Jan. 2 Thousands of Israeli soldiers enjoyed Hanukkah celebrations on their army bases across Israel thanks to support from the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF). Over Hanukkah, FIDFs ambassadors in Israel brought messages of hope and light and some 230,000 sufganieaten on Hanukkah) to Israel Defense Forces (IDF) soldiers from units that FIDFs chapters and supporters across the United States adopted as part of the FIDF Adopt-A-Brigade Program. FIDFs Adopt-A-Brigade Program is the only of its kind, allowing supporters to go beyond their donations to get assistance to soldiers in need, caring for Lone Soldiers with no immediate family rf ntbfrfntbft nf rfntbrft rffntbrntrr t RETIREMENT CO MMUNIT Y Location. Location. Shell Point. SLS-3547-18 LChayim Feb 2018.indd 1 1/15/18 3:55 PM Changing you address? Keep LCHAYIM coming to your home. Email loriramos@jfedlcc.org. For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit JewishFederationLCC.org.

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17 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD FIDF delivers hundreds of thousands of sufganiyot to Israeli soldiers for HanukkahT ZEELIM, Israel, Jan. 2 Thousands of Israeli soldiers enjoyed Hanukkah celebrations on their army bases across Israel thanks to support from the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF). Over Hanukkah, FIDFs ambassadors in Israel brought messages of hope and light and some 230,000 sufgani eaten on Hanukkah) to Israel Defense Forces (IDF) soldiers from units that FIDFs chapters and supporters across the United States adopted as part of the FIDF Adopt-A-Brigade Program. FIDFs Adopt-A-Brigade Program is the only of its kind, allowing support ers to go beyond their donations to get assistance to soldiers in need, caring for Lone Soldiers with no immediate family in Israel, and funding rest and recuperation weeks for combat units. Supporters of the program are able to visit the soldiers in their adopted units on IDF bases, and have periodic communications with the units commanders. In 2016, FIDF supporters formed unbreakable bonds with the soldiers of eight brigades and kah menorahs and candles as part of the FIDF Spiritual Needs Program, which provides spiritual items and activities focused on Jewish traditions and holidays. In 2017, FIDF funded 40 Hanukkah parties on IDF bases across Israel and brought soldiers 230,000 sufganiyot, 40,000 personal Hanukkah menorah and candle sets, 40,000 dreidels and Hanukkah gelt packages, 3,000 Hanukkah menorah kits with oil cups and wicks, 40 giant menorahs, and 40 four-foot-tall menorahs to celebrate Hanukkah. About Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF): FIDF was established in 1981 by a group of Holocaust survivors as a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit organization with the mission of offering educational, cultural, recreational and social programs and facilities that provide hope, purpose and life-changing support for the soldiers who protect Israel and Jews worldwide. Today, FIDF has more than 150,000 loyal supporters, and 20 chap ters throughout the United States and Panama. FIDF proudly supports IDF soldiers, families of fallen soldiers, and wounded veterans through a variety of innovative programs that reinforce the vital bond between the communities in the United States, the soldiers of the IDF, and the State of Israel. For more nd nd th rf ntbfrfntbft nf rfntbrft rffntbrntrr t RETIREMENT CO MMUNIT Y Location. Location. Shell Point. SLS-3547-18 LChayim Feb 2018.indd 1 1/15/18 3:55 PM For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit JewishFederationLCC.org.

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18 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader!For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.continued on next page 13 of the biggest health breakthroughs in Israel in 2017By Nicky Blackburn, ISRAEL21c, www.israel21c.org, December 26, 2017 1. Compound kills energy-generating system of cancer An Israeli researcher devised a synthetic compound to disable the enzymes that allow cancer cells to metastasize. When cancer cells leave the primary tumor and spread to other organs, they reprogram their energy-generating sys tem in order to survive in harsh condi tions with a shortage of nutrients like glucose. Prof. Uri Nir of Bar-Ilan University identified an enzyme called FerT in the energy-generating mitochondria of metastatic cancer cells an enzyme nor mally only found in sperm cells (which need to function outside the body they came from). When he targeted FerT in lab mice, the malignant cells soon died. Using advanced chemical and robotic approaches, Nirs lab team de veloped a synthetic compound, E260, which can be administered orally or by injection, causing a complete collapse of the entire mitochondria power station. We have treated mice with meta static cancer and this compound com pletely cured them with no adverse or Nir, adding that normal cells were not 2. Personal menu to help avoid diabetes In 2015, two researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel released a groundbreaking study That discovery was incorporated into a made-in-Israel app, DayTwo, which helps pre-diabetics and diabetics who are not insulin dependent choose dishes that can best balance their individual blood-sugar levels. The algorithm predicts blood-glu cose response to thousands of foods based on gut microbiome informa tion and other personal parameters. High blood sugar is linked to energy dips, excessive hunger and weight gain as well as increased risk of metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. To use the app, which went on sale in the U.S. in 2017, users need to answer a questionnaire about their medical history, physical characteristics, lifestyle and diet. A stool-sample kit is then FedExed to the user, who sends it on to DayTwos lab. There the micro biome DNA is sequenced and the data is plugged into an advanced machinelearning algorithm. In about six to eight weeks, users receive a microbiome report and a sixmonth plan of personalized meal recommendations to help balance blood sugar. In August and December, doctors at Emek Medical Center in Afula per formed rare bone implants one on a man missing part of his arm bone and meters of his shinbone, both as the result of car accidents. Normally, the human body cannot restore bone segments, but revolution ary tissue-engineering technology developed by Haifa-based Bonus BioGroup enables growing semi-solid live bone tissue from the patients own fat cells. The tissue is then injected back into the patients body in the expectation that the missing bone fragment will be regenerated in around six weeks without any danger of implant rejection or the complications of traditional bone transplants. tion; it changes the entire game in orthopedics, said Dr. Nimrod Rozen, head of orthopedics at Emek, who carried out the experimental procedure. In the future, the Bonus BioGroup regeneration technology could be used for a variety of bone-loss conditions, including bone cancer, for which there is currently no solution. An early-stage Israeli ophthalmic medical devices startup developed a that holds out hope to millions of blind and visually-impaired people. The nanotech-based synthetic cor nea by CorNeat Vision of Raanana proved successful in initial tests on animals. The company plans human implantations in Israel in mid-2018, and a larger clinical trial in the United States. According to the World Health Or ganization, diseases of the cornea are the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting as many as 30 million people. Unlike previous devices, which attempt to integrate optics into the native cornea, CorNeats implant leverages a virtual space under the conjunctiva quickly and provides robust long-term integration, said CorNeat Visions Almog Aley-Raz. The surgical proce dure takes just 30 minutes. 5. Hernia surgery just got simpler In June, ISRAEL21c reported on a new tool developed by Via Surgical for attaching mesh to tissue, allowing sur geons to treat hernias with fewer com plications, less pain and faster recovery. people have a hernia a protrusion of an organ or tissue through a weak spot in the abdomen or groin according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Traditionally, open hernia-repair surgery involved stitching a mesh patch, or surrounding tissue, over the weak tissue. Today, many hernias are repaired laparoscopically, but because suturing through tiny laparoscopic incisions is solution screw-like tacks to secure the mesh to the abdominal wall or bone. Via Surgicals unique FasTouch cartridge system, which received FDA approval in 2016, affixes prosthetic material to soft tissue. It is designed like sutures and delivered like tacks, with the goal of providing the best of both worlds for laparoscopic hernia repair. Surgeons are very excited about it, says Lena Levin, cofounder and CFO of Via Surgical. Hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries. 6. Screening newborns for autism Israeli engineer Raphael Rembrand developed a simple noninvasive way to screen newborns for signs of autism us ing the same instrument currently used to test infants hearing. The SensPD diagnostic test, now ready for clinical trials, uses opto acoustic emissions as an indicator of the babys overall sensory perception. It can be administered hours after birth, and because the inner-ear mecha nism develops in the third trimester of pregnancy, one day it may even be possible to screen for autism spectrum disorders prenatally. Some three million children are diagnosed with autism every year. The earlier the condition is detected the better the possible outcome. Thirty years ago, Rembrands four-year-old son was diagnosed as autistic, but it was too late at this point for critical earlyintervention therapies. Applying interventions before the age of two results in better than 90% success rate in ingraining social skills for social integration, says Rembrand. 7. Reversing cognitive decline with cannabis In May, scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and from the SAVE THE DATE Sunday, April 15 2:30 5:00 p.m. COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Happy Birthday, Israel!

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19 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader!For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org. continued from previous page 13 of the biggest health breakthroughs in Israel in 2017University of Bonn in Germany an nounced that they had restored the memory performance of lab mice to a juvenile stage by administering a small quantity of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis. The report in Nature Medicine showed that after giving low doses of THC to mice over a four-week pe riod, the cognitive functions of 12to 18-month-old mice treated with can nabis were just as good as the functions of two-month-old mice in the control group. Clinical trials on humans are to follow. A study by Therapix Biosciences presented in September to the Inter national Association for Cannabinoid Medicines Conference on Cannabi noids in Cologne, Germany, similarly reverse age-related cognitive impair ment in old mice. 8. Early diagnostic test for Parkinsons This year, Hebrew University of Jeru salem PhD student Suaad Abd-Elhadi won the Kaye Innovation Award for her diagnostic tool, ELISA, which detects Parkinsons disease at a much earlier stage than existing tools, and better tracks progression of the disease and response to therapy. to 10 million people worldwide, is shaking. Medication to control symp toms is costly. Currently there are no standard diagnostic tests for Parkinsons other than clinical information provided by the disorder in time to improve the lives of patients. Abd-Elhadi has demonstrated a proof of concept and is analyzing a large cohort of samples as part of a clinical study. Through its Yissum technology transfer company, Hebrew University has signed an agreement with Integra Holdings for further development and commercialization. 9. Hip-Hope cushions falls in elderly Each year, nearly 3 million seniors worldwide are hospitalized due to hip fractures many experiencing a drastic deterioration in quality of life. The di rect annual cost of treating hip fractures exceeds $15 billion in the U.S. alone. Rather than focus on better ways to treat the broken bone, Israeli engineer Amatsia Raanan decided to use cuttingedge technology to avoid injury in the first place. He and three cofounders developed Hip-Hope, a smart wearable device designed as a belt. Once Hip-Hopes multi-sensor detection system senses an impending collision with a ground surface, two large airbags are deployed instantly from each side of the belt to cushion the hips, and a connected smartphone app sends an automatic alert message to predetermined recipients. The 1-kilo (2.2-pound) device, due to go on sale shortly, even has a built-in emergency call button that the user can activate in any situation of distress. Hip-Hope is certified by the CE (Europe), FDA (United States), HealthCanada and AMAR (Israel). In studies carried out at a major Canadian lab, the Israeli device was proven to reduce impact by 90%. 10. An injection that melts fat Jerusalem-based Raziel Therapeutics has developed an injection that melts fat cells and postpones the proliferation of new fat cells. The medication generates heat to use up some of the free fatty acid thats produced by fat cells in the body, which in turn reduces fat tissue. Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic, and the World Obesity Federation predicts that by 2025, a third of the worlds population will be over weight or obese. Raziels technology, which targets clinical trials in the U.S. Preliminary results show a 30 to 50 percent reduction in subcutaneous fat at the treated site after a single injection. Each treatment lasts between six and nine months, but treatment could their lifestyle in parallel. 11. Diagnosing sleep disorders while youre awake An audio-analysis technology developed at Ben-Gurion University can assess sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) while the user is awake, at home and not hooked up to machines or sensors. The American Sleep Apnea Association estimates that 22 million Ameri as many as 80% of moderate to severe OSA cases go undiagnosed. Currently, patients are diagnosed using overnight polysomnography (PSG) to record brain waves, blood oxygen level, heart rate, breathing, and eye and leg movements via electrodes and sensors. The new system, which does not require contact sensors, could be installed onto a smartphone or other device that utilizes ambient microphones. It analyzes speech during waking hours and records and evaluates overnight breath ing sounds using new technology that is than PSG. The researchers have tested the system on more than 350 subjects and are working toward commercialization. 12. First implant for heart failure In July, a 72-year-old Canadian man an Israeli-developed implant to treat diastolic heart failure a fairly common long-term treatment. continued on next page JEWISH NATIONAL FUND INVITES YOU TO THEHONORINGHELENE KRIVOSHA & THE HONORABLE NORMAN KRIVOSHA ARLENE & KEITH SILVERFEATURING GUEST SPEAKERYEDIDYA HARUSHJNF-Halutza LiaisonTuesday, March 20, 2018 6:00 PMTwin Eagles Country Club 11725 Twineagles Blvd, Naples, FL RSVP by March 6 at jnf.org/naplestol or 727.536.5263 For more information, contact Marcy Friedland, Senior Campaign Executive, Southwest Florida mfriedland@jnf.org or 727.536.5263 Honest, caring and knowledgable advice about assisted living options at no cost to you!Personal and professional advice for you or a loved one when you need it the mostBruce B. Rosenblatt, Owner Senior Housing Expert239.595.0207 www.SeniorHousingSolutions.net SAVE THE DATE Sunday, April 15 2:30 5:00 p.m. COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Happy Birthday, Israel! Following is a list of staples always in need at the food pantry: P e a n u t b u t t e r a n d j e l l y P a s t a s a u c e ( p a s t a n o t n e e d e d ) R i c e a n d b e a n s C a n n e d v e g e t a b l e s a n d f r u i t s C e r e a l C a n n e d m e a t s C o n d i m e n t s T o i l e t r i e s f o r a d u l t s & c h i l d r e n Gift cards to places like Publix, Walmart, Target, etc., as well as cash donations, are also appreciated. Jewish Family Services helps seniors, individuals and families with a variety of needs. J E W I S H F E D E R A T I O N F O O D P A N T R Y

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20 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD BRIEFS SUSAN SILVER, AUTHOR OF FINEMARK BANK 12681 Creekside Ln. Fort Myers Couvert: $36/person includes a copy of the book WOMEN S PHILANTHROPY AUTHOR EVENT & DESSERT RECEPTION Tuesday, March 13 7:30 p.m. The minimally invasive surgery was performed at Rambam Health Care Campus, a medical center in Haifa. The CORolla implant was devel oped by cardiologists at Israeli startup CorAssist Cardiovascular of Haifa. The elastic device is implanted inside the left ventricle and applies direct expansion force on the ventricle wall to help the The patient, Robert MacLachlan, had run out of treatment options in Canada for his diastolic heart failure. His wife read about CORolla on the Internet and contacted Rambam. 13. Renewing damaged cells Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science discovered a molecule in newborn hearts that appears to control the process of renewing heart muscle. Nature point to new directions for research on restoring the function of damaged cardiac cells. Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. The Agrin molecule seems to un lock the renewal process and enable heart-muscle repair never seen before outside the womb. Normally, after a heart attack the damaged muscle cells called cardiomyocytes are replaced by scar tissue, which cannot pump blood and therefore place a burden on the remaining cardiomyocytes. Following a single injection of Agrin, damaged mouse hearts were almost completely healed and fully functional. Scar tissue was dramatically reduced, and replaced by living heart tissue that restored the hearts pumping function. The research team has begun preclinical studies in larger animals. Nicky Blackburn, Editor and Israel Director, has worked extensively as a journalist and editor both in Britain and Israel for a range of national and in ternational publications including The Cambridge Evening News, London News, Travel Weekly Israel High Tech Investor, and The Times of London She was the Associate Editor at LINK Is raels Business and Technology Maga zine and the High-Tech Correspondent for The Jerusalem Post Specializing in knee replacement continued from previous page continued on next page ISRAEL NEARING 9 MILLION PEOPLEAs 2018 begins, Israels Central Bureau of Statistics reported that 8,793,000 people currently reside in the country. 6,556,000 are Jewish (75%), 1,837,000 are Arab (21%), and 400,000 are non-Arab Christians and others (4%). (Amir Alon, Ynet News)RECORD 3.6 MILLION TOURISTS VISIT ISRAEL IN 2017An all-time record 3.6 million tourists visited Israel in 2017, 25% more than in 2016. Over 700,000 tourists came from the U.S., 21% more than in 2016. Russia sent 307,000, a 26% increase. France was third with 284,000 tourists, 8% more than in 2016, fol lowed by Germany with 202,000, a 34% rise over 2016, and the UK, with 185,000, 10% more than in 2016. Other important sources were Ukraine with 137,000, China with 105,000, Italy (93,000), Poland (85,000) and Canada (75,000). (Michal Raz-Chaimovich, Globes)ISRAELI ARABS HAVE HIGHEST LIFE EXPECTANCY IN ARABMUSLIM WORLD Compared with the populations of 21 Muslim and Arab countries, Arab Is raelis have the highest life expectancy. The life expectancy of Arab Israe lis at birth in 2015 was 79, higher than such wealthy countries as Qatar, the UAE and Bahrain. It is also equal to that of the gen eral U.S. population. (Taub Center for Social Policy Studies in Israel) SEAL FROM FIRST TEMPLE PERIOD FOUND AT WESTERN WALL IN JERUSALEM dating to the First Temple period, with the Hebrew inscription belonging to the governor of the city, was recent ly discovered during excavations by the Israel Antiquities Authority in the Western Wall Plaza in Jerusalem. The relic, dating from the 6th to 7 th facing each other, and the lower part holds an inscription in ancient Hebrew script, said Dr. Shlomit WekslerBdolah, excavator of the site. high-rank title...supports the assump tion that this area...was inhabited by years ago, Jerusalem, the capital of Is rael, was a strong and central city. Jeru salem is one of the most ancient capi tals of the world. (Daniel K. Eisenbud, Jerusalem Post) LCHAYIM is a monthly nonprot newspaper supported by generous readers, committed advertisers and the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties.

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21 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD Briefs...continued from previous page For more information or to request an application, contact the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties at (239) 481 4449 ext. 4, fax (239) 481 0139 or email: loriramos@jfedlcc.org Scholarship applications are now available for Jewish residents of Lee and Charlotte Counties, Florida, wishing to pursue postsecondary education. Applicants must be under 30 years of age and priority will be given to full -time students. Funding is limited and decisions will be based primarily on financial need Completed applications are due by April 30, 2018 Scholarships are made available from designated funds held by the Jewish Community Foundation. Fall 2018 Educational Scholarships Available 2674 Winkler Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-275-7800www.ThePalmsAtFortMyers.comINDEPENDENT LIVING ASSISTED LIVING MEMORY CARE REHABILITATION Assisted Living Facility License #AL07269 17 Five Star Senior Living Pet Friendly What does exceptional senior living mean to you? At The Palms of Fort Myers it means a lifestyle where 24-hour Five Star service meets a world of opportunities. Savor a delicious meal prepared for you by our culinary team or whip up something special in your own kitchen. Take an exercise class with your neighbors or start your day with our Coffee and Crosswords group. Our lifestyle is designed for the way you live.DISCOVER: Month-to-month rental community Five Star Dining Experience, featuring Signature recipes Lifestyle360 program offering a full-schedule of activities Variety of in-house religious services Scheduled local transportation for medical appointments and shopping 24-hour care available, should your needs change Exceptional senior living experiencesCALL TO SEE HOW YOU CAN LIVE THE EXCEPTIONAL LIFE TODAY!DISCOVERWHATITSLIKETOHAVEANEXCEPTIONALDAY, EVERYDAY. continued on next page GAL GADOT IS THE HIGHEST-GROSSING ACTRESS OF 2017The numbers are in Gal Gadot is of of 2017, amassing $1.4 billion world wide. She is also the third highestgrossing actor overall, according to Forbes latest report. Unless youve been living under a rock, you know that 2017 was an action-packed year for the Wonder Woman star. Gadot played the same superhero twice in six months, turning herself into a household name and her character into a rejuvenated symbol of feminism and girl power for todays audience. I feel that Ive got the opportunity to set a great role model for girls to look up to a strong, active, compas sionate, loving, positive woman and I think its so important, Gadot told Entertainment Weekly Its about time that somebody will do that and Im very privileged and honored to be the one. Her breakout role as the Amazonian warrior heroine in Wonder Woman $822 million, and making it the high directed by a woman (Patty Jenkins). Justice League released six months later, wasnt as well received but raked in another few millions in boxRounding out the top three in Forbes list of highest earners are fellow action stars Vin Diesel, tallying $1.6 billion, and Dwayne The Rock Johnson, at $1.5 billion. To compile its annual list, Forbes to add up global ticket sales of major not included. (Rebecca Stadlen Amir, ISRAEL21c)THE CHRISTIAN HAVEN OF ISRAELHaving been born and raised in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, I am certain that Israel is the only country in the region where Christians are thriving. Christians in the Middle East, including in eastern Jerusalem and the West Bank, are under enormous pressure from Muslim leaders. Recently, a Palestinian terrorist embarked on a vehicular ramming attack in the Christian town of Beit Jala, wounding 18 people and demolish the assailants declared goal was to exodus from Palestinian cities, including Bethlehem, is evidence of their maltreatment and their feelings of insecurity. For daily news stories related to Israel & the Jewish world, visit the Federations website at JewishFederationLCC.org.

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22 ISRAEL & THE JEWISH WORLD Connecting the dots Paul Weinstein, CFPManaging Partner, WWFG Branch Manager, RJFS 13720 Six Mile Cypress Pkwy #1 Fort Myers, FL 33912 239-768-1490 888-768-1490 Toll Free 239-768-1935 Fax paul.weinstein@raymondjames.com Securities oered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPCRAYMOND JAMES PATTERSON, ESKIN & BALLHAROLD S. ESKIN, P.A.ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW CERTIFIED FAMILY LAW MEDIATOR CERTIFIED CIVIL LAW MEDIATOR1420 S.E. 47TH STREET, CAPE CORAL (239) 549-5551 FAX (239) 549-4834 E-mail: haleskin@legalsurrogacy.com E-mail: haleskin@earthlink.net Janet Astrin Sales Associate 14360 S. Tamiami Trail Fort Myers, Florida 33912 (239) 482-3001 Fax (239) 482-8846 leelightingflorida.com Like us on Facebook Rubinstein, Holz & King P.A.Family Law Attorneys Alan J. Rubinstein 1375 Jackson St., Ste. 304 (239) 332-3400 Fort Myers, FL 33901 Fax (239) 332-5078 henlaw.com 239.344.1100 Divorce, Marital & Family LawJennifer Siegal-MillerBusiness & Tax PlanningGuy E. Whitesman Florida Bar Board Certi ed Tax AttorneyWills, Trusts & EstatesEric Gurgold Florida Bar Board Certi ed Wills, Trust and Estate Attorney Lake Suzy Florida (941) 627-2001 Repairs Salt Chlorine Generators Heat Pumps HIGGINSON TAX & ACCOUNTING, LLC TAX PREPARATION PLANNING AUDIT REPRESENTATION ERIC HIGGINSON, CPA 8695 COLLEGE PARKWAY, SUITE 2024 FORT MYERS, FL 33919 TEL 239.935.6950 FAX 239.425.3289 ERIC@HIGGINSONTAX.COM WWW.HIGGINSONTAX.COM www.doctorben.net INTERNIST OF THE YEAR AWARD Presented by the Florida Chapter of the American College of Physicians 6840 International Center Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33912Located in Plantation Professional Center next to the CenturyLink Sports Complex YOUR AD COULD BE HERE FOR AS LITTLE AS $25 PER MONTH! CALL 239.634.6923 Briefs...continued from previous page However, in Israel, the Christian community continues to grow in num bers. Christians in Israel enjoy econom ic prosperity, independent educational systems with some of the countrys most successful schools, a great health system, and full civil rights. It is for this reason that a growing number of Christians choose to enlist in the Israel Defense Forces, study, and live here. (Elias Zarina, co-founder of the Brotherly Covenant Association, dedi cated to the social integration of the Christian minority in Israel, Times of Israel)ISRAEL HONORS ITS FALLEN WITH AN ARCHITECTURAL GEMThe recently opened National Me morial Hall for Israels Fallen next to the Mount Herzl military cemetery in Jerusalem has been included on a list Institute of British Architects 2018 in ternational prize. A curved, 250-meter wall contains thousands of bricks with the names and date of death of the more than 23,000 fallen men and women from Israels security services killed in the line of duty. A small light bulb juxtaposed to each engraved brick enables it to be lit on the date of the persons death, as per the Jewish tradition to light a candle. memorated the memory of all its fallen service people in one site, said Yair Ben Shalom, director of the site for the Defense Ministry. (Daily Mail UK) Christian-funded immigration to Israel spikes 25 percent in 2017J ERUSALEM, Dec. 26 Supported by millions of Christians worldwide, the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (The Fellowship) brought 5,600 immigrants from 27 countries to Israel in 2017, last year and amounting to a third of Is raels new citizens from non-Englishspeaking countries. During the past year, The Fellowship also reached a new milestone by bringing the 10,000 th immigrant to Israel since the organization began sin glehandedly operating its own global aliyah (immigration) program in late 2014. The Fellowship works in 27 countries from Argentina to Ukraine where the Jewish community is threat ened by economic turbulence, rising anti-Semitism or terrorism, and has be come the lead aliyah force in nine of those countries. During 2017, a total of about 28,400 immigrants arrived in Israel from around the world, including 3,000 from North America and up to 1,000 from other English-speaking na tions. Among the overall total of new comers, between 5,000-6,000 arrived on tourism visas but later changed their status to become new immigrants. The Fellowship itself brought one third of the remaining 18,400 olim, becoming an increasing force in aliyah. Thanks to our millions of Christian friends in the U.S. and in countries from Brazil to South Korea, we are playing an increasingly active role in bringing new immigrants to their Jewish homeland, said Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, The Fellowships founder and president. We look forward to bringing even more Jews home to Israel in 2018 and continuing to help build the Jewish state. The Fellowship has been active in aliyah for 25 years, partnering with other organizations initially including the Jewish Agency and Nefesh BNefesh, which The Fellowship helped found. Since starting its own global aliyah program in late 2014, The Fellowship has brought nearly 12,000 new immigrants to Israel from Argentina, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, the Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Guatemala, Latvia, Lithuania, Melilla, Mexico, Moldova, Panama, Paraguay, Russia, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela and another nation which cannot be named due to security reasons. The Fellowships partnership with new immigrants to Israel does not begin and end at Ben-Gurion Airport. In addition to providing pre-aliyah seminars in immigrants native countries, counseling and other support for olim to help them absorb into Israeli life, including grants of $800 per adult and $400 per child. About The Fellowship: The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (The Fellowship) was founded in 1983 to promote better understanding and cooperation between Christians and Jews, and build broad support for Israel. Today it is one of the leading forces helping Israel and Jews in need worldwide and is the largest channel of Christian support for Israel. Led by its founder and president, Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, The Fellowship now raises more than $140 million per year, mostly from Christians, to assist Israel and the Jewish people. Since its founding, The Fellowship has raised more than $1.4 billion for this work. The Chicago, Toronto and Seoul. For more information, visit www.ifcj.org. For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. To donate to the Federations Annual Campaign, call 239.481.4449 or visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org.

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23 COMMENTARY Connecting the dotsBy Rabbi Michael J. Schorin Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. This column is written in memory of my teacher, Rabbi Neil Gillman, zl.A long time ago, Rabbi Gillman, a theology professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary, said the following: Every mitzvah is an opportunity, an invitation, to increase ones level of awareness, ones consciousnessin short, it is a chance to increase ones sense of love. they struck me like a bolt of lightning. Why did this statement reverberate so strongly for me? Up to that point, I had encountered religiously observant peo ple who observed the mitzvot because G-d commanded them. And I had been reading a lot of spiritual literature that that of the mitzvot. But with the state ment quoted above, there seemed to be a bridge between the two. Most Jewish Americans do not feel comfortable in the world of mitz vot. But the outer form of the ritual is only the outer form. I believe that what makes us most uncomfortable is the rationale behind it. G-d commanded this act, and so whatever it is, I need to do it or face criticism and judge ment. With such an either-or kind of choice, it is not surprising that many people shy away from them. Especially in a world where autonomy is in vogue, performing the mitzvot because they are commanded will continue to be a tough sell. One of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschels books was called God In Search of Man. What if a mitzvah was G-ds way of inviting us to a conver sation? As with any good talk, a conversation with Hashem requires two partners, and enough humility to listen for the other side. When we do a mitzvah, we are keeping up our side of the bargain. When we say a hamotzi over the bread we are about to to us. It can mean that we are observing the commandment, as requested. It can mean that we are thankful that G-d has brought forth bread from the ground and enabled us to satiate our hunger. Saying ha-motzi also reinforces the notion that we did not create the world and need to be grateful for everything we receive. Seen in this light, saying this blessing not only refreshes our humility but connects us more strongly to this world and all of our fellow beings. If we truly open ourselves to this blessing, we might also choose to remember that someone needed to plant the seeds, and water them, and keep bugs away, and make sure they get enough sun. The wheat needed to be harvested and stored and brought to either a market or a bakery. Most like ly, the bread got wrapped and trucked and marketed and unloaded, to where it landed on the shelves of our super market. And we earned the money to exchange for it. Our gratitude should extend not only to G-d but to all those people who worked on it. So this loaf becomes much more important as we slow down, say the bracha, the blessing, and connect to all those people who we cannot see, but who each played a role in bringing the bread to us. Indeed, we might even spend a second thinking about this wonderful earth that is able to produce so many amazing crops, palm trees, etc. Every mitzvah, then, becomes an opportunity to slow down, and take it all in, and appreciate, and be grateful and loving. Every mitzvah reminds us that we are all connected, to Hashem and to our fellow humans. And that is certainly worthy of a blessing! Rabbi Dr. Michael J. Schorin, MAPC, BCC is a Chaplain in Lee Healths Department of Spiritual Services, and ministers at the Gulf Coast Medical Center. P: 239.333.0500 F: 239.333.0501 doug@leejustice.com www.leejustice.com1625 Hendry Street, Suite 102 Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Attorney at Law A r t o f F a s h i o n a n d M o o r e Sylish Comfortable Different The Art of Fashion and Moore(in the Arcade in historic downtown Ft. Myers) Teri Moore, Owner (239) 204-9759 2267 1st. St., Suite 12 info@artoffashionandmoore.com Ft. Myers, FL 33901 www.artoffashionandmoore.com Brian Simon, ChFC, CLUFinancial Advisor, Park Avenue Securities, LLC 15671 San Carlos Blvd. Ste 201 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.cpamassie.com O: 239-768-2171 F: 239-768-6074 charlesm@cpamassie.com Charles Abels Massie CPA, CFP NFLPA Registered Player Financial Advisor We Save Your Income for You to Enjoy Your Outcome RICK SNYDERMANLicensed Pedorthist 1900 Trailwinds Dr. Fort Myers, FL 33907 Ph: (239) 939-2239 Fax: (239) 939-7792We Specialize In All Widths We Will Ship AnywhereFIT SERVICE QUALITY FORT MYERS www.gskattorneys.com rf ntbf bfbnnbLowell S. SchoenfeldFlorida Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney YOUR AD COULD BE HERE FOR AS LITTLE AS $25 PER MONTH! CALL 239.634.6923 ADRIENNE WEINERBroker-AssociateRealty Group 7910 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907Cell: (239) 246-4991Ofce: (239) 489-0444 Fax: (239) 288-6727 Email: Adrienne@AdrienneWeiner.com www.soldsign.com www.AdrienneWeiner.com Each Ofce Independently Owned and Operated PLEASE SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS THEY HELP MAKE LCHAYIM POSSIBLE. w w w li v in g h ap p il y o rg 2 3 9 2 0 8 2 2 1 7 1 5 0 5 0 E l de rbe rry L an e Su it e 4 F t M y e rs I n s u ran c e an d M e di c are A c c e p t e d L i s a B e n d e t o w i c z L C S W M i c h e l l e S c h o e n f e l d L C S W For a continuously updated calendar of events, visit www.JewishFederationLCC.org. LCHAYIM delivers!Introduce your business to a POWERFUL demographic and reach 5,000 readers each month for pennies per reader! For ad rates and deadlines, contact Jim Lewin at 239.634.6923 or JamesLewin@jfedlcc.org.

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24 COMMENTARY / FROM THE BIMAH Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. The AJC West Coast Florida oce, located in Sarasota, can be reached at 941.365.4955. What do you think?LCHAYIM wants to know!Send your letters and comments to Ted Epstein, LCHAYIM Editor, at LChayim36@gmail.com.Letters PolicyLetters must include the writers full name, full address and daytime phone. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for length LCHAYIM nor its advertisers. We cannot acknowledge or publish every letter received. The adult issues of PurimPurim arrives early this year, on the evening of February 28. It is a time for groggers, costumes, noise and merriment. With all the frivolity and fun that we shall hopefully experience, it is easy to dismiss Purim as merely a fun holiday for the young and the young at heart, but Purim is much more. The Purim story in the Book of Esther confronts the mature reader with vital issues about sexual abuse, the phenomenon of prejudice, and human destiny. Vashti Too seldom do we ponder the courage The worlds most powerful man commands her to display her beauty for his drunken friends, but she refuses. She is a worthy role model for our daughters. Vashti refused to simply be a sex object even if that refusal cost her throne. Hopefully, all of us can learn from her courage. Prejudice A vital lesson about prejudice presents itself when Mordecai refuses to bow down before Haman. Haman is angry, but as the Bible records: ...it was not enough for him to punish Mordecai alone, for they had told him the people of Mordecai. (Esther 3:5) No, because of his anger at one man, Haman sought to destroy all the Jews. Sadly, the prejudice presented in the book of Esther has confronted our people many times throughout history. Many other groups experience it today. The Purim story provides a vivid example of this discuss with young people. Destiny When Mordecai read Hamans decree condemning the Jews of Persia to death, he sent a message to Esther Rabbi Stephen Fuchs By David Harris, AJC CEO, December 25, 2017I n all the discussion about this dea solution, some basic facts are too often missing, neglected, downplayed or skewed. Not only does this do a disservice to history, but it also contributes to false assumptions and mistaken notions. Consider: Fact #1: There could have been a two-state solution as early as 1947. Thats precisely what the UN Special Committee on Palestine (UNSCOP) proposed, recognizing the presence of two peoples and two nationalisms in a territory governed temporarily by the United Kingdom. And the UN General Assembly decisively endorsed the UNSCOP proposal. The Jewish side pragmatically accepted the plan, but the Arab world categorically rejected it. Fact #2: When Israel declared independence on May 14, 1948, it extended the hand of friendship to its Arab neighbors, as clearly evidenced by its founding documents and state its total destruction. Despite vastly outnumbering the Jews and possessing superior military arsenals, they failed in their quest. Fact #3: Until 1967, the eastern part of Jerusalem and the entire West Bank were in the hands of Jordan, not Israel. Had the Arab world wished, an indepen dent Palestinian state, with its capital in Jerusalem, could have been established at any time. Not only did this not hap pen, but there is no record of it ever having been discussed. To the contrary, Jordan annexed the territory, seeking full and permanent control. It proceeded to treat Jerusalem as a backwater, while denying Jews any access to Jewish holy sites in the Old City and destroying the synagogues there. Meanwhile, Gaza was under Egyptian military rule. Again, there was no talk of sovereignty for the Palestinians there, either. Fact #4: In May 1967, the Egyptian and Syrian governments repeatedly threatened to annihilate Israel, as these countries demanded that UN peacekeeping forces be withdrawn from the region. Moreover, Israeli shipping lanes to its southern port of Eilat were blocked, and Arab troops were deployed to front-line positions. The Six-Day War was the outcome, a war that Israel won. Coming into possession of the Gaza Strip, Golan Heights, Sinai Peninsula, West Bank and eastern Jerusalem, Israel extended feelers to its Arab neighbors, via third parties, seeking a land for peace formula. The Arab response came back on September 1, 1967, from Khartoum, Sudan, where the Arab League nations were meeting. The message was unmistakable: No peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, and no negotiations with Israel. Yet another and gone. Fact #5: In November 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat broke with the Arab rejectionist consensus. He traveled to the Israeli capital of Jerusalem to meet with Israeli leaders and address Israels parliament and speak of peace. Two years later, underscoring the lengths to which Israel was prepared reached, in which Israel led, notably, by a right-wing government yielded the vast Sinai Peninsula, with its strate gic depth, oil deposits, settlements and air bases, in exchange for the promise of a new era in relations with the Arab worlds leading country. In 1981, Sadat was slain by the Muslim Brotherhood of peace with Israel, thankfully, has endured. Fact #6: In September 1993, Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organi zation (PLO) reached an agreement, hope for peace on that front as well, but eight months later, PLO Chairman of many that he was not honest, when he was caught on tape in a Johannesburg mosque asserting that this agreement was nothing more than a temporary Fact #7: In 1994, Jordans King Hussein, following in the footsteps of Egyptian President Sadat, reached an agreement with Israel, again demonstrating Israels readiness for peace and willingness to make territorial come forward. Fact #8: In 2000-1, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, leading a left-ofcenter government and supported by groundbreaking two-state arrangement to Arafat, including a bold compromise on Jerusalem. Not only did the Palshockingly told Clinton that Jews had never had any historical connection to triggered a new wave of Palestinian violence that led to more than 1,000 Israeli fatalities (proportionately equivalent to 40,000 Americans). Fact #9: In 2008, three years after Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon unilaterally withdrew all Israeli soldiers and settlers from Gaza, only to see Hamas seize control and destroy another chance for coexistence, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert went even further than Barak in extending an olive branch to the Palestinian Author two-state proposal, but got no formal response from Mahmoud Abbas, Arafats successor. A Palestinian negotia tor subsequently acknowledged in the media that the Israeli plan would have given his side the equivalent of 100 percent of the disputed lands under discussion. Fact #10: At the request of the Obama administration, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu agreed to a ten-month freeze on settlementbuilding in 2010, as a good-faith gesture to lure the Palestinians back to the table. Regrettably, it failed. The Palestinians didnt show up. Instead, they have continued to this day their strategy of incitement; attempts to bypass Israel and face-to-face talks by going to international organizations instead; denial of the age-old Jewish link to Jerusalem and, by extension, the re captured terrorists and the families of suicide bombers. Isnt it high time to draw some obvious conclusions from these facts, recognize the many lost opportunities to reach a settlement because of a con sistent no from one side, and call on the Palestinians to start saying yes for a change? Send an email to lenibsack@jfedlcc.org Fort Myers has T wenty-one years in Fort Myers and what has become of me? I used to camp out in snow caves on Oregons Cascade Mountains, and go to work on my cross-country skis in New Hampshire. I still vividly recall going out for walks on sub-zero mornings in the White Mountains and mar veling at the crystal lized snow crunching with each step, all by impossibly clear blue skies. It was all so magical. And now, a couple of chilly days in Southwest Florida and I want to just curl up under a heap of blankets, not daring to move an inch from the warm spot. Never have I been more grateful for my Catahoula companion Pandora, who sleeps tucked in next me, gener ously sharing her perfectly normal 101+ body temperature. There can be no doubt about it. am 100% certain that I am not the only one. The ancient bard had Odysseus tell of the land of lotus eaters, and how they arrived there after a power way home to Ithaca. It was a paradi siacal island whose residents were so friendly, the food so abundant and the conditions so idyllic that his battlehardened men, weary of rowing, forgot about their journey and their homes and wanted to stay just where they were. Odysseus describes that though they wept bitterly I forced them back to the ships and made them fast under the benches. Then I told the rest to go on board at once, lest any of them should to get home, so they took their places and smote the grey sea with their oars. (Odyssey Book IX) Without a doubt, here we live in the land of lotus eaters. It causes too many of us to lose our stamina, not only in the face a little cool weather, but in more important ways as well. So many wonderful people who spent so much of their lives up north fully engaged in the life of their Jewish community in particular, and of their larger community in general, now are blissfully content to munch on Early Bird Lotus Specials and forget who they really are. Where is that stern and regal captain who will get us back on board so that our journey as involved and committed Jews can continue?! Rabbi Bruce Diamond serves at The Community Free Synagogue in Fort Myers. Rabbi Bruce Diamond How can you command someone to love? Rabbi Nicole Luna You shall love the Eternal your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength. (Deuteronomy 6:5) These words are found in the heart of every Jewish prayer service. Yet scholars, commenta tors and rabbis have all asked, throughout the centuries, a fairly obvious question: How can you command someone to love? How can a feeling, especially such an intimate, personal one as love, be commanded on cue? In answering this question, we look to Leviticus 19:18, the famous commandment, Love your neighbor as yourself. While this line is undoubtedly important, a similar but lesser known commandment follows, one that speaks to the particular Jewish experience out of which we love: You shall love the stranger as yourself for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. We love the stranger because we know what it is to be a stranger, to not be at home. This verb form of love, vahavta appears only these three times in the whole Torah, commanding us to love our neighbor, the stranger and God. The Baal Shem Tov, founder of the Jewish mystical tradition, taught that if to love our neighbor and the stranger, standing of the Hebrew helps us here because in Hebrew the command form of a verb is also the future form. So instead of reading You shall love the Eternal your God, we can read it You will love. If you love your neighbor, you will love God. If you love the stranger, you will love God. Loving our neighbor and the stranger is also not so simple, but the verse following the commandment to love God, reads, Take to heart these instructions which I command you to day. Sifre, a 3rd century commentary, we love God, through acting out Gods commandments. Jews turn to our bibli cal and rabbinic sources for guidance on how to live a caring, ethical life of kindness, justice and love. Out of love for God we turn to Torah, from the prac tice of Torah we learn to care for others. These caring acts lead to love, and in loving others we come to love God. During this secular season when we are surrounded by heart-shaped boxes of chocolate and bright pink and red cards, may our Jewish tradition in spire us to act with love toward God and love toward others. Rabbi Nicole Luna serves at Temple Beth El in Fort Myers.

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25 FROM THE BIMAH Opinions and letters printed in LCHAYIM do not necessarily reect the views of the Jewish Federation of Lee and Charlotte Counties, its Board of Directors or sta, or its advertisers. Rabbi Marc Sack What happens to the work of sexual harassers?I am confused about one question in the aftermath of the spate of accusations of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is when a per son uses their position of power to extract sexual favors from a subordinate. In the vast majority of cases, the perpetrators are men and the victims are women. Since last November, we have seen prominent men in the entertainment industry, in politics and journalism be ter being accused of sexually harassing, or raping, women who worked with them. Sexual harassment is always wrong: people in subservient positions, women or men, are there to do a job, not to be sex objects. While, except for Bill Cosby, none of these cases went to trial, my guess is that most, if not all, of the men had their downfall coming to them. I am confused about this: What happens to the work of these people after theyve been outed? Does it lose all its value? Back in November, Leon Wiesel tier, formerly the Literary Editor of The New Republic and most recently a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute, was forced to resign after multiple women accused him of regularly commenting on their looks, asking about their intimate life, and kissing them. Wieseltier, a yeshivah graduate with a Ph.D. in Jewish History, was a brilliant thinker about American Jewish life and Israel. His book, Kaddish, written after his year of saying Kaddish for his father, was a wonderful weaving of Jewish tradition on the origins of the prayer and his experience of going to minyan every day to say the prayer for his father. I loved his work. I read his columns, showed up for his sessions at AIPAC conferences, and looked for ward to his upcoming book on Jewish messianism. Ari Shavit, author of the book My Promised Land was a senior columnist for the Israeli newspaper, Haaretz, un til he was accused of harassing a female Jewish journalist. With Shavit, like with Wieseltier, I looked for his writing and went to his sessions at AIPAC. What happens to the work of these men? Does it lose all its value? Maybe Jewish history can be a guide on this question. Composer Richard Wagner was a virulent anti-Semite, his work being celebrated by the Third Reich. But Israeli orchestras now play his compositions. Charles Dickens was anti-Semitic. (Fagin was no accident.) So too was T.S. Eliot. We dont remove their works from the literary canon. Perhaps the answer is twofold. Enough time must pass, and the victims must feel empowered so that they are no longer threatened. We can play Wagner because we have a strong State of Israel and multiple organizations to combat anti-Semitism so that we no longer feel threatened. How long will it take for the works of Wieseltier, Shavit and others to be appreciated for their literary and in tellectual value? I dont know. But it will be necessary for society politi cal parties, businesses, social and reli gious groups to have a zero-tolerance policy regarding sexual harassment so that all potential victims can say no without fear of reprisal. When that hap pens, and some more time passes, we may read the works of these men and appreciate them for their great insight. Rabbi Marc Sack serves at Temple Judea in Fort Myers. Bar / Bat Mitzvah SpecialistChoosing the right photographer is an important decision. Michael Shapiro has more than 30 years experience in media and journalism. He is able to capture images that are unique, unexpected and spontaneous.Other Services: Weddings / Family Portraits / Events239.770.6860mike@shapiro-photography.com www.shapiro-photography.com The wonder of wordsI t is not how much we say, but what we say, that is important. What really matters, when it comes to speech, is quality not quantity. The fact is dramatized by a story in the Talmud that is thousands of years old, yet is as relevant as this mornings newspaper. It is the story of the Great Rabbi Gamaliel and one of his wise servants. Rabbi Gamaliel told the man, Go to the market and bring me something good. The servant brought a tongue. The rabbi then said, Go to the market and bring me something bad. Again the servant returned with a tongue. A tongue, my master, may be the source of either good or evil, was the explanation. If it is good, there is nothing better. If it is bad, there is nothing worse. Words are powerful. They can breed hatred or spread healing. They can ignite a quarrel or inspire a cause. They can trigger wars or they can encourage peace. Pleasant words are as a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and health to the bones. (Proverbs 16:24) Words are valuable currency and deserve to be weighed, measured and counted rather than squandered heedlessly. Fittingly, the last words of the right words: May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable to You, O Lord, my Rock and my redeemer.Rabbi Solomon Agin serves at Temple Shalom in Port Charlotte. Rabbi Solomon Agin The adult issues of PurimP urim arrives early this year, on the evening of February 28. It is a time for groggers, costumes, noise and merriment. With all the fri volity and fun that we shall hopefully experience, it is easy to dismiss Purim as merely a fun holiday for the young and the young at heart, but Purim is much more. The Purim story in the Book of Esther confronts the mature reader with vital issues about sexual abuse, the phenomenon of prejudice, and human destiny. Vashti Too seldom do we ponder the courage The worlds most powerful man com mands her to display her beauty for his drunken friends, but she refuses. She is a worthy role model for our daughters. Vashti refused to simply be a sex ob ject even if that refusal cost her throne. Hopefully, all of us can learn from her courage. Prejudice A vital lesson about prejudice presents itself when Mordecai refuses to bow down before Haman. Haman is angry, but as the Bible records: ...it was not enough for him to punish Mordecai alone, for they had told him the people of Mordecai. (Esther 3:5) No, be cause of his anger at one man, Haman sought to destroy all the Jews. Sadly, the prejudice presented in the book of Esther has confronted our people many times throughout history. Many other groups experience it today. The Purim story provides a vivid example of this discuss with young people. Destiny When Mordecai read Hamans de cree condemning the Jews of Persia to death, he sent a message to Esther to intercede for her people. Esthers response was that she dared not enter the presence of the king because he had not summoned her, and the penalty is death for anyone who appears unbidden before the king unless he holds out his scepter as a sign of acceptance. Mordecai, through the servant Hatach, asks Esther a question we should all frequently ask ourselves: Who knows if you have not become queen for just such a time as this? (Esther 4:14) In other words, who knows if we are where we are at any given moment just for the opportunity the Mordecai really asks us all: Are we on this earth just to enjoy life? Is our own pleasure the primary purpose of our existence? Jewish tradition and the Book of Esther say No. Esther could have lived out her life tion pricked her conscience enough so that she risked everything to save our people. Mordecais question addresses us as well. In our lives, all of us like Esther have moments when our action or inaction, our willingness or unwillingness to take a risk can make a vital seize these moments or turn away from them. Esther swallowed her fear and seized her moment. Her example and her courage commend themselves to all of us when opportunities come for So as Purim approaches, I hope we prepare for more than fun and games. If we study the Book of Esther care fully, the lessons we learn about sexual harassment, the phenomenon of prejudice, and our destiny as human beings can enrich our Jewish souls long after the celebration is over. Rabbi Stephen Lewis Fuchs serves at Bat Yam Temple of the Islands on Sanibel Island. Rabbi Stephen Fuchs Stay in touch throughout the month. Sign up for the Federations e-blasts.Get the latest information on upcoming community events and cultural activities, breaking news items, updates from Israel and lots more. Send an email to lenibsack@jfedlcc.org facebook.com/jfedsrq CONNEC T with your Jewish Community www.facebook.com/ JewishFederationLCC Like us on Facebook! Jewish mystical tradition, taught that if to love our neighbor and the stranger, standing of the Hebrew helps us here because in Hebrew the command form of a verb is also the future form. So instead of reading You shall love the Eternal your God, we can read it You will love. If you love your neighbor, you will love God. If you love the stranger, you will love God. Loving our neighbor and the stranger is also not so simple, but the verse following the commandment to love God, reads, Take to heart these instructions which I command you today. Sifre, a 3rd century commentary, we love God, through acting out Gods commandments. Jews turn to our bibli cal and rabbinic sources for guidance on how to live a caring, ethical life of kindness, justice and love. Out of love for God we turn to Torah, from the practice of Torah we learn to care for others. These caring acts lead to love, and in loving others we come to love God. During this secular season when we are surrounded by heart-shaped boxes of chocolate and bright pink and red cards, may our Jewish tradition inspire us to act with love toward God and love toward others. Rabbi Nicole Luna serves at Temple Beth El in Fort Myers.

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26 FOCUS ON YOUTH PJ LIBRARY HOLIDAY PROGRAMS for families with children ages 2-8 years January 25 Temple Beth El shevat 5:00 6:00 p.m. February 14 Community Free Synagogue 5:00 6:00 p.m. April 26 Temple Judea Fun on Lag B Omer 5:00 6:00 p.m. March 6 Shalom Life Center 5:00 6:00 p.m. RSVP to Leni at lenibsack@jfedlcc.org or 239 481 4449 Ext. 3 PJ LIBRARY PROGRAM FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN AGES 2 8 YEARS OF AGE Thursday, FEBRUARY 22 5:00 6:00 p.m. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUE HAPPY PURIM P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E Refer a new subscriber to PJ Library and your friend will love you! So will PJ Library! For every new subscriber you refer by Do it today! REFER A FRIEND CAMPAIGN https://pjlibrary.org/refer

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27 TEMPLE BETH EL SCHOOLSFort Myers FOCUS ON YOUTH TEMPLE JUDEA SCHOOLSFort Myers Temple Judea Religious School Liz Singer Dir. of Congregational Learning Before leaving for winter break, Tem ple Judeas Religious School students in pre-kindergarten through second grade discussed their monthly value of Ometz Lev (Courage of the Heart) and related it to the story of Chanu kah. They also spoke about how the Vahavta prayer tells Jews to have courage in how we show our love for G-d with all of our heart, and with all of our might. The older students in grades 3-7 learned about the value of Gvurot (Strength). They also likened it to the Chanukah story, as well as learning about other biblical stories that encap sulated the theme of Strength, like David and Goliath. Shabbat of the year featuring the third and fourth grade. Third-graders Ari Kleiman, Noah Moon and Henry in honor of their consecration. This sid dur will become very familiar to them as they use it to strengthen their prayer skills while working toward their Bar Mitzvahs. They, along with fourthgraders Sophia Fox, Devyn Frey, Ella Lader and Allison Manekin, took a strong leadership role at the pulpit and led an amazing service. Currently, the value of the month for grades 3-6 is Achrayut (Responsibility). This will connect to the holi day of Tu BShevat, the environment, the mitzvah (commandment) of lov ing ourselves as others, and Tzedakah (Charity). The younger grades (prekindergarten through second grade) will spend the month by beginning a deeper exploration into the land of Israel and the Parshat HaShavua (Weekly Torah Portion). As I write this, on January 19, our Teens (Madrichim) will hold their Class Shabbat. Soon after that, a num ber of our teens will attend United Synagogue Youths Winter Convention at Camp Shalom in Ocala, Florida. They will connect with hundreds of teens from throughout the region, and pray, sing and learn togeth er in a powerful way. In February, our youngest students will demonstrate their prayer skills by leading us in services and tell the congregation what they have learned so far at Religious School. Stay warm inside Temple Judea by participating in any of our upcoming programming. * Temple Judea Preschool Joann Goldman, Director In January we celebrated the 100th day of school. Thanks to everyone who donated items to make the day so much fun. We had a great time dancing, playing games, and eating delicious snacks. During the month of February, we will continue working on language skills, both in a large group and on an individual basis. Teaching time begins for our pre-k students this month. Each student takes the spotlight and shares his/her knowledge about their subject of choice with program continues throughout the month. Fred E Bear has more homes to visit and is living large in the prek homes. The children enjoy sharing the weekend with Fred E Bear and love writing and drawing in their jour nal about the experience theyve had. When they return to school, the chil dren are proud to stand in front of the classroom sharing the adventure they had. Temple Judea Preschool registration for the 2018-2019 school year will open to the community starting Monday, February 26. If you are interested in learning about our school, please call 239.482.1121 or stop by for a tour. We accept children ages 18 months to 5 years of age. Limited space is avail able. Do not wait. DISCOVER THE FUN! RECEIVE THE GIFT OF FREE JEWISH CHILDREN S BOOKS MAILED TO YOUR HOME EVERY MONTH! SHARE the experience of reading with your children as they grow with PJ Library books. SIGN UP TODAY! Enrollment is open to Jewish families with children between the ages of six months to eight years living in Lee & Charlotte Counties. Funded by the Roth Family Foundation & Asher Family Foundation More information, contact Leni Sack 239.481.4449 ext. 3 lenibsack@jfedlcc.org Candle lighting times:February 2: 5:53 February 9: 5:58 February 16: 6:03 February 23: 6:07 Temple Beth El Religious School Dale M. Cohen, R.J.E., MA.Ed. D.C., to attend the Ltaken Confer ence. Vanessa Sax and I will be participating in the Religious Action Center (LTaken) Social Justice Seminar in Washington. This should be a phenomenal and educationally stimulating trip for our students and for us as well! This will actually be Vanessas second time, so now she is considered to be a veteran of the program. Eight of us will be attending this year. Our students and I will be reporting on our experiences next month. only for the students in our Religious School. Please help and support this endeavor, as you will enjoy the delec table and Kosher for Passover goodies! I have been working with Bartons (Miss Chocolate) for 20 years. (Who is are having fun and, of course, eating high-quality chocolates. Please look March 30. We have to order early because we live in Florida and we have to deal with the melting factor. P J L I B R A R Y R A D I O L I V E

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28 ORGANIZATIONS ZIONIST ORG. of AMERICA Southwest Florida Chapter (914) 329-1024 JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA(239) 566-1771 Read the current and previous editions of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org.Fabulously February Marina Berkovich We thank our sponsors and members for their generosity and belief in our mission and look forward to bringing forward many fabulous local Jewish stories. Look for coverage of our Jewish History Month event in the March is sue. On Sunday, February 18 at 2:00 p.m., Temple Beth El of Fort Myers will hold a community-wide presen tation of Southwest Florida Jewish Pioneers: The Labodas of Fort Myers This documentary was produced in 2017 by the Society and had a limited release in Lee County last year. Thanks to the broader mission of our organization, we can cross county borders and raise overall awareness throughout the Southwest Florida community Many Collier County Jewish residents had a preview of this fascinat cal side stories Gerald Laboda is well known for. He is a man who appreci ates the local Jewish history, and for years collected information he loves to share with Jews, non-Jews, oldtimers, newcomers and the next generation. Through him, the stories of Abraham Myers, Lee Ratner, Jules Freeman, the Rosen Brothers and other Southwest Florida Jewish Pioneers come to life. Gerald was fortunate to know most of them in person. Some of them he studied through the legacy they created and, he, himself a Jewish Pioneer of this region, got to witness and build upon. Very much like during the initial phase of JHSSWF activities, the Temple Sisterhood is putting on this presentation. To learn more, please go to www.templebethel.com/calendar/. The Southwest Florida Jewish History Master Class presentations will resume after Passover. If you know of someone whose story makes him/her a noteworthy SWFL Jewish resident, or to nominate a candidate for an Eyewitness Inter view, please email us with details. We hope you will renew your membership or become a member or an event sponsor. Please email jhsswf @gmail.com, go to www.jhsswf.org or call us. We are looking for volunteers. some time and can work in Microsoft Word without supervision. Explore the early Jewish life of Southwest Florida at Virtual Museum of Southwest Florida Jewish History by going to http://jewishhistorysouth Our Mission Collecting, protecting and preserving Jewish history to celebrate the contri bution by Jews in Southwest Florida every day of every year is part of our mission. Become a member of JHSSWF, a sponsor, business associate, volunteer and/or donor. Contact us at: The Jewish Historical Society of Southwest Florida 899 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Suite 116, Naples FL 34108 239.566.1771 The Jewish Historical Society of Southwest Florida is a section 501(c) (3) charitable organization. HUMANISTIC JEWISH HAVURAHof Southwest Florida (239) 495-8484 The real story of Jonathan Pollard Paula Creed The complicated story of Jonathan Pol lard will be our topic of discussion on Sunday afternoon, February 18 in the David G. Willens Community Room of the Jewish Federation of Greater Naples, 2500 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Suite 2201, Naples. We start with Cof fee n Chat at 1:30 p.m. before speak er Tom Eastwood takes the podium promptly at 2:00 p.m. To RSVP, con com or 239.591.0101. Mr. Eastwood began his law enforcement career with the U.S. Trea surys Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms before transferring as a special agent, and later as an execu tive with the Department of Defense where for 15 years he conducted and led counterintelligence, security and criminal investigations. He was trained by and worked on joint investi gations with many agencies including ATF, CIA, DEA, DoJ, FBI, IRS, Secret Service, and U.S. military and foreign intelli gence agencies. At his retirement, he was serving as Director of the IRS in Michigan, and had previously served in this position in Milwaukee, Louisville and Fargo. In his current career, Eastwood bills himself as lecturer, consultant and Edutainer. Locally, he has lectured at FGCU, Renaissance, Shell Point and for the Bonita Bay Community Association, to great acclaim. Jonathan Jay Pollard (born August 7, 1954) is a former intelligence analyst for the United States government. In 1987, as part of a plea agreement, Pollard pleaded guilty to spying for formation to Israel. He was sentenced to life in prison for violations of the Espionage Act. Pollard is the only American who has received a life sentence for passing was released on November 20, 2015, in accordance with federal guidelines in place at the time of his sentencing. Pollards parole terms were upheld on appeal after he served 30 years of a life sentence. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has asked President Donald Trump to allow Jonathan Pollard to immigrate to Israel, but at the time of his arrest, Israel maintained that Pollard worked for an unauthor ized rogue operation, a position they maintained for more than ten years. The prevailing conception is he was a U.S. citizen who received a life sentence for spying for Israel and giving away sensitive American intelli gence. Tom Eastwood will address the facts behind this highly debated and political case. Was Pollard motivated by love for Israel and its security or was his aim more sinister greed? Also, did he spy only for Israel? Mr. Eastwood will also discuss other Mossad operations (Eichmann, the Hangman of Riga, assassinations) and Israeli in telligence organizations. The complicated issue now is whether Pollard should be allowed to leave the country to live in Israel, or remain in the U.S. and live under the terms of his tethered parole? As Ameri can Jews, where do our allegiances lie? As Humanists we are compelled to look at the facts to discover both sides of the question. We believe reason is the best meth od for the discovery of truth. And then, can reason prevail? Like Tevye from Fiddler on the Roof on the one hand, this. On the other hand, that. Its not al ways easy to reach a proper conclusion. But then, what is the proper conclusion? Reason requires a special disci able, strong convictions are possible. When facts are meager or unavailable, uncertainty follows. Reasonable peo ple often say, I dont know. The use of reason, a distinctly hu man capacity, enables human beings to be most fully human. The goal of the BDS movement Jerrold L. Sobel There is a scourge of anti-Semitism dis guised as anti-Zionism on college cam puses throughout the United States. Its not a hidden secret. Most people, un less hidden away on a secluded island for the past 12 years, have heard about the BDS movement. But relatively few understand the insidiousness of this its having upon Jewish students, both mentally and, in some cases, physi cally at schools once deemed pillars of American freedom and democracy. The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement was start ed in July 2005 by Omar Barghouti, a member of the infamous Barghouti family, whose cousin Marwan is serving multiple life terms in an Israeli prison for multiple murders of Israeli citizens. Ostensibly, the movement was created as a global campaign to increase economic and political pressure on Israel to end what it describes as occupation of Palestinian land and violations of international law. However, to student advocates for Israel, this goal is mere subterfuge for the abridgment of their 1st amendment rights and blatant antiSemitism. In a November press release, 93 prominent Jewish organizations condemned BDS. The signatories, one of which is our next ZOA speaker, Professor Samuel Edelson, stated: Following is a list of staples always in need at the food pantry: P e a n u t b u t t e r a n d j e l l y P a s t a s a u c e ( p a s t a n o t n e e d e d ) R i c e a n d b e a n s C a n n e d v e g e t a b l e s a n d f r u i t s C e r e a l C a n n e d m e a t s C o n d i m e n t s T o i l e t r i e s f o r a d u l t s & c h i l d r e n Gift cards to places like Publix, Walmart, Target, etc., as well as cash donations, are also appreciated. Jewish Family Services helps seniors, individuals and families with a variety of needs. J E W I S H F E D E R A T I O N F O O D P A N T R Y Academic, cultural and commer cial boycotts, divestments and sanctions of Israel are: counterproductive to the goal of peace; antithetical to freedom of speech; and part of a great ples right to self-determination in their homeland, Israel. It also condemns the extremist rhetoric of the delegiti mization movement. In its conclusion, the statement expresses particular concern with the BDS movement on American campuses because: It is antithetical to princi ples of academic freedom and discour ages freedom of speech, has provoked deep divisions among students, and has created an atmosphere of intoler ance and hatred. It calls on students, faculty, administrators and other campus stakeholders to uphold the academic and democratic values of a free and civil discourse that promotes peace and tol erance. Half-jokingly, whenever you can get 93 Jewish organizations to unani mously agree on a common problem, you know its really a problem. But recognizing it as such it not enough. Who are the BDS people on campus? How are they organized? How are they funded? Are they supported by terrorist groups? These and a plethora of other questions will be answered by Prof. Samuel Edelson, a prominent signa tory to this statement and a leading au thority on the BDS movement. Dr. Edelson will be speaking at the Chabad Jewish Center of Naples on, Wednesday, February 21 at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $20. For more informa tion or to RSVP, email me at jerry sobel@aol.com. Happy New Year for Trees! Lawrence & Robin Dermer In September, we witnessed the devastating and destructive force of Hur ricane Irma. Why did some of our trees break during the storm while others rewill likely break when facing a strong ible will bend but never break. How do we handle lifes storms? Do we bend or break? With a strong faith and willingness to bend and be manageable. We know that eventually every storm will come to a conclusion and the sun will shine again. Each Tuesday afternoon, an open session of Mah Jongg is held at the Jewish Federation. Players must be at least advanced beginners, as no lessons are given. DAY: Tuesdays, 12:30~3:30 P.M. FEE: $1 per week for more information call Rona Strausberg at 239.949.9003

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29 ORGANIZATIONS Read the current and previous editions of LCHAYIM online at www.JewishFederationLCC.org. HADASSAHCollier/Lee Chapter (239) 370-6220 Gayle Dorio What a year 2017 was! In the world of Hadassah, there was so much to cel ebrate! Our chapter, Collier-Lee, is one of 22 chapters in the Florida Central Region. In 2017, our chapter partici pated in the Israel at 69 Celebration, sponsored two authors at the Collier County Jewish Book Festival, con ducted a beautiful Shabbat Zocor service, hosted several membership brunches and an afternoon tea. We laughed at the Kosher Comedy Tour. We also found ourselves at California Pizza Kitchen and Charming Charlie for charity fundraisers. We enjoyed the Joys and Oys of Jewish Music with Joy Katzen-Guthrie. Members participated in the evening activity group, four dif ferent book clubs, a movie club and a walking club. Board meetings, several major luncheons and lots of planning committee meetings took place. We enjoyed an afternoon at the Broad way Palm Dinner Theatre. In addition, there was a Chai Society luncheon, a Keepers of the Gate brunch, and a Ma jor Donors/Keepers/Chai Society lun change through support of Israel, advancing health and wellness, and advocacy. Here are just a few highlights: The Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower campaign was completed Hadassah Medical Organization (HMO) performed the worlds gery; made headlines for outstanding innovations, including identi fying the genetic mutation causing a devastating pediatric neurologi cal disease; won the American Academy of Ophthalmologys annual prize for the prevention of blindness around the world Dr. Esti Galili-Weisstub, Founder and Director of Hadassahs Jerusalem Crisis Intervention Center, helped the Mexican government create a strategic plan for responding to the long-term psychological impact of Septembers devastating earthquake. More than 165 events in the U.S. engaged and educated 20,000 attendees about heart disease, nutrition, breast cancer, melanoma, multiple sclerosis and other ill nesses. The Coalition for Womens Health Equity, founded by Hadassah in 2016, grew to 28-member organizations. We helped 395 youngsters attend Young Judaea programs in the U.S. and Israel. We sent more than 33,000 messaghealth, womens economic equity, combating violence against women, immigrant rights, and against hate, racism, and white supremacy. Hadassah Magazine won seven awards from the American Jewish Press Association. As for Karen Cohn, my co-president, and me, this ends our term in ofincoming co-presidents, we wish them as much success as possible as they go forth in our joint mission to make our world a better place! I am moved by the prayer, Modim anachnu lach We acknowledge with thanks. There are many verses these are the ones I feel most deeply: For this fragile planet earth, its times and tides, Its sunsets and seasons. For the joy of human life, its won ders and surprise, Its hopes and achievements. For human community, our com mon past and future hope, our one ness transcending all separation, our capacity to work for peace and justice in the midst of hostility and oppression. For high hopes and noble causes, for faith without fanaticism, for understanding of views not shared. For all who have labored and suf fered for a fairer world, who have lived so that others might live in dignity and freedom. We pray that we may live not by our fears but by our hopes, not by our words but by our deeds. Modim anachnu lach for the privi lege of serving as the co-president of this amazing organization. G-d Bless and see you at the upcoming Hadassah events in 2018! Dont miss our Tues day, January 30 luncheon. See you at the Bountiful Birthday Brunch cel ebrating Israels 70th birthday on Sun day, February 25 at the Hilton Naples! of Riga, assassinations) and Israeli intelligence organizations. The complicated issue now is whether Pollard should be allowed to leave the country to live in Israel, or remain in the U.S. and live under the terms of his tethered parole? As American Jews, where do our allegiances lie? As Humanists we are compelled to look at the facts to discover both sides of the question. We believe reason is the best meth od for the discovery of truth. And then, can reason prevail? Like Tevye from Fiddler on the Roof, on the one hand, this. On the other hand, that. Its not always easy to reach a proper conclusion. But then, what is the proper conclusion? Reason requires a special disciable, strong convictions are possible. When facts are meager or unavailable, uncertainty follows. Reasonable people often say, I dont know. The use of reason, a distinctly human capacity, enables human beings to be most fully human. GENERATIONS OF THE SHOAH SOUTHWEST FLORIDA(239) 963-9347 Three very special GenShoah community programs in February Ida Margolis Moving Pictures: An Analysis of Films About the Holocaust will be presented by Dr. Andre Krauss on Sun day, February 18 at 5:00 p.m. at Beth Tikvah, 1459 Pine Ridge Road, Naples. A research fellow at the Institute of So ciology at the Romanian Academy, Dr. Krauss is a published art historian and media psychologist. He holds doctor ates in History of Art from the Uni versity of Gothenburg, Sweden, and Social Psychology from the University of Bucharest, Romania. Krauss will present a riveting program which will address many discussions and contro including the controversial topic: Is comedy an appropriate genre for nar rating the Holocaust? Film clips from dozens of docuFannys Journey will be presented on Tuesday, February 6 at 7:00 p.m. at Beth Tikvah. Based on a true story, Fannys Journey is an incredible tale of bravery, strength and survival, a story of a daring young girl who will stop at nothing and fear no one. In 1943, 13-year-old Fanny and her younger sisters were sent from their home in France to an Italian foster home for Jewish children. When the Nazis arrive in Italy, their caretak ers desperately organize the departure of the children to Switzerland. However, suddenly these children are left completely on their own. This superbly ternational awards is both suspenseful and inspirational. Fannys Journey is required to shelleygoodman@rogers. com. By request, GenShoah will provide an opportunity for children of Holocaust survivors to meet and discuss their own personal stories. Members of the Second Generation will come together on Sunday, February 4 at 1:00 p.m. at a members home for a discussion of Our Stories. If you would like to listen to stories and share your own story, email either shirleybesikof@ gmail.com or rene@geistgroup.com for information and directions. Information about future GenShoah programs can be found in the GenShoah e-newsletter. For questions or to receive the newsletter, email Ida HAZAK 55+ CHAPTER at Temple Judea(239) 433-0201Joyce Rosinger On Thursday, February 15, HAZAK members will visit the Holocaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida in Naples. The museum will provide a docent. If needed, car pools will be formed at 9:00 a.m. in Temple Judeas parking lot. Contact Freda Confeld at 612.801.3758 if you wish to carpool. The group will have lunch at Brio Tuscan Grille in the Waterside Shops in Naples. RSVP is required for this program. For additional information and to RSVP, please call Lynda Maslow at 239.703.7273. Save the dates: On Sunday, March 11 at Temple Judea Remember, and have dinner after the movie at a local Fort Myers restaurant (to be determined). On Sunday, April 22 we will have a special musical program at Tem ple Judea. Temple Judeas active HAZAK Chapter is a chartered member of the United Synagogue of Conservative Ju daism. Dues are a modest $5 per year per person. Membership in the organi zation is open to the community. Join HAZAK and meet new friends. The HAZAK Chapters are for singles or couples. Its an organization formed by the USCJ to enable members to meet and socialize with each other. Our monthly programs vary in nature. For additional information, please contact Bunny Lawrence at 239.245.7708, or George or Joyce Rosinger at 239.437.1566. SHALOM LIFE CENTER Fort Myers(239) 218-3433 Happy New Year for Trees! Lawrence & Robin Dermer In September, we witnessed the dev astating and destructive force of Hur ricane Irma. Why did some of our trees break during the storm while others re will likely break when facing a strong manageable. We know that eventually every storm will come to a conclusion and the sun will shine again. Tu BShevat, the 15th day of Shevat, is the New Year for Trees. Trees have their own New Year just as people do. Tu BShevat reminds us to care for our world and to honor our natural sur roundings. We celebrate G-ds gift to us with the custom of eating fruits that olives and pomegranates. We attach a cause Man is [compared to] the tree nurturing sturdy and resilient roots like our faith and commitment to G-d, we are able to harvest many fruits in our own lives. On Tu BShevat, we are reminded to revitalize our connection to G-d, and rejuvenate the commitment to our sacred Jewish traditions and our Torah. Historically, trees and nature have a prominent role in Jewish law. There are about 200 Jewish laws that relate G-d gives to Adam in the Garden of Eden was to care for our world. (Genesis 2:15) In the Midrash, we learn that G-d said to Adam, Behold my works, see how beautiful they are! Pay atten tion to it and take care of it so that you do not corrupt and destroy it; for if you corrupt it there is no one to repair it after you. (Ecclesiastes Rabbah 7:20) Its our responsibility to appreciate the earth as a Divine gift. On Rosh Hashanah, Jews around the world ushered in 5778, and just last month we welcomed 2018. On both occasions, many of us reviewed our lives, took inventory and made resolutions to improve ourselves and our relationships with each other and with G-d in the upcoming year. Although trees cannot communicate verbally, their actions speak louder than words. With a little imagination we can relate to the behavior of trees that survive the most turbulent storms and continue to grow strong in both years and wisdom. Join us every Friday for joyful, musical and meaningful Shabbat Ser vices at 7:30 p.m., and Saturday morn ings for Torah study at 10:00 a.m. Visit our website at www.shalomlifecenter. org for our many clubs, programs and special events. Dont forget to mark your calendars for Saturday, Febru ary 24 at 7:30 p.m. for Good Vibra tions on a Saturday Night, a musical journey featuring the many hit songs of The Beach Boys and The Bee Gees. For more information, email us at info@shalomlifecenter.org or call 239.218.3433.

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30 TEMPLE NEWS Send updates and changes to the Jewish Directory below to loriramos@jfedlcc.org. COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUE REFORM 10868 Metro Parkway, South Fort Myers (The Southwest Florida Masonic Center) P.O. Box 07144, Fort Myers, FL 33919 Rabbi Bruce Diamond (bdiamond5@comcast.net) Coordinator: Natalie Fulton Adult Educator: Jessica Evers Phone: (239) 466 6671 E mail: comfreesyn@gmail.com Web site: www.fortmyerssynagogue.com Community Sabbath eve dinner each Friday at 6:30 p.m. Sabbath eve worship every Friday at 7:30 p.m. Light breakfast and Torah study with the rabbi every Saturday morning from 9:30 11:30 a.m. TEMPLE JUDEA CONSERVATIVE 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, FL 33908 Rabbi Marc Sack E mail: rabbi@tjswfl.org President: Jennifer Manekin Director of Congregational Learning: Elizabeth Singer Preschool Director: Joann Goldman templejudeapreschool@gmail.com Phone: 433 0201 Fax: 433 3371 E mail: tjswfl@gmail.com Web site: www.tjswfl.org Services: 6:15 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. Saturday Minyan: 9:00 a.m. Monday Religious School: Sun. 9:30 a.m. noon; Wed. 4:306 p.m. Early childhood education: Preschool, M F, ages 18 months 5 years; Mommy & Me, months 2 years Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism CHABAD OF BONITA SPRINGS/ ESTERO ORTHODOX 24850 Old 41 Road, Suite 20 (in the Bernwood Centre) Bonita Springs, FL 34135 7024 Rabbi Mendy Greenberg Phone: 949 6900 Web site: www.JewishBonita.com Services: Saturday at 10 a.m., followed by a kiddush TEMPLE BETH EL REFORM 16225 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, FL 33908 Rabbi Nicole Luna E mail: rabbiluna@templebethel.com Temple educator: Dale Cohen, Ma.Ed., R.J.E Preschool director: Jesyca Virnig President: Ellis Rabinowitz Phone: 433 0018 Fax: 433 3235 Web site: www.templebethel.com Shabbat services: 7:30 p.m. Friday; Torah study 9:00 a.m. Saturday; B nai Mitzah 10:30 a.m. Saturday Religious School: 9:30 a.m. noon Sunday Hebrew School: 5:00 6:30 p.m Wednesday Judaica Gift Gallery Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE BETH SHALOM REFORM 702 S.E. 24th Ave., Cape Coral, FL 33990 Rabbi Devora Buchen President: Arnie Schwartz Phone: 772 4555 Fax: 772 4625 E mail: office@templebethshalomcc.org Web site: www.templebethshalomcc.org Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday Religious School: Thursday 4:00 6:30 p.m. Torah study with Rabbi Buchen: Shabbat 10:30 a.m. Organizations: Brotherhood, Sisterhood, Family Service (1st Friday of the month at 7:30 p.m.) BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS REFORM Meets at Sanibel Congregational Church 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island Rabbi Stephen L. Fuchs President: Alan Lessack Phone: 239 579 0296 (Oct Apr) 773251 8862 (May Sept) Email: batyamsanibel@gmail.com Cantor: Murray Simon Web site: www.batyam.org Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday (Nov Apr) 7:00 p.m. Friday (May Oct) Adult Education: Saturday, 9:00 11:30 a.m. (Nov Apr) Jewish Current Events: Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. (Nov Apr) Write: P.O. Box 84, Sanibel, FL 33957 Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE SHALOM CHARLOTTE HARBOR AND THE GULF ISLANDS REFORM 23190 Utica Ave., P.O. Box 494675 Port Charlotte, FL 33949 4675 Rabbi Solomon Agin President: Gary Wein Phone: (941) 625 2116 E mail: shalom06@netzero.com Web site: templeshalomfl.com Services: 7:30 p.m. Friday Religious school: Sunday 10 a.m. Beginning Hebrew: Tuesday 4:15 5:15 p.m. Advanced Hebrew: Thursday 4:15 5:15 p.m. Organizations: Sisterhood Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism CHABAD OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY ORTHODOX 204 E Mckenzie St Unit B, Punta Gorda, FL 33950 Rabbi Simon Jacobson Phone: (941) 833 3381 E mail: chabadpg@yahoo.com Web site: www.chabadofcharlottecounty.com Services: Saturday at 10 a.m. followed by a kiddush Torah study: Wednesday at 8 p.m. CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road Fort Myers, FL 33919 Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz Phone: 4337708 Fax: 481 9109 E mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 5:15 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday & Thursday 7:00 a.m. CHABAD JEWISH CENTER OF CAPE CORAL ORTHODOX 1716 Cape Coral Pkwy. W., Cape Coral, FL 33914 Rabbi Yossi Labkowski Phone: 963 4770 E mail: info@chabadcape.com Web site: www.chabadcape.com Services: Friday Evening 7:30 p.m. Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. followed by Kiddush luncheon Sunday morning 8:00 a.m. Monday Friday morning 7:00 a.m. JLI Courses: Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. Weekly Torah Study: Tuesday evening 7:30 p.m. Hebrew School: Sunday 10:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Jgirls: Tuesday 6:00 7:00 p.m. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS Shalom Life Center Lawrence Dermer, Spiritual Leader 218 -3433 AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee): Jacki Waksman (954) 653 -9053 AJC (American Jewish Committee): Brian Lipton (941) 365 -4955 Anti -Defamation League: (561) 988 -2900 B Nai B rith International: (941) 302 -4500 Chevra Kadisha: Gene Sipe 841 -4615 Generations of the Shoah SWFL: 963 -9347 Hadassah Collier/Lee Chapter: Lynn Weiner 598 -1009 Hadassah Sharon Chapter (Charlotte County): Odette Port (941) 505 -1409 Hazak 55+ Chapter: Joyce Rosinger 437 -1566 Humanistic Jewish Havurah: Paula Creed 495 -8484 Israel Bonds: Regional Headquarters: (800) 622 -8017 Jewish Community Services: 481 -4449 Jewish National Fund: (727) 536 -5263 Memorial Tree Planting in Israel 1 -800 -542 -8733 Jewish War Veterans: Post 400: Commander Harvey Charter 246 -3151 Mikvah Bashka of Southwest Florida: Nechamie Minkowicz 822 -2784 ORT Gulf Beaches Chapter Marina Berkovich 566 -1771 IN LEE & CHARLOTTE COUNTIES TEMPLE JUDEAFort Myers (239) 433-0201 Alon Nechushtan and his Israeli Jazz Trip will perform at Temple Judea on Sunday, February 4 at 4:30 p.m. Alon is a jazz pianist raised and trained in Israel. Alon has written for ensembles and orchestras around the world, and has performed at famous venues like Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, Blue just to mention a few. The congrega tion is excited to welcome Alon and his group to Fort Myers. The community is invited to attend. The recommended donation is $10. Chaverot, Temple Judeas Sisterhood, will be cooking with Temple Judeas shlicha, Zohar, and her Israeli friend, Avigail, on Sunday, February 11. Temple Judeas 55+ group, HAZAK, will be taking a tour of the Holocaust Museum & Education Center of Southwest Florida in Naples on Thursday, February 15. Planning is underway for the synagogues big Purim and Member Celebration scheduled for Saturday evening, March 3. This annual fundraiser will honor Temple Judea Preschool Director Joann Goldman for her 21 years of service at the preschool. It will not one to miss! For more information, A wine and cheese reception is held every Friday evening from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., before Shabbat services. Its a great time for members to enjoy socializing and to greet prospective new members and those visiting the synagogue. Join Rabbi Sack at his monthly ToMyers and Brettholtz and Company. It is an hour of open discussion of Torah and Judaism where all levels of background and all questions are encour aged. Everyone is welcome and there is no cost to attend. The next Torah study is Thursday, February 1. Our monthly volunteering at the Salvation Armys Meals with Compas Volunteers are needed for Sundays, February 4 and 18. If you would like to volunteer, please contact Linda Idelson at lindaidelson8@gmail.com. For more information about Tem ple Judea or upcoming programs, call Regular scheduled events: Friday evening Shabbat services at 6:30 p.m. Saturday morning Shabbat servic es at 9:30 a.m. Lunchtime Torah study with Rabbi month. Morning minyan every Monday at 9:00 a.m. TEMPLE BETH ELFort Myers (239) 433-0018 During Rabbi Lunas maternity leave, Temple Beth Els worship services and Torah study continue under Can tor Bessman and our lay leaders. Rabbi Luna and husband Joe Bord send the following message: Thank you so much for all the cards, gifts and do nations to celebrate the birth of our daughter Iris. We are all doing well, though not getting much sleep! Zara loves being a big sister and we are happily adjusting to life as a family of four. Get out your dancing shoes because the Sisterhood of Temple BethEl is sponsoring a Doo-Wop & Mo town show on Sunday, February 11 at 6:00 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Fort Myers at the Bell Tower. This event is open to the community. Uptown Express, a local four-piece band specializing in the Amer ican Bandstand era with a touch of Motown, will perform for your enjoyment. What a great way to feel good and dance the night away. Tickets are $35, or $40 for priority seating in the For information about events or joining Sisterhood, contact Bernice at btcansing@hotmail.com. Open to the community and back by popular demand, Morah Bari will Wednesday, February 14 at 12:00, 1:30 and 3:00 p.m. The prerequisite is Class A, Hebrew grammar. Each course is one hour weekly for 10 weeks. Classand reading and chanting the Friday night service in Hebrew no transliter ation from candle lighting to Kiddush. To register and for further information about classes or private tutoring, call by February 7. Bari has been teaching children and adults at Temple Beth El for over 10 years. Organized by Mike Kashi, thirtytrip of a lifetime in December. From north to south and everything in between, from Tel Avivs historical sites and beach boardwalk to the beautiful waters of the Jordan at Banyas Park, to the actual places where Jewish heroes and heroines lived and died, to Jewish, Christian, Bahai sites, to the golden city of Jerusalem and the Red Hills of Petra, Jordantour members learned more than they ever imagined about history, recent political struggles, cultural mores, and the melting pot that is Israel. Mikes expertise, combined with incentives from the Israel Minis try of Tourism, raised almost $28,000 from this trip to donate to Temple Beth El. For more good news out of Israel, check out these three links: 1. Israels cycling team includes bikers from sixteen countries and di verse languages, cultures and religions. Read about this melting pot of a team at www.israel21c.org/?p=87033 2. Ben Gurion Airport will undergo a massive expansion which will shape the future of tourism in Israel: www. 3. Israeli research on Alzheimers disease reveals new hope. Read about revolutionary advances at www.israel 21c.org/?p=87204 TEMPLE SHALOMCharlotte Harbor & the Gulf Islands (941) 625-2116 The months of December and Januprograms. On Sunday, December 17, over a hundred people gathered on the temples front lawn to light the giant menorah and be treated to wonderful music with Jane Galler, Cantor Riselle Bain, and Rabbi Agin on bass. Everyone was treated to latkes, cookies and much more. Many thanks to the Marc Friedman Memorial Fund, which made the event possible. Rabbi James Rudin gave an outstanding lecture during the early part of December on the Post-1967 War. The

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31 TEMPLE NEWS COMMUNITY FREE SYNAGOGUEFort Myers (239) 466-6671 The Community Free Synagogues 3-week adult education series on American anti-Semitism Between the World Wars continues on Sun day mornings, February 4 and 11 from 10:30 a.m. to noon in the congrega tions Community Hall, 10868 Metro Parkway, Fort Myers. Taught by FGCU Adjunct Professor of American History Jessica Evers, Associate Director of the universitys Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Geno cide Studies, the course will examine a broad-based American ant-Semitism that reached into the highest echelons of government, media and business. This and all Community Free Synagogue events and programs are free and open to the public. C.F.S. Auxiliary Rabbi Thomas Miess is once Hebrew Literacy Ulpan on Sundays, February 18 and 25 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (including a pizza lunch break). Rabbi Miesss enable the novice to read prayerbook Hebrew in just two weeks. Those wishing to continue will be taught how to chant a Torah portion and surrounding prayers in May as adult Bnot and Bnai Mitzvah. Please email synfree@com cast.net to let us know you are coming. Free and open to all. The synagogue will once again host a Federation Senior Lunch Bunch at noon on Thursday, February 22. Lunch is free for all community seniors, but please call Jodi Cohen at 239.481.4449 x6 to let her know you are coming. Also on Thursday, February 22, at 5:00 p.m. C.F.S. will host PJ Library Purim Warm-Up in the Community Hall for families with elemen tary school-aged children. Please call Leni Sack at the Jewish Federation at 239.481.4449 x3 for details. The Community Free Synagogues next installment of its very popular Brown Bag Movie Night features a star-studded cast headed by Dustin Patten, Ben Stiller and Emma Thompson in The Meyerowitz Stories, directed by Noah Baumbach. Its a story of adult of their self-absorbed aging father. Join us at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 22. Pack your dinner. Admission and soft drinks are free. Each Friday evening at 6:30 p.m., The Community Free Synagogue serves a traditional Sabbath dinner. It is free and reservations are never required. At 7:30 p.m., the Sabbath is welcomed with prayer and song. A coffee hour follows worship. Every Saturday morning at 9:30 followed by a lively discussion of the weeks Torah portion until 11:30 a.m., when the Mourners Qaddish is recited. Now in its 13th year, The Commu open community religious resource, not a private membership-based orga nization. All of its events and programs, including youth and adult Jewish education, are open to all and always free. The purpose of The Community Free Synagogue is Study, Worship and Benevolent Acts, generally fol lowing Reform traditions. The syna gogue meets at the Southwest Florida Masonic Center, 10868 Metro Park way in South Fort Myers. For more information, visit its website at www. fortmyerssynagogue.com. C.F.S.s founder and leader, Rabbi Bruce Diamond, D.D., is celebrating his 40th year since ordination at The Hebrew Union College-Jewish In stitute of Religion in Cincinnati, and marks his 21st year in Fort Myers. BAT YAM TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDSSanibel (773) 251-8862 The increase in attendance at Friday night Shabbat services can be attrib uted to the new presiding dynamic duo of Rabbi Stephen Fuchs and Cantor Murray Simon, plus the returning snowbirds. The result is that services are now in the spacious Sanctuary of the Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ (UCC) rather than in Fellowship Hall. The superior acous tics in the Sanctuary transmit the beau ty of Cantor Simons chanting and Abi gail Allisons piano accompaniment. On January 5, the audience was privileged to witness and enjoy the special formal installation ceremony of Rabbi Fuchs and Cantor Simon. Their friend and colleague, Rabbi Paul Citrin Awareness Partnerships located in Fort \000\HUV\017\003ZLOO\003VSHDN\003RQ\003WKLV\003GLrvFXOW\003EXW\003 important topic. For those who wish to know about her whereabouts, but dont follow her vailed against the Peace Corps bureau cracy. On Wednesday, February 21, she year commitment. It will be interesting to learn the impact of the change for charitable contributions in the recently enacted federal income tax legislation. One hopes that the Jewish values of tzeda kah and tikkun olam will continue to inspire charitable contributions to wor thy religious and secular causes as in past years. All Temple Bat Yam services and classes take place on the campus of our host, the Sanibel Congregation United Church of Christ, located at 2050 Peri winkle Way on Sanibel, where mem bers of the community, guests and visi tors are always welcome to join with congregants. Salvation Armys Meals with CompasVolunteers are needed for Sundays, February 4 and 18. If you would like to volunteer, please contact Linda Idelson at lindaidelson8@gmail.com. For more information about Temple Judea or upcoming programs, call Regular scheduled events: Friday evening Shabbat services at 6:30 p.m. Saturday morning Shabbat services at 9:30 a.m. Lunchtime Torah study with Rabbi month. Morning minyan every Monday at 9:00 a.m. TEMPLE SHALOMCharlotte Harbor & the Gulf Islands (941) 625-2116 The months of December and Janu programs. On Sunday, December 17, over a hundred people gathered on the temples front lawn to light the giant menorah and be treated to wonderful music with Jane Galler, Cantor Riselle Bain, and Rabbi Agin on bass. Every one was treated to latkes, cookies and much more. Many thanks to the Marc Friedman Memorial Fund, which made the event possible. Rabbi James Rudin gave an outstanding lecture during the early part of December on the Post-1967 War. The program was made possible from the Robert B. Bader Memorial Fund. As of press time, The Chosen, was scheduled to be screened on January 21 followed by March on a Sunday afternoon. The Intro to Judaism class contin ued to meet during January on Tuesday evenings. The Lunch and Learn with the Forward class will meet on Tuesday, January 30. Many thanks to the donations to the Rabbis Discretionary Fund that make these programs happen. The New Member Sabbath will be held on Friday, January 26. During the service, ten new members will be formally welcomed into the Temple Shalom family. An Oneg will be held in their honor. On Saturday, January 27, there is a Relax Shabbat Service with Jane Galler. Following the service is a lunch and Tu BShevat program led by Dr. During February, Jewish Music Month will be observed on Friday, February 2 with Dr. David Katz. On Friday, February 9, during Shabbat services, AIPAC will present a special program on the BDS movement in the United States. A Q&A will follow during the Oneg. The Annual Art Auction will be held on Saturday, February 10 at the Kingsway Country Club. This is an out standing event that is not to be missed. the Union for Reform Judaism and its rabbi is a member of the Central Conference of American Rabbis. The temple serves North Fort Myers, Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte and North Port. Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Genocide StudiesDedicated to educating all sectors of society about Jewish civilization, the Holocaust, and genocide through: scholarship outreach inquiry sharing knowledge preserving the record helping teachers encouraging studentsVisit www.fgcu.edu/hc/ Dr. Paul Bartrop, Director Stay in touch throughout the month. Sign up for the Federations e-blasts. Get the latest information on upcoming community events and cultural activities, breaking news items, updates from Israel and lots more. Send an email to lenibsack@jfedlcc.org

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