Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Full Text

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** SUNDAYSome sun 89 / 73SATURDAYMostly sunny 90 / 73TODAYMostly sunny 91 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Friday, October 5, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A feud between Bay District Schools and the Florida Health Department of Bay County (FDOH-Bay) boiled over Thursday as Superintendent Bill Husfelt issued a letter barring health department nurses from coming on school campuses.The letter comes after four health department RNs showed up at Merritt Brown Middle School on Monday and stayed on campus from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. auditing student records, according to Husfelt, before informing staff they would need to be back the next day to complete the audit.The manner in which your department has begun the process of pervasive auditing on our campuses is an intolerable disruption to the provision of both educa-tional and health services of Bay District Schools,Ž Husfelt wrote.Husfelt wrote that Everitt Middle School was similarly disruptedŽ on Wednesday Husfelt bars DOH nursesSuperintendent says he will ask School Board to transfer those duties to PanCare By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Steve Jenkins has gone fishing for more than 20 years but never knew what the fish did when they werent biting.Jenkins, an Army veteran who served from 1968 to 1970, has tracheal cancer and isnt sure how much longer he has to live. But before he dies, hes going with his hospice caregiver Dustin Womble to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta, a place hes always wanted to visit to learn more about those mysterious fish.The two are leaving Sunday for the long drive and plan to go to the aquarium Monday morning, where they will participate in a dolphin Veteran in hospice care gets Atlanta dream tripSteve Jenkins and hospice caregiver Dustin Womble will travel to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta on SundayRN Dustin Womble, left, chats with Army veteran Steve Jenkins on Wednesday in Panama City. The two are planning a trip to the G eorgia Aquarium through the Dream Foundation. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Steve Jenkins writes a response to a question Wednesday. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] SUIT DISMISSED AGAINST TDC CHAIRMAN LOCAL | B1 LOCAL & STATE | B1STATE AVENUE SIDEWALK PROJECT AHEAD OF SKED SPORTS | C1MOSLEYS BOYS GRAB COUNTY GOLF TITLE SPORTS | C1MARLINS LOOK TO SHAKE OFF LOSS TO RAMS Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-5 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints .....................A8 See TRIP, A3 See KAVANAUGH, A3 See NURSES, A4By Alan Fram and Lisa MascaroThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh acknowledged Thursday he might have been too emotionalŽ when testifying about sexual mis-conduct allegations as he made a bid to win over wavering GOP senators on the eve of a crucial vote to advance his confirmation.The 53-year-old judge said in an op-ed that he knows his tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have saidŽ during testimony last week to the Judiciary Com-mittee. He forcefully denied the allegations.Going forward, you can count on me to be the same kind of judge and person I have been for my entire 28-year legal career: hardworking, even-keeled, open-minded, independent and dedicated to the Consti-tution and the public good,Ž he wrote in The Wall Street Journal.Kavanaugh: I might have been too emotionalKavanaugh

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** A2 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldCary Mack and Jennifer King, of Santa Rosa Beach, emailed this photo of a half rainbow over Powell Lake.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.CATCH OF THE DAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@ pcnh.com. Jerry Baker shared this photo in the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and asked, What kind of “ sh is this please? We released it and it immediately buried itself in the sand.Ž Several members identi“ ed the “ sh. John Miller was one who replied, Star gazer. Very lucky it didnt shock the crap out of you.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] HAPPY BIRTHDAYFLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 04-06-15-29-31 Lotto: 11-12-31-35-37-45; estimated jackpot: $3.5 million Lotto XTRA: 03 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot: $405 million Pick 2 Evening: 2-4 Pick 2 Midday: 8-6 Pick 3 Evening: 5-0-2 Pick 3 Midday: 5-2-3 Pick 4 Evening: 3-5-3-1 Pick 4 Midday: 0-9-6-1 Pick 5 Evening: 1-0-0-9-8 Pick 5 Midday: 6-6-4-3-9 Powerball: 41-53-59-63-66; Powerball: 3; Power Play: 3; estimated jackpot: $229 million YOUNG ARTISTSophia McWaters Grade 1. Waller Elementary School. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY Rhythm-and-blues singer Arlene Smith (The Chantels) is 77. Singer-musician Steve Miller is 75. Rock singer Brian Johnson (AC/DC) is 71. Blues musician Rick Estrin is 69. Actress Karen Allen is 67. Writer-producerdirector Clive Barker is 66. Rock musician David Bryson (Counting C rows) is 64. Astrophysicist-author Neil deGrasse Tyson is 60. Memorial designer Maya Lin is 59. Actor Daniel Baldwin is 58. Rock singer-musician Dave Dederer is 54. Hockey Hall of Famer Mario Lemieux is 53. Actor Guy Pearce is 51. Actress Josie Bissett is 48. Singer-actress Heather Headley is 44. Pop-rock singer Colin Meloy (The Decemberists) is 44. Rock musician Brian Mashburn (Save Ferris) is 43. Actress Parminder Nagra is 43. Actor Scott Weinger is 43. Actress Kate Winslet is 43. Rock musician James Valentine (Maroon 5) is 40. Rock musician Paul Thomas (Good Charlotte) is 38. Actor Jesse Eisenberg is 35. TV personality Nicky Hilton is 35.Send your birthday information and photos to pcnhnews@pcnh.com. TodayCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: through Saturday at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alices on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer and music. THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. For details, www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Interactive demonstration: cow camp. Parking $5 per vehicle. SaturdayCAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Battle of Marianna re-enactment at 10 a.m. Parking $5 per vehicle. COFFEE TALKS: 10-11 a.m. at Vinny & Bays Coffee Shop in Panama City. Come for coffee and a candid conversation about what it takes to be a foster parent. For details, Taryn Tasker, www.lmccares. org or 850-522-4485 FALL FESTIVAL AND PUMPKIN SALES: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park. Fun, food, music and games. Pumpkins sold from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For details, 850-233-5059 ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR APP LAUNCH PARTY: 2-3 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Company Museum, 1134 Beck Ave. Join the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership to celebrate the launch of its Walking Tour App. SundayPANAMA CITY RESCUE MISSION RECOVERY GRADUATION: 10:15 a.m. at First Assembly of God, 1701 N. East Ave., Panama City. For details, 850-215-5029 MondayBAY COUNTY AUDUBON MONTHLY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center on Airport Road. Open to the public. Jim Cox of Tall Timbers Conservancy will talk on the brown-headed nuthatch. For details, www.baycountyaudubon.org MERMAID MONDAYS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Gulf World, 5412 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. For details, GulfWorld.net TuesdayCOFFEE TALKS: 5-6 p.m. at W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown. Come for coffee and a candid conversation about what it takes to be a foster parent. For details, Taryn Tasker, www.lmccares.org or 850-522-4485 JOYFUL PAINT PARTY: 6-8 p.m. in Grand Lagoon D at Sheraton Bay Point for Short Presentation by Gulf World Marine Institute representatives. To bene“ t the Gulf World Marine Institute. $40 per individual, $65 per couple. For details, https://www.beachartgroup.com/reservations-on-line. html CIVICCON WATCH PARTY: 6 p.m. at PCMI Campus, 200 E. Beach Drive, Panama City. Simulcast of year-long project to series of public town halls and workshops with the nations leading thinkers and experts. Speaker is Donald Shoup on Getting Parking Right.Ž For details, visitwww.pnj. com/topic/CivicConGO & DOThe Associated PressToday is Friday, Oct. 5, the 278th day of 2018. There are 87 days left in the year.Todays Highlight in HistoryOn Oct. 5, 1983, Solidarity founder Lech Walesa was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.On this dateIn 1829, the 21st president of the United States, Chester Alan Arthur, was born in North Fair“ eld, Vermont. In 1931, Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon completed the “ rst non-stop ” ight across the Paci“ c Ocean, arriving in Washington state some 41 hours after leaving Japan. In 1947, President Harry S. Truman delivered the “ rst televised White House address as he spoke on the world food crisis. In 1958, racially-desegregated Clinton High School in Clinton, Tennessee, was mostly leveled by an early morning bombing. In 1969, the British TV comedy program "Monty Python's Flying Circus" made its debut on BBC 1. In 1984, the space shuttle Challenger blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center on an 8-day mission; the crew included Kathryn D. Sullivan, who became the “ rst American woman to walk in space, and Marc Garneau, the “ rst Canadian astronaut. In 1988, Democrat Lloyd Bentsen lambasted Republican Dan Quayle during their vice presidential debate, telling Quayle, "Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy." In 1989, a jury in Charlotte, North Carolina, convicted former P-T-L evangelist Jim Bakker of using his television show to defraud followers. In 1999, two packed commuter trains collided near London's Paddington Station, killing 31 people. In 2001, tabloid photo editor Robert Stevens died from inhaled anthrax, the “ rst of a series of anthrax cases in Florida, New York, New Jersey and Washington.TODAY IN HISTORY

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** Kavanaughs column appeared aimed at winning over the three GOP senators who remain unde-cided. He got an additional boost late Thursday from President Donald Trump, who praised his nominees incredible intellectŽ and scoffed at detractors during a campaign rally in Minnesota.Trump said the protest-ers and their rage-fueled resistance is starting to backfire at a level nobody has ever seen before.Ž He was referring to polling that shows some improvement for Republicans heading into the midterm election.Earlier Thursday, a pair of undeclared Republican senators accepted a confidential new FBI report into sex-abuse allegations against Kavanaugh as thorough,Ž bolstering GOP hopes for confirma-tion as the Senate plunged toward showdown votes.One of the senators hinted he was open to supporting Kavanaugh as party leaders set a pivotal preliminary vote for 10:30 a.m. Friday. If that succeeds, a final roll call was expected Saturday as the long, emotional battle over the conservative jurist drew toward its climax.Six days after Trump reluctantly ordered the FBI to scrutinize the accu-sations„ which allegedly occurred in the 1980s and Kavanaugh has denied „ leading GOP lawmakers briefed on the agencys confidential document all reached the same conclusion: There was no verification of the womens past claims and nothing new.Democrats complained that the investigation was shoddy, omitting interviews with numerous potential witnesses, and accused the White House of limiting the FBIs leeway. Those not interviewed in the reopened background investigation included Kavanaugh himself and Christine Blasey Ford, who ignited the furor by alleging hed molested her in a locked room at a 1982 high school gathering. The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A3 KAVANAUGHFrom Page A1encounter. The trip is made possible through the Dream Foundation, which accord-ing to its website provides end-of-life dreams that offer inspiration, comfort and closure.ŽI was in a bad state before Dustin was assigned as my nurse,Ž Jenkins, who has trouble speaking because of the cancer, wrote on a board Wednes-day while sitting on the porch of his Panama City home. Dustin and I dont talk about dying. Its more like, What ya doin this weekend? ŽThe Army veteran fell down, leading to his meet-ing Womble, who was assigned as his caregiver at the end of May, but is in much better health now that the two have become close. Jenkins was given four months to live in April and now says its up to Godas towhen hes going.Ive really gotten the chance to get to know him,Ž said Womble, who works for Emerald Coast Hospice. I definitely look forward to our visits. Every time I leave here to go somewhere, he tells me to be careful out there driving. Its more than just a patient. Thats why Im excited about the road trip.ŽWhen they visit the Georgia Aquarium, Jenkins is eager to see schools of fish and figure out why or how they know when the other fish are going to turn.Womble said hospice is more than medicine and the other usual aspects of health care „ its making the best of the life they have and getting to know personal details about a patient. Womble has worked 10 years in health care but never has done something like this with a patient before.A lot of it is mental,Ž Jenkins said of his recovery since being in Wombles care.Jenkins has other people who care about him, including close friend Michael Polk, who stopped by Wednesday to check on Jenkins and called the Army veteran a good man.ŽI met him about 10, 15 years ago. Hes the best man you ever want to meet,Ž Polk said. He could be my father or brother or best friend. Any time I ever needed or wanted help or to talk, we would talk or see whats best.ŽWomble has similar compliments for Jenkins and said his time with the Army veteran and upcoming trip is the most rewarding experienceŽ he has had during his time in health care.Hospice is more than caregiving for the dying,Ž Jenkins wrote. TRIPFrom Page A1Steve Jenkins, left, stands for a photo with RN Dustin Womble on Wednesday in Panama City. The two are planning a trip to the Georgia Aquarium through the Dream Foundation. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** A4 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Heraldwith five RNs, and that addi-tional audits were scheduled for Jinks Middle School, Deane Bozeman School, as well as Tyndall, Springfield, Deer Point, Lucille Moore, Patronis and Hutchison Beach elementary schools and Breakfast Point Academy.In addition to barring nurses from campus, Husfelt stated he intends to recom-mend the Bay District School Board terminate the existing memorandum of understand-ing (MOU) in place with the health department, opting instead to transfer those duties to PanCare Inc.After consulting with our attorney, and with experts in Tallahassee, I have decided to recommend that the School Board terminate our MOU with the Bay County Depart-ment of Health,Ž Husfelt said in a statement. I am also authorizing staff to submit our School Health Plan with-out signatures from the Bay County Department of Health since we are unable to reach an agreement with them despite multiple attempts to reach a compromise.ŽThe order comes after months of back-and-forth between Bay District Schools and the health department, both over the status of the School Health Plan, which the district has not submitted to state health officials in Talla-hassee despite it being almost a month past deadline, as well as allegations that health department nurses entered school health rooms without authorization and removed student records without informing the district.Last Thursday, Husfelt asked the states Inspector Generals Office to investi-gate the matter.The allegations came to light Wednesday as part of a public records request by The News Herald.This is the latest in a drawn-out dispute between the two entities. Bay District Schools has contracted with the health department for the past several years to provide health technicians for every school, as well as RNs to draft student individual health care plans. In May, health depart-ment officials went before the school board to request modi-fications to the contract and informed the board they no longer would serve Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students. The district then opted to contract with PanCare for health technician services, but maintained an MOU with the health depart-ment to have nurses audit student records and collect data.If the school board adopts Husfelts recommendation; however, that MOU will be terminated and many of the responsibilities previously held by the health department in the overall School Health Plan will be transferred to PanCare.The new School Health Plan, without the health departments signatures, will go before the school board during Tuesdays hearing.In the meantime, Husfelt said school officials are work-ing with PanCare and parents to update the missing health records.I am disappointed that I had to request an investigation to settle the matter of the missing records but I look forward to a final resolution and to moving forward,Ž Husfelt said. NURSESFrom Page A1 By Gregory Katz, Michael Balsamo and Raf CasertThe Associated PressLONDON „ The West unleashed an onslaught of new evidence and indictments Thursday accusing Russian military spies of hacking so widespread that it seemed to target anyone, anywhere who investigates Moscows involvement in an array of criminal activities „ including doping, poisoning and the downing of a plane.Russia defiantly denied the charges, neither humbled nor embarrassed by the exceptional revelations on one of the most high-tension days in East-West relations in years. Moscow lashed back with alle-gations that the Pentagon runs a clandestine U.S. biological weapons program involving toxic mosquitoes, ticks and more.The nucleus of Thursdays drama was Russias military intelligence agency known as the GRU, increasingly the embodiment of Russian med-dling abroad.In the last 24 hours: U.S. authorities charged seven officers from the GRU with hacking international agencies; British and Australian authorities accused the GRU of a devastating 2017 cyberattack on Ukraine, the email leaks that rocked the U.S. 2016 election and other damaging hacks; And Dutch officials alleged that GRU agents tried and failed to hack into the worlds chemical weapons watchdog, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.The ham-handed attempted break-in „ involving hacking equipment in the trunk of a car and a trail of physical and virtual clues „ was the most stunning operation revealed Thursday. It was so obvious, in fact, that it almost looked like the Russians didnt care about getting caught.Basically, the Russians got caught with their equipment, people who were doing it, and they have got to pay the piper. They are going to have to be held to account,Ž U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said in Brussels, where he was meeting with NATO allies.Mattis said the West has a wide variety of responsesŽ available. Britains ambassador to the Netherlands, Peter Wilson, said the GRU would no longer be allowed to act with impunity.Calling Russia a pariah state,Ž British Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Where Russia acts in an indiscriminate and reckless way, where they have done in terms of these cyberattacks, we will be exposing them.ŽDeputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov of Russia said in a statement that the U.S. is taking a dangerous pathŽ by deliberately inciting ten-sions in relations between the nuclear powers,Ž adding that Washingtons European allies should also think about it.West accuses Russian spy agency of attacksMark Flynn, Director General for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, left, and Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers, attend a news conference, Thursday at the Justice Department in Washington. [JACQUELYN MARTIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] NATION & WORLDBy Laura Davison, Lynnley Browning and David VoreacosBloombergCharles Rettig was barely 24 hours into his new job as President Donald Trumps hand-picked chief tax offi-cial when a bombshell news report hit, alleging shady tax dealings by Trump and his family roughly 20 years ago.With New York state and city officials now saying theyll examine allegations raised by the New York Times, Rettig „ who built a reputation as a tough tax litigator in private practice „ risks incurring Trumps wrath if he chooses to follow suit, according to tax lawyers and veterans of the Internal Revenue Service.Look what happened to Sessions when he wouldnt block the Russian investigation,Ž said David Klasing, a Calfornia-based tax litigator and accountant. He was referring to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who recused himself from overseeing Special Counsel Robert Muellers investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election „ and has been lambasted by Trump on Twitter ever since.On Tuesday, Trump focused his ire on the Tim es, calling its article a hit pieceŽ that was very oldŽ and boring.Ž White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has said that many decades ago, the IRS reviewed and signed off on these transactions.ŽAn IRS spokesman didnt respond to a request for comment. Tax lawyers say that while the statute of limitations might bar the IRS from pursuing any criminal charges related to the details alleged in the Times story, the agency could levy civil penalties totaling hundreds of mil-lions of dollars „ if it proved that the Trumps pursued strategies they knew to be illegal.But thats a big if.Ž One problem for investigators would be getting access to records that are about two decades old.Trump family tax report quickly tests new IRS chiefGovernment wants to use insects to help genetically modify cropsBy Candice Choi and Seth BorensteinThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon.In an opinion paper pub-lished Thursday in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peacetime purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field.That would mark a departure from the current widely used procedure of genetically modifying seeds for crops such as corn and soy, before they grow into plants.The military research agency says its goal is to protect the nations food supply from threats like drought, crop dis-ease and bioterrorism by using insects to infect plants with viruses that protect against such dangers.Food security is national security,Ž said Blake Bextine, who heads the 2-year-old proj-ect at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, an arm of the U.S. Department of Defense.The State Department said the project is for peaceful purposes and does not violate the Biological Weapons Convention. The U.S. Depart-ment of Agriculture said its scientists are part of the research, which is being con-ducted in contained labs.The technology could work in different ways. In the first phase, aphids „ tiny bugs that feed by sucking sap from plants „ infected plants with a virus that temporarily brought about a trait. But researchers are also trying to see if viruses can alter the plants genes themselves to be resistant to dangers throughout the plants life.Scientists: Military program could be seen as bioweaponThis 2013 photo shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. [MEENA HARIBAL/BOYCE THOMPSON INSTITUTE VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Rettig

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A5

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** A6 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A7 BUSINESSTHE DOW 30COMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $213.84 -1.92 Am. Express $107.74 -0.32 Apple $227.99 -4.08 Boeing $389.99 -2.31 Caterpillar $156.75 -1.47 Chevron $124.95 -0.36 Cisco $48.38 -0.43 Coca-Cola $45.85 -0.02 DowDuPont $64.01 -0.38 Exxon $85.58 -0.57 Goldman $227.78 -0.30 Home Depot $198.85 -4.89 Intel $48.13 -0.63 IBM $151.31 -1.91 J&J $139.35 +0.32 JP Morgan $115.27 +1.03 McDonalds $165.80 +1.14 Merck $71.22 -0.15 Microsoft $112.79 -2.38 Nike $80.18 -2.32 P“ zer $44.70 -0.11 Proc. & Gamble $81.92 -1.11 Travelers $130.79 +1.25 United Tech. $140.39 -0.63 Verizon $55.02 +0.73 Walgreen Boots $73.34 -0.46 Walmart $94.21 +0.14 Walt Disney $116.13 -0.78 United Health $268.32 -2.58 Visa $146.76 -2.61STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG. AT&T $34.12 +0.20 DARDEN RESTS $108.14 +0.24 GEN DYNAMICS $205.91 +1.12 HNCOCK WHTNY $48.55 -0.01 HANGER INC $20.05 +0.00 HOME BANCS $21.70 -0.25 ITT CORP $60.72 -0.38 THE ST JOE $16.53 -0.10 KBR INC $21.49 -0.16 L-3 COMMS $211.59 -1.88 OCEANEERING $27.07 -0.33 REGIONS $18.67 +0.20 SALLIE MAE $11.03 -0.18 SOUTHERN $42.98 +0.19 SUNTRUST $67.18 +0.06 WESTROCK $51.59 -0.21 ING-RAND $104.23 -0.18 ENGILITY $34.18 -0.78 Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City, 850-769-1278. FOREIGN EXCHANGEU.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.29 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 19.11 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.87 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.77A contractor works near the main entrance of the rebuilt WTC Cortlandt station at the MTAs Oculus transportation hub and shopping center, Sept. 10 in New York. [BEBETO MATTHEWS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] What to keep your eye on in todays monthly US jobs reportBy Christopher RugaberThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The U.S. economy is humming, unem-ployment is skating near a half-century low and busi-nesses are eager „ desperate, in some cases „ to hire. And when the government issues its September employment report Friday, expectations are high for another sunny picture of the job market.Economists have forecast that the government will report that employers added a solid 184,000 jobs, according to the data provider Fact-Set, and that unemployment dipped from 3.9 percent to 3.8 percent, matching an 18-year low. The monthly jobs report provides a wealth of informa-tion beyond the number of job added and the unemployment rate. Here are five things to watch in Fridays jobs report for September:WILL UNEMPLOYMENT HIT A NEARLY 50-YEAR LOW? If the jobless rate should fall two ticks to 3.7 percent, it would reach the lowest level in nearly “ ve decades. The unemployment rate hit 3.5 percent in December 1969, after a streak of brisk economic growth had kept joblessness at or below 4 percent for four years. If the rate keeps dropping, it will heighten two concerns: Has the economy soaked up nearly all the people who want or are able to work? And if it has, will a shortage of workers compel businesses to raise pay quickly and sharply? ARE MORE AMERICANS LOOKING FOR WORK? If people who arent working are encouraged by steady hiring and pay increases to begin looking for a job, their in” ux could prevent unemployment from falling further. Heres why: The government counts people as unemployed only if theyre actively looking for a job. If more people start looking „ and dont immediately “ nd a job „ the government will count them as unemployed. And the unemployment rate could rise or „ as other unemployed workers “ nd jobs „ stay the same. For prime ageŽ workers „ those who are 25 through 54 „ the proportion who either have a job or are looking for one has crept up in the past year. Yet its still below its pre-recession levels. ARE FULL-TIME JOBS STILL GROWING? The healthy economy hasnt only produced lots more jobs; its also allowed people to work more hours. A rising number of companies are converting parttimers who have wanted more hours to full-time w orkers and are posting more full-time jobs. At a time of intense competition in some industries for hires, offering full-time work is one way for employers to attract more applicants. More hours, of course, mean larger weekly paychecks. The number of people working part time who would prefer full-time work has reached its lowest point since the Great Recession in 2008-2009. WILL PAY KEEP RISING? In August, average hourly wages rose 2.9 percent from 12 months earlier „ the biggest year-over-year increase since the recession of“ cially ended in June 2009. The strength of that gain, if it can be sustained, would suggest that the low unemployment rate is pressuring more companies to raise pay in order to attract and keep workers. Amazons announcement this week that it would increase its minimum hourly wage to $15 for all its U.S. employees elevated the pressure on other employers to lift their wages as well. EFFECT FROM HURRICANE FLORENCE? Many economists have forecast that Hurricane Florence, which ” ooded parts of North and South Carolina last month, depressed Septembers job growth by roughly 30,000. In particular, hiring might have been constrained in construction and restaurants because the storm likely closed construction work sites and restaura nts. In part, thats because the Labor Department counts people as employed only if they were actually paid during the period of each month when it conducts its jobs surveys. So any hourly workers who werent paid during the survey period because Florence forced their employer to close temporarily wouldnt have been counted as employed during September.5 things to watchBy Marcy Gordon and Sarah Skidmore SellThe Associated PressWASHINGTON„ Big real estate developers like Donald Trump have long benefited from a myriad of legal loopholes and breaks that can shrink their tax bills. Their advantages expanded further with the federal tax overhaul that took effect this year.Even before the new tax law, the U.S. tax code provided loopholes and special breaks that favor wealthy real estate inves-tors. Tax experts say theyre often able to claim losses more quickly and easily than other taxpay-ers. They are also afforded several ways of delaying or avoiding reporting profits to the Internal Revenue Service.They can fall behind on their debts and still face fewer tax penalties for having the debt forgiven than other kinds of investors, according to Steve Wamhoff, director of federal tax policy at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Trump took advantage of that, Wamhoff says, when he couldnt repay debts on his Atlantic City casinos in the 1990s and early 2000s.Wealthy families typically try to transfer some of their assets during their lifetime to ease the tax burden on their heirs. There are a number of ways to do so legally. As assets go, real estate is one of the most flexible options.But a report this week by The New York Times suggests that the Trump family cheated the IRS for decades, using dubious tax maneuvers and out-right fraud in some cases. A lawyer for Trump has disputed the Times find-ings of possible tax fraud or evasion and said that parts of the report are extremely inaccurate.ŽThe U.S. has a long history of property own-ership and related tax law, says Anne-Marie Rhodes, a professor at Loyola Uni-versity Chicago School of Law. As real estate holdings have gotten more complex in recent years, so have applications of the law.How big developers bene t from web of tax breaksMARKET WATCHDow 26,627.48 200.91 Nasdaq 7,879.51 145.58 S&P 2,901.61 23.90 Russell 1,646.91 24.38 NYSE 13,042.29 145.58COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,197.20 1.10 Silver 14.510 .080 Platinum 821.00 11.20 Copper 2.7650 .0575 Oil 74.33 2.08PANAMA CITYCivics program watch party set for TuesdayThe nonprofit Panama City Growing Strong is set to host a watching of an ongoing civics program starting on Tuesday.According to a press release, the first watch party will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Panama City Marine Institute campus meeting room on 200 E. Beach Drive. The presentation will feature Donald Shoup, an expert on city planning and street parking.The CivicCon Series is a year-long program, organized by the Studer Community Institute and the Pensacola News Journal, of public town halls and workshops with experts who share their expertise on what is needed to develop communities.Panama City Growing Strong will use the News Journals Facebook live feed to show the program to those interested in watching it. All programs are free and open to the public.IN BRIEFSpecial to The News HeraldYour future employee is a hard-working young man who has been volunteering twice a week as a store associate at Salvation Army the past two years. He likes to feel included and part of a team while not being treated differently. He has great work references where everyone has embraced and appreciated his work ethic. He would like to work in a retail environment and is knowledgeable in stock-ing, sorting, and organizing retail items on sales floors and warehouse areas. He also is used to keeping a clean and safe work space environment. He is dedicated and depend-able working a part-time work schedule and would be happy working up to 20 hours a week while being flexible with the needs of employer.He is eligible for OJT, a program where her salary, workers comp and liability insurance are provided at no cost to the employer for a 90-day work trial period. He would make a great addition to your team. Will you give him a chance and consider an interview for this fine young man?For information about him or any of the other clients or services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.Celebrating: We are so thankful to all our community partners and their businesses for their support and participation at our recent Job-A-Palooza and their continued investment in our clients and our employment program.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTFuture Arc of the Bay clients and their peer mentors are shown honing their employment skills at the recent Job-A-Palooza at Gulf Coast State College. Students were paired with mentors to compete in a series of job-related tasks for fun and prizes. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** A8 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com ANOTHER VIEW Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTS A rose is a rose by any other name, and everyone deserves one from time to time, while brickbats seemingly hit all of us at some point or another in life. Here are some of each in local news last week:A Rose for ... Lynn Havens latest splash pad that opened Monday at Cain-Griffin Park. Named after Leon Miller, the citys first African-American city commissioner and a still-active member of the community, it is the second splash pad for the city. Miller, who remains a resident and supported the splash pad going to Cain-Griffin, cut the ribbon at Mondays opening.Brickbats for ... Lynn Haven for voting to rid the city of its outside attorney in favor of an in-house attorney.A possibility mentioned was a current police officer licensed to practice in Texas„ in an effort to save money. Seeing government strive to cut costs is great, but replacing the city attorney with an in-house attorney who has other duties borders on bizarre. The fact that the city was spending close to $200,000 a year on its attorney might be a sign that the city is in need of legal advice from time to time from a seasoned government attorney. Commissioner Antonius Barnes, who was joined by Commissioner Rodney Friend in dissenting, said he was "appalled and disgustedŽ at the vote, said, "I think that the commission is making a very, very bad decision.Ž We agree.A Rose for ... the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership working with Destination Panama City to secure matching grants for an audio walking tour app for visitors to St. Andrews. The app allows those interested to learn more about the historic buildings and sites as they actually walk by them, creating an engaging and unique outing.A Rose for ... new Panama City City Manager Mark McQueen, simply for showing up to his first day on the job with a positive attitude, a plan and an open discussion with a reporter about both. I want to make (Panama City) great in every dimension, whether its quality of life, business development, economic development, the schools, pedestrian-friendly. Why cant we be the great place? Thats the goal.Ž Brickbats are on standby and hopefully will see no action.A Rose for ... Callaway for approving a budget that reduces ad valorem taxes and increases starting pay for employees. We hope other cities are taking notes.A Brickbat for ... Mosquitos carrying and spreading the West Nile Virus. In the last week the county recorded its fifth case, raising concern for human transmission. While 80 percent of those who contract the virus will experience no symptoms and others experience fever, neck stiffness, vision problems or numbness, in rare cases (1-150 people) it can develop into a more serious form of encephalitus or meningitis.Brickbats and rosesThey live on the street, often foraging through Dumpsters. Some threaten us. Occasionally, they assault people. Thousands of mentally ill people cycle in and out of hospital emergency rooms. They strain our medical system, scare the public and sometimes harm themselves. Most, says DJ Jaffe, are schizophrenic or bipolar and have stopped taking their medication. Jaffe gave up a successful advertising career to try to improve the way America deals with such people. John Hinckley shot President Reagan because he knew, not thought, knew that was the best way to get a date with Jodie Foster,Ž Jaffe tells me in my latest internet video collaboration with City Journal. Years ago, such people were locked up in mental hospitals. That protected the public, but the asylums were horrible, overcrowded places, where sick people rarely got good treatment. We decided we would largely replace that system with mental health care in the community,Ž says Stephen Eide, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Community treatment made sense. Care would be easier and cheaper in the patients own neighborhoods. But community treatment never really happened. Politicians didnt fund it. Neighborhood mental health facilities were not popular with their constituents. Many mentally ill people now end up in prison. Prison is no place for somebody with schizophrenia,Ž Eide says. However, thats where theyre going to remain. Today, more seriously mentally ill people are locked up in Los Angeles County Jail, Cook County Jail and New Yorks Rikers Island jail than in any mental hospital. In jail, they barely get treatment. As a result, they stay in jail longer than other inmates. America has some high-quality me ntal hospitals, but they dont have enough money for extended treatment. Its become harder to get into Bellevue (a New York City mental hospital) than Harvard. If youre well enough to walk into a hospital and ask for care, theyre going to say youre not sick enough to need it,Ž Jaffe says. Hospitals often practice what Jaffe calls treating and streeting.Ž The police call it catch and release.Ž Jaffe says that a big part of the problem is that governments, instead of treating the sickest people, often offer something for everyone.Ž Thats a line from Chirlane McCray, wife of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. De Blasio named his wife director of the citys program to combat mental illness. McCray promised to spend almost a billion dollarsŽ on 54 initiatives.Ž Unfortunately, most of those initiatives address people who are not very sick. They wrap anything that makes you sad „ bad grades, poverty, coming from a single-parent household „ in a mental health narrative,Ž Jaffe says. Blurring the lines between mild mental disorders such as anxiety or mild depression „ and schizophrenia „ is not a bug; its a feature of the program,ŽEide says. They believe the only way New Yorkers will support improvements to mental illness policy is if they are convinced that everybody has a mental illness.Ž So most funds dont go to helping the people diving into Dumpsters or to protecting us from threatening people on the street. If were going to spend all our money on people who are anxious or cant sleep, whats left for the seriously ill?Ž Jaffe asks. Ask any cop what we need, hes going to say: more hospitals, easier civil commitment, so that when I bring somebody, theyre admitted.Ž John Stossel is host of StosselŽ on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Mentally ill still not get ting adequate care John StosselSummer tourism in Panama City B each was up 25.4 percent from last year in Aug., according to Tourist Development Tax data. Vicky Sullivan: Its more than likely due to the red tide in August, but even that didnt last long before it made its way in PCB and its still going. Jerome Nathan DeFreitas: Shouldnt the major focus be on making PCB a year-round destination? This place is a ghost town in the winter, where areas such as Clearwater/St. Pete, Sarasota, etc., are hopping with snowbirds. Perhaps grow the airport and make it a bigger hub with more direct ” ights from the Midwest. Bay District Schools officials have accused Florida Department of Health of Bay County employees of gaining unauthorized access to school health rooms and taking student health care records, with superintendent Bill Husfelt now calling for an investigation by the states Office of the Inspector General. Jim Gentry: Sounds like a situation of Husfelt losing or allowing someone to steal records and then pointing “ ngers at someone else. The entire school system is ” awed and in need of a massive overhaul. Time to drain the school swamp! Rachel Allen: Oh, hell no. They have Florida statutes in place to protect documents like that plus retention periods for how long the “ le must be kept. If the records are electronic, there is still a procedure that must be followed, by law, in order to get rid of the paper documents. Sounds like there are going to be some lawsuits going on. Red tide has hit Mexico Beach and caused a massive fish kill. October is a pretty month and theres nothing more unsightly than walking down the canal and seeing dead fish,Ž Mexico Beach Mayor Al Cathey said. It certainly can affect the economy.Ž Jim Gentry: Great to see prisoners doing something for their room and board. Jay Wright: And the smell must be terrible. Brandie Kittrell: So does this mean our beach trip next week will be a bust? Bobbie Cayce: I feel like our ocean and Gulf are dying; Im concerned the oil and disbursements may have contaminated our seafood. In response to a U.N. court order that the U.S. lift sanctions on Iran, the Trump administration said We dnesday it was terminating a decades-old treaty affirming friendly relations between the two countries. Howard Houk: Im guessing that this is an AP story. Trying to make this administration in as bad a light as is possible. Shawn Terry: By reporting what they do? Mike Hatch: This doesnt hurt anybody; its an outdated treaty that should have been eliminated decades ago. Its actually a good thing to stop enemy countries from suing us. Jason Curfman: The truth about Iran is that they choseŽ approximately 10 years ago to convert to the US dollar. Now, after we attacked other countries for avoiding, Iran is trying to switch back to their own currency. Joe Nalley: Thats why I voted for the current administration. He knows a bad deal from a good one and doesnt go around apologizing and bowing to the rest of the world.READER FEEDBACKFirst AmendmentCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A9

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** A10 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE LUCKY CUB | B3NECK DEEP IN TROUBLEFWC agents help free young bear from potentially fatal cheese-ball jar STILL IN LIMBO | B5MEDICAL MARIJUANATallahassee judge blocks state from licensing Counts-Oakes drops embezzlement caseBy Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A lawsuit claiming the sitting Tourist Development Council (TDC) chairman had embezzled and misappropriated more than $400,000 during his employment with a property management company has been dropped, according to court records.Counts-Oakes Resort Properties Inc. filed a volun-tary dismissal Tuesday of its lawsuit in the 14th Judicial Circuit Court against former employee Andrew S. Phil-lips. Owners of the company had claimed Phillips, since becoming treasurer and a director of the business in 2014, defrauded CountsOakes of about $412,000. In the dismissal, Counts-Oakes officials told the court they would like to voluntarily drop the allegations against Phillips, the current chairman over the TDC on the west side of the Hathaway Bridge, of theft, conversion and unau-thorized misappropriation of company funds, court records show.The terms of the dismissal were not available. However, the lawsuit has been dismissed without prejudice, which means Counts-Oakes could file similar allegations in the future.The decision comes weeks after Phillips filed a counter-suit of defamation against Counts-Oakes, claiming that because of the companys allegations he has been unable to find work in his long-time career field of rental management.According to the charter of the TDC, board members are required to be elected Suit dismissed against TDC chairman Phillips By Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickM pmccreless@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A project to turn a dirt path along State Avenue into a sidewalk is ahead of schedule and could be done by early December.Since late September, crews have been preparing the site and pouring concrete between 19th and 23rd streets near the Walmart shopping center. City officials said the long-requested, $197,020 project has progressed better than expected and could finish ahead of schedule if the weather cooperates.Theyre moving fast,Ž said Billy Rader, the Ward 3 State Avenue sidewalk construction underwayA motorist drives past a sidewalk under construction on State Avenue in Panama City. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Construction is underway on a new sidewalk on State Avenue in Panama City. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Moving to Panama City from the Fort Myers area, Samantha Soto couldnt help being disappointed with the shop-ping opportunities.Im used to outlet malls and stores like Papaya and Cotton:On,Ž she said.So when she heard about the Bay City Point construc-tion, at first she was excited, thinking the new shopping plaza being built at State 77 and 23rd Street would fill that void.But then she found herself disappointed as the first phase brought more restaurants „ Cracker Barrel, Chick-fil-A, Mission BBQ, Which Wich, Dunkin Donuts, Chipotle, etc. „ than anything else.When will PC get more shops? Bay Asked „ We Answered Have a question you want us to investigate? Something youve always wondered about? Ask us at newsherald.com/ bay-asked-we-answered. The Bay City Point shopping center on 23rd Street has brought several new businesses to Panama City. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Its on schedule if not ahead of schedule. Were hoping to nish before Christmas if the weather holds.ŽDale Cronwell, city engineerBy Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A Bay County mother has been arrested after allegedly admitting to choking her child during a tantrum, according to official reports.Candace Nicole Wadlington, 27, appeared in court Thursday on a charge of aggravated child abuse. She was arrested after a month-long Bay County Sheriffs Office investigation into injuries on the child, who was not iden-tified, noticed by day-care workers. Wadlington initially denied placing her hands on the childs neck but eventually admitted grabbing the childs chest and shoulders while the child was throwing a tantrum, officials reported.Wadlington said that she moved her hands higher and pressed on the base of the childs neck with both hands,Ž officers wrote. She also demonstrated pushing her thumbs into the base of the childs neck and gripping the side of the childs neck with her fingers in the carotid artery.ŽWadlington allegedly BCSO: Mother charged with choking child Wadlington See CHOKING, B2 See SIDEWALK, B2 See BAY ASKED, B2 See SUIT, B2

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** B2 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 92/72 90/75 91/65 88/73 88/75 90/68 92/67 94/68 91/65 92/68 92/68 92/67 93/68 90/72 89/74 89/71 92/67 91/7190/7389/7389/7488/75Mostly sunny, warm and humid Partly sunny, warm and humid Partly sunny, warm and humid Sunshine, a t-storm; breezy, humid9172898371Winds: ESE 6-12 mph Winds: ESE 7-14 mph Winds: ESE 8-16 mph Winds: ESE 10-20 mph Winds: ESE 4-8 mphBlountstown 3.42 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 6.14 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 34.93 ft. 42 ft. Century 10.39 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 4.17 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 2:59a 7:50a 12:42p 8:48p Destin 7:46a 5:53p ----West Pass 2:32a 7:23a 12:15p 8:21p Panama City 7:35a 5:09p ----Port St. Joe 5:09a 12:34a 11:14p 6:11p Okaloosa Island 6:19a 4:59p ----Milton 9:59a 8:14p ----East Bay 9:03a 7:44p ----Pensacola 8:19a 6:27p ----Fishing Bend 9:00a 7:18p ----The Narrows 9:56a 9:18p ----Carrabelle 1:34a 5:37a 11:17a 6:35pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018NewFirstFullLast Oct 8Oct 16Oct 24Oct 31Sunrise today ........... 6:38 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 6:23 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 2:41 a.m. Moonset today ......... 4:23 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 90/76/s 89/76/t Daytona Beach 88/72/pc 87/73/pc Ft. Lauderdale 88/79/pc 87/79/t Gainesville 92/66/pc 91/68/pc Jacksonville 90/67/s 89/69/pc Jupiter 88/77/s 87/77/t Key Largo 87/79/s 86/80/t Key West 90/80/s 89/81/t Lake City 91/67/s 90/67/pc Lakeland 90/71/s 89/71/t Melbourne 89/76/pc 89/76/t Miami 89/76/pc 88/75/t Naples 91/72/t 91/71/t Ocala 91/66/pc 91/68/s Okeechobee 87/71/t 87/70/t Orlando 91/71/pc 89/71/t Palm Beach 87/79/pc 86/79/t Tampa 94/75/pc 93/75/t Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 102/71/s 99/66/s Berlin 68/48/s 73/52/s Bermuda 81/75/pc 81/74/pc Hong Kong 86/72/s 85/75/s Jerusalem 80/63/pc 80/63/pc Kabul 73/46/s 79/45/s London 71/52/pc 57/44/r Madrid 81/53/s 83/53/pc Mexico City 74/56/t 74/56/t Montreal 52/37/pc 58/46/r Nassau 88/74/pc 87/74/pc Paris 77/55/s 75/53/t Rome 76/62/t 72/61/t Tokyo 69/68/c 78/74/pc Toronto 54/47/c 71/54/t Vancouver 56/42/r 58/45/c Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 79/49/s 76/53/s Anchorage 54/41/pc 53/43/c Atlanta 93/71/s 91/70/s Baltimore 73/59/pc 73/63/pc Birmingham 92/69/s 92/70/s Boston 60/47/pc 63/54/s Charlotte 91/70/s 87/70/pc Chicago 65/62/t 72/59/t Cincinnati 79/68/pc 85/68/pc Cleveland 68/60/pc 84/66/t Dallas 88/75/pc 86/73/t Denver 65/36/sh 58/41/c Detroit 61/58/sh 79/63/t Honolulu 88/76/c 87/76/pc Houston 88/75/pc 88/75/t Indianapolis 78/69/pc 85/69/t Kansas City 79/57/t 60/53/r Las Vegas 83/66/s 81/61/s Los Angeles 77/61/s 76/60/s Memphis 90/72/s 89/73/s Milwaukee 61/55/r 68/55/r Minneapolis 55/43/c 53/42/c Nashville 89/69/s 89/68/s New Orleans 90/77/pc 88/77/t New York City 67/57/pc 67/62/s Oklahoma City 86/68/pc 70/61/r Philadelphia 72/58/pc 73/60/pc Phoenix 86/67/s 87/65/pc Pittsburgh 70/59/pc 81/66/t St. Louis 89/74/pc 88/69/t Salt Lake City 60/43/pc 56/41/sh San Antonio 87/75/pc 87/74/t San Diego 73/65/pc 72/66/pc San Francisco 69/57/pc 71/58/s Seattle 55/47/r 61/45/pc Topeka 81/54/pc 58/51/r Tucson 83/58/s 86/63/s Wash., DC 75/64/pc 76/66/pcSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 85 Today: Wind from the east-southeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Wind east-southeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Clear. Tomorrow: Wind from the east-southeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility generally clear.Mostly sunny and humid today. Winds southeast 4-8 mph. Clear and humid tonight. Winds light and variable.High/low ......................... 90/73 Last year's high/low ....... 86/68 Normal high/low ............. 84/65 Record high ............. 90 (2018) Record low ............... 41 (1974)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.20" Normal month to date ...... 0.59" Year to date ................... 42.80" Normal year to date ....... 49.58" Average humidity .............. 71%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 89/75 Last year's high/low ....... 89/71 Normal high/low ............. 82/67 Record high ............. 99 (1954) Record low ............... 37 (1984)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.00" Normal month to date ...... 0.81" Year to date ................... 45.27" Normal year to date ....... 50.14" Average humidity .............. 73%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton Beachadmitted that she pressed too hard but said she never wrapped her hands around the childs neck, officers reported.The investigation began Sept. 5 when the child arrived to day care with redness on her neck and face. She allegedly told the teacher that her mother had choked her, but when initially interviewed by investi-gators, Wadlington told them the injuries were because of an aller-gic reaction to laundry detergent,Ž officials reported.A doctor examined the child and concluded that pinpoint discolorations to the neck, chin and ar ound the eyeŽ were more consistent with being choked. When asked why her mother would do that to her, the child told inves-tigators she hates me,Ž officers wrote.After collecting the statements from Wad-lington, officers arrested her and took her to the Bay County Jail. CHOKINGFrom Page B1Commissioner Billy Rader said the sidewalk for State Avenue has long been needed, given residents created the dirt path walking to and from the shopping center during the years. [PATTI BLAKE/ THE NEWS HERALD] To try to figure out why that was happening, Soto wrote to The News Heralds Bay Asked, We Answered series asking Will we be getting more shops in PC?Ž Well yes. And no.Earlier this week, the Bay City Point developers turned in plans for phase two of the project to the city that included Burlington Coat Factory, Ulta Beauty, Five Below and Hobby Lobby, so since Soto asked her question more retailers are moving into the space.But, we still wanted to figure out why the first phase was mostly restaurants and why that seems to represent a lot of the new business that comes into the area, so we asked Panama City City Planner Mike Lane and local commercial real estate agent Kevin Wattenbarger.First off, this is a difficult time for retailers.Theyre all in flux, even the established ones,Ž Lane said. Sears is on a respirator.ŽA driving force behind that is Amazon, which has been steadily growing its market share as consumers choose twoday shipping, and often lower prices, over a trip to the store. In response to that trend, many retailers have slowed the growth of their brick and mortar locations.The buzzword is Ama zon proof, Ž Wattenbarger said.Restaurants tend to meet the Amazon proofŽ threshold, as two-day shipping isnt compatible with wanting a quick meal, making them a safer bet.And thats not the only factor that makes restaurants a safer bet, according to Wattenbarger.The price of construction is very challenging and restaurants will pay the highest rent so developers will build for those users,Ž he said.Put it together, you have a safer bet for the business owners, a safer bet for the developer and a new plaza full of restaurants.Its the market at work. BAY ASKEDFrom Page B1 officials, in the service industry or responsible for contributing to bed taxes.Members serve four years. If during their term they no longer are qualified, they either have to resign or be removed by the County Commission.TDC Director Dan Rowe said that situation does not apply to Phillips because, after severing his ties to Counts-Oakes, he started his own vacation rental business in July.Someone with a vested interest is able to serve on the board,Ž Rowe said. It is our attorneys legal opinion that Andy Phillips business satisfies that requirement.ŽWhile the theft lawsuit against Phillips has been dismissed, his defamation countersuit against Counts-Oakes is pending. In his lawsuit, Phillips claims that because of the allegations of embezzlement and misappropriation he was unable to find work.As a result of the defamatory statements, Mr. Phillips has been unsuccessful in his efforts to obtain employ-ment,Ž the lawsuit states. Despite having decades of experience, Mr. Phillips has been denied employ-ment for 10 positions within the rental manage-ment business industry because of the damage caused to his professional reputation by the defama-tory statements.Ž Phillips has alleged two counts of defamation, a count of aiding and abet-ting and a count of civil conspiracy against his former business partners. A follow-up trial date has not been scheduled. SUITFrom Page B1 city commissioner who spearheaded the project. This is going to be a great Christmas gift for people.ŽThe project, paid for with city capital improvement money and undertaken by Main Street Construction Ser-vices LLC of Lynn Haven, calls for a 6-foot-wide sidewalk along the west side of State Avenue. The project also includes an asphalt parking lot for the Bay County Conservancy Park walking trail and an aluminum pedestrian bridge on the sidewalk path near the Walmart.Dale Cronwell, city engineer, said the project is contracted to be finished in mid-January.Its on schedule if not ahead of schedule,Ž Cronwell said of the proj-ect. Were hoping to finish before Christmas if the weather holds.ŽCronwell said setting up the new pedestrian bridge is another factor that could slow down the project.The pedestrian bridge has to be manufactured and set in place over a ditch that goes under State Avenue,Ž Cronwell said.Rader said he has pushed for the sidewalk in his ward for four or five years, even going so far as to apply for state grant money to pay for it. When that fell through, he advocated for his fellow commissioners to approve the project and use city money to pay for it.Rader said the sidewalk has long been needed, given residents created the dirt path walking to and from the shopping center during the years.Ive seen baby stroll-ers going down that path many times andƒ Ive seen wheelchairs go down that dirt path,Ž Rader said. This is a great investment to enhance the safety and quality of life of our citizens.ŽMany people walk the path to reach a nearby Bay Town Trolley stop too, he said.Theres just a lot of people who dont have transportation,Ž he said. Its just dangerous walking on the side of the road.Ž SIDEWALKFrom Page B1

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** TodayCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point/Palms Conference Center. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. For details, http:// www.beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor.html MADE IN GREECE VII ART EXHIBITION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112. OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alices on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer and music. BALLROOM DANCING: 6:308:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. Presented by GCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division. For details, www. GulfCoast.Edu/Arts CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Interactive demonstration: cow camp. Parking $5 per vehicle.SaturdayCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot at Capt. Andersons restaurant in Panama City Beach. For details, www. waterfrontmarkets.org PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point/Palms Conference Center. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. For details, http:// www.beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor.html CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Battle of Marianna re-enactment at 10 a.m. Live music. Parking $5 per vehicle. COFFEE TALKS: 10-11 a.m. at Vinny & Bays Coffee Shop in Panama City. Come for coffee and a candid conversation about what it takes to be a foster parent. For details, Taryn Tasker, www.lmccares.org or 850-522-4485 CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Vendors, family activities and games. For details, 850-265-2121 or communications@cityo” ynnhaven.com FALL FESTIVAL AND PUMPKIN SALES: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park. Fun, food, music and games. Pumpkins will be sold from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 31. For details, 850-233-5059 ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR APP LAUNCH PARTY: 2-3 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Company Museum, 1134 Beck Ave. Join the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership to celebrate the launch of its new Walking Tour App. OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alices on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer and music. THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. Presented by GCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division. For details, www. GulfCoast.Edu/Arts The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES LOCAL & STATEUlysses Wiley McQueen, 68, passed away Friday,Sept. 28, 2018, in Panama City, Florida. Funeral service will be at 11 a.m. CDT Saturday,Oct. 6, at Greater Friendship MB Church with burial at Hillside Cemetery, both in Panama City. Mr. McQueen will rest in the mortuary from 4-7 p.m. CDT Friday,Oct. 5, at Richardsons Panama City Chapel, 850-481-8762. He leaves to cherish his memories his soulmate, Kay McQueen of Panama City.; three children, Brinae Halvorson (Peter), Renee McQueen, Ulysses (Mike) McQueen, II (Evelyn); siblings, Leroy McClain Jr. (Gloria) of Panama City, Bobby Swinson Jr. of Tucson, Arizona, Christell Walker of Killeen, Texas, Dewey Cromartie Jr., Pamela Vann, Gregory, Cheryl, Kenneth, Sonya, Katrina, Cassetta, and Reggie Cromartie; 13 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; an uncle whom he viewed as a father, Sandy McQueen (Katherine); and a host of loving cousins, nieces and nephews.ULYSSES WILEY MCQUEEN Memorial services will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018, at Freedom Church, Dickson, Tennessee, with Pastor Kim Trimble officiating.Mr. Jerry Martin Jackson, 71, of Fairview, Tennessee, passed away on Sept. 24, 2018, at Horizon Medical Center in Dickson, Tennessee. He was born on June 2, 1947, in Panama City, Florida, to the late Samuel Leferne and Ruby Hughes Jackson. Jerry received his Bachelor of Science in business administration and worked most of his career in the oil field industry and manufacturing. He was a member of Freedom Church, Dickson, Tennessee. Mr. Jackson is survived by his wife, Judy Phillips Jackson; sons, Craig Jackson (Scarlett), Philip Jackson (Morgan); daughter, Stacey Schroeder; brother, John Jackson; and sisters, Jacque Howell, Janice Shipbaugh and Judy Giacomozzi. Arrangements under the direction of Taylor Funeral Home, 214 N. Main St., Dickson, TN 37055, 615-446-2808, TaylorSince1909.comJERRY MARTIN JACKSON Visitation for Thomas J. Bowers, who died Sept. 29, 2018, will be from 1-8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, 2018, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home. Services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church. Viewing will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday at the church.Interment will be at Redwood Cemetery.THOMAS J. BOWERSFuneral services for Columbus Burke Sr., 76, of Sanford, Florida, who died Sept. 24, 2018, will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday,Oct. 6, 2018, at New Life Word Center with burial at Evergreen Cemetery, both in Sanford. Visitation will be from 5-7 p.m. today,Oct. 5, at Christian Fellowship in Sanford. Richardsons Tallahassee Chapel is handling arrangements.COLUMBUS BURKE SR.Funeral services for Patricia Byrd, 70, who died Friday,Sept. 28, 2018, in Tallahassee, Florida, will begin at 11:30 a.m. Saturday,Oct. 6, at Mt. Zion PB Church with burial at Macon Cemetery, both in Tallahassee. Richardsons Tallahassee Chapel is handling arrangements.PATRICIA BYRDServices for Wayne Hendley Sr., 58, who died Sept. 20, 2018, in Gainesville, Florida, will be announced by Richardsons Tallahassee Chapel.WAYNE HENDLEY SR.L. Charles Hilton, Jr., a lawyer, contractor and businessman for more than six decades, and hotelier, developer and entrepreneur for more than half a century, took the ultimate journey to complete his life on Friday evening, Sept. 28, 2018. Fourscore and seven years ago (87), he was born on Aug. 24, 1931, in Helena, Georgia. Charles made the world a better place through courage, authenticity, and perseverance and mentoring others to do the same. A celebration of Charles life will be held at Wilson Funeral Home at 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel, followed by interment at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Dr. Henry E. Roberts, Ph.D., will be officiating at the services and interment. Contributions, in lieu of flowers, are encouraged to the James Madison Institute, P.O. Box 37460, Tallahassee, FL 32315; Boy Scouts of America, Gulf Coast Council, 9440 University Parkway, Pensacola, FL 32514; or Hilton Family Foundation, 13200-B Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach, FL 32407.Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, Fla. 850-785-5272L. CHARLES HILTON, JR.1931 … 2018A memorial service for Mr. Glenn Earl Hinton Jr., 75, of Southport, Florida, will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, at Christian Church of Panama City. Southerland Family Funeral Home is handling arrangements.GLENN EARL HINTON JR.Services for Elvis Curtis Jones, 60,of Panama City, Florida, who died Oct. 2, 2018, will be announced by Richardsons Panama City Chapel.ELVIS CURTIS JONESFuneral services for Retia C. Walker, 64, who died Oct. 1, 2018, in Tallahassee, Florida, will begin at 11 a.m.Thursday, Oct. 11, at Restoration Place in Tallahassee with burial at Mt. Zion AME Church Cemetery in Havana, Florida. Visitation will be from 3-7 p.m. Wednesday,Oct. 10, at Richardsons Tallahassee Chapel.RETIA C. WALKERVisitation for Mrs. Smithie L. Walker,78, of Jacob City, Florida, who died Oct. 1, 2018, will be from 4-7 p.m. today, Oct. 5, 2018, in the Pittman Memorial Chapel in Graceville, Florida. The family will receive friends from 6-7 p.m. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church in Jacob City. Interment will be in the church cemetery under the directions of Christian Memorial Chapel of Graceville.SMITHIE L. WALKER WHATS HAPPENINGSubmit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before By Stephen HudakOrlando SentinelASTOR „ A giant jar of Herrs Cheese Balls, while a tempting snack to some, probably isnt a healthy choice for anyone. But the jar could have been deadly for a Florida black bear cub that got its head stuck inside the 26-ounce plastic container.State wildlife officials released a video Tuesday showing the cub with its head wedged in a cheese-ball container, probably in a desperate effort to lick the last specks of cheese dust from the bottom of a snack receptacle it found in Astor.Bears are common in the small Lake County community on the west side of the St. Johns River.A woman who saw the distressed cub in a neighbors yard called the states nuisance-bear hotline Sept. 23 and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commis-sion dispatched an on-call wildlife biologist and a bear contractor to help.The wildlife agents immediately trapped an adult bear but spent sev-eral hours trying to catch the cub and a sibling.Once they coaxed the cub into a cage, they used a device to hold the cheese-ball container while the cub pulled its head loose using its paws.In the video, the wildlife agents can be heard cheering when the bears head is free.FWC used the cubs ordeal to spread a message on its Facebook page for residents in bear areas, especially Lake, Orange and Seminole counties, some of Floridas densest bear corridors: Stash your trash!ŽPlease help bears avoid dangerous situations like this by securing your trash and make sure to rinse out recyclables,Ž FWCwrote on Facebook. This will also help keep you and your neighbors safe.ŽThe plastic jar could have been fatal for the cub,Ž the wildlife agency explained on its social-media post.The biologist and his crew released all three bears back into the wild. FWC pointed out Flor-ida bears become most active in October and November while search-ing for food in preparation for winter. Reports of nuisance bears spike at this time of year with the animals in neighbor-hoods, often rummaging through curbside trash cans, wandering into open garages or raiding bird-feeders and outdoor pet bowls.For more information on living in bear country, visit www.MyFWC.com/Bear.FWC agents help free bear cub from cheese-ball jarAfter several hours stuck in a cheese-ball snack jar, a black bear cub has been freed. [FWC/ORLANDO SENTINEL]

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** B4 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson @nwfdailynews.comEGLIN AFB „ An investigation into alleged cocaine smuggling from Colombia by an Army 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) soldier has not stopped following his indictment on charges of con-spiring in trafficking the drug, according to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration office in Miami.Master Sgt. Daniel Gould was detained by authorities Aug. 13 and indicted last month by a federal grand jury on two counts of conspiring to smuggle cocaine. Gould entered pleas of not guilty to both charges in his initial appearance Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Pensacola. His trial is slated to begin with jury selection Nov. 13.Ours is still ongoing,Ž DEA spokeswoman Anne-Judith Lambert said Wednesday when asked whether Goulds pending trial had ended the smuggling probe. In addition to the DEA, the investigation has involved the Armys Criminal Investigation Division and the U.S. Attorneys Office for the Northern Dis-trict of Florida.Lambert declined to offer specifics. Were still not saying anything,Ž she said.Gould will not be in custody in advance of his trial, according to a Tuesday court order. However, he does have restrictions, including location monitoring. The court order also required Gould to surrender his passport.The two-count indictment returned against Gould last month indicates other people were involved in the alleged cocaine smuggling. Both counts allege Gould did knowingly and willfully com-bine, conspire, confederate, and agree with other persons to distributeŽ a controlled substance.According to court documents, the Sept. 18 federal grand jury indictment against Gould was sealed for a time because he could not be imme-diately located.Gould was detained by authorities on Aug. 13 after two heavy bagsŽ „ punching bags used by boxers in training „ were intercepted at the U.S. Embassy in Colombia before they were to be loaded onto a plane bound for the United States. The bags contained almost 90 pounds of cocaine, with a street value in the mil-lions of dollars. It is not clear whether they were bound for a civilian or military aircraft, but the 7th Group is based at Eglin Air Force Base.It remains unclear how the bags were linked to Gould, who was back in the United States when the cocaine was discovered. Colombia is part of the 7th Groups area of responsibility, but Gould was on vacation „ not on mili-tary duty „ at the time of the alleged incident.Gould remained free after his initial detention, apparently as he took some role in the investigation. In a late August interview, Col. Patrick Colloton, commander of the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), said Gould was, at that time, under the eye of civilian and military authorities.But in a motion requesting the Sept. 18 indictment be sealed, the U.S. Attorneys Office noted that the current whereabouts of the defendant are unknown and the public revelation of the indictment could severely hamper law enforcements ability to locate and appre-hend the defendant to answer the charges.Ž Gould was present with his attorney in U.S. District Court on Tuesday. He is being repre-sented by Pensacola attorney John Wilkins, who did not return a phone call Wednes-day seeking comment.Probe continues after 7th Group soldiers indictmentMaster Sgt. Daniel J. Gould of the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) is facing trial next month on cocaine traf“ cking conspiracy charges. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] The News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Legal challenges continue to mount over the states Medicaid man-aged-care program.Lighthouse Health Plan filed a petition in state administra-tive court last week challenging state decisions that it says will lead to the automatic assignment of Medicaid patients in Northwest Florida to a com-petitor, Humana.Attorneys for Lighthouse, a type of managed-care plan known as a provider-spon-sored network, argue that the patient-assignment policy is an unadopted rule.They also argue that the policy violates Florida law and a federal Medicaid waiver that allows Florida to oper-ate a statewide managed-care program.The challenge has been assigned to Administrative Law Judge Robert J Telfer III. Lighthouse, which is affiliated with Pensacola-based Baptist Health Care, was awarded a contract this year to provide Medicaid managed medical assistanceŽ services in Med-icaid regions 1 and 2.Combined, the regions stretch across 18 counties in Northwest Florida.Medicaid managed-medical assistance plans cover acute care and other traditional health services.Humana Medical Plan also was awarded a Medicaid con-tract in regions 1 and 2. It was awarded a comprehensiveŽ contract, which means it is responsible for managed med-ical-assistance services as well as long-term care.Florida lawmakers in 2011 approved a major revamp of the Medicaid program that requires most beneficiaries to enroll in managed-care plans.The state contracted with various numbers of plans in 11 regions. But with the initial contracts ending, the state went through a procurement process that led to AHCA this spring awarding a new set of contracts.The Lighthouse challenge comes about four months before the state transitions the Northwest Florida counties to newly contracted health plans in February.In the challenge, attorneys for Lighthouse argue that state law requires assigning patients based on a number of criteria, including whether plans have sufficient networks, whether patients previously received care from plans providers and whether primary care providers in plans are more geographically accessible to patients.Specifically, the law precludes the agency from engaging in practices that are designed to favor one managed care plan over another,Ž Light-house attorneys wrote in their petition.The Lighthouse case comes after other health plans filed administrative challenges about contract awards.While some of those case have been resolved, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation and the South Florida Community Care Network, which did not reach settlements with the state, are pursuing challenges.Panhandle health plan les Medicaid challenge

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 B5By Dara KamThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ In what could be another delay for Floridas burgeoning medicalmarijuana industry, a Tallahassee judge agreed Wednesday to block state health officials from moving forward with the application process for highly sought-after medi-cal marijuana licenses.Leon County Circuit Judge Charles Dodsons verbal order during a hearing came almost two months after he found a state law, passed during a special legislative session last year, runs afoul of a constitutional amendment broadly legalizing medical marijuana.In August, Dodson ruled a cap on the number of medical marijuana operators included in the law directly contradictsŽ the amendment, which was overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2016.Dodson also decided the 2017 law is unconstitutional because it requires marijuana opera-tors licensed by the state to cultivate, process and dispense medical mari-juana „ something known as vertical integrationŽ „ as opposed to breaking the activities into sepa-rate parts for licensure.And the judge ruled the state improperly restricted who could get licenses. The law ordered health officials to grant licenses to operators who already wereup and run-ning in Florida or who were involved in litigation as of Jan. 1, 2017. The law also required a license for a black farmer who meets certain conditions and set aside a preference for applicants with certain ties to the citrus industry.The citrus and blackfarmer provisions amounted to what is known as a specialŽ law, Dodson ruled in August. The judge found the 2017 law restricts rights granted under the Con-stitution and that plaintiff Florigrown LLC has a substantial likelihood of successŽ in its claim that the law conflicts with the amendment.Despite multiple find-ings in his August decision that the statute is uncon-stitutional, Dodson waited until Wednesday to issue the temporary injunction sought by Florigrown, a company that was turned down for a license.Judge blocks medical marijuana licensingLYNN HAVENLynn Haven starts new Fall Concert SeriesThe City of Lynn Haven will host a first-ever Fall Concert Series every Thursday through Nov. 8, from 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Sheffield Park.City officials hope the series will be successful similar to its Spring Concert Series, according to a news release. There will be a variety of music styles, and food and drinks for purchase.Our citizens and sur-rounding communities were so excited about the Spring Concert Series which was a great success," City Manager Michael White said in the news release. Many res-idents requested that the City host another concert series, so we decided that the fall would be a great time for this one. We are grateful to be able to provide awesome enter-tainers, great food, and family-oriented fun.ŽWhile the city will not provide seating for the concert, attendees are welcome to bring their own chairs or blankets. For more information about the Fall Concert Series, contact Marketing and Communication Coordinators Kathryn Gay and Kaylee Gardner at 850.265.2121 or communications@cityo-flynnhaven.com. LYNN HAVENLynn Haven invites community to city government eventsThe City of Lynn Haven will host several events Oct. 22-26 to celebrate Florida City Government Week.On Oct. 22, citizens are encouraged to come out and have coffee and donuts with Mayor (Margo) Anderson, City Manager (Michael White) and commissionersŽ from 8-9:30 a.m. at the City Chambers, according to a news release.Middle and high school SGA Clubs will be recog-nized Oct. 23 during the city commission meeting for their work along with Anderson recogniz-ing students who painted her portrait. Elementary/Middle School students will have the chance to paint a por-trait of Mayor Anderson and paintings must be submitted by Friday, October 19th,Ž the news release stated. Mayor Anderson will also speak to Mowat Middle Schools Civics Class and Student Government Association about her job and answer questions. Lastly, on Friday, October 26 at 10 a.m. at the Lynn Haven Library, Deputy Chief of Police Ricky Ramie will read to students a book about his job during Story Time.ŽFor more information on Florida City Government Week, contact Marketing and Communications Coordinators Kaylee Gardner and Kath-ryn Gay at 850-265-2121 or communications@cityoflynnhaven.com. PANAMA CITY BEACHAlabama police chief charged with disorderly conductThe police chief of Level Plains, Alabama, was arrested Tuesday for allegedly masturbating in public in an elevator in the Aqua Condominium and while walking down the beach behind teenage girls.Billy Maurice Driggers, 44, from Daleville, Alabama, was arrested at his work and charged with four counts of disorderly conduct.According to Panama City Beach police, security alerted law enforcement to a white male seen by guests masturbat-ing while watching women, as well as sticking his hand down his pants and touching himself on three occasions while women and children entered the elevator. He was wearing just shorts, according to reports.Officers found the man matching that description and identified him as Driggers, who was not a registered guest at the hotel.It also was discovered that Driggers allegedly was seen touching himself while walking down the beach in front of the condo while following teenage girls, along with taking video and photos of girls rinsing off after coming off the beach, police said.According to PCBPD, law enforcement officers were not able to determine that Driggers exposed his genitalia, but PCBPD did describe Driggers actions as obsceneŽ and sexually deviant in nature.Ž Driggers was held in the Dale County Jail and is awaiting extradition to Bay County. From staff reportsIN BRIEF Driggers Employees sort medical marijuana products at the Curaleaf dispensary in Orlando. [KYLE ARNOLD/ORLANDO SENTINEL]

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** B6 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldARIES (March 21-April 19) „ You are gracious and social even when you don't feel like dealing with people. Somehow doing it anyway just puts you right in the mood, and as a direct result, good things happen for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Don't underestimate the power of feeling liked. Even people who profess not to care if others like them or not may in fact very much appreciate a sign of your acceptance. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Should you stick with what you know, or make a switch to the new way? That's the juncture you'll come to today and both paths have pros and cons. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Since what you say always re” ects what's going on inside you, the easiest way to say the right thing is to be the right thing. You may need to sort through some feelings and get clarity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ The competitor with nothing to lose will surpass the one who has to make a strategic choice about what to risk „ an important consideration in today's proceedings. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ It's the little ways a person shows you that he or she is paying attention that will go straight to your heart and turn someone into your favorite in an instant. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ The best way is not to compare yourself to anyone. But since that's also a very unrealistic expectation of yourself today, then at least compare yourself to an example that is both attainable and worthy of you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ How can you make things clearer to the most amount of people with the least amount of cost, trouble or time? The answer may be in a sign. A message built for all to read saves you having to whisper to each person. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ You're always training people. Each interaction is a training. It never ends. Give a thought to what you're teaching as you go about your day, speci“ cally, how you're teaching people to treat you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ You're handling a lot of responsibility today but you also needn't take it so seriously. Keep your perspective and your humor and you'll stay relaxed enough to handle anything that comes up. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ Set an expectation early on about what you'd like to see happen. Otherwise, no one knows will know quite what to do you'll wind up with all the frustrations of a cat-herder. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ You'll have the pleasure of getting to know someone through teamwork on a project. It's the best way to learn what people are all about, and it will be a very accurate picture of what future work and play together will be like.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy. com 1. What poets quotes included, A diplomat is a man who always remembers a womans birthday, but never remembers her age.Ž? Thomas Hardy, Robert Frost, Theodore Roethke, Jim Badger 2. Union Products of Massachusetts is the worlds largest producer of what lawn ornament? Birdbaths, Pink ” amingos, Windmill ” owers, Stone squirrels 3. What classic TV character was famous for, You look lovely today, Mrs. Cleaver.Ž? Gomer Pyle, Eddie Haskell, Cosmo Kramer, Dobie Gillis 4. Research supports the more education one has, the larger their whatŽ will be? Pet, Yard, Signature, Vehicle 5. What do you get when you multiply length times width? Area, Height, Diameter, Circumference 6. By altitude, whats the highest European capital city? London, Madrid, Reykjavik, Oslo ANSWERS: 1. Robert Frost, 2. Pink ” amingos, 3. Eddie Haskell (Leave It to BeaverŽ), 4. Signature, 5. Area, 6. Madrid (Spain)TRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) BURRO ASKED ASPECT RHYTHM Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: To become better at golf, the young golfer would need to — STAY THE COURSE Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEBy David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble UREES KENLE TIAFEX PLTEOP ” “ SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBYMoms wild stories cause distressDEAR ABBY: My mother insists on telling my three youngest children that my husband is not their father. The oldest girl is the spitting image of him, and shes upset about it. Mom also calls me terrible names. She keeps saying it will add years to my life if I divorce him and makes appointments with divorce lawyers forŽ me, which I am charged for. My husband and I have a limited income and cant move away because our jobs are here. How can I convince our kids my husband is their father? „ TRYING TO PROVE ITDEAR TRYING: A way to do that would be to explain to your children that your mother has severe emotional problems and isnt in her right mind when she says those things. (From what you have written, it appears to be true.) You do not have to move away to distance yourself from this toxic, troubled woman. Stop communicating with her. Block her phone number, if you must, and do not allow her to have contact with any members of your family unless and until she regains her senses and apologizes to all of you.DEAR ABBY: I belong to a womens golfing group. The mission of the club is to play golf and have fun. We have tournaments, prizes, and awards are given for the best scores. The problem: Several of the ladies are allergicŽ to counting their scores correctly. We have given them counting beads to help them rememberŽ their score. They have played with board members who asked them to count their scores out loud each time they hit the ball and to state their scores after the last putt. There have also been conversations with the golf pro about the importance of keeping accurate scores. Yet, the inaccurate counting persists and denial reigns. Members are upset because these ladies often winŽ tournaments. What to do? „ PROUD OF MY HIGH HANDICAPDEAR PROUD: You might be able to curb the cheating if you suggest club members swap scorecards and keep score for each other. However, if that doesnt do the trick, stop playing with those who cheat. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 B7 PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 5 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Al Roker; Rita Wilson; Chassie Post. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Cops Cheaters The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Maury Maury MedicareMake Healthier WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Helen Hunt; Anita Cochran performs. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) GMA Day (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The ClownŽ Diagnosis Murder The FlameŽ In the Heat of the Night GunsmokeGunsmoke WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning (N) Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) DailyMailTV Face the TruthFace the TruthThe Wendy Williams Show (N) Divorce CourtDivorce CourtPaternity CourtPaternity CourtCouples CourtCouples Court WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVCitylineJudge Mathis (N) The Peoples Court (N) The Peoples Court Pickler & Ben (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplash A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -05.06.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: Patrol AMC 30 62 131 254 (:01) The Walking Dead (:02) The Walking Dead (:03) The Walking Dead (:04) The Walking Dead (:05) The Walking Dead TryŽ(:06) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Too Cute! Animal Cops Houston Animal Cops Houston My Cat From Hell Bad MaxŽ The Vet Life Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet BET 53 46 124 329 House/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsM eet, Browns COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Futurama Futurama Futurama (:05) Futurama (:40) Futurama (:10) Futurama70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People The Wolf Pack braces for a wildfire. E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News: Daily Pop (N) Ashlee&EvanAshlee&Evan ESPN 9 23 140 206 Get Up (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Outside LinesNFL Live (N) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Get UpFirst Take FOOD 38 45 110 231 Learn theCarol Alt at 57Paid ProgramPioneer Wo.Giada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomePi oneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 Reba Reba Reba 700/InteractiveThe 700 Club Fresh Off-BoatFresh Off-BoatFresh Off-Boat ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) Lindsay Lohan. FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstSkip and Shannon: Undisputed (N) (L) The Herd with Colin Cowherd (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‚ Getaway (13) ‰‰ Terminator Genisys (15) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jason Clarke. How I MetHow I MetMike & MollyThe Amazing Spider-Man (12) HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family Brian Bird and Michelle Cox. (N) Love in Paradise (16) Luke Perry, Emmanuelle Vaugier. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Rustic RehabRustic RehabRustic RehabRustic RehabDesert FlipDesert FlipDesert FlipDesert FlipFixer UpperHouse HuntersHouse Hunte rs HIST 35 42 120 269 MonsterQuest MonsterQuest Octopus. MonsterQuest Super RatsŽ MonsterQuest Bear attacks. Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesThe First 48 Last FareŽ The First 48The First 48 PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Brawlin BabesŽ Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Two/Half MenTwo/Half Men SUN 49 422 656 ScubaNationFlorida SportShip Shape TVSport FishingFishing FlatsAddict. FishingSportsmanSport FishingXolos: Tijuanas TeamBoxing 30 Focused SYFY 70 52 122 244 Z Nation Crisis of FaithŽ Z NationZ Nation FrenemiesŽ Z NationZ Nation Mt. WeatherŽ Z Nation The Black RainbowŽ TBS 31 15 139 247 KingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Pre-Game TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰ Luxury Liner (48) George Brent.(:45) ‰‰ Unexpected Uncle (41) Anne Shirley. ‰‰‰ The Courtship of Eddies Father (63) Glenn Ford. ‰‰ Wedding Rehearsal (32) TLC 37 40 183 280 Little CoupleLittle CoupleLittle CoupleLittle CoupleSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesLong Island Medium Long Island Medium TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed A Witchs TailŽ Charmed A Witchs TailŽ Supernatural Road TripŽ Supernatural First BornŽ Supernatural Sharp TeethŽ Supernatural BittenŽ USA 62 55 105 242 Chicago P.D. MonsterŽ Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarLifeLockMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote DeadpanŽ Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night: Grow Old Along With Me (95) FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 5 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramBig DealPaid ProgramToday (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) SpringsteenNever FearPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCue VaporL King ReportIndoor GrillingDr. Ho Reliev.DermaWandSleep BetterPaid Progr am WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenPhilips!Philips KitchenMake HealthierCredit?L King ReportPaid ProgramOpen HousePaid ProgramTri-StatesGood Morning Am erica (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Mannix Murder RevisitedŽ Cannon Fools GoldŽ 77 Sunset StripPetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. HillbilliesGreen AcresGreen Acres WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Mo rning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesForensic FilesPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPai d ProgramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 How I MetTwo/Half MenSteve (N) Me/FrangelaPaid ProgramNever FearPaid ProgramPaid ProgramMakeup!Never FearPaid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 (12:00) Great PerformancesPOV Dark MoneyŽ Citizens United decision. EmeryThe This Old House HourMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob BuilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindBarry WhiteMakeup!Learn thePaid ProgramDermaWandGrillFlipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 The Walking Dead (:04) The Walking Dead (:05) The Walking Dead (:06) The Walking Dead EastŽ(:07) The Walking Dead Last Day on EarthŽ Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 TreehouseTreehouseTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTanked Boyz II Men to ATMŽ Tanked 2 Chainz, 1 TankŽ BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithHouse/PayneHouse/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 ChappellesChappellesSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkLegendsRelieve painProstatePaid ProgramOrganicScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:01) Gold Rush (:01) Gold Rush: AlaskaGold Rush: AlaskaRaised HuntGiven RightBrake RoomOn the Road Major League Fishing E! 63 57 114 236 Life as KnowAshlee&EvanAshlee&EvanAshlee&EvanAshlee&EvanSex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityS ex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) College Football Georgia Tech at Louisville. SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Formula 1 RacingGolf Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, Third Round. From Sentosa Golf Club in Singapore. NBA Preseason Basketball: Warriors vs Kings FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesBrew & QueBrew & QueMedicareNew BissellKitchenAidPerricone MDGuys Big B iteBrunch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Barry WhiteWonder CookThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPiYo Craze! ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) FS1 24 27 150 219 Drag RacingUFC Weigh-InUFC 229 Bad Blood: KhabibUFC TonightTMZ SportsSportsMoneyRed Bull Signature Series FX 45 51 136 248 Mr Inbetween (:06) ‰‚ Getaway (13) Ethan Hawke, Selena Gomez. Barry WhiteNew BissellMedicareLifeLockHow I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasier IQŽ FrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love Lucy ‰‰ You Again (10) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomePaid ProgramPiYo Workout!Hair LoveEvenSkinPiYo Craze!PiYo Workout!Texas Flip N Mo ve HIST 35 42 120 269 (11:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified The Next HumansŽ CoinCoinCoinCoin CoinMedicareAx Men Shelbys New ToyŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) The Closer Fate LineŽ(:04) The CloserDERMAFLASH,Philips KitchenPaid ProgramPaid ProgramSmartWashSleep BetterSmartWashSmartWash PARMT 28 48 241 241 (11:30) ‰‰‚ The Replacements (00) CopsCredit?Sex ToysIndoor GrillingPaid ProgramMakeup!MedicareRelieve painYoga Retreat! SUN 49 422 656 After MidnightInside HEATOmegaOrganicMore HairHydroShotProstateProstateInside Seminole FootballFlorida: Dan Mark Richt SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:07) Futurama (:37) Futurama (:07) ‰‰ Insidious: Chapter 2 (13) Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne. Twilight ZonePaid ProgramLearn theNew BissellSmartWash TBS 31 15 139 247 (12:30) ‰‰‰ Frankenweenie (12) ‰‰‰ Rush Hour (98) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondFriendsFriendsFriends TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰ Deadly Friend (86) Matthew Laborteaux.(:45) ‰‰ Swamp Thing (82) Louis Jourdan, Adrienne Barbeau. Narcotics ‰‰‰‚ Make Way for Tomorrow (37) Victor Moore. TLC 37 40 183 280 90 Day Fianc: Before the 90 (:06) 90 Day Fianc: What NowTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading Spaces TNT 29 54 138 245 NCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New Orleans MonsterŽ NCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVUDateline PoisonŽ Dateline NBCDateline NBCNCIS: Los AngelesNew BissellPaid Program WGN-A 13 239 307 How I MetHow I MetElementary Step NineŽ Camp MeetingBeyond TodayMake HealthierLifeLockYoga Retreat!OmegaPaid Program FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 5 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) The Doctors (N) The Real (N) Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramDermaWandJerry Springer Fights!Ž Jerry Springer blackish blackish American DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show (N) Dr. Phil (N) NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza Top HandŽ The RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainCharlies AngelsMamas FamilyThe JeffersonsM*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 ProvidenceProvidenceDateline Secrets in the MistŽ Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolChicago P.D. Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury (N) Me/FrangelaThisMinuteSteve (N) Judge Mathis Judge Judy (N) Judge Judy Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD Live PD -09.29.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 Walking Dead (:43) The Walking Dead (:44) The Walking Dead JSSŽ(:45) The Walking Dead Thank YouŽ(4:46) The Walking Dead (5:50) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 Fresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh Princeblackish blackish ‰‰‚ The Five Heartbeats (91) Robert Townsend, Leon. COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office PromosŽ (:15) The Office The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush BattleBots The TournamentŽ E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:30) NFL Live (N) (L) NBA: The Jump (N) (L) High Noon (N) QuestionableAround/HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (L) College Football ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Jalen & Jacoby NBANFL LiveNBA: The JumpFootball LiveESPN FC (N) Around/HornInterruptionUFC 229 Bad Blood: Khabib FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 (11:30) ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) ‰‰‰ Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (05) Johnny Depp, David Kelly. (:10) ‰‰‚ The Addams Family (91) Anjelica Huston. FS1 24 27 150 219 The Herd with Colin CowherdInside SlantMLB PregameMLB Baseball Colorado Rockies at Milwaukee Brewers. Game 2 of the NLDS. (N) (L) MLB PostgameLock It In (N) FX 45 51 136 248 (12:00) ‰‰‰ The Amazing Spider-Man (12) Andrew Garfield. ‰‰‚ The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (14) Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Jamie Foxx. Capt. America: Winter HALL 23 59 185 312 A Ring by Spring (14) Stefanie Powers, Rachel Boston. Stop the Wedding (16) Rachel Boston, Niall Matter. Summer in the Vineyard (17) Rachael Leigh Cook. HGTV 32 38 112 229House HuntersHunters Intl House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream Home HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens The GreysŽ Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 The First 48Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy The Closer Time BombŽ The Closer Good FaithŽ PARMT 28 48 241 241 Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenMom Mom Mom Mom Mom Mom ‰‰‰ Pitch Perfect (12) SUN 49 422 656 SpotlightSportsMoneyGatorZonePower of Epic TrailsReel Animalsto Do FloridaACC AccessInside HEATNBA Preseason Basketball SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‰ Insidious (10) Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Lin Shaye.(:26) ‰‰ Insidious: Chapter 2 (13) Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne. (5:55) Jeepers Creepers 3 (17) TBS 31 15 139 247 MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Houston Astros. (N) (L) PostseasonAmerican DadAmerican DadPostseasonMLB Baseball TCM 25 70 132 256 Wedding ‰‰‚ Tish (42) Marjorie Main, ZaSu Pitts. ‰‰ Hurry, Charlie, Hurry (41)(:15) ‰‰ Make Way for a Lady (36) ‰‰ Bachelor Bait (34) Stuart Erwin. TLC 37 40 183 280 My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding Say YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay Yes TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Fragments. Bones Bones NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans ViralŽ NCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the NightIn the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods PilotŽ Blue Bloods SamaritanŽ Blue Bloods PrivilegeŽ ‰‰‰ The Sixth Sense (99) FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 5 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Manifest ReentryŽ New Amsterdam RitualsŽ Dateline NBC (N) NewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Masters ofMasters ofPenn & Teller: Fool UsPage Six TVThe GoldbergsThe GoldbergsSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKing WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Fresh Off-BoatSpeechlessChild Support (:01) 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 MacGyver (N) Hawaii Five-0 (N) Blue Bloods (N) Family FeudLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenDailyMailTV MNT (18.2) 227 13 CSI: Miami Bolt ActionŽ CSI: Miami In Plane SightŽ 2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsModern FamilyModern FamilyThe GameThe GameLive PD: PatrolLive PD: Patrol WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Last-StandingThe Cool KidsHells Kitchen (N) Two/Half MenThisMinuteTMZ Live (N) Pawn StarsPawn StarsImp. JokersTMZ (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashFiring-HooverGreat Performances A concert honors Grammy Award-winners. Amanpour and Company (N) PBS NewsHour (N) Great Performances A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -10.05.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:51) The Walking Dead (7:52) The Walking Dead (8:53) The Walking Dead (9:57) The Walking Dead (10:58) The Walking Dead (11:59) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters: Out on a Limb (N) TreehouseTreehouseTreehouse MastersTreehouse Masters: Out on a Limb BET 53 46 124 329 (5:00) The Five Heartbeats (91)The Grand Hustle (:02) Martin (:31) MartinMartinMartinMartinMartinMartinMartin COM 64 53 107 249 The OfficeThe OfficeThe OfficeThe OfficeKevin Hart: Grown Little ManComedy-StandComedy-StandKevin Hart: Grown Little ManChappel lesChappelles DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots (Season Finale) (N) Treasure Quest: Snake Island (:01) Gold Rush (N)(:01) Gold Rush: AlaskaBattleBotsTreasure Quest: Snake Island E! 63 57 114 236 ‰ Coyote Ugly (00) Piper Perabo, Adam Garcia, Maria Bello. ‰ Coyote Ugly (00) Piper Perabo, Adam Garcia, Maria Bello. ‰‰ Life as We Know It (10) Katherine Heigl, Josh Duhamel. ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) College Football Georgia Tech at Louisville. (N) (L) NBANBA Preseason Basketball Golden State Warriors vs Sacramento Kings. (N) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Jalen & Jacoby NBACollege Football Utah State at BYU. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Baseball Tonight (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, D riveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 Addams (:20) ‰‰‰ The Goonies (85) Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen. The 700 Club ‰‰‰‚ The Breakfast Club (85) Emilio Estevez, Judd Nelson. FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC Weigh-In (N) (L) MLB PregameMLB Baseball Atlanta Braves at Los Angeles Dodgers. Game 2 of the NLDS. (N) (L) MLB on FS1 Postgame (N) Drag Racing FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‰‰ Captain America: The Winter Soldier (14) Chris Evans. ‰‰‰ Captain America: The Winter Soldier (14) Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson. HALL 23 59 185 312 October Kiss (15) Ashley Williams, Sam Jaeger. Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHu nters Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens: Declassified The Next HumansŽ The merging of man and machine. (N)(:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified The Next HumansŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Closer Junk in the TrunkŽ The Closer (:03) The Closer Fate LineŽ(:03) The Closer (:01) The Closer (12:01) The Closer PARMT 28 48 241 241 (6:00) ‰‰‰ Pitch Perfect (12) Anna Kendrick. ‰‰‰ Pretty Woman (90) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. ‰‰‚ The Replacements (00) Keanu Reeves. SUN 49 422 656 NBA Preseason Basketball: Heat at Wizards Inside HEATMark RichtInside Seminole FootballFootball WeekAfter Midnight with the HEAT From Oct. 5, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (5:55) Jeepers Creepers 3 (17) Z Nation (Season Premiere) (N)(:01) Van Helsing (:03) Z Nation (:04) The Purge Rise UpŽ Futurama (:36) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 (6:30) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. (N) (L) PostseasonELEAGUESeinfeldSeinfeldFrankenw TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰‚ Night Train to Munich (40) Margaret Lockwood. ‰‰‰‰ The Lady Vanishes (38) Margaret Lockwood. ‰‰‚ The Wicked Lady (46) Margaret Lockwood. TLC 37 40 183 280 90 Day Fianc: Before the 90 Days Rachel confronts Jon. (N)(:06) 90 Day Fianc: What Now90 Day Fianc: Before the 90 Days Rachel confronts Jon. TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰‚ The Jungle Book (16) Neel Sethi, Voice of Bill Murray. ‰‰‰ Petes Dragon (16) Bryce Dallas Howard, Oakes Fegley. Arrow The Sin-EaterŽ Arrow Vigilante attacks Oliver. USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyLaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 (6:00) ‰‰‰ The Sixth Sense (99) Bruce Willis. ‰‰‰ The Sixth Sense (99) Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment, Toni Collette. Carter Happy CampersŽ MarriedMarried B8 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 C1 SPORTS MLB | C2NLDSYelich, Brewers top Rockies in 10 Arnold running back Jerian Hardrick (1) tries to break a tackle by a Mosley defender during last weeks game at Tommy Oliver Stadium. [MIKE FENDER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS HERALD] By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comArnold started the week trying to shake the memory of its most disappointing loss of the season following a 28-7 defeat at the hands of county and district rival Mosley. The Marlins will look to finish the week by getting back in the win column over another county rival.The Marlins (3-2) try to bounce backFriday nightat 7 p.m., at Tommy Oliver Stadium against a Rutherford (2-4) squad trying to win a second straight game for the first time this season. The Rams are coming off of a 13-7 victory over Walton and will get an Arnold club eager to wash away the taste of last weeks loss.Arnold coach Josh Wright said he didnt anticipate a hangover-type performance from his players but wanted to see just how forcefully they would respond to adversity.Its Homecoming, theres a lot on the line, a lot of people watching,Ž he said. Nobodys more disappointed than they are (with the Mosley loss), but weve got areas to improve on and a lot of ball still to be played this season. We told the guys that your reaction to disappointment will determine how successful youll be in the games ahead of you.ŽRutherfords last perfor-mance was hardly a masterpiece against a winless Walton team, but it was enough to snap a three-game losing skid and keep the Rams slim postseason hopes alive. Rams coach Loren Tillman said a win over Arnold would be great, but the larger focus for his team is improving enough between now and Oct. 19 when Rutherford plays South Walton in the first of three straight games against 4A foes.I think that will be the difference in making the playoffs or not,Ž he said. Right now all three of those teams (South Walton, Gads-den County, Marianna) from the latest FHSAA rankings would be in the playoffs, therefore us playing head to head with them can really impact who is in the playoffs. Were just continuing to work on everything and prepare for those last three games.Ž If the Rams are to make a late season run, theyll have to do so without their leading rusher, senior James Caldwell, who broke his ankle against Walton and is out for the season. Ruth-erford will look to junior Montell Bouie (282 yards, four touchdowns) and Janathan Proctor (270 yards, two touchdowns) to pick up the slack, while sopho-more Brian Edwards (12 carries, 46 yards) will have to take on a much larger role in the offense.Marlins look to shake o loss against RamsRutherfords Janathan Proctor looks for room to run against Walton. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ County championships come as no great shock for the Mosley boys team, as the Dolphins captured their third in a row Thursday afternoon at the Meadows Course at Bay Point Golf Club.For a senior-laden Mosley club that fell heartbreakingly short of advancing past last years Region 1-2A tournament, the ultimategoal for 2018 remains much loftier.We have three seniors in our top five and this is kind of their year,Ž second-year Mosley coach Josh Laatsch said. I believe weve got the talent to get out of regional this year, so weve just got to play good golf down the stretch. If we take care of business and play the golf were capable of playing, I think we have agood chance.ŽMosley boys add another County ChampionshipMosleys Noah Zediker hits a shot during Thursdays Bay County Championship at the Meadows Course at Bay Point Golf Club. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Overcome Bay to improve to 20-4 in volleyballBy Pat McCannThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ North Bay Haven is attempting to travel some familiar terri-tory in volleyball that it has paved in girls soccer.Namely, establish itself behind Mosley as the second-most accomplished program in Bay County.While that premise could be debated, ostensibly by Arnold in both female sports, the Buccaneers took another step to solidify that status on Thursday night.A 25-16, 25-19, 25-20 victory over host Bay gave North Bay Haven a 20-4 record for the season, including 5-0 in the county. The Tornadoes slid to 10-12 overall.Were kind of growing into that role where were getting closer to the Mosleys and the Arnolds,Ž North Bay Haven coach Fred Corbin said. The girls are getting more competi-tive and theyre starting to understand that now.ŽThe Buccaneers immediately were in charge when Morgan Cox reeled off five consecutive service points as 6-foot-2 junior Amaya Bazemore took command early at the net. Throughout all three sets the Bucs were the better serving team as Bay derailed its momentum in a highly competitive third set with a trio of service errors.The first two came with the set tied, and the last was especially crippling as the Tornadoes had surged within 23-20 when Yas-mine Trammell won a point at the net.Sometimes its as simple as serves and passes,Ž Corbin said. I thought we started out strong serving and passing, and when I called timeout (third set) I reminded them to get more aggressive on their serve.ŽDespite libero Kayla Casiple being the only senior on the NBH roster, the Bucs have added poten-tial in 6-1 eighth-grader Kumara Flanagain and 6-foot freshman Caroline Peaden. Flanagain became prominent down the stretch with a kill and winning block on Taylor Waddells serve. That helped the Bucs escape a 19-19 tie and sweep the match.The first set was almost a formality as North Bay Haven broke to the early lead. The spread grew as large as 19-8 before Tornadoes sophomore Kylie Smith finally led a response by Bay.Smith had three kills and a dink, but was overmatched by the Bucs firepower with Bazemore, Flanagain and Kristen McLaughlin all prominent at the net.Kilee Hudson became a factor for the Tornadoes in the second set and rallied them within 21-17 on two kills and a block. Again NBH responded, however, this time with Laurel Dudley serving and Flanagain standing tall in the middle.Shes going to be special,Ž Corbin said of Flanagain, playing only her second year of competitive volleyball. Shes really a fast learner.ŽBucs net fth county triumphNorth Bay Havens Kumara Flanagain (9) puts up a block against Bays Yasmine Trammell on Thursday in the Buccaneers sweep. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See COUNTY, C2 See MARLINS, C2 See BUCS, C2

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** C2 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Genaro C. ArmasThe Associated PressMILWAUKEE „ Mike Moustaksas scored MVP front-runner Christian Yelich with a two-out single in the 10th inning, and the Milwaukee Brew-ers bounced back to beat the Colorado Rockies 3-2 Thursday in their NL Division Series opener.After giving up two runs in the ninth that made it 2-all, the Brewers regrouped and soon celebrated. Making their first postseason appear-ance since 2011, they won their ninth straight game overall.Yelich hit a tworun homer in the third inning, then opened the 10th with a walk against Adam Ottavino. Yelich advanced to second on a wild pitch and came home on Moustakas line drive to right field. After almost winning the Triple Crown this year, Yelich got two hits, scored twice and stole a base in is play-off debut.Josh Hader and the Brewers allowed just one hit over eight innings in a dominant bullpen game and led 2-0 before Jeremy Jeffress gave up three straight singles to open the ninth. Charlie Blackmon grounded an RBI single shortly after his ground-rule double was overruled on replay review, and Nolan Arenado added a basesloaded sacrifice fly totie it.Moustakas lifts Brewers with winning hit in 10thAt a glanceNATIONAL LEAGUEMILWAUKEE VS. COLORADO Today: Colorado at Milwaukee (Chacin 15-8), 3:15 p.m. CDT (FS1) LOS ANGELES VS. ATLANTA Today: Atlanta (Sanchez 7-6) at Los Angeles (Kershaw 9-5), 8:37 p.m. CDT (FS1)AMERICAN LEAGUEBOSTON VS. NEW YORK Today: New York (Happ 17-6) at Boston (Sale 12-4), 6:32 p.m. CDT HOUSTON VS. CLEVELAND Today: Cleveland (Kluber 20-7) at Houston (Verlander 16-9), 1:05 p.m. CDTThe Dolphins were plenty good enough to get past their county rivals Thursday, posting a team score of 318 to beat Arnold by 41 strokes. Bay finished third and Rutherford was fourth. Mosley had the two lowest individual golfers as well, with Noah Zedicker and Will Massey each posting 77.Zedicker shot an even par 36 on the front nine before posting 41 on the back, with the senior expressing frustrating with how he finished his day.I played pretty solid on the front nine, but on the back nine things got away from me and I definitely left some shots out there,Ž he said. I had some shots where all I could make was bogey and I had to save bogey a few times. After my front nine, I was expecting to play pretty good because there are normally a couple of scor-ing holes on the back, but I had a double on probably the easiest hole on the back. After that, it just kind of fell apart, but it turned out alright.ŽMassey shot 38 on the front and 39 on the back and said he was mostly happy with his performance. While calling it awesomeŽ to see Mosley win another county title, the senior said the bigger focus, as it has been since the start of the year, is fin-ishing his senior season with a trip to Howey-in-the-Hills for the 2A state tournament next month.We havent made it there since Ive been here,Ž he said. We would love to make it. Thats our main goal and if we dont make it, it would be a big letdown.ŽLaatsch said he believes this group has what it takes to make another run and get that elusive break-through thanks largely to the players consistency and competitiveness.The thing I like about this team is theyre level-headed and they just come to compete every day,Ž he said. Theyre always pushing each other to get better and really grinding and trying to beat each other in every-thing they do, which ultimately makes them better as individuals. I think thats everybodys mindset. Theyve come together uniquely in a cool sense of bonding off the course, as well as playing in tune with each other. It has been a cool thing to see.ŽThere are still more hurdles for the Dolphins to clear before they make it to state, starting with the District 2-2A tournament Oct. 16 at Bay Point followed by the Region 1-2A tournament Oct. 22 at Tiger Point Golf Club in Gulf Breeze.The Dolphins took care of their first goal with adding another county title to their total with an effort Laatsch described as solid all-around.ŽI think we played well,Ž he said. It wasnt Noahs best round, but he still played consistent. Hayden Ricks parred out his last four holes to shoot an 86. We had to grind out a couple down the stretch, but I really think we played collectively as a team pretty well and took care of business. I was proud of them for grinding it out and getting it done today. Its hard to walk 18 (holes) any day, but they stayed consistent with it and played good golf.Ž Final results (Top four scores count toward team total)Mosley 318 „ Zedickerk 77, Massey 77, Jack Hund-ley 80, Hayden Ricks 84, Hunter Lark 87Arnold 359 „ Kaleb Cunningham 85, Mitchell Campbell 88, Andrew Sexton 91, Luke Moskow-itz 95, Brendan Propst 107Bay 365 „ JP Harbison 80, Mac Chapman 85, Garrett Nelson 97, Jake Chapman 103Rutherford 452 „ Ethan Bargy 101, Levi Cherek 103, Shane Dupepe 124, Jace Damon 134 COUNTYFrom Page C1Arnold quarterback Cade Ledman has been dealing with an injury of his own, as he continues to play after breaking the pinkie finger on his right throwing hand Sept. 14 against Bay. He had surgery on the finger in the week leading up to the Mosley game and completed 6 of 13 passes for 101 yards and a touchdown.Ledman was held largely in check in the running game by the Dolphins defense, but Tillman said he knows his guys will have their hands full when the 6-foot-1, 203-pound senior tucks the ball and runs.You know what you have to deal with in that kind of weapon with somebody that can run and throw,Ž he said. And hes a hard runner, not a slasher or a speed guy, but he can run you over. Hes a kid who has obviously spent a lot of time in the weight room. When he commits to the run, youve got to understand hes running like a fullback and not like a quarterback. Hes not going to be sliding or running out of bounds. You have to put a shoulder pad on him and get him to the ground.Ž Blountstown (5-1) at Bozeman (2-3)The schedule doesnt get any easier for Bozeman with another talented 1A opponent in Blountstown, which comes in on a fourgame winning streak and a 4-0 record against 1A opponents by a combined margin of 168-26.Bozeman is coming off of losses at the hands of Sneads and Vernon, each of which has just one loss this season. Bucks coach Jason Griffin said the Tigers were just as good as advertisedŽ and just the latest in a line of high-level opponents for his team.Weve got our work cut out for us, but its been that way for three weeks,Ž he said. We faced probably the best Sneads team theyve had in years, the best Vernon team in years, and now weve got another great Blountstown team. Theyre a very talented team, theyve got some good players, and theyre physical and strong and well-coached.ŽThe Bucks showed improvement offensively in the loss to Vernon in their first game with junior Blake Embrick taking all the snaps at quarterback, but the Blountstown defense will provide a uniquely dif-ficult test for the new-look attack.Theyre going to be very tough,Ž Griffin said. Its one of the most sound defenses that weve faced all year. Theyve got really good players and theyre really strong up front, but weve been improving every week and the offense has gotten better. Weve got some confidence that well be able to move the football and score some points and hopefully put ourselves in position at the end to be in it.Ž North Bay Haven (0-5) at Cottondale (3-2)The Buccaneers nar-rowly missed out on getting their first win of the season in a 12-10 loss last week to Lighthouse Christian Academy, and theyll take another stab at it against a Hornets squad riding a three-game winning streak.NBH will again be with-out senior quarterback Ray Tynan, who was expected back last week before tweaking his knee injury the day before the game. Sophomore Trey Johnson stepped in and performed well enough to earn another start from interim coach Ty Steele.Steele said it has been frustrating to havekeep looking foranswers at quarterback all year due to Tynans injury issues, but that he thinks Johnson may be the long-term answer at the position.It has been very difficult trying to get the quarterback spot filled, but last week we saw something in Trey Johnson that Ive known he could do since he was 5 years old,Ž he said. He has a very high football IQ, high football knowledge. Hes the quarterback of the defense when we have him on defense, although he prob-ably wont be able to do that as much now. Were defi-nitely seeing a guy that can be the quarterback of the future here. He answered the call for us last week and were rallying around him.ŽOther area games (7 p.m. Central Time unless noted)Vernon at Graceville, Gadsden County at Mari-anna, Chipley at Freeport, Liberty County at Wewahitchka, Franklin County at Branford 6:30 p.m., Port St. Joe at Walton, Lighthouse Christian Academy at Sneads. MARLINSFrom Page C1 The Tornadoes came together in the third set to play by far their best volley-ball of the match. Hudson took over as their most powerful hitter in support of Smith, and Hudson, Trammell and Kamera Johnson were effective with a strong middle block.Hudsons kill gave Bay a 17-16 lead, but the Tornadoes couldnt continue their momentum at the service line and North Bay Haven closed out the win.Bazemore led the Bucs with 10 kills, McLaughlin had nine and Flanagain seven. Smith topped Bay with 10 and Hudson added nine. Flanagain had five blocks to pace NBH and Johnson had four and Hudson and Trammell each three for Bay.Cox had 33 assists for NBH, Casiple had 18 digs and McLaughlin had 14.North Bay Haven plays at Arnold next Thursday to conclude its regular season before hosting the District 1-5A tournament begin-ning Oct. 15.Bay has three matches before beginning District 1-6A tourney play Oct. 16 at Rutherford. The Tornadoes initiate that stretch at Taylor County on Saturday. BUCSFrom Page C1North Bay Havens Morgan Cox had 33 assists on Thursday night. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Barry WilnerThe Associated PressFOXBOROUGH, Mass. „ Tom Brady reached 500 touchdown passes for his unparalleled career and the New England Patriots put together their second straight win after a medi-ocre start to the season, beating Indianapolis 38-24 on Thursday night.Bradys 500th went to Josh Gordon, recently acquired from Cleveland, where he basically was unavailable through NFL suspensions for all but five games over the past three seasons. But, as he often does, Brady spread the wealth, hitting running back James White 10 times for 77 yards, and greeting the return of buddy Julian Edelman by completing seven for 57 yards to him.Brady also tied Colts kicker Adam Vinatieri, a former teammate, for most NFL victories with 226.As everyone in Gillette Stadium except, apparently, the Colts knew, Brady started off with a pass to Edelman, who was wide open for 9 yards. That drew the first of many loud cheers for the 10th-year veteran receiver in his first game since the 2017 preseason, when he tore up a knee. Edelman was suspended for the first four games this year for violating the NFLs policy on performance enhancers.That was the first of three receptions for 28 yards for Edelman on the opening 75-yard touch-down drive Brady capped with a 1-yard toss to Cor-darrelle Patterson .From there, even though the Colts (1-4) had a drive deep into New England (3-2) territory, usually reliable Adam Vinatieri missed a 38-yard field goal.Nothing was going right for Indianapolis, particularly after Brady led a 72-yard march to his sneak from the 1. Then he took the Patriots 68 yards near the end of the half and hit workhorse White for a 6-yard score to lead 21-3.Under pressure, Andrew Luck threw a poor pass that Patrick Chung inter-cepted at midfield, and Stephen Gostkowski made a 45-yard field goal for a 24-3 halftime lead.Luck did extend his string of games with a touchdown pass by hitting Eric Ebron on a 14-yarder in the third quarter. Showing a strong arm all night „ remember, Luck missed all of 2017 with shoulder issues „ he has a TD throw in 28 successive games, tops of any current quarterback.After Matthias Farleys interception of a pass bob-bled by Chris Hogan, Indy could do nothing. Rookie Jordan Wilkins had the ball stripped from his hands by Devin McCourty four players later.But a second pick of Brady that was not his fault „ Rob Gronkowski had the ball stolen and Najee Goode wound up with it „ helped the Colts get back into it for a short time. Looking like vintage Luck, he brought his team 80 yards, including a pair of big third-down throws to Ebron, and Eric Swoope caught a 13-yard scoring pass to make it 24-17.Thats when everyone saw vintage Brady as he hit the half-century mark for TD throws by connecting with newcomer Gordon for 34 yards, the 71st player to catch a touchdown pass from Brady, an NFL mark.KICKING ITVinatieri, whose leg helped New England win three Super Bowls, hit the left upright with his 673rd career field goal attempt, the second most in NFL history. He already holds the mark for most field goals made and is closing in on Hall of Famer Morten Andersens points record, but was victimized by a high snap on the first-quarter miss.Showing his true skills, Vinatieri later nailed a 54-yarder with plenty to spare.Brady reaches 500 TD passes in Patriots win The Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman runs from Indianapolis Colts defensive back George Odum during the “ rst half on Thursday. [CHARLES KRUPA / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 C3 ALDS PREVIEWS ProjectedlineupsYankees: LFAndrew McCutchen(.255,20HRs,65 RBIsforPiratesandYankees), RFAaronJudge(.278,27, 67,152Ksin112games),CF AaronHicks(.248,27,79in137 games),DHGiancarloStanton (.266,38,100,211Ks),1BLuke Voit(.322,15,36in47games forCardinalsandYankees; .333,14,33in39gameswith Yankees),SSDidiGregorius (.268,27,86in134games),3B MiguelAndujar(.297,27,92, 472Bs),CGarySanchez(.186, 18,53in89games),2BGleyber Torres(.271,24,77in123 games). RedSox: RFMookieBetts(.346, 32,80,129runs,30steals),LF AndrewBenintendi(.290,16, 87),DHJ.D.Martinez(.330,43, 130),SSXanderBogaerts(.288, 23,103),1BMitchMoreland (.245,15,68),2BIanKinsler (.240,14,48withAngelsand RedSox),3BRafaelDevers (.240,21,66),CSandyLeon (.177,5,22),CFJackieBradley Jr.(.234,13,59).StartingpitchersYankees: LHJ.A.Happ(17-6, 3.65ERAforBlueJaysand Yankees;7-0,2.69in11starts withYankees),RHMasahiro Tanaka(12-6,3.75),RHLuis Severino(19-8,3.39,220Ks),LH CCSabathia(9-7,3.65). RedSox: LHChrisSale(12-4, 2.11,237Ksin158IP),LHDavid Price(16-7,3.58,177Ksin176 IP),RHRickPorcello(17-7,4.28, 190Ksin191.1IP),RHNathan Eovaldi(6-7,3.81withRedSox andRays).RelieversYankees: LHAroldisChapman (3-0,2.45,32/34saves,.136 BAagainst,93Ksin51.1IP), RHDellinBetances(4-6,2.70, 4saves,115Ksin66.2IP),LH ZachBritton(2-0,3.10,7/10 savesforOriolesandYankees), RHDavidRobertson(8-3,3.23, 5saves),RHChadGreen(8-3, 2.50),RHJonathanHolder (1-3,3.14),RHLanceLynn (10-10,4.77forCardinalsand Yankees). RedSox: RHCraigKimbrel(5-1, 2.74,42/47saves),RHMatt Barnes(6-4,3.65),RHRyan Brasier(2-1,1.60),RHSteven Wright(3-1,2.68),RHJoeKelly (4-2,4.39),RHBrandonWorkman(6-1,3.27),LHEduardo Rodriguez(13-5,3.82,146Ks, 129.2IPin27games,23 starts).WhattowatchforRedSoxstarters: Thereisnt asinglepitcherintheBoston rotationwhohaswona postseasonstart.Theyare acombined0-19.Pricehas wontwogamesasareliever, andpitchedwellintworelief appearancesduringlastyears ALDSagainstHouston.Sale gaveupsevenrunsover“ve inningsinGame1againstthe Astroslastyearinhis“rst careerplayoffappearance,but pitchedwellinreliefonthree daysrestbeforerunningout ofgasinhis“fthinning.The seven-timeAll-Starwassidelinedbyinjuryinthesecond halfthisseasonandhadavery limitedworkload.Whetherhe willbeatthetopofhisgame inOctoberremainstobeseen. Youngstars: TheYankees lineupwasinvigoratedbytwo rookieswhocameupearlythis seasoninAndujarandTorres. Andujars47doublesbroke thefranchiserookierecordset byJoeDiMaggioin1936.The energeticVoit,anunder-theradarJulyacquisitionfromSt. Louis,has“lledtheoffensive voidat“rstbasecreatedby GregBirdsseason-long slump.TheAssociatedPress Yankeesvs.RedSox Indiansvs.Astros Schedule/TV: (AlltimesEDT)Game1,today,atBoston,7:32p.m.;Game2,Saturday,atBoston,8:15p.m.;Game3,Monday,Oct.8,atNewYork,TBA;x-Game4, Tuesday,Oct.9,atNewYork,TBA;x-Game5,Thursday,Oct.11,atBoston,TBA. (AllgamesonTBS).x-ifnecessary. Seasonseries: RedSoxwon10-9. Schedule/TV: (AlltimesEDT)Game1,toay,atHouston,2:05p.m.;Game2,Saturday,atHouston,4:37p.m.;Game3,Monday,Oct.8,atCleveland,TBA;x-Game4, Tuesday,Oct.9,atCleveland,TBA;x-Game5,Thursday,Oct.11,atHouston,TBA. (AllgamesonTBS).x-ifnecessary. Seasonseries: Astroswon4-3. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ProjectedlineupsIndians: SSFranciscoLindor (.277,38HRs,92RBIs,422Bs, 25SBs),LFMichaelBrantley (.309,17,76),2BJoseRamirez (.272,39,106,34SBs),DHEdwin Encarnacion(.246,32,107), 3BJoshDonaldson(.246,8,23 withBlueJaysandIndians),1B YonderAlonso(.250,23,83), RFMelkyCabrera(.280,6,39in 78games),CYanGomes(.266, 16,48),CFJasonKipnis(.230, 18,75). A stros: CFGeorgeSpringer (.265,22,71),2BJoseAltuve (.315,13,61),3BAlexBregman(.286,31,103,AL-best51 doubles,84walks,82Ks),SS CarlosCorrea(.239,15,65),1B YuliGurriel(.291,13,85),DH EvanGattis(.226,25,78),LF MarwinGonzalez(.247,16,68), RFJoshReddick(.242,17,47), CMartinMaldonado(.225,9, 44forAngelsandAstros)or BrianMcCann(.212,7,23in63 games).StartingpitchersIndians: RHCoreyKluber(20-7, 2.89ERA,222Ksinleagueleading215IP),RHCarlos Carrasco(17-10,3.38,careerhigh231Ks),RHMikeClevinger (13-8,3.02,career-high200IP, 207Ks),RHTrevorBauer(12-6, 2.21,221Ksin175.1IP). Astros: RHJustinVerlander (16-9,2.52,AL-high290Ksand only37walksin214IP),RH GerritCole(15-5,2.88,2ndin ALwith276Ksin200.1IP),LH DallasKeuchel(12-11,3.74),RH CharlieMorton(15-3,3.13).RelieversIndians: RHCodyAllen(4-6, 4.70,27/32saves),LHBrad Hand(2-5,2.75,32/39saves withPadresandIndians),LH AndrewMiller(2-4,4.24,37 appearances,fewestsince 2013),RHShaneBieber(11-5, 4.55in19starts),LHOliver Perez(1-1,1.39in51appearances),LHAdamCimber(3-8, 3.42in70gamesforPadresand Indians). Astros: RHRobertoOsuna(2-2, 2.37,21/22savesforBlueJays andAstros),RHRyanPressly (2-1,2.54,2savesforTwinsand Astros),RHHectorRondon(2-5, 3.20,15saves),LHTonySipp (3-1,1.86,54appearances),RH CollinMcHugh(6-2,1.99,58 appearances),RHWillHarris (5-3,3.49,61appearances),RH JoshJames(2-0,2.35),RHBrad Peacock(3-5,3.46,61appearances),RHJoeSmith(5-1,3.74, 56appearances),RHLance McCullers(10-6,3.86in25 games,22starts).WhattowatchforDynamiteorduds? Lindorand RamirezmaketheIndians offensego„orstop.Thepair didntshowany”awslast seasonuntilOctober,when theywentacombined4for38 andstruckout13timesagainst theYankees. Correasback: Thetopoverall pickinthe2012drafthit.268 with13homersand49RBIsin the“rsthalfthisseasonbut struggledwithabackinjury formostofthesecondhalf.He missedaboutsixweeksand hitjust.180withtwohomers and16RBIsin37gamesafter theAll-Starbreak.Hesaidhes feelingbetternowandhopes hecangetbackontrack.. Bauerpower: Theright-handersabilitytopitchmultiple inningsonshortrestgives Franconaavaluableweaponhe wonthesitatetouseagainst theAstros.Bauerwillcomeout ofthebullpenifeitherKluber orCarrascostrugglesinthe “rsttwogames,andtheresa chanceBauercouldbeusedas eitherthecloserorabridgeto thebackofthebullpen.TheAssociatedPressTheYankeesAaronJudge(99)celebrateswithAndrew McCutchenafterhittingatwo-runhomerunagainsttheAthletics onWednesdayinNewYork.[BILLKOSTROUN/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS]AstrosshortstopCarlosCorreastandsonthe“eldduringagame againsttheOriolesonSaturdayinBaltimore.[PATRICKSEMANSKY/ THEASSOCIATEDPRESS]

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** C4 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald PLAYERTOWATCH GregDortch,WakeForest: Caught11passesfor163yards andfourTDstohelptheDemonDeaconscruisetoa56-24 winoverRice. A TLANTICCONFALL T EAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY C lemson2-05-0190843-02-0 N orthCarolinaState1-04-0137613-01-0 B ostonCollege1-04-12161343-01-1 S yracuse1-14-12211073-01-1 W akeForest0-13-21911582-21-0 F loridaState1-23-21111232-11-1 L ouisville0-22-3921302-10-2 COASTALCONFALL TEAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY VirginiaTech2-03-1152831-02-1 Miami(Fla.)1-04-1221843-01-1 Virginia1-13-21511023-00-2 Pittsburgh1-12-31121602-10-2 NorthCarolina1-11-3841471-00-3 Duke0-14-1164922-12-0 GeorgiaTech0-22-31821392-10-2 BESTOFTHERESTThisweekendsothertopconferencegames(alltimesEDT)KEYSFORNOTREDAME Maintainoffensive momentum: Replacingsenior BrandonWimbushatquarterbacktwoweeksagoagainst WakeForestwithjuniorIan BocklitafireunderNotre Damesoffense.Averaging just23pointsthroughthefirst threegameswithWimbushat thehelm,theFightingIrishare scoringata47-pointclip withBock,whoisa threatpassingandrunningwiththefootball. Pressurethequarterback: NotreDame,ledby6-foot-7 seniorJerryTillery,registered fivesacksinlastweekswin againstStanford.Tilleryhad fourofthose.VirginiaTech reliedheavilyonthepassing ofRyanWillistobeatDuke lastweek,sopressureis necessarytodisrupthisrhythm. KEYSFORVIRGINIATECH Establishtherun: The Hokiesareaveraging204 yardsontheground,butnettedjust81inlastSaturdays winagainstDuke.Someof thatwasduetoRyanWillis hothandpassing.Buttobeat theFightingIrishtheHokiesneedtohavethebackfield duoofStevenPeoplesand DeshawnMcCleaseoperatingattheirhighestlevel. Stoptherun: VirginiaTech hastheACCsbestdefense againsttherun,limitingfoes tojust84yardsagame.Stifle theIrishrunningbacksand keepBockinthepocketwill makeNotreDameone-dimensionalandeasiertodefend. PREDICTION PlayinginanintimidatingenvironmentatLane Stadiumandonanevening whereemotionswillbe evenhigherasVirginiaTech honorsformercoachFrank Beamerbyunveilingastatute ofhimoutsidethestadium willbeachallengeforNotre Dame.ButtheFightingIrish areprovingtobeaplayoffcaliberteam.TheHokiesare good,butnotthatgood. G AMEOFTHEWEEK NO.6NOTREDAME(5-0)ATNO.24VIRGINIATECH(3-1) W hen: 8p.m.EDTSaturday Where: LaneStadium,Blacksburg,Va. TV: ABCPOWERRANKINGSBreakingdowntheACC 1.Clemson(5-0): TheTigerssuddenlyneed toreplenishtheQBspot. 2.Miami(4-1): Hurricanesdroppedin nationalrankingsafterpoundingNorth Carolina. 3.N.C.State(4-0): Wolfpackkeepsit smooth,butBostonCollegeisnext. 4.VirginiaTech(3-1): Hokiesheadhome aftersmotheringDuke,butNotreDameis nextontheslate. 5.Syracuse(4-1): TheOrangemissesan upsetatClemson.Lastyear,Syracuse didntwinafterfacingClemson. 6.BostonCollege(4-1): Eaglesputoffense backingearvs.Temple 7.Duke(4-1): Itsashort-livednational rankingforBlueDevilsafterdownervs. Hokies. 8.FloridaState(3-2): Seminolesneedgreat escape,butnotchACCvictoryatLouisville. 9.WakeForest(3-2): RicemadeDemon Deaconsfeelbetter.Wontbesoeasyvs. Clemson. 10.Virginia(3-2): Cavalierswerentupto speedagainstN.C.State. 11.GeorgiaTech(2-3): NexttaskforYellow Jacketsistrackingdownaqualityvictory. 12.Louisville(2-3): Cardinals“ndagonizing waytolosetoFloridaState. 13.NorthCarolina(1-3): TarHeelsneedthis weekofftorecoverfromMiamidisaster. 14.Pittsburgh(2-3): Pantherslook miserableinlosingtoCentralFlorida. Lastweek: 1 Lastweek: 2 Lastweek: 3 Lastweek: 6 Lastweek: 5 Lastweek: 7 Lastweek: 4 Lastweek: 8 Lastweek: 9 Lastweek: 10 Lastweek: 13 Lastweek: 14 Lastweek: 11 Lastweek: 12STANDINGSThroughSept.29PASSINGYARDS PlayerYds. D.Francois,FSU1,377 RyanFinley,NCST1,313 SamHartman,WAKE1,185 BrycePerkins,UVA1,125 EricDungey,SYR1,013 PASSINGTOUCHDOWNS PlayerNo. AnthonyBrown,BC12 BrycePerkins,UVA11 SamHartman,WAKE10 Severaltiedat...9 RUSHINGYARDS PlayerYds. AJDillon,BC652 TravisEtienne,CLEM594 JordanEllis,UVA478 CadeCarney,WAKE428 QadreeOllison,PITT404 RECEIVINGYARDS PlayerYds. GregDortch,WAKE555 O.Zaccheaus,UVA501 KelvinHarmon,NCST406 JamalCustis,SYR360 DamonHazelton,VT348 SCORING PlayerPts. AndreSzmyt,PK,SYR65 T.Etienne,RB,CLEM54 NickSciba,PK,WAKE46 Severaltiedat...42 ROUNDINGITOUTThisweekendsothergames SATURDAYTime(ET)MatchupTV 12:20p.m.SyracuseatPittsburghACCNetworkExtraBYTHENUMBERSACCindividualstatisticalleadersthroughSept.29 BOSTONCOLLEGE(4-1,1-0) A TNO.23N.C.STATE(4-0,1-0) When: 12:30p.m.Saturday Where: Carter-FinleyStadium, Raleigh,N.C. TV: RSN Notes: BostonCollegewontwo yearsagoinRaleigh,snapping a12-gamelosingskidvs.ACC opponents.TheWolfpackclaimed aroadvictorylastyear.ƒN.C. Stateisaimingforits“rst5-0start since2002.ƒBostonCollegeRB AJDillonleadstheACCinrushing (130.4yardspergame). NO.4CLEMSON(5-0,2-0)AT WAKEFOREST(3-2,0-1) When: 3:30p.m.Saturday Where: BB&TField,WinstonSalem,N.C. TV: ESPN Notes: Clemsonleadstheseries 65-17-1,withWakeForestslast victoryintheseriesin2008.ƒ ClemsonQBTrevorLawrence,a freshmanwhomadehis“rststart lastweekbutwasknockedoutof thegameinthe“rsthalfagainst Syracuse,wasbackatpracticeat thebeginningoftheweek. FLORIDASTATE(3-2,1-2) ATNO.17MIAMI(4-1,1-0) When: 3:30p.m.Saturday Where: HardRockStadium,Miami TV: ABC Notes: Thelastfourmatchups havebeendecidedby“vepoints orfewer.ƒMiamis24-20victory lastyearsnappedaseven-game FloridaStatewinningstreakin theseries.ƒMiamileads32-30in all-timemeetings.ƒSinceMiami joinedtheACC,FloridaStatehas won10of14meetings.ƒMiamis defenserankssecondnationally. AGOLDEN OPPORTUNITYHOKIESFACERED-HOTIRISHINWHATSHOULD BEANEMOTIONALNIGHTINBLACKSBURGTHISWEEKINTHE POWEREDBYWEEKLYE-EDITION: Formorecoverageofcollegefootballaroundthenation„plusin-depthreportsfrom allofthePowerFiveconferences„checkoutthe8-pagee-edition,Varsity,everySaturdayonourwebsite. [WOODYMARSHALL/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS] VirginiaTechsDamonHazelton(14) andBraxtonPfaff,right,congratulate StevenPeoples(32)aftera touchdownagainstDukeonSaturday inDurham,N.C.[GERRYBROOME/THE ASSOCIATEDPRESS] The Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ HyunJin Ryu pitched seven dominant innings, Max Muncy hit an early, threerun homer and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Atlanta Braves 6-0 in their NL Division Series opener Thursday night.Picked a surprising Game 1 starter over fellow lefty Clayton Kershaw, Ryu deliv-ered in his first postseason start since 2014. The South Korean allowed four singles „ all with two outs „ struck out eight and walked none.The 31-year-old Ryu missed 3 months of the season with a groin strain and returned Aug. 15 to post a 1.88 ERA in 52 ‡ innings. Dodgers great Sandy Koufax was among those who gave Ryu a standing ovation as he walked to the dugout after his final pitch. The Dodgers set a National League record by hitting 235 homers during the regular season, and their tear contin-ued with three more to begin their playoffs. The defending NL champions actually were outhit 6-5 by Atlanta, but the Braves only got singles.Game 2 in the best-of-five matchup is today at Dodger Stadium, with Kershaw start-ing for Los Angeles against Anibal Sanchez.The Braves have lost eight straight series openers in the postseason. They havent won a Game 1 since 2001 when they went on to sweep Houston in the NLDS.Rookie Ronald Acuna Jr. struck out twice and went 0 for 4 as the Baby Braves were blanked. This was Atlantas first playoff appearance since 2013, when they lost to the Dodgers in four games.Joc Pedersons blast in the bottom of the first rattled Mike Foltynewicz in his post-season debut.Dodgers hit 3 HRs, beat Braves 60 in opener

PAGE 23

** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 C5 EBRO SCHEDULE MONDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 10:55 a.m., Delaware 11:15 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 10:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 5:35 p.m.TUESDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 10:55 a.m., Belmont 10:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 11:10 a.m.WEDNESDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 10:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 11:10 a.m., Delaware 11:15 a.m., Gulfstream West 11:15 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 10:30 a.m., Jacksonville 10:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 5 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 5:30 p.m., Jacksonville 5:35 p.m.THURSDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 10:55 a.m., Gulfstream West 11:15 a.m., Delaware 11:15 a.m., Finger Lakes 11:10 a.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 10:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 5 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 5:35 p.m.FRIDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Keeneland 11:05 a.m., Gulfstream West 11:15 a.m., Belmont 10:55 a.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 10:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 5 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 5 p.m., Derby Lane 5:30 p.m., Jacksonville 5:35 p.m.SATURDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Belmont 10:30 a.m., Keeneland 11:05 a.m., Gulfstream West 11:15 a.m., Santa Anita 1:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 10:30 a.m., Jacksonville 10:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai alai 5 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 5:30 p.m., Jacksonville 5:35 p.m.SUNDAYMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 10:55 a.m., Keeneland 11:05 a.m., Gulfstream West 11:15 a.m., Santa Anita 1:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 11:35 a.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION…234-3943. PRO FOOTBALL NFL All times Central AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Miami 3 1 0 .750 82 90 New England 2 2 0 .500 95 84 Buffalo 1 3 0 .250 50 106 N.Y. Jets 1 3 0 .250 89 89 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Tennessee 3 1 0 .750 75 73 Jacksonville 3 1 0 .750 88 56 Houston 1 3 0 .250 96 108 Indianapolis 1 3 0 .250 94 100 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Cincinnati 3 1 0 .750 126 113 Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 123 65 Cleveland 1 2 1 .375 102 104 Pittsburgh 1 2 1 .375 102 116 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Kansas City 4 0 0 1.000 145 115 Denver 2 2 0 .500 84 97 L.A. Chargers 2 2 0 .500 111 120 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 97 123 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Washington 2 1 0 .667 64 44 Dallas 2 2 0 .500 67 77 Philadelphia 2 2 0 .500 82 81 N.Y. Giants 1 3 0 .250 73 95 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA New Orleans 3 1 0 .750 137 121 Carolina 2 1 0 .667 71 60 Tampa Bay 2 2 0 .500 112 139 Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 116 122 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Chicago 3 1 0 .750 111 65 Green Bay 2 1 1 .625 92 83 Minnesota 1 2 1 .375 90 110 Detroit 1 3 0 .250 94 114 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA L.A. Rams 4 0 0 1.000 140 67 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 85 81 San Francisco 1 3 0 .250 100 118 Arizona 0 4 0 .000 37 94WEEK 5 Thursdays GameIndianapolis at New England, lateSundays GamesMiami at Cincinnati, Noon N.Y. Giants at Carolina, Noon Denver at N.Y. Jets, Noon Jacksonville at Kansas City, Noon Green Bay at Detroit, Noon Baltimore at Cleveland, Noon Atlanta at Pittsburgh, Noon Tennessee at Buffalo, Noon Oakland at L.A. Chargers, 3:05 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 3:25 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m. L.A. Rams at Seattle, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at Houston, 7:20 p.m.Mondays GameWashington at New Orleans, 7:15 p.m. Open: Tampa Bay, ChicagoWEEK 6 Thursday, Oct. 11Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 7:20 p.m.Sunday, Oct. 14Seattle vs Oakland at London, UK, Noon Chicago at Miami, Noon Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets, Noon Buffalo at Houston, Noon Tampa Bay at Atlanta, Noon Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, Noon Arizona at Minnesota, Noon L.A. Chargers at Cleveland, Noon Carolina at Washington, Noon L.A. Rams at Denver, 3:05 p.m. Jacksonville at Dallas, 3:25 p.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 3:25 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 7:20 p.m.Monday, Oct. 15San Francisco at Green Bay, 7:15 p.m. Open: Detroit, New Orleans PRO BASEBALL PLAYOFFSAll times CentralWILD CARDOct. 2: Colorado 2, Chicago 1, 13 innings Wednesday: New York 7, Oakland 2WEDNESDAYS LATE BOX SCORE YANKEES 7, ATHLETICS 2OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Martini lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 a-Canha ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 M.Chapman 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Lowrie 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Davis dh 4 1 1 2 0 2 .250 Olson 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .000 Piscotty rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000 Laureano cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000 Semien ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .333 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 TOTALS 33 2 5 2 5 13 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG McCutchen lf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Gardner lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Judge rf 3 2 2 2 1 1 .667 Hicks cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Stanton dh 3 2 1 1 1 1 .333 Voit 1b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .250 Walker 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gregorius ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .333 Andujar 3b 1 0 1 0 1 0 1.000 Hechavarria 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Torres 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 TOTALS 29 7 7 7 4 6 OAKLAND 000 000 020„2 5 0 NEW YORK 200 004 01X„7 7 1 a-struck out for Martini in the 9th. E„Andujar (1). LOB„Oakland 9, New York 3. 2B„Judge (1), Hicks (1). 3B„Voit (1). HR„Davis (1), off Britton; Judge (1), off Hendriks; Stanton (1), off Treinen. RBIs„ Davis 2 (2), Judge 2 (2), Hicks (1), Stanton (1), Voit 2 (2), Gregorius (1). SB„Stanton (1). SF„Gregorius. Runners left in scoring position„Oakland 4 (M.Chapman, Davis, Semien 2); New York 1 (Torres). RISP„Oakland 0 for 6; New York 2 for 4. Runners moved up„Sanchez. GIDP„Sanchez. DP„Oakland 1 (Semien, Lowrie, Olson); New York 1 (Hechavarria, Torres, Voit). OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendriks, L, 0-1 1 1 2 2 1 1 25 18.00 Trivino 3 1 0 0 1 4 41 0.00 Kelley 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.00 Rodney 0 2 2 2 0 0 5 0.00 Treinen 2 2 3 3 2 0 42 13.50 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Severino 4 2 0 0 4 7 87 0.00 Betances, W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 0 3 25 0.00 Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Britton 1 2 2 2 1 0 13 18.00 A.Chapman 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 Severino pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Rodney pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Treinen pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Betances 2-0. WP„Rodney. Umpires„Home, Jim Wolf; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Alan Porter; Right, Pat Hoberg; Left, Will Little. T„3:25. A„49,620 (47,309).DIVISION SERIES(Best-of-5; x-if necessary) AMERICAN LEAGUEAll games on TBSBOSTON VS. NEW YORKToday: New York (Happ 17-6) at Boston (Sale 12-4), 6:32 p.m. Saturday: New York at Boston (Price 16-7), 7:15 p.m. Monday: Boston (Porcello 17-7) at New York (Tanaka 12-6), TBA x-Tuesday: Boston at New York, TBA x-Thursday, Oct. 11: New York at Boston, TBAHOUSTON VS. CLEVELANDToday: Cleveland (Kluber 20-7) at Houston (Verlander 16-9), 1:05 p.m. Saturday: Cleveland (Carrasco 17-10) at Houston (Cole 15-5), 3:37 p.m. Monday: Houston (Keuchel 12-11) at Cleveland (Clevinger 13-8), TBA x-Tuesday: Houston at Cleveland, TBA x-Thursday, Oct. 11: Cleveland at Houston, TBANATIONAL LEAGUEFS1 and MLB NetworkMILWAUKEE 1, COLORADO 0Thursday: Milwaukee 3, Colorado 2, 10 innings Today: Colorado at Milwaukee (Chacin 15-8), 3:15 p.m. (FS1) Sunday: Milwaukee at Colorado, 3:37 p.m. (MLB) x-Monday: Milwaukee at Colorado, TBA x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: Colorado at Milwaukee, TBABREWERS 3, ROCKIES 2, 10 INN.COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .250 LeMahieu 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Arenado 3b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Gonzalez rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Desmond 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Iannetta c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Parra ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Senzatela p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 c-McMahon ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Musgrave p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Holliday ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 1-Hampson pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 --Wolters c 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 2 4 2 2 12 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Cain cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .000 Yelich rf 3 2 2 2 2 0 .667 Braun lf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .400 Shaw 2b-1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .000 Aguilar 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Broxton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Jeffress p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Soria p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Granderson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .250 Pina c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333 Arcia ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Woodruff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Santana ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Burnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Schoop ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Perez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 TOTALS 35 3 7 3 7 7 COLORADO 000 000 002 0„2 4 0 MILWAUKEE 002 000 000 1„3 7 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-popped out for Woodruff in the 3rd. bgrounded out for Burnes in the 5th. c-walked for Senzatela in the 6th. d-struck out for Hader in the 8th. e-singled for Iannetta in the 9th. f-singled for Oberg in the 9th. g-out on “ elders choice for Soria in the 10th. 1-ran for Holliday in the 9th. E„Arcia (1). LOB„Colorado 3, Milwaukee 10. 3B„Gonzalez (1). HR„Yelich (1), off Senzatela. RBIs„Blackmon (1), Arenado (1), Yelich 2 (2), Moustakas (1). SB„Yelich (1), Braun (1). CS„LeMahieu (1), McMahon (1). SF„Arenado. Runners left in scoring position„Colorado 2 (Story, Desmond); Milwaukee 3 (Cain, Pina 2). RISP„Colorado 1 for 5; Milwaukee 2 for 9. COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Senzatela 5 3 2 2 2 1 73 3.60 Rusin 1.1 1 0 0 1 1 23 0.00 Johnson .2 1 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Musg rave .2 1 0 0 2 2 22 0.00 Oberg .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Ottavino, L, 0-1 1.2 1 1 1 2 1 30 5.40 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Woodruff 3 0 0 0 1 3 48 0.00 Burnes 2 1 0 0 0 3 26 0.00 Knebel, H, 1 1.2 0 0 0 1 1 25 0.00 Hader, H, 1 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 20 0.00 Jeffress, BS, 1-1 1 3 2 2 0 1 18 18.00 Soria, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Inherited runners-scored„Johnson 1-0, Oberg 3-0. WP„Senzatela 2, Ottavino. Umpires„Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Todd Tichenor; Right, John Tumpane; Left, Alfonso Marquez. T„4:04. A„43,382 (41,900).ATLANTA VS. LOS ANGELESThursday: Atlanta at Los Angeles, late Today: Atlanta (Sanchez 7-6) at Los Angeles (Kershaw 9-5), 8:37 p.m. (FS1) Sunday: Los Angeles (Buehler 8-5) at Atlanta, 7:07 p.m. (FS1) x-Monday: Los Angeles vs. Atlanta, TBA x-Wednesday, Oct. 10: Atlanta vs. Los Angeles, TBA PRO HOCKEY NHLAll Times CDTEASTERN CONFERENCEATLANTIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Toronto 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 Boston 2 1 1 0 2 4 7 Detroit 1 0 0 1 0 2 3 Montreal 1 0 0 1 1 2 3 Ottawa 1 0 0 1 0 3 4 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Buffalo 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 METROPOLITAN DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Washington 2 1 0 1 3 13 7 Columbus 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 N.Y. Islanders 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 Pittsburgh 1 1 0 0 2 7 6 Carolina 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 New Jersey 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N.Y. Rangers 1 0 1 0 0 2 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE CENTRAL DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Winnipeg 1 1 0 0 2 5 1 Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 4 3 Dallas 1 1 0 0 2 3 0 Nashville 1 1 0 0 2 3 2 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis 1 0 1 0 0 1 5 PACIFIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Anaheim 1 1 0 0 2 5 2 Vancouver 1 1 0 0 2 5 2 Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Edmonton 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vegas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Calgary 1 0 1 0 0 2 5 San Jose 1 0 1 0 0 2 5 Arizona 1 0 1 0 0 0 32 points for win, 1 point for overtime loss. Top 3 teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.Wednesdays GamesToronto 3, Montreal 2, OT Washington 7, Boston 0 Vancouver 5, Calgary 2 Anaheim 5, San Jose 2Thursdays GamesPittsburgh 7, Washington 6, OT Boston 4, Buffalo 0 N.Y. Islanders 2, Carolina 1, OT Columbus 3, Detroit 2, OT Nashville 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Chicago 4, Ottawa 3, OT Winnipeg 5, St. Louis 1 Dallas 3, Arizona 0 Minnesota at Colorado, late Philadelphia at Vegas, lateTodays GamesCarolina at Columbus, 6 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.Saturdays GamesEdmonton vs. New Jersey at Goteborg, Swe., Noon Winnipeg at Dallas, 6 p.m. Montreal at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Toronto, 6 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Nashville at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m. Vegas at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Chicago at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 9 p.m.Sundays GamesN.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 4 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 6 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.BRUINS 4, SABRES 0BOSTON 2 1 1 „ 4 BUFFALO 0 0 0 „ 0First Period„1, Boston, Chara 1 (McAvoy, Marchand), 6:33. 2, Boston, Donato 1 (Bergeron, Marchand), 15:34 (pp). Penalties„ Sobotka, BUF, (slashing), 13:58. Second Period„3, Boston, Pastrnak 1 (Marchand, Krejci), 16:16. Penalties„Heinen, BOS, (slashing), 2:47. Third Period„4, Boston, Bergeron 1 (Marchand), 19:48 (sh). Penalties„Chara, BOS, (roughing), 19:21; McAvoy, BOS, (roughing), 19:21; Sobotka, BUF, (roughing), 19:21. Shots on Goal„Boston 11-10-5„26. Buffalo 6-11-15„32. Power -play opportunities„Boston 1 of 1; Buffalo 0 of 2. Goalies„Boston, Halak 1-0-0 (32 shots-32 saves). Buffalo, Hutton 0-1-0 (25-22). A„19,070 (19,070). T„2:34. Referees„Steve Kozari, Justin St Pierre. Linesmen„Steve Miller, Kory Nagy.ISLANDERS 2, HURRICANES 1, OTN.Y. ISLANDERS 0 1 0 1 „ 2 CAROLINA 0 0 1 0 „ 1First Period„None. Penalties„Barzal, NYI, (high sticking), 4:44; Pesce, CAR, (holding), 10:21. Second Period„1, N.Y. Islanders, Filppula 1 (Nelson), 9:27. Penalties„Pulock, NYI, (holding), 6:48; Wallmark, CAR, (interference), 11:29. Third Period„2, Carolina, Staal 1 (Hamilton, Aho), 18:25. Penalties„Sbisa, NYI, (illegal equipment), 6:57; Ferland, CAR, (tripping), 19:56. Overtime„3, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 1 (Barzal, Pulock), 0:43 (pp). Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„N.Y. Islanders 7-7-4-2„20. Carolina 16-15-15„46. Power -play opportunities„N.Y. Islanders 1 of 3; Carolina 0 of 3. Goalies„N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 1-0-0 (46 shots-45 saves). Carolina, Mrazek 0-0-1 (20-18). A„18,680 (18,680). Referees„Dean Morton, Tim Peel. Linesmen„Scott Cherrey, Brad Kovachik.PENGUINS 7, CAPITALS 6, OTWASHINGTON 3 1 2 0 „ 6 PITTSBURGH 2 3 1 1 „ 7First Period„1, Pittsburgh, Oleksiak 1 (Malkin, Kessel), 1:49. 2, Washington, Vrana 1 (Backstrom, Oshie), 3:30. 3, Washington, Orpik 1, 4:18. 4, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 1 (Schultz, Sprong), 7:27 (pp). 5, Washington, Ovechkin 2 (Kuznetsov, Djoos), 8:00. Penalties„Niskanen, WSH, (interference), 5:47; Hagelin, PIT, (interference), 18:11. Second Period„6, Pittsburgh, Letang 1 (Crosby, Dumoulin), 0:30. 7, Washington, Carlson 2 (Connolly), 3:54. 8, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 2 (Schultz, Hornqvist), 15:09. 9, Pittsburgh, Brassard 1 (Dumoulin, Simon), 16:58. Penalties„Kessel, PIT, (slashing), 4:13; Eller, WSH, (hooking), 7:24. Third Period„10, Pittsburgh, Malkin 1 (Crosby, Letang), 2:45. 11, Washington, Oshie 2, 13:01. 12, Washington, Oshie 3 (Carlson), 13:22. Penalties„Connolly, WSH, (tripping), 0:39; Bowey, WSH, (hooking), 3:53; Vrana, WSH, (slashing), 8:40. Overtime„13, Pittsburgh, Letang 2 (Malkin, Kessel), 1:20 (pp). Penalties„Kuznetsov, WSH, (hooking), 0:19. Shots on Goal„Washington 10-16-10„36. Pittsburgh 5-23-11-2„41. Power -play opportunities„Washington 0 of 2; Pittsburgh 2 of 6. Goalies„Washington, Holtby 1-0-1 (41 shots-34 saves). Pittsburgh, Murray 1-0-0 (36-30). A„18,627 (18,387). T„2:39. Referees„Eric Furlatt, Kendrick Nicholson. Linesmen„Tim Nowak, Andrew Smith.PREDATORS 3, RANGERS 2NASHVILLE 0 1 2 „ 3 N.Y. RANGERS 0 1 1 „ 2First Period„None. Penalties„Kreider, NYR, (cross checking), 15:54. Second Period„1, Nashville, Forsberg 1 (Turris, C.Smith), 3:54. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 1 (Chytil), 7:37. Penalties„Rinaldo, NSH, (holding), 8:13; Lettieri, NYR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 8:13. Third Period„3, Nashville, Subban 1 (Sissons, Ekholm), 3:28. 4, Nashville, Sissons 1 (Ellis, Ekholm), 18:36. 5, N.Y. Rangers, Buchnevich 1 (Zibanejad, Zuccarello), 19:25. Penalties„ Turris, NSH, (slashing), 14:00; Subban, NSH, (interference), 18:30; N.Y. Rangers bench, served by Namestnikov (too many men on the ice), 18:30. Shots on Goal„Nashville 9-15-9„33. N.Y. Rangers 7-17-12„36. Power -play opportunities„Nashville 0 of 1; N.Y. Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies„Nashville, Rinne 0-0-0 (36 shots-34 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 0-0-0 (32-30). T„2:30. Referees„Ghislain Hebert, Chris Rooney. Linesmen„Greg Devorski, James Tobias.BLUE JACKETS 3, RED WINGS 2, OTCOLUMBUS 1 1 0 1 „ 3 DETROIT 0 2 0 0 „ 2First Period„1, Columbus, Atkinson 1 (Dubois, Panarin), 5:12 (pp). Penalties„Bertuzzi, DET, (delay of game), 4:19; Cholowski, DET, (holding), 12:52; Panarin, CBJ, (tripping), 13:09; Abdelkader, DET, (slashing), 17:38. Second Period„2, Detroit, Cholowski 1 (Nyquist, Larkin), 7:46. 3, Columbus, Anderson 1 (Duclair, Dubinsky), 13:06. 4, Detroit, Bertuzzi 1 (Nyquist, Larkin), 16:13 (pp). Penalties„Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 10:58; Carlsson, CBJ, (interference), 15:56; DeKeyser, DET, (delay of game), 17:22; Hronek, DET, (holding), 19:45. Third Period„None. Penalties„Vanek, DET, (hooking), 5:41. Overtime„5, Columbus, Panarin 1 (Foligno, Nutivaara), 2:11. Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„Columbus 11-11-16-1„39. Detroit 5-9-3-3„20. Power -play opportunities„Columbus 1 of 6; Detroit 1 of 3. Goalies„Columbus, Korpisalo 0-0-0 (20 shots-18 saves). Detroit, Howard 0-0-0 (39-36). A„19,515 (20,000). T„2:43. Referees„Gord Dwyer, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen„Devin Berg, David Brisebois.BLACKHAWKS 4, SENATORS 3, OTCHICAGO 2 0 1 1 „ 4 OTTAWA 3 0 0 0 „ 3First Period„1, Chicago, DeBrincat 1, 4:40. 2, Ottawa, Smith 1 (Chabot, White), 6:47. 3, Chicago, Toews 1 (Gustafsson), 10:30. 4, Ottawa, Lajoie 1 (Duchene, Dzingel), 12:06. 5, Ottawa, White 1 (Lajoie, Tierney), 16:32 (pp). Penalties„Kunitz, CHI, (tripping), 16:23. Second Period„None. Penalties„Chicago bench, served by DeBrincat (delay of game), 14:18; Johnson, CHI, (slashing), 16:06; White, OTT, (slashing), 17:20. Third Period„6, Chicago, Seabrook 1 (Kampf, Kane), 12:18. Penalties„Lajoie, OTT, (tripping), 9:21; Tierney, OTT, (tripping), 16:12. Overtime„7, Chicago, Kane 1 (Toews), 0:38. Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„Chicago 18-8-15-2„43. Ottawa 10-10-5„25. Power -play opportunities„Chicago 0 of 3; Ottawa 1 of 3. Goalies„Chicago, Ward 1-0-0 (25 shots-22 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 0-0-1 (43-39). A„15,858 (18,572). T„2:39. Referees„Brian Pochmara, Garrett Rank. Linesmen„Shandor Alphonso, Derek Nansen.JETS 5, BLUES 1WINNIPEG 1 0 4 „ 5 ST. LOUIS 0 0 1 „ 1First Period„1, Winnipeg, Laine 1 (Scheifele, Wheeler), 4:01 (pp). Penalties„Bouwmeester, STL, (hooking), 3:31. Second Period„None. Penalties„Dunn, STL, (tripping), 11:25; Trouba, WPG, (tripping), 14:59; Myers, WPG, (delay of game), 19:07. Third Period„2, Winnipeg, Lowry 1, 5:51 (sh). 3, Winnipeg, Wheeler 1 (Scheifele, Connor), 6:55. 4, Winnipeg, Connor 1 (Laine, Trouba), 7:35. 5, Winnipeg, Tanev 1 (Roslovic, Vesalainen), 11:05. 6, St. Louis, Dunn 1 (Bozak, OReilly), 14:10. Penalties„Connor, WPG, (tripping), 4:49; Wheeler, WPG, (slashing), 12:03. Shots on Goal„Winnipeg 10-7-8„25. St. Louis 10-12-20„42. Power -play opportunities„Winnipeg 1 of 2; St. Louis 0 of 4. Goalies„Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 1-0-0 (42 shots-41 saves). St. Louis, Allen 0-1-0 (25-20). A„18,292 (19,150). T„2:34. Referees„Jake Brenk, Dan OHalloran. Linesmen„Brian Mach, Libor Suchanek. COLLEGE FOOTBALL THE AP TOP 25 SCHEDULEAll times CentralSaturdays GamesNo. 1 Alabama at Arkansas, 11 a.m. No. 2 Georgia vs. Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m. No. 3 Ohio State vs. Indiana, 3 p.m. No. 4 Clemson at Wake Forest, 2:30 p.m. No. 5 LSU at No. 22 Florida, 2:30 p.m. No. 6 Notre Dame at No. 24 Virginia Tech, 7 p.m. No. 7 Oklahoma vs. No. 18 Texas at Dallas, 11 a.m. No. 8 Auburn at Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m. No. 9 West Virginia vs. Kansas, 11 a.m. No. 10 Washington at UCLA, 6:30 p.m. No. 12 UCF vs. SMU, 6 p.m. No. 13 Kentucky at Texas A&M, 6 p.m. No. 14 Stanford vs. Utah, 9:30 p.m. No. 15 Michigan vs. Maryland, 11 a.m. No. 16 Wisconsin vs. Nebraska, 6:30 p.m. No. 17 Miami vs. Florida State, 2:30 p.m. No. 20 Michigan State vs. Northwestern, 11 a.m. No. 21 Colorado vs. Arizona State, 3 p.m. No. 23 NC State vs. Boston College, 11:30 a.m. No. 25 Oklahoma State vs. Iowa State, 2:30 p.m.RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times Eastern (Subject to change)Thursdays Games SOUTHTroy 37, Georgia State 20SOUTHWESTTulsa (1-2) at Houston (3-1), lateTodays Games EASTDartmouth (3-0) at Yale (2-1), 5 p.m.SOUTHGeorgia Tech (2-3) at Louisville (2-3), 6 p.m. Middle Tenn. (2-2) at Marshall (3-1), 6:30 p.m.FAR WESTUtah State (3-1) at BYU (3-2), 8 p.m.Saturdays Games EASTColgate (4-0) at Bucknell (1-4), 11 a.m. Illinois (2-2) at Rutgers (1-4), 11 a.m. East Carolina (2-2) at Temple (1-3), 11 a.m. Kansas (2-3) at West Virginia (4-0), 11 a.m. Syracuse (4-1) at Pittsburgh (2-3), 11:20 a.m. Marist (1-3) at Columbia (2-1), Noon Bryant (3-1) at Duquesne (3-2), Noon Georgetown (1-4) at Fordham (0-4), Noon Holy Cross (1-4) at New Hampshire (0-4), Noon Lehigh (1-3) at Princeton (3-0), Noon Brown (1-2) at Rhode Island (3-1), Noon CCSU (2-3) at Robert Morris (0-3), Noon Harvard (2-1) at Cornell (1-2), 12:30 p.m. Penn (2-1) at Sacred Heart (3-1), 2 p.m. Villanova (3-2) at Maine (2-2), 2:30 p.m. South Florida (4-0) at UMass (2-4), 2:30 p.m. Stony Brook (4-1) at Towson (3-1), 3 p.m.SOUTHSan Diego (2-2) at Morehead State (1-3), 11 a.m. Missouri (3-1) at South Carolina (2-2), 11 a.m. Boston College (4-1) at NC State (4-0), 11:30 a.m. Jacksonville (1-2) at Davidson (4-1), Noon SC State (0-4) at Morgan State (1-3), Noon Elon (3-1) at James Madison (4-1), 12:30 p.m. W. Carolina (2-1) at Samford (1-4), 12:30 p.m. Wagner (1-4) at Campbell (4-1), Noon Lane (0-4) at Hampton (1-3), Noon Presbyterian (2-1) at Kennesaw State (4-1), Noon Howard (1-2) at NC Central (1-3), Noon Alabama State (1-3) at Alcorn State (4-1), 2 p.m. Wofford (3-1) at Chattanooga (4-1), 2 p.m. Delaware (2-2) at Richmond (2-3), 2 p.m. Gardner-Webb (1-3) at ETSU (4-1), 2:30 p.m. LSU (5-0) at Florida (4-1), 2:30 p.m. S. Alabama (1-4) at Ga. Southern (3-1), 2:30 p.m. Florida State (3-2) at Miami (4-1), 2:30 p.m. Clemson (5-0) at Wake Forest (3-2), 2:30 p.m. Albany (NY) (2-2) at Wm. & Mary (1-3), 2:30 p.m. MVSU (0-3) at Bethune-Cookman (2-3), 3 p.m. Jacksonville State (3-1) at E. Ky. (2-2), 3 p.m. Norfolk State (3-1) at Florida A&M (3-2), 3 p.m. La.-Monroe (2-3) at Mississippi (3-2), 3 p.m. Old Dominion (1-4) at FAU (2-3), 4 p.m. Charleston Southern (1-2) at Savannah State (0-4), 5 p.m. Tenn. State (2-1) at Austin Peay (2-3), 6 p.m. NC A&T (4-1) at Delaware State (0-4), 6 p.m. Oklahoma Panhandle State (2-3) at Grambling State (1-3), 6 p.m. UAB (3-1) at Louisiana Tech (3-1), 6 p.m. Abilene Christian (2-3) at McNeese State (4-1), 6 p.m. UConn (1-4) at Memphis (3-2), 6 p.m. W. Florida (4-1) at N. Alabama (3-2), 6 p.m. Nicholls (3-2) at Northwestern State (2-2), 6 p.m. SE Missouri (2-2) at Tenn. Tech (0-5), 6 p.m. SMU (2-3) at UCF (4-0), 6 p.m. Vanderbilt (3-2) at Georgia (5-0), 6:30 p.m. Auburn (4-1) at Miss. State (3-2), 6:30 p.m. Notre Dame (5-0) at Virginia Tech (3-1), 7 p.m.MIDWESTBuffalo (4-1) at Cent. Michigan (1-4), 11 a.m. Tulane (2-3) at Cincinnati (5-0), 11 a.m. Maryland (3-1) at Michigan (4-1), 11 a.m. Northwestern (1-3) at Mich. State (3-1), 11 a.m. E. Michigan (2-3) at W. Michigan (3-2), 11 a.m. Valparaiso (0-4) at Dayton (2-3), Noon Butler (3-1) at Drake (2-1), Noon N. Dakota State (4-0) at N. Iowa (2-2), Noon N. Illinois (2-3) at Ball State (2-3), 2 p.m. W. Illinois (2-2) at Illinois State (3-1), 2 p.m. Missouri State (2-1) at S. Dakota (2-2), 2 p.m. Miami (Ohio) (1-4) at Akron (2-1), 2:30 p.m. Ohio (2-2) at Kent State (1-4), 2:30 p.m. Iowa (3-1) at Minnesota (3-1), 2:30 p.m. Bowling Green (1-4) at Toledo (2-2), 2:30 p.m. Indiana (4-1) at Ohio State (5-0), 3 p.m. S. Illinois (1-3) at Youngstown State (1-3), 5 p.m. Murray State (1-3) at E. Illinois (1-4), 6 p.m. Ind. State (2-2) at S. Dakota State (2-1), 6 p.m. SCOREBOARD Today AUTO RACING 10 a.m. NBCSN [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Gander Outdoors 400, practice, at Dover, Del. 11 a.m. NBCSN [„] NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Bay Harbor 200, practice, at Dover, Del. 4:30 p.m. NBCSN [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Gander Outdoors 400, qualifying, at Dover, Del. (same-day tape) 9:55 p.m. ESPNEWS [„] Formula One, Honda Japanese Grand Prix, practice, at Suzuka, Japan 12:55 a.m. (Saturday) ESPN2 [„] Formula One, Honda Japanese Grand Prix, qualifying, at Suzuka, Japan COLLEGE FOOTBALL 5 p.m. ESPNU [„] Dartmouth at Yale 6 p.m. ESPN [„] Georgia Tech at Louisville 6:30 p.m. CBSSN [„] Middle Tennessee at Marshall 8 p.m. ESPN2 [„] Utah at BYU DRAG RACING 12:30 a.m. (Saturday) FS1 [„] NHRA, AAA Texas FallNationals, qualifying, at Ennis, Texas (sameday tape) GOLF 7 a.m. GOLF [„] European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, second round, at St. Andrews, Scotland 4:30 p.m. GOLF [„] PGA Tour, Safeway Open, second round, at Napa, Calif. 8 p.m. GOLF [„] LPGA Tour, UL International Crown, third round, at Incheon, South Korea 2 a.m. (Saturday) ESPN2 [„] Asia-Paci“ c Amateur Championship, third round, at Singapore (same-day tape) MLB 1 p.m. TBS [„] AL Division Series, Game 1, Cleveland at Houston 3 p.m. FS1 [„] NL Division Series, Game 2, Colorado at Milwaukee 6:30 p.m. TBS [„] AL Division Series, Game 1, N.Y. Yankees at Boston 8:30 p.m. FS1 [„] NL Division Series, Game 2, Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 9 p.m. NBCSN [„] Professional Fighters League, playoffs, at New Orleans NBA 6:30 a.m. NBA [„] Preseason, Philadelphia vs. Dallas, at Shanghai 7 p.m. NBA [„] Preseason, Atlanta at Memphis 9:30 p.m. ESPN [„] Preseason, Sacramento vs. Golden State, at Seattle SOCCER 1:20 p.m. FS2 [„] Bundesliga, Werder Bremen vs. Wolfsburg 2 p.m. NBCSN [„] Premier League, Brighton & Cove Albion vs. West Ham 5 p.m. FS2 [„] 2018 CONCACAF Womens Championship, Group Stage, Group B: Costa Rica vs. Cuba, at Edinburg, Texas 7:30 p.m. FS2 [„] 2018 CONCACAF Womens Championship, Group Stage, Group B: Canada vs. Jamaica, at Edinburg, TexasON THE AIRLISBON, PORTUGAL Ronaldo left off Portugal squad for matchesCristiano Ronaldo was left off Portugals national team squad for a pair of upcoming matches, the decision coming Thursday as the soccer great fights a rape allegation in the United States.Ronaldo has been accused of rape by Kath-ryn Mayorga, who says the player assaulted her in Las Vegas in 2009. He has denied the accusation. The Associated PressIN BRIEFFootball Rutherford at Arnold 7 p.m Blountstown at Bozeman 7 p.m. Mosley at Niceville 7 p.m North Bay Haven at Cottondale 7 p.m.AREA EVENTS The News Herald will publish announcements of area interest concerning meetings or events. Announcements, which must be dated and contain contact information, can be mailed to the Sports Department, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 or emailed to sports@pcnh.com. Events that require entry fees or registration costs that dont benefit charities or go toward the operating expenses of youth leagues or school booster clubs, or toward the purchase of trophies and awards are not eligible, and must run as an advertisement. Advocates for Children golf Advocates for Children, supporting Guardian ad Litem, is holding its fourth annual golf tournament on Oct. 26 at Holiday Golf Club in Panama City Beach. Lunch and registration is 11:30 a.m. with a 12:30 p.m. start. Entry fee is $100 per person with prizes for first-, secondand third-place teams. All proceeds benefit children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse or neglect. Contact: www. guardianadlitem14. com or call 747-5180. Junior golf tournament A junior golftournament at Nature Walk Golf Club in Lynn Havenwill be held Oct. 20 and Nov. 10. There will be a 1 p.m. start for the 9-hole event. Boys and girls age 12 and younger are eligible to participate. Entry fee is $12.05, payable at the pro shop. Parents have an option of renting a golf cart for nine holes for $7 to be spectators or caddies. Range balls are available for half price. Contact: Call or text Lee Anderson at 850-3489431 with the nameand age of the player.ANNOUNCEMENTS

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 6 6 Friday, October 5, 2018| The News Herald NF-1191629 Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an aggressive leader in the Marine Shipbuilding Industry with new Contracts to build various ships at their Panama City, FL locations has an immediate opening for aPayroll Clerk Quali cations include: € High school diploma or GED equivalent plus 1…3 years experience in Payroll. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered. € Intermediate to advanced level payroll software, including job cost, Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook experience required. Sage software with report design experience highly desired. € Experience with electronic timekeeping desired. € Experience with government contracts and DCAA compliance desired. € Position requires integrity, exibility, initiative, interpersonal skills, attention to detail and multitasking. € The ability to obtain and maintain bonding insurance coverage may be required. Eastern offers a competitive salary and bene“ t package including 401(k) and Company paid health, dental & life insurance.Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Af“ rmative Action Employer. All quali“ ed applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, protected veteran status, disability status or any other status or characteristic protected under applicable federal, state, of local laws. Quali“ ed applicants may submit their resume/application in con“ dence to Human Resources, 13300 Allanton Road, Panama City, FL 32404 or via e-mail: HR@Easternshipbuilding.com MORE THAN A JOBƒ A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORKEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP 21979 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2017-21-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT Plaintiff(s), VS. THE ESTATE OF JOE DAVIS and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant who are unknown to be dead or alive whether said unknown are persons, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOE DAVIS LOUISE DAVIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LOUISE DAVIS; HEATHER DAVIS; JOSEPH C. DAVIS; MARISA DAVIS; TRACY KING ; TENANT I/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT H/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT HI/UNKNOWN TENANT and TENANT IV/UNKNOWN TENANT, in possession of the subject real property, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that the Clerk of Court of Bay County, Florida will sell the following property situated in Bay County, Florida described as: LOTS NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) AND FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK D IN SHERMAN’S SECOND ADDITION TO MILL VILLE, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION THREE (3), TOWNSHIP FOUR (4), RANGE FOURTEEN (14) WEST, ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at www .bay .realfore close.c om at 11:00 a.m. CT / 12:00 p.m. ET on January 7, 2019 The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Court. Final payment must be made by 12:00 p.m. the next business day. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE Lis PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE Dated: September 21st, 2018. Clerk of the Court By: Sharon Chambers Deputy Clerk Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 21680 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (Section 83 80 1 83 80 9 The undersigned will sell at pu blic sale by compe titive bidding on Mon day the 15th day of October 2018, sched uled to begin at 10:30 am The sale will occur as an online auction via www .storagetrea sures.c om The said property is located at StorQuest Self Storage, 934 S Tyndall Pkwy, City of Panama City, County of Bay, State of Florida, the following: Unit #C16 Julie Sanchez Household Goods Unit #E106 Victoria Key Household Goods Unit# G203 Angela Rogers Household Goods Unit# H125 James Perker Household Goods Purchases must be paid for in Cash Only. All purchased items sold as is, where is, and must be removed within 48 hours after the sale. Sale is Subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 21704 PUBLIC NOTICE The regular meeting of the Panama City Port Authority Board of Directors will be held Tuesday, October 9th, 2018 at 3:00PM in the Port Board Room at One Seaport Drive. Pub: October 5, 2018 21991 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2018-881-CP ROBERT MARION HIGDON, JR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Robert Marion Higdon, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was June 19, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 27, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: H. Cranston Pope Attorney Florida Bar Number: 0582409 Pope & Barloga, P.A. 490 Grace Ave. P.O. Box 1609 (32402) Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 784-9174 Fax: (850) 692-6822 hcp@popebarloga.com tprater@popebarloga.c om Personal Representative: Suzanne H. Farrar P.O. Box 28251 Panama City, Florida 32411 Pub: September 27, October 5, 2018 22005 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 17-000348-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; WAYNE T. ALLISON; STEVEN A. HULL; BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER — SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM; CLERK OF THE COURT; STATE OF FLORIDA; NANCY RIVERS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated September 25, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017-000348-CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; WAYNE T. ALLISON; STEVEN A. HULL; BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER — SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM; CLERK OF THE COURT; STATE OF FLORIDA; NANCY RIVERS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT, are the Defendants, that the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale to the highest bidder for cash online at www .bay .realf oreclose.com on November 8, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. Central Standard Time the following described real property as set forth in the Final Judgment: Legal Description: LOT 5, BLOCK 29, OF REPLAT OF THE TOWN OF FOUNTAIN, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 18232 April Avenue, Fountain, Florida 32438 NOTICE ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 26th day of September, 2018. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Jennifer Estrada As Deputy Clerk NOTICE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 300 East 4th Street Panama City, Florida 32401, 850-763-9061, within two working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8770. Attorney for Plaintiff, ROGER A. KELLY, ESQ., P.O. Box 3146, Orlando, FL 32802-3146 Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 22003 Government Surplus Auction October 13, 2018 at 8:00 a.m. at 3847 E. Bus Hwy 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-896-2343 facebook.com/flauc tionnetwork auctionzip.com ID# 42719 Items from Bay County, Bay County TPO, Franklin County Sheriff, City of Parker, City of Springfield and other consignors. Florida Auction Network LLC Jon Sewell, Manager/Auctioneer 13% Buyer’s Premium 3% Discount for cash/check cash, check, credit cards accepted + tax, tag, and title fees AB# 3488 AU# 4677 Pub: October 5, 12, 2018 22037 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 2018 CA 000418 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, VS. TRENT J. WATKINS A/K/A TRENT JUSTIN WATKINS; KELLY J. WATKINS A/K/A KELLY JOAN WATKINS; TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A SELENIA MORAN; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A MELISSA MORAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 1, 2018 and entered in Case No. 2018 CA 000418 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, is the Plaintiff and TRENT J. WATKINS A/K/A TRENT JUSTIN WATKINS; KELLY J. WATKINS A/K/A KELLY JOAN WATKINS; TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A SELENIA MORAN; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A MELISSA MORAN, are Defendants, Bill Kinsaul, Bay County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash www .bay .realfore close.c om at 11:00 AM on the 15 day of November, 2018, the following described property set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK D OF SHADOW BAY UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 15, PAGE(S) 17-19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 106 SHADOW BAY CT, PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 CASE NO: 2018 CA 000418 Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the Foreclosure Sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within sixty (60) days after the Foreclosure Sale. DATED in Bay County, Florida this, 2nd day of October, 2018. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of Circuit Court County, Florida Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk Matthew McGovern, Esq. Lender Legal Services, LLC 201 East Pine Street, Suite 730 Orlando, Florida 32801 Attorney for Plaintiff Pub: October 5, 12, 2018 22027 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING DATES PIER PARK COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT The Board of Supervisors of the Pier Park Community Development District will hold their regular meetings for Fiscal Year 2018/2019 at 10:00 a.m. (CDT) located at the Panama City Beach City Hall, 110 South Arnold Road, Panama City Beach, Bay County, Florida on the following dates: November 12, 2018 February 11, 2019 May 13, 2019 August 12, 2019 The meetings will be open to the public and will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of Florida Law for Community Development Districts. The meetings may be continued in progress, without additional notice, to a date, time, and place to be specified on the record. A copy of the agenda for each meeting can be obtained at the offices of the District Manager, Rizzetta & Company, Inc., located at 120 Richard Jackson Blvd, Suite 220, Panama City Beach, FL 32407, Telephone: 850-334-9055, during normal business hours, or electronically at www .pierparkcdd.org. There may be occasions when one or more Supervisors will participate by telephone. At the above location will be present a speaker telephone so that any Supervisor of member of stuff can attend the meeting at the above location and be fully informed of the discussions taking place either in person or by telephone communication. Pursuant to provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in these meetings is asked to advise the District Office at (850) 334-9055, at least 48 hours before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the Florida Relay Service at 711, who can aid you in contacting the District Office. Each person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting is advised that person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which such appeal is to be based. Justin Croom District Manager Pub: October 5, 2018 22049 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY Probate Division Case Number 2018-864-CP IN RE: Estate of KYLE STEVEN DeMAIO, deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of KYLE STEVEN DEMAIO deceased, whose date of death was February 7, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. 4th Street, Panama City, FL 32401. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this Notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 5, 2018. YVONNE R. PETTY Personal Representative 6815 Forsythe Drive Panama City, FL 32404 JELKS & WHITE, P.A. C. JASON WHITE Florida Bar No. 0357080 Attorney for Personal Representative 516 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: 850.784.0809 Fax:850.784.0806 Email:jason@jelksand white.com Pub: October 5, 12, 2018 22043 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: CondoCierge located at 266 S. Glades Trail, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City Beach, Florida, 32407 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City Beach, Florida, this 2nd day of October 2018. Patricia A. Kennedy Pub: October 5, 2018 22051 Notice of Application to Establish a Branch of a State Member Bank SmartBank , Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to establish a branch at 2713 Highway 77, Panama City, FL 32405. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application including the record of performance of applicant banks in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this application to the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, 1000 Peachtree Street N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30309-4470. The comment period will not end before October 20, 2018. The Board’s procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board’s procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Kathryn Haney, Director of Applications, at (404) 498-7298. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period. Any person wishing to comment on or protest this application/notification or any person having information which may have a bearing on the fitness of any of the organizers or proponents of this application/notifi cation, may file comments with the Commissioner of Financial Institutions, Tennessee Tower, 26th Floor, 312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee 37243, or telephone the Department of Financial Institutions at (615) 741-5018. Written or telephonic notice must be made to the Commissioner within fifteen (15) days of this publication Pub: October 5, 2018 22055 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College Foundation, Inc. Board of Directors will meet on Monday, October 15, 2018 in Student Union East Private Dining Room at 11:30 a.m. CDT at Gulf Coast State College. The Gulf Coast State College Foundation, Inc. Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 in Student Union West in Room 270 at 4:00 p.m. CDT at Gulf Coast State College. Pub: October 5, 2018 Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 855-259-0557 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised Best Health Guar. Call 239-324-4650www .noahslittleark.com $3499-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY A. Pearce Tree & Stump Service“We go out on a limb for you!” Lic. & Ins. 850-596-5067 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794 BJ’S TREE REMOVAL & LOT CLEARING! We also offer Excavating Services! Military and senior citizen discounts. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices. Licensed & insured For a F ree estimate Call ( 850)819-9987 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Townsend Quality Home Repairs, LLC Specializing In All Types. Roof repairs, Vinyl siding Soffit, and Fascia 35 Years Experience Ins/Lic #L18000039382 Call 850-257-6041/ 850-387-9661 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting Clean-Ups/Sod Epoxy floors Rock/Flower Beds Gutter & Roof Cleaning Drainage systems. Lot Clearing, Haul-Offs. Weeding, Tree Trimming, Pressure Washing, Deck Renovations. Save 10%-20% 850-303-8526 Kevin WilliamsAll Areas of Home Repair and Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Additions No Job too Small! 30 Years Experience! Call (843)270-9251 Quality Work Guaranteed Free Estimates Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569Text FL91517 to 56654 !!Bob’s Home Repairs!!Roof, soffit, facia repair, drywall repair and painting, electric & plumbing. Free Estimates!850-257-6366Panama City Area All Home Repairs & RemodelingWood rot, roofs repairs, drywall, painting, vinyl, windows, doors, fencing. Lic & Ins. Sam (850)348-0207 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 $10 Off New Clients One time cleanings welcome. Exp & thorough housekeeper. Excellent Loc Ref. Lic & Ins. Kim 850-625-9062 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Driveway SpecialistWHITE’S CONCRETELic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 or 896-6864 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 C C 7 7 NF-1185390 Eastern Shipbuilding Group an aggressive leader in the Marine Shipbuilding Industry has immediate openings for the following skilled craftsmen:€ Ship“ tters € Structural Welders € Pipe Welders € Pipe“ tters € Marine Electricians € Safety Rep. € QA Inspectors € Ship“ tter, Welder & Pipe“ tter TraineesQuali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon … Fri, 8am 12pm … 1pm 4:30pm.Human Resources (2 Locations):13300 Allanton Rd, Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave, Panama City, FL 32401 www.easternshipbuilding.comEastern offers a competitive salary and bene“ ts package including 401(k) and Company paid health, dental & life insurance, attendance & safety bonuses.Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Af rmative Action Employer. All quali ed applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, protected veteran status, disability status or any other status or characteristic protected under applicable federal, state, of local laws. MORE THAN A JOBƒ A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORKEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP 1002 W. 23rd Street, Suite 130 Panama City, FL 32405 P: (850) 770 7047 | F: (850) 770 7126 www.PFinsurance.com Peoples First Insurance is currently looking for high-energy, self motivated individuals to join our team! If you are in sales or have worked in the insurance eld, this opportunity may be for you! Peoples First Insurance is a successful independent insurance agency located in Panama City with customers spanning across the southeast. Exciting job opportunities exist in all lines of insurance including Property & Casualty, Bene ts, and Personal Lines. Using consultative selling techniques and proactive lead generation, ideal candidates will build and develop customer relationships and service an elite group of clients. We provide a generous base compensation and commission structure, paid vacation, sick leave, and bene ts including health, life, and 401 (k). Preferred SkillsPlease e-mail resumes to resumes@p nsurance.com or visit our website to apply. Applicable insurance licenses are desired Independent agency sales experience desired but not required Experience in sales or client service environment Highly effective communication skills, both written and verbal Exceptional customer service skills Dependable, self-motivated, and organized with the ability to multi-task and manage multiple projects Ability to handle information con dentiallyPeoples First Insurance participates in E-Verify and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Peoples First Insurance is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. NF-1186902 Rutherford High SchoolClass of ‘7345th ReunionOctober 12 & 13Holiday Inn across from Panama City Mall For information, please call 850-896-2269 or email Ramsclassof1973@aol.com Maintenance Technician WantedFull time position with competitive wage and benefits. Weekend work required. Must have maintenance experience. Need to be detailed oriented and have basic computer skills. Valid driver’s license required. Come by Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. located at 60 East Gulf Beach Drive to apply in person or email Quentin Allen to request an application be emailed to you. quentin@collinsvacationrentals.com Apalachee Center, INC.NOW HIRING FOR OUR COMMUNITY ACTION TEAMWill serve Liberty and Franklin Counties *Care Manager -bachelor’s degree in Human Services (psychology, social work, etc.) *Therapist -masters degree in Human Services required. *Therapeutic Mentor -family member or caregiver to another person who is living with a mental health condition or a Certified Recovery Peer Specialist by the Florida Certification Board. *Team Leader -Must hold LCSW, LMHC, or LMFT. All positions require a valid driver’s license with no more than 6 points on driver history report. MESSIAH LUTHERAN CHURCHis seeking applicants for CHURCH SECRETARY/ADMINISTRATOR The church secretary will perform a variety of clerical and administrative duties to assist the pastor in performing ministerial responsibilities and to support the day-to-day operation of the church. Qualifications: -High school diploma -Minimum of three years prior experience, relevant experience in office setting -Computer literacy including knowledge of Microsoft Office programs, especially Word, Publisher and Excel -Excellent English and grammatical skills -Excellent organizational skills with the flexibility to handle a number of different tasks & projects -Ability to work independently Interested applicants please submit resume to: mlcoffice@messiah-lutheran.net SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.co m1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N 10% DISCOUNT CUSTOM ORDER FURNITURE and WINDOW TREATMENTSS & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy BENELLI 12 gauge(850)258-7841 Four Cemetary Plots Available Evergreen Memorial Gardens Hwy 231 GARDEN OF SERMON ON THE MOUNT PLOTS 1,2,3,4 LOT No. 143A $2,500.00 each Call 850-832-4894 Mr. BaseballBuying sports cards & memorabilia. 203-767-2407 SALE20% OFF In-StockFURNITURE LAMPS ARTWORKS & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy Piano Lessons Enroll Fall Discounts! Lessons in your home or in studio. All ages! Call (850)260-5993 Dental Asst. & Dental HygienistBusy growing dental practice looking for an experienced, enthusiastic, team oriented dental assistant and hygienist to start immediately. Please fax resume to (850) 271-0679 or email mel kaye@hotmail.com Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring Ride Attendants CashiersMultiple Positions Small Engine MechanicPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park. Exp Receptionist Office AssistantFor busy medical practice. Fax resume to: 850-763-1477 Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now HiringSMALL ENGINE MECHANIC FULL TIME AND PART TIME YEAR ROUND OR SEASONAL. PAID BENEFEITS AVAILABLE!Pick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Full-Time SalariedCleaning, Landscaping, & Maintenance Tech. $30-32K DOE. (Health and Dental available). Apply at www.north star.church/jobs Medical/HealthMedical Asst./ ReceptionistExp. preferred for front & back office. Fax resume to: 850-763-9494 Liquor License Bay CountyI HAVE A BAY COUNTY LIQUOR LICENSE FOR SALE. THIS LICENSE IS READY TO BE TRANSFERRED AND CAN BE USED IN A BAR OR PACKAGE STORE. I CAN OFFER FINANCING IF NEEDED. CALL OR TEXT TODD AT (954)303-9454 Panama City: 4410 Bylsma Circle (Take 231N to Pipeline Road turning right onto Pipeline, 1st left onto Bylsma Cir.) Sat., Oct. 6th @ 7 AMNEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALEMany families participating. Lots to choose from and many different items. Don’t miss this one! Panama City: 4502 Brook Forest Dr. Fri & Sat 10/5 & 10/6 8 AM -3 PMSecond Chance Brain Injury YARD SALEFurniture, antiques, leather couch /chair /ottoman for $500, household items, too much to list. Panama City: Grace Presbyterian Church 1415 Airport Road. Friday 7am-6pm Saturday 7am-12pmIndoor Youth Yard SaleLots of Furniture; Tools; Clothes; Household Goods, Misc. items and Much more! Parker: 1201 East Park Street (Across from the ballfields) Sat., Oct. 8th 8:00AM -1:00PMDownsizing SaleTools, fishing gear, furniture recipe books, misc household items, golds gym recline exercise bike, other misc. Parker: 132 Parker Village Circle Oct. 8th, 9th, 10th 1 PM -5 PMESTATE SALEFurniture, kitchenware, household items, etc. Santa Rosa Beach: 353 Bay Circle Dr.MOVING SALEFri., Oct. 5th 8am-4pm Sat., Oct. 6th 8am-4pm Everything must go! Furniture, beds, TV, desk, table, garden tools, freezer, jewelry, dolls, xmas tree & ornaments, household goods, and more. Springfield: 118 Poston Ave. Fri, Sat and Sun 10/5, 10/6 & 10/7 7 AM til DarkGinormous SaleA little bit of everything! St. Andrews: 1708 Lake Ave Fri & Sat,10/5 & 10/6Yard Sale Lynn Haven: 100 Fleming Court October 13th 8:00 -11:00 AMMULTIPLE FAMILYVarious Items. Lynn Haven: 903 Minnesota Ave. Sat., Oct., 6th 8:00 AM until...YARD SALEClothes, antique rockers, pictures, bedding, games, golf clubs, misc. Northshore: 3701 W. Hwy 390 inside The Messiah Lutheran Church Saturday,Oct. 6th 7am-12pm Yard Sale All proceeds benefit Night to Shine. Panama City: 24 W. Oak Ave. (Across from the Appliance Ctr.) Sunday Oct. 7th 10:30 AM -4:30 PMESTATE SALELots of antique furniture, collectibles, and household goods. Panama City: 3613 N. HWY 231 Bauman Chiropratic (Corner of Transmitter Rd & Hwy 231) Sat. Oct. 6th 8 AM -12 PMAnnual Bauman Chiropractic Staff Yard Sale! Panama City: 403 Tanya Pass (Near N. Star Ave & Wewa Hwy) Sat., Oct. 6th 7:00 am -11:00 am2-FAMILY SALETables, electronics, appliances, home decor, video games, & more. Pics on Craigslist. Cedar Grove: 2803 Gwendolen Fri & Sat 10/5 & 10/6 7 AM-12 PMDOWNSIZING YARD SALEToo many items to list! CLOSE OUT SALE!FIESTA DINNERWAREIn Stock Only REDUCED TO COST S & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy Downtown PC: 209 W. 9th Street Thurs, Fri & Sat 7:00 am untilHUGE YARD SALEHunting and fishing equip., tools, toys, mens and womens clothing, tons of household goods. Alittle of everything. Forest Hills: 953 Rosemont Dr. Oct., 5th & 6th 7:00 am -NOON6-Family Yard SaleBaby clothes, toys, furniture, plus-size clothing, kitchenware, and so much more! Forest Park: 949 Huntingdon Circle Sat Oct. 6th 7 AM -NoonMOVING SALECookbooks, VHS tapes, furniture and household items. Lynn Haven: 823 Goose Bayou (Northshore) Fri & Sat. 10/5 & 10/6 8 AM -?4 FAMILY SALELots of household items, antiques, misc. Bayou George: 6814 Adams Rd Fri 10/5 7AM -4 PM Sat 10/6 7AM -2 PM Womens clothes, cookbooks, tools, Dewalt Honda 13 HP pressure washer commercial, garden push plows (2), generator, Sears table saw, lots of misc items. Beach East End -4305 Magnolia Beach Rd. Oct 5 & 6; 7am untilHuge amount of new and used clothingvintage items, household, furniture & children’s items & more Callaway5610 Boat Race Rd &Tyndall Parkway Sat. Oct 6th 8am-12pmGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERANShare MinistryThrift Shop Clothing Sale!!! Double oven stove, bunk, sofa/couch, loveseat, household items, dining room table with chairs & hutch, remote control bed, gas dryer, dresser and bed frames, Free Books!!! Callaway: 215 Lannie Rowe Dr. Fri & Sat 10/5 & 10/6 8 AM -1 PMBack Patio SaleSmall dorm fridge, kitchen items, vacuum cleaner, ladies clothes, bags, shoes, belts, books. Bay House St Andrews: 4303 W 17th St. (Turn off 98 next to Schlotszkys to Bay. R on 17th St.) 7:30 AM 2 Brass lamps, shades, 3 lg framed art, 25 purses, backpacks, audio books, glassware, crystal items, antique pix frames, 30 prs of jeans and shorts 8-12, Dollar day for name brand clothes, Barbie dolls, lots of new and estate jewelry, Magic earring backs as seen on TV, new sunglasses, wallpaper, lots of materials, Dirt Devil vac, 18V Dewalt drill w/ charger, skill saws, chain saw, wrenches, flood lights & fixtures, much more. Beach East End: 324 Moonlight Bay Dr., (Back Beach Road to Colony Club) Oct. 5th and 6th 8am -2pmSale in Waterfront HomeDrexel dining room set with hutch and server; 7-piece Drexel bedroom set, king Sleep Number set, Palliser bedroom set; Chromecraft dining set with white leather chairs; 4 white leather bar stools; computer desk; leather office chair; end tables and sofa tables; stainless pots and pans; glassware, stoneware dishes, audio books, books, CDs; LED TVs, home decor, artwork, and much more! SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Call To Place An Ad 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 8 8 Friday, October 5, 2018| The News Herald NF-1190247 Waterfront Home on Deerpoint Lake 9204 Cherokee St. € $285,000 Open House Saturday & Sunday 1 PM 4 PM The City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for the position ofCode Enforcement Officer .This position’s primary responsibility is working with enforcement of city ordinances, permitting and other duties as assigned. Qualified candidates will have a valid driver’s license. Code Enforcement Certification preferred. Salary depending on qualifications. City benefits include Retirement, Health Insurance, Life Insurance, Dental Insurance and Vision Ins. Applications will be accepted at: Mexico Beach City Hall, 201 Paradise Path. Job posting closes Oct. 26, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. For more information please visit www.mexicobeachgov.com The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider. Skilled Trades Worker Job ID 44115 FSU-Panama City Campus is seeking applicants for a Skilled Trades Worker for building maintenance consisting of skilled carpentry work, painting, drywall, electrical, plumbing, operation of doors and windows, HVAC and other related work; preventative maintenance for equipment including grounds, roadways, and parking; purchase material and small equipment used daily and routinely work with vendors on prices and quotes. Must have high school education or equivalent and two years relevant experience. Must be available one week per month for on call duties. Must be able to meet the physical requirements of the position. Background check required. Schedule is Tues. -Sat. 6 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Apply online at www.jobs.fsu.edu Applications accepted until October 3, 2018 Florida State University is an Equal Opportunity/Access/Affirmative Action/ Pro Disabled and Veteran Employer. CARE is one of Florida’s leading substance abuse agencies providing services to our community for over 40 years. CARE provides a stable work environment and the opportunity to grow within the agency. The following positions are now open: SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELORS -Provide substance abuse treatment including psychosocial evaluation, treatment planning, individual, and group counseling in a substance abuse outpatient facility or a substance abuse adolescent residential facility. BA/BS in a social services related area required, Master’s degree preferred. Full-time with Benefits. SUBSTANCE ABUSE TECHNICIAN AIDES Provide client support in an adolescent and/or female residential or detoxification substance abuse treatment facility. High School diploma required. Full-time with Benefits. RN or LPN -Part-Time/PRN positions available. Provide nursing services in a Detox Unit. Part-time/PRN positions on all other shifts. Competitive salaries and all full-time positions come with a Full benefit package (including 15 days’ paid vacation, 15-days’ paid sick leave, 10 paid holidays, health/dental/vision insurance, retirement program with 401K option and more). 707jenks.com Nice, big office spaces. 200 to 2,400 sq ft. Shared reception, conf. areas. Starting at $400 and up. (850)535-5028 (850)624-5634 Beach East End: Promenade Mall on Ft Beach Rd. 1000 sq ft. 3 offices reception for lease $1000 per month Call Don Nations Owner/Broker 850-814-4242 Snowbird Special Beachfront Condo 2bd/2bth $1,200/mo January -March Call 330-879-5614 Millville : Newly remodeled 2 BR/1BA no pets, w/d hookup, $650 mo + $650 dep, Call 850-785-7341 or 850-814-3211. SPRINGFIELD: Mobile Home 2 BR, 1 BA, very private, $495.00 month. Call Jean. 624-1997 or 872-8438 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.com 3202 MAGNOLIA ISLANDS Boulevard Panama City Beach Gorgeous New Orleans Style home located in the gated friendly community of The Preserve. This residence is surrounded by beautiful trees and the pool is privitely sacluded for lots of family fun. A stunning gourmet kitchen with double stacked ovens extra large pantry space and a wet bar for entertaining. Up the raw iron stair case the library with wrap-around bookcases. Three bedrooms up stairs and two down. The master bedroom is spacious and so is the master bathroom. His and her very large closets will make everyone happy. It has a beautiful entry way with a vaulted ceiling to welcome friends and family. This is a total charmer and there is plenty of room for the whole family. Did I mention 5 bathrooms? Colleen Dietrich Centergate Realty LLC (850)814-7298 Kings PointWaterfront home for sale. 4 BR/ 3B, hottub, inground pool with enclosure, covered boatlift, waverunner lift. $525,000 Call (850)527-6326 4001 Riverside Dr. Beautiful custom built 3br/2ba. 3126sqft. $425,000. MLS #668301 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL92794 to 56654 Custom quality 3BR/ 2BA home. Pool w/ (3rd) outside bath. Split BR plan, lots of high end features. FP, wet bar, big rooms! Near Pier Park & Beach! $269,000 134 Colina Circle O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors (850)785-8746 St. Andrews Charmer 1303 Calhoun Avenue 2BR/2.5BA Newly renovated Price Reduced $166,900 MLS#670029 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850)866-2158 Commercial Bldg For Sale or Lease 4,000 sq ft, 15th Street -Large parking lot, previously car lot and pawn shop. Don Nations, Broker Call 850-814-4242 Hwy 79 Winery & Gift Shop Business with Building, 2.0 acs, Inventory, Furniture & Equipment $350,000 Call Mike Alvis 850-373-4531 Performance Realty Colony Club/ PCB 2br 2Ba 1,200sqft 3rd floor corner unit Great Golf Course View Community Pool David Shearon 850-814-9098 MLS#674920 Text FL98207 to 56654 105 +/-Acres Hunting TractWaverly Rd. recreation fill dirt. 1,800 +/ft. road frontage. 10 mi. north of PC. 50/50% +/-wet/dry. $185,000 ($1,750 / acre) 850-865-8585 Jackson Co, FL377 Acres, $2,985.oo per Acre 145 Acres Cultivated/Irrigated 6,000 SQ FT Open Packing Shed 2,400 SQ FT Cooler with Loading Ramps Multiple Wells Excellent Hunting Call Kane 850-509-8817 Mobile Home trailer for sale. 12’x70’ in good shape in Callaway. 334 Camelia Ave., Lot 4 Call 850-871-2629 WATERFRONT Protected deep water on Bayou with boat slip to handle over 40’ boat. Unobstructed access to Bay & Gulf. 15 minute run to pass & Gulf! Approximately 88x200 tree filled lot. NOW REDUCED $239,900! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors (850)785-8746 NF-1116606 FOR SALE FOR PARTS2001 Grand Caravan Rebuilt 3.8 engine, etc., etc. $750.00 FIRM. 850-257-6366 Pontiac Montana, 2005, Nice van! Lthr, pwr doors, Nice! $3988 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 @ Bay Cars Ram Promaster Cargo Van, 2017, Perfect for a sub-contractor or anyone in the delivery business! Only 24k miles! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars 2008 Harley Davidson Fat Boy 8700 miles, 96 inch motor, 6 spd trans, exc condition, $7100 or make offer, Call 850-532-5995 2011 Honda PCX 125 White Scooter Will do 65 mph asking price $2,250, OBO Needs tune up, hasn’t been ridden in 1 yr. 6000 miles, Call 850-276-4009 Utility Trailer (5’ X 10’) for sale: two new tires with spare (never been used); set of ramps included. $1000 OBO Call 256-975-5299 Live in local area. For Sale 16’ Carolina Skiff 30 hp Yamaha alum trailer, new fish finder, new batteries, trolling motor, everything runs good. $5700 850-832-9177 For Sale By Owner 16’ Bass Tracker with new 50 hp mercury four stroke outboard, only 9 hours. Boat completely redone. Electric anchor, new electronics and trailer to match. $9,000 Call 850-596-0652 TOW DOLLYRoadMaster RM3477 Car Dolly with Electric Brakes. $2400 new, selling for $1100 with approximately 1000 miles on it. Call/Text 850-778-9100, in Panama City. Ram 1500, 2014, Crew Cab, 4x4, Won’t last! $15,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2015, 4x4, all pwr, alloys, 4dr, Only $24,998! Call Jeffrey Gainer 850-866-1867 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2016, Just in!! 4x4, Quad cab, white w/ gray int, only 41k miles! Super steal at $27,998! Call Bryan 850-628-3980 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500 Diesel, 2008, 150k miles, Great pulling machine! $16,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500, 2017-2018, Diesel or gas! Low miles! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500, 2018, Diesel or gas! Low miles! Crew cabs! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ram 3500 Laramie Mega Cab, 2016, 4x4, 32k miles, Perfect condition dually! Won’t last at $59,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 3500 Laramie Mega Cab, 2016, 4x4, 32k miles, Perfect condition dually! Won’t last at $59,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tacoma, 2006, double cab, Sr5, only 84k miles, auto, all pwr, Save!! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra 4x4, 2014, Limited, lthr, nav, backup cam, 52k miles, Crew Cab, Special Edition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Chrysler Pacifica T, 2018, low miles, 2 to choose from!! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, 2017, Stow-n-Go, Clean CarFax. Looking for a family vehicle? This one is perfect with a great price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Ford Ranger, 1999, V6, 5spd, $2488 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 @ Bay Cars Nissan Frontier S, 2015, only 44k miles! Fresh trade! 1 owner! Only $24,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Nissan Frontier, 2017, 3500 miles! In the wrapper! Extended cab! Perfect condition! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Nissan Frontier, 2017, 3500 miles! In the wrapper! Extended cab! Perfect condition! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Laramie, 2012, 4x4, This truck is beautiful! Has all the bells and whistles! Drives like a dream! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Laramie, 2012, Crew Cab, Hemi, Super nice & clean truck! Only 126k miles! SAVE BIG!! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Laramie, 2017, white, Your choice V6 or V8 4x4 Hemi! Both have nav, backup cam, lthr and more! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Limited, 2019, 4x4, Beautiful! New body style which separates it from the rest of the competition! Call Garcia Johnson 305-600-8331 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Rebel, 2019, This slightly used pick-up is absolutely stunning! Call Garcia Johnson 305-600-8331 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, 4x4, Laramie, Hemi, only 93k miles! Super clean! Nice truck! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, Crew Cab, 4x4, Great condition! Won’t last at $25,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, Crew Cab, 4x4, Great condition! Won’t last at $25,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2018, 2dr, black hard top, only 4k miles! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Kia Sedona, 2014, 92k miles, white w/ gray lthr, $12,900 Call Randy Johnson 850-209-3469 @ Bay Cars Lincoln MKX, 2018, midsize SUV, Fully loaded w/ nav, lthr, htd/cld seats! Certified demo! Call Jeffrey Gainer 850-866-1867 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Navigator, 2014, Ride in luxury and style! Clean CarFax! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Mitsubishi Endeavor, 2004, 1 owner, service records, silver w/ black lthr, $3998 Call Randy Johnson 850-209-3469 @ Bay Cars Nissan Pathfinder SL, 2018, silver, 22k miles, black lthr, backup cam, htd seats, nav, 3rd row, and more! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Subaru Crosstrek, 2018, AWD, 4dr, adaptive cruise, blind spot detection, MUST SEE! Call Jeffrey Gainer 850-866-1867 @ Bay Cars Toyota Highlander, 2016, gray, lthr, 3rd row, backup cam, Excellent condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Tahoe LS, 2005, black, clean! $4988 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 @ Bay Cars Ford F150 Supercrew, 2017, 4x4, 17k miles, under warranty! Lowest price anywhere! $33,998 Call Sandro 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Ford F250, 1996, diesel, clean CarFax! $6988 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 @ Bay Cars Ford F350, 2006, 4x4, $13,900 Call Naseer 850-294-7527 @ Bay Cars Nissan Frontier S, 2015, only 44k miles! Fresh trade! 1 owner! Only $24,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ford escape Titanium, 2014, lthr, Very nice!! $14,990 Call Sandro 850-785-1591 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Tuscon SE, 2017, only 10k miles, under warranty, low price! $16,988 Call Bryan 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Jeep Cherokee Limited, 2015, LOADED! Only 45k miles! SAVE BIG!! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Jeep Compass Limited, 2018, only 17k miles, Clean CarFax, You won’t be disappointed, especially for the price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Car Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 2011, black, Excellent running and looking condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler SE, 1994, Clean CarFax! This beauty was taken care of! Come take a look and a test drive! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, 2015, Clean CarFax, Just in and it won’t last! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport, 2008, only 68k miles, Only $15,998! Hurry! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport, 2008, only 68k miles, Only $15,998! Hurry! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2008, Unlimited Sport, Manual, 80k miles, hard top, Great condition! $17,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2008, Unlimited Sport, Manual, 80k miles, hard top, Great condition! $17,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2011, Sahara, 4dr hardtop, only 101k miles! Upgraded wheels! SAVE!!! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Buick Enclave, lthr, 3rd row, under warranty, $26,998 Call Sandro 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Captiva Sport LTZ, 2014, If you are looking for a cost effective vehicle, this one’s for you! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Dodge Durango SXT, 2015, 3rd row, only 41k miles! $20,998 Call Naseer 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Dodge Journey SXT, 2017, Perfect SUV for a growing family w/ 3rd row seating and only 32k miles! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars Ford Escape SE, 2013, lthr, sunroof, LOADED! $13,998 Call Sandro 850-785-1591 @ Bay Cars Ford Escape SE, 2018, only 11k miles! Under warranty! $17,998 Call Naseer 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Ford Escape SEL, 2013, 2.0 w/ Eco Boost, lthr, pwr driver seat, backup cam, and more! Call Laura 850-348-1452 @ Bay Cars Ford Escape Titanium, 2014, lthr, sunroof, nav, Only $13,988! Call Bryan 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Ford Escape, 2017, white, only 10k miles, Like new! Good tires! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars GMC Yukon XLC, 2015, black lthr, nav, sunroof, backup cam, only 43k miles, LOADED! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, 2018, blue, 20k miles, backup cam, Great on Gas! Very nice SUV! $21,998 Call/text Mike Speedling 850-814-5977 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, 2018, white, 20k miles, backup cam, Call/text Mike Speedling 850-814-5977 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Tucson GLS, 2012, AWD, Super nice! Clean vehicle! Only 49k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Toyota Camry, 2007, Nice! Only $5999! Call Naseer 850-294-7527 @ Bay Cars BMW 328i Convertible, 2011, 1 owner, 84k miles, Great asking price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars BMW 535D, LOADED! Nice car! $19,990 Call Sandro 850-785-1591 @ Bay Cars Cadillac ATS, 2015, Luxury, 32k miles, silver, black lthr, $22,998 Call Randy Johnson 850-209-3469 @ Bay Cars Cadillac ATS, 2017, coupe. Simply a gorgeous car! Low miles! 1 owner! Just beautiful! Call Garcia Johnson 305-600-8331 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Camaro LT, 2013, Look good going down the road in this beauty! You won’t beat this price! Only 47k miles! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger R/T, 2015, metallic blue, only 15k miles, manual, Looks & drives like a new sports car! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger R/T, 2016, 12k miles, lthr, moonroof, Fully LOADED! Call/text Mike Speedling 850-814-5977 @ Bay Cars Dodge Charger SXT, 2014, red, lthr int, backup cam, only 41k miles, Excellent condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Dodge Charger, 2014, 61k miles, gray, good tires, auto, Excellent condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ford Mustang, 2016, lthr, Premium package, 3276 actual miles, black on black, $26,900 Call Randy Johnson 850-209-3469 @ Bay Cars Lincoln MKZ, 2014, lthr, 63k miles, luxury with a low price! $14,998 Call Naseer 850-832-4655 @ Bay Car Hyundai Sonata Sport, 2015, under warranty, 29k miles! Great MPG! $15,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Town Car, 2003, Signature, Perfect car at an affordable price! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz C300, 2014, only 39k miles! Clean CarFax! You can’t look this good anywhere else! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars Mercedes C300, 2014, 4matic, black w/ tan lthr int, 38k miles! Only $19,988! Won’t last! Call Bryan 850-628-3980 @ Bay Cars Mercedes S550, black, moonroof, CLASSY! $28,990 Call Sandro 850-785-1591 @ Bay Cars Mercedes SLK280, 2006, convertible, silver w/ black lthr, $10,998 Call Randy Johnson 850-209-3469 @ Bay Cars Mitsubishi Lancer, 2015, manual transmission, black on black, 1 owner, 7k miles, very clean! Won’t last long at $15,998! Call Laura 850-348-1452 @ Bay Cars Nissan Altima 2.5SL, 2014, pearl white, tan lthr, 58k miles, sunroof, Nicely equipped! Call Laura 850-348-1452 @ Bay Cars Nissan Altima SL, 2017, lthr, sunroof, nav, $18,998 Call Bryan 850-832-4655 @ Bay Cars Nissan Altima, 2014, Great car! Great on gas! $13,900 Call NAseer 850-294-7527 @ Bay Cars Toyota Scion FR-S, 2016, only 14k miles! Perfect condition! Need for Speed!! Only $20,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota Scion FR-S, 2016, only 14k miles! Perfect condition! Need for Speed!! Only $20,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars 1990 MAZDA MIATA convertible Body in great shape. Runs well. Asking $5,000. (850) 647-5325 or (850) 340-0735 1999 Porsche Boxster Black Convertible 75,000 miles body perfect shape needs motor $4,500 OBO. Fountain, FL 850-625-9451. Cadillac ATS, 2017, Luxury Coupe, RWD, clean CarFax, 1 owner, Come take her for a spin! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Camaro LT, 2013, This beauty won’t last long! Come take her for a test drive! Incredible asking price! Call Jon Megason 850-596-6582 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Camaro SS, 2010, low miles, 6spd manual, lthr, all pwr, Runs great! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Dodge Avenger SXT, 2013, blue, black lthr, auto, 85k miles. Only $9998! Call Laura 850-348-1452 @ Bay Cars For Sale By Owner2015 Toyota Avalon Only 45 K, grey, excell. cond., $19,500 Call 850 769-1127 Honda Civic EX, 2015, Coupe, auto, only 41k miles! Super clean car! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata Sport, 2015, under warranty, 29k miles! Great MPG! $15,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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** SUNDAYSome sun 89 / 73SATURDAYMostly sunny 90 / 73TODAYMostly sunny 91 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Friday, October 5, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A feud between Bay District Schools and the Florida Health Department of Bay County (FDOH-Bay) boiled over Thursday as Superintendent Bill Husfelt issued a letter barring health department nurses from coming on school campuses.The letter comes after four health department RNs showed up at Merritt Brown Middle School on Monday and stayed on campus from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. auditing student records, according to Husfelt, before informing staff they would need to be back the next day to complete the audit.The manner in which your department has begun the process of pervasive auditing on our campuses is an intolerable disruption to the provision of both educa-tional and health services of Bay District Schools,Ž Husfelt wrote.Husfelt wrote that Everitt Middle School was similarly disruptedŽ on Wednesday Husfelt bars DOH nursesSuperintendent says he will ask School Board to transfer those duties to PanCare By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Steve Jenkins has gone fishing for more than 20 years but never knew what the fish did when they werent biting.Jenkins, an Army veteran who served from 1968 to 1970, has tracheal cancer and isnt sure how much longer he has to live. But before he dies, hes going with his hospice caregiver Dustin Womble to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta, a place hes always wanted to visit to learn more about those mysterious fish.The two are leaving Sunday for the long drive and plan to go to the aquarium Monday morning, where they will participate in a dolphin Veteran in hospice care gets Atlanta dream tripSteve Jenkins and hospice caregiver Dustin Womble will travel to the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta on SundayRN Dustin Womble, left, chats with Army veteran Steve Jenkins on Wednesday in Panama City. The two are planning a trip to the G eorgia Aquarium through the Dream Foundation. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Steve Jenkins writes a response to a question Wednesday. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] SUIT DISMISSED AGAINST TDC CHAIRMAN LOCAL | B1 LOCAL & STATE | B1STATE AVENUE SIDEWALK PROJECT AHEAD OF SKED SPORTS | C1MOSLEYS BOYS GRAB COUNTY GOLF TITLE SPORTS | C1MARLINS LOOK TO SHAKE OFF LOSS TO RAMS Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-5 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints .....................A8 See TRIP, A3 See KAVANAUGH, A3 See NURSES, A4By Alan Fram and Lisa MascaroThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh acknowledged Thursday he might have been too emotionalŽ when testifying about sexual mis-conduct allegations as he made a bid to win over wavering GOP senators on the eve of a crucial vote to advance his confirmation.The 53-year-old judge said in an op-ed that he knows his tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have saidŽ during testimony last week to the Judiciary Com-mittee. He forcefully denied the allegations.Going forward, you can count on me to be the same kind of judge and person I have been for my entire 28-year legal career: hardworking, even-keeled, open-minded, independent and dedicated to the Consti-tution and the public good,Ž he wrote in The Wall Street Journal.Kavanaugh: I might have been too emotionalKavanaugh

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** A2 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldCary Mack and Jennifer King, of Santa Rosa Beach, emailed this photo of a half rainbow over Powell Lake.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.CATCH OF THE DAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@ pcnh.com. Jerry Baker shared this photo in the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and asked, What kind of “ sh is this please? We released it and it immediately buried itself in the sand.Ž Several members identi“ ed the “ sh. John Miller was one who replied, Star gazer. Very lucky it didnt shock the crap out of you.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] HAPPY BIRTHDAYFLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 04-06-15-29-31 Lotto: 11-12-31-35-37-45; estimated jackpot: $3.5 million Lotto XTRA: 03 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot: $405 million Pick 2 Evening: 2-4 Pick 2 Midday: 8-6 Pick 3 Evening: 5-0-2 Pick 3 Midday: 5-2-3 Pick 4 Evening: 3-5-3-1 Pick 4 Midday: 0-9-6-1 Pick 5 Evening: 1-0-0-9-8 Pick 5 Midday: 6-6-4-3-9 Powerball: 41-53-59-63-66; Powerball: 3; Power Play: 3; estimated jackpot: $229 million YOUNG ARTISTSophia McWaters Grade 1. Waller Elementary School. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY Rhythm-and-blues singer Arlene Smith (The Chantels) is 77. Singer-musician Steve Miller is 75. Rock singer Brian Johnson (AC/DC) is 71. Blues musician Rick Estrin is 69. Actress Karen Allen is 67. Writer-producerdirector Clive Barker is 66. Rock musician David Bryson (Counting C rows) is 64. Astrophysicist-author Neil deGrasse Tyson is 60. Memorial designer Maya Lin is 59. Actor Daniel Baldwin is 58. Rock singer-musician Dave Dederer is 54. Hockey Hall of Famer Mario Lemieux is 53. Actor Guy Pearce is 51. Actress Josie Bissett is 48. Singer-actress Heather Headley is 44. Pop-rock singer Colin Meloy (The Decemberists) is 44. Rock musician Brian Mashburn (Save Ferris) is 43. Actress Parminder Nagra is 43. Actor Scott Weinger is 43. Actress Kate Winslet is 43. Rock musician James Valentine (Maroon 5) is 40. Rock musician Paul Thomas (Good Charlotte) is 38. Actor Jesse Eisenberg is 35. TV personality Nicky Hilton is 35.Send your birthday information and photos to pcnhnews@pcnh.com. TodayCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: through Saturday at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alices on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer and music. THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. For details, www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Interactive demonstration: cow camp. Parking $5 per vehicle. SaturdayCAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. on Caverns Road, Marianna. Battle of Marianna re-enactment at 10 a.m. Parking $5 per vehicle. COFFEE TALKS: 10-11 a.m. at Vinny & Bays Coffee Shop in Panama City. Come for coffee and a candid conversation about what it takes to be a foster parent. For details, Taryn Tasker, www.lmccares. org or 850-522-4485 FALL FESTIVAL AND PUMPKIN SALES: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park. Fun, food, music and games. Pumpkins sold from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For details, 850-233-5059 ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR APP LAUNCH PARTY: 2-3 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Company Museum, 1134 Beck Ave. Join the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership to celebrate the launch of its Walking Tour App. SundayPANAMA CITY RESCUE MISSION RECOVERY GRADUATION: 10:15 a.m. at First Assembly of God, 1701 N. East Ave., Panama City. For details, 850-215-5029 MondayBAY COUNTY AUDUBON MONTHLY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center on Airport Road. Open to the public. Jim Cox of Tall Timbers Conservancy will talk on the brown-headed nuthatch. For details, www.baycountyaudubon.org MERMAID MONDAYS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Gulf World, 5412 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. For details, GulfWorld.net TuesdayCOFFEE TALKS: 5-6 p.m. at W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown. Come for coffee and a candid conversation about what it takes to be a foster parent. For details, Taryn Tasker, www.lmccares.org or 850-522-4485 JOYFUL PAINT PARTY: 6-8 p.m. in Grand Lagoon D at Sheraton Bay Point for Short Presentation by Gulf World Marine Institute representatives. To bene“ t the Gulf World Marine Institute. $40 per individual, $65 per couple. For details, https://www.beachartgroup.com/reservations-on-line. html CIVICCON WATCH PARTY: 6 p.m. at PCMI Campus, 200 E. Beach Drive, Panama City. Simulcast of year-long project to series of public town halls and workshops with the nations leading thinkers and experts. Speaker is Donald Shoup on Getting Parking Right.Ž For details, visitwww.pnj. com/topic/CivicConGO & DOThe Associated PressToday is Friday, Oct. 5, the 278th day of 2018. There are 87 days left in the year.Todays Highlight in HistoryOn Oct. 5, 1983, Solidarity founder Lech Walesa was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.On this dateIn 1829, the 21st president of the United States, Chester Alan Arthur, was born in North Fair“ eld, Vermont. In 1931, Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon completed the “ rst non-stop ” ight across the Paci“ c Ocean, arriving in Washington state some 41 hours after leaving Japan. In 1947, President Harry S. Truman delivered the “ rst televised White House address as he spoke on the world food crisis. In 1958, racially-desegregated Clinton High School in Clinton, Tennessee, was mostly leveled by an early morning bombing. In 1969, the British TV comedy program "Monty Python's Flying Circus" made its debut on BBC 1. In 1984, the space shuttle Challenger blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center on an 8-day mission; the crew included Kathryn D. Sullivan, who became the “ rst American woman to walk in space, and Marc Garneau, the “ rst Canadian astronaut. In 1988, Democrat Lloyd Bentsen lambasted Republican Dan Quayle during their vice presidential debate, telling Quayle, "Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy." In 1989, a jury in Charlotte, North Carolina, convicted former P-T-L evangelist Jim Bakker of using his television show to defraud followers. In 1999, two packed commuter trains collided near London's Paddington Station, killing 31 people. In 2001, tabloid photo editor Robert Stevens died from inhaled anthrax, the “ rst of a series of anthrax cases in Florida, New York, New Jersey and Washington.TODAY IN HISTORY

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** Kavanaughs column appeared aimed at winning over the three GOP senators who remain unde-cided. He got an additional boost late Thursday from President Donald Trump, who praised his nominees incredible intellectŽ and scoffed at detractors during a campaign rally in Minnesota.Trump said the protest-ers and their rage-fueled resistance is starting to backfire at a level nobody has ever seen before.Ž He was referring to polling that shows some improvement for Republicans heading into the midterm election.Earlier Thursday, a pair of undeclared Republican senators accepted a confidential new FBI report into sex-abuse allegations against Kavanaugh as thorough,Ž bolstering GOP hopes for confirma-tion as the Senate plunged toward showdown votes.One of the senators hinted he was open to supporting Kavanaugh as party leaders set a pivotal preliminary vote for 10:30 a.m. Friday. If that succeeds, a final roll call was expected Saturday as the long, emotional battle over the conservative jurist drew toward its climax.Six days after Trump reluctantly ordered the FBI to scrutinize the accu-sations„ which allegedly occurred in the 1980s and Kavanaugh has denied „ leading GOP lawmakers briefed on the agencys confidential document all reached the same conclusion: There was no verification of the womens past claims and nothing new.Democrats complained that the investigation was shoddy, omitting interviews with numerous potential witnesses, and accused the White House of limiting the FBIs leeway. Those not interviewed in the reopened background investigation included Kavanaugh himself and Christine Blasey Ford, who ignited the furor by alleging hed molested her in a locked room at a 1982 high school gathering. The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A3 KAVANAUGHFrom Page A1encounter. The trip is made possible through the Dream Foundation, which accord-ing to its website provides end-of-life dreams that offer inspiration, comfort and closure.ŽI was in a bad state before Dustin was assigned as my nurse,Ž Jenkins, who has trouble speaking because of the cancer, wrote on a board Wednes-day while sitting on the porch of his Panama City home. Dustin and I dont talk about dying. Its more like, What ya doin this weekend? ŽThe Army veteran fell down, leading to his meet-ing Womble, who was assigned as his caregiver at the end of May, but is in much better health now that the two have become close. Jenkins was given four months to live in April and now says its up to Godas towhen hes going.Ive really gotten the chance to get to know him,Ž said Womble, who works for Emerald Coast Hospice. I definitely look forward to our visits. Every time I leave here to go somewhere, he tells me to be careful out there driving. Its more than just a patient. Thats why Im excited about the road trip.ŽWhen they visit the Georgia Aquarium, Jenkins is eager to see schools of fish and figure out why or how they know when the other fish are going to turn.Womble said hospice is more than medicine and the other usual aspects of health care „ its making the best of the life they have and getting to know personal details about a patient. Womble has worked 10 years in health care but never has done something like this with a patient before.A lot of it is mental,Ž Jenkins said of his recovery since being in Wombles care.Jenkins has other people who care about him, including close friend Michael Polk, who stopped by Wednesday to check on Jenkins and called the Army veteran a good man.ŽI met him about 10, 15 years ago. Hes the best man you ever want to meet,Ž Polk said. He could be my father or brother or best friend. Any time I ever needed or wanted help or to talk, we would talk or see whats best.ŽWomble has similar compliments for Jenkins and said his time with the Army veteran and upcoming trip is the most rewarding experienceŽ he has had during his time in health care.Hospice is more than caregiving for the dying,Ž Jenkins wrote. TRIPFrom Page A1Steve Jenkins, left, stands for a photo with RN Dustin Womble on Wednesday in Panama City. The two are planning a trip to the Georgia Aquarium through the Dream Foundation. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** A4 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Heraldwith five RNs, and that addi-tional audits were scheduled for Jinks Middle School, Deane Bozeman School, as well as Tyndall, Springfield, Deer Point, Lucille Moore, Patronis and Hutchison Beach elementary schools and Breakfast Point Academy.In addition to barring nurses from campus, Husfelt stated he intends to recom-mend the Bay District School Board terminate the existing memorandum of understand-ing (MOU) in place with the health department, opting instead to transfer those duties to PanCare Inc.After consulting with our attorney, and with experts in Tallahassee, I have decided to recommend that the School Board terminate our MOU with the Bay County Depart-ment of Health,Ž Husfelt said in a statement. I am also authorizing staff to submit our School Health Plan with-out signatures from the Bay County Department of Health since we are unable to reach an agreement with them despite multiple attempts to reach a compromise.ŽThe order comes after months of back-and-forth between Bay District Schools and the health department, both over the status of the School Health Plan, which the district has not submitted to state health officials in Talla-hassee despite it being almost a month past deadline, as well as allegations that health department nurses entered school health rooms without authorization and removed student records without informing the district.Last Thursday, Husfelt asked the states Inspector Generals Office to investi-gate the matter.The allegations came to light Wednesday as part of a public records request by The News Herald.This is the latest in a drawn-out dispute between the two entities. Bay District Schools has contracted with the health department for the past several years to provide health technicians for every school, as well as RNs to draft student individual health care plans. In May, health depart-ment officials went before the school board to request modi-fications to the contract and informed the board they no longer would serve Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students. The district then opted to contract with PanCare for health technician services, but maintained an MOU with the health depart-ment to have nurses audit student records and collect data.If the school board adopts Husfelts recommendation; however, that MOU will be terminated and many of the responsibilities previously held by the health department in the overall School Health Plan will be transferred to PanCare.The new School Health Plan, without the health departments signatures, will go before the school board during Tuesdays hearing.In the meantime, Husfelt said school officials are work-ing with PanCare and parents to update the missing health records.I am disappointed that I had to request an investigation to settle the matter of the missing records but I look forward to a final resolution and to moving forward,Ž Husfelt said. NURSESFrom Page A1 By Gregory Katz, Michael Balsamo and Raf CasertThe Associated PressLONDON „ The West unleashed an onslaught of new evidence and indictments Thursday accusing Russian military spies of hacking so widespread that it seemed to target anyone, anywhere who investigates Moscows involvement in an array of criminal activities „ including doping, poisoning and the downing of a plane.Russia defiantly denied the charges, neither humbled nor embarrassed by the exceptional revelations on one of the most high-tension days in East-West relations in years. Moscow lashed back with alle-gations that the Pentagon runs a clandestine U.S. biological weapons program involving toxic mosquitoes, ticks and more.The nucleus of Thursdays drama was Russias military intelligence agency known as the GRU, increasingly the embodiment of Russian med-dling abroad.In the last 24 hours: U.S. authorities charged seven officers from the GRU with hacking international agencies; British and Australian authorities accused the GRU of a devastating 2017 cyberattack on Ukraine, the email leaks that rocked the U.S. 2016 election and other damaging hacks; And Dutch officials alleged that GRU agents tried and failed to hack into the worlds chemical weapons watchdog, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.The ham-handed attempted break-in „ involving hacking equipment in the trunk of a car and a trail of physical and virtual clues „ was the most stunning operation revealed Thursday. It was so obvious, in fact, that it almost looked like the Russians didnt care about getting caught.Basically, the Russians got caught with their equipment, people who were doing it, and they have got to pay the piper. They are going to have to be held to account,Ž U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis said in Brussels, where he was meeting with NATO allies.Mattis said the West has a wide variety of responsesŽ available. Britains ambassador to the Netherlands, Peter Wilson, said the GRU would no longer be allowed to act with impunity.Calling Russia a pariah state,Ž British Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Where Russia acts in an indiscriminate and reckless way, where they have done in terms of these cyberattacks, we will be exposing them.ŽDeputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov of Russia said in a statement that the U.S. is taking a dangerous pathŽ by deliberately inciting ten-sions in relations between the nuclear powers,Ž adding that Washingtons European allies should also think about it.West accuses Russian spy agency of attacksMark Flynn, Director General for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, left, and Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers, attend a news conference, Thursday at the Justice Department in Washington. [JACQUELYN MARTIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] NATION & WORLDBy Laura Davison, Lynnley Browning and David VoreacosBloombergCharles Rettig was barely 24 hours into his new job as President Donald Trumps hand-picked chief tax offi-cial when a bombshell news report hit, alleging shady tax dealings by Trump and his family roughly 20 years ago.With New York state and city officials now saying theyll examine allegations raised by the New York Times, Rettig „ who built a reputation as a tough tax litigator in private practice „ risks incurring Trumps wrath if he chooses to follow suit, according to tax lawyers and veterans of the Internal Revenue Service.Look what happened to Sessions when he wouldnt block the Russian investigation,Ž said David Klasing, a Calfornia-based tax litigator and accountant. He was referring to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who recused himself from overseeing Special Counsel Robert Muellers investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election „ and has been lambasted by Trump on Twitter ever since.On Tuesday, Trump focused his ire on the Tim es, calling its article a hit pieceŽ that was very oldŽ and boring.Ž White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has said that many decades ago, the IRS reviewed and signed off on these transactions.ŽAn IRS spokesman didnt respond to a request for comment. Tax lawyers say that while the statute of limitations might bar the IRS from pursuing any criminal charges related to the details alleged in the Times story, the agency could levy civil penalties totaling hundreds of mil-lions of dollars „ if it proved that the Trumps pursued strategies they knew to be illegal.But thats a big if.Ž One problem for investigators would be getting access to records that are about two decades old.Trump family tax report quickly tests new IRS chiefGovernment wants to use insects to help genetically modify cropsBy Candice Choi and Seth BorensteinThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon.In an opinion paper pub-lished Thursday in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peacetime purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field.That would mark a departure from the current widely used procedure of genetically modifying seeds for crops such as corn and soy, before they grow into plants.The military research agency says its goal is to protect the nations food supply from threats like drought, crop dis-ease and bioterrorism by using insects to infect plants with viruses that protect against such dangers.Food security is national security,Ž said Blake Bextine, who heads the 2-year-old proj-ect at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, an arm of the U.S. Department of Defense.The State Department said the project is for peaceful purposes and does not violate the Biological Weapons Convention. The U.S. Depart-ment of Agriculture said its scientists are part of the research, which is being con-ducted in contained labs.The technology could work in different ways. In the first phase, aphids „ tiny bugs that feed by sucking sap from plants „ infected plants with a virus that temporarily brought about a trait. But researchers are also trying to see if viruses can alter the plants genes themselves to be resistant to dangers throughout the plants life.Scientists: Military program could be seen as bioweaponThis 2013 photo shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. [MEENA HARIBAL/BOYCE THOMPSON INSTITUTE VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Rettig

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A7 BUSINESSTHE DOW 30COMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $213.84 -1.92 Am. Express $107.74 -0.32 Apple $227.99 -4.08 Boeing $389.99 -2.31 Caterpillar $156.75 -1.47 Chevron $124.95 -0.36 Cisco $48.38 -0.43 Coca-Cola $45.85 -0.02 DowDuPont $64.01 -0.38 Exxon $85.58 -0.57 Goldman $227.78 -0.30 Home Depot $198.85 -4.89 Intel $48.13 -0.63 IBM $151.31 -1.91 J&J $139.35 +0.32 JP Morgan $115.27 +1.03 McDonalds $165.80 +1.14 Merck $71.22 -0.15 Microsoft $112.79 -2.38 Nike $80.18 -2.32 P“ zer $44.70 -0.11 Proc. & Gamble $81.92 -1.11 Travelers $130.79 +1.25 United Tech. $140.39 -0.63 Verizon $55.02 +0.73 Walgreen Boots $73.34 -0.46 Walmart $94.21 +0.14 Walt Disney $116.13 -0.78 United Health $268.32 -2.58 Visa $146.76 -2.61STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG. AT&T $34.12 +0.20 DARDEN RESTS $108.14 +0.24 GEN DYNAMICS $205.91 +1.12 HNCOCK WHTNY $48.55 -0.01 HANGER INC $20.05 +0.00 HOME BANCS $21.70 -0.25 ITT CORP $60.72 -0.38 THE ST JOE $16.53 -0.10 KBR INC $21.49 -0.16 L-3 COMMS $211.59 -1.88 OCEANEERING $27.07 -0.33 REGIONS $18.67 +0.20 SALLIE MAE $11.03 -0.18 SOUTHERN $42.98 +0.19 SUNTRUST $67.18 +0.06 WESTROCK $51.59 -0.21 ING-RAND $104.23 -0.18 ENGILITY $34.18 -0.78 Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City, 850-769-1278. FOREIGN EXCHANGEU.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.29 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 19.11 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.87 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.77A contractor works near the main entrance of the rebuilt WTC Cortlandt station at the MTAs Oculus transportation hub and shopping center, Sept. 10 in New York. [BEBETO MATTHEWS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] What to keep your eye on in todays monthly US jobs reportBy Christopher RugaberThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The U.S. economy is humming, unem-ployment is skating near a half-century low and busi-nesses are eager „ desperate, in some cases „ to hire. And when the government issues its September employment report Friday, expectations are high for another sunny picture of the job market.Economists have forecast that the government will report that employers added a solid 184,000 jobs, according to the data provider Fact-Set, and that unemployment dipped from 3.9 percent to 3.8 percent, matching an 18-year low. The monthly jobs report provides a wealth of informa-tion beyond the number of job added and the unemployment rate. Here are five things to watch in Fridays jobs report for September:WILL UNEMPLOYMENT HIT A NEARLY 50-YEAR LOW? If the jobless rate should fall two ticks to 3.7 percent, it would reach the lowest level in nearly “ ve decades. The unemployment rate hit 3.5 percent in December 1969, after a streak of brisk economic growth had kept joblessness at or below 4 percent for four years. If the rate keeps dropping, it will heighten two concerns: Has the economy soaked up nearly all the people who want or are able to work? And if it has, will a shortage of workers compel businesses to raise pay quickly and sharply? ARE MORE AMERICANS LOOKING FOR WORK? If people who arent working are encouraged by steady hiring and pay increases to begin looking for a job, their in” ux could prevent unemployment from falling further. Heres why: The government counts people as unemployed only if theyre actively looking for a job. If more people start looking „ and dont immediately “ nd a job „ the government will count them as unemployed. And the unemployment rate could rise or „ as other unemployed workers “ nd jobs „ stay the same. For prime ageŽ workers „ those who are 25 through 54 „ the proportion who either have a job or are looking for one has crept up in the past year. Yet its still below its pre-recession levels. ARE FULL-TIME JOBS STILL GROWING? The healthy economy hasnt only produced lots more jobs; its also allowed people to work more hours. A rising number of companies are converting parttimers who have wanted more hours to full-time w orkers and are posting more full-time jobs. At a time of intense competition in some industries for hires, offering full-time work is one way for employers to attract more applicants. More hours, of course, mean larger weekly paychecks. The number of people working part time who would prefer full-time work has reached its lowest point since the Great Recession in 2008-2009. WILL PAY KEEP RISING? In August, average hourly wages rose 2.9 percent from 12 months earlier „ the biggest year-over-year increase since the recession of“ cially ended in June 2009. The strength of that gain, if it can be sustained, would suggest that the low unemployment rate is pressuring more companies to raise pay in order to attract and keep workers. Amazons announcement this week that it would increase its minimum hourly wage to $15 for all its U.S. employees elevated the pressure on other employers to lift their wages as well. EFFECT FROM HURRICANE FLORENCE? Many economists have forecast that Hurricane Florence, which ” ooded parts of North and South Carolina last month, depressed Septembers job growth by roughly 30,000. In particular, hiring might have been constrained in construction and restaurants because the storm likely closed construction work sites and restaura nts. In part, thats because the Labor Department counts people as employed only if they were actually paid during the period of each month when it conducts its jobs surveys. So any hourly workers who werent paid during the survey period because Florence forced their employer to close temporarily wouldnt have been counted as employed during September.5 things to watchBy Marcy Gordon and Sarah Skidmore SellThe Associated PressWASHINGTON„ Big real estate developers like Donald Trump have long benefited from a myriad of legal loopholes and breaks that can shrink their tax bills. Their advantages expanded further with the federal tax overhaul that took effect this year.Even before the new tax law, the U.S. tax code provided loopholes and special breaks that favor wealthy real estate inves-tors. Tax experts say theyre often able to claim losses more quickly and easily than other taxpay-ers. They are also afforded several ways of delaying or avoiding reporting profits to the Internal Revenue Service.They can fall behind on their debts and still face fewer tax penalties for having the debt forgiven than other kinds of investors, according to Steve Wamhoff, director of federal tax policy at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Trump took advantage of that, Wamhoff says, when he couldnt repay debts on his Atlantic City casinos in the 1990s and early 2000s.Wealthy families typically try to transfer some of their assets during their lifetime to ease the tax burden on their heirs. There are a number of ways to do so legally. As assets go, real estate is one of the most flexible options.But a report this week by The New York Times suggests that the Trump family cheated the IRS for decades, using dubious tax maneuvers and out-right fraud in some cases. A lawyer for Trump has disputed the Times find-ings of possible tax fraud or evasion and said that parts of the report are extremely inaccurate.ŽThe U.S. has a long history of property own-ership and related tax law, says Anne-Marie Rhodes, a professor at Loyola Uni-versity Chicago School of Law. As real estate holdings have gotten more complex in recent years, so have applications of the law.How big developers bene t from web of tax breaksMARKET WATCHDow 26,627.48 200.91 Nasdaq 7,879.51 145.58 S&P 2,901.61 23.90 Russell 1,646.91 24.38 NYSE 13,042.29 145.58COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,197.20 1.10 Silver 14.510 .080 Platinum 821.00 11.20 Copper 2.7650 .0575 Oil 74.33 2.08PANAMA CITYCivics program watch party set for TuesdayThe nonprofit Panama City Growing Strong is set to host a watching of an ongoing civics program starting on Tuesday.According to a press release, the first watch party will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Panama City Marine Institute campus meeting room on 200 E. Beach Drive. The presentation will feature Donald Shoup, an expert on city planning and street parking.The CivicCon Series is a year-long program, organized by the Studer Community Institute and the Pensacola News Journal, of public town halls and workshops with experts who share their expertise on what is needed to develop communities.Panama City Growing Strong will use the News Journals Facebook live feed to show the program to those interested in watching it. All programs are free and open to the public.IN BRIEFSpecial to The News HeraldYour future employee is a hard-working young man who has been volunteering twice a week as a store associate at Salvation Army the past two years. He likes to feel included and part of a team while not being treated differently. He has great work references where everyone has embraced and appreciated his work ethic. He would like to work in a retail environment and is knowledgeable in stock-ing, sorting, and organizing retail items on sales floors and warehouse areas. He also is used to keeping a clean and safe work space environment. He is dedicated and depend-able working a part-time work schedule and would be happy working up to 20 hours a week while being flexible with the needs of employer.He is eligible for OJT, a program where her salary, workers comp and liability insurance are provided at no cost to the employer for a 90-day work trial period. He would make a great addition to your team. Will you give him a chance and consider an interview for this fine young man?For information about him or any of the other clients or services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.Celebrating: We are so thankful to all our community partners and their businesses for their support and participation at our recent Job-A-Palooza and their continued investment in our clients and our employment program.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTFuture Arc of the Bay clients and their peer mentors are shown honing their employment skills at the recent Job-A-Palooza at Gulf Coast State College. Students were paired with mentors to compete in a series of job-related tasks for fun and prizes. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** A8 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com ANOTHER VIEW Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTS A rose is a rose by any other name, and everyone deserves one from time to time, while brickbats seemingly hit all of us at some point or another in life. Here are some of each in local news last week:A Rose for ... Lynn Havens latest splash pad that opened Monday at Cain-Griffin Park. Named after Leon Miller, the citys first African-American city commissioner and a still-active member of the community, it is the second splash pad for the city. Miller, who remains a resident and supported the splash pad going to Cain-Griffin, cut the ribbon at Mondays opening.Brickbats for ... Lynn Haven for voting to rid the city of its outside attorney in favor of an in-house attorney.A possibility mentioned was a current police officer licensed to practice in Texas„ in an effort to save money. Seeing government strive to cut costs is great, but replacing the city attorney with an in-house attorney who has other duties borders on bizarre. The fact that the city was spending close to $200,000 a year on its attorney might be a sign that the city is in need of legal advice from time to time from a seasoned government attorney. Commissioner Antonius Barnes, who was joined by Commissioner Rodney Friend in dissenting, said he was "appalled and disgustedŽ at the vote, said, "I think that the commission is making a very, very bad decision.Ž We agree.A Rose for ... the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership working with Destination Panama City to secure matching grants for an audio walking tour app for visitors to St. Andrews. The app allows those interested to learn more about the historic buildings and sites as they actually walk by them, creating an engaging and unique outing.A Rose for ... new Panama City City Manager Mark McQueen, simply for showing up to his first day on the job with a positive attitude, a plan and an open discussion with a reporter about both. I want to make (Panama City) great in every dimension, whether its quality of life, business development, economic development, the schools, pedestrian-friendly. Why cant we be the great place? Thats the goal.Ž Brickbats are on standby and hopefully will see no action.A Rose for ... Callaway for approving a budget that reduces ad valorem taxes and increases starting pay for employees. We hope other cities are taking notes.A Brickbat for ... Mosquitos carrying and spreading the West Nile Virus. In the last week the county recorded its fifth case, raising concern for human transmission. While 80 percent of those who contract the virus will experience no symptoms and others experience fever, neck stiffness, vision problems or numbness, in rare cases (1-150 people) it can develop into a more serious form of encephalitus or meningitis.Brickbats and rosesThey live on the street, often foraging through Dumpsters. Some threaten us. Occasionally, they assault people. Thousands of mentally ill people cycle in and out of hospital emergency rooms. They strain our medical system, scare the public and sometimes harm themselves. Most, says DJ Jaffe, are schizophrenic or bipolar and have stopped taking their medication. Jaffe gave up a successful advertising career to try to improve the way America deals with such people. John Hinckley shot President Reagan because he knew, not thought, knew that was the best way to get a date with Jodie Foster,Ž Jaffe tells me in my latest internet video collaboration with City Journal. Years ago, such people were locked up in mental hospitals. That protected the public, but the asylums were horrible, overcrowded places, where sick people rarely got good treatment. We decided we would largely replace that system with mental health care in the community,Ž says Stephen Eide, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute. Community treatment made sense. Care would be easier and cheaper in the patients own neighborhoods. But community treatment never really happened. Politicians didnt fund it. Neighborhood mental health facilities were not popular with their constituents. Many mentally ill people now end up in prison. Prison is no place for somebody with schizophrenia,Ž Eide says. However, thats where theyre going to remain. Today, more seriously mentally ill people are locked up in Los Angeles County Jail, Cook County Jail and New Yorks Rikers Island jail than in any mental hospital. In jail, they barely get treatment. As a result, they stay in jail longer than other inmates. America has some high-quality me ntal hospitals, but they dont have enough money for extended treatment. Its become harder to get into Bellevue (a New York City mental hospital) than Harvard. If youre well enough to walk into a hospital and ask for care, theyre going to say youre not sick enough to need it,Ž Jaffe says. Hospitals often practice what Jaffe calls treating and streeting.Ž The police call it catch and release.Ž Jaffe says that a big part of the problem is that governments, instead of treating the sickest people, often offer something for everyone.Ž Thats a line from Chirlane McCray, wife of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. De Blasio named his wife director of the citys program to combat mental illness. McCray promised to spend almost a billion dollarsŽ on 54 initiatives.Ž Unfortunately, most of those initiatives address people who are not very sick. They wrap anything that makes you sad „ bad grades, poverty, coming from a single-parent household „ in a mental health narrative,Ž Jaffe says. Blurring the lines between mild mental disorders such as anxiety or mild depression „ and schizophrenia „ is not a bug; its a feature of the program,ŽEide says. They believe the only way New Yorkers will support improvements to mental illness policy is if they are convinced that everybody has a mental illness.Ž So most funds dont go to helping the people diving into Dumpsters or to protecting us from threatening people on the street. If were going to spend all our money on people who are anxious or cant sleep, whats left for the seriously ill?Ž Jaffe asks. Ask any cop what we need, hes going to say: more hospitals, easier civil commitment, so that when I bring somebody, theyre admitted.Ž John Stossel is host of StosselŽ on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Mentally ill still not get ting adequate care John StosselSummer tourism in Panama City B each was up 25.4 percent from last year in Aug., according to Tourist Development Tax data. Vicky Sullivan: Its more than likely due to the red tide in August, but even that didnt last long before it made its way in PCB and its still going. Jerome Nathan DeFreitas: Shouldnt the major focus be on making PCB a year-round destination? This place is a ghost town in the winter, where areas such as Clearwater/St. Pete, Sarasota, etc., are hopping with snowbirds. Perhaps grow the airport and make it a bigger hub with more direct ” ights from the Midwest. Bay District Schools officials have accused Florida Department of Health of Bay County employees of gaining unauthorized access to school health rooms and taking student health care records, with superintendent Bill Husfelt now calling for an investigation by the states Office of the Inspector General. Jim Gentry: Sounds like a situation of Husfelt losing or allowing someone to steal records and then pointing “ ngers at someone else. The entire school system is ” awed and in need of a massive overhaul. Time to drain the school swamp! Rachel Allen: Oh, hell no. They have Florida statutes in place to protect documents like that plus retention periods for how long the “ le must be kept. If the records are electronic, there is still a procedure that must be followed, by law, in order to get rid of the paper documents. Sounds like there are going to be some lawsuits going on. Red tide has hit Mexico Beach and caused a massive fish kill. October is a pretty month and theres nothing more unsightly than walking down the canal and seeing dead fish,Ž Mexico Beach Mayor Al Cathey said. It certainly can affect the economy.Ž Jim Gentry: Great to see prisoners doing something for their room and board. Jay Wright: And the smell must be terrible. Brandie Kittrell: So does this mean our beach trip next week will be a bust? Bobbie Cayce: I feel like our ocean and Gulf are dying; Im concerned the oil and disbursements may have contaminated our seafood. In response to a U.N. court order that the U.S. lift sanctions on Iran, the Trump administration said We dnesday it was terminating a decades-old treaty affirming friendly relations between the two countries. Howard Houk: Im guessing that this is an AP story. Trying to make this administration in as bad a light as is possible. Shawn Terry: By reporting what they do? Mike Hatch: This doesnt hurt anybody; its an outdated treaty that should have been eliminated decades ago. Its actually a good thing to stop enemy countries from suing us. Jason Curfman: The truth about Iran is that they choseŽ approximately 10 years ago to convert to the US dollar. Now, after we attacked other countries for avoiding, Iran is trying to switch back to their own currency. Joe Nalley: Thats why I voted for the current administration. He knows a bad deal from a good one and doesnt go around apologizing and bowing to the rest of the world.READER FEEDBACKFirst AmendmentCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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** The News Herald | Friday, October 5, 2018 A9

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** A10 Friday, October 5, 2018 | The News Herald

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Undercurrents: Kinsey Collection | 4 Just the Cook opens in new location | 10-11 Beach Insider: Pirates of the High Seas | 19-21 Movietown: Smallfoot | 29 A L L  S F A I R ALLS FAIR E n j o y r i d e s e x h i b i t s Enjoy rides, exhibits a t a n n u a l e x t r a v a g a n z a | 6 at annual extravaganza | 6 E N T E R T A I N E R ENTERTAINER I S S U E N O 1 8 9 € ISSUE NO. 189 € F r i d a y O c t o b e r 5 2 0 1 8 Friday, October 5, 2018 € € F R E E FREE

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E2 Friday, October 5, 2018 | INSIDE SEEN ON SCENE ABOUT US Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Gary Bruce Advertising 850-747-5033 Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com ABOUT THE COVER Undercurrents .................. 4 Shooting the Shot .............. 5 Central Panhandle Fair ..... 6 Just the Cook opens ...... 10-11 Liquid Dream Fishing ........ 13 GO & DO: 5 Best Bets ........ 15 Community Spotlight ...... 18 Pirates of the High Seas 19-21 Nightlife ........................ 22 Life's A Beach ................. 23 Artist's Touch ................ 25 Movietown: 'Smallfoot' .... 29 GO & DO: Calendar .... 32-38 The Central Panhandle Fair runs through Saturday at the Bay County Fairgrounds in Panama City. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD]Share your photosDon't keep all of the good times to yourself! Send your photos of people who make the scene around town to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@ pcnh.com, and we'll share them with our readers. Billy Joel, Elton John tribute a big hit at The BarnThe Barn at The Wicked Wheel hosted The Greatest Hits of Billy Joel & Elton John on Sept. 28 to bene“ t the Panama City Pops Orchestra. Social hour began at 5:30 p.m. with music performed by Steve Wiggins, Champagne and hors doeuvres. Dinner featured Applewood Smoked Prime Rib. [PHOTOS BY JOSIE FERRAIOLI/THE MARKETING DEPT] Bill Buskell „ owner of Pineapple Willys, The Barn and The Wicked Wheel „ talks to the crowd at the Sept. 28 fundraiser with Tammala Spencer, past Pops president. Chaz Butler performs Billy Joel hits. Chaz Butler was backed by a band (with special guest Kevin Jacobs) for the dinner theater show.

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E4 Friday, October 5, 2018 | Internationally-touring arts, artifacts detail hidden heritage PANAMA CITY „ Dean Randy Hanna says Florida State Universitys Panama City campus needs to be an integral partner in Bay Countys cultural scene. To that end, hes arranged to bring an internationally-recognized collection of African American art and artifacts to the Holley Center on campus in early 2019. The Kinsey Collection, a lifelong passion of Bernard and Shirley Kinsey of Los Angeles, California, will open an exhibition at FSU PC on Feb. 1. But the exhibit will remain in place long after Black History Month ends „ through May, in fact. With education as a goal, the Kinsey African American Art and History Collection has been on national tour since 2007 and has been seen by more than 10 million visitors. A portion of the collection was on display at EPCOT for five years; it has shown at the Smithsonian; and it was a smash at the University of Hong Kong Museum and Gallery in 2016. The collection is unique in that it tells the untold stories of American history, supported by primary source materials like official documents (dating back to 1595), diaries and letters, as well as the art and literature created by African Americans throughout the centuries. The collection has been cited for three national awards, including the Presidents National Award for Museum and Library Services. It stimulates discussion and provides the historical perspective,Ž Hanna said of the collection. Its not about the struggle, or slavery or Civil Rights,Ž Bernard Kinsey said. Its about how you overcome. Its about achievement, the artistic and literary heritage.Ž The Kinseys work with area schools on educational aspects of the exhibit, field trips and other opportunities. Special programming includes an 18-page Newspaper in Education study guide, videos, catalogues and an innovative delivery system developed with Apple Computer to reach students on iPads, iPods and iPhones. In 2009, an African American History curriculum based on collection was developed and implemented by the Florida Department of Education for 3.2 million students in grades K-12 statewide. Bernard and Shirley Kinsey both grew up in Florida and attended Florida A&M University, where they met during the Civil Rights era. They moved to California after college and began a life of collecting and travel that has lasted more than half a century. They decided to share their collection with the world when they realized how it told a narrative of American history that is most often overlooked. Their son, Khalil, now serves as general manager of the collection. If you want to change a person, the first thing you must do is to change their awareness of themselves. It starts with their consciousness,Ž the Kinseys explain on their website, TheKinseyCollection.com. We believe that to a large degree, our vulnerable children do not succeed because they are not taught their rich history of achievement and contribution. ... Children of all races benefit from this knowledge, as they are able to get a broader and more accurate knowledge of American history and draw inspiration from it, dispelling myths and shattering stereotypes, allowing them to view African Americans in a positive light.Ž Peace. Look for updates and details on The Kinsey Collection as the exhibition dates approach. The News Herald will be partnering with the Kinseys to tell some of the untold stories and highlight educational opportunities.Kinsey Collection coming to FSU PC in 2019 UNDERCURRENTS Tony SimmonsDetail from The Cultivators,Ž oil on canvas by Samuel L. Dunson Jr., from The Kinsey Collection. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] Shirley and Bernard Kinsey will bring their collection of African-American art and artifacts to Florida State University Panama City for exhibit from February through May 2019. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E5By Joshua BoucherPanama City News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ On this weeks Shooting the Shot with Patti and Josh, the News Heralds photographers talk about photographing high school football. Photographing football can at times be more dangerous and more technically challenging than other stories Patti Blake and Joshua Boucher cover throughout the week. Between dodging teenagers as they skid across the grass, to trying to take photos at high shutter speeds at night, it requires focus and experience. As a general rule, Blake and Boucher try to stay between 10 and 20 yards downfield from the offense. In general, this position helps them be close enough to the action to be able to get storytelling images of the play. However, depending on the flow of the game, knowledge of the players „ or a hunch „ the photographers will either get closer or farther downfield to try and be ready for a long run or a quarterback sack head-on. But photography is more than just a technical skill; Blake and Boucher are also storytellers. In the podcast they discuss how they look for moments that shape the game and how they cull their photos at the end of the night to create their visual reporting for the paper.The challenges of photographing footballArnold faced off with Marianna for a Sept. 17 football game at Arnold High School in Panama City Beach. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Arnold faced off with Marianna for a football game Sept. 17 at Arnold. [PATTI BLAKE/ THE NEWS HERALD] Mosley High School plays West Florida at Tommy Oliver Stadium Sept. 13. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] SHOOTING THE SHOT

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E6 Friday, October 5, 2018 | Friday is School Day at the Bay County Fairgrounds By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The public has two more days to enjoy the calliope music, flashing lights and whirling rides, try games of skill and chance, and feast on flavors of cotton candy, popcorn and other concessions.The Central Panhandle Fair, which opened Monday, will run through Saturday night at the Bay County Fair-grounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City.Friday is School DayŽ at the Central Panhandle Fair, with all students admitted for free. Adult admission is $7. The gates open at 4 p.m. Armbands for amusement rides will be $20; without an armband, all rides require three to four tickets at $1.25 per ticket.Saturday, gates open at 2 p.m. and admission is $7 for all ages. Armbands for rides will be available until closing time. All buildings will close at 10 p.m., but the Arnold Amusements midway rides will remain open until the crowd thins out.The indoor exhibits include arts and crafts, gardening, food preservation and prepa-ration, as well as educational and commercial exhibits. In the livestock area, 4-H Clubs will show their best cattle. Awards will be presented in numerous categories within each exhibit.The fair is dedicated to the memory of Horace Carr, who first became its director in 1954 and remained active with the organization until 2015. In 2001, Carr received the Heritage Award from the International Association of Fairs and Expositions for his outstanding service. He was a lifetime member of the American Legion, a 25-year member of the Kiwanis Club, leader of the 4-H Riding Rebels, and a County Extension agent for 31 years.Horace was responsible for many years of livestock and agricultural exhibits at the fair,Ž said Charles Bodi-ford, president of the Central Panhandle Fair. He always took extra care to ensure that the livestock was well taken care of while they were exhibits at the fair. He often arranged field trips for school groups when the fair was not open to the public. It was important to him that the public support agriculture and farming in Bay County.ŽEach year, about 5 million people attend one of the numerous fairs across the state of Florida, according to information from the states Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.Central Panhandle Fair features rides, exhibits GO & DOCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIRWhere: Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City When: Gates open at 4 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday; buildings close at 10 p.m. each night but the midway will remain open late Admission: Free to students on Friday, with adult tickets $7; all admissions are $7 on Saturday Armbands: $20, allows unlimited rides (without armbands, rides require three to four tickets each at $1.25 per ticket) Crowds line the midway concession stands at the Bay County Fair on Tuesday. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD] Bumper cars slam together at the Bay County Fair on Tuesday.

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E8 Friday, October 5, 2018 |

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E10 Friday, October 5, 2018 | FOOD & DRINK : DININGBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Just the Cook owner Ernie Hallis back to doing what hedoes best„ feedingfans cravingsfor more Dan-D Donut burgers. Its just like I remember it,Ž said customer Alex Flemingafter takinghis firstbite Wednesday afternoon. It was the first thing I ever tried. The mix of flavors and how it sits in the mouth and on the tongue „ you cant beat it. And I like how he serves the local Dan-D Donuts, too; you cant find this burger anywhere else.Ž The rosemary garlic burger is served on battered and grilled Dan-D Donuts and topped with Canadian bacon, Swiss, blue cheese and roasted red pepper. The floating restaurant „ 48-feet long and two stories high „ opened Wednesday, Oct. 3, in its new location, 4601 W. U.S. 98., across from the former Black Angus Restaurant. Just look for the Just the CookŽ powerboat (till the signs go up) situated behind the chain-link fence on the waterfront property. Youll find plenty of parking and the Just the CookŽ pavilion, where youll be greeted by Ernie. The menu hangs behind the bar, and theres plenty of seating in the shade with a cool breeze off St. Andrew Bay. I think this lot is fantastic to take the business to the next level,Ž Alex added. It has more space and is more accommodating. Its a new phase for Just the Cook. The skys the limit for whatever he puts his mind to.Ž While Alex was back forhis Dan-D Donut Burger fix, it was Robert Galpersons first trip. We have an awesome view here,Ž said Robert, who then took a bite of his Diver Down Burger topped with hickory bacon and a fried egg. Its amazing. I dont think Ive had a burger this good in years.Ž All of Ernies originalrecipes are still being prepared on thefloating restaurantdocked by the beach, and theresstill free beer (two-beer limit while it lasts) with every adult order. (Customers also can purchase sodas or bottled water.) There were about 50 here this morning,Žsaid Ernie, who will continue his Fettuccine Friday tradition this week. The menu also includeshis Chipotle Slaw and Cilantro burgers, Curry Chicken Tacos (my pick), the All Grown-Up Grilled Cheese, Fish Tacos, Shrimp Tortuga, the Crab Trap, and Housemade Crab Dip. We added a Hurricane Brisket Sandwich.We came up with that afterthe hurricane (Irma) was supposed to hit us, and we went to the grocery store and we couldnt find anything except brisket,Ž said Ernie, who added it was so popular it stayed on the menu. The sandwich features slow smoked brisket topped with grilled onions, bell peppers and Pepper Jack Cheese. A few picnic tables also have returned, now situated in the grassy area next to cornhole boards and giant Jenga „ which Ernie and Debras 7-year-olddaughter, Gianna, played when she wasnt helping her dad walk orders from the boat to the pavilion. I like it; it has lights,Ž said Gianna, as she looked up to the strings of lights hanging from the ceiling. On Saturdays, Aqua Theater will feature family friendly movies on a big screen. It will be 300 here on Saturday,Ž Just the Cook opens in new locationJust the Cook opened Oct. 3 at its new location on St. Andrew Bay, which features covered seating. Just walk up to the pavilion and order off the menu behind the bar. [PHOTOS BY JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Just the CookWhat: Floating restaurant with seating under pavilion Where: 4601 W. U.S. 98., Panama City (look for the boat across from the former Black Angus Restaurant) Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and noon to 7 p.m. Sunday (or later, if busy) Details: Facebook.com/ JustTheCookFlorida/ Burgers, sandwiches, and more prepared on 48-foot-long boat, served at pavilion o US 98Food is still prepared on the two-story boat and brought to customers tables. See COOK, E11

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E11 FOOD & DRINK : DININGpredicted Jim Purcell of Bay Ice Cream, who has been helping Ernie in the kitchen sincethey met in 2012 at Shell Island. This location is awesome; its a very comfortable place just to hang out, plenty of room, dont have to rush. Its a family atmosphere.Ž Ernie added that one customer noted, You can see all the way from Shipyard to Shell Island.Ž And if you come by boat, thats OK, too. The Coast Guard came in today on a boat anddropped the anchor,Ž said Ernie, who said there are plans for the sand to be turned by the beach „ where customers also can hang out. Although if you want to walk right up to the boat, be prepared to get wet. To me, when you get here, its tranquility. Its relaxing to me. We have more freedom and can play our music,Ž said Debra, who also likes that the pavilion provides coverage fromrainy weather. Theres even a pink portabletoilet set up on the property. Before going to lunch or dinner, theres now a place to hang out, a destination,Ž Ernie said. Hisoriginal Just the Cook boat, a 25-foot Bennington, sank August 2015at the St. Andrews Marina. In February 2016, Ernie opened Just the Cook 2.0, an expanded floating restaurant with two refrigerators, a full Miele oven, a Thermador sixburner gas cooktop and his original griddle. About six months ago, Ernie briefly served his food out of Sizzle Dog in St. Andrews, whilehe looked for a new location for the boat. We have a saying in the Marine Corps,Ž Jim said in February 2016. You have to rise from death and overcome.Ž During the time Ernie was closed, Just the Cook was featured on Food BoatsŽ with Chef Jordan Andino „ which aired Sept. 2on Food Network. Ernie also has been featured on Food Networks Americas Best Cook,Ž Cooking Channels Trending Bites,Ž and Sport Fishing Channels Tackle to Table.Ž COOKFrom Page E10Just the Cook owner Ernie Hall, and his daughter, Gianna, bring Dan-D Donut and Diver Down burgers back to the pavilion for customers. Dan-D Donut Burgers feature a rosemary garlic burger topped with Canadian bacon, Swiss, blue cheese and roasted red pepper, while the Diver Down is topped with hickory bacon and a fried egg. A few picnic tables and family games are set up in the grassy area by the pavilion.

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E13PANAMA CITY „ With the number of tournaments and pre-fishing lately, I wanted to do something different. I had received word there was a weed line roughly 8 miles out; Mahi-Mahihas beenone of my favorite fish to catch and eat since I was little. I can remember being 5 years old fishing for mahi with my mom and dad, filling the cooler with chicken dolphin. My plan was to run to the weed line, catch four or five dolphins,depending on size, and then head back to the docks and make fish tacos for dinner. Ben and I loaded up his 20-foot Key West and headed for the pass. As we left the dock, we both noticed rain all around us and the wind picking up. We decided to make the run anyway, as we both wanted mahi for dinner. We made it to the pass and it was rough, but we decided to proceed toabout the whistle buoy, and then decided it was too rough. We turned to head back in but stopped by the channel markers on the way for triple tail. Triple tail will hold under the cans by the chain, so we tossed a shrimp or paddle tail by the can and let the current take the bait under the can. We fished three cans and only managed to catch a skipjack and a blue runner. We talked, and he asked if I could show him some places to catch redfish, since he won Team of the Year amateur division in the Florida Pro, and that qualified him to fish the Florida Pro Championship in November. We ran to Shell Island across from the Beacon Beach Marina, dropped the trolling motor and fished the flats. I threw a 4-inch paddle tail and Benji threw a 5-inch paddle. First cast, I hung a 17-inch trout out of the grass patches on the sand. We kept working shallow, but we werent seeing much and were catching nothing. We chose to move to about 3 feet deep, so we could work the drop-off as well. As soon as we did, we could see big reds schooled up with blue fish pushing the ledge. Ben threw on them, set hook, and drag pulled. The issue was he caught the blue, not the red, and the blue cut him about 10 feet from the boat. I was casting shallow and dragging it deep, and I hooked up a big red. I got the red about 20 feet from the boat, the red rolled and cut the liter on its gill plates. We continued to work that flat until we started noticing dead fish floating by and the water had some film in it. We assumed it was red tide and moved to North Bay. We went to the flat outside the old airport and begun to work the shoreline to the inside of the bayou to the seawall. We started out at the point, dropped the trolling motor and began to beat the banks. We both threw the same baits as earlier,casting deep, shallow, close, far „ and nothing. Ready to call it a day, I threw again and had the bait almost to the boat when I felt a thump. The drag took off, and it was a strong fish. Ilanded a red at 26 inches and a little over 6 pounds. We chose to keep pushing that bank. We made it about 50 feet farther down the flat and I saw a V by the shore. I threw at the V, jigged once, and felt a thump. Once I felt the thump, I waited a couple of seconds and set the hook. The drag took off again, another heavy fish. I landed a 25.5-inch red weighing right at 6 pounds. Not only did the fish weigh 6 pounds, but I also counted 32 spots on the red's final third. Thats the red I need during the Emerald Coast Redfish Circuit(ECRC) for the spot Calcutta. After the second red, we were hot, tired and headed back in. It was nice to take a break from tournament/prefishing and to help the youth of tournament fishing. It is time to focus. We are 5 points from first in the Team of the Year running, with the ECRC championship Saturday, Oct. 6. We have done our research, spent two weekends in Apalachicola, and done everything we could to prepare. Now what is going to happen will happen. Anthony Watson of the Liquid Dream Fishing Team shares his fishing adventures weekly in the Entertainer.Chasing mahi, catching redsA.J. Watson shows off the 6-pound red. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAM A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony Watson

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E15 GO & DO : 5 BEST BETS FOR THIS WEEKENDMore Content NowHere are five ways to have fun this weekend: 1 In theaters this weekend is the action “ lm VenomŽ (rated PG-13), an original story of the titular Marvel super-villain about a man who acquires the powers of an alien symbiote, then will have to release his alter-ego VenomŽ to save his life; A Star Is BornŽ (rated R), a remake of the classic “ lm, this time directed by and starring Bradley Cooper as a musician who helps a young singer and actress (Lady Gaga) “ nd fame, even as age and alcoholism sends his own career into a downward spiral; and The Hate U GiveŽ (rated PG-13), based on the bestselling YA novel about a teenage girl who, after witnessing the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend at the hands of a police of“ cer, must “ nd her voice and stand up for whats right. 2 It is World Space Week, and the theme this year is Space Unites The World,Ž which focuses on how space brings the world together. Celebrate by using Google Earth to explore the world „ zooming in on ancient wonders like Stonehenge or the Pyramids „ or use it to “ nd your house or school. Other ideas include visiting your local observatory or try building your own model spacecraft from a small juice box, construction paper and other supplies. Directions are available at SpacePlace. Nasa.gov/build-a-spacecraft/en/ 3 October is here, which means its time to decorate for Halloween. You can get the kids involved by making cutout pumpkins or ghosts, or you can start carving your Jack-o-lanterns. And dont forget to get (or make) costumes! 4 October is also Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month. If your family is ready for a new addition, then head over to your local shelter. If not, then still head over and volunteer or drop off a donation of food or supplies to celebrate shelter dogs and the people who care for them. 5 There are a lot of sports events this weekend. The MLB playoffs are taking place, there are plenty of football games (NFL and college) scheduled, and NASCARs Gander Outdoors 400 race is on Sunday at Dover International Speedway. Check your TV guide for more information.A Star is Born on World Space WeekBradley Cooper and Lady Gaga star in A Star is Born. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E18 Friday, October 5, 2018 | Today's spotlight captured three actors in The Wolves,Ž a drama being presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m Sunday for its “ nal weekend at Gulf Coast State College's Amelia Center Theatre Lab, 5230 W. 11th St., Panama City. For tickets and details, visit GulfCoast.edu/arts.THE WOLVES COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Ceairra Orr (playing Jersey 00) Age: 20 Occupation: Gulf Coast State College student Where youre from: Panama City Favorite local restaurant/dish: Which Wich/Reuben sandwich Favorite local hangout: Anywhere outside What you do for fun: paint Name: Jamiah Morris (playing Jersey 08) Age: 18 Occupation: Gulf Coast State College student; works at Audience of One Dance Studio Where youre from: Born and raised in Panama City Favorite local restaurant/dish: Pana Roma/cheese calzone Favorite local hangout: the dance studio, hanging out with friends What you do for fun: dance and sing Name: Suzanne Nelson(playing Jersey 25) Age: 18 Occupation: Gulf Coast State College student; works at Tillys in Pier Park Where youre from: Panama City Favorite local restaurant/dish: Pana Roma/chicken marsala Favorite local hangout: the beach What you do for fun: Play piano, paint. Im a typical arts kid, I guess.

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Pirates of the High Seas:Legend comes alive| 20-21 B E A C H I N S I D E R BEACH INSIDER ISSUE NO. 189 €F riday, October 5, 2018

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E20 Friday, October 5, 2018 | BEACH INSIDER | Friday, October 5, 2018 E21By Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Talking like a pirate doesnt have to be limited to one day „ its actually encouragedthroughout Columbus Day weekendwhen theeighth annual Pirates of the High Seas Fest returns. The free festival is scheduled for Friday and Saturday in Pier Park and Sunday in the Grand Lagoon „ with Capt. TomŽ Mason and the Blue Buccaneers performing for the fifth time in this fair cityŽ Saturday and Sunday. We will get a bunch of pirates on stage with us at both shows. We tend to get people up and singing with us,Ž said Capt. Tom. And when in doubt what to say ... Arrgghh just sums it up about anytime,Ž said Capt. Tom, who wrote Talk Like A PirateŽ on the crews recently released fifth album, If You Want to BePirate: Songs for Young Buccaneers.ŽPirate Fest: Get on board Columbus Day weekend traditionTom Mason and the Blue Buccaneers will perform Saturday in Pier Park and Sunday in the Grand Lagoon during the Pirates of the H igh Seas Fest. From left are Jo Cleary, Tom Mason and Jeff Thorneycroft, with Pete Pulkrabek on drums. [JOHN LEE/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Capt. Tom penned the song with John Baur, aka Chumbucket, who created Talk Like a Pirate Day (Sept. 19) in 1995 with Capt. Mark Summers, aka Capn Slappy. When we used to play in St. Croix and the Virgin Islands, I met a guy who invented the day „ John Baur, Chumbucket,Ž Capt. Tom said. They were playing racquetball one day and cursing (after one of them got hurt) and said they should come up with a day to talk like a pirate.Ž Capt. Tom, who lives in Nashville,got the idea to start a pirate band while playing in the Virgin Islands. I knew I could go to Nashville and get others to come with me. Everybody wants to go to the beach,Ž he said. Its great coming down to Panama City because weve gotten to meet a lot of pirates, and there are great crews around the coast weve gotten to meet.Ž He has been inspired by sea shanties with blues and rock arrangements. One thing I like about the idea is we get to create our own genre. Pirates sailed around the world so influences are found everywhere,Ž Capt. Tom said. For years were were playing at seaside taverns andfestivals and would try toget adults not to be shy anymore, and we just put out one album for kids thats getting kids to come out of their shells. Justgive a good Arrgghh anytime and its easier not to be shy. People let go of their inhibitions and its so much fun. I was always a shy kid but I got into theater, and I could take care of shyness that way.Ž Although the band wasnt able to attend last years celebration because Tropical Storm Nate rolled in, it looks like smooth sailing this year. Our sets are 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Pier Park on the main stage, and noon Sunday at the Grand Lagoon at Capt. Andersons Marina,Ž Capt.Tom said. Well also be doing a meetand-greet with songs at Shuckums on Friday night around 8 p.m.Ž Capt. Tom will be donning a tricorn hat and eye patch. The bass player always wears kilts; hes of Scottish descent,Ž Capt. Tom said. I have a tricorn hat andbring some extra for the uninitiated pirates to sing with us.Ž Pier Park The Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone opens at 5 p.m. Friday at the Grand Theatre Plaza, before the kids parade begins at 6 p.m. Opening ceremonies and the Treasure Drop with 8,000 beach balls begins at 6:45 p.m. Everyone in costume is invited to join in the Pirate Crawl/Second Line Parade from South to North „ ending at the Celebration Stage. Friday nights music includes Victor Wainwright & The Train. Fireworks from RussellFields City Pier at 9:15 p.m. conclude the nights pirate shenanigans. On Saturday, the Festival Villageand Little Pirates Fun Zone reopens at noon, with a magic show at 1:30 p.m. Be prepared for a pirate invasion at the Pier Stage at 2:30 p.m., followed by the music of Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on the Celebration Stage. The Main Parade follows the Pier Park route at 5 p.m., followed by the music of the Landsharks and fireworks at 8:30 p.m. Grand Lagoon The festivities move to the Grand Lagoon on Sunday with a Festival Village opening at noon at Capt. Andersons Marina, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, as well as a Kids Fishing Clinic on the Marina Dock.Dress up your dog for a chance to win a treat bag in thePirate Pet Parade at 5 p.m., and fireworks at 7:15 p.m. signal the end of the Pirates of the High Seas Fest. At 1:15 p.m., gather around to hear the legend of Dominique Youx, before the reenactment of the battle erupts. (Bring your water guns and make history.) The legend The Pirate Battle-Flotilla drives out the pirates at the Grand lagoon and marinas from 2-3 p.m. The Grand Lagoon also is hosting a photo scavenger hunt contest till midnight Saturday, where participants take photos of themselves around the Grand Lagoon in a variety of categories with a hashtag for each photo. The winner will be announced on stage at 3:15 p.m. Sunday. The Commodore Mayhem Magic Show is set for 3:15 p.m. at the Capt. Andersons stage followed by the Pirate Pet Parade at 5 p.m., live music and fireworks at 7:15 p.m. over the Grand Lagoon. Weekend scheduleFRIDAY, OCT. 5All Friday events are at Pier Park.5 p.m.: Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone opens at Grand Theatre Plaza 6 p.m.: Kids parade begins and ends at The Back Porch 6:45 p.m.: Opening ceremonies and Treasure Drop at center stage 7:15 p.m.: Pirate Crawl/Second Line Parade to Celebration Stage 8 p.m.: Live Music: Victor Wainwright & The Train at Celebration Stage 9:15 p.m.: Fireworks (Russell-Fields City Pier)SATURDAY, OCT. 6Except for the 5K, all other events are at Pier Park.8 a.m.: Pirates of the High Seas Fest 5K Run/Walk at Frank Brown Park Noon: Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone open at Grand Theatre Plaza 1:30 p.m.: Commodore Mayhem Magic Show on Celebration Stage 2:30 p.m.: Pirate Invasion at Pier Stage 3:30 p.m.: Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on Celebration Stage 5 p.m.: Main Parade (Pier Park route) 7 p.m.: Landsharks on Celebration Stage 8:30 p.m.: Fireworks (Russell-Fields City Pier)SUNDAY, OCT. 7All Sunday events are at the Grand Lagoon.Noon: Festival Village opens (Capt. Andersons Marina parking area, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive); Kids Fishing Clinic (Marina Dock); Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on Main Stage 1:15 p.m.: Storytelling: The Legend of Dominique Youx at Main Stage 2-3 p.m.: Pirate Battle-Flotilla Drives out the Pirates (Grand Lagoon/marinas) 3:15 p.m.: Treasure Hunt Announcement on Main Stage 3:15 p.m.: Commodore Mayhem Magic Show at Capt. Andersons stage 5 p.m.: Pirate Pet Parade at Capt. Andersons stage 6 p.m.: Live music 7:15 p.m.: Fireworks (Grand Lagoon) The pirates of Dominique Youx defend Panama City Beach from invading pirates during the Pirates of the High Seas Festival in October 2015. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Pirates of Dominique Youx defend Panama City Beach from bad pirates during the Pirates of the High Seas Festival in October 2015. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Pirates that stole the keys to the city are overtaken by pirates of Dominique Youx in October 2015. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Naughty pirates are locked into a cage after being defeated at the Pirates of the High Seas Festival in October 2015. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHFriends compete during a beach day held by Northstar Church. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Macie Mettille, 3, straightens her goggles. A colorful umbrella brightens up the empty beach. Jamir Martinez, 4, shows off his smile. A young girl searches for shells along the water.

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E25 THE ARTISTS TOUCHCollector shares classic monster movie artBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Things that go bump in the night will be a featured attraction at the Panama City Center for the Arts through the end of the month. Monsters in the Main,Ž an exhibit of vintage monster movie posters, will open Saturday, just in time to lure the unsuspecting to their doom „ or rather, just in time for the downtown arts district to go full-on Halloween. The posters represent a wide variety of Hollywoods takes on classic creatures, radioactive mutants and comedic send-ups of the genre. Expect to see multiple versions of the Wolfman, Dracula and Frankensteins monster from the 1930s and 40s, the giant ants and space blobs that terrorized audiences in the 1950s, and Hammer Horror reboots of the Universal monsters from the 1960s and early 70s. In addition, the little kids will enjoy such images as Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein,Ž Munsters Go Home,Ž and Casper the Friendly Ghost.Ž Larry T. Clemons, the owner ofGallery 721 on Harrison Avenue,is loaning his personal collection of posters to the Center for the Arts this month. Clemons previously has pulled from his collections to put together exhibits at the Center for the Arts focusing on Elvis Presley, Muhammad Ali, and superhero films. My goal is to bring every collection I have to the Center for the Arts first, to build up significant and powerful exhibits,Ž Clemons said during a tour Wednesday. Everything that has to do with the arts downtown should flow through the Panama City Center for the Arts.Ž Clemons started collecting movie posters as a teenager when he worked at a theater in his hometown. One day he saw the manager tearing down and throwing away old posters and, I screamed. He stopped dead and asked, Are you OK?Ž Clemons explained his reaction, and the manager told him he could take any of the older posters he wanted. Later, he bought more when he found them at thrift stores and hippie shops,Ž thinking he might oneday sell them in his retirement. Except for one he recently sold to a friend, that hasnt happened yet. In addition to the vintage posters, the exhibit will include acrylic paintings of the famous monsters and their actors, such as Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff, Peter Cushing and John Carradine. And some of the posters will represent the marketing efforts offoreign countries, including France, Italy and Argentina. Ive got some of the coolest international vintage horror movie posters,Ž Clemons said. Some of the best come out of Venezuela and Argentina, because they were such wealthy countries in the 1950s and 60s that they would do their own movie posters for American films„ more colorful, dynamic and scary than the American versions.Ž Margaret Webster of The Public Eye will photograph the posters to assemble a Public Eye Soar-style projection of images on the exterior of the Center for the Arts building during the Haunted Walking Tour on Oct. 12. The tour ticket office will be on the steps of the Center for the Arts, and the last stop on the circuit will take tourists into the Main Gallery to view the exhibit and hear the legends of the buildings ghosts. In addition, other projections will be set up to further add to the spirit of the event. Jayson Kretzer, director of the Center for the Arts, said he couldnt wait to see the posters properly displayed as works of art in the gallery. I was blown away by Larrys collection,Ž Kretzer added. What a perfect complement they will make to the Haunted Walking Tour.Ž (For more on the Haunted Walking Tour, be sure to check out next Fridays Entertainer.)Vintage Scares: Posters revel in what haunts usWhat: Collection of vintage monster movie posters from the collection of Larry T. Clemons Where: Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City When: Oct. 6-31; regular hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday Cost: Free admission Details: PCCenterForTheArts. com or 850-640-3670MONSTERS IN THE MAINVintage monster movie posters from the collection of Larry T. Clemons will be displayed at the Panama City Center for the Arts through Halloween. [LARRY T. CLEMONS/CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] The display will include acrylic paintings of horror movie icons, such as this portrait of Bela Lugosi. [LARRY T. CLEMONS/ CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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E28 Friday, October 5, 2018 |

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E29 MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEach week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit Movietown MovieClub.com. Matt: Smallfoot surprises with music Its rare that Im ever really surprised by movies anymore, even ones I really love. What with endless cross-marketing, TV ads, and endlessly repeating trailers, we go into most movies with at least a vague idea of what genre and feel the movie is playing with. So when Channing Tatum suddenly and unexpectedly jumps into the first song of Smallfoot,Ž I got excited. This is a musical?! And a good one, at that?! With the heart of another recent (and remarkably fun) kids outing, Trolls,Ž only with defter thematics, SmallfootŽ was a delightfully pleasant surprise. A village of Yetis is thrown into societal turmoil when one of the villagers claims to have encountered the fabled Smallfoot,Ž a.k.a. a human. Set in a snowy, Himalayan-esque mountain area, Warner Animation creates a beautiful world ofinnovations and stunning visuals. This shouldnt be a surprise, as this is the same studio that has brought us the endlessly creative Lego films, but SmallfootŽ just feels more ordinary; and in some ways it is. The humor is sometimes lazy, and the story is far from unpredictable. Still, neither of those things snow-in the worldbuilding creativity and good-hearted fun in most corners of this musical. In fact, what really makes SmallfootŽ shine is its viewpoint. With lines like, the only thing stronger than fear is curiosity,Ž and, Its complicated and it can be scary, but its better than living a lie,Ž the story shows a huge respect for difficult realities. The importance of discovered truth over inherent dogma. The difficulty of dropping naivete. The multiple stages for a crisis of faith. And dont forget: Its a musical! A good musical! Rating: 1 /2 out of stars Cole: Smallfoot piques interest SmallfootŽ flips the bigfoot myth upside down, as a Yeti finds a human „ previously thought to be non-existent. As the story begins to settle in we find it has some interesting thematic ground for a kids movie. The social and religious order of the Yeti community is disrupted by the discovery in alarming ways and SmallfootŽ shows itself to be more interesting than it could be. Its a movie about the ignorance of ignorance is bliss,Ž the dangers of religious tyranny, and the fragility of fundamentalism. It also touches on the need for integrity in the age of fake news and click-bait and the insidious nature of socially engineered fear to perpetuate systemic problems; and yet the movie is never oppressive with any of this, allowing itself to indulge cartoon pleasures like the brilliant bit where the protagonist descends the mountain in pursuit of the human. Still, SmallfootŽ is part of a large community of movies that have enough interesting things going on that its tempting to overlook its basic, essential dramatic faults. Its first act breaks when he leaves the village, but its rushed as if the story is intentionally denying itself of any emotional weight. Its second act-break tries to hide its empirical stupidity behind a stupid rap song. In fact, its third act-break only makes sense because its an undoing of the second act-break, which didnt make sense in the first place. The fourth act-break is merely gestured at; it doesnt even happen. SmallfootŽ remains interesting, however, with a character named after Nietzsche and acting like Descartes, and ultimately landing about where postmodern theologians like Rollins land when he urges that, To believe is human. To doubt, divine.Ž Rating: out of starsSmallfoot ipops bigfoot perspective Director: Karey Kirkpatrick, Jason Reisig Starring: Channing Tatum, James Corden, Zendaya, Common, Lebron James, Gina Rodriguez, Danny DeVito, Justin Roiland Rated: PGSmallfootYetis discover a human in Smallfoot.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS]

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E32 Friday, October 5, 2018 | HAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh. com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, Oct. 5 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. STEPHEN BENNETT SMITH 'LANDSCAPES': Exhibit runs through Oct. 6, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST: 5 p.m. Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone Open at Grand Theatre Plaza; 6 p.m. Kids Parade begins/ends at The Back Porch; 6:45 p.m. Opening Ceremonies and Treasure Drop at Center Stage in Pier Park; 7:15 p.m. Pirate Crawl/ Second Line Parade runs South to North, ends at Celebration Stage in Pier Park; 8 p.m. live music by Victor Wainwright & The Train on the Celebration Stage; 9:15 p.m. “ reworks at Russell-Fields City Pier. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at the Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of State 90 on Caverns Road, Marianna. Interactive demonstration: cow camp. Parking $5 per vehicle. 'MADE IN GREECE VII' ART EXHIBITION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details, GulfCoast.edu/arts PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palms Conference Center, Panama City Beach. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. Details: www. beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alice's on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer, and music. 'HAUNTED PANAMA CITY' TALK: 5-9 p.m. at Capstone House, 1713 Beck Ave., Panama City. Author Beverly Neild will discuss her new book and sign copies for sale. She'll share stories of paranomal activity in the area. Tickets are $8 for members, $10 for visitors. Details at 850-747-9224 or email caphousenews@gmail.com 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 for adults and $32 for seniors, students, and military. Presented by the Emerald Coast Theatre Company. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the Main Campus of Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast. Edu/Arts Saturday, Oct. 6 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST:8 a.m. Pirates of the High Seas Fest 5K Run/Walk at Frank Brown Park; noon Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone Open at Grand Theatre Plaza; 1:30 p.m. Commodore Mayhem Magic Show at the Celebration Stage in Pier Park; 2:30 p.m. Pirate Invasion at the Pier Stage; 3:30 p.m. live music by Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on the Celebration Stage; 5 p.m. Main Parade in Pier Park; 7 p.m. live music by Landsharks on the Celebration Stage; 8:30 p.m. “ reworks at RussellFields City Pier. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach. com SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 North Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: waterfrontmarkets.org CAVERNS CULTURAL CELEBRATION: 9 a.m to 3 p.m. at the Florida Caverns State Park, 3 miles north of U.S. 90 on Caverns Road, Marianna. Battle of Marianna reenactment at 10 a.m. Live music. Parking $5 per vehicle. PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palms Conference Center, Panama City Beach. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. Details: www. beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email GO & DO : CALENDARSee CALENDAR, 33

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARcommunications@cityo” ynnhaven.com FALL FESTIVAL AND PUMPKIN SALES: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, Panama City Beach. Fun, food, music, and games. Pumpkins will be sold from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 29th through Oct. 31st. Details: 850-233-5059 'MONSTERS IN THE MAIN': Oct. 6-31 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR APP LAUNCH PARTY: 2-3 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, 1134 Beck Ave. Join the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership to celebrate the launch of their new Walking Tour App. 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 2 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or call 850-684-0323 OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alice's on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer, and music. MEET THE ARTIST RECEPTION: 6-9 p.m. at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission. Featuring artist Stephen Bennett Smith. Light hors d'oeuvres. Details: PCCenterForTheArts.com 'THE WOLVES': 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the Main Campus of Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts Sunday, Oct. 7 PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST: Oct. 5-7 at Grand Lagoon; noon Festival Village opens at Capt. Anderson's Marina parking Area, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive; noon Kids Fishing Clinic on the Marina Dock; noon live music by Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on the Main Stage; 1:15 p.m. Storytelling The Legend of Dominique Youx on the Main Stage; 2 p.m. Pirate Battle-Flotilla drives out the pirates on Grand Lagoon/Marinas; 3:15 p.m. Treasure Hunt announcement (Main Stage); 3:15 p.m. Commodore Mayhem Magic Show (Capt. Anderson's Stage); 5 p.m. Pirate Pet Parade (Capt. Anderson's Stage); 6 p.m. live music; 7:15 p.m. “ reworks over Grand Lagoon. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 North Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org PUPPY YOGA: 10:30 a.m. at Momentum Fitness, 170 Serenoa Road, Santa Rosa Beach. One-hour yoga class with roaming, adoptable puppies. Led by Rebecca Simmons. $25 entry. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Contact: Maureen@Momentum.Fit or call 850-231-1322 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 2 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 2 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 2:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the Main Campus of Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts BILLY RADER IN CONCERT: 5 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Callaway, 6930 E. State 22, Panama City. Free admission. Details: FBCCallaway.com or 850-871-2772 Monday, Oct. 8 GLOBAL ARTS SOCIETY GRAND OPENING: 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Panama City Mall. Free admission. Enjoy make and take arts and crafts, live music, dancing and more. Learn about programs, classes, performance companies and how to join the team. Details at www.globalartssociety.org OLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. BAY COUNTY AUDUBON MONTHLY MEETING: 6:30 pm at the Science and Discovery Center on Airport Road, Panama City. Open to the public. A special program features Jim Cox of Tall Timbers Conservancy who will talk on the brownheaded nuthatch, a bird native to local pine forests. Details at www.baycountyaudubon.org THREE WAY MIRROR IN CONCERT: 7-10 p.m. at Moon Lodge Cafe, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Atlanta-based jazz trio. Cover: $3. Includes wine tasting. CALENDARFrom Page 32 See CALENDAR, 34

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E34 Friday, October 5, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARTuesday, Oct. 9 JOYFUL PAINT PARTY: 6-8 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, Panama City Beach. Presentation by Gulf World Marine Institute; to bene“ t the Gulf World Marine Institute; $40 each or $65 per couple. Tickets include all art materials, one drink ticket (wine/beer) and one raf” e ticket. Details: www.beachartgroup.com/ reservations-on-line Wednesday, Oct. 10 BUDDY GUY THE LEGEND COMES ALIVE: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com or 850-763-4696 Thursday, Oct. 11 PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach; $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 BEGINNER WHEEL THROWING POTTER: 5-8 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Instruction from potter Sara Pearsall will include handbuilding for beginners with glazing and “ re process included. Supplies included; ages 15 and older; $200 members ($240 non-members). BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/ movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: True Soul. Details: CityOfLynnHaven.com Friday, Oct. 12 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com 'MONSTERS IN THE MAIN': Exhibit open through Oct. 31 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com OKTOBERFEST 2018: 4-11 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, 3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest.com WINE TASTING: 5-7 p.m. at Somethin's Cookin', 93 E. 11th St., Panama City; complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. RSVP: 850-769-8979 JAZZ BY THE BAY FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. at Oaks By The Bay Park, 2715 W. 10th St., Panama City. A free concert hosted by Gulf Jazz Society. HAUNTED WALKING TOUR: 6-10 p.m. in downtown Panama City, starting and ending at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St. Hear all of the ghost stories; last tour is at 9:30 p.m. Tickets: $10, available at Panama City Center for the Arts the night of the event. This event is kid friendly, but remember there are some scary parts. Saturday, Oct. 13 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 North Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org FIFTH ANNUAL HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1107 Maryland Ave., Lynn Haven. OKTOBERFEST 2018: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, CALENDARFrom Page 33 See CALENDAR, 35

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E35 GO & DO : CALENDAR3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest.com JAZZ BY THE BAY FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. at Oaks By The Bay Park, 2715 W. 10th St., in Panama City. A free concert hosted by Gulf Jazz Society. ALLMAN GOLDFLIES BAND CONCERT GOES POPS: 6 p.m. at SweetBay, 1980 Discovery Loop, Panama City. Allman Gold” ies Band to perform in concert with the Panama City POPS Orchestra. Details: 850-785-7677 or www.PanamaCityPops.org PETER BRADLEY ADAMS CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Sunday, Oct. 14 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org OKTOBERFEST 2018: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, 3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest.com Monday, Oct. 15 OLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. 'AFTER ACTION REVIEW': Exhibit of art by veterans of the U.S. armed services, open through Nov. 9 at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Tuesday, Oct. 16 'REPORTERO' SCREENING: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Part of the Point-ofView documentary series showcased by PBS. Details: 850-522-2107 Wednesday, Oct. 17 PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by awardwinning artist Perry Austin. Details, beachartgroup. com/austin-perry-oilacrylic Thursday, Oct. 18 PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by awardwinning artist Perry Austin. Details, beachartgroup. com/austin-perry-oilacrylic PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach; $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: Kelley & The Healers. Details: CityOfLynnHaven.com JULIA OTHMER CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Friday, Oct. 19 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com 'MONSTERS IN THE MAIN': Exhibit open through Oct. 31 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com 'AFTER ACTION REVIEW': Exhibit of art by veterans of the U.S. armed services, open through Nov. 9 at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by award-winning artist, Perry Austin. Details, beachartgroup.com/ austin-perry-oilacrylic 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'The Birds,' 4:30 p.m. 'Rear Window,' and 7 p.m. 'Psycho,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com CALENDARFrom Page 34 See CALENDAR, 36

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E36 Friday, October 5, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDAR9th ANNUAL BAY COUNTY HAUNTED HAYRIDE: Ticket booth open from 5:30-9 p.m. at H.G. Harders Park, located at 8110 John Pitts Rd., Panama City. A frightful, fun-“ lled, familyoriented event. Admission: $5, all ages. Pumpkin Patch open for smaller kids and the faint of heart from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Costume Contest at 6:30 p.m. Details at 850-248-8730 GRIFFIN HOUSE CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Saturday, Oct. 20 MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER 5K WALK/ RUN: at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 W. Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosted by the American Cancer Society to honor those affected by breast cancer and raise awareness to “ ght the disease. Details, MakingStridesWalk.org SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org BAY POINT PLEIN AIR ART FESTIVAL: 8 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Grand prize is a two-day stay at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort. For more information, contact beachartgroup@att.net or visit beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-festival-info.html ORANGE AND BOO MINI GOLF TOURNAMENT: 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. tee off at Pirates Island Golf in Panama City Beach. Sponsored by the Panhandle Gator Club to raise scholarship funds. Free for “ rst 80 players. For details, contact Mike Varner at mvarnerg8r@gmail.com. THIRD ANNUAL BLOODY MARY & MUSIC FESTIVAL: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music from Kyle Mitchell & Southern Sunday; 20 bars and restaurants compete for "Best Bloody Mary in the Grand Lagoon"; sample and vote for your favorite. Tickets: $25 per person; $20 for military, active duty and “ rst responders. 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'Rear Window,' 4:30 p.m. 'Psycho,' and 7 p.m. 'The Birds,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com OKTOBERFEST PANAMA CITY: 4-10 p.m. on Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. Free admission. Live music from True Soul and traditional Oktoberfest music from Krankenhaus; games; stein hoisting, brat eating and pretzel-catching contests; beard and mustache contest, cornhole, giant Jenga, Mr. and Mrs. Oktoberfest; street vendors and merchants lining the street. Free kids' zone. Come in costume for contest, bring chairs for bands, traditional Oktoberfest cuisine at street vendors and participating restaurants, as well as American dishes. Large selection of craft and domestic beers and wines. Vending spaces available. Details at 850-785-2554 9th ANNUAL BAY COUNTY HAUNTED HAYRIDE: Ticket booth open from 5:30-9 p.m. at H.G. Harders Park, located at 8110 John Pitts Rd., Panama City. A frightful, fun-“ lled, familyoriented event. Admission: $5, all ages. Pumpkin Patch open for smaller kids and the faint of heart from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Costume Contest at 6:30 p.m. Details at 850-248-8730 SONGWRITERS CIRCLE: 6 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Featuring Ellen Robertson, Kristen Barkuloo and Kristan Mikala. Seating limited to 35 guests. Tickets: $20 each at the door or at EventBrite.com LAKE POWELL MOONLIGHT PADDLE: 7-9 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway. A moonlight paddle on Florida's largest coastal dune lake. $35 cash, ages 12 and older. Reservations required. Details: 850-233-5059 GRIFFIN HOUSE CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Sunday, Oct. 21 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'Psycho,' 4:30 p.m. 'The CALENDARFrom Page 35 See CALENDAR, 37

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| Friday, October 5, 2018 E37 GO & DO : CALENDARBirds,' and 7 p.m. 'Rear Window,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com Wednesday, Oct. 24 18TH ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Of“ cial Thunder Beach venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and HarleyDavidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com Thursday, Oct. 25 18TH ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Of“ cial Thunder Beach venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and HarleyDavidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 SPOOKY SKEDADDLE: 5-7 p.m. in downtown Panama City. A safe night of trick or treating as businesses open to “ ll those baskets with treats. BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: Cross Cut. Details: CityOfLynnHaven. com Friday, Oct. 26 18TH ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Of“ cial Thunder Beach venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and HarleyDavidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com 'MONSTERS IN THE MAIN': Exhibit open through Oct. 31 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com 'AFTER ACTION REVIEW': Exhibit of art by veterans of the U.S. armed services, open through Nov. 9 at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com COFFEE AND CANDLES 'PARANORMAL JOURNEY': 7-9 p.m. at Capstone House, 1713 Beck Ave., Panama City. Lisa Rains explains techniques and equipment used in paranormal investigations, relating to personal experiences, photographs and testimonies of haunted victims. Dessert and coffee provided; $10 for members, $12 for visitors. Details and reservations: 850-747-9224 'DEATH TRAP': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, Lynn Haven. A successful writer of Broadway thrillers struggles to overcome a dry spell, a string of failures and shortage of funds. Then a possible solution arises in the form of a students script he recognizes as a potential Broadway hit, leading to conspiracy and murder. Advance tickets: $18 for adults ($20 at the door); $17 for military and seniors ($19 at the door); $10 for students ($12 at the door). Details at 850-2653226 or KT-online.org Saturday, Oct. 27 18TH ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Of“ cial Thunder Beach venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and HarleyDavidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com RUNNING SCARED 5K ZOMBIE RUN: 8-10 a.m. Harders Park, 8110 John Pitts Road Panama City. Run from attacking zombies through this 5k obstacle course. To bene“ t Arc of the Bay. Details: Zombie5kPC.com SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw CALENDARFrom Page 36 See CALENDAR, 38

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E38 Friday, October 5, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDAR& Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org HARVEST MARKET: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Rosemary Beach on County 30A. More than 50 artists and crafters from all across the nation in a variety of media including “ ne art, folk art, pottery, stained glass, handcrafted furniture and jewelry, natural products, Christmas decorations, holiday gifts, and much more. Other activities include the merchants' ScareCrow Walk, the haunted cemetery, and the BooSpectacular, from 2-5 pm. All events are free and open to the public. Details: www.HilltopProductionEvents.com or 850-951-2148 ZOOBOO TRICK OR TREAT: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at ZooWorld, 9008 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Enjoy games, prizes, candy, costumes and surprises. Everyone in costume receives a prize. Admission: $13.95 per person, or $6.97 for Season Pass Holders. Kid-friendly. SPIRITS OF ST. ANDREWS BAR HAUNT: 5-9 p.m. in the historic St. Andrews business district. Purchase the "Book of Spells" containing the "spirit" recipes offered at all the Haunt stops. Dress in costume for chances to win contests and door prizes. Enjoy fantastic deals available only to holders of the Book of Spells, which will go on sale ($5 each) in early October at the Panama City Publishing Museum. The fun begins with a Halloween march down Bayview Avenue led by the Wabi Sabis, beginning at the Villa Gateway Park at 5:30 p.m. Bars on the route will include Alices on Bayview, Barefoot on the Bay, Bricks & Barley Slice House, Enzos, Little Village, Los Antojitos, Sailors Landing, Shrimp Boat Restaurant, Taproom, and Uncle Ernies. ROBERT'S HALL-OWEEEEN: 7 p.m. at Robert's Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. The Bay Storytellers eighth annual Halloween celebration including stories, door prizes and refreshments for purchase. Free for adults and children 12 and older. Donations go toward improving Robert's Hall. 'DEATH TRAP': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, Lynn Haven. Advance tickets: $18 for adults ($20 at the door); $17 for military and seniors ($19 at the door); $10 for students ($12 at the door). Details at 850-2653226 or KT-online.org Sunday, Oct. 28 18TH ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Of“ cial Thunder Beach venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and HarleyDavidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.waterfrontmarkets.org ZOOBOO TRICK OR TREAT: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at ZooWorld, 9008 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Enjoy games, prizes, candy, costumes and surprises. Everyone in costume receives a prize. Admission: $13.95 per person, or $6.97 for Season Pass Holders. Kid-friendly. 7th ANNUAL SPAGHETTI DINNER & SILENT AUCTION: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. Tickets: $10 per person, including spaghetti, salad, bread, dessert and beverage. Tickets go on sale Oct. 1, and are available by calling the Bay Bandroom, 850-767-4625 or via any Million Dollar Band student; 100 percent of proceeds go directly to the cost of the Bay High School bands performance at the 2020 St. Patricks Day Parade in Dublin, Ireland. CALENDARFrom Page 37

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AUTOMATIC FOLIO WILL APPEAR HERE