Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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** SUNDAYA t-storm 89 / 74SATURDAYT-shower 89 / 72TODAYA t-storm 88 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Friday, September 28, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A new court to help military veterans deal with mental health issues and avoid incarceration soon will start in the Panhandle circuit, court and state officials announced Thursday.The veterans court will emphasize treatment and rehabilitationŽ as an alternative to incarceration, said Elijah Smiley, chief judge for the 14th Judicial Cir-cuit, which serves Bay, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Calhoun and Washington counties.This veterans court is intended to serve veterans in all six counties,Ž said Smiley, who has veterans in his family. Its necessary we consider innovative ways to solve some of these cases. Our veterans shored up the cost of the freedoms we enjoy and helped preserve the liber-ties and rights we maintain in our courts.ŽThe veterans court is Veterans court to address mental health By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Convicted of gunning down a 16-year-old with an AK-47 during a parking lot marijuana robbery plot, Demarcus Montrel Gid-dens now faces a lifetime behind bars.Giddens, 22, was found guilty as charged Thursday of first-degree murder and attempted robbery after a two-day trial. Prosecutors made the case that he killed Arnold High School student Jason Ian Price during a robbery for marijuana while Giddens defense attorney contended that he was defending himself and Shooter guilty in teens slayingDemarcus Giddens, 22, faces life in prison for murdering Arnold High School student Jason Ian Price, 16Demarcus Giddens, 22, looks at defense attorney Kim Jewell after being found guilty as charged of “ rst-degree murder and attempted robbery charges. [ZACK MCDONALD/THE NEWS HERALD] PCB OKS 4 HEIGHT INCENTIVES, DENIES 1 LOCAL | B1 LOCAL & STATE | B1BAY COUNTY HONORS WARRIOR BEACH VETS SPORTS | D1DOLPHINS, MARLINS MEET AGAIN WITH MORE AT STAKE Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................D7 Local & State ...............B1-7 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................D1-6 Viewpoints .....................A6 Christine Blasey Ford is sworn in to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on Thursday in Washington. [SAUL LOEB/POOL PHOTO VIA AP] Judge Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on Thursday in Washington. [ANDREW HARNIK/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Lisa Mascaro and Alan FramThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ In an emotional day like few others in Senate history, Califor-nia psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford quietly but firmly recounted her 100 percentŽ certainty Thursday that President Donald Trumps nominee for the Supreme Court had sexu-ally assaulted her when they were teenagers „ and then Brett Kavanaugh defiantly testified he was 100 percent certainŽ he did no such thing.That left senators to decide whether the long day tipped their confirmation votes for or against Trumps nominee in a deeply partisan fight with the future of the high court and pos-sibly control of Congress in the balance.He said, she saidKavanaugh, Ford provide raw, emotional testimony in historic hearing that devolves into vicious partisan ght By Rosalind S. Helderman and Tom HamburgerThe Washington PostWASHINGTON „ For five minutes at a time, as she was quizzed by a pros-ecutor about the details of an alleged assault that occurred when she was 15 years old, Christine Blasey Ford was on trial.And then, for five minutes, she wasnt.The Republican deci-sion to relinquish each GOP Analysis: Part deposition, part therapy, hearing emerges as strange hybridSen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday in Washington. [MICHAEL REYNOLDS/POOL IMAGE VIA AP] Mitchell See GUILTY, A3 See HEALTH, A4 See HEARING, A5 See ANALYSIS, A5

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** A2 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald The Associated PressToday is Friday, Sept. 28, the 271st day of 2018. There are 94 days left in the year.Todays Highlight in HistoryOn Sept. 28, 1787, the Congress of the Confederation voted to send the just-completed Constitution of the United States to state legislatures for their approval.On this dateIn 1542, Portuguese navigator Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo arrived at present-day San Diego. In 1781, American forces in the Revolutionary War, backed by a French ” eet, began their successful siege of Yorktown, Va. In 1892, the “ rst nighttime football game took place in Mans“ eld, Pennsylvania, as teams from Mans“ eld State Normal and Wyoming Seminary played under electric lights to a scoreless tie. In 1920, eight members of the Chicago White Sox were indicted for allegedly throwing the 1919 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds. (All were acquitted at trial, but all eight were banned from the game for life.) In 1928, Scottish medical researcher Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, the “ rst effective antibiotic. In 1939, during World War II, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a treaty calling for the partitioning of Poland, which the two countries had invaded. In 1964, comedian Harpo Marx, 75, died in Los Angeles. In 1976, Muhammad Ali kept his world heavyweight boxing championship with a close 15-round decision over Ken Norton at New Yorks Yankee Stadium. In 1989, deposed Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos died in exile in Hawaii at age 72. In 1993, “ rst lady Hillary Rodham Clinton went to Capitol Hill to begin selling the administrations health care plan to Congress.TODAY IN HISTORY FLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday Fantasy 5: 02-07-22-29-30 Lotto: 02-08-09-25-35-53; estimated jackpot: $2.5 million Lotto XTRA: 04 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot: $336 million Pick 2 Evening: 7-9 Pick 2 Midday: 6-8 Pick 3 Evening: 6-3-0 Pick 3 Midday: 0-2-4 Pick 4 Evening: 5-1-8-6 Pick 4 Midday: 5-7-1-4 Pick 5 Evening: 2-1-3-9-5 Pick 5 Midday: 0-4-3-5-4 Powerball: 01-02-07-30-50; Powerball: 8; Power Play: 5; estimated jackpot: $193 million YOUNG ARTISTGabriela Sosa. Grade 7. Rising Leaders Academy. CATCH OF THE DAY HAPPY BIRTHDAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY Deron Nguyen, right, shared this photo taken with Michael Lincoln, left, and Hayden Calloway in the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, Whistle buoy action with the guys.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Becky Ann Litke, of Panama City Beach, sent this photo and said, This lemur at Zoo World looks like he is ready to get plugged in!Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] A belated birthday to Tiffany D. Sparks who turned 32 on Wednesday. Actress Brigitte Bardot is 84. Actor Joel Higgins is 75. Singer Helen Shapiro is 72. Movie writer-director-actor John Sayles is 68. Rock musician George Lynch is 64. Actor Steve Hytner is 59. Actresscomedian Janeane Garofalo is 54. Country singer Matt King is 52. Actress Mira Sorvino is 51. TV personality/singer Moon Zappa is 51. Actress-model Carre Otis is 50. Actress Naomi Watts is 50. Country singer Karen Fairchild (Little Big Town) is 49. Actor Peter Cambor is 40. Writer-producer-directoractor Bam Margera is 39. Actress Melissa Claire Egan is 37. Actress Jerrika Hinton is 37. Neo-soul musician Luke Mossman (Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats ) is 37. Pop-rock singer St. Vincent is 36. Rock musician Daniel Platzman (Imagine Dragons) is 32. Actress Hilary Duff is 31. Actor Keir Gilchrist is 26.TodayGREATEST HITS OF BILLY JOEL AND ELTON JOHN: 5:30-8:30 p.m. at The Barn at the Wicked Wheel, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach, to bene“ t the Panama City Pops Orchestra. Tickets $100, includes smoked prime rib dinner with sides and drink; available at TheWickedWheel.com/Pops. 6th ANNUAL FORE HER GOLF OUTING: At the Santa Rosa Golf & Beach Club, 334 Golf Club Drive, Santa Rosa Beach. Cost $110 per golfer and includes breakfast, lunch, the green fee, and a cart. Proceeds will bene“ t local breast cancer patients. To register, www.foreher.org or email info@thehivecreativeconsulting.com WALLY WHITE „ AFRICA: Exhibit runs through Sept. 29 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission. For details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com F:/STOP NORTH FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION AND EXHIBIT: Exhibit runs through Sept. 29 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. BLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: 6-10 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for kids, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Tickets $20 per day or $30 for weekend. Free for children 12 and younger. For details, 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org JAM SESSION „ STRING THEORY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. BACKSTAGE PASS „ ANTHONY PEEBLES: 6:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets $5. For details, BayArts.org THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. Presented by GCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division. For details, www. GulfCoast.Edu/ArtsSaturdayBLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: noon to 9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. For details, 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org SundayTHE SPITFIRE GRILL: 2 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets $35 for adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. For details and tickets, EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/tickets or 850-684-0323 THE WOLVES: 2:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. For details, www.GulfCoast.Edu/ArtsMondayOLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. MADE IN GREECE VII ART EXHIBITION : Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112.Monday-WednesdayCENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at 15th Street and Sherman Avenue; includes Bay County Art Exhibition.GO & DO

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 A3friends from harm. Gid-dens faces up to life in prison when he is sentenced Oct. 2 before Circuit Judge Michael Overstreet.It took jurors about two hours of deliberation before reaching their verdict.Giddens did not react physically while the sentence was read aloud. Prices family, however, wept as the courtroom was cleared and some of Giddens family member gave them embraces.During the last day of testimony, Prices autopsy pictures showed jurors he had been shot almost point blank outside the CVS, 7112 U.S. 98, with a pistolstyle AK-47. A single bullet entered his chest at about his right armpit and angled through his body to exit his left lower back. Giddens took the stand after the autopsy pictures to claim the trajectory of the fatal wound on Price, who he called the said victim,Ž was because of a struggle over the gun.He approaches me in a very, very hostile manner „ did nothing to slow down,Ž Giddens told the jury. Hes fixing to literally take the gun out of my hand. Its survival, period. Survive and stay alive.ŽGiddens told jurors that moments before that his group of friends from Auburn, Alabama „ Rodney Jarquez Jones, 19, and Gerta-vious Canada, 22 „ had run into a group of guys at the nearby Taco Bell. Giddens god-brother, Jones, asked to buy some marijuana from their source before relocating to the CVS parking lot to meet and conduct the transaction. Once there, 17-year-old Jon Pyle „ driven by Price, who remained behind inside his truck „ arrived to sell the group from Alabama an ounce of marijuana.According to Giddens, a disagreement escalated to a physical fight between the groups and then to the point he grabbed the AK-47 from a book bag.I rack a round and they hear it, but it doesnt change anything,Ž Giddens told the jury. Thats when Jason hops out of the truck and fast, very fast hes trying to get at me.ŽGiddens said he backed up with the gun, ordering Price to likewise back off, until he hit a curb. At that moment, Giddens claimed, Price reached for the gun, so he fired a single round into his chest. As everyone scat-tered at the crack of gunfire in the night, Giddens testi-fied he thought about staying behind.I aint never killed anyone, and I never seen no one die,Ž Giddens said. I knew I wasnt in the wrong and wanted to stay.ŽHowever, he fled with his friends anyway.Prosecutor Bob Sombathy called the account a fairy tale in his closing argument. The states position throughout the trial was that Giddens and company had come to Panama City Beach with the intention of committing rob-bery. They also brought the AK-47 and several maga-zines of ammunition in case of a worst-case scenario, Sombathy said.It was all designed to come down here and rob somebody, and its not a bad plan,Ž Sombathy told jurors. What better target than a drug dealer „ they arent going to go to the police. The only reason were here today is because someone got killed.ŽSombathy called Gid-dens friends to testify to the theory.But defense attorney Kim Jewell in her closing arguments reasserted Giddens had been defending himself. Price was unarmed at the time of his death, but Jewell pointed out the law that danger does not have to be actual, only perceived, to be real. She highlighted Giddens life experience as growing up in the projectsŽ of Auburn.He has a different perspective,Ž Jewell told the court. Something that may look one way to us is completely different in his eyes. He sees this stuff every day and thats why his head is on swivel and on his guard.ŽJewell then called into question Giddens codefendants in an attempt to discredit their testimony.In the first day of trial, Jones and Canada impli-cated Giddens in the killing. Canada told the jury that he watched as Giddens drew the AK-47 from the book bag and demanded the marijuana from Pyle. Canada said he did not stick around for the gunfire to start.Everybody was talking at once ... and he was like give the s*** up, Ž Canada told the jury. As soon as I heard that gun cock, I ran because I was scared.ŽJones told the jury that Giddens had unveiled his plot to rob the group beforehand. As they fled the scene and went to change clothes, Giddens showed no remorse, he said.He looked at me and said f*** that n*****, bro, Ž Jones told the jury. I told him he was tripping.ŽBoth Jewell and Sombathy attempted to claim the physical evidence from Prices fatal wound as a credit to their respective cases. Jewell said the angle showed Giddens was retreating and lifted the gun in self-defense. Sombathy said it showed Price was crouched at the time he was felled.The jury sided with the prosecution.Sombathy concluded that while many of the codefendants motives were questionable, Prices inten-tions the night of his death were noble.A lot of testimony has been about drugs but that nothing has to do with Price,Ž Sombathy added. He just had his friends back. ƒ Thats all he did was run out there to get his friends back.ŽCanada and Jones accepted plea agreements in exchange for their testimony against Giddens. Canada will receive four years for his role, while Jones will be sen-tenced to 20 years. Giddens, who has four previous felony convictions, is expected to receive life in prison. GUILTYFrom Page A1

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** A4 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Eric TuckerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ A highly anticipated meeting between President Donald Trump and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was postponed until next week to avoid conflicting with a dramatic Senate hearing involving Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the White House said Thursday.The two were set to meet Thursday following news media reports that Rosenstein last year discussed possibly secretly recording the president and using the Constitutions 25th Amend-ment to remove him from office.But White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the men agreed to reschedule their meeting because they do not want to do anything to interfere with the hearing.ŽAmid speculation that the meeting could result in Rosensteins dismissal or resignation, Trump said Wednesday that he would certainly prefer notŽ to fire Rosenstein and that the Justice Departments No. 2 official had denied making the remarks first attributed to him in a New York Times report.I would much prefer keep-ing Rod Rosenstein,Ž Trump said at a news conference in New York. He said he did not say it. He said he does not believe that. He said he has a lot of respect for me, and he was very nice and well see.ŽTrump added, My pref-erence would be to keep him and to let him finish up.ŽWhite House counselor Kellyanne Conway would not say Thursday when the meeting would take place, but stressed that the two will talk and Trump has made clear he would prefer that the deputy attorney general stay on the job and complete the job.ŽRosenstein is overseeing special counsel Robert Muellers investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, and his dismissal would put that probe in jeopardy and create a polit-ical storm.The meeting delay prolongs the uncertainty of Rosensteins status. Rosenstein headed to the White House on Monday morning preparing to be fired and had discussed a possible resignation over the weekend with White House officials. But after meeting with chief of staff John Kelly and speaking by phone with Trump, he got a reprieve with the Trump meeting scheduled for Thursday.Since then, the White House has sought to tamp down anxi-ety that Rosenstein would be fired. White House officials called senators Monday to say Trump had said he wouldnt be firing Rosenstein at the meeting, according to two people familiar with the conversations who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss private discussions. Aides have advised Trump against taking any extreme actions ahead of the midterm elections with his partys majorities in Congress already under threat.Friends and former col-leagues of Rosenstein say they dont expect him to step aside and give up oversight of the Russia investigation and the enormous swath of Justice Department operations for which he is responsible.Rosenstein, who has spent his entire career in government, has tremendous loyalty to the department,Ž said former Justice Department lawyer and longtime friend James Trusty.Hes a very long-run, historical-minded guy in a lot of ways,Ž Trusty said. I think he may have some confidence that history will be kinder to him than politicians are.ŽTrumps remarks Wednesday followed a chaotic period that began last Friday with reports that Rosenstein had last year discussed possibly secretly recording the president and invoking the Constitution to remove Trump from office. The Justice Department issued statements aimed at denying the reports, including one that said the wiretap remark was meant sarcastically.Trump-Rosenstein meeting postponedDeputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves his home Thursday in Bethesda, Md. President Donald Trumps meeting with the deputy attorney general was postponed until next week. [JOSE LUIS MAGANA/ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] expected to begin in January. Whether veterans enter the court will be handled on an individual basis, and Smiley said accountability will be required. The program is voluntary and the state leg-islature allocated $8.9 million in support. Court officials will work with the VA and local drug rehab and mental health providers to get vet-erans help.Its been a long time coming. We have a track record that demonstrates that it actually works,Ž said Circuit Judge Michael Over-street, referencing a similar existing program. Typically were dealing with someone who, but for their mental health issues, probably would not have committed a crime. When you can take a person like that and address their mental health issues and get them to a place where theyre properly medicated and understand the importance of medication and therapy, we graduate someone from the process who is less likely to commit a crime in the future.ŽState Sen. George Gainer is an advocate for the veterans court, and was thanked by Smiley and Overstreet for his support. Gainer said he was glad to help get the program underway.This is something that didnt come about because we had veterans complaining. This is because the fine judges in this state, county and circuit decided they could do a better job in terms of our veterans,Ž Gainer said. Vet-erans didnt ask why or how. They just went and served this country. They came back with unique and different problems, problems specific to what they did in the ser-vice. These judges recognize that and asked me to do my little part in this thing.ŽDetails on the new program are being finalized through discussions with the state attorney and public defender offices. People accused of murder, sexual battery and other serious crimes may not be eligible for the program, Smiley said.Veterans are a very spe-cial population,Ž Smiley said. We believe there is a need. The goal is to get them in a place where theyre function-ing well in society.Ž HEALTHFrom Page A1 DATELINESATHENS, GREECE SELMA, ALA. Man arrested, held on $5M bail in police ambushBond is set at $5 million for a man charged in what authorities are calling the ambush-style shooting of a police officer in Selma, Alabama.District Attorney Michael Johnson says 21-year-old Kevin Devonta Johnson Jr. is charged with attempted murder and other offenses in an attack on Officer Michael Hale, who was wounded but survived.A hearing is set for Nov. 6. Court records arent yet avail-able to show whether the man has a lawyer. Selma police say the officer was wounded while on patrol early Sunday when someone shot into his patrol car using a high-powered rifle. Authori-ties have said multiple people were involved.WASHINGTONFeds: Philly mishandled grant for Democratic conventionA U.S. Department of Justice report released Thursday criti-cized how Philadelphia handled nearly a third of a $50 million grant for security during the July 2016 Democratic National Convention.Following an investigation, the agencys inspector general issued a report that said the city did not perform adequate over-sight for spending by police agencies, the host committees expenditures or fire depart-ment overtime. It also found that Philadelphia did not do enough to ensure accountability over spending and failed to comply with federal rules for request-ing funds and reporting how the money is doled out.Philadelphia spokesman Mike Dunn said the city should have done better.TUNIS, TUNISIA Italy, Tunisia vow to cooperate more over migrantsTunisia and Italy agreed Thursday to step up efforts to send Tunisian migrants identi-fied as illegally staying in Italy back to their home country and to improve the cooperation between their governments.Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini, speaking during an official visit to Tunisia, said the the priority is to improve the conditions of return of these migrants.ŽSalvini said both countries agreed to fight against the traf-ficking of human beings ... and to limit the number of deathsŽ of those crossing the Mediter-ranean Sea from North Africa to Europe. The International Organization for Migration says over 1,600 people have died crossing the Mediterranean so far this year.SAO PAULOBrazils Petrobras to pay $853.2 million in penaltiesBrazils state oil company Petrobras said Thursday it had agreed to pay more than $850 million in penalties for bookkeeping violations related to bribes to Brazilian politicians and political parties.Petrobras said in a securities filing that the penalties total $853.2 million. It said Brazil will receive 80 percent of that amount and the U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission will receive 10 percent each.Brazilian prosecutors have said that construction companies, with contracts from Petrobras, paid billions of dollars in kickbacks to politicians and other public officials over more than a decade.LONDONMan arrested for chasing after plane at Dublin Airport An Irish man who missed his flight at Dublin Airport was arrested Thursday for running after the plane on the tarmac in a bid to flag it down.Witnesses said a man in his 20s broke through an airport door and ran toward the Ryanair plane, which was about to take off for Amsterdam, at around 7 a.m.Declan Harvey, who was at the airport, said he could hear a man shouting Wait!Ž at the plane before he was tackled to the ground by air-port workers. The airport said that a man became agitatedŽ after he and a woman arrived at the gate too late for their flight. The Associated PressTwo men try to secure boats due to bad weather Thursday at the port of Ra“ na, east of Athens. Severe weather warnings remain in effect around Greece, halting ferry services and prompting school closures. Gale-force winds of up to 62 mph slammed into Greece from the west, and meteorologists warned about the possibility of a cyclone in the Ionian Sea. [THANASSIS STAVRAKIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]GASTONIA, N.C. Gastonia Police Chief Robert Helton, left, listens as Ian Ritch speaks during a press conference Wednesday in Gastonia, N.C., about his 6-year-old son Maddox Ritch who disappeared Saturday near downtown Gastonia. Helton fought back tears and a breaking voice during a Thursday news conference in which it was announced of“ cials believed the body searchers found was that of Maddox. [JOHN CLARK /THE GASTON GAZETTE VIA AP]FARGO, N.D. William Hoehn enters the courtroom on Wednesday in Cass County District Court in Fargo, N.D., during his trial on a charge of conspiring to murder Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, whose baby was cut from her womb. Hoehn, 33, disputed testimony from his now ex-girlfriend, Brooke Crews, that he took any part in the August 2017 slaying of Greywind, 22. Crews is serving life in prison after pleading guilty to murder. [DAVID SAMSON/THE FORUM VIA AP, POOL]

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** senators five minutes of question time to a career sex-crimes prosecutor turned Thursdays hear-ing on Fords accusation against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavana-ugh into a strange hybrid: part legal deposition, part therapy session.Throughoutthe morn-ing, Ford swiveled abruptly between Arizona prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, who focused on the minutia of her account, and Democratic senators, who worked to elicit the emotional impact of the alleged assault.This is utterly bizarre,Ž said Peter Zeidenberg, who was a veteran prosecutor in the Justice Departments public integrity section, as he watched the session unfold. This is no way to conduct an investiga-tion, on live television in five-minute incre-ments. Its ridiculous and offensive.ŽThe dueling approaches were mirrored in the reactions outside Congress. Ford was lauded by supporters on social media as a hero, while some Kava-naugh advocates focused on small details raised by Mitchell such as Fords decision to fly to Wash-ington, even though she said the alleged attack gave her a fear of enclosed spaces.President Trumps son Donald Trump Jr. tweeted, Im no psychology professor but it does seem weird to me that someone could have a selective fear of flying.ŽMitchell, the Maricopa County, Arizona, prosecutor tapped by Republicans to handle the GOP questions, never laid out a broad theory in her questions.Instead, she asked Ford to mark her home on a map of the Chevy Chase, Maryland, area. She asked her to review each of her past statements about the attack and explore whether her account has been consistent over time. She inquired whether Ford was on medication the night she remembered that Kavanaugh and friend Mark Judge locked her in a bedroom and attacked her. (Not at all,Ž Ford recalled.) The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 A5Showing their own cer-tainty, Republicans quickly scheduled a recommenda-tion vote for Friday morning in the Senate Judiciary Committee, where they hold an 11-10 majority. Theyre hoping for a final Senate roll call next week, seating Kavanaugh on the court for the Oct. start of its new term.In the committees packed hearing room for hour upon hour Thursday, both Kavanaugh and Ford said the alleged assault and the storm of controversy that has erupted 36 years later had altered their lives forever and for the worse „ perhaps the only thing they agreed on during their separate testimony marked by a stark contrast of tone and substance.Ford recounted for the senators and a nationwide TV audience her long-held secret of the alleged assault in a locked room at a gathering of friends when she was just 15. The memory „ and Kavanaughs laugh-ter during the act „ was lockedŽ in her brain, she said. Ford delivered her testimony with deliberate certitude, though admitting gaps in her memory as she choked back tears at some points and said she believed he was going to rape me.ŽHours later, Kavanaugh entered the hearing room fuming. He angrily denied her allegation, alternating a loud, defiant tone with near tears of his own, particularly when discussing his family. He decried his confirmation opposition as a national disgrace.Ž He interrupted senators and dismissed some questions with a flippant whatever.ŽYou have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy,Ž he said, referring to the Consti-tutions charge to senators duties in confirming high officials.Democrats pressed the judge to call for an FBI investigation into the claims, but he would say only, I welcome whatever the committee wants to do.ŽRepublicans are concerned, among other reasons, that further investigations could push a vote past the November elections that may switch Senate control back to the Democrats and make consideration of any Trump nominee more difficult. HEARINGFrom Page A1 ANALYSISFrom Page A1

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** A6 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com ANOTHER VIEW Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTSFor many Florida families, post-high school education is the key to the American dream. And for businesses in the Sunshine State, the constant stream of potential employees with valuable skills is a strong incentive to grow, invest and innovate. Fortunately, Floridas higher-education system is a rich resource that „ with support from the Legislature and the next governor „ will only get better. Last week, U.S. News and World Report released its annual college rankings, and for the first time, five Florida state universities are ranked in the top 100 of public universities nationwide. The University of Florida is breathing rarefied air indeed: In this years rankings, it moved from No. 9 to No. 8 (where it is tied with the Georgia Institute of Technology). The states flagship university should keep pushing to crack the top five. Its an achievable goal. Other schools in the top 100: Florida State University, at No. 26; the University of South Florida, which climbed 10 spots to No. 58 and has just been named a pre-eminent research facility; and the University of Central Florida, coming in at No. 87. Meanwhile, the College of Central Florida scored its best-ever performance in the states performance-based funding competition, just one point shy of gold status. Moreover, CF continues to be among the na tions best bargains, most veteran friendly and, importantly, is perennially among the nations top community colleges, meeting the unique needs of both a diverse and atypical student population. Thats a lot of bragging, for a good reason. It should be clear by now that Florida colleges and universities have become major factors in the states economic fortunes „ attracting investment, creating well-paid jobs and fostering entrepreneurship. It also speaks well of our state on a national stage that we have so many highly touted colleges and universities. This kind of success doesnt happen overnight. And it doesnt happen by accident. In its coming session, the Legislature should look for ways to boost the state university and college systems, directing the right resources in the right direction. Performance-based funding, along with clustering research efforts at select university powerhouses instead of several smaller programs statewide, seems to be creating good results. One obvious step: The state still ranks relatively low on its out-of-state tuition rates. Raising those, at both the state college and university levels, would parlay the states growing national prominence into revenue that boosts quality and enable more Floridians to attend the schools their families tax dollars support. College isnt the only path to prosperity for Florida students. But it will be a key factor in the states quest to diversify its economy and meet the states growing need for a high-skilled workforce. Investing in higher education will almost always pay off. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Ocala StarBanner, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.High marks for higher educationWatching this video upset me. Students and even faculty members wont let Dave Rubin speak. They constantly interrupt, shouting hate speech!Ž and black lives matter!Ž Rubin was once a man of the left. He even was a co-host on The Young Turks network. But then he started a podcast. He did long interviews with people like talk show host Larry Elder. In that interview, Rubin referred to systemic racismŽ and said that cops are more willing shoot if the perpetrator is black.Ž Whats your data for that?Ž Elder replied. Then he gave Rubin answers the left doesnt like to hear, like, Seventy percent of homicides are black-onblack ...Ž and The idea that a racist white cop shooting black people is a peril to black people is complete and total b.s.Ž He just beat me with fact over fact about how systemic racism doesnt exist „ not that racism doesnt exist,Ž Rubin told me. The more people Rubin interviewed, the more he became convinced something was missing in the lefts picture of the world. I realized not everyone that (the left) disagreed with could be a racist and a bigot and a homophobe and a sexist. That was the argument constantly being laid out. If a Republican gave a speech and said, We should lower taxes, their answer was, hes racist. Now that actually makes no sense.Ž Rubin now considers himself a classical liberal. That means he believes in liberalism roughly as it was before todays liberals added big government to the philosophy and subtracted belief in individual freedom. If you believe in the individual, then you fundamentally understand that individuals are different, so you are willing to sit down with someone different than you,Ž Rubin says. I didnt know what was going to happen, but I started doing these long-form interviews, and people kept watching. Ž Today, his former leftwing colleagues hate him. Hes a puppet for the right wing,Ž Ana Kasparian said on Rubins old Young Turks network. He was lazy when he worked here. Hes lazy now with his ridiculous show.Ž To me, she sounded jealous. I lose friends now,ŽRubin says. This goes to the laziness of the argument of the left. They truly believe that if you disagree, youre evil.Ž Many on the left have also come to believe that words themselves are a form of violence, so some now said Rubins words must not be heard. As he tried to speak at the University of New Hampshire, a womens studies professor screamed, We dont want you in the LGBT community, so get the (expletive)out!Ž Its an oppression Olympics,Ž Rubin told me. The more marginalized you claim to be, the more political clout you have on campus or in left-wing circles. ... If you have a limp, youre this much oppressed; if youre a Jew, this much oppressed; Muslim, this much oppressed. Everyone wants to be oppressed.Ž Of course, many minorities have suffered genuine oppression. Rubin acknowledges that but says the left misses whats special about America. No societys perfect, but the United States, by and large, has given more freedom to more people from every walk of life, regardless of your skin color, your sexuality. ... Do we have problems? Yes. We can talk about those things, but to tell me those are because you are oppressed?! It aint true.Ž John Stossel is host of StosselŽ on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Leaving the laziness of the left John StosselA Florida Bar complaint has been pending against her since July 2017 in connection with a litany of alleged misconduct dating back to 2011 while she was licensed to practice law. Circuit Judge John Miller of Pensacola, acting as the refereeŽ in the case, has now recommended that Clyatt is guilty and that she should face disbarment, according to official reports. Dawn Johnson: I read the litany of complaints against her. I and my former husband, along with another man and his wife had a similar experience with her and her of“ ce in the mid 2000s. It was a wrongful termination/racial issue. She caused our case to be closed by the courts for lack of doing ANYTHING and without ever having our say. We found out later that she was battling her own legal problems so we heard nothing from her for over 12 months. We ended up paying her $7800.00 for doing nothing. Im glad she may be getting the justice she deserves. She ruined our lives and probably others as well.Ž In a recent letter to the editor titled Trump supporters still blind to Trumps faults,Ž the author says, some Trump supporters arent able to see it with their own eyes or hear it with their own ears.Ž He said, Understand Trump cant remember what he says, so his stories always change and he cant help but tell lies.Ž Richard Weber: Its so simple, Trumpsters think that Trump, with all his faults, is working for them. Over his life, Trump has never worked for someone else. He uses people to get what he wants, and he never gives something away without a pro“ t for himself. All one has to do is look at his life, its well documented that he has cheated many many people out of their money, or good will. He is cheating his followers even now. He is ” eecing our Government, he is not performing for the good of the Country. Just as his workers dont always get paid for their work, even the little girls that sang for him in Pensacola, neither will his supporters be repaid for their trust and loyalty!READER FEEDBACKToo much bad news I feel sick. All this Trump this, Trump that, and dirty politics in Washington are making me feel sick. Its bad in England, where Jeremy Corbin is challenging Teresa May to nail down a Brexit plan. Its also bad in France, where Emanuel Macron is facing headwinds from the Left over his reforms. But, the things going on in this country are exceptionally bad, and sickening.Ž I may soon boycott T.V. news and think twice about being a good citizenŽ. I had my sixty ninth birthday today and think I should refuse to let all this silly nonsenseŽ shorten the rest of my days on Earth. If people want to participate, thats their business and their problem.ŽTom Heil, Panama City BeachLETTER TO THE EDITORFirst AmendmentCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 A7 BUSINESSTHE DOW 30COMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $210.11 -0.96 Am. Express $107.85 -0.16 Apple $224.95 +4.53 Boeing $367.39 +2.36 Caterpillar $152.47 -0.70 Chevron $122.47 +0.52 Cisco $48.33 -0.08 Coca-Cola $46.01 +0.16 DowDuPont $65.33 -1.56 Exxon $85.77 -0.01 Goldman $227.74 -1.14 Home Depot $206.84 -0.68 Intel $45.88 +0.18 IBM $151.50 -0.11 J&J $138.22 +0.06 JP Morgan $114.52 -0.50 McDonalds $166.53 +0.77 Merck $70.72 +0.39 Microsoft $114.41 +0.43 Nike $84.54 +0.84 P“ zer $43.90 +0.22 Proc. & Gamble $82.86 -0.40 Travelers $129.12 -0.38 United Tech. $139.68 +0.12 Verizon $53.59 +0.45 Walgreen Boots $73.81 +0.85 Walmart $94.13 -0.46 Walt Disney $116.04 +0.83 United Tech. $264.65 +1.74 Visa $150.02 +0.75STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG. AT&T $33.42 +0.07 DARDEN RESTS $111.28 -1.26 GEN DYNAMICS $202.08 +0.22 HNCOCK WHTNY $47.70 -0.55 HANGER INC $20.30 -0.29 HOME BANCS $21.96 -0.42 ITT CORP $61.03 +0.03 THE ST JOE $16.85 +0.20 KBR INC $20.74 +0.13 L-3 COMMS $212.09 +0.64 OCEANEERING $27.89 +0.48 REGIONS $18.54 -0.40 SALLIE MAE $11.39 -0.11 SOUTHERN $43.24 +0.58 SUNTRUST $67.23 -1.11 WESTROCK $53.53 -0.16 ING-RAND $102.68 +0.30 ENGILITY $35.37 -0.07 Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City, 850-769-1278. FOREIGN EXCHANGEU.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.30 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 18.79 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.86 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.76Special to The News HeraldYour future employee is a young man who is eager to enter the work force.He would like to work in food service and is willing to start at entry level. He is looking for a dish-washing position as he has some experience in that position. He prefers to work part time in the beginning and is willing to work flexible hours. He has an upbeat and positive attitude with a willingness to learn and follow direction. He is easy going and eager to be a part of a success-ful team. The potential to learn other aspects of food service would be a bonus for him.He is eligible for OJT, a program where her salary, workers comp and liability insurance are provided at no cost to the employer for a 90-day work trial period. He would make a great addition to your team. Will you give him a chance and consider an inter-view for this fine young man?For information about him or any of the other clients or services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.Celebrating: We are so thankful to TJ Maxx for its continued support and investment in our clients and our employment program.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTDeja, left, an Arc of the Bay client, is shown with Reva, one of the managers at TJ Maxx where Deja works. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] By Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ After four days of modest losses, Apple and Amazon led the U.S. stock market to small gains on Thurs-day. Internet and health care companies rose while mining companies fell with metals prices.Apple and Amazon are the two most valuable U.S. companies, and analysts said each stock should keep climbing. Other market favorites includ-ing Facebook and Google parent Alphabet also rose.Interest rates slipped for a second day, which led to losses for banks, while the stronger dollar weighed on metals prices and on shares of the companies that mine those metals. Smaller companies, which have strug-gled in September, also fell.Scott Wren, senior global equity strategist for the Wells Fargo Investment Institute, said investors have been reluc-tant to get back into the stock market since the 2008-09 recession, and there are signs thats changing.Stocks break four-day slideMARKET WATCHDow 26,439.93 54.65 Nasdaq 8,041.97 51.60 S&P 2,914.00 8.03 Russell 1,690.53 1.08 NYSE 13,105.72 3.76COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,182.30 12.10 Silver 14.201 .109 Platinum 810.30 15.30 Copper 2.7645 .0440 Oil 72.12 0.55MARKET MOVERS€ Apple Inc.: Up $4.53 to $224.95 „ An analyst for JPMorgan Chase said Apple stock could rise more than 20 percent by late 2019. € Carnival Corp.: Down $3.24 to $63.74 „ The cruise line company said prices for recent bookings have been lower than they were a year ago.By Martin CrutsingerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The U.S. economy grew at a robust annual rate of 4.2 percent in the second quar-ter, the best performance in nearly four years, though economists believe growth has slowed in the current quarter partly because of a drag from trade.The performance of the gross domestic product, the countrys total output of goods and services, was unchanged from an estimate the Commerce Department made last month, the government reported Thursday.The strong GDP performance has been cited by Trump as proof that his economic program is working.Were doing much better than anybody thought possible,Ž Trump said at a Wednesday news conference.However, a big part of that growth reflected a temporary rush to ship soybeans and other U.S. exports out before penalty tariffs triggered by Trumps get-tough trade policies took effect.Economists believe growth has slowed in the current quarter to between 3 percent and 3.5 percent, still a solid pace. While trade boosted GDP by 1.2 per-centage point in the second quarter, due to a surge in exports, it is expected to trim growth by around 1 percentage point in the third quarter. Some of that weakness may be offset by businesses rebuilding their inventories at a stronger pace.Growth still looks quite strong,Ž Jim OSullivan, chief U.S. economist for High Frequency Economics, said in describing the revised GDP report for the second quarter. He said he was forecasting third and fourth quarter growth at around 3 percent before momentum starts to fade in 2019.Ž A 3 percent growth aver-age in the second half of this year would leave the annual growth in 2018 at 3 percent. That would be the best performance since 2005, three years before the 2008 financial crisis pushed the country into the worst recession since the 1930s.The country is currently in the 10th year of an economic expansion, the second longest in history. But growth has averaged a lackluster 2.2 percent, making this the weakest recovery in the post-World War II period.US economy grew at robust rate during second quarterBRIEFCASEWASHINGTONUS mortgage rates up; 30-year at 7-year highLong-term U.S. mort-gage rates are up for the fifth straight week, with the key 30-year rate reaching its highest level in more than seven years. Costs for would-be home-buyers continue to climb. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages jumped to 4.72 percent from 4.65 percent last week. The aver-age benchmark rate has risen from 3.83 percent a year ago. The Associated PressFord CEO Jim Hackett said Wednesday that the Trump administrations tariffs on imported steel and aluminum will cost the company $1 billion. [CARLOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] Ford, several other US corporate giants warn tari s on imports will mean price hikesBy Tom Krisher and Josh BoakThe Associated PressDETROIT „ From Ford to Walmart to Procter & Gamble, a growing number of iconic American companies are warning that President Donald Trumps tariffs on U.S. imports are rais-ing their costs and prices.Jim Hackett, CEO of Ford, the second-largest U.S.-based automaker, said Wednesday that Trumps taxes on imported steel and aluminum will cost Ford $1 billion through 2019.Likewise, Walmart, Americas largest retailer, has told the administration that Trumps latest round of taxes „ on $200 billion of Chinese imports „ could increase prices for its shoppers. Walmart specifically mentioned items ranging from car seats, cribs and backpacks to hats, pet products and bicycles.Procter & Gamble, the consumer products giant, has warned of both poten-tial price increases and job losses as a result of the tariffs.In the meantime, drink-ing Coca-Cola is costing more because of Trumps tariffs. Macys, too, has warned of likely price increases. So has Gap.On Wednesday, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell took on the issue at a news conference after the Fed announced its latest interest rate hike. Asked about the Trump tariffs forcing up prices for Americas consumers, Powell agreed that Fed officials are hearing from businesses about forthcoming higher costs.You dont see it yet,Ž the chairman said, referring to the data the Fed studies.But, Powell acknowledged, the tariffs might provide a basis for companies to raise prices in a world where theyve been very reluctant to and unable to raise prices.ŽAt his own news confer-ence Wednesday in New York, Trump rejected any notion that his tariffs posed an economic risk, echoing assertions by his administration that consumers would barely notice the new taxes.Its had no impact... on our economy,Ž the presi-dent said after meetings with foreign leaders at the United Nations General Assembly.Hackett, in a television interview Wednesday, revealed the $1 billion esti-mate that he said Trumps steel and aluminum tariffs are costing Ford. He said the figure is a year-over-year increase from March through 2019.Ford buys most of its metals from U.S. pro-ducers, which have raised prices this year as a result of the tariffs on foreign competitors, the company has said.Hacketts boss, Execu-tive Chairman Bill Ford, said Thursday the company has met with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to give input on trade policies.Ford wants decisions to be made because it takes years for the capitalintensive auto industry to develop and build vehi-cles, he said.Our business runs a lot better when we have cer-tainty and we dont have big gyrations because our lead times are long,Ž Ford said.Other automakers that produce vehicles in the U.S. are experiencing the same price increases as Ford, said IHS Markit Senior Analyst Peter Nagle. While they may be absorbing the increased costs at present, eventu-ally theyll have to pass at least some of the costs on to customers, he said.Driving up cost

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** A8 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE GULF COAST | B5RED TIDEFishing restrictions extended amid outbreak 4 approved with provisions, Beachcomber request deniedBy Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ A series of what likely will be the last height incen-tive requests heard by the city split the Panama City Beach City Council on Tuesday, with Mayor Mike Thomas saying the city had done a horribleŽ job in the past of managing these additional height requests and that he hopes the city does away with them immediately.ŽAfter a three-hour hear-ing on the five requests, four were approved with provi-sions while one was denied.Its long been the citys practice to approve height incentives for resorts and hotels, leading to what Coun-cilman Hector Solis described as overbuilding on Front Beach Road and an abundance of 22-story buildings obstructing the skyline.At some point, do we want to be able to drive down the road and see the sunlight come through?Ž Solis asked during the hearing. I benefit by living in one of those prop-erties, but at some point, we have to stop the madness.ŽCurrent city code allows for hotels with FBO-4 (Front Beach Road Overlay Zone 4) zoning to be built at a maximum height of 150 feet, but developers can apply for a variance by agreeing to trade incentivesŽ for additional height up to 220 feet, with the idea that these incentives mitigate the extra height of the building by improving the attractiveness of the building or promoting public safety and wellness.PCB hears nal height incentive requests Thomas By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Air Force veteran Marlon Olson said he was grateful for the 11th Annual Home-less Veteran Stand Down because it helps him get by.Olson isnt homeless „ he lives with a roommate „ but said he wouldnt be able to survive on his own. Not every veteran is as fortunate, he continued, adding things are tough all over, even if you have an income.ŽFor the fellows that need it, the ladies also, its one of the best things going,Ž Olson, 61, said.The Stand Down, which provided veterans with free food and services, took place Thursday at First Baptist Church in downtown Panama City. Veterans paired up with an active duty service member to go through stations fill-ing backpacks with clothes, hygiene items and bags of food.Jairo Selvera, an airman out of Tyndall Air Force Base, walked with Olson as the veteran picked out items. Selvera said it felt great to help out.Im glad to be here serving our community,Ž Selvera said. Its important to do some stuff out of the base.ŽVeterans also received free haircuts and medical tests. CareerSource Gulf Coast partnered with numerous organizations, including the Panama City Rescue Mission and Bay County Vet Center, for the event.The VA in Florida estimates almost 2,800 homeless veterans live in the state, based on a 2017 study. Preliminary num-bers from this years point in time survey „ a homeless count conducted by Doorways of Northwest Florida „ indicate there are about 32 homeless veterans living in Bay County.We dont even pretend to think we can address all of those (in Florida) but by having events like today we give people hope, 11th Stand Down helps Bay County homeless veteransMeghan Rodriguez gives Tom, an Army veteran, a haircut. Homeless veterans received a free meal, haircuts, hygiene products and other essential items Thursday during the annual Veterans Stand Down at First Baptist Church. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Warrior Beach RetreatFlags wave from motorcycles going across the Hathaway Bridge during Thursdays motorcade for the Warrior Beach Retreat. A small crowd of supporters waved ” ags and lined the bridge during the motorcade. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] A veteran leans out of a truck to thank the ” ag wavers on the Hathaway Bridge. Becky Nicastro waves ” ags with her 6-year-old granddaughter, Ramona Carmichael. News Herald staff reportPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Starting Friday, gray trig-gerfish season is closed in state waters.At its September meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation commission voted to close the recreational gray triggerfish season early, saying harvest projections indicate the quota has been reached. The closure will remain in effect through Dec. 31. The state fishery will reopen March 1, 2019, FWC to close trigger sh season earlyJon Dodrill holds a gray trigger“ sh caught during a tagging trip off Panama City. [AMANDA NALLEY/FWC FILE] See HEIGHT, B2 See SEASON, B2 See VETERANS, B2

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** B2 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 85/70 86/72 85/68 86/73 86/74 86/70 88/71 92/73 92/70 83/68 91/72 88/71 92/72 89/74 89/75 90/74 93/74 88/7189/7289/7488/7388/72Some sun, a t-storm in spots; humid Partly sunny, a thunderstorm; humid Partly sunny, a thunderstorm; humid Mostly sunny, a thunderstorm; humid8875868271Winds: ESE 4-8 mph Winds: SE 4-8 mph Winds: ENE 7-14 mph Winds: ENE 7-14 mph Winds: SW 3-6 mphBlountstown 1.70 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 5.16 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.40 ft. 42 ft. Century 6.12 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 3.72 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 5:44a 12:06a 7:38p 12:42p Destin 12:20a 9:40a ----West Pass 5:17a 12:15p 7:11p --Panama City --8:55a ----Port St. Joe 9:57a 7:18a 4:34p 12:05p Okaloosa Island 11:22p 8:46a ----Milton 2:33a 12:01p ----East Bay 1:37a 11:31a ----Pensacola 12:53a 10:14a ----Fishing Bend 1:34a 11:05a ----The Narrows 2:30a 1:05p ----Carrabelle 4:19a 10:29a 6:13p 10:21pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018LastNewFirstFull Oct 2Oct 8Oct 16Oct 24Sunrise today ........... 6:34 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 6:32 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 9:08 p.m. Moonset today ......... 9:46 a.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 91/78/t 92/77/s Daytona Beach 90/75/t 90/75/pc Ft. Lauderdale 90/82/t 89/81/t Gainesville 94/71/t 94/72/pc Jacksonville 92/74/s 90/74/pc Jupiter 90/81/t 89/80/t Key Largo 88/81/pc 86/80/t Key West 90/81/s 89/81/t Lake City 92/72/pc 92/72/pc Lakeland 92/73/s 92/74/pc Melbourne 90/78/s 90/78/pc Miami 91/80/t 90/80/t Naples 92/77/t 92/76/t Ocala 93/71/t 93/71/pc Okeechobee 89/74/pc 89/74/pc Orlando 93/75/s 92/74/pc Palm Beach 90/82/t 90/81/t Tampa 93/78/t 94/77/s Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 106/73/s 104/71/s Berlin 61/40/c 58/40/pc Bermuda 81/75/pc 83/77/sh Hong Kong 88/77/pc 89/76/s Jerusalem 85/64/s 87/67/s Kabul 82/49/s 83/49/s London 64/41/pc 65/43/pc Madrid 86/59/pc 85/57/s Mexico City 72/55/t 72/56/t Montreal 67/51/pc 61/46/c Nassau 88/77/pc 87/77/pc Paris 70/44/pc 63/39/pc Rome 77/58/s 80/59/s Tokyo 76/64/s 71/67/r Toronto 70/48/s 60/46/pc Vancouver 67/51/s 65/52/c Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 86/55/s 85/60/s Anchorage 56/45/r 59/44/s Atlanta 81/67/c 85/70/c Baltimore 74/57/c 75/55/s Birmingham 81/65/c 85/67/c Boston 59/54/r 73/53/s Charlotte 84/66/sh 82/65/c Chicago 60/42/sh 61/51/pc Cincinnati 72/52/s 70/54/pc Cleveland 72/52/pc 64/50/pc Dallas 84/67/pc 84/70/t Denver 60/44/s 86/45/pc Detroit 70/46/pc 63/49/pc Honolulu 86/77/sh 87/77/sh Houston 84/70/t 82/69/t Indianapolis 72/50/pc 68/53/pc Kansas City 62/45/pc 61/56/pc Las Vegas 100/75/s 97/73/s Los Angeles 84/63/pc 79/61/pc Memphis 78/61/pc 80/60/pc Milwaukee 58/40/sh 56/48/pc Minneapolis 55/35/pc 52/41/pc Nashville 76/58/pc 78/59/pc New Orleans 85/73/t 86/75/t New York City 66/58/r 74/55/s Oklahoma City 81/59/pc 79/66/pc Philadelphia 72/59/pc 74/56/s Phoenix 105/80/s 103/80/s Pittsburgh 70/51/pc 66/48/pc St. Louis 76/51/pc 71/58/pc Salt Lake City 87/64/pc 88/66/pc San Antonio 86/72/c 84/72/t San Diego 76/66/pc 75/67/pc San Francisco 67/57/pc 70/58/c Seattle 77/54/pc 73/57/pc Topeka 63/45/pc 66/60/pc Tucson 100/71/s 97/72/s Wash., DC 76/61/c 77/59/sSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 86 Today: Wind from the west-southwest at 4-8 knots. Seas less than a foot. Visibility less than 2 miles in a morning shower or thunderstorm. Tomorrow: Wind from the northeast at 4-8 knots becoming southwest. Seas less than a foot. Visibility under 2 miles in a shower or thunderstorm.Partial sunshine today with a shower or thunderstorm around; humid. Winds westnorthwest 3-6 mph. Partly cloudy and humid tonight.High/low ......................... 89/75 Last year's high/low ....... 90/73 Normal high/low ............. 86/67 Record high ............. 94 (1980) Record low ............... 48 (1975)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... trace Month to date .................. 3.98" Normal month to date ...... 5.48" Year to date ................... 42.52" Normal year to date ....... 48.44" Average humidity .............. 78%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 89/76 Last year's high/low ....... 93/77 Normal high/low ............. 84/69 Record high ............. 95 (1984) Record low ............... 43 (2001)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.86" Month to date .................. 4.84" Normal month to date ...... 4.56" Year to date ................... 44.62" Normal year to date ....... 48.75" Average humidity .............. 76%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton Beachinformation, direction and somebody to talk to that can help them,Ž said Lee Ellzey, director of workforce services at CareerSource. Those of us that work with community-based orga-nizations and nonprofits, were not in this for the money. This whole idea of helping and providing services for others is huge for us.ŽThe American Legion Post 392 Auxiliary handed out food and clothes at its table on behalf of the whole post, which donated funds.Were here to help vet-erans get on their feet,Ž Auxiliary President Tina Redmiles said. We want to show them the community is behind them and appreciates their sacrifices. They sacrificed their whole life and now theyre still sacrificing, being on the streets. God bless them.Ž VETERANSFrom Page B1Each incentiveŽ approved buys the developer a certain amount of additional height. For example, building public restrooms at a nearby public beach access would allow the developer to increase the hotels height by 10 feet. Adding skyline features and architectural embellishments would allow the developer to increase the height by an additional 5 feet. The city has been taking steps to eliminate the incentives, even issuing a moratorium on incentive requests and the five voted on during Tuesdays meeting represent the last batch submitted before the city decides how to handle the issue.Cementing his opposition, Solis voted against all five incentive requests, saying they were not in the publics best interest and pointing to other hotels „ such as the Holi-day Inn Express, Hampton Inn and Marriott „ that built within the 150-foot maximum and still make money.The public that we serve is overwhelmingly against this,Ž Solis said about a proposal to add another tower to Beachcomber by the Sea. You dont get dozens of petitions and calls and letters when your citizenry agrees with this.ŽCouncilman Paul Casto argued that, while he is against height incentives, everything submitted was allowed by the citys current code but he hopes these are the lastŽ of the 22-story hotels built along Front Beach Road.I dont know if I could vote against it when youre following all the rules,Ž Casto said. I dont like it but thats my position.ŽThomas argued that the incentives also are difficult, if not impossible, for the city to enforce. If the public restrooms are closed and locked at the public beach access, or if the landscaping is pulled up, the public loses those incentives while the resort still has the extra height on its hotel.Several members of the public pleaded with the council to not to approve the incentives, citing traf-fic, congestion and safety concerns. Genese Hatcher, who operates Little Mermaid Properties, said she and another local resident were denied 4-foot height incentives on their rental properties while large resorts are being granted 70and 80-foot incentives.Its just not right,Ž Hatcher said.Council members approved an incentive request for By the Sea Resorts south of the inter-section of Front Beach Road and Shalimar Street to build two 185-foot hotels with several variances, including covered side-walks and skyline features. The council was split, with the final vote coming down to Thomas, who gave his yes vote on the caveat that the developers cut an exit road through a nearby marsh out to Back Beach Road.The council also approved another incentive request from By the Sea Resorts, allowing it to build a 185-foot hotel at 11815 and 11827 Front Beach Road, east of the Alf Coleman intersection.Two more requests were approved for 185-feet for Resort Hospitality Enterprise on a 20-acre site at 9500 and 9600 S. Thomas Drive, where the develop-ers plan to demolish the existing hotels and build a series of high-rise condos with green space between.But the council unani-mously denied an incentive request by Beachcomber by the Sea to increase the height on its planned second tower at 17001 and 17101 Front Beach Road east of State 79, saying the resort was surrounded by neighborhoods, rather than other high-rise hotels, and that those residents would be negatively affected.These other things arent showing in neighborhoods as much,Ž Thomas said. But the effect of that density in that neighborhood makes a difference to me.ŽThe next city council meeting will be on Oct. 11. HEIGHTFrom Page B1Veteran George Green tries on a new coat with help from volunteer Carol Ladouceur. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Army veteran Paul Stepp tries on a pair of reading glasses. following the annual January-February rec-reational harvest closure.The triggerfish season was expected to be open in state waters through the end of the year. In federal waters „ which is where federally permitted head-boats and charters fish „ the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis-tration closed the season early on Aug. 17, saying the quota had been caught.The triggerfish season also was closed early the past two years.Local fishermen have contended there are plenty of triggerfish, and the closure is unnecessary.If we have plenty of anything, its trigger-fish,Ž said Daniel Melzer.In addition to people feeling an abundance of triggerfish makes the closure misguided, others expressed concern that the abrupt closure would affect charter boat captains who hold state permits, potentially cost-ing them business.On a moments notice FWC just messed with hundreds of charter boats reservations with out-of-state anglers, but who cares, huh,Ž said angler Mike Hatch. SEASONFrom Page B1

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** TodayGREATEST HITS OF BILLY JOEL AND ELTON JOHN: 5:30-8:30 p.m. at The Barn at the Wicked Wheel, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach, to bene“ t the Panama City Pops Orchestra. Dinner theater show performance by Chaz Butler on keys and vocals with special guest vocalists James Austin and Kevin Jacobs. Tickets $100, includes smoked prime rib dinner with sides and drink; available at TheWickedWheel.com/Pops. Casual attire. 6th ANNUAL FORE HER GOLF OUTING: At the Santa Rosa Golf & Beach Club, 334 Golf Club Drive, Santa Rosa Beach. Cost $110 per golfer and includes breakfast, lunch, the green fee, and a cart. Proceeds will bene“ t local breast cancer patients. To register, www. foreher.org or email info@ thehivecreativeconsulting. com WALLY WHITE „ AFRICA: Exhibit runs through Sept. 29 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission. For details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com STEPHEN BENNETT SMITH „ LANDSCAPES: Exhibit runs through Oct. 6 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. F:/STOP NORTH FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION AND EXHIBIT: Exhibit runs through Sept. 29 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. VIVA CUBA „ PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. For details, TheLightRoomPC.com MADE IN GREECE VII ART EXHIBITION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. BLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: 6-10 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for kids, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Tickets $20 per day or $30 for weekend. Free for children 12 and younger. For details, 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org JAM SESSION „ STRING THEORY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook. com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. BACKSTAGE PASS „ ANTHONY PEEBLES: 6:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets $5. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. For details, BayArts.org BALLROOM DANCING: 6:308:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels; $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com THE SPITFIRE GRILL: 7:30 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets $35 for adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. For details and tickets, EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or 850-684-0323 THE WOLVES: 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. Presented by GCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division. For details, www. GulfCoast.Edu/ArtsSaturdayST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master crafts people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot at Capt. Andersons Restaurant in Panama City Beach. For details, www.waterfrontmarkets.org SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. For details, SeasideFL. com BLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: noon to 9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for children, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Tickets $20 per day or $30 for weekend. Free for children 12 and under. For details, 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org SundayGRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N, Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot at Capt. Andersons Restaurant in Panama City Beach. For details, www.waterfrontmarkets.org ANNUAL KENT REUNION: 12:30 p.m. at the Kent Cemetery Pavilion, 3 miles southwest of Alford. Bring a well-“ lled basket. THE SPITFIRE GRILL: 2 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets $35 for adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. For details and tickets, EmeraldCoastTheatre. org/tickets or 850-684-0323 THE WOLVES: 2:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus. Presented by GCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division. For details, www. GulfCoast.Edu/Arts The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIESMr. Glenn Earl Hinton, Jr., 75, of Southport, Florida, passed away Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. Mr. Hinton was born Aug. 9, 1943, in Williamsport, Indiana, to the late Glenn Earl, Sr., and Betty Jean Hinton. He served in the United States Army in Vietnam, where he received the Bronze Star. Mr. Hinton was a charter member and lifelong member of American Legion Post 375 in Southport, and he was a lifelong member of AMVETS and VFW. He managed Willow Wood Trailer Park in Southport for 20-plus years. Mr. Hinton was preceded in death by his wife, Carolyn Sue Hinton. He is survived by his son, Glenn Earl Hinton III and wife Sharon of Callaway, Florida; daughter, Margo Thaxton of Kankakee, Illinois; and five grandchildren, Savannah Sallaway, Hunter and Logan Hinton, and Julia and Melanie Thaxton. Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, at Christian Church of Panama City with Pastor Phil Carter officiating. Military honors will be accorded. The family will receive friends at the church one hour prior to the services. The family would like to give a special thanks to Covenant Hospice and Kindred Home Care. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to a memorial account that has been set up for Savannah Sallaways College Fund at any Tyndall Federal Credit Union location. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com.Southerland Family Funeral Home 100 E. 19th St. Panama City FL 32405 850-785-8532GLENN EARL HINTON, JR.1943 … 2018 LOCAL & STATE WHATS HAPPENINGSubmit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh.com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday beforeDennis D. Julson, 67, of Wewahitchka, Florida, passed away Sept. 22, 2018, at Bay Medical Center surrounded by family. Dennis was born Feb. 13, 1951, in Minot, North Dakota, where he attended school through junior high. The family then moved to Key West, Florida, in 1965, and he graduated high school there in 1969. He married Vickie June Pugh shortly thereafter. The couple moved to Wewahitchka, where he worked for the REA Co-Op for many years. Dennis is survived by his parents, Vernon and Yvonne Julson; mother-in-law, Rose M. Pugh; wife, Vickie J. Julson; daughters, Jennifer Dean, Amber Crutchfield; son-in-law, Frederick L. Crutchfield; grandchildren, Landon Crutchfield, Scout and Winona Ballard, Derek Ballard (USAF), Calvin Dean III, fathers, Calvin Dean II and Dustin Ballard; great-grandson, Colton Ballard. He was preceded in death by his maternal and paternal grandparents; father-in-law, Thomas Pugh; brother and sister, Allen W. Julson, Lavonne R. Brodie. Surviving niece and nephews, Wayne A. Julson, Kathy Jones, Sheldon A. Brodie and family. Many brothers and sisters-in-law, James Brodie, Sherrie Julson, Tommy Pugh and family, Tina and Jack Jensen and family. Aunt and uncles preceded in death of Dennis, Cleone Rollman, Duane Woodall, Tilford and Margie Julson, Myrtle and Harold Brabandt. Aunts and uncles survived by Dennis, Marion and Roger Dalen and family, Janice and Larry Boutilier and family, Donnie Rollman and family and Marie Woodall. The best husband, father and son. So now your dreams can be fulfilled. We will ride with you again.Comforter Funeral Home Wewahitchka Branch Chapel 560 S. State 71 Wewahitchka, Fla. 32465 850-227-1818DENNIS D. JULSON Visitation for Angela Denise Moreland-Butler, 49, of Panama City, Florida, who died Sept. 19, 2018, will be from 1-8 p.m. today, Sept. 28, 2018, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, at Zion Hope Baptist Church. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery.ANGELA DENISE MORELAND-BUTLERFuneral services for Mrs. Nancy E. Clay, 62, will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, at All Faiths Chapel at Russell Allen Wright Sr. Mortuary. Interment will follow in Hillside Cemetery.NANCY E. CLAYVisitation for Mr. Calvin C. Harris, 56, will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, at St. Paul A.M.E. Church in Apalachicola, Florida. Funeral services will begin at 1 p.m. Interment will follow in Magnolia Cemetery. Russell Allen Wright Sr. Mortuary is handling arrangements.CALVIN C. HARRISFuneral services for Stephen SteveŽ Doug-las Rehberg, 51, of Lynn Haven, Florida, who died Sept. 23, 2018, will begin at 10 a.m. today, Sept. 28, 2018, at Wilson Funeral Home. Inter-ment will follow in Lynn Haven Cemetery.STEPHEN STEVE DOUGLAS REHBERGVisitation for Edward JoeŽ Schell of Port St. Joe, Florida, who died Sept. 23, 2018, will begin at 1 p.m. today, Sept. 28, 2018, at Port St. Joe Methodist Church, with a memorial service following at 2 p.m.EDWARD JOE SCHELLPrivate services for Graham Hendon Segrest, 84, of Panama City Beach, Florida, who died Sept. 26, 2018, will be held at a later date.GRAHAM HENDON SEGRESTA celebration of life for Lonnie Richard Williams, 73, of Port St. Joe, Florida, who died Sept. 22, 2018, will begin at 11 a.m. EDT Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, at Holly Hills Cemetery in Port St Joe. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.LONNIE RICHARD WILLIAMS By Tony Judnich315-4438 | @Tonyjnwfdn tjudnich@nwfdailynews.comOKALOOSA ISLAND „ Okaloosa County officials are looking to unload a Yamaha baby grand piano that waits in a corner of the Emerald Coast Convention Center for someone to tickle the ivories once more.The county is auc-tioning it because its not frequently rented by cli-ents,Ž county spokesman Christopher Saul said of the piano, which has a self-playing capacity.He said the county purchased the piano for $24,990 in 2003 in con-junction with the opening of the center.Since then, the instru-ment occasionally has come to life for events such as receptions, ban-quets and performances.Musicians who have played the piano at the center during performances with Sinfonia Gulf Coast include Roberta Flack, Chris Brubeck, Thomas Lau-derdale from Pink Martini and several classical artists.But such performances, as well as other events featuring the piano, have been few and far between.In addition, county Tourist Development Department Director Jen-nifer Adams recently said the piano must be tuned every time its used, but the county doesnt have anyone to perform that task.Saul said the piano became a fully depreciated asset in 2010. The County Commission recently approved auc-tioning it pursuant to the countys capital asset disposition process.The piano will be auctioned to the highest bidder via the View Online AuctionŽ link at www.co.okaloosa.fl.us/ purchasing.home.A credit card is required for bidding approval, and a buyers premiumŽ of 15 percent will be charged on the total bid.Grand piano will go to the highest bidderThe grand piano stands in a hallway at the Emerald Coast Convention Center. [CHRISTOPHER SAUL/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** B4 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald The News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Florida Attorney Gen-eral Pam Bondi and four high-ranking senators „ including President Joe Negron „ are among the witnesses being asked to testify in a discrimination case filed by legislative aide Rachel Perrin Rogers, who accuses the Senate of retaliation after she filed a sexual harass-ment complaint last year against former Sen. Jack Latvala.Latvala, a Clearwater Republican who held the powerful post of Senate budget chief and was a candidate for governor when Perrin Rogers alle-gations against him first came out, resigned from the Senate shortly before the legislative session began in January. He has steadfastly denied any wrongdoing. Latvala is among the witnesses Tiffany Cruz, a lawyer who represents Perrin Rogers, is asking to appear at a Jan. 14 federal administrativecourt hearing in Tampa, according to court documents first reported Wednesday by Politico Florida.The list of witnesses gives just a glimpse into the allegations made by Perrin Rogers, who filed the discrimination com-plaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in January.One of the witnesses is Jean Seawright, who was hired by the Senate to conduct an investigation into Perrin Rogers after the aide filed the complaint against Latvala, according to court docu-ments. Senate Special Master Ronald Swanson, who investigated Perrin Rogers allegations against Latvala, is also on the witness list.Negron, a Stuart Republican who is leaving office after the November elections, has knowledge that complainant suffered retaliation for making a report of sexual harassment,Ž Cruz wrote in a four-page list of witnesses submitted Tuesday to U.S. Administrative Law Judge Alexander Fernndez.The Senate president denied anyone punished Perrin Rogers, a highranking aide who works for Senate Majority Leader Wilton Simpson, after she complained about Latvala.The complaint of sexual harassment in this case was immediately and fully investigated. At all times the Senate has acted appropriately and there has been no retaliation,Ž Negron said in a text message Wednesday.But Cruz told The News Service of Florida on Wednesday that there has been con-stant retaliationŽ against Perrin Rogers since she first complained about Latvala last fall. And the retaliation got worse after Swansons report was completed and the Senate aide filed her discrimina-tion complaint, Cruz said.High-pro le witnesses called in Senate discrimination case Latvala Hurlburt Field is among the bases that pose a threat to service womenBy Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson@nwfdailynews.comHURLBURT FIELD„ A recently released study placed Hurlburt Field in a somewhat dubious top 10.According to the RAND Corp.s National Defense Research Institute study, Hurlburt Field ranked ninth among Air Force installations where Air Force women faced the greatest risk of sexual assault or sexual harassment. That risk, though, was pegged at less than 1 percent.By comparison, the highest-ranked base on the list, Oklahomas Vance Air Force Base, presented a risk of about 1 percent for women to be sexually assaulted.According to the study, Eglin Air Force Base is at the other end of the spectrum. Home to the 33rd Fighter Wing and 96th Test Wing, Eglin was fourth among the 10 Air Force bases posing the lowest risk for sexual assault.Hurlburt Fields Air Force Special Operations Command public affairs office had no immediate comment on the study, although a spokeswoman indicated the installation could have responses to questions later this week. In the meantime, AFSOC referred questions to the Secretary of the Air Force and Department of Defense.In an email, Eglins public affairs office said the base employs a robust Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, providing response, victim advocacy, case management, and sexual assault awareness, prevention and response training to the base population.ŽThat includes mandatory annual bystander-basedŽ train-ing that teaches how small proactive actions of intervention by bystanders will influence the behavior of others ... ,Ž according to the email.Eglin also provides Sexual Assault and Response Program briefings to new commanders and incoming personnel, and sexual assault response coordinators and victim advocates regularly promote awareness among squadrons, according to the email.Additionally, according to Team Eglin Public Affairs, the program team is always on call for victims of sexual assault at 850-240-3219 and 850882-7272. Services are offered to military mem-bers and dependents over 18 and to DoD civilians employed on base.Offering a broader perspective, Air Force spokeswoman Erika Yepsen said that while the RAND study pro-vides interesting data,Ž it doesnt identify specific causes of risk.Study details Air Force harassment risk

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 B5 The News Service of FloridaHAVANA „ A restriction on fishing for red drum and snook was extended to next spring and will stretch north to Pasco County, as the state continues trying to limit impacts from a red-tide outbreak along the Gulf Coast.The Florida Fish and Wild-life Conservation Commission agreed Wednesday to extend until May 10 an executive order that imposed a mandatory catch-and-release rule on red drum and snook. The order has been in place for a month from Anna Maria Island to Naples.The commission also announced a new executive order immediately ending the scallop season in Northwest Floridas Gulf County, where red tide has recently appeared, and said it plans to pursue innovative testingŽ to reduce often-annual outbreaks of red tide.I know were in a reactive mode right now, but were planning to transition into a proactive mode with these issues,Ž said Commissioner Joshua Kellam of Palm Beach Gardens.Were putting our best foot forward to learn what we can from it and be better pre-pared next time,Ž Chairman Bo Rivard of Panama City added during the commission meeting, held in the Gadsden County community of Havana.The catch-and-release order, which was set to expire Oct. 12, now will be reviewed by the commission in May and covers waters from Naples north to the Pasco-Hernando County line.Charter boat operators from the Tampa Bay region expressed support for extend-ing the catch-and-release rules as a way to help replenish the redfish stock in the waters.Commission Executive Director Eric Sutton said during a break in the meeting that the commissions action was taken with an abundance of caution.ŽI certainly hope that the message is that catch and release means you can still catch them, and you can,Ž Sutton said. If you go out on those waters, you will see that its patchy. There are places to still catch fish. We just want to make sure we are returning them back to the water to help with the recovery.ŽGov. Rick Scott, during a brief phone call to the commission, outlined recent efforts to tackle the outbreak, and he repeated his call for the commission to create a Florida Center for Red Tide Research, reestablish the Florida Harmful Algal Bloom Task Force and request additional funding next year from the Legislature for red tide research.Fishing restrictions ex tended amid red tide woesSeagulls pick at dozens of dead “ sh that washed ashore at St. Andrews State Park recently. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** B6 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald TALLAHASSEEScott: Throw out lawsuit over new justices Gov. Rick Scott is asking the states highest court to throw out a lawsuit challenging his authority to appoint three new justices to the states Supreme Court.Age limits are forcing three justices to retire on the day Scott is scheduled to leave the governors office. This month Scott asked a nominating commission to start accepting applications. He also said he would try to reach an agreement on the picks with the next governor.The League of Women Voters and Common Cause maintain the picks should be made by Scotts successor.Scotts attorneys Wednesday filed a legal brief that argues the Repub-lican governor should be allowed to move ahead on finding replacement candi-dates. The brief points out new justices routinely have been selected before a spot on the court is vacant.DAYTONA BEACHWoman faces life in prison in sons death A mother has pleaded no contest to second-degree murder charges in the death of her 4-year-old son.Prosecutors said 27-year-old Mikkia Shardae Lewis beat and punished KeAndre Coleman and his body already was going into rigor mortis when paramedics arrived after her boyfriend called 911 in 2013. Lewis told dis-patchers her son wasnt breathing.In May, 37-year-old Joe McCaskell was found guilty of third-degree felony murder and aggravated child abuse. He was sentenced to 30 years in prison.GateHouse Media reported that during McCaskells trial, prose-cutors said belts and shoes were used to beat the boy.A police report says Lewis told investigators she guessed she whooped him too much.ŽShe faces a minimum of 40 years in prison. A judge hasnt set the sentencing hearing.ORLANDODeputies shoot man who pulled gun during traf“ c stopSheriffs deputies shot a man who they say got out of his pickup truck during a traffic stop and pointed a gun at them.Orange County Sheriffs Office spokeswoman Ingrid Tejada-Monforte said the incident happened Wednesday night near Orlando.Tejada-Monforte said the deputies were in an unmarked vehicle when they stopped the truck. They fired when the man, who is white, pointed the gun at them. The man was taken to a hospital where he underwent surgery. His condition was not avail-able. A woman who was in the truck was not injured. The case is under review by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the three deputies are on administrative leave pend-ing the FDLE findings.DAYTONA BEACHIrate man gets 20 years for threatening to kill judgeA man has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for threatening to kill a judge he believed ruled against him in his custody case.GateHouse Media reported 36-year-old Alan McCarty Jr. spent much of the hearing in an adjacent room with a speaker and one-way glass, just like he did during his trial, after unleashing a fresh stream of obscenities Wednesday at the judge, the prosecu-tor and even his own public defender.McCarty was convicted last month of threatening to kill Circuit Judge Stasia Warren last year when he mistakenly blamed her for taking his kids away in a custody case.A prosecutors statement says the 20-year sentence will give McCarty ample time to reflect on the seriousness of his threats against the judicial system.BROOKSVILLEMan accused of shooting family faces life sentenceA man likely will spend the rest of his life in prison for fatally shooting three family members and wounding another.A Hernando County jury declined Wednesday to give 46-year-old George Mason III the death penalty. He was convicted in June of three counts of first-degree murder and one of attempted firstdegree murder. A judge will make the life sentence official at a Nov. 11 hearing.Authorities said Mason went to a Brooksville home in August 2014 and killed his girlfriend, 37-year-old Tarasha Yata Townsend, his grandmother, 81-year-old Jannie Taylor, and his half-brother, Ralph Peyton.Investigators said Mason chased another half-brother, Gabriel Taylor, and shot him multiple times. A passing truck then hit Mason, who was hospitalized with broken bones before he was charged.Investigators never determined a motive for the shooting.FORT MYERSReport: Girl brought stun gun to school for safetyA teen is accused of bringing a lighter and pink stun gun to her high school.Citing an arrest report, The News-Press reported the 16-year-old told authorities she brought the items for protection. It says the teen told Dunbar High School administrators that she had been afraid while walking to school because it was dark outside.She was arrested Tuesday morning and charged with possession of a weapon on school property. Principal Carl Burnside said in a message to parents Wednesday that administrators suspected the teen had contraband, searched her backpack and uncovered the items.A student at the school was wounded last month when he was stabbed by another student while in gym class.TALLAHASSEEState gets share of Uber data breach settlementFlorida is getting $8.2 million of a $148 million, multi-state settlement with ride-sharing company Uber Technologies over a massive 2016 data breach.Attorney General Pam Bondi announced the states share of settlement with Florida and 49 other states and the District of Columbia, triggered by the app-based companys year-long delay in notify-ing 600,000 Uber drivers that hackers had gained access to their personal data, including drivers license numbers.Uber later tracked down the hackers and obtained assurancesŽ that they had deleted and never distributed the information.But a year-long delay in reporting the data breach violated the 2014 Florida Information Protection Act, among other things.Hopefully, this settlement will send the clear message that faster reporting is essential,Ž Bondi said.According to Bondis office, Uber learned hack-ers gained access to the data in November 2016, but didnt report the breach until November 2017.As part of the settlement, Uber is required for the next two years to report to Florida all datasecurity incidents on a quarterly basis.JUPITERMissing kangaroo tracked down in neighborhoodA fugitive kangaroo named Storm was found safe and sound Thursday after several days of searching in South Florida neighborhoods.The kangaroos owner, Eric Westergard, told the Palm Beach Post that wildlife officers found the 4-foot kangaroo early in the day.Storm hopped away Monday night from Westergards home in Jupiter Farms, where he also keeps six other kangaroos and other exotic animals.Officers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-vation Commission used drones and a K-9 from the Tequesta Police Department to help track down the kangaroo. From wire reportsSTATE BRIEFSA kangaroo crosses the street Tuesday in Jupiter after escaping from an animal sanctuary in South Florida. Of“ cers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission found the 5-year-old kangaroo named Storm on Thursday. [AP]

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 B7 The News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Melbourne Greyhound Park has put $145,000 into a political committee fighting a proposed con-stitutional amendment that could make it harder to expand gambling in Florida.The Brevard County greyhound track contrib-uted $50,000 last week to a committee known as Dont Lose Your Control, Inc., bringing to $145,000 the tracks contribu-tions since early August, according to a report posted on the state Divi-sion of Elections website.The committee has not received other contributions.Dont Lose Your Control is at least the third PAC formed to fight what will appear on the November ballot as Amendment 3. The other committees, Citizens for the Truth About Amendment 3 and Vote NO on 3, had combined to raise more than $4.1 million as of Sept. 14, reports show.Amendment 3, which is backed by Disney Worldwide Services, Inc. and the Seminole Tribe of Florida, would change the Florida Constitution and give voters the "exclusive right to decide whether to authorize casino gambling" in the state.If approved, it would require voter approval of casino-style games in the future and effectively reduce the power of the Legislature and governor to decide gam-bling-related issues.It would need support from 60 percent of voters in the November election to pass.Greyhound track ghts gambling amendment

PAGE 16

** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV SEPTEMBER 28 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Actors Jeff Bridges and Cynthia Erivo. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Cops Cheaters The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Maury Maury DermaWandSkin Care WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View Actor Ricky Gervais. WMBB Midday News (N) GMA Day (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The Good BoyŽ Diagnosis Murder In the Heat of the Night GunsmokeGunsmoke WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Actor Cedric the Entertainer. (N) Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) DailyMailTV Face the TruthFace the TruthThe Wendy Williams Show (N) Divorce CourtDivorce CourtPaternity CourtPaternity CourtCouples CourtCouples Court WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVCitylineJudge Mathis (N) The Peoples Court (N) The Peoples Court Pickler & Ben (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplash A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -03.18.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: Patrol AMC 30 62 131 254 Paid ProgramWonder CookThree Stooges (:25) M*A*S*H (8:55) ‰‰ The Lone Ranger (13) Johnny Depp. An Indian warrior and a lawman unite to fight corruption. Tombstone ANPL 46 69 184 282 Too Cute! Animal Cops Houston TumorŽ Animal Cops Houston FloodŽ My Cat From Hell The Vet Life The Vet MobileŽ Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet BET 53 46 124 329 House/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneTyler Perrys House of PayneHouse/PayneMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, B rownsFresh Prince COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Futurama Futurama Futurama (:05) Futurama (:40) Futurama (:10) Futurama70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Man v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. FoodMan v. FoodAlaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News: Daily Pop (N) ‰‰‰ Oceans Twelve (04) ESPN 9 23 140 206 Get Up (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) NFL Live (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Get UpFirst Take Outside LinesFootball Live FOOD 38 45 110 231 PiYo Workout!Paid ProgramCindys SkinPioneer Wo.Giada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada Enter.Pi oneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny 700/InteractiveThe 700 Club (N) Reba Reba ‰‰‚ The Princess Diaries (01) Julie Andrews. FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstSkip and Shannon: Undisputed (N) (L) The Herd with Colin Cowherd (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) A Good Day to Die Hard ‰‚ The Watch (12) Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill. How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetMike & MollyThe 5th Wave HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family Lacey Chabert; Brennan Elliott. (N) Love at First Dance (18) Niall Matter, Becca Tobin. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Beach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainFixer UpperRestoredRest ored HIST 35 42 120 269 Custer: The Final Mystery (N) Custer: The Final Mystery (N) Custer: The Final Mystery (N) Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Alien TechŽ Ancient Aliens The ReturnŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesThe First 48The First 48 Killing SpreeŽ The First 48 PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Owner OustedŽ Bar Rescue Boss Lady BluesŽ Bar Rescue A western bar. Bar Rescue Two/Half MenTwo/Half Men SUN 49 422 656 Sport FishingScubaNationFlorida SportShip Shape TVFishing FlatsAddict. FishingSportsmanFlorida Insider Fishing Report Sport FishingSports SYFY 70 52 122 244 Z Nation Election DayŽ Z Nation Heart of DarknessŽ Z NationZ Nation Docs AngelsŽ Z NationZ Nation DuelŽ TBS 31 15 139 247 KingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 Gambling (:45) ‰‰‰ Cast a Dark Shadow (55)(:15) ‰‰‰‚ The Naked City (48) Barry Fitzgerald. ‰‰‚ The Last of Sheila (73) James Coburn, Dyan Cannon. TLC 37 40 183 280 (6:00) Outdaughtered Unexpected Unexpected Extreme CouExtreme CouExtreme CouExtreme CouSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Hell Hath No FuryŽ Charmed Paige has a mishap. Supernatural Supernatural Taxi DriverŽ Supernatural Pac-Man FeverŽ Bones USA 62 55 105 242 Chicago P.D. Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarRepair Secret!Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote ‰‰ By Duty Bound (95) Carroll OConnor, Carl Weathers. FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV SEPTEMBER 28 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Andy GriffithAndy Griffith2018 Ryder Cup Day 2. From Albatros Course of Le Golf National in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France. (N) (L) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) SpringsteenH2O SteamMake HealthierLarry KinMake HealthierPaid ProgramCredit?Pain SolvedDermaWandPaid ProgramNew Larry K. WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenMake HealthierPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramOpen HouseTai ChengTri-StatesGood Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Mannix Harlequins GoldŽ Cannon The Salinas JackpotŽ 77 Sunset StripPetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. HillbilliesGreen AcresGreen Acres WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Mo rning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesForensic FilesPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPai d ProgramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 How I MetTwo/Half MenSteve (N) Me/FrangelaPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPiYo Workout!WonderPaid ProgramPiYo Workout! WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 The Hispanic Heritage AwardsPOV Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. EmeryThe This Old House HourMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob BuilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindBarry WhiteRehab?SexCookSmartSmartWashNever FearFlipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 Talking Dead (:35) Lodge 49 (:39) Fear the Walking DeadThree StoogesThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse MastersTreehouse: Out on a LimbTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and Parolees BET 53 46 124 329 (12:46) Martin (:21) Martin (1:57) Martin (:29) MartinJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithFresh PrinceFresh Prince COM 64 53 107 249 ChappellesChappellesChappellesChappellesChappelles (:40) CorporateSex ToysIT CosmeticsPiYo Workout!Paid ProgramScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:01) BattleBotsEdge of AlaskaEdge of AlaskaOutdoorsGiven RightTreasure Quest: Snake IslandTreasure Quest: Snake Island E! 63 57 114 236 (12:30) ‰‰‰ Oceans Thirteen (07) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. Total BellasTotal Bellas Save the DateŽ Total BellasTotal Bellas ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterMLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. SportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NFL LiveTrueSouthMarty & McGee (N) SportsCenterFormula 1 RacingFormula 1 Racing Singapore Airlines Singapore Grand Prix. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QuePaid ProgramGrillPaid ProgramCindys SkinGuys Big Bi teBrunch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Thinning Hair?OmegaThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramOmegaCarol Alt at 57Makeup!PiYo Craze!Paid Program ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) FS1 24 27 150 219 NFL PresentsTMZ SportsCollege Football UCLA at Colorado. Drag RacingBundesliga Soccer FX 45 51 136 248 (12:35) ‰‰‰‚ Flight (12) Denzel Washington, Don Cheadle, Kelly Reilly. FXM PresentsSpringsteenPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramHow I MetThe 5th Wave HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyDestination Wedding (17) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeEasy CookTry Yoga!Hair LoveCindys SkinPiYo Craze!PiYo Workout!Texas Flip N Move HIST 35 42 120 269 (11:03) Ancient Aliens: DeclassifiedCoinCoinCoinCoinCoinPain SolvedMountain Men LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) The Closer Time BombŽ(:04) The Closer Good FaithŽ DermaflashCredit?Get EnergyDr. HoSmartWashGrillEvenSkinPaid Program PARMT 28 48 241 241 (12:30) ‰‰‰ The Rundown (03) The Rock, Rosario Dawson. Credit?Sex ToysPiYo Workout!Makeup!CookSmartPiYo Craze!Relieve painCredit? SUN 49 422 656 After Midnight PostgameAirfryer OvenProstateHydroShotOrganicTummy TuckInside Seminole Football (N) Florida: Dan Epic Trails SYFY 70 52 122 244 FuturamaFuturamaSnakehead Swamp (14) Ayla Kell, Antonio Fargas, Terri Garber. Wynonna EarpAir Fryer OvenAir Fryer OvenPaid ProgramWonder Cook TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰‰ Frankenweenie (12) Voices of Catherine OHara. ‰‰‚ Jumanji (95) Robin Williams, Bonnie Hunt. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-Raymond TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‚ Alone in the Dark (82) Jack Palance.(:45) ‰‰ Eye of the Devil (67) Deborah Kerr, David Niven. MGM Parade ‰‰‰ Malaya (50) Spencer Tracy, James Stewart. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes to the DressTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading Spaces TNT 29 54 138 245 Castle An actor is murdered. Castle Bad SantaŽ Castle Castle, P.I.Ž Castle Private Eye Caramba!Ž NCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New Orleans CarrierŽ USA 62 55 105 242 NCIS: Los AngelesDateline Dark ValleyŽ Dateline HauntingŽ Dateline HauntingŽ NCIS: Los Angeles ExposureŽ Make HealthierPaid Program WGN-A 13 239 307 How I MetHow I MetPerson of InterestElementaryBeyond TodayPhilips KitchenYoga Retreat!Dr ColbertCredit?Omega FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV SEPTEMBER 28 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) The Doctors (N) The Real (N) Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramJerry Springer Jerry Springer blackish blackish American DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show (N) Dr. Phil (N) NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BonanzaThe RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainCharlies AngelsMamas FamilyThe JeffersonsM*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 ProvidenceProvidenceDateline Deadly ConspiracyŽ Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolChicago P.D. Thirty BalloonsŽ Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury (N) Me/FrangelaThisMinuteSteve (N) Judge Mathis Judge Judy (N) Judge Judy Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD Live PD -09.22.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:25) ‰‰‰ Tombstone (93) Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Michael Biehn.(:25) ‰‰ On Deadly Ground (94) Steven Seagal, Michael Caine, Joan Chen.(5:55) ‰‰ Hard to Kill (90) ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse: Out on a Limb BET 53 46 124 329 Fresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh Princeblackish blackish ‰‰‚ Beauty Shop (05) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silverstone. COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office (:15) The Office (Part 2 of 2) The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Treasure Quest: Snake IslandTreasure Quest: Snake IslandTreasure Quest: Snake IslandBattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 (12:00) ‰‰‰ Oceans Twelve (04) George Clooney, Brad Pitt. ‰‰‰ Walk the Line (05) Joaquin Phoenix, Reese Witherspoon, Ginnifer Goodwin. E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs. From Wrigley Field in Chicago. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) MLB Baseball ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Jalen & Jacoby (N) NFL LiveIntentional Talk (N) (L) Football LiveQuestionableAround/HornInterruptionCollege Football Countdown FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 Princess Drs (:40) ‰‰ The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (04) Anne Hathaway, Julie Andrews. (:20) ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) Lindsay Lohan, Dennis Quaid. FS1 24 27 150 219 Match DayBundesliga Soccer Hertha BSC Berlin vs FC Bayern Munich. (N) Lock It In (N) (L) Turning PointNFL PresentsAll the Way All the Way All the Way FX 45 51 136 248 (12:30) ‰‰ The 5th Wave (16) Chlo Grace Moretz. ‰‰‚ Fast & Furious 6 (13) Vin Diesel. Hobbs offers Dom and crew a full pardon for their help. ‰‰‰ Furious 7 (15) HALL 23 59 185 312 Autumn Dreams (15) Jill Wagner, Colin Egglesfield. Winters Dream (18) Dean Cain, Kristy Swanson. Love in Design (18) Danica McKellar, Andrew W. Walker. HGTV 32 38 112 229 RestoredRestoredRestoredRestoredDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream Home Dream HomeDream Home HIST 35 42 120 269 (12:00) Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Area 52Ž Ancient Aliens The ReturnedŽ Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 The First 48Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy PARMT 28 48 241 241 Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenMom (:36) Mom (:12) Mom (4:48) Mom (:24) Mom ‰‚ The Waterboy (98) SUN 49 422 656 MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays. ACC AccessFlorida Insider Fishing Report Inside RaysRays PregameMLB Baseball SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‚ The Legend of Hercules (14) Kellan Lutz, Scott Adkins.(:07) ‰‰ Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters (13) Logan Lerman. ‰‰‰ Twister (96) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy Bobs BurgersBobs Burgers TCM 25 70 132 256 (:15) ‰‰‚ Undercurrent (46) Katharine Hepburn.(:15) ‰‰‰ Purple Noon (60) Alain Delon, Marie Lafort.(:15) ‰‰‰‚ Suspicion (41) Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings Four Weddings Say YesSay YesSay Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Bones Bones NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans OutlawsŽ NCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Pain KillersŽ Blue Bloods ‰‰‰ Remember the Titans FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV SEPTEMBER 28 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Manifest PilotŽ New Amsterdam PilotŽ Dateline NBCNewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Masters ofMasters ofPenn & Teller: Fool UsPage Six TVThe GoldbergsThe GoldbergsSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKing WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Truth & Lies: Jonestown, Paradise Lost (N) 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockHitch cock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 MacGyver ImproviseŽ Hawaii Five-0Blue BloodsFamily FeudLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenDailyMailTV MNT (18.2) 227 13 CSI: Miami Out of TimeŽ CSI: Miami Hostile TakeoverŽ 2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsModern FamilyModern FamilyThe GameThe GameLive PD: PatrolLive PD: Patrol WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Last-StandingThe Cool KidsHells KitchenTwo/Half MenThisMinuteTMZ Live (N) Pawn StarsPawn StarsImp. JokersTMZ (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashFiring-HooverArt in the Twenty-First CenturyThe Hispanic Heritage AwardsAmanpour and Company (N) PBS NewsHour (N) Art in the Twenty-First Century A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -09.28.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) (L) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (5:55) ‰‰ Hard to Kill (90) ‰‰‚ Armageddon (98) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton, Liv Tyler. A hero tries to save Earth from an asteroid. Fear the Walking DeadTalking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters (N) Treehouse Masters (N) Treehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTreehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 Beauty Shop2018 BET Awards Celebrating achievements. (:05) Martin (:38) Martin (12:10) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 The OfficeThe OfficeKevin Hart: Seriously FunnyKevin Hart: Laugh at My PainComedy-StandComedy-StandChappellesChappellesChappe llesChappelles DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots The TournamentŽ(:01) Treasure Quest: Snake Island The team uses explosives.(:01) Treasure Quest: Snake Island The team uses explosives.(12:01) BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 ‰‰‰ Oceans Eleven (01) George Clooney, Matt Damon, Andy Garcia. ‰‰‰ Oceans Twelve (04) George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. Ocean Thirt. ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Boston Red Sox. (N) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Football Memphis at Tulane. (N) (L) Womens College Volleyball USC at Stanford. (N) (L) NFL MatchupNFL Live FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 ‰‰‰‚ Frozen (13) Voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff. The 700 Club ‰‰‚ Nanny McPhee (05) Emma Thompson, Colin Firth. FS1 24 27 150 219 All the Way College FtballCollege Football UCLA at Colorado. (N) (L) FootballInside SlantTurning Point FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‰‰ Furious 7 (15) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. Mayans M.C. Murcilago/ZotzŽ(:25) Mr InbetweenAmerican Horror Story (:35) Flight HALL 23 59 185 312 A Harvest Wedding (17) Jill Wagner, Victor Webster. Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHu nters Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens: Declassified Pyramids, Monoliths, and Unexplained StructuresŽ An in-depth look at Antarctica. (N)(:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified An in-depth look at Antarctica. LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Closer Split EndsŽ The Closer Tijuana BrassŽ(:03) The Closer Time BombŽ(:03) The Closer Good FaithŽ(:01) The Closer Split EndsŽ(12:01) The Closer PARMT 28 48 241 241 (6:00) ‰‚ The Waterboy (98) ‰‰‰ Forgetting Sarah Marshall (08) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis. ‰‚ The Waterboy (98) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. The Rundown SUN 49 422 656 (6:00) MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays. (N) PostgameBaseball BeginACC AccessFootball WeekAfter Midnight With the Rays Sept. 28, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (5:30) ‰‰‰ Twister (96) Wynonna Earp (N) Wynonna Earp War PaintŽ The Purge Release the BeastŽ Futurama (:32) FuturamaFuturama (:31) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰‰ Captain America: Civil War (16) Chris Evans. Captain America clashes with Iron Man. ELEAGUE ‰‰‚ Sky High (05) Michael Angarano, Kurt Russell. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ Bright Victory (51) Arthur Kennedy, Peggy Dow. ‰‰‚ The Naked Dawn (55) Arthur Kennedy.(:45) ‰‰‰ Trial (55) Glenn Ford, Dorothy McGuire, Arthur Kennedy. TLC 37 40 183 280 90 Day Fianc: Before the 90 Days Michael pleads with Angela. Unexpected (N) 90 Day Fianc: Before the 90 Days Michael pleads with Angela. Unexpected TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‚ Olympus Has Fallen (13) Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart. ‰‰ London Has Fallen (16) Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart. Arrow BratvaŽ Arrow City Hall is attacked. USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyNCIS: Los Angeles IdentityŽ WGN-A 13 239 307 (6:00) ‰‰‰ Remember the Titans (00) ‰‰‰ Blades of Glory (07) Will Ferrell, Jon Heder, Will Arnett. Carter VoiceoverŽ MarriedMarriedMarried B8 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 C C 1 1 21560 Foreclosure HOA 80080-LE20-HOA. Notice of Default and Intent to Foreclose regarding timeshare interest(s) owned by the Obligor(s) on Schedule “1” at Legends Edge Condominium located in Bay County, Florida, as described pursuant the Declaration referred to below of said county, as amended. Legends Edge Condominium Association, Inc., a Florida not-for-profit corporation did cause a Claim of Lien to be recorded in public records of said county. Obligor is liable for payment in full of amounts as shown in the lien plus costs; and is presently in default of obligation to pay. Trustee is conducting a non-judicial foreclosure pursuant to Florida Statute 721.855. The Obligor must pay all sums no later than 30 days from the first date of publication by contacting Trustee or the Trustee will proceed with the sale of the timeshare interest at such date, time and location as Trustee will include in the Notice of Sale. The Trustee is: : First AmeRICA, n Title Insurance Company, 400 Rampart Blvd, Suite 290, Las Vegas, NV, 89145, (702) 304-7509. Each obligor, notice address, and timeshare interest description are as listed on Schedule “1”. Legal Description: Unit Week (See Schedule “1” Legal Description Variables), in Unit (See Schedule “1” Legal Description Variables), in LEGENDS EDGE CONDOMINIUM, according to the Declaration of Condominium thereof, as recorded in Official Record Book 1919, at Page 323, in the Public Records of Bay County, Florida, and any amendments thereof. SCHEDULE “1”: Contract No., Obligors, Obligor Notice Address, Legal Description Variables; LE*1102*18*B, SANDRA PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ PARDO, CRA 2DA #70-19 APTO 801 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 18, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*18*B, JOSE VICENTE CAMACHO VANEGAS, CRA 2DA #70-19 APTO 801 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 18, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*19*B, SANDRA PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ PARDO, CRA 2DA #70-19 APTO 801 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*19*B, JOSE VICENTE CAMACHO VANEGAS, CRA 2DA #70-19 APTO 801 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*31*B, CARLOS MARIO IGLESIAS, CALLE 2 SUR #4-128 CONJ PALO AMARILLO CASA 4 SEC LA BALSA CHIA CUNDINAMARCA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 31, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*31*B, MARIA CRISTINA JIMENEZ, CALLE 2 SUR #4-128 CONJ PALO AMARILLO CASA 4 SEC LA BALSA CHIA CUNDINAMARCA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 31, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*32*B, CARLOS MARIO IGLESIAS, CALLE 2 SUR #4-128 CONJ PALO AMARILLO CASA 4 SEC LA BALSA CHIA CUNDINAMARCA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 32, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*32*B, MARIA CRISTINA JIMENEZ, CALLE 2 SUR #4-128 CONJ PALO AMARILLO CASA 4 SEC LA BALSA CHIA CUNDINAMARCA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 32, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*38*B, JAIME EDUARDO RINCON CERON, CRA 11A 112-76 APTO 702 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 38, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*38*B, MIRIAM CERON, CRA 11A 112-76 APTO 702 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 38, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*39*B, JAIME EDUARDO RINCON CERON, CRA 11A 112-76 APTO 702 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 39, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1102*39*B, MIRIAM CERON, CRA 11A 112-76 APTO 702 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 39, Unit: 1102, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, ANDRES VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, HADASA PELIOWSKI, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, JUAN ANDRES VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, DIEGO VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, JUAN ESTEBAN VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, JUAN IGNACIO VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, TIABE PALACIOS, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1104*09*B, JAVIERA PALACIOS, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1104, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, ANDRES VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, HADASA PELIOWSKI, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, JUAN ANDRES VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, DIEGO VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, JUAN ESTEBAN VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, JUAN IGNACIO VARELA, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, TAIBE PALACIOS, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1106*09*B, JAVIERA PALACIOS, CERRO PLOMO 6678 DPTO 2003 LAS CONDES, SANTIAGO 00000 CHILE, Unit Week: 9, Unit: 1106, Frequency: Annual; LE*1205*08*B, EDUARDO RIVODO, CALLE 92 #8-20 APT. 502 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 8, Unit: 1205, Frequency: Annual; LE*1205*08*B, TRINA RIVODO, CALLE 92 #8-20 APT. 502 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 8, Unit: 1205, Frequency: Annual; LE*1205*35*B, JENNIFER L REAGAN, 103 MACK ROPER ROAD, TRUSSVILLE, AL 35173 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 35, Unit: 1205, Frequency: Annual; LE*1205*35*B, BRUCE REAGAN, 103 MACK ROPER ROAD, TRUSSVILLE, AL 35173 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 35, Unit: 1205, Frequency: Annual; LE*1205*46*B, SHIRLEY A. LATHAM, 2606 PENTOLOPE DRIVE SE, HUNTSVILLE, AL 35803 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 46, Unit: 1205, Frequency: Annual; LE*1206*23*B, LUCILLE M. COX, 289 CEDAR MOUNTAIN RD, DAHLONEGA, GA 30533 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 23, Unit: 1206, Frequency: Annual; LE*1302*16*B, LAVENDA HILES, 5081 WOODSTOCK WAY DRIVE, CENTRAL, LA 70739 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 16, Unit: 1302, Frequency: Annual; LE*1302*16*B, TRACIE HILES, 5081 WOODSTOCK WAY DRIVE, CENTRAL, LA 70739 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 16, Unit: 1302, Frequency: Annual; LE*1304*22*B, JOHN MICHAEL HARRISON, 2690 S HANNON HILL DR, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32309-8921 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 22, Unit: 1304, Frequency: Annual; LE*1304*22*B, CHRISTINA N. HARRISON, 2690 S HANNON HILL DR, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32309-8921 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 22, Unit: 1304, Frequency: Annual; LE*1306*14*B, REGINALD D. WILLIAMS, 2160 SOUTH PARKWAY E, MEMPHIS, TN 38114 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 1306, Frequency: Annual; LE*1402*10*B, BRAD HARDY, 145 HILL VALLEY DR, TAYLORSVILLE, KY 40071 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 10, Unit: 1402, Frequency: Annual; LE*1402*10*B, ELIZABETH K. HARDY, 145 HILL VALLEY DR, TAYLORSVILLE, KY 40071 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 10, Unit: 1402, Frequency: Annual; LE*1405*03*B, ASHLI CHRISTEN, 109 CANDORA ROAD, MARYVILLE, TN 37804 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 3, Unit: 1405, Frequency: Annual; LE*1405*03*B, EVERETT CHRISTEN, 109 CANDORA ROAD, MARYVILLE, TN 37804 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 3, Unit: 1405, Frequency: Annual; LE*1406*52*B, NATALIE GIDNEY, PO BOX 9672, COLUMBIA, SC 29290-0672 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 52, Unit: 1406, Frequency: Annual; LE*1406*52*B, DONALD GIDNEY, PO BOX 9672, COLUMBIA, SC 29290-0672 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 52, Unit: 1406, Frequency: Annual; LE*1504*49*B, MARTHA M. AROMATORIO, 123 ANNA KATHRYN DRIVE, GURLEY, AL 35748-9256 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 49, Unit: 1504, Frequency: Annual; LE*1504*50*B, MARTHA M. AROMATORIO, 123 ANNA KATHRYN DRIVE, GURLEY, AL 35748-9256 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 50, Unit: 1504, Frequency: Annual; LE*1506*14*X, NEAL RODEFER, 1673 REDWOOD DR, KINGSPORT, TN 37664 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 1506, Frequency: Odd Year Biennial; LE*1506*14*X, DEDE RODEFER, 1673 REDWOOD DR, KINGSPORT, TN 37664 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 1506, Frequency: Odd Year Biennial; LE*1506*49*E, DAVID C. WYLAND, 17 MILSTEAD WAY, GREENVILLE, SC 29615 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 49, Unit: 1506, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*1506*49*E, KATHERINE M. WYLAND, 17 MILSTEAD WAY, GREENVILLE, SC 29615 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 49, Unit: 1506, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*1602*13*B, THOMAS P DORIAN, 4744 BARFIELD ROAD, MEMPHIS, TN 38117 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 13, Unit: 1602, Frequency: Annual; LE*1602*13*B, CYNTHIA M DORIAN, 4744 BARFIELD ROAD, MEMPHIS, TN 38117 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 13, Unit: 1602, Frequency: Annual; LE*1602*19*B, WILLIAM L. MOSS SR., 4507 BARON AVENUE, SACRAMENTO, CA 95821 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 1602, Frequency: Annual; LE*1602*19*B, CASSANDRA J. MOSS, 4507 BARON AVENUE, SACRAMENTO, CA 95821 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 1602, Frequency: Annual; LE*1605*46*B, TIMOTHY D. SCHAAF 1876 FOREST RUN DRIVE, INDEPENDENCE, KY 41051 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 46, Unit: 1605, Frequency: Annual; LE*1605*46*B, LANA G. SCHAAF, 1876 FOREST RUN DRIVE, INDEPENDENCE, KY 41051 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 46, Unit: 1605, Frequency: Annual; LE*1607*34*X, JOHN J ROWNAK JR, 3525 N BUCKINGHAM DR, FAYETTEVILLE, AR 72703 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 34, Unit: 1607, Frequency: Odd 4DayLE*1607*34*X, JUDY C ROWNAK 3525 N BUCKINGHAM DR, FAYETTEVILLE, AR 72703 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 34, Unit: 1607, Frequency: Odd 4Day; LE*2105*32*B, KENDRA C. BOSWELL, 113 Redbud Ln, Greenville, AL 36037-1317 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 32, Unit: 2105, Frequency: Annual; LE*2107*35*B, CHARLIE BULLARD, 36 ELBA AVE, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35214 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 35, Unit: 2107, Frequency: Annual; LE*2201*12*B, MUSE MANN JR, 1740 Villa Maison, Mt Pleasant, SC 29464-7501 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 12, Unit: 2201, Frequency: Annual; LE*2201*12*B, CAROLYN DUKE MANN, 1740 Villa Maison, Mt Pleasant, SC 29464-7501 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 12, Unit: 2201, Frequency: Annual; LE*2202*05*B, JOYCE PERRY, PO BOX 1245, GRAND BAY, AL 36541 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 5, Unit: 2202, Frequency: Annual; LE*2202*05*B, CHRIS ROWLAND, PO BOX 1245, GRAND BAY, AL 36541 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 5, Unit: 2202, Frequency: Annual; LE*2203*12*X, KENNIE L. SHELTON, 1477 PARAGON PKWY, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35235 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 12, Unit: 2203, Frequency: Odd 4Day; LE*2203*12*X, NICOLE C. SHELTON 1477 PARAGON PKWY, BIRMINGHAM, AL 35235 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 12, Unit: 2203, Frequency: Odd 4Day; LE*2204*18*B, CARLOS SALINAS MARCANO, AV.FRANCISCO DE MIRANDA TORRE BANCO PROVINCIAL,TORRE A PISO 14 VENEZUELA, FL UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 18, Unit: 2204, Frequency: Annual; LE*2204*18*B, IVONNE VELASCO ALVARADO, AV.FRANCISCO DE MIRANDA TORRE BANCO PROVINCIAL,TORRE A PISO 14 VENEZUELA, FL UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 18, Unit: 2204, Frequency: Annual; LE*2205*38*B, DOROTHY M. STIVERS, 1626 JEFFERSON ST, PADUCAH, KY 42001-2721 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 38, Unit: 2205, Frequency: Annual; LE*2207*45*B, DAVID C. DILLMAN, 115 E Van Fleet Dr # 236, Bartow, FL 33830-3829 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 45, Unit: 2207, Frequency: Annual; LE*2207*45*B, LINDA D. DILLMAN, 115 E Van Fleet Dr # 236, Bartow, FL 33830-3829 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 45, Unit: 2207, Frequency: Annual; LE*2302*14*B, JOHN C. DUNN, JR, 108 LIGHTHORSE LN, WAYNESBORO, VA 22980 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 2302, Frequency: Annual; LE*2302*14*B, THE DUNN FAMILY TRUST, 108 Lighthorse Ln Waynesboro, Waynesboro, VA 22980-1592 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 2302, Frequency: Annual; LE*2302*14*B, THE DUNN FAMILY TRUST, 108 LIGHTHORSE LN, WAYNESBORO, VA 22980 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 2302, Frequency: Annual; LE*2302*14*B, SCHARLENE C. DUNN, 236 Overview St, Waynesboro, VA 22980 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 14, Unit: 2302, Frequency: Annual; LE*2304*05*E, JORGE JOSE SIMAN, CALLE TEPECOYO #27 E AVE TEOTEPEQUE SANTA TECLA LA LIBERTAD EL SALVADOR, Unit Week: 5, Unit: 2304, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2304*05*E, FRANCIS BETANCO DE SIMAN, CALLE TEPECOYO #27 E AVE TEOTEPEQUE SANTA TECLA LA LIBERTAD EL SALVADOR, Unit Week: 5, Unit: 2304, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2307*01*E, BRIAN D. MULLINS, 60 JASON DRIVE, COLCHESTER, VT 05446 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 1, Unit: 2307, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2307*01*E, ERIN K. RANDALL-MULLINS, 60 JASON DRIVE, COLCHESTER, VT 05446 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 1, Unit: 2307, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2402*51*B, DUSHY SELVARATNAM, 31 PINE GROVE, BROOKMANS PARK HATFIELD HERTS AL97BP UNITED KINGDOM, Unit Week: 51, Unit: 2402, Frequency: Annual; LE*2404*50*E, MARILYN V. FORD, 5515 Windsor Mill Rd, Gwynn Oak, MD 21207-5927 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 50, Unit: 2404, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2404*50*E, ROBERT L. SIMMONS JR, 5515 Windsor Mill Rd, Gwynn Oak, MD 21207-5927 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 50, Unit: 2404, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2406*16*B, CARMEN ESTRADA, SN JOSE STA ANA URUCA COSTADO OESTE PLAZA OBELICO COND ORO DEL RIO 7 SAN JOSE 00000 COSTA RICA, Unit Week: 16, Unit: 2406, Frequency: Annual; LE*2406*16*B, IGNACIO ESQUIVEL, SN JOSE STA ANA URUCA COSTADO OESTE PLAZA OBELICO COND ORO DEL RIO 7 SAN JOSE 00000 COSTA RICA, Unit Week: 16, Unit: 2406, Frequency: Annual; LE*2504*07*B, DUSHY SELVARATNAM, 31 PINE GROVE, BROOKMANS PARK HATFIELD HERTS AL97BP UNITED KINGDOM, Unit Week: 7, Unit: 2504, Frequency: Annual; LE*2505*22*B, ESTRELLITA DAVILA, 18 BOVARD AVENUE, ORMOND BEACH, FL 32176 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 22, Unit: 2505, Frequency: Annual; LE*2506*46*B, CHERYL A. HART, 6N110 SUNSET COURT, ROSELLE, IL 60172 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 46, Unit: 2506, Frequency: Annual; LE*2506*46*B, JENNIFER J. HART, 6N110 SUNSET COURT, ROSELLE, IL 60172 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 46, Unit: 2506, Frequency: Annual; LE*2507*45*X, DENISE COX, 3581 Meadowglen Vlg Ln Apt H, Doraville, GA 30340-5365 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 45, Unit: 2507, Frequency: Odd 4Day; LE*2601*33*B, ADRIANA MARIA CASTRO LOPEZ, CALLE 92 #4A-80 APTO 201 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 33, Unit: 2601, Frequency: Annual; LE*2601*33*B, GUILLERMO GONZALEZ-LARSEN, CALLE 92 #4A-80 APTO 201 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 33, Unit: 2601, Frequency: Annual; LE*2601*42*B, DIANA FORD, 3505 S Ocean Dr Apt 206, Hollywood, FL 33019-2811 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 42, Unit: 2601, Frequency: Annual; LE*2601*43*B, GEORGE W. LEW-JEN-TAI, KWARTJE Z/N KAV 58 WILLEMSTAD, CURACAO 00000 NETHERLANDS ANTILLES, Unit Week: 43, Unit: 2601, Frequency: Annual; LE*2601*43*B, MARIA TERESA LEW-JEN-TAI, KWARTJE Z/N KAV 58 WILLEMSTAD, CURACAO 00000 NETHERLANDS ANTILLES, Unit Week: 43, Unit: 2601, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*19*B, THELMA C. LAT, 9819 SUMMERHILL ROAD, RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91737-1677 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*19*B, ERROL G. LAT, 9819 SUMMERHILL ROAD, RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91737-1677 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 19, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*22*B, ERIKA C. DE LOPEZ, COSTA DEL ESTE,RESIDENCIAL BALMORAL CASA #1 PANAMA, 0819-01617 PANAMA, Unit Week: 22, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*25*B, ISABEL CARDENAS ESPITIA, CALLE 108 1711 APTO 401 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 25, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*25*B, MIGUEL CARDENAS, CALLE 108 1711 APTO 401 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 25, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*26*B, ISABEL CARDENAS ESPITIA, CALLE 108 1711 APTO 401 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 26, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2602*26*B, MIGUEL CARDENAS, CALLE 108 1711 APTO 401 BOGOTA 00000 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 26, Unit: 2602, Frequency: Annual; LE*2603*07*B, EMILY N. MBURU, PO BOX 3018 GABORONE 00000 BOTSWANA, Unit Week: 7, Unit: 2603, Frequency: Annual; LE*2604*25*B, ELIZABETH MARIA DIAZ TARUD CRA. 52 NO. 99A-168 CASA 6 BARRANQUILLA 80020 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 25, Unit: 2604, Frequency: Annual; LE*2604*25*B, IVAN JOSE SARUE ZAHER, CRA. 52 NO. 99A-168 CASA 6 BARRANQUILLA 80020 COLOMBIA, Unit Week: 25, Unit: 2604, Frequency: Annual; LE*2604*28*B, JULIO CASTRO MENDEZ, TERRAZAS DEL AVILA, CALLE 5 EDIF. COTA MIL I, PISO 3 APTO. 31, LAKE MARY, FL 32746 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 28, Unit: 2604, Frequency: Annual; LE*2604*28*B, MARIA GABRIELA TRUJILLO DE CASTRO, TERRAZAS DEL AVILA, CALLE 5 EDIF. COTA MIL I, PISO 3 APTO. 31, LAKE MARY, FL 32746 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 28, Unit: 2604, Frequency: Annual; LE*2604*41*B, AURA ANGELA DELLAN ROJAS, LOMAS DE LA ALAMEDA, CALLE A EDIF ARBOL AVILA C PB 4, LAKE MARY, FL 32746 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 41, Unit: 2604, Frequency: Annual; LE*2605*34*B, CARLOS SALINAS MARCANO, AV.FRANCISCO DE MIRANDA TORRE BANCO PROVINCIAL,TORRE A PISO 14, LAKE MARY, FL 32746 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 34, Unit: 2605, Frequency: Annual; LE*2605*34*B, IVONNE VELASCO ALVARADO, AV.FRANCISCO DE MIRANDA TORRE BANCO PROVINCIAL,TORRE A PISO 14, LAKE MARY, FL 32746 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 34, Unit: 2605, Frequency: Annual; LE*2606*28*X, RANDOLPH LEE HAMILTON, 2516 LOCUST GROVE LANE, VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23456 UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 28, Unit: 2606, Frequency: Odd Year Biennial; LE*2607*04*E, JUSTIN MORGAN, 2 SHIRAZ PLACE TWEED HEADS SOUTH NEW SOUTH WALES 2486 AUSTRALIA, Unit Week: 4, Unit: 2607, Frequency: Even Year Biennial; LE*2607*04*X, JUSTIN MORGAN, 2 SHIRAZ PLACE TWEED HEADS SOUTH NEW SOUTH WALES 2486 AUSTRALIA, Unit Week: 4, Unit: 2607, Frequency: Odd 4Day. Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21680 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statutes (Section 83 80 1 83 80 9 The undersigned will sell at pu blic sale by compe titive bidding on Mon day the 15th day of October 2018, sched uled to begin at 10:30 am The sale will occur as an online auction via www .storagetrea sures.c om The said property is located at StorQuest Self Storage, 934 S Tyndall Pkwy, City of Panama City, County of Bay, State of Florida, the following: Unit #C16 Julie Sanchez Household Goods Unit #E106 Victoria Key Household Goods Unit# G203 Angela Rogers Household Goods Unit# H125 James Perker Household Goods Purchases must be paid for in Cash Only. All purchased items sold as is, where is, and must be removed within 48 hours after the sale. Sale is Subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 21861 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 14001602CA MTGLQ INVESTORS, EP. Plaintiff. vs. JUNE C. FORDHAM. et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 14, 2018 and entered in 14001602CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for BAY County, Florida, wherein MTGLQ INVESTORS. LP is the Plaintiff and JUNE C. FORDHAM is the Defendant(s). Bill Kinsaul as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the hiliest and best bidder for cash at www.bay.realtbre close.c om, at 11:00 AM, onJanuary 14, 2019, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 16, BLOCK “D”, SILVER SANDS UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, AT PAGES 41A THROUGH 41B, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 8112 S LAGOON DR PANAMA CITY, FL 32408 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated 14th day of September, 2018. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court By: Jennifer Estrada As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest(a) j ud14.flcou rts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, Attorneys for Plaintiff Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, Pl., Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21863 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 18000562CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF DELISON H. WHITE (DECEASED). et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: PAYTON ALEXANDER WHITE whose residence is unknown and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF DELISON H. WHITE (DECEASED). whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 20, BLOCK C, ROBINDALE, ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 47, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before 30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 2 2 Friday, September 28, 2018| The News Herald Bay County, Florida, this 16th day of August, 2018. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Debbie Roberson DEPUTY CLERK ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, & SCHNEID, PL 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: mail@rasflaw .com Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21871 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2018-800 -CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DON WAYNE CLEMO, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Don Wayne Clemo, deceased, whose date of death was May 28, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, FL 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVERBARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 21, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative Angela N. Warren Florida Bar No. 0728632 The Reed Law Office, P.A. 1328 Jenks Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 914-9455 pleadings@reedlaw pa.com Attorney for Petitioner Personal Representative: Mary E. Brown 2113 W. 27th Street Panama City, FL 32405 Petitioner Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21867 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 18000638CA VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., Plaintiff vs. UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ROBIN MICHELLE KRAKOW, DECEASED, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ROBIN MICHELLE KRAKOW, DECEASED 626 LIVE OAK LANE PANAMA CITY, FL 32408 NICOLE DANETTE WILCOX 626 LIVE OAK LANE PANAMA CITY, FL 32408 NICOLE DANETTE WILCOX 1614 2ND ST PANAMA CITY, FL 32409 NICOLE DANETTE WILCOX 1729 MADRAS ST SE APT 46 SALEM, OR 97306 ROBIN MICHELLE KRAKOW, DECEASED 626 LIVE OAK LANE PANAMA CITY, FL 32408 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Bay County, Florida: LOT I, IN BLOCK A, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SEVENTH ADDITION TO NORTH LAGOON OAKS, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGES 80 THROUGH 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2013 CLAY MANUFACTURED HOME, BEARING SERIAL#: WHC019851GAA AND WHC019851GAB; TITLE#: 113897236 AND 113897267; WHICH HAVE BEEN CANCELLED/RETIRE D WITH THE DMV has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, LLP, Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 and file the original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice in THE NEWS HERALD, otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 10th day of September, 2018. BILL KINSAUL As Clerk of said Court By: Debbie Roberson As Deputy Clerk Prepared by: Greenspoon Marder, LLP (954)491-1120; gmforeclosure@gmlaw corn Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21873 NOTICE TO BIDDERS FUEL FARM RELOCATION at MARIANNA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT CITY OF MARIANNA, FLORIDA Notice is hereby given that the City of Marianna will receive sealed bids at the City of Marianna City Hall, City Commission Room, Attn: Clerk’s Office, 2898 Green Street, Marianna, Florida 32446 (850-482-4353) until 2 pm local time on Monday, October 22, 2018 for the Fuel Farm Relocation project at the Marianna Municipal Airport, Marianna, Fl. Bids must be submitted in a sealed enveloped clearly marked “BID ENCLOSED: FUEL FARM RELOCATION; MARIANNA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT.” Bids will be opened in the City Commission room immediately following the 2 pm deadline on Mon day October 22, 2018 Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. The project consists of providing all labor, materials, machinery, tools, equipment and other means of construction necessary and incidental to the completion of the work shown on the plans and described in the specifications including, but not necessarily limited to the following: Furnish and install a complete fuel farm to include one new 12,000-gallon AVGAS tank, one new 12,000-gallon Jet-A tank, and all concrete foundations, pads, hoses, reels, ladders, electrical improvements, lighting, bollards, vehicle containment pad, drainage improvements, security fencing, and grading. The contract time for substantial completion of the work included shall be 180 calendar days from the date of the “Notice to Proceed (NTP).” The final project completion shall be 210 calendar days from the date of the “Notice to Proceed (NTP)”. Beginning on Thurs day September 20, 2018 digital copies of the above documents may be obtained from the offices of AVCON, INC., 320 Bayshore Drive, Suite A, Niceville, Florida, 32578, (850) 678-0050, upon payment of a non-refundable fee of twenty dollars ($20.00) payable to AVCON, INC. for each set of project documents obtained. A hard copy of the above documents may be provided at an additional charge. Bid security in the amount of at least five percent (5%) of the total quote must be submitted with the quote. The quote security may be either a certified check or a proposal guaranty bond executed by a surety company authorized to do business in the State of Florida. Quote security shall be made payable to the City of Marianna. The successful contractor must be able to furnish proof of required insurance, a 100% Performance Bond, and a 100% Labor and Materials Payment Bond, and shall begin execution of this contract within five (5) calendar days following the date of the Notice to Proceed. Funding for this project is being provided by the Florida Department of Transportation and will be subject to all applicable requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration and U.S. Department of Transportation grant assurances. The successful contract will be required to comply with all provisions of the Federal Government Equal Employment Opportunity clauses issued by the Secretary of Labor on May 21, 1968 and published in the Federal Register (41CFR Part 60-1, 33 F.2 7804). The successful contractor must comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (CWHSSA), Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 11246. The City of Marianna has an approved Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program for Airport Improvement Program projects which the successful contract must comply with. The DBE participation goal for this project is 5% and compliance requirements are listed in the project documents. A non-mandatory Pre Bid Conference will be conducted at the Terminal Building of the Marianna Municipal Airport at 3689 Industrial Park Drive, Marianna, Florida 32446 on T ues day October 2, 2018 at 1:00 p.m local time (CDT). Questions relating to the Project Documents will be answered at that time. Attendance by prospective prime contractors is strongly recommended. The City of Marianna City Commission reserves the right, it its sole and absolute discretion, to reject, to cancel, or withdraw this bid at any time and waive any irregularities in the bid process. The City reserves the right to award any contract to the respondent which it deems to offer the best overall service; therefore, the City is not bound to award any contract based on the lowest quoted price. The City, in its sole and absolute discretion, also reserves the right to waive any minor defects in the process and to accept the bid deemed to be in the City’s best interest. No faxed Proposals will be accepted. OWNER’S CONT ACT : Joe Richey Public Works Director City of Marianna 2898 Green Street Marianna, Florida 32446 Tel: 850-482-4129 ENGINEER’S CON T ACT : John Collins, P.E. Project Manager AVCON, INC. 320 Bayshore Drive, Suite “A” Niceville, Florida 32578 Tel: 850-678-0050 All bids should be addressed as follows: BID ENCLOSED: FUEL FARM RELOCATION MARIANNA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT City of Marianna City Commission Attention: Clerk’s Office 2898 Green Street Marianna, Florida 32446 By: City of Marianna Name: Title: Date: Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21875 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 18000473CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, AS SUCCESSOR TO FIRSTAR TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, FOR MANUFACTURED HOUSING CONTRACT SENIOR/SUBORDINATE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATE TRUST 1997-5, Plaintiff, VS. STELLA S. PITCHER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STELLA S. PITCHER, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 17, 2018, and entered in 18000473CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and or Bay County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, AS SUCCESSOR TO FIRSTAR TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, FOR MANUFACTURED HOUSING CONTRACT SENIOR/SUBORDINATE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATE TRUST 1997-5 is the Plaintiff and STELLA S. PITCHER; are the Defendant(s). Bill Kinsaul as the Clerk of the Circuit Court yill sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at vvvvw.bay.realforeclose.com, at 11:00 AM, on October 31, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 89, BLOCK A, BAYSIDE PARK UNIT NO.!, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE 74, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY. FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1992 MOBILE HOME CONTAINING VIN# FL11MLCP4988462. Property Address: 6916 SUNRISE DR PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32407 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of September, 2018. IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@jud14.fl courts.org Publish In: THE NEWS HERALD Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L., Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21913 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 18000663CA CIT BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF RUBY C. GORDON (DECEASED). et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF RUBY C. GORDON (DECEASED). whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT NINE (9) AND THE SOUTH HALF (S1/2) OF LOT TEN (10) OF BLOCK SIXTY EIGHT (68), LYNN HAVEN, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SAID CITY ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Bay County, Florida, this 5th day of September, 2018. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Debbie Roberson Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ, AND SCHNEID, PL ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: mail@rasflaw .com Pub: September 21, 28, 2018 21979 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2017-21-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT Plaintiff(s), VS. THE ESTATE OF JOE DAVIS and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant who are unknown to be dead or alive whether said unknown are persons, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOE DAVIS LOUISE DAVIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LOUISE DAVIS; HEATHER DAVIS; JOSEPH C. DAVIS; MARISA DAVIS; TRACY KING ; TENANT I/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT H/UNKNOWN TENANT; TENANT HI/UNKNOWN TENANT and TENANT IV/UNKNOWN TENANT, in possession of the subject real property, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the final judgment/order entered in the above noted case, that the Clerk of Court of Bay County, Florida will sell the following property situated in Bay County, Florida described as: LOTS NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) AND FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK D IN SHERMAN’S SECOND ADDITION TO MILL VILLE, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION THREE (3), TOWNSHIP FOUR (4), RANGE FOURTEEN (14) WEST, ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at www .bay .realfore close.c om at 11:00 a.m. CT / 12:00 p.m. ET on January 7, 2019 The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Court. Final payment must be made by 12:00 p.m. the next business day. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE Lis PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE Dated: September 21st, 2018. Clerk of the Court By: Sharon Chambers Deputy Clerk Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 21941 PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID. The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: On 16 single home or duplex housing units, a total of approximately 25,000 square feet, located on 14th, 15th, and 16th Streets in Apalachicola, FL, install (color silver) 24 gauge galvalume metal roofing with 6 inch eave drip edge to match roof color, installation of one layer of #30 lb felt underlayment on existing roof surface, replace all existing gutters and add new vent pipes. Metal roofing will go over existing shingle roofs. All grounds to be cleaned up on a daily basis as homes are occupied by tenants. Bids will be received until November 1, 2018. Please mail bids to: Apalachicola Housing Authority, 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, attn: Executive Director. For Project Specifications, Requirements and Bid Package, please call 850-653-9304 or email your request to: apalhousing@gmail.co m Pub: September 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 2018 21991 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2018-881-CP ROBERT MARION HIGDON, JR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Robert Marion Higdon, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was June 19, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 27, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: H. Cranston Pope Attorney Florida Bar Number: 0582409 Pope & Barloga, P.A. 490 Grace Ave. P.O. Box 1609 (32402) Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 784-9174 Fax: (850) 692-6822 hcp@popebarloga.com tprater@popebarloga.c om Personal Representative: Suzanne H. Farrar P.O. Box 28251 Panama City, Florida 32411 Pub: September 27, October 5, 2018 22005 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 17-000348-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; WAYNE T. ALLISON; STEVEN A. HULL; BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER — SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM; CLERK OF THE COURT; STATE OF FLORIDA; NANCY RIVERS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated September 25, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017-000348-CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; WAYNE T. ALLISON; STEVEN A. HULL; BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER — SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM; CLERK OF THE COURT; STATE OF FLORIDA; NANCY RIVERS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GERALDINE ZIMMERMAN A/K/A BARBARA ZIMMERMAN A/K/A GERRI ZIMMERMAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT, are the Defendants, that the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale to the highest bidder for cash online at www .bay .realf oreclose.com on November 8, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. Central Standard Time the following described real property as set forth in the Final Judgment: Legal Description: LOT 5, BLOCK 29, OF REPLAT OF THE TOWN OF FOUNTAIN, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 18232 April Avenue, Fountain, Florida 32438 NOTICE ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 26th day of September, 2018. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Jennifer Estrada As Deputy Clerk NOTICE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at 300 East 4th Street Panama City, Florida 32401, 850-763-9061, within two working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8770. Attorney for Plaintiff, ROGER A. KELLY, ESQ., P.O. Box 3146, Orlando, FL 32802-3146 Pub: September 28, October 5, 2018 21999 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The Bay County Board of County Commissioners (County) is seeking statements of qualifications from firms for construction manager services for renovations to the Bay County Juvenile Justice Courthouse located at 533 E. 11th Street, Panama City, Florida. SEALED SUBMITTALS for RFQ NO: 19-03 for Construction Manager Services for Bay County Juvenile Justice Courthouse Renovations will be received by the BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA at the Purchasing Department, 840 West 11th Street, Suite 2500, Panama City, Florida 32401 up until 1:00 PM (central time) Friday, October 19, 2018. Submittals will be publicly opened immediately following the deadline. It is the sole responsibility of the Respondent to ensure that the Submittal is received on time. Electronic versions of the solicitation documents are available via the Purchasing Department’s Web Page http://co.bay .fl. us/169/P urchasing. The Bay County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all proposals in the best interest of Bay County. Submitted by Wendi Nation Purchasing Director Pub: September 28, 2018 A. Pearce Tree & Stump Service“We go out on a limb for you!” Lic. & Ins. 850-596-5067 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794 BJ’S TREE REMOVAL & LOT CLEARING! We also offer Excavating Services! Military and senior citizen discounts. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices. Licensed & insured For a F ree estimate Call ( 850)819-9987 Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 $3499-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY Kevin WilliamsAll Areas of Home Repair and Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Additions No Job too Small! 30 Years Experience! Call (843)270-9251 Quality Work Guaranteed Free Estimates Townsend Quality Home Repairs, LLC Specializing In All Types. Roof repairs, Vinyl siding Soffit, and Fascia 35 Years Experience Ins/Lic #L18000039382 Call 850-257-6041/ 850-387-9661 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting Clean-Ups/Sod Epoxy floors Rock/Flower Beds Gutter & Roof Cleaning Drainage systems. Lot Clearing, Haul-Offs. Weeding, Tree Trimming, Pressure Washing, Deck Renovations. Save 10%-20% 850-303-8526 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569Text FL91517 to 56654 All Home Repairs & RemodelingWood rot, roofs repairs, drywall, painting, vinyl, windows, doors, fencing. Lic & Ins. Sam (850)348-0207 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Driveway SpecialistWHITE’S CONCRETELic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 or 896-6864 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 C C 3 3 DIGITAL SALES ASSISTANTPOSITION SUMMARY: Do you enjoy working in a fast-paced environment? Are you tired of the clich support roles that don’t let you fully show what you can do? If so, you just found the perfect gig! The Digital Sales Assistant role with the Panama City News Herald will be responsible for digital campaign strategy and fulfillment. The Digital Sales Assistant will launch digital campaigns on theledger.com as well as SEO, SEM & SMO campaigns through ThriveHive. The Digital Sales Assistant will assist in putting together monthly, client facing reports for the Account Executives and Sales Managers. Reports are to include, but not limited to, overall performance, Google Analytics insights and campaign optimizations. This individual will also assist in creative best practices and be the main conduit with our creative services team. As a Digital Sales Assistant you will build a relationship with the client and other multimedia account executives to ensure the clients’ business goals and needs are met. The Digital Sales Assistant should be proactive in uncovering issues, reporting to the client on optimizations and ensuring the overall campaign performance. REQUIRED EDUCATION, EXPERIENCE AND SKILLS: Work experience that demonstrates an ability to perform the job required 2 – 5years’ of relevant digital support experience preferred Understanding and proficiency with Google Analytics and reporting platforms Ability to work with clients and sales reps to explain campaigns, understand their business needs and adjust the campaigns to best meet those needs Strong interpersonal skills to work with all levels of management and across departments DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The duties listed are intended as examples only and may not represent a complete list.  Campaign Fulfillment : Execute and launch campaigns quickly and accurately. This will involve working with sales reps, managers and our fulfillment teams.  Reporting: Skilled at building reports that show the value of campaign performance. Reports should not only communicate clearly the successes of the campaign, but should show areas for optimization and budget increases. Digital Sales Assistant to present the reports to the client, explaining variances to the plan and presenting options for ways to improve the plan’s effectiveness.  Strategy Development: Create and implement successful strategies based on campaign performance and client’s goals Google Analytics: Utilizing Google Analytics, report and interpret data in clients’ campaign performance reports. The Panama City News Herald is a digitally focused news and information company that combines quality journalism fromThe Panama City News Herald with up-to-the-minute access ofnewsherald.com. The Panama City News Herald provides innovative ways to inform, connect, and empower the people in the Florida Panhandle communities we serve.Interested applicants please submit resume to: krsmith@pcnh.com Skilled Trades Worker Job ID 44115 FSU-Panama City Campus is seeking applicants for a Skilled Trades Worker for building maintenance consisting of skilled carpentry work, painting, drywall, electrical, plumbing, operation of doors and windows, HVAC and other related work; preventative maintenance for equipment including grounds, roadways, and parking; purchase material and small equipment used daily and routinely work with vendors on prices and quotes. Must have high school education or equivalent and two years relevant experience. Must be available one week per month for on call duties. Must be able to meet the physical requirements of the position. Background check required. Schedule is Tues. -Sat. 6 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Apply online at www.jobs.fsu.edu Applications accepted until October 3, 2018 Florida State University is an Equal Opportunity/Access/Affirmative Action/ Pro Disabled and Veteran Employer. Heavy Equipment Operator500 TPD Waste To Energy Facility Front End Loader Operator responsible for safely operating and servicing Front End Loaders, directing Municipal Solid Waste trucks for dumping, and mixing and stacking solid waste for feeding two Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Units. Loader operating experience preferred. Twelve (12) hour rotating shift schedule. HS diploma or GED required. Salary $17.47/hr. plus benefits. Qualified candidates should send resumes to: Human Resources, 6510 Bay Line Dr., Panama City, FL 32404 or email to: hollisj@engenllc.com EOE/DFWP Production/OperationsSEASONAL / PART-TIME NEWSPAPER INSERTERStanding, bending & lifting required. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekends.Apply at The News Herald 501 W. 11th Street Panama CityInterviews will be scheduled at a later time. No phone calls Candidates are hired pending criminal background check and pre-employment drug screen NF-1185390 Eastern Shipbuilding Group an aggressive leader in the Marine Shipbuilding Industry has immediate openings for the following skilled craftsmen:€ Ship“ tters € Structural Welders € Pipe Welders € Pipe“ tters € Marine Electricians € Safety Rep. € QA Inspectors € Ship“ tter, Welder & Pipe“ tter TraineesQuali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon … Fri, 8am 12pm … 1pm 4:30pm.Human Resources (2 Locations):13300 Allanton Rd, Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave, Panama City, FL 32401 www.easternshipbuilding.comEastern offers a competitive salary and bene“ ts package including 401(k) and Company paid health, dental & life insurance, attendance & safety bonuses.Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Af rmative Action Employer. All quali ed applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, protected veteran status, disability status or any other status or characteristic protected under applicable federal, state, of local laws. MORE THAN A JOBƒ A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORKEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP Apalachee Center, INC.NOW HIRING FOR OUR COMMUNITY ACTION TEAMWill serve Liberty and Franklin Counties *Care Manager -bachelor’s degree in Human Services (psychology, social work, etc.) *Therapist -masters degree in Human Services required. *Therapeutic Mentor -family member or caregiver to another person who is living with a mental health condition or a Certified Recovery Peer Specialist by the Florida Certification Board. *Team Leader -Must hold LCSW, LMHC, or LMFT. All positions require a valid driver’s license with no more than 6 points on driver history report. Truck DriverClass A CDL required. Must have knowledge of required Department of Transportation truck driver regulations. Must have a safe driving record and at least 1 year experience operating and maintaining tractor trailer rigs. Mechanical background preferred. HS diploma or GED required. Local driving only, Mon-Sat, and approximately 10 hrs. per day. Salary $15.48/hr. plus excellent benefits. Qualified candidates should send resumes to: Human Resources, 6510 Bay Line Dr., Panama City, FL 32404 or e-mail to: hollisj@engenllc.com EOE/DFWP Looking for a new entrepreneurship opportunity?*** The Panama City News Herald is looking for energetic individuals to sell newspaper subscriptions over the telephone from your home. The right person will have a pleasant voice and the ability to tailor a flexible schedule to meet his or her needs. *** Limited positions available. Sell for one of the area’s most distinguished businesses. Perfect opportunity for retirees, home makers, college students, and someone needing a second job! *** No experience necessary, full training provided. What’s in it for you? Unusually high commissions Weekly bonus incentives Be your own boss; set your own hours *** Make an extra $600 -$1,000 a month part-time! *** Email resume to: sfristoe@pcnh.com Resumes will be reviewed. Interviews will be scheduled No phone calls, please AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others-start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649. Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 855-259-0557 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. Dr. McLoughlin Has Moved!!!Come see us at our new office!Ivy Spine & OrthopedicsDr. James McLoughlin has opened a new practice, along with his team, Lisa McLoughlin, ARNP and Marcelo Gerjoi, P.A. We are located at 742 Harrison Avenue, near downtown Panama City. www.Ivyspineand orthopedics.com (850)628-7679 -PH (866)730-6967 -FAX Vessel Fitness coming soon to your area! Contact us at: support@vessel fitness.org HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised Best Health Guar. Call 239-324-4650www .noahslittleark.com ABSOLUTE AUCTIONSept. 29th -10:00 AM Inside the Panama City Mall, right outside of JC Penny. Oriental Furniture, decorations, and figurines. Hosted by: Florida Auction Network LLC Call 850-896-2343 for more information. 13% buyer’s premium 3% Discount for cash or check. Cash, Check, and Credit Cards accepted. AB# 3488 AU# 4677 Live & Online Public AuctionTues, Oct 2nd, 2018 at 9:00 A.M. Transform Dcor & Technical Event Solutions 1231 NE 8th Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304 Wide variety of party equipment for all types of events. Large inventory of new and used top quality merchandise and equipment: Accents, Professional Lighting, Lounge Seating, Outdoor Seating, Bars, Bar Stools, Coffee Tables, Linens, Slipcovers, Catering Equipment, Staging Equipment, Mirrors, Textile, Disco Balls, Audio/Visual Equipment, Pipe & Drapery, Office Equipment, 2014 Freightliner 2500 High Roof Sprinter, 2015 Isuzu NPR HD Diesel Box Truck w/lift gate, Mitsubishi 3 Stage 3,500 lb cap. LPG Forklift and much more. Catalog and photos available at www.moeckerauctions.comPreview: 10/01 from 10AM-3PM and day of sale 8AM-9AM, 15%-18% BP. To register: $100 refundable cash deposit and valid driver’s license. (800) 840-BIDS AB-1098 AU-3219 Eric Rubin SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.co m1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N Lane Leather swivel rocker recliner $150 OBO Hot point self cleaning glass top range $150 OBO Ryobi mitre $60 Four man LLBean tent make offer 850-708-7898 10 yr old full kitchen, 10X10 includes cabinets, Kitchen Aid appliances granite, sink & faucet $6000 Needs to be removed before Oct. 5th 850-819-8010 Four Cemetary Plots Available Evergreen Memorial Gardens Hwy 231 GARDEN OF SERMON ON THE MOUNT PLOTS 1,2,3,4 LOT No. 143A $2,500.00 each Call 850-832-4894 Homemade Cakes (No mixes) Call Sandra anytime 334-898-7208 Ready Thurs, Fri, Sat 14 layer choc $40 Coconut $30 Red Velvet $30 Lemon Cheese $30 Italian Cream $40 Peanut Butter $30 Key Lime $30 Butternut $30 Old Fashion Lane Cake $50 German Chocolate $45 Made Fresh, Call to order 334-898-7208 Piano Lessons Enroll Fall Discounts! Lessons in your home or in studio. All ages! Call (850)260-5993 Beach Attendants Service oriented persons a plus. Job includes meeting the public and renting out various beach rental equipment Call 10a-5p 527-6829 Exp Receptionist Office AssistantFor busy medical practice. Fax resume to: 850-763-1477 Full-Time SalariedCleaning, Landscaping, & Maintenance Tech. $30-32K DOE. (Health and Dental available). Apply at www.north star.church/jobs Now Hiring CDL Class A Drivers with household goods exp. preferred. Must apply in person. 850-763-3965 Panama City: 2922 US-BUS 98.On Business 98 between East and Everitt Ave. Sept. 28th & 29th Friday 10am-5pm Saturday 9am-3pmBAG SALE!Catholic Charities Thrift Store will be having a bag sale this Friday and Saturday! Don’t miss out! Panama City: 3400 Hillcrest Dr. (Off Transmitter Rd., close to HWY 390 side.) Sat. Sept. 29 8am-1pmThree Family Yard SaleFurniture, All sizes and gender clothes, toys, kitchen items, sheets & bedding, and much more. Something for everyone. Too much to list it all. Southport :7616 Glen Cove Lane. (Go up 77 to HWY 2302.) Sat., Sept. 29th 8 AM -1 PMMOVING SALE 100+ PlantsClose out on plants and lots of other items including household goods and clothing. Forest Park: 1102 Emory Dr. Sat. Sept. 29th 6 AM -1 PMMission FundraiserMisc. household items, too much to list. Lynn Haven 123 Derby Woods Dr. Sat. Sept. 29th 8 AM to 1 PMGreat Sale!!!Tools, fishing and camping gear, etc. Lynn Haven/PC: 4027/4031 Torrino Way Sept. 28th & 29th 8:00 AM -NOONTWO FAMILY YARD SALE Panama City: 1814 West 23rd Court Sept. 29th 7am -11amMulti Family Yard SaleMisc. items, coolers, books, clothes, and appliances. Panama City: 1915 Chestnut Ave. Saturday Sept. 29th 7:00 am -untillHuge Yard Sale Many, Many ItemsClothes, Rugs, High Chair, Car Seat, Dollhouse, Books, Electronics, Toys, Luggage. We have a little bit of everything. Small and large items. Beach West End: 304 Summerwood Dr, Summerwood near Pier Park. Saturday, Sept. 29th 7:00 am -NoonMoving SaleWasher and dryer, dining room table, XL twin bed, little bit of everything. Lynn Haven: 1923 Quail Run Fri & Sat 9/28 & 9/29 8 AM -3 PM Beautiful home full of antiques, collectibles and wonderful treasures. Furniture, large collection of wall pockets, fine and costume jewelry, nice men’s and women’s clothes, “Civil War collectibles and memorabilia”, kitchen items, garage items, glassware, artwork, telescopes, rugs, lamps, stained glass and more. Appalachicola: 339 Hwy. 98 Flowers Home Sat., Sept. 29th 8:00 AM -untilYARD SALEWing-back chair, VCR, Coleman stove, and many household items. Beach East End6500 Bridge Water Way(Wildwood Rd to Bridge Water Way to Hibiscus by the Bay Community)Sat., Sept. 29th 8am till 1pmGated Community Garage Sale @Hibiscus by the Ba yHome furnishings, fishing equipment, lamps, luggage, Christmas decorations, etc. something for everyone! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Spot Advertising works! Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects.

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 4 4 Friday, September 28, 2018| The News Herald Mr Trashis hiring for the following positions: Roll Off Driver Residential Driver ASL Driver Please apply in person at 1108 School Ave Panama City FL 32401 PLUMBER HELPER 2 POSITIONS With benefits, 3 years documented experience in the field. To apply, go to: www .bay .k12.fl.us click on Our District, Job Openings, Support, Open support positions at the bottom. For additional assistance call (850)767-4231 Deadline to apply is: 4:30 pm on 10/02/18. #1 Commercial Cleaning CompanyPANAMA CITYCommercial Cleaning Business Franchise Opportunity Now available in your area! 850-479-8815 For more information visit www .janiking.com Liquor License Bay CountyI HAVE A BAY COUNTY LIQUOR LICENSE FOR SALE. THIS LICENSE IS READY TO BE TRANSFERRED AND CAN BE USED IN A BAR OR PACKAGE STORE. I CAN OFFER FINANCING IF NEEDED. CALL OR TEXT TODD AT (954)303-9454 707jenks.com Nice, big office spaces. 200 to 2,400 sq ft. Shared reception, conf. areas. Starting at $400 and up. (850)535-5028 (850)624-5634 Beach East End: Promenade Mall on Ft Beach Rd. 1000 sq ft. 3 offices reception for lease $1000 per month Call Don Nations Owner/Broker 850-814-4242 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Snowbird Special Beachfront Condo 2bd/2bth $1,200/mo January -March Call 330-879-5614 3 BR 2BA House located in lovely Lynn Haven. AC/Heated, reasonable rates, close to shopping, St. Andrews Bay, and city offices. 850-747-9033 Millville : Newly remodeled 2 BR/1BA no pets, w/d hookup, $650 mo + $650 dep, Call 850-785-7341 or 850-814-3211. SPRINGFIELD: Mobile Home 2 BR, 1 BA, very private, $495.00 month. Call Jean. 624-1997 or 872-8438 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.com Kings PointWaterfront home for sale. 4 BR/ 3B, hottub, inground pool with enclosure, covered boatlift, waverunner lift. $525,000 Call (850)527-6326 3202 MAGNOLIA ISLANDS Boulevard Panama City Beach Gorgeous New Orleans Style home located in the gated friendly community of The Preserve. This residence is surrounded by beautiful trees and the pool is privitely sacluded for lots of family fun. A stunning gourmet kitchen with double stacked ovens extra large pantry space and a wet bar for entertaining. Up the raw iron stair case the library with wrap-around bookcases. Three bedrooms up stairs and two down. The master bedroom is spacious and so is the master bathroom. His and her very large closets will make everyone happy. It has a beautiful entry way with a vaulted ceiling to welcome friends and family. This is a total charmer and there is plenty of room for the whole family. Did I mention 5 bathrooms? Colleen Dietrich Centergate Realty LLC (850)814-7298 4001 Riverside Dr. Beautiful custom built 3br/2ba. 3126sqft. $425,000. MLS #668301 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL92794 to 56654 St. Andrews Charmer 1303 Calhoun Avenue 2BR/2.5BA Newly renovated Price Reduced $166,900 MLS#670029 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850)866-2158 Commercial Bldg For Sale or Lease 4,000 sq ft, 15th Street -Large parking lot, previously car lot and pawn shop. Don Nations, Broker Call 850-814-4242 Colony Club/ PCB 2br 2Ba 1,200sqft 3rd floor corner unit Great Golf Course View Community Pool David Shearon 850-814-9098 MLS#674920 Text FL98207 to 56654 105 +/-Acres Hunting TractWaverly Rd. recreation fill dirt. 1,800 +/ft. road frontage. 10 mi. north of PC. 50/50% +/-wet/dry. $185,000 ($1,750 / acre) 850-865-8585 Jackson Co, FL377 Acres, $2,985.oo per Acre 145 Acres Cultivated/Irrigated 6,000 SQ FT Open Packing Shed 2,400 SQ FT Cooler with Loading Ramps Multiple Wells Excellent Hunting Call Kane 850-509-8817 *Like New*3 bd, 2 ba, Double wide Set up in quiet mobile home park. 200 ft. from swimming pool. **$27,388** In the heart of Panama City **850-960-8452** Mobile Home trailer for sale. 12’x70’ in good shape in Callaway. 334 Camelia Ave., Lot 4 Call 850-871-2629 BEST BUY ON THE COAST Yacht Club Homesite with boat slip. Gated, Luxury, Community. ONLY $49,880. Way under value!!! WWW.WATERFRONTLIFEFL.NET 1.855.459.1128 Florida Waterway Sales, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker WATERFRONT Protected deep water on Bayou with boat slip to handle over 40’ boat. Unobstructed access to Bay & Gulf. 15 minute run to pass & Gulf! Approximately 88x200 tree filled lot. NOW REDUCED $239,900! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors (850)785-8746 NF-1116606 NF-1190222 DODGE CHRYSLER JEEP RAM HYUNDAI MITSUBISHI LINCOLNSALARIED SALES POSITIONS! Come join the largest and busiest dealership in Bay County! We are looking to hire sales consultants for our New & Used Departments. Join our team and be able to sell from the largest selection of vehicles in the area. No experience necessary. We are offering a full training program! • $500/week plus commission! Please apply in person: 636 W. 15th Street Panama City, FL 32401Ask for Wayne Bailey. Toyota Tundra, 2007, Local trade Great Condition Priced at $13,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra, 2014, 4x4, Limited, Crew Cab, only 52k miles, brown, excellent condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Truck Headquarters!!!!! Every make and model from Gas to Diesel!!!! If I don’t have It, I’ll get it! Contact Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars 2011 Honda PCX 125 White Scooter Will do 65 mph asking price $2,250, OBO Needs tune up, hasn’t been ridden in 1 yr. 6000 miles, Call 850-276-4009 For Sale 16’ Carolina Skiff 30 hp Yamaha alum trailer, new fish finder, new batteries, trolling motor, everything runs good. $5700 850-832-9177 For Sale By Owner 16’ Bass Tracker with new 50 hp mercury four stroke outboard, only 9 hours. Boat completely redone. Electric anchor, new electronics and trailer to match. $9,000 Call 850-596-0652 Mazda CX-5, 2015, GT, only 52k miles, local trade, $15,998 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mitsubishi Outlander, 2014, Loaded with everything Super Clean! Only 16,998 Can Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ford F150, 2016, XLT, 4x4, silver, gray int, only 19k miles! 1 owner! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Crew Cab, 2013, only 34k miles, 1 owner, local trade, Like new! $24,988 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Laramie, 2018, white, beige int. You won’t be disappointed with this package! Like new! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2017, Laramie, LOADED! 4x4 Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500, 2018, Diesel or gas available! 4x4, white, Crew Cab, low miles! Come see me! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tacoma, 2017, SR5, gray on gray, 26k miles! Come take it for a test drive! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Porsche Cayman, 2014, black, beige lthr, only 13k miles, Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Infiniti QX80, 2015, only 39k miles, 3rd row, Immaculate! In the wrapper! $46,998 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Renegade Latitude, 2015, red, black int, only 32k miles! You won’t find a better Jeep for this price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 2010, Great buy! Only $18,998! Easy financing available! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 2014, LOADED! Only 40k miles! $34,995 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Sport, 2012, Great condition! 1 owner, 74k miles, $19,988 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, 2010, Lots of extras! Good miles, local trad. $20,988 Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Navigator, 2015, only 50k miles, black, lthr, nav, htd/cld seats. Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Honda Civic Coupe EX, 2015, white, gray int, only 41k miles, 29/38MPG, 1 owner. Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Elantra SE, 2017, black, gray int, Come see this little beauty and take a test drive! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz C300, 2014, black, beige int, 38k miles, Ride in style at a great price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Mitsubishi Mirage ES, 2018, white, dark gray int, 1 owner, less than 1k miles! Great asking price! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars Need a Car, Truck, or SUV??? Easy Financing Available! Over 300 new and used to choose from! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Nissan Altima, 2014, white, tan lthr, sunroof, backup cam, pwr seat, Bluetooth, & more! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Porsche 911 Turbo, 46k miles, very nice! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars For Sale By Owner 2007 Lexus ES 350 Good cond, maroon, only 2 owners, both non-smokers, tan leather interior, dual controls for A/C & heat, dual air conditioning and heated seats, tinted windows, drives very smooth $4500 OBO 850-774-0075 For Sale By Owner2015 Toyota Avalon Only 45 K, grey, excell. cond., $19,500 Call 850 769-1127 For Sale By Owner2015 Toyota Avalon Only 45 K, grey, excell. cond., $19,500 Call 850 769-1127 Ford Focus Titanium, 2013, Great MPG! Local Trade Only 74k miles Priced at #10,998 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Honda Accord Touring, 2016, black, 29k miles, lthr, sunroof, backup cam, 4dr sedan, Great condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars 1999 Porsche Boxster Black Convertible 75,000 miles body perfect shape needs motor $4,500 OBO. Fountain, FL 850-625-9451. 2009 Infinity M35 79K miles, white/tan, sunroof, all the bells and whistles! Second owner, garage kept. No damage history, new brakes, good tires, very, very clean car. A must see! (SE Walton County) $11,100 Call 850-974-3420 No Text. Buick Lacrosse, 2011, only 23k miles, beige, lthr, good tires, V6, Impeccable sedan! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Dodge Charger SE, 2014, granite, black int, 61k miles (which is awesome for a 2014!). You’ll look great driving in this beauty! Call Jon Megason 850-896-6582 @ Bay Cars For Sale By Owner 2004 Mercedes CLK 320 Convertible Only 45K miles, loaded, white w/ gray interior, new soft top, $11,500 Call 850-596-0652 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 D1 SPORTS BASEBALL | D3MLB ROUNDUPScores, stats, standings, and leaders from Thursdays games By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Its been four months since Mosley and Arnold met on the field for a spring jamboree, but the 21-7 Marlins victory in one half of play remains freshly in the memories of Dolphins play-ers and coaches.Theyll get a chance to turn the tables on their county and district rivals in a game with far greater consequences tonight at Tommy Oliver Stadium, as the Dolphins (5-0) play host to Arnold (3-1) in a District 1-6A contest at 7 p.m. Both teams are 1-0 against league competition, but with a win over defending district champion West Florida already under its belt, a move to 2-0 would put Mosley in an especially strong position to win the league.However, Mosley coach Jeremy Brown said thats not even his teams primary motivation heading into the game."We havent really even talked about the district ramifications or any of that," he said. "Weve just talked about how its Arnold and its a county game and our first goal is always to win the county championship. I feel like if we win the county championship, that gives us a leg up, so weve just been approaching it as a county game and a rivalry game. They dont really like us that much and we dont really like them that much either."While it was Arnold that looked like the dominant team in the county back in the spring, its Mosley that has looked the part in the fall, winning all five games to start the year by an average margin of 26.8 points per game. The Marlins have been pretty good as well, with a 21-7 home loss to Fort Walton Beach on Aug. 31 their only setback.Mosley, Arnold Part 2: More at stakeMosleys Alex Noble runs the ball against Fort Walton Beach during a game last week. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See MOSLEY, D2Rutherford takes errorplagued game, 13-7By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ On a night featuring eight total turnovers and penalties eras-ing big plays on both sides, Thursdays matchup between Rutherford and Walton wasnt exactly a game for the time capsule.For a team desperately in need of a victory, however, the 13-7 triumph was more than enough to make it a sat-isfying night for Rutherford. The Rams snapped a threegame losing skid with the win to improve to 2-4 on the season. Walton remains win-less at 0-6.Rutherford won despite committing three turnovers and six penalties, one of which took away a 50-yard run by Janathan Proctor, thanks to two field goals from Billy Thompson and a 68-yard touchdown run by Proctor late in the third quarter."Well, we sure didnt play well, but I thought we did play pretty well on defense and I thought the special teams was improved," Rams coach Loren Tillman said. "Offensively, weve still got to find an identity, but I was proud of the defense and the special teams. The guys pulled out a win and thats what we needed to do tonight to still have a chance at the playoffs."Proctor led Rutherford offensively with eight carries for 78 yards, followed by Montell Bouie with 68 yards on 12 attempts. Brian Edwards also carried seven times for 41 yards. Reggie Tubbs completed 3 of 7 passes for 26 yards. Walton rotated quarterbacks Dalton White-hurst and Landon Rogers, with Whitehurst completing 8 of 15 for 71 yards and Rogers 3 of 8 for 44 yards and a touchdown.Each Walton signal-caller was intercepted by Jaylen Bouie, who returned the second interception 43 yards to the Walton 34-yard line with 4:14 to play with his team nursing a six-point advantage. Rutherford gave it right back two plays later with a fumble by Montell Bouie, but the Rams defense held firm and forced a turnover on downs when Jaylen Bouie broke up a fourth-and-17 pass from the Walton 46-yard line by Rogers with 44 seconds to play.Rutherfords first points of the night came following one of Waltons five turnovers, with a fumble at theBraves 22-yard line resulting in a 24-yard field goal by Thompson with 8:42 left in the second quarter. Another Braves fumble gave it back to the Rams in Walton territory with 24 seconds until halftime, with a 24-yard pass from Tubbs to Donovan Smith setting up a 31-yard field goal by Thompson to make it 6-0 at the break.The Rams only touchdown of the night started as a near disaster, as Proctor bobbled a shotgun snap and scooped it off the turf to avoid a turnover before turning up field and racing through the Walton defense for a 68-yard score. The extra point by Thompson made it 13-0 with 2:58 left in the third quarter.Rams keep Braves winlessWalton quarterback Dalton Whitehurst is smothered by a pair of Rutherford defenders during Thursdays game at Tommy Oliver Stad ium. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] O ensively, weve still got to nd an identity, but I was proud of the defense and the special teams. The guys pulled out a win and thats what we needed to do tonight to still have a chance at the playo s.ŽRams coach Loren Tillman See RAMS, D2By Kyle HightowerAP Sports WriterFOXBOROUGH, Mass. „ Using some occasional trickery against the Patriots has previ-ously been a winning formula for the Dolphins.The last time Miami won at New England was in 2008, when Tom Brady was sidelined for the season and the Dolphins sprung the wildcat on Patriots coach Bill Belichick in a 38-13 rout.Trickery is also a big reason why the Dolphins will arrive at Gillette Stadium on Sunday with a 3-0 record and sitting atop the AFC East They havent been 4-0 since 1995 „ Don Shulas last season as coach.But getting there again will be tough. Since the Dolphins 2008 win, the Patriots have won nine straight at home in the series. Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is 14-1 at home as a starter against Miami. His lone loss was in the final game of the 2005 season, when he was pulled after the first quarter.Miami will also be facing a New England team that has lost two in a row and is coming off a humbling 26-10 loss at Detroit that underscored the Patriots weaknesses on both sides of the ball. The Patriots havent started 1-3 since 2001."Any time you play them at their place, its a challenge," Dolphins coach Adam Gase said. "Thats why theyre one of the best teams. If you look at the last 15 years, its ridicu-lous how well they do at home compared to everybody else. The crowd is extremely loud, and its a tough environment to play in."After missing last season because of a torn ACL in his left knee, Miami quarterback Ryan Tannehill has started this season strong. He has completed 73 percent of his passes, while throwing seven touchdowns and just two interceptions.He has won 10 of his past 11 starts overall, but hes 0-5 in games at Foxborough, with five touchdown passes and nine interceptions in those games."Weve had our opportuni-ties up there," Tannehill said. "Weve put halves of football together, but havent played a full game. Thats going to be a big emphasis for us this week „ to go up and play a full four quarters."Unbeaten Dolphins look to earn rare road win vs. PatriotsSee DOLPHINS, D6

PAGE 22

** D2 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald The News HeraldPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Arnolds girls volleyball team won its second straight match Thursday night to move to 10-9 overall and 2-0 in District 1-6A, knocking off Bay 25-17, 25-14, 25-0. The Tornadoes fell to 9-11 overall and 2-4 in the district.Bethany Wohlford led the Marlins in kills with seven, followed by Sarah Livingstone and Gabbie Carlini with four each. Darcy Hawes was the top playmaker for Arnold with 16 assists, followed by Kaylan Gunning with eight, while Anna Lee Vaught had a team-high nine digs. Gigi Carlini also had five digs and Sydney Painter had four. Living-stone also led Arnold with two blocks and Hayes with two aces.Yasmine Trammell and Kilee Hudson each had seven kills to lead the way for the Tornadoes, with Hailey Dunnigan adding three kills and two aces. Ashleigh Koch added a team-best 16 assists. Hudson led with six digs.Arnold next plays host to Blountstown on Monday, with going to Port St. Joe on Tuesday. Rutherford 3, Franklin County 2SPRINGFIELD „ The Rams snapped a five-match losing streak with the five-set win, taking it 18-25, 20-25, 25-18, 25-17, 15-10 to improve to 3-13 on the season.Joydon Westinghouse led Rutherford with 15 kills to go with three ace serves, while Alexandra Mears added five kills and three aces. Alysa Miller had four aces and seven digs, with Aleah Colter adding three digs and two aces. Kira Nguyen had two aces and three kills.Rutherford next plays Tuesday at home against Mosley. Franklin County, which dropped to 4-11, travels to Chipley on Tuesday. Blountstown 3, Bozeman 0SAND HILLS „ The Tigers won their 14th straight match to improve to 16-3 on the season and 6-0 in District 3-1A, while the Bucks fell to 5-8 overall and 2-3 in league play. Blountstown took the match 25-9, 25-6, 25-10.Bozeman next plays Saturday at home against West Florida. Blountstown is at Arnold on Monday.PREP ROUNDERArnold tops Bay in 3 "Hes a special player," Tillman said of Proctor. "He can turn a busted play into a big play in a heartbeat."Walton immediately answered with a 13-play, 65-yard scoring march culminating in an 18-yard touchdown toss from Rogers to Kazeri Freeman with 10:19 remaining. The Braves started their next two series at their own 48 and the Rutherford 44 but couldnt capitalize either time, with the first ending in a punt and the second in an interception.The Braves got a fourth-and-12 conversion on their final drive on a 14-yard pass from Rogers to Freeman at the Rutherford 47-yard line. But a bad shotgun snap resulted in a 7-yard loss by Rogers on the next play, and three straight incompletions gave it back to the Rams.Rutherford next plays Oct. 5 at Arnold, while Walton is home the same night against Port St. Joe. RAMSFrom Page D1By Greg BeachamThe Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ Jared Goff turned a phenomenal first half into the biggest game of his career, and it was still just barely enough to beat Kirk Cousins.Goff passed for career highs of 465 yards and five touchdowns, winning a scintillating duel with his Minnesota counterpart and leading the unbeaten Los Angeles Rams to a 38-31 victory over the Vikings on Thursday night.Goff hit Cooper Kupp with two of his four TD throws during a 251-yard first half in which the third-year quarterback flawlessly executed coach Sean McVays offense. It was just great com-mand by him,Ž McVay said about Goff.Todd Gurley then finished with 83 yards rushing and 73 yards receiving while the Rams (4-0) held off the Vikings (1-2-1) and Cousins, who passed for 422 yards and three touchdowns.The Vikings got the ball back with 2:20 left, but Los Angeles rookie John Franklin-Myers stripped Cousins of the ball near midfield. The Rams recovered and ran out the clock on their first win in the franchises last six meetings with Minnesota.McVay was Cousins offensive coordinator in Washington before he became Goffs head coach on the West Coast last season. McVays current and former prize pupils put on a show at the Col-iseum, but Goff finished 26 of 33 with a perfect 158.3 quarterback rating.Go has 465 yards, 5 TDs, propels Rams past VikingsStill, Arnold coach Josh Wright said hes aware that many neutral observers are favoring the Dolphins to win tonight and that hes just fine with that."I give (the Dolphins) credit where its due, and we accept that no one wants to give us any credit until weve earned it," he said. "We feel that the consensus is that were not in their league, but we dont really listen too much to the outside world. This is the same team we got on the field with in the spring and had success with, but obviously the spring is different. Theyre more honed and developed now and theyre playing good football."The Dolphins have sported a balanced offensive attack thus far, with senior quarterback Michael Maddox pass-ing for 633 yards and six touch downs without an interception, while the ground game is averag-ing 189 yards per contest led by Don McKay at 316 yards and four touch-downs and Jacarri Greene with 232 yard and four scores.Daveno Ellington has been perhaps the Dolphins most dangerous offensive player this season, reeling in 16 passes for 368 yard and five touchdowns. Alex Noble has been their most versatile weapon, catching 10 passes for 151 yards and a touchdown and rushing 18 times for 145 yards."They dont have a whole lot of weak spots," Wright said of the Dolphins. "I think theyre a much better team than they were a year ago. I think the quarterback is a good game manager and has got a good arm and throws a lot of catchable balls for their receivers to go get. I think (offen-sive coordinator Chad Weeks) does a good job getting the ball into dif-ferent guys hands."While Mosley has been able to make several big plays in the passing game, Brown said ulti-mately this game will be determined by how well the Dolphins can run the ball on offense and stop the run on defense."I think any time you go through any level of football when its a rivalry game, the team that wins the line of scrimmage probably has the best chance to win," he said. "Youre going to have your big plays, but the team that can con-sistently run the ball will probably win."The Marlins will present a significant challenge for the Mosley defense with their rush-ing attack, with senior running back Jerian Hardrick and senior quarterback Cade Ledman combining for 869 yards on the ground and 11 touchdowns. Ledman had a rushing and passing touchdown and Hardrick added the other in the Marlins spring win. Although it was just a half of football its a half that Brown said his players still discuss even four months later."We talk about it and I think its definitely fresh in the kids minds," he said. "We dont make a ton of excuses when we lose whether its the reg-ular season or the spring. It was set up in the spring as a two quarter game, but it meant something to us and we didnt get it done. I told the kids this is another opportunity to get a win against a team that you beat you the last time. I hope the kids take that mindset with them to the game and try to get a win this time." Bozeman (2-2) at Vernon (2-1)The Bucks return to the field following an open week with a new look at the quarterback position, as junior Blake Embrick will start and take the majority of the reps after previously splitting them 50-50 with senior Zach Foster.Bozeman coach Jason Griffin said both Embrick and Foster have "responded well" to the change, with Foster embracing a larger role at wide receiver."Zachs attitude has been fantastic," he said. "Hes playing wide receiver and doing some good things for us. Hes contributing as much if not more than he was before."The Bucks will face perhaps their toughest test yet in a Vernon squad has been dominant since an opening loss to Baker, beating Chipley 54-0 and Blue Ridge (S.C.) 34-6. The Yellowjackets have a dynamic sophomore 1-2 punch in the backfield in highly-touted running back Kwan Powell and dual-threat quarterback Dyvion Bush that Grif-fin said will pose a major threat to his defense."Theyre incredibly talented," he said. "Everybody knows (Powell) is a heck of a player, but I think (Bush) is a really special player too. Every time he plays he gets a little better. Hes very good throwing the ball and hurts you when hes running as well. Its a very tal-ented football team. The kids know we have to play good football to put ourselves in position to be there at the end and have a chance to win." Other area games (7 p.m. unless noted)Bay at Pensacola, Lighthouse Christian Academy vs. North Bay Haven at Bozeman, North Florida Educational Institute at Port St. Joe 6:30 p.m. Central Time, Blountstown at Holmes County, Wewahitchka at Sneads, Graceville at Autauga Academy. MOSLEYFrom Page D1 Arnold quarterback Cade Ledman tries to elude the tackle of a Bay player during a game earlier this season. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD]

PAGE 23

** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 D3AMERICAN LEAGUE x-clinched division; y-clinched wild cardNATIONAL LEAGUE z-clinched playoff berth; x-clinched division EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Boston 107 52 .673 „ „ 5-5 L-1 56-22 51-30 y-New York 98 61 .616 9 „ 7-3 W-1 53-28 45-33 Tampa Bay 88 71 .553 19 8 5-5 L-1 49-29 39-42 Toronto 72 87 .453 35 24 5-5 W-1 40-41 32-46 Baltimore 46 112 .291 60 49 4-6 W-1 27-50 19-62 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Cleveland 89 69 .563 „ „ 6-4 W-1 49-32 40-37 Minnesota 73 84 .465 15 22 6-4 W-1 44-32 29-52 Detroit 64 94 .405 25 31 4-6 L-1 38-43 26-51 Chicago 62 96 .392 27 33 3-7 L-1 30-51 32-45 Kansas City 56 102 .354 33 39 4-6 W-3 30-47 26-55 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Houston 100 58 .633 „ „ 7-3 L-1 46-35 54-23 y-Oakland 96 63 .604 4 „ 6-4 W-1 50-31 46-32 Seattle 86 72 .544 14 9 4-6 L-1 42-35 44-37 Los Angeles 78 81 .491 22 18 5-5 W-3 40-38 38-43 Texas 66 92 .418 34 29 2-8 L-3 34-47 32-45 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY x-Atlanta 89 70 .560 „ „ 6-4 L-2 43-38 46-32 Washington 81 78 .509 8 7 6-4 W-3 41-40 40-38 Philadelphia 78 81 .491 11 10 2-8 L-8 47-31 31-50 New York 75 84 .472 14 13 6-4 W-2 35-43 40-41 Miami 62 96 .392 26 25 5-5 L-3 38-43 24-53 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY z-Chicago 93 66 .585 „ „ 6-4 W-2 49-29 44-37 z-Milwaukee 92 67 .579 1 „ 7-3 W-4 48-30 44-37 St. Louis 87 72 .547 6 1 6-4 L-3 43-38 44-34 Pittsburgh 80 78 .506 12 7 6-4 L-2 44-36 36-42 Cincinnati 66 93 .415 27 22 3-7 L-5 36-42 30-51 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Colorado 89 70 .560 „ „ 7-3 W-7 45-33 44-37 Los Angeles 88 71 .553 1 „ 6-4 L-2 44-37 44-34 Arizona 81 78 .509 8 7 3-7 W-2 40-41 41-37 San Francisco 73 86 .459 16 15 3-7 L-1 42-36 31-50 San Diego 64 95 .403 25 24 5-5 W-1 29-49 35-46 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLROCKIES 5, PHILLIES 3 PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Bautista rf 2 1 1 1 1 1 .200 b-Bour ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .230 1-Williams pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Hunter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Loup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Crawford ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Quinn cf 3 0 0 0 2 2 .281 Hoskins 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .245 S antana 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .228 Cozens lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .152 Kingery ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .229 Knapp c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .202 A rrieta p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .133 a-Florimon ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .225 T OTALS 35 3 8 3 4 14 COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .287 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Dahl lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .282 A renado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .296 S tory ss 3 1 1 1 1 0 .291 Gonzalez rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .276 Desmond 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Iannetta c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 S enzatela p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .083 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Parra ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --T OTALS 34 5 9 4 1 4 PHILADELPHIA 001 000 020 „ 3 8 1 COLORADO 120 000 20X „ 5 9 0 a-struck out for Arrieta in the 7th. b-singled f or Bautista in the 7th. c-homered for Oh in t he 7th. d-struck out for Neris in the 9th. 1-ran for Bour in the 7th. E„Hernandez (12). LOB„Philadelphia 10, Colorado 6. 2B„Santana (28), Cozens (1), Kingery (23), Blackmon (30), Arenado (37), Gonzalez (31). 3B„Dahl (3). HR„Bautista (13), off Senzatela Santana (24), off Ottavino Dahl (14), off Arrieta Story (35), off A rrieta Parra (6), off Hunter. RBIs„Bautista (48), Santana 2 (85), Dahl 2 (44), Story (105), Parra (53). SB„Cozens (1). Runners left in scoring position„ Philadelphia 6 (Hoskins, Santana, Knapp, A rrieta 2, Florimon) Colorado 4 (Story, Gonzalez, Desmond 2). RISP„Philadelphia 1 f or 11 Colorado 1 for 6. Runners moved up„LeMahieu. PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A rrieta, L, 10-11 6 6 3 3 1 3 103 3.96 Hunter .1 3 2 2 0 0 10 3.88 Neshek .2 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.59 Loup .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.62 Neris .2 0 0 0 0 1 4 5.32 COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S enzatela 4.2 5 1 1 3 4 95 4.38 Oberg, W, 8-1 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 13 2.51 Oh, H, 21 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 2.65 Ottavino 1 1 2 2 1 3 29 2.47 Davis, S, 42-48 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 4.20 Inherited runners-scored„Neshek 1-0, Oberg 2-0. HBP„Ottavino (Hoskins). WP„ A rrieta. PB„Knapp (6). Umpires„Home, Jim Reynolds First, Mark Wegner Second, John Tumpane Third, Todd T ichenor. T „3:06. A„36,448 (50,398). Y ANKEES 12, RAYS 1 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Gardner cf 4 3 2 1 1 0 .239 J udge rf 2 0 0 2 0 1 .278 Bird 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 V oit 1b 3 2 3 2 1 0 .319 T orreyes 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 S tanton lf 3 3 2 2 2 1 .262 W alker 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .217 W ade rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175 A ndujar dh 4 1 2 3 0 0 .296 a-Higashioka ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .171 T orres 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .274 Romine c 4 1 1 1 0 3 .244 Hechavarria ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .250 T OTALS 37 12 13 11 4 10 T AMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S mith cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .291 Pham lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .273 W endle 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .300 V elazquez 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Cron dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .255 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .239 A dames ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Bauers 1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .197 Gomez rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .210 S ucre c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .212 T OTALS 29 1 2 1 1 12 NEW YORK 400 304 001 „ 12 13 0 T AMPA BAY 000 000 100 „ 1 2 0 a-”ied out for Andujar in the 9th. LOB„New York 4, Tampa Bay 4. 2B„Gardner (20), Voit (5). 3B„Gardner (7). HR„Andujar (27), off Schultz Voit (13), off Kittredge Stanton (36), off Kittredge Stanton (37), off Milner Cron (29), off Cessa. RBIs„Gardner (45), Judge 2 (66), Voit 2 (33), Stanton 2 (97), Andujar 3 (90), Romine (41), Cron (72). S B„Gardner (16). SF„Judge 2. Runners left in scoring position„New York 3 (Stanton, Andujar 2) Tampa Bay 1 (Wendle). RISP„New York 3 for 9 Tampa Bay 0 for 1. Runners moved up„Walker. GIDP„Torres. DP„Tampa Bay 1 (Wendle, Lowe, Bauers). NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S abathia, W, 9-7 5 1 0 0 0 5 55 3.65 Cessa 3 1 1 1 0 5 42 4.67 Loaisiga 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 5.56 T AMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S chultz, L, 2-2 .2 2 4 4 2 2 32 5.64 Pruitt 3.1 5 3 3 1 2 50 4.75 Kittredge 2 5 4 4 0 2 35 7.75 Hu 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.15 Wood 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 3.57 Milner 1 1 1 1 0 2 20 7.71 Sabathia pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored„Cessa 1-0. HBP„ Sabathia 2 (Bauers,Sucre). WP„Schultz, Cessa. PB„Sucre (6). Umpires„Home, Vic Carapazza First, Jerry Layne Second, Jordan Baker Third, Greg Gibson. T„2:49. A„12,349 (42,735).METS 4, BRAVES 1 ATLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Acuna cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .290 Albies 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .264 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .299 Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .274 Camargo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .270 Culberson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Duvall lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .194 Flaherty 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .220 d-Freeman ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .308 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175 Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ruiz ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Flowers ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Fried p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 TOTALS 32 1 6 1 1 8 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Nimmo cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .260 Rosario ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .257 McNeil 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .329 Conforto lf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .245 Bruce rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .230 Frazier 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .211 Do.Smith 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Plawecki c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .216 Vargas p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .148 a-Mesoraco ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .222 Swarzak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Zamora p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dr.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 29 4 5 4 4 10 ATLANTA 000 000 010 „ 1 6 0 NEW YORK 001 000 30X „ 4 5 0 a-homered for Vargas in the 7th. b-pinch hit for Brach in the 8th. c-struck out for Ruiz in the 8th. d-struck out for Flaherty in the 9th. LOB„Atlanta 7, New York 5. 2B„Nimmo (28). HR„Plawecki (7), off Teheran Mesoraco (11), off Brach. RBIs„Acuna (61), Plawecki (30), Mesoraco 3 (33). SB„ Conforto (3). S„Teheran. Runners left in scoring position„Atlanta 4 (Acuna, Markakis 2, Freeman) New York 4 (Conforto 2, Frazier 2). RISP„Atlanta 1 for 7 New York 1 for 10. Runners moved up„Albies, Rosario. ATLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran, L, 9-9 6 2 1 1 2 5 91 3.94 Biddle .1 1 2 2 1 1 12 3.16 Brach .2 1 1 1 0 1 16 3.65 Fried 1 1 0 0 1 3 19 3.03 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas, W, 7-9 7 3 0 0 0 6 77 5.77 Swarzak 0 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.39 Zamora, H, 5 .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.38 Dr.Smith, H, 4 .2 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.67 Gsellman, S, 13-20 1 1 0 0 0 1 21 4.28 Swarzak pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Brach 2-2, Zamora 2-0, Dr.Smith 2-1. HBP„Gsellman (Duvall). Umpires„Home, Fieldin Culbreth First, Brian ONora Second, Chris Conroy Third, CB Bucknor. T„2:41. A„24,824 (41,922).CUBS 3, PIRATES 0 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Reyes lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .314 Marte cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .274 Bell 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .264 Cervelli c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .259 Osuna rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Harrison 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Moran 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275 Mercer ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .253 Williams p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .116 Neverauskas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kramer ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .107 Holmes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 TOTALS 31 0 4 0 5 5 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Murphy 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Almora cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Zobrist rf-2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .310 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Baez ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .293 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .241 Chavez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Happ cf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .234 1-Gore pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Lester p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .119 a-La Stella ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Edwards Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Heyward ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Bote 3b 2 0 1 2 1 1 .239 TOTALS 32 3 10 3 3 7 PITTSBURGH 000 000 000 „ 0 4 0 CHICAGO 020 100 00X „ 3 10 1 a-doubled for Lester in the 6th. b-”ied out for Neverauskas in the 7th. c-struck out for Edwards Jr. in the 8th. d-out on “elders choice for Holmes in the 9th. 1-ran for Happ in the 8th. E„Bote (4). LOB„Pittsburgh 9, Chicago 8. 2B„Moran (18), Zobrist (28), Baez (39), Contreras (27), La Stella (8). 3B„Bote (2). RBIs„Murphy (41), Bote 2 (32). SB„Bell (2), Gore (6). CS„Happ (4). Runners left in scoring position„Pittsburgh 6 (Reyes 2, Osuna 2, Harrison 2) Chicago 6 (Murphy 2, Zobrist, Baez, Happ, Heyward). RISP„Pittsburgh 0 for 10 Chicago 3 for 15. Runners moved up„Williams, Cervelli, Contreras. GIDP„Cervelli. DP„Chicago 1 (Baez, Murphy, Rizzo). PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, L, 14-10 5 8 3 3 3 4 98 3.11 Neverauskas 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 7.92 Holmes 2 1 0 0 0 2 31 7.25 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, W, 18-6 6 3 0 0 4 3 108 3.32 Cishek, H, 25 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.22 Edwards Jr., H, 23 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.63 Chavez, S, 5-6 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.63 WP„Williams. Umpires„Home, Jim Wolf First, Alfonso Marquez Second, D.J. Reyburn Third, Sam Holbrook. T„2:53. A„38,415 (41,649).STATISTICAL LEADERSAMERICAN LEAGUE RUNS: Betts, Boston, 126; Lindor, Cleveland, 125; Martinez, Boston, 109; Ramirez, Cleveland, 107; Bregman, Houston, 104; Benintendi, Boston, 102; Springer, Houston, 100; Trout, Los Angeles, 99; Chapman, Oakland, 98; Stanton, New York, 98. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 127; Davis, Oakland, 121; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 105; Ramirez, Cleveland, 104; Bregman, Houston, 103; Bogaerts, Boston, 100; Cruz, Seattle, 96; Lowrie, Oakland, 96; Stanton, New York, 95; Gallo, Texas, 92. HITS: Merri“eld, Kansas City, 186; Martinez, Boston, 185; Castellanos, Detroit, 181; Lindor, Cleveland, 180; Betts, Boston, 178; Segura, Seattle, 175; Brantley, Cleveland, 173; Bregman, Houston, 169; Haniger, Seattle, 166; Altuve, Houston, 165. HOME RUNS: Davis, Oakland, 47; Martinez, Boston, 42; Gallo, Texas, 40; Ramirez, Cleveland, 38; Trout, Los Angeles, 38; Cruz, Seattle, 37; Lindor, Cleveland, 37; Stanton, New York, 35; Betts, Boston, 32; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 32. STOLEN BASES: Merri“eld, Kansas City, 41; Smith, Tampa Bay, 37; Ramirez, Cleveland, 33; Betts, Boston, 30; Gordon, Seattle, 30; Mondesi, Kansas City, 28; Anderson, Chicago, 26; Trout, Los Angeles, 24; Lindor, Cleveland, 23; 2 tied at 21. PITCHING: Snell, Tampa Bay, 21-5; Kluber, Cleveland, 20-7; Severino, New York, 19-8; Porcello, Boston, 17-7; Carrasco, Cleveland, 16-10; Happ, New York, 16-6; Price, Boston, 16-7; Verlander, Houston, 16-9; 3 tied at 15. ERA: Snell, Tampa Bay, 1.90; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.26; Verlander, Houston, 2.60; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.83; Cole, Houston, 2.92; Clevinger, Cleveland, 3.07; Morton, Houston, 3.18; Fiers, Oakland, 3.31; Severino, New York, 3.39; Carrasco, Cleveland, 3.42. STRIKEOUTS: Verlander, Houston, 280; Cole, Houston, 272; Sale, Boston, 237; Carrasco, Cleveland, 225; Severino, New York, 220; Bauer, Cleveland, 219; Kluber, Cleveland, 216; Snell, Tampa Bay, 211; Clevinger, Cleveland, 202; Paxton, Seattle, 199. NATIONAL LEAGUE RUNS: Blackmon, Colorado, 115; Yelich, Milwaukee, 112; Carpenter, St. Louis, 108; Albies, Atlanta, 104; Harper, Washington, 101; Turner, Washington, 101; Arenado, Colorado, 100. I: Baez, Chicago, 111; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 105; Arenado, Colorado, 105; Story, Colorado, 105; Yelich, Milwaukee, 104; Suarez, Cincinnati, 101; Harper, Washington, 100; Rizzo, Chicago, 97; Freeman, Atlanta, 95; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 94. HITS: Freeman, Atlanta, 187; Markakis, Atlanta, 184; Gennett, Cincinnati, 181; Peraza, Cincinnati, 181; Yelich, Milwaukee, 181; Blackmon, Colorado, 175; Turner, Washington, 175; Baez, Chicago, 172; 3 tied at 170. HOME RUNS: Carpenter, St. Louis, 36; Story, Colorado, 35; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 34; Arenado, Colorado, 34; Baez, Chicago, 34; Harper, Washington, 34; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 33; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 33; Muncy, Los Angeles, 33; Yelich, Milwaukee, 33. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 43; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 33; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 32; Cain, Milwaukee, 30; Inciarte, Atlanta, 28; Story, Colorado, 26; Jankowski, San Diego, 24; MTaylor, Washington, 24; Peraza, Cincinnati, 23; Rosario, New York, 22. PITCHING: Scherzer, Washington, 18-7; Lester, Chicago, 17-6; Mikolas, St. Louis, 17-4; Freeland, Colorado, 16-7; Nola, Philadelphia, 16-6; Chacin, Milwaukee, 15-8; Greinke, Arizona, 15-11; 4 tied at 14. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.70; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.46; Scherzer, Washington, 2.53; Freeland, Colorado, 2.84; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.88; Mikolas, St. Louis, 2.94; Williams, Pittsburgh, 3.04; Taillon, Pittsburgh, 3.16; Greinke, Arizona, 3.21; Corbin, Arizona, 3.23. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 300; deGrom, New York, 269; Corbin, Arizona, 242; Marquez, Colorado, 221; Nola, Philadelphia, 216; Greinke, Arizona, 199; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 193; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 188; Gray, Colorado, 182; Godley, Arizona, 180.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSRockies 5, Phillies 3: David Dahl homered for the fourth straight game, and the Colorado Rockies opened a one-game NL West lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers with a victory over the Philadelphia Phillies that extended their winning streak to seven. Trevor Story and Gerardo Parra also went deep for the Rockies (89-70), who matched their losing winning streak this season. Dahl hit a run-scoring triple and “nished the four-game sweep with eight hits and 11 RBIs. Cubs 3, Pirates 0: David Botes two-run triple and Jon Lesters six shutout innings helped the Cubs hold onto sole possession of “rst place in the NL Central. Lester allowed three hits and four walks. Mets 4, Braves 1: Jason Vargas tossed seven shutout innings in his best start of the season as he helped New York blank the Braves for the second day in a row. Julio Teheran looked sharp in his last audition to become part of Atlantas playoff rotation, pitching two-hit ball for six innings. Yankees 12, Rays 1: Miguel Andujar and Luke Voit went deep for the Yankees, who ensured their winningest season since going 103-59 en route to the 2009 World Series title and moved two games ahead of Oakland for hosting the Oct. 3 wild-card game. CC Sabathia was ejected in the sixth inning for hitting Jesus Sucre. LATE Detroit at Minnesota Cleveland at Kansas City Texas at Seattle POSTPONED Houston at BaltimoreTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA St. Louis Wainwright (R) 2-3 4.08 4-3 1-0 17.1 4.15 Chicago Hendricks (R) 2:20p 13-11 3.49 17-15 2-1 21.1 1.69 Pittsburgh Kingham (R) 5-7 5.23 5-9 0-2 7.1 9.82 Cincinnati DeSclafani (R) 6:40p 7-7 4.91 11-9 0-3 15.1 7.04 Atlanta Gausman (R) 10-10 3.93 13-17 1-1 16.2 5.40 Philadelphia Eickhoff (R) 7:05p 0-0 9.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Miami Urena (R) 8-12 4.07 11-19 3-0 17.0 1.06 New York Oswalt (R) 7:10p 3-3 6.08 4-7 0-1 10.2 3.38 Washington Ross (R) 0-1 3.75 1-2 0-1 12.0 3.75 Colorado Freeland (L) 8:10p 16-7 2.84 22-10 2-0 20.0 2.25 Arizona Corbin (L) 11-7 3.23 17-15 0-2 15.1 5.87 San Diego Lauer (L) 10:10p 6-7 4.60 8-14 1-0 14.0 1.93 Los Angeles Ryu (L) 6-3 2.00 9-5 2-1 18.0 1.50 San Francisco Bum garner (L) 10:15p 6-6 3.20 9-11 1-1 18.0 4.00AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Chicago Lopez (R) 7-9 3.94 13-18 2-0 20.0 0.45 Minnesota Berrios (R) 2:10p 11-11 3.93 15-16 0-1 17.2 4.08 Houston Verlander (R) 16-9 2.60 20-13 2-0 20.0 1.35 Baltimore Ramirez (R) 7:05p 1-7 6.07 3-8 0-3 12.1 10.22 New York Happ (L) 16-6 3.57 20-10 1-0 17.0 0.53 Boston Johnson (L) 7:10p 4-4 4.11 9-3 0-1 10.0 7.20 Toronto Pannone (L) 4-1 3.58 4-1 3-0 20.0 2.70 Tampa Bay Glasnow (R) 7:10p 2-7 4.23 4-6 1-2 19.0 2.37 Chicago Giolito (R) 10-12 5.81 14-17 0-2 19.2 5.49 Minnesota De Jong (R) 8:10p 0-1 3.86 1-2 0-1 11.2 3.86 Cleveland Clevinger (R) 12-8 3.07 15-16 1-1 17.0 2.65 Kansas City Kennedy (R) 8:15p 3-8 4.59 6-15 2-0 19.0 1.89 Oakland Fiers (R) 12-7 3.31 21-9 1-1 16.0 2.81 Los Angeles Barria (R) 10:07p 10-9 3.54 12-13 0-1 13.0 5.54 Texas Perez (L) 2-6 6.13 4-10 0-1 15.0 6.60 Seattle LeBlanc (L) 10:10p 8-5 3.55 16-10 0-2 15.1 3.52INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Detroit Zimmermann (R) 7-8 4.31 11-13 0-2 15.2 6.32 Milwaukee Davies (R) 8:10p 2-7 4.65 4-8 0-2 14.0 3.86 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. THIS DATE IN BASEBALLSept. 28 1919: In the shortest nine-inning game in major league history, 51 minutes, the New York Giants beat the Philadelphia Phillies 6-1. 1920: A grand jury indicted eight members of the Chicago White Sox on charges of “xing the 1919 World Series in the Black Sox Scandal.Ž 1938: Gabby Hartnett hit his famous Homer in the GloaminŽ in the ninth inning against Mace Brown to give the Chicago Cubs a 6-5 victory, their ninth straight, at Wrigley Field. It was a key triumph en route to the Cubs NL pennant. 1941: Ted Williams went 6-for-8 in a doubleheader against the Philadelphia As to “nish the season with a .406 average. No player has batted .400 since. 1951: Allie Reynolds pitched his second no-hitter of the season as the New York Yankees defeated the Boston Red Sox, 8-0, in the opener of a doubleheader. The Yankees clinched the AL pennant with an 11-3 victory in the nightcap. 1960: Ted Williams homered in his “nal major league plate appearance, against Baltimores Jack Fisher. Williams did not take a curtain call, but he trotted out to left “eld in the ninth and was replaced immediately by Carroll Hardy and retired to a standing ovation. It was Williams 521st career home run. The Red Sox rallied for two runs in the ninth for a 5-4 victory. 1974: Nolan Ryan pitched his third of seven career no-hitters, striking out 15 batters and beating the Minnesota Twins, 4-0, at Anaheim Stadium.WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League Boston 19, Baltimore 3, 1st game Toronto 3, Houston 1 Baltimore 10, Boston 3, 2nd game Tampa Bay 8, N.Y. Yankees 7 Cleveland 10, Chicago White Sox 2 Minnesota 11, Detroit 4 L.A. Angels 3, Texas 2 Oakland 9, Seattle 3 National League Washington 9, Miami 3, 7 innings Milwaukee 2, St. Louis 1 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0 Chicago Cubs 7, Pittsburgh 6, 10 innings Colorado 14, Philadelphia 0 Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 San Diego 3, San Francisco 2 Interleague Kansas City 6, Cincinnati 1 SATURDAYS GAMES American League N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 1:05 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 7:15 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 9:07 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. National League St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Washington at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 8:40 p.m. Interleague Detroit at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.MLB CALENDAROct. 2-3: Wild-card games. Oct. 4: Division Series start. Oct. 12: League Championship Series start. Oct. 23: World Series starts. November TBA: Deadline for teams to make qualifying offers to their eligible former players who became free agents, “fth day after World Series. November TBA: Deadline for free agents to accept qualifying offers, 15th day after World Series. Nov. 6-8: General managers meetings, Carlsbad, Calif. Nov. 8-15: All-Star tour of Japan. Nov. 14-15: Owners meetings, Atlanta. TOP TEN A MERICAN LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Betts Bos 134 515 126 178 .346 JMartinez Bos 147 560 109 185 .330 Altuve Hou 134 525 84 165 .314 Trout LAA 137 463 99 145 .313 Brantley Cle 140 559 88 173 .309 Segura Sea 141 577 90 175 .303 Merri“eld KC 154 614 87 186 .303 Wendle TB 137 480 60 144 .300 Castellanos Det 153 604 85 181 .300 Andujar NYY 146 560 80 166 .296 NATIONAL LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Yelich Mil 143 563 112 181 .321 Gennett Cin 153 579 86 181 .313 Cain Mil 137 522 87 162 .310 Zobrist ChC 134 435 64 135 .310 Rendon Was 133 517 87 160 .309 FFreeman Atl 159 608 94 187 .308 Martinez StL 149 523 62 160 .306 Markakis Atl 159 615 77 184 .299 Dickerson Pit 133 496 65 148 .298 DPeralta Ari 144 550 75 163 .296 Through early games on Sept. 27 NATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA St. Louis Wainwright (R) 2-3 4.08 4-3 1-0 17.1 4.15 Chicago Hendricks (R) 1:20p 13-11 3.49 17-15 2-1 21.1 1.69 Pittsburgh Kingham (R) 5-7 5.23 5-9 0-2 7.1 9.82 Cincinnati DeSclafani (R) 5:40p 7-7 4.91 11-9 0-3 15.1 7.04 Atlanta Gausman (R) 10-10 3.93 13-17 1-1 16.2 5.40 Philadelphia Eickhoff (R) 6:05p 0-0 9.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Miami Urena (R) 8-12 4.07 11-19 3-0 17.0 1.06 New York Oswalt (R) 6:10p 3-3 6.08 4-7 0-1 10.2 3.38 Washington Ross (R) 0-1 3.75 1-2 0-1 12.0 3.75 Colorado Freeland (L) 7:10p 16-7 2.84 22-10 2-0 20.0 2.25 Arizona Corbin (L) 11-7 3.23 17-15 0-2 15.1 5.87 San Diego Lauer (L) 9:10p 6-7 4.60 8-14 1-0 14.0 1.93 Los Angeles Ryu (L) 6-3 2.00 9-5 2-1 18.0 1.50 San Francisco Bumgarner (L) 9:15p 6-6 3.20 9-11 1-1 18.0 4.00AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Chicago Lopez (R) 7-9 3.94 13-18 2-0 20.0 0.45 Minnesota Berrios (R) 1:10p 11-11 3.93 15-16 0-1 17.2 4.08 Houston Verlander (R) 16-9 2.60 20-13 2-0 20.0 1.35 Baltimore Ramirez (R) 6:05p 1-7 6.07 3-8 0-3 12.1 10.22 New York Happ (L) 16-6 3.57 20-10 1-0 17.0 0.53 Boston Johnson (L) 6:10p 4-4 4.11 9-3 0-1 10.0 7.20 Toronto Pannone (L) 4-1 3.58 4-1 3-0 20.0 2.70 Tampa Bay Glasnow (R) 6:10p 2-7 4.23 4-6 1-2 19.0 2.37 Chicago Giolito (R) 10-12 5.81 14-17 0-2 19.2 5.49 Minnesota De Jong (R) 7:10p 0-1 3.86 1-2 0-1 11.2 3.86 Cleveland Clevinger (R) 12-8 3.07 15-16 1-1 17.0 2.65 Kansas City Kennedy (R) 7:15p 3-8 4.59 6-15 2-0 19.0 1.89 Oakland Fiers (R) 12-7 3.31 21-9 1-1 16.0 2.81 Los Angeles Barria (R) 9:07p 10-9 3.54 12-13 0-1 13.0 5.54 Texas Perez (L) 2-6 6.13 4-10 0-1 15.0 6.60 Seattle LeBlanc (L) 9:10p 8-5 3.55 16-10 0-2 15.1 3.52INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Detroit Zimmermann (R) 7-8 4.31 11-13 0-2 15.2 6.32 Milwaukee Davies (R) 7:10p 2-7 4.65 4-8 0-2 14.0 3.86 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League Boston 19, Baltimore 3, 1st game Toronto 3, Houston 1 Baltimore 10, Boston 3, 2nd game Tampa Bay 8, N.Y. Yankees 7 Cleveland 10, Chicago White Sox 2 Minnesota 11, Detroit 4 L.A. Angels 3, Texas 2 Oakland 9, Seattle 3 National League Washington 9, Miami 3, 7 innings Milwaukee 2, St. Louis 1 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 0 Chicago Cubs 7, Pittsburgh 6, 10 innings Colorado 14, Philadelphia 0 Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 San Diego 3, San Francisco 2 Interleague Kansas City 6, Cincinnati 1 SATURDAYS GAMES American League N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 12:05 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. Houston at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 6:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 6:15 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 8:07 p.m. Texas at Seattle, 8:10 p.m. National League St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 12:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 3:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m. Washington at Colorado, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 7:40 p.m. Interleague Detroit at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m.

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** D4 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Belmont 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Gulfstream West 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 11:55 a.m., Gulfstream West 12:15 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 1:15 p.m., Belmont noon, Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai Alai 6 p.m. Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Gulfstream 11:45 a.m., Belmont noon, Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m., Churchill 5 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Jai alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill 11:45 a.m., Belmont noon, Parx 11:55 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION…234-3943. PRO FOOTBALL NFL All times Eastern AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Miami 3 0 0 1.000 75 52 New England 1 2 0 .333 57 77 Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 50 84 N.Y. Jets 1 2 0 .333 77 58 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 49 50 Jacksonville 2 1 0 .667 57 44 Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 60 63 Houston 0 3 0 .000 59 74 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 89 77 Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 97 51 Cleveland 1 1 1 .500 60 59 Pittsburgh 1 1 1 .500 88 90 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 118 92 Denver 2 1 0 .667 61 70 L.A. Chargers 1 2 0 .333 82 93 Oakland 0 3 0 .000 52 81 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Washington 2 1 0 .667 64 44 Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 59 55 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 41 53 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 55 62 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 102 91 New Orleans 2 1 0 .667 104 103 Carolina 2 1 0 .667 71 60 Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 80 85 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Chicago 2 1 0 .667 63 55 Green Bay 1 1 1 .500 70 83 Minnesota 1 1 1 .500 59 72 Detroit 1 2 0 .333 70 88 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA L.A. Rams 3 0 0 1.000 102 36 Seattle 1 2 0 .333 65 64 San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 73 89 Arizona 0 3 0 .000 20 74WEEK 4 Thursdays GameMinnesota at L.A. Rams, lateSundays GamesCincinnati at Atlanta, noon Tampa Bay at Chicago, noon Houston at Indianapolis, noon N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, noon Miami at New England, noon Detroit at Dallas, noon Buffalo at Green Bay, noon Philadelphia at Tennessee, noon Seattle at Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 3:25 p.m. San Francisco at L.A. Chargers, 3:25 p.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:20 p.m.Mondays GameKansas City at Denver, 7:15 p.m. Open: Washington, CarolinaWEEK 5 Thursday, Oct. 4Indianapolis at New England, 7:20 p.m.Sunday, Oct. 7Miami at Cincinnati, noon N.Y. Giants at Carolina, noon Denver at N.Y. Jets, noon Jacksonville at Kansas City, noon Green Bay at Detroit, noon Baltimore at Cleveland, noon Atlanta at Pittsburgh, noon Tennessee at Buffalo, noon Oakland at L.A. Chargers, 3:05 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 3:25 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m. L.A. Rams at Seattle, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at Houston, 7:20 p.m.Monday, Oct. 8Washington at New Orleans, 7:15 p.m. Open: Tampa Bay, ChicagoNFL INJURY REPORTThe National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (DNP: did not practice; LIMITED: limited participation; FULL: full participation):SundayCINCINNATI at ATLANTA „ BENGALS: DNP: RB Joe Mixon (knee), C Billy Price (foot). LIMITED: RB Giovani Bernard (thigh), LB Preston Brown (ankle), CB Darqueze Dennard (calf), T Cordy Glenn (knee), WR A.J. Green (pelvis), DE Michael Johnson (knee), CB Dre Kirkpatrick (groin). FULL: TE Tyler Eifert (back). FALCONS: DNP: CB Justin Bethel (knee), RB Devonta Freeman (knee), WR Julio Jones (calf), DE Derrick Shelby (groin). LIMITED: S Damontae Kazee (knee), DE Takkarist McKinley (groin), LB Foyesade Oluokun (ankle), CB Brian Poole (thumb, toe), RB Ito Smith (ribs). TAMPA BAY at CHICAGO „ BUCCANEERS: DNP: DT Beau Allen (foot). LIMITED: T Demar Dotson (knee), DT Gerald McCoy (biceps), DT Vita Vea (calf), CB Marcus Williams (hamstring). FULL: S Isaiah Johnson (shoulder), S Jordan Whitehead (shoulder). BEARS: DNP: DB Prince Amukamara (hamstring), DB Marcus Cooper Sr. (hamstring), WR Anthony Miller (shoulder). FULL: DB D. Houston Carson (forearm). HOUSTON at INDIANAPOLIS „ TEXANS: DNP: CB Kayvon Webster (not injury related). LIMITED: WR Sammie Coates (hamstring), WR Keke Coutee (hamstring), WR Will Fuller (hamstring), WR DeAndre Hopkins (thumb, ankle, hamstring), G Senio Kelemete (knee), CB Shareece Wright (shoulder). FULL: T Martinas Rankin (ankle), DE J.J. Watt (thigh). COLTS: DNP: DE Tarell Basham (not injury related), T Anthony Castonzo (hamstring), TE Jack Doyle (hip), TE Eric Ebron (shoulder, knee), S Clayton Geathers (knee), T Joe Haeg (ankle), S Malik Hooker (hip, groin), DT Hassan Ridgeway (calf), CB Quincy Wilson (concussion). LIMITED: DT Denico Autry (ankle), RB Marlon Mack (hamstring). FULL: QB Andrew Luck (groin) N.Y. JETS at JACKSONVILLE „ JETS: DNP: S Doug Middleton (knee, “ nger), WR Charone Peake (hamstring), CB Buster Skrine (knee), TE Neal Sterling (concussion). LIMITED: LB Josh Martin (concussion), S Marcus Maye (ankle, foot). FULL: WR Robby Anderson (nose), T Kelvin Beachum (foot), G James Carpenter (ankle), WR Quincy Enunwa (back), C Spencer Long (shoulder, knee), DT Steve McLendon (knee), WR Terrelle Pryor (ankle), S J.J. Wilcox (wrist). JAGUARS: DNP: CB D.J. Hayden (toe), C Brandon Linder (knee), RB T.J. Yeldon (ankle). LIMITED: G A.J. Cann (triceps), RB Leonard Fournette (hamstring), T Jermey Parnell (knee), TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins (core muscle). FULL: DE Calais Campbell (ankle) MIAMI at NEW ENGLAND „ DOLPHINS: DNP: LB Chase Allen (foot), WR Danny Amendola (not injury related), DE Andre Branch (knee), TE A.J. Derby (foot), DE Cameron Wake (knee). LIMITED: S Reshad Jones (shoulder). FULL: LS John Denney (shoulder), DT Davon Godchaux (ankle), CB Bobby McCain (shoulder), QB Ryan Tannehill (right shoulder). PATRIOTS: LIMITED: T Marcus Cannon (calf), S Patrick Chung (concussion), CB Keion Crossen (hamstring), S Nate Ebner (hip), DE Trey Flowers (concussion), WR Josh Gordon (hamstring), DL Geneo Grissom (ankle), TE Rob Gronkowski (ankle), TE Jacob Hollister (chest), CB Eric Rowe (gr oin), DT Danny Shelton (elbow). DETROIT at DALLAS „ LIONS: DNP: DE Ezekiel Ansah (shoulder), TE Michael Roberts (knee). LIMITED: T Andrew Donnal (knee), G T.J. Lang (back). COWBOYS: DNP: DT Maliek Collins (knee), C Travis Frederick (illness), LB Sean Lee (hamstring). LIMITED: WR Cole Beasley (ankle), S Jeff Heath (ankle), DT Antwaun Woods (groin). FULL: DE Demarcus Lawrence (shoulder), S Xavier Woods (hamstring). BUFFALO BILLS at GREEN BAY PACKERS „ BILLS: DNP: LB Lorenzo Alexander (rest), DT Kyle Williams (rest). LIMITED: TE Charles Clay (shoulder/hip), S Micah Hyde (toe), DE Shaq Lawson (hamstring), RB LeSean McCoy (rib), RB Marcus Murphy (rib), DE Trent Murphy (ankle). FULL: CB Phillip Gaines (elbow), PACKERS: DNP: TE Jimmy Graham (knee), CB Kevin King (groin), G Justin McCray (shoulder), LB Nick Perry (concussion), QB Aaron Rodgers (knee), DL Muhammad Wilkerson (ankle). LIMITED: T Bryan Bulaga (back), S Josh Jones (ankle). PHILADELPHIA at TENNESSEE „ EAGLES: DNP: RB Jay Ajayi (back), DE Michael Bennett (illness), S Rodney McLeod (knee), RB Darren Sproles (hamstring). FULL: WR Alshon Jeffery (shoulder). TITANS: DNP: RB David Fluellen (groin), QB Blaine Gabbert (concussion), T Dennis Kelly (illness), WR Rishard Matthews (not injury related), K Ryan Succop (left knee). LIMITED: LB Kamalei Correa (back). FULL: T Jack Conklin (knee), CB Adoree Jackson (concussion), S Kendrick Lewis (foot), QB Marcus Mariota (right elbow) SEATTLE at ARIZONA „ SEAHAWKS: No Practice Reported. CARDINALS: No Practice Reported. CLEVELAND at OAKLAND „ BROWNS: DNP: LB James Burgess (knee), S Damarious Randall (heel), QB Tyrod Taylor (concussion, back). LIMITED: TE Seth DeValve (hamstring), LB Christian Kirksey (shoulder, ankle), DE Emmanuel Ogbah (ankle). FULL: DE Myles Garrett (knee), T Desmond Harrison (shoulder), WR Jarvis Landry (knee). RAIDERS: No Practice Reported. NEW ORLEANS at N.Y. GIANTS „ SAINTS: DNP: CB Patrick Robinson (ankle), LB Manti Teo (knee). LIMITED: T Terron Armstead (knee), WR Ted Ginn, Jr. (knee), DT Tyeler Davison (foot), WR Cameron Meredith (knee), G Andrus Peat (ankle), DE Cameron Jordan (biceps), RB Alvin Kamara (knee). GIANTS: DNP: CB Eli Apple (groin), LB Connor Barwin (knee), TE Evan Engram (knee), CB Antonio Hamilton (groin), DL Damon Harrison (knee), WR Cody Latimer (knee), RB Jonathan Stewart (foot). LIMITED: LB Olivier Vernon (ankle). SAN FRANCISCO at L.A. CHARGERS „ 49ERS: DNP: S Adrian Colbert (hip), G Joshua Garnett (toe), G Mike Person (knee), CB Richard Sherman (calf), T Joe Staley (not injury related), S Jaquiski Tartt (shoulder). LIMITED: RB Matt Breida (knee), WR Marquise Goodwin (quadricep). FULL: CB Ahkello Witherspoon (ankle, hip). CHARGERS: DNP WR Keenan Allen (knee), T Joe Barksdale. (knee), DE Joey Bosa (foot). LIMITED: WR Travis Benjamin (foot). FULL: T Russell Okung (knee), RB Derek Watt (thumb). BALTIMORE at PITTSBURGH „ RAVENS: DNP: CB Anthony Averett (hamstring), WR John Brown (not injury related), CB Brandon Carr (knee), DT Willie Henry (abdomen), QB Lamar Jackson (illness), T Ronnie Stanley (foot), LB Terrell Suggs (knee), S Eric Weddle (not injury related). LIMITED: TE Hayden Hurst (foot), S Anthony Levine (hamstring), LB C.J. Mosley (knee), DT Michael Pierce (foot). STEELERS: DNP: G Ramon Foster (not injury related), CB Mike Hilton (elbow), QB Ben Roethlisberger (not injury related), WR JuJu Smith-Schuster (abdomen). FULL: S Morgan Burnett (groin), G David DeCastro (hand), T Marcus Gilbert (hamstring).MondayKANSAS CITY at DENVER „ CHIEFS: No Practice Reported. BRONCOS: No Practice Reported. COLLEGE FOOTBALL THE AP TOP 25 POLLThe Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with “ rst-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 22, total points based on 25 points for a “ rst-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and last weeks ranking: RECORD PTS. LW 1. Alabama (60) 4-0 1,523 1 2. Georgia 4-0 1,422 2 3. Clemson (1) 4-0 1,409 3 4. Ohio State 4-0 1,363 4 5. Louisiana State 4-0 1,238 6 6. Oklahoma 4-0 1,201 5 7. Stanford 4-0 1,143 7 8. Notre Dame 4-0 1,067 8 9. Penn State 4-0 1,001 10 10. Auburn 3-1 987 9 11. Washington 3-1 946 10 12. West Virginia 3-0 923 12 13. Central Florida 3-0 727 16 14. Michigan 3-1 698 19 15. Wisconsin 3-1 662 18 16. Miami (Fla.) 3-1 571 21 17. Kentucky 4-0 541 „ 18. Texas 3-1 308 „ 19. Oregon 3-1 297 20 20. Brigham Young 3-1 270 25 21. Michigan State 2-1 256 24 22. Duke 4-0 244 „ 23. Mississippi State 3-1 241 14 24. California 3-0 118 „ 25. Texas Tech 3-1 106 „ Others receiving votes: Colorado 83, Boise State 58, Virginia Tech 55, South Florida 50, Oklahoma State 44, Texas A&M 41, Iowa 31, South Carolina 31, Florida 29, NC State 28, Syracuse 25, TCU 24, North Texas 10, Cincinnati 10, Utah 9, Mississippi 7, Missouri 7, Buffalo 6, Maryland 6, San Diego State 5, Arizona State 4. THE AP TOP 25 RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times EasternThursdayNo. 16 Miami (Fla.) 47, North Carolina 10SaturdayNo. 1 Alabama vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, 11 a.m. No. 2 Georgia vs. Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. No. 3 Clemson vs. Syracuse, 11 a.m. No. 4 Ohio State at No. 9 Penn State, 6:30 p.m. No. 5 Louisiana State vs. Mississippi, 8:15 p.m. No. 6 Oklahoma vs. Baylor, 2:30 p.m. No. 7 Stanford at No. 8 Notre Dame, 6:30 p.m. No. 10 Auburn vs. Southern Miss., 3 p.m. No. 11 Washington vs. No. 20 BYU, 7:30 p.m. No. 12 West Virginia at No. 25 Texas Tech, 11 a.m. No. 13 Central Florida vs. Pittsburgh, 2:30 p.m. No. 14 Michigan at Northwestern, 3:30 p.m. No. 17 Kentucky vs. South Carolina, 6:30 p.m. No. 18 Texas at Kansas State, 2:30 p.m. No. 19 Oregon at No. 24 California, 9:30 p.m. No. 21 Michigan State vs. Central Michigan, 11 a.m. No. 22 Duke vs. Virginia Tech, 6 p.m. No. 23 Mississippi State vs. Florida, 5 p.m.RESULTS/SCHEDULEWEEK 6All times Eastern (Subject to change)Thursdays Games SOUTHNorth Carolina A&T 31, South Carolina State 16 Miami (Fla.) 47, North Carolina 10 Presbyterian 10, Lindsey Wilson 0MIDWESTNorthern Iowa 33, Indiana State 0Todays Games EASTPrinceton (2-0) at Columbia (2-0), 5 p.m. Rhode Island (2-1) at Harvard (2-0), 6 p.m.SOUTHMemphis (3-1) at Tulane (1-3), 7 p.m.FAR WESTUCLA (0-3) at Colorado (3-0), 8 p.m.Saturdays Games EASTTemple (1-2) at Boston College (3-1), 11 a.m. Army (2-2) at Buffalo (4-0), 11 a.m. Indiana (3-1) at Rutgers (1-3), 11 a.m. Georgetown (1-3) at Brown (0-2), noon Bucknell (0-4) at Holy Cross (1-3), noon Dayton (2-2) at Marist (0-3), noon Wagner (1-3) at Monmouth (NJ) (2-2), noon Maine (2-1) at Yale (1-1), noon Sacred Heart (3-0) at Cornell (0-2), 12:30 p.m. Penn (2-0) at Dartmouth (2-0), 12:30 p.m. Cincinnati (4-0) at UConn (1-3), 2:30 p.m. WV Wesleyan (0-4) at St. Francis (Pa.) (1-3), 3 p.m. The Citadel (1-2) at Towson (2-1), 3 p.m. CCSU (2-2) at Lafayette (0-4), 5 p.m. Villanova (3-1) at Stony Brook (3-1), 5 p.m. Ohio State (4-0) at Penn State (4-0), 6:30 p.m.SOUTHLouisiana-Lafayette (1-3) at Alabama (4-0), 11 a.m. Syracuse (4-0) at Clemson (4-0), 11 a.m. Bowling Green (1-3) at Georgia Tech (1-3), 11 a.m. Virginia (3-1) at NC State (3-0), 11:20 a.m. Drake (1-1) at Jacksonville (1-1), noon New Hampshire (0-3) at Elon (2-1), 12:30 p.m. Mercer (2-2) at VMI (0-4), 12:30 p.m. W. Carolina (2-0) at Furman (0-3), Noon Louisiana-Monroe (2-2) at Georgia St. (1-3), Noon Charleston Southern (0-2) at Hampton (1-2), Noon James Madison (3-1) at Richmond (2-2), 2 p.m. South Alabama (1-3) at Appalachian State (2-1), 2:30 p.m. Old Dominion (1-3) at East Carolina (1-2), 2:30 p.m. Tennessee (2-2) at Georgia (4-0), 2:30 p.m. Florida State (2-2) at Louisville (2-2), 2:30 p.m. Lamar (1-3) at Nicholls (2-2), 2:30 p.m. Coastal Carolina (3-1) at Troy (3-1), 2:30 p.m. Pittsburgh (2-2) at UCF (3-0), 2:30 p.m. Rice (1-3) at Wake Forest (2-2), 2:30 p.m. Southern Miss. (2-1) at Auburn (3-1), 3 p.m. Austin Peay (2-2) at Jacksonville State (2-1), 3 p.m. Florida A&M (2-2) at NC Central (1-2), 3 p.m. Delaware State (0-3) at Norfolk State (2-1), 3 p.m. Tennessee State (2-0) at Vanderbilt (2-2), 3 p.m. Alabama A&M (1-3) at Jackson State (1-1), 4 p.m. North Alabama (3-1) at Campbell (3-1), 5 p.m. Wofford (2-1) at Gardner-Webb (1-2), 5 p.m. Arkansas State (3-1) at Georgia Southern (2-1), 5 p.m. Samford (1-3) at Kennesaw State (3-1), 5 p.m. Florida (3-1) at Mississippi State (3-1), 5 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (1-3) at Savannah State (0-3), 5 p.m. Charlotte (2-2) at UAB (2-1), 5 p.m. Colgate (3-0) at William & Mary (1-2), 5 p.m. Virginia Tech (2-1) at Duke (4-0), 6 p.m. Stephen F. Austin (1-2) at McNeese State (3-1), 6 p.m. FAU (2-2) at Middle Tennessee (1-2), 6 p.m. UT Martin (1-3) at Murray State (0-3), 6 p.m. Alcorn State (3-1) at Southern U. (2-2), 6 p.m. E. Illinois (0-4) at Tennessee Tech (0-4), 6 p.m. Chattanooga (4-0) at ETSU (3-1), 6:30 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-3) at FIU (2-2), 6:30 p.m. South Carolina (2-1) at Kentucky (4-0), 6:30 p.m. Marshall (2-1) at W. Kentucky (1-3), 6:30 p.m. Northwestern State (2-1) at SE Louisiana (1-3), 7 p.m. Mississippi (3-1) at LSU (4-0), 8:15 p.m.MIDWESTOklahoma State (3-1) at Kansas (2-2), 11 a.m. Cent. Michigan (1-3) at Michigan State (2-1), 11 a.m. Morehead State (1-2) at Butler (2-1), noon UMass (2-3) at Ohio (1-2), Noon Davidson (3-1) at Valparaiso (0-3), Noon Kent State (1-3) at Ball State (1-3), 2 p.m. Illinois State (3-0) at Missouri State (2-1), 2 p.m. Texas (3-1) at Kansas State (2-2), 2:30 p.m. W. Michigan (2-2) at Miami (Ohio) (1-3), 2:30 p.m. S. Dakota State (2-0) at N. Dakota State (3-0), 2:30 p.m. Purdue (1-3) at Nebraska (0-3), 2:30 p.m. Youngstown State (1-2) at W. Illinois (1-2), 3 p.m. Michigan (3-1) at Northwestern (1-2), 3:30 p.m. N. Illinois (1-3) at E. Michigan (2-2), 5 p.m. South Dakota (1-2) at S. Illinois (1-2), 6 p.m. Stanford (4-0) at Notre Dame (4-0), 6:30 p.m.SOUTHWESTTexas A&M (2-2) vs. Arkansas (1-3) at Arlington, Texas, 11 a.m. West Virginia (3-0) at Texas Tech (3-1), 11 a.m. Baylor (3-1) at Oklahoma (4-0), 2:30 p.m. Central Arkansas (2-1) at Sam Houston State (1-2), 3 p.m. Prairie View (2-3) vs. Grambling St. (1-2), 4 p.m. Incarnate Word (1-2) at Abilene Christian (2-2), 6 p.m. Houston Baptist (1-2) at SMU (1-3), 6 p.m. Iowa State (1-2) at TCU (2-2), 6 p.m. UTEP (0-4) at UTSA (1-3), 6 p.m. Louisiana Tech (2-1) at North Texas (4-0), 6:30 p.m.FAR WESTNorth Dakota (2-2) at N. Colorado (0-4), 1:05 p.m. E. Washington (3-1) at Montana State (3-1), 2 p.m. Nevada (2-2) at Air Force (1-2), 3 p.m. N. Arizona (2-2) at Idaho State (2-1), 3:30 p.m. Portland State (1-3) at Idaho (1-2), 4 p.m. Stetson (3-0) at San Diego (1-2), 4 p.m. Liberty (1-2) at New Mexico (2-1), 5 p.m. Utah (2-1) at Washington State (3-1), 5 p.m. Hawaii (4-1) at San Jose State (0-3), 6 p.m. Boise State (2-1) at Wyoming (2-2), 6 p.m. Montana (3-1) at Cal Poly (1-3), 6:05 p.m. BYU (3-1) at Washington (3-1), 7:30 p.m. Oregon State (1-3) at Arizona State (2-2), 9 p.m. Southern Cal (2-2) at Arizona (2-2), 9:30 p.m. Oregon (3-1) at California (3-0), 9:30 p.m. Toledo (2-1) at Fresno State (2-1), 9:30 p.m. PRO HOCKEY NHL PRESEASONAll times Eastern (ss-split squad) EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Detroit 6 6 0 0 12 25 17 Boston 7 5 0 2 12 23 17 Toronto 6 5 1 0 10 22 15 Montreal 6 4 2 0 8 21 16 Florida 6 3 3 0 6 17 23 Tampa Bay 6 3 3 0 6 20 18 Buffalo 6 2 4 0 4 15 20 Ottawa 4 0 4 0 0 6 16 METROPOLITAN DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA N.Y. Islanders 7 5 2 0 10 19 15 Carolina 4 4 0 0 8 19 4 N.Y. Rangers 6 3 2 1 7 21 23 Philadelphia 7 3 3 1 7 21 20 Pittsburgh 5 2 2 1 5 18 13 New Jersey 5 1 2 2 4 12 16 Columbus 6 2 4 0 4 13 22 Washington 5 1 3 1 3 10 17 WESTERN CONFERENCE CENTRAL DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Dallas 5 4 0 1 9 19 12 Winnipeg 6 4 2 0 8 22 22 St. Louis 5 3 2 0 6 14 12 Nashville 5 2 3 0 4 14 17 Minnesota 6 2 4 0 4 18 16 Chicago 4 1 3 0 2 14 18 Colorado 4 1 3 0 2 7 18 PACIFIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Calgary 8 3 2 3 9 31 31 Edmonton 5 4 1 0 8 27 14 Vegas 5 4 1 0 8 27 14 Arizona 5 3 2 0 6 18 17 San Jose 4 2 1 1 5 20 16 Anaheim 5 2 3 0 4 16 23 Los Angeles 6 1 4 1 3 18 27 Vancouver 6 1 5 0 2 10 26 2 points for win, 1 point for overtime loss. Top 3 teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.Wednesdays GamesN.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, OT Detroit 3, Boston 2, OT Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 1 Toronto 5, Montreal 3 Minnesota 4, Winnipeg 3 Dallas 3, Colorado 1 Anaheim 7, Los Angeles 4Thursdays GamesN.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Tampa Bay 6, Florida 2 New Jersey 5, Winnipeg 3 Ottawa at Chicago, late Arizona at Edmonton, late Calgary at San Jose, lateTodays GamesPittsburgh at Columbus, 6 p.m. Buffalo vs. N.Y. Islanders at Oshawa, Ont., 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 8 p.m. Los Angeles at Vegas, 9 p.m.Saturdays GamesCalgary at Edmonton, 2 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 6 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 6 p.m. Columbus at Chicago, 7 p.m. Arizona at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. AUTO RACING UPCOMING RACESAll times EasternNASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUP BANK OF AMERICA ROVAL 400Site: Charlotte Schedule: Today, practice, 11:05 a.m. (NBCSN), qualifying, 3:45 p.m. (NBCSN); Saturday, practice, 10 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. (NBCSN); Sunday, race, Noon, NBC. Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway Road Course (road/oval, 2.28 miles). Race distance: 248.52 miles, 109 laps. Last race: Kyle Busch snapped Brad Keselowskis three-race winning streak. Fast facts: Drivers will be approaching the new 17-turn Roval,Ž the “ rst road course in the history of the playoffs, with trepidation. But itll be a big race nonetheless, as the championship contender list will be cut from 16 to 12 after the race. ...ŽI think surviving is just the biggest thing,Ž said Jimmie Johnson, who is in 14th place. Johnsons lone win on a road course came at Sonoma in 2010. ...Busch, Keselowski and Martin Truex Jr. are the only drivers whove clinched a spot in the next round. Next race: Sunday, Oct. 7, Dover International Speedway, Dover, Delaware. Online: www.nascar.comNASCAR XFINITY DRIVE FOR THE CURE 200Site: Charlotte Schedule: Today, practice, 1:05 & 2 p.m.; Saturday qualifying, 11:10 a.m. (CNBC), race, 2 p.m., NBCSN. Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway Road Course Race distance: 125.4 miles, 55 laps. Last race: Christopher Bell won from the pole in Richmond. Fast facts : JR Motorsports announced on Tuesday that Noah Gragson will join its X“ nity team next season. Gragson, 20, will pilot the No. 1 Chevrolet on a two-year deal to replace Elliott Sadler, who is retiring from full-time racing. ...Gragson, who is second in the truck series, has posted top-10 “ nishes in all three of his X“ nity runs in 2018. ...Bell enters the weekend with a 28-point lead over Daniel Hemric. Justin Allgaier is third. Next race: Saturday, Oct. 6, Dover International Speedway. Online: www.nascar.comFORMULA ONE RUSSIAN GRAND PRIXSite: Sochi, Russia Schedule: Today, practice, 4 & 7 a.m. (ESPNU); Saturday, practice, 4 a.m. (ESPN2), qualifying, 7 a.m. (ESPN2); Sunday, race, 6:10 a.m., ESPN2 Track: Sochi Autodrome (circuit, 3.63 miles) Race distance: 192.4 miles, 53 laps. Last year: Valterri Bottas won after starting third. Last race: Lewis Hamilton won the pole and his fourth victory in “ ve races in Singapore. Fast facts: Formula 1 returns to Russia, where it “ rst ran at Sochi in 2014. Hamilton won that start as part of a “ ve-race winning streak in a championship season for the British driver. ...Last season the Russian Grand Prix was the fourth race of the year, held in late April between Bahrain and Catalunya. ...Hamiltons lead over Sebastian Vettel is up to 40 points. Next race: Japanese Grand Prix, October 7, Suzuka International Racing Course, Suzuka, Japan. Online: www.formula1.com TENNIS ATP WORLD TOUR CHENGDU OPENThursday at Sichuan International Tennis Center, Chengdu, China Purse: $1.18 million (WT250); Surface: Hard-Outdoor Mens SinglesSecond RoundMatthew Ebden (6), Australia, def. Matteo Berrettini, Italy, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (3). Fabio Fognini (1), Italy, def. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Taylor Fritz, United States, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-1. Sam Querrey, United States, def. Nikoloz Basilashvili (3), Georgia, 6-1, 6-4.Mens Doubles Quarter“ nalsAustin Krajicek, United States, and Jeeyan Nedunchezhiyan, India, def. Ruben Bemelmans and Prajnesh Gunneswaran, India, 6-3, 7-5. Ivan Dodig and Mate Pavic (1), Croatia, def. Denys Molchanov, Russia, and Igor Zelenay, Slovakia, 3-6, 6-3, 10-4.SHENZHEN OPEN Thursday at Longgang Sports Center, Shenzhen, China Purse: $800,320 (WT250). Surface: Hard-OutdoorMens Singles Second RoundDamir Dzumhur (4), Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Ramkumar Ramanathan, India, 6-4, 6-2. Alex de Minaur (7), Australia, def. Mackenzie McDonald, United States, 1-6, 7-6 (1), 6-0. Andy Murray, Britain, def. David Gof“ n (1), Belgium, 6-3, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (5), Spain, def. Taro Daniel, Japan, 3-6, 6-2, 7-5.Mens Doubles Quarter“ nalsBen McLachlan, Japan, and Joe Salisbury (1), Britain, def. Marcin Matkowski, Poland, and Nicholas Monroe, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Philipp Oswald, Austria, def. Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, and Wesley Koolhof (2), Netherlands, 6-4, 6-2. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Rajeev Ram (4), United States, def. Li Zhe and Wu Di, China, 6-3, 6-3.WTA TOURDONGFENG MOTOR WUHAN OPENThursday at Wuhan Optical Valley Tennis Centre, Wuhan, China Purse: $2.75 million (Premier); Surface: Hard-OutdoorWomens Singles Quarter“ nalsAshleigh Barty (16), Australia, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 6-2, 5-7, 6-4. Wang Qiang, China, def. Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, 6-3, 6-1. SCOREBOARD ST. LOUISPerron excited about return to St. LouisDavid Perron had no idea what would happen when he became a free agent this summer. Then he got a familiar call.Perrons NHL odyssey has taken him all over his native Canada and the United States. But he always seems to find his way back to St. Louis.The 30-year-old Perron is beginning his third stint with his first NHL team after signing a $16 million, four-year deal with the Blues. When it came time to pick a new home this summer, the veteran winger opted for an old one. NFL defends itself in Super Bowl ticket caseThe National Football League defended itself Thursday against charges that its ticketing policies for the 2014 Super Bowl violated New Jerseys consumer fraud law, in arguments before the state Supreme Court that reached a granular level with disputes over words in the stat-ute including theŽ and those.ŽThe case was spurred by a 2014 federal lawsuit filed by a New Jersey man who claimed he was forced to pay more than double the $800 face value for a ticket on the secondary market because of the NFLs policy of making just 1 percent of the tickets available to the public through a lottery. Josh Finkelman is seeking class-action status for himself and thousands of other fans in a case that could translate to millions of dollars in damages. Courier decided in 17 to leave as Davis Cup captainJim Courier says he decided a year ago to step aside as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team after the 2018 competition ended.The U.S. Tennis Association announced Thursday that Courier was stepping down,Ž less than two weeks after the Americans lost to host Croatia 3-2 in the Davis Cup semifinals.The USTAs news release did not say why he was leaving after eight years on the job.In an email to The Associated Press, Cou-rier said that the choice to walk away was his and that he determined at the end of 2017 that 2018 would be my final year as captain.ŽHe added that he revealed his impending departure to players, staff and USTA President Katrina Adams at the teams closing dinner in Croatia on Sept. 16, after the matches there concluded. The Associated PressIN BRIEFFootball Arnold vs. Mosley at Tommy Oliver Stadium 7 p.m. North Bay Haven vs. Lighthouse Christian at Bozeman 7 p.m. Bozeman at Vernon 7 p.m. Bay at Pensacola 7 p.m. Volleyball Gulf Coast at St. Johns River 5 p.m.AREA EVENTS Today AUTO RACING 6:55 a.m. ESPNU [--] Formula One, VTB Russian Grand Prix, practice, at Sochi, Russia 11 a.m. NBCSN [--] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Bank of America ROVAL 400, practice, at Concord, N.C. Noon NBCSN [--] NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Drive for the Cure 200, practice, at Concord, N.C. 2 p.m. NBCSN [--] NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Drive for the Cure 200, “ nal practice, at Concord, N.C. 3:30 p.m. NBCSN [--] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Bank of America Roval 400, qualifying, at Concord, N.C. 3:55 a.m. (Saturday) ESPN2 [--] Formula One, VTB Russian Grand Prix, practice, at Sochi, Russia BOXING 9 p.m. SHO [--] Devin Haney vs. Juan Carlos Burgos, lightweights; Thomas Mattice vs. Zhora Hamazaryan, lightweights; Cem Kilic vs. Deandre Ware, middleweights, at Temecula, Calif. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 5 p.m. ESPNU [--] Princeton at Columbia 7 p.m. ESPN2 [--] Memphis at Tulane 8 p.m. FS1 [--] UCLA at Colorado COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL 10 p.m. ESPN2 [--] Southern Cal at Stanford GOLF 4 a.m. GOLF [--] PGA of America/European Tour, Ryder Cup, Day 1 (foursomes, four-ball matches), at Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France 4 p.m. GOLF [--] Champions Tour, PURE Insurance Championship, “ rst round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. 1 a.m. (Saturday) GOLF [--] PGA of America/European Tour, Ryder Cup, Day 2 (foursomes, four-ball matches), at Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France 2 a.m. (Saturday) NBC [--] PGA of America/ European Tour, Ryder Cup, Day 2 (foursomes, four-ball matches), at Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France MLB 1 p.m. ESPN [--] St. Louis at Chicago Cubs 6 p.m. ESPN [--] N.Y. Yankees at Boston 9 p.m. MLB [--] Regional coverage, L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco OR Arizona at San Diego NBA 6:30 p.m. NBA [--] Preseason, Boston vs. Charlotte, at Chapel Hill, N.C. SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FS1 [--] Bundesliga, Hertha Berlin vs. Bayern MunichON THE AIR

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 D5By Steve ReedThe Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. „ Eric Reids return to the NFL cre-ated a buzz around the league on Thursday, six months after he filed a grievance alleging collusion by the NFL to pre-vent teams from signing him because of his participation in racial injustice protests during the national anthem alongside former San Francisco 49ers teammate Colin Kaepernick.Some NFL players were excited about the 2013 Pro Bowl safety signing a oneyear deal with the Panthers, but were quick to point out they believe Kaepernick should be back in the league as well.Kaepernick congratulated his Reid on Twitter saying Reid should have been signed the 1st day of free agency. ... He was the 1ST person 2 kneel alongside me. Eric is a social justice warrior, continues to support his family and com-munities in need.ŽBrowns running back Carlos Hyde, who played with Reid and Kaepernick in San Fran-cisco, was stunned to hear his former teammate had been picked up by the Panthers.For real?Ž Hyde said following Clevelands practice. Im so happy for him. Its been too long. I kind of felt like they was doing him the same way they were doing Kap, so its good to see E-Reid got signed and Kap should defi-nitely be up next. It would be a real good thing then.ŽSaid Eagles defensive end Michael Bennett, Its about time.ŽAs for Reid, who filed his grievance in May, he was mum during the hoopla on Thursday, declining comment through the Panthers and not weighing in on social media except to re-tweet Kaepernick.The 26-year-old Reid said in March that he doesnt plan to protest during the national anthem this season. The Pan-thers have a bye this week and next play at home on Oct. 7 against the New York Giants.Kaepernick, who filed his grievance in October 2017 and remains a free agent, began protesting racial and social injustice during the 2016 pre-season by kneeling during the national anthem. Reid later joined the quarterback. After that other players around the league joined in, much to the displeasure of President Trump, who Tweeted at players to Find another way to protest. Stand proudly for your National Anthem or be Suspended Without Pay!ŽThat sparked a polarizing political debate that divided some NFL fans.Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills knelt during this years season opener against the Titans.Im just happy for (Reid), excited to see him get out there on the field and be the impact player we all know he is,Ž Stills said Thursday. Obviously I feel like he should have been signed the first day of free agency.ŽStills said he spoke to Kae-pernick, his close friend, on Thursday.He wants to play. Hes good enough to play. He deserves to play,Ž Stills said. I dont see why a team wont sign him, or hasnt signed him.ŽThe decision by the Panthers to sign Reid comes less than three months after David Tepper bought the team from conservative owner Jerry Richardson.Panthers general manager Marty Hurney said he wasnt concerned about Reids past protests, telling The Associated Press it was a football decisionŽ „ and one that was approved by Tepper.Every decision we make we communicate withŽ Tepper, the GM said. Everybody we sign we ask if he has the skill set, does he fit into our system, and if he can help us win football games „ and we feel the answer is yes.ŽEric Reids younger brother, Justin, who plays safety for the Texans, said he is immensely proudŽ of what his older brother stands for in trying to have a voice for the voiceless.ŽWhen asked if he believes his brother was not signed earlier by NFL teams because of his decision to protest, Justin Reid said Im going to try and defer away from that.ŽReid is expected to start right away after the Panthers placed starter DaNorris Searcy on injured reserve last week with a concussion. The 6-foot-1, 215-pound Reid played the first five seasons of his NFL career with San Fran-cisco after the 49ers selected him in the first round of the 2013 NFL draft. He has started 69 games.Hes a physical safety with good ball skills and he makes plays and he has experience,Ž Hurney said. Hes a young player with skins on the wall. He has played at a very high level.ŽForty Niners defensive coordinator Robert Saleh confirmed Thursday they inquired about signing Reed this week after injuries to Jaquiski Tartt and Adrian Colbert.E-Reid is familiar with our system and we know him, are comfortable with him,Ž Saleh said. Obviously, it didnt work out, but any time you have the opportunity you explore it.ŽEric Reid signs with Panthers, back in NFL after protestsIn this Sept. 10, 2017, photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) kneels in front of teammates during the playing of the national anthem before a game against the Carolina Panthers in Santa Clara, Calif. The Panthers have signed Reid, a free agent safety, to a one-year contract. Terms of the deal were not announced Thursday. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressSAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France „ Jim Furyk has spent four days watching his team play loose and confident, two key ingre-dients he hopes will allow the Americans to end 25 years without winning the Ryder Cup away from home.He can only hope thats what he sees when the shots at Le Golf National really count. What would make me ner-vous?Ž Furyk said on the eve of the matches. If I showed up in the morning and guys had a look on their face that made me nervous. I dont usually see that with this group.ŽFlags were raised, anthems were played and the partisan cheers began late Thursday afternoon to signal the end of a hype and anticipation of a Ryder Cup featuring two of the strongest teams the U.S. and Europe have presented at the same time. Now its time to play.I believe in this team, one through 12,Ž European captain Thomas Bjorn said.Furyk chose to send off Ryder Cup rookie Tony Finau and three-time major champion Brooks Koepka in the opening fourballs match Friday against Justin Rose and rookie Jon Rahm. He also broke up the Jordan Spieth-Patrick Reed partnership that had delivered five points in seven matches over the last two Ryder Cups.Instead, Spieth gets to play with one of his best friends, Justin Thomas, a relationship that took root in France more than a decade ago when both wore American colors in the Evian Junior Masters.Very familiar with each others games „ have been for, shoot, over 10 years now,Ž Spieth said. So its going to be really exciting to be able to look at him on the first tee and kind of remember where weve come from, and were both here.ŽReed gets his hero „ Tiger Woods „ in the anchor match.We both feel like were playing well, and we want to go out there and represent our country the best,Ž said Reed, who in two Ryder Cups has been called Captain AmericaŽ because of his fist-pumping, ear-cupping, finger-shushing bravado. The best way to do that is go out and have some fun and try to play some good golf and do it the right way. And any time you get to tee it up with Big Cat, its always fun.ŽThey play against British Open champion Francesco Molinari and Tommy Fleetwood.Missing from the American lineup is Phil Mickelson, who will sit out the opening ses-sion for the first time since his Ryder Cup debut in 1995.Bjorn has five Ryder Cup rookies on his side, and four of them will be walking to that first tee to hit a shot before a grandstand that looks like it belongs at a football stadium, 72 feet high with a capacity of 6,928, unheard of for a golf tournament.That starts with Rahm, the latest Spaniard who brings a big game and big emotion to an event that means so much to all of Europe. He will be with Rose, who has played effec-tively with Henrik Stenson the last two Ryder Cups.Both captains delivered the same message: Their teams are so strong that they had loads of options and tough choices on whom to sit. Another session of foursomes follow Friday after-noon, and neither was willing to guarantee that everyone will have played by the end of the day.Bjorn said he would accept a split of the morning matches considering he has four rook-ies playing, though he hopes for more.Youd like to be ahead after any session, but when I look at these matches, they could be as tight as anything, all four of them, and its impossible for me to predict whats going to happen,Ž Bjorn said. What would surprise me?Ž he added. I think I learned to not expect anything but sur-prises in this. It would surprise me if its quiet on the first tee.ŽPressure is unlike any other event in golf, with 28 matches held over three days, relentless action before partisan cheering. It started during the opening ceremony, where Woods received the loudest ovation, and even chants of Tiger, TigerŽ were overpowering chants of USA.ŽNot long after winning two years ago at Hazeltine, the Americans were reminded they havent won on European soil since The Belfry in 1993, the year three of its players „ Spieth, Thomas and Bryson DeChambeau „ were born.Woods was still in high school.Ryder Cup ready to start with pressure on for everyoneTiger Woods of the U.S. places the cover of a water sprinkler as he jokes with Patrick Reed, center, and Jordan Spieth, right, during a practice round of the Ryder Cup, on Thursday at Le Golf National in Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, outside Paris. The 42nd Ryder Cup begins on Friday. [FRANCOIS MORI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Joe ReedyThe Associated PressTiger Woods wasnt the only one celebrating after he won the Tour Champi-onship. Golf announcers and network executives are excited about the momentum Woods comeback season can gen-erate for ratings.All three of the sports major U.S. broadcasters have reasons to look forward to the next nine months.CBS Jim Nantz saw Woods saw signs of Woods working his way back into contention at the Honda Classic last February in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, as well as The Memorial in Columbus and at the PGA Champi-onship, where he finished two strokes behind Brooks Koepka.I saw him working his way through it and never doubted that he would win again,Ž Nantz said. It could have happened earlier but he would have trouble over the last nine holes and lose some shots. But you dont say it was ever over with him because he will outwork everyone.ŽThe immediate ben-eficiary is the NBC Sports Group, which has this weekends Ryder Cup on Golf Channel and NBC. It also had last weekends Tour Championship and saw a ratings increase of 178 percent. Sundays final round had a 4.45 Nielsen rating. The round also had 18.4 million minutes streamed across NBCs digital platforms accord-ing to the network.NBC Sports Mike McCa-rley, who is the president of the networks golf coverage, said last weekends FedEx Cup finale and this weekends Ryder Cup present two interesting story lines.Last weekend he was squaring off against a generation of players who watched him. Now he is teaming up with them this week,Ž McCarley said from Paris. It sets up a good storyline for next year where Tiger will be squaring off with younger players who were inspired by him and attempted to fill the void. Whether it is in the spring or summer it is shaping up as a pretty dynamite season.ŽNBC and Golf Channel have 30 hours of Ryder Cup coverage Friday through Sunday. Golf Channel will air Fridays coverage and NBC will have Saturday and Sunday.Justin Leonard was paired with Woods at the 1997 Ryder Cup and will be a part of NBCs crew this weekend. Leonard said what he is looking forward to this weekend is seeing how Woods and Phil Mickelson work together on the same team.I dont think well see a Tiger-Phil pairing, but it will be fascinating to watch how this unfolds, seeing how at the begin-ning of the year, we didnt think either of these players would be on this team, and now here they are,Ž he said.Tiger E ect creating excitement for Ryder Cup and next yearTiger Woods stands on the fairway during a Thursday practice round for the 2018 Ryder Cup at Le Golf National in Saint-Quentinen-Yvelines, outside Paris. [FRANCOIS MORI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** D6 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald PLAYERTOWATCH DeondreFrancois,QB,FloridaState: Threw for352yardsandtwotouchdownsinawin overNorthernIllinois. A TLANTICCONFALL T EAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY C lemson1-04-0163612-02-0 S yracuse1-04-0198803-01-0 B ostonCollege1-03-1171992-01-1 N .C.State0-03-0102402-01-0 L ouisville0-12-2681022-00-1 W akeForest0-12-21351341-21-0 F loridaState0-22-283992-10-1 COASTALCONFALL TEAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY Virginia1-03-1130673-00-1 VirginiaTech1-02-1121691-01-1 NorthCarolina1-01-2741001-00-2 Pittsburgh1-12-2981152-10-1 Duke0-04-0150612-02-0 Miami0-03-1174742-01-0 GeorgiaTech0-21-31191221-10-2 BESTOFTHERESTThisweekendsothertopconferencegames(alltimesEDT)KEYSFORVIRGINIATECH Bigplaysfromabackup: TheHokieslostdynamic quarterbackJoshJackson withafracturedankleinlast weeksstunninglossagainst OldDominion.RyanWillis, whologged10startsatKansas b eforetransferringtoTech, willtakeoverforJackson.The 6-foot-4,22-poundWillislacks Jacksonsmobility,buthasa strongerarm,whichcouldlead tomorepassesdownfield. Secondaryimprovement: Inupsettingthethen-No. 13-rankedHokieslastweek,Old DominiontookshotsatVirginia Techsinexperiencedsecondarydownfield.Thestrategy workedastheMonarchsaccumulated495yardspassing. Tighteningupthesecondaryplaywillbevitalagainsta Duketeamevenmorecapable thanODUofthrowingdeep. KEYSFORDUKE Keepupthedefensiveplay: DefensehasrarelybeenaDuke strength,butthisseasontheBlue Devilsareplayingtough,especiallyintheredzone.Theyve allowedjustfourtouchdowns in11red-zoneattemptsby foessofar,whichrankseighth nationally.Dukehasachieved thatdespitelosingseveralkey personneltoinjuries.Thisweek pressuringthequarterback willbevitalfortheDevils. Protectthequarterback: EventhoughstartingdefensiveendTrevonHillwas dismissedfromtheteamearlierintheweek,VirginiaTech isstillcapableofmountingan aggressivepassrush.Dukes offensivelineneedstokeep theHokiesoffquarterback QuentinHarris,whowillbe makinghisfirstACCstartin placeofinjuredDanielJones. PREDICTION Dukehasbeenimpressive inovercomingmanyinjuries tostart4-0andcrackthe nationalrankingswhileTechis reelingfromlastweeksdefeat thelossoftwokeyplayersin quarterbackJoshJacksonand TrevonHill.ButifWilliscan movetheballthroughtheair, theHokiesshouldbounceback toimprovetheirrecordto2-0. G AMEOFTHEWEEK VIRGINIATECH(2-1)ATNO.22DUKE(4-0) W hen: 7p.m.EDTSaturday Where: Wallace-WadeStadium,Durham,N.C. TV: ESPN2POWERRANKINGSBreakingdowntheACC 1.Clemson(4-0): TheTigerswillhave revengeontheirmindsforvisitfrom Syracuse. 2.Miami(3-1): Hurricanesstartdefenseof CoastalDivisioncrown. 3.N.C.State(3-0): Oneroadgameoutofthe way,andafewweeksbeforethenextone. 4.Duke(4-0): BlueDevilsbounceintothe nationalrankingsintimeforACCopener. 5.Syracuse(4-0): TheOrangemakesarapid rise,butmustdealwithClemson. 6.VirginiaTech(2-1): Shameonyou, Hokies.Youdfallfartherinthispoll,but youvegotcompanythisweek. 7.BostonCollege(3-1): Eagleswere soaring,butPurduechangedthat. 8.FloridaState(2-2): Seminolesmightbe “ndingsomefooting.Maybe. 9.WakeForest(2-2): Soapparentlytheres noDŽinDemonDeacons. 10.Virginia(3-1): Cavaliersshowingsome spunkandtheyllneedmorethisweek. 11.NorthCarolina(1-2): TarHeelswould moveatoptheCoastalDivision„believeit ornot„bywinningatMiami. 12.Pittsburgh(2-2): Panthersmissedan opportunitywithgameatNorthCarolina. 13.GeorgiaTech(1-3): YellowJacketsarein thatreelingmode.Isthereawayout? 14.Louisville(2-2): Cardinalswillhave plentyofchancestomovebackup. Lastweek: 1 Lastweek: 3 Lastweek: 4 Lastweek: 6 Lastweek: 7 Lastweek: 2 Lastweek: 5 Lastweek: 9 Lastweek: 8 Lastweek: 12 Lastweek: 14 Lastweek: 10 Lastweek: 11 Lastweek: 13STANDINGSThroughSept.22PASSINGYARDS PlayerYds. DeondreFrancois,FSU1,083 RyanFinley,NCST1,056 SamHartman,WAKE944 BrycePerkins,UVA867 EricDungey,SYR763 PASSINGTOUCHDOWNS PlayerNo. AnthonyBrown,BC10 BrycePerkins,UVA9 EricDungey,SYR9 TrevorLawrence,CLEM9 Severaltiedat...6 RUSHINGYARDS PlayerYds. AJDillon,BC491 JordanEllis,UVA448 TravisEtienne,CLEM391 CadeCarney,WAKE379 QadreeOllison,PITT355 RECEIVINGYARDS PlayerYds. O.Zaccheaus,UVA392 GregDortch,WAKE392 JeffThomas,MIAMI315 KelvinHarmon,NCST312 JamalCustis,SYR287 SCORING PlayerPts. AndreSzmyt,PK,SYR54 NickSciba,PK,WAKE39 TravisEtienne,RB,CLEM36 Severaltiedat...30 ROUNDINGITOUTThisweekendsothergames SATURDAYTime(ET)MatchupTV NoonTempleatBostonCollegeESPNU NoonBowlingGreenatGeorgiaTechACCNE 3:30p.m.Pittsburghat#13UCFESPNU 3:30p.m.RiceatWakeForestACCNE NorthCarolinaat#16MiamionThursday.BYTHENUMBERSACCindividualstatisticalleadersthroughSept.22 SYRACUSE(4-0,1-0)AT NO.3CLEMSON(4-0,1-0) When: NoonSaturday Where: MemorialStadium, Clemson,S.C. TV: ABC Notes: Clemsonwontheprevious fourACCmatchupspriortothe stunningupsetlastyearatthe CarrierDome.ƒThisisSyracuses “rstroadgamesinceopeningthe seasonatWesternMichigan.ƒThe Orangeis4-0forthe“rsttimesince 1991.ƒClemsonisgoingforits fourthstraight5-0starttoaseason. VIRGINIA(3-1,1-0) ATN.C.STATE(3-0,0-0) When: 12:20p.m.Saturday Where: Carter-FinleyStadium, Raleigh,N.C. TV: Raycom Notes: N.C.Stateleadstheseries 34-22-1,buttheteamshavent metsince2012,whenVirginiawon 33-6inRaleigh.ƒVirginiaopened leagueplaybydefeatingLouisville lastweek,soitfacestwoAtlantic DivisionfoestostartACCplay.ƒ N.C.Stateisaimingtowinitsleague openerforthethirdyearinarow, FLORIDASTATE(2-2,0-2) ATLOUISVILLE(2-2,0-1) When: 3:30p.m.Saturday Where: CardinalStadium, Louisville,Ky. TV: ESPN2 Notes: FloridaStateleadsthe series14-4,buttheCardinalshave wonthelasttwo.Thatincludeda 43-point2016homerout,marking thelargestmarginofdefeatfor theSeminolessince1976.ƒThe loserofthisgamewillbealone inlastplaceintheAtlantic Division. DEVILSON THERISEDUKEWILLFINDOUTIFITSFORREAL ASTHEYFACEVIRGINIATECH THISWEEKINTHE POWEREDBYWEEKLYE-EDITION: Formorecoverageofcollegefootballaroundthenation„plusin-depthreportsfrom allofthePowerFiveconferences„checkoutthe8-pagee-edition,Varsity,everySaturdayonourwebsite. DukesJakeBobo(19)makes adivingcatchaheadofNorth CarolinaCentralsDarylSmith(21) onSaturdayinDurham,N.C.[BEN MCKEOWN/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS] Despite some issues over the past two weeks, Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski said there is no sense of panic inside their locker room. New England started 2-2 last season, before recovering to win the AFC championship."Youve just got to keep going forward, no matter what it is, if youre win-ning or if youre losing," Gronkowski said. "Youve got to just put that week behind you. ... Just got to keep on grinding."Here are some things to watch for in Sundays game: BRADY VS. FINSMiami is the only NFL team with at least 10 vic-tories against Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.The reigning regularseason MVP is 21-10 against the Dolphins. The 10 losses are his most against any fran-chise. Brady is 76-19 as a starter in regular-season games against AFC East opponents.Records aside, Miami safety Reshad Jones said he is expecting to get Bradys best."Hes probably one of the best to ever do it," Jones said. "Weve got our hands full. Its going to be a challenge for us. ... I think well be ready." CLOSE CALLSAll three of Miamis victories this season have been by eight or fewer points.The Dolphins are 16-5 in one-score games under Gase. They are 3-12 in games decided by more than one score. PATRIOTS PAST Receiver Danny Amendola isnt the only Dolphins newcomer with a history in New England. Running back Brandon Bolden was with the Patriots for six years until they released him just before the start of this season.Bolden has quickly become a cog on Miamis special teams, and he and Amendola share impor-tant traits, Gase said."They love football. They love practicing. They bring great energy on game day. Whatever they have, they give it," Gase said. "Those two are as pro-fessional as Ive ever seen on NFL football players. Every day I see them, Im glad theyre here." DOLPHINSFrom Page D1

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** The News Herald | Friday, September 28, 2018 D7ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Theres a standard cost for one kind of work and quite another cost for work that includes anything custom, super-quick or in any way unpleasant. Because this is only fair, youll either pay or be paid more today. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Dealing with people will be a forte of yours today and youll enjoy it. This is what makes you a great manager „ of others, and also of your own playful spirit, which sometimes needs a little reigning in to be effective. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ In order to surround yourself with the right people, you must “ rst understand your own strengths and weaknesses. Then youll know who can “ ll in where you need help, and whom you can serve with your strength. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Theres not a single area of life that isnt improved today by your clear vision of what it should be. People understand your expectations. Youll give them feedback as to how everyone is doing and what is next to come. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Youd rather not have to “ gure out the complexities of a nuanced political situation before you roll up your sleeves and get to work. The best scenario is one in which the talking points are the same as the doing points. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ Youre someone that others consider to be a good and caring person. Dont underestimate the value in this. Its a detail that, on paper, may seem insigni“ cant or cliche, but is, in actuality, is all that really matters. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ While most people open their eyes in the morning recalling what they must do, youll take a different approach today. Youll think, what fun can I get into? How can I maximize this days potential for enjoyment? SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ Spend an hour early in the day handling all those small details that have been bugging you. It will keep your mind from ” itting around to un“ nished tasks later in the day when youll really need to concentrate. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ Because you do what it takes to get the favorable outcome, people who understand power dynamics will “ nger you as the leader whether or not you actually have the title. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ You and a certain someone share a language that, when spoken between you, creates a series of mental and emotional shortcuts that outsiders wont begin to understand. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ Oddly, youll let go of the controls and then things start to happen for you. This is partly because you set things up so well in earlier stages, and partly because key people feel freer to perform once you take a few steps back. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ What happens today will de“ nitely help you hone your critical ability to recognize the difference between superb, mediocre and shoddy work. Mastering this will ensure you continue to gravitate toward excellence.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy. com 1. From surveys, whats the most popular response when asked to name a book thats found in most homes? Diary, Telephone, Cook, Bible 2. What coach was credited with the phrase, A tie is like kissing your sister.Ž? Knute Rockne, John Wooden, Bear Bryant, Vince Lombardi 3. When was F. Scott Fitzgeralds The Great GatsbyŽ first published? 1850, 1898, 1925, 1942 4. Whats the more common name for a bill of fare? Bill of Lading, Invoice, Statement, Menu 5. Which has both eyes on one side of its head? Cat“ sh, Squid, Flounder, Shrimp 6. What do you call the dot over the letter iŽ? Rap, Ruble, Tittle, Tuttle ANSWERS: 1. Bible, 2. Bear Bryant, 3. 1925, 4. Menu, 5. Flounder, 6. TittleTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) OFTEN KHAKI PEOPLE SCENIC Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: For the pool shark, it was like stealing money, thanks to his ability to — PICK POCKETS Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEBy David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble SLUPH MRUST PUABET ECINET SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBYMan uses wifes problems at work against her DEAR ABBY: My husband tends to fight dirty, and I dont know how much more I can take. If we argue about some issue between us, hell say something along the lines of, This is why you have so much trouble with your colleagues at work.Ž He knows this is a touchy subject, and it upsets me. I have ongoing issues with two work colleagues who give me the silent treatment for months over perceived (but not intentional) slig hts, and it causes me a lot of social isolation and anguish. Im upset that he brings this up when we argue to validate his point of view. Of course, this escalates our fights and eventually he apologizes. However, I know the next disagreement we have hell resort to similar tactics. We have tried counseling, but its tough to fit into our busy schedules, and it never stopped him from resorting to personal attacks of character during our fights. I dont know what to do anymore. I want to forgive him, but I dont see the point since his apologies dont mean anything. Is there anything left for us to try before I throw in the towel? „ TOO TIRED TO FIGHTDEAR TOO TIRED: As I see it, you have two issues to deal with. You have two colleaguesŽ at work who have ganged up on you and are creating a hostile work environment by giving you the silent treatment. They dont have to love you, but they do have to work cooperatively with you, which they arent doing. You should report it to human resources or your boss, so it can be dealt with in a professional manner. As to your husband and what hes been doing on the home front, tell him he has a choice „ MAKE the time to work with a counselor and learn to fight fair or you will consult a lawyer about ending the marriage. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.

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** D8 Friday, September 28, 2018 | The News Herald PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD COMICS & PUZZLES

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Shooting the Shot with Patti and Josh | 5 Pops bene t concert at The Barn | 10-11 Bluegrass at the Beach | 19-21 The House with a Clock in Its Walls | 29 L E A D E R O F T H E P A C K LEADER OF THE PACK S o c c e r d r a m a  W o l v e s  f e a t u r e s f e m a l e c a s t | 6 7 Soccer drama Wolves features female cast |6-7ENTERTAINER I S S U E N O 1 8 8 € ISSUE NO. 188 €Friday, September 28, 2018 € FREE

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E21 E20 Friday, September 28, 2018 | BEACH INSIDERBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Bluegrass at the Beach is ready to grow this weekend at its new home at Aaron Bessant Park with two days of music, square dancing, food trucksand old-fashioned family fun. Trinity River Band is the headliner for Friday night, and Twin Kennedy from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada is the headliner for Saturday evening,Ž said Mike Burton, event promoter.Billy Rader is emceeing the event both days. Hes going to do a little singing and tell jokes between sets; were excited about it.Ž Bluegrass at the Beach is from 6-10 p.m. Friday, and noon to 9 p.m. Saturday.Musicians also include Jeff Brown & Still Lonesome, Frances Mooney & Fontanna Sunset, Judge Talford Band, Blue Holler, Kristi Stanley & Running Blind, The Wiseman Brothers, SwiftWater Band, and Melanie A. Davis. We have four new bands: Trinity River Band out of Northeast Florida, Melanie Davis from West Kentucky, The Judge Talford Bandrockin bluegrass, and Kristi Stanley and Running Blind„ shes the relative of the famous Ralph Stanley,Ž Burton said. All are members of the IBMA (International Bluegrass Music Association).Ž Twin Kennedy, performing both nights, is a two-time Vancouver Island Music Awardswinner for Country Recording and Song of the Year, John Lennon Songwriting Contest Grand Prize Winner (Secondhand GoldŽ), 12 British Columbia County Music Association Award nominationsand three-time Canadian Country Music Award (CCMA) nominee. Most recently, Twin Kennedy was nominated for the CCMA Roots Artist of the Year. The duo is comprised of sisters Carli Kennedy and Julie Kennedy, with Carli on vocals and guitar and Julie on vocals and violin. We are attracting tourists that would never come to Panama City because they are here for the beach. They had country music, rock and roll and jazz festivals on the beach, but they wanted to have bluegrass out there,Ž Burton said. The TDC made a donation to the Boys & Girls Clubs and helped with national promotion. It alsobenefits them with putting heads in beds. Its going to open the door for more performers to want to come here.Ž The 11th annual festival benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Formerly named Gulf Coast Bluegrass & Folk Music Festival, the event was moved from Under the Oaks in Parker to the larger beach venuethis year in hopes of raising more money for the club. Thats our main focus „ to raise money for our kids and provide scholarships for those who couldnt afford childcare,Ž said Hank Hill, CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Since the Boys & Girls Clubs came on boardin 2015, the event has raised $41,000 for the local organization. We served over 3,300 kids lastyear through different programs „ community programs and thesummer food program,Ž Hill said. The Boys & GirlsClubs junior staff members will be selling drink concessions on Saturday to raise money for their teen programs.Other food vendors will be set up Friday and Saturday, including the Filipino American Association of Bay County, Temperleys British Eatery, Garys Oyster Shack, Dovalinas Wood Fired Pizza, Culvers, Its Tamale Time, Smok n Butts BBQ, and Dixieland Funnel Cakes. A12-by-24 stage also will be set up for square dancing with Tommy Jackson and the Rocky Top Revue square dancing team of Nashville, where they have performed at the Grand Ole Opry. A good fun team that not only square dances and clogs, but get audience participation,Ž Burton said.At last years (festival),they got Chief Hutto, police chief in Parker, and they worked him out pretty good.Ž Craft vendors include Teresas Sparkling Sensations, Mumpower Farms, Terra Bella Soaps, SC Crafts, Tina Louise Boutique, Bling by the Bay 2, Tastefully Simple, Southern Glitter Girls, Grandma Dis Kettle Corn, Why Knot Crafts & More, SunniRaes Boutique, Bills Deals, Cottage Collages, Soap Tree Emporium, and Mermaids and Moonbeams. Children also can get on board for free train rides during the festival. The train is all cleaned up, and everything moving and ready to go,Ž said Burton, who built the train (which holds up to 10 children) before the 2016 festival. I enjoy it, dont get paid or anything. I volunteer to do this just because I love music. Ive been a musician all my life, and my dad was a musician. Anything to do with musicand I can be a part of, Im happy. I work on this thing six or seven months ahead of the event.Ž While Burton booked all of the entertainment this year, he is able to step back from this yearstechnical aspects „ light and sound„ which are being handling by Mike Frimet of HMX Productions. It will be nicer; thegreen room is air-conditioned with his and her dressing rooms,Ž said Burton, who admitted this is abig change from the RV performers had in Parker. Chilis, OCharleys, T.G.I. Fridays, Texas Roadhouse and PoFolksthis year are all donating food to feed the 100-plus band members and their stage crew.Ž By the Sea Resorts is providing hotel rooms for the bands this year. BAND SCHEDULEFriday, Sept. 28 6-6:30 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (square dance team) 6:30-7:15 p.m.: SwiftWater Band (bluegrass music) 7:30-8:15 p.m.: Twin Kennedy (bluegrass/country music) 8:30-9:30 p.m.: Trinity River Band (bluegrass/Gospel music) Saturday, Sept. 29 Noon to 12:30 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (square dance team) 12:30-1:15 p.m.: Melanie A. Davis (folk music) 1:30-2:15 p.m.: The Wiseman Brothers (bluegrass music) 2:30-3:15 p.m.: The Blue Holler (bluegrass music) 3:30-4:15 p.m.: Frances Mooney & Fontanna Sunset (bluegrass music) 4:15-5 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (bluegrass music) 5-5:45 p.m.: Judge Talford Band (bluegrass music) 6-6:45 p.m.: Kristi Stanley & Running Blind (bluegrass music) 7-7:45 p.m.: Jeff Brown & Still Lonesome (bluegrass music) 8-9 p.m.: Twin Kennedy (bluegrass/country music)Bluegrass at the Beach: What: Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for children, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County When: 6-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, and noon to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29 Where: Aaron Bessant Park, 600 S. Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach Tickets: $20 per day or $30 for weekend; free for ages 12 and younger; available at EventBrite, BluegrassAtTheBeach.org or at the gate (same price) Bring: Chairs and blankets Details: 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.orgBluegrass at the BeachTwin Kennedy headlines Bluegrass at the Beach with Friday and Saturday evening performances at Aaron Bessant Park. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Trinity River Band performs bluegrass and Gospel music Friday night. Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue lead both days with square dancing „ bringing a few out of the audience onto the dance ” oor. Melanie A. Davis performs folk music Saturday afternoon. Judge Talford Band performs bluegrass Saturday. Local musician Billy Rader will be the master of ceremonies for the event, as well as doing a little singing and comedy of his own. Music festival grows at Aaron Bessant Park

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E4 Friday, September 28, 2018 | UNDERCURRENTSVisitors share the origins, inspirations of their passions PANAMA CITY „The past week has been extraordinary, as it relates to rubbing shoulders with creative people. I got to sit for a chat with actor Jerome Blake, who has appeared in many blockbuster films; attended a luncheon where best-selling author Kristina McMorris discussed how she became an accidental authorŽ; and was surrounded for a weekend by artists, writers, gamers, filmmakers, comedians, costumers, cosplayers, puppeteers and many other imaginative minds at the ninth annual Panama City Creative Con. Some of this I was lucky enough to capture on audio for my Creative Passion podcast at NewsHerald. com. McMorris advocated following your bliss rather than chasing trends. That is, find the creative path that excites you and fulfills you, and then follow that path where it leads „ even if others tell you its a dead-end. When McMorris wrote her first novel on 2009 „ Letters from Home,Ž a love story set in World War II „ she was told no one was interested in that era and the novel would never sell. In fact, many of the rejection letters she collected told her in no uncertain terms that neither WWII stories nor books about letters would find an audience. Im so glad I was so blissfully ignorant and didnt know what to try to chase,Ž she said. Because it taught me a really good lesson, and that is that you have to write what youre passionate about. If you have that passion, other people will be attracted to that passion and want to share it with you.Ž If she hadnt found a publisher, she said, shed have printed her book at a Kinkos and given it out as gifts. It was a love letter to her grandparents and to the Greatest Generation, and she believed in it even if the so-called literary gatekeepers didnt. Like McMorris, Blake noted it was important to do good work and follow your bliss. He added that one should be willing to say yes to unique opportunities when they arise, but the most important thing one can do is show up on time and be nice.Ž He said one should never be the moanerŽ in the group; leave that job to someone else, because the next time a job comes up „ in his case, the chance to perform in a film or TV program „ the casting director or other person in charge of hiring is going to avoid the complainer and ask the nice person to come out and play. Ive had fantastic experiences with these people,Ž Blake said, listing all the actors and craftspeople hes been fortunate to know because of his association with films like the Star WarsŽ prequels. He said he has one expression „ which he came up with alongside fellow Star WarsŽ actor, the late Richard LaParmentier (General Motti in A New HopeŽ) „ that sums up his feelings about his career so far: Thank you, George Lucas.Ž Whatever your subjective review of the prequels, Blake said, none of the films, books, comics, TV shows, toys or other spinoffs would exist without one guy who wanted to tell his own story in the 1970s and kept at it until it was on movie screens around the globe. And today, one creative mind with a compelling tale can still change the world. Peace.Lighting the creative sparkAuthor Kristina McMorris speaks to a luncheon crowd at Florida State University Panama City on Monday. [ERICA MARTIN/FSUPC] Tony SimmonsActor Jerome Blake addresses the Panama City Creative Con audience at the Marina Civic Center on Saturday, Sept. 22. [TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD]

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E5 SHOOTING THE SHOTBy Patti BlakeThe News HeraldWere talking trash in this weeks episode of Shooting the Shot with Patti and Josh.Ž Okay, were actually talking about how the end of the summer season typically marks the beginning of the local beach cleanup efforts. Hundreds of volunteers donate a Saturday morning or two in September to help keep Panama City Beach a beautiful place with organized cleanup efforts. Chief Photographer Patti Blake went scuba diving at St. Andrews State Park, rode around on a boat in Lake Powell and climbed over large rocks under the Thomas Drive bridge with community volunteers to document their cleanup efforts. In this episode, we discuss what it was like to see the community come together to volunteer their time and what surprising kinds of trash volunteers pulled out of the water. The photo story will be published in The News Herald in the Sunday, Sept. 30, CelebrateŽ section of the newspaper. A gallery and videos from the cleanup effort will also be available online at NewsHerald.com.Community members keep beach beautifulLuke Powell and Dr.Andrea Kroetz cut through “ shing line and pick up trash near the jetties on Sept. 8 at St. Andrews State Park during the Panama City Dive Clubs End of Summer Jetties Clean Up. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Rusted cans, plastic items and “ shing line are stored on a tarp after scuba divers collected them underwater on Sept. 8 at St. Andrews State Park. Volunteers look over trash that was collected by scuba divers on Sept. 8 during the second annual Panama City Dive Clubs End of Summer Jetties Clean Up at St. Andrews State Park. Trey Howland holds a garbage bag open while 9-year-old Hudson helps pick up trash on Sept. 15 during the Lake Powell Clean-up.

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E6 Friday, September 28, 2018 | Empowering play The Wolves opens Friday at GCSCBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A challenging and empowering play premieres Friday at Gulf Coast State College, The WolvesŽ by Sarah DeLappe, a 2017 Pulitzer Prize Finalist in Drama.Its been a challenge, but Ill tell you, its been empow-ering,Ž said director Hank Rion, an assistant professor. We need diversity in the-ater. You rarely come across a show with 10 strong, empow-ered women and a show just about women.Ž Rion added that the teams name is a metaphor for the concept of strength in num-bers. He was proud of the work the actors had done to prepare for the show, which included running drills with a soccer coach, learning to kick, and even holding a scrimmage game at Fusion Fitness Center in Lynn Haven. He said the realism of the show depended on the actors familiarity with the game because the audi-ence is seated literally within a foot or two of the sidelines.In a space like this, you cant hide it. They have to look like they know what theyre doing,Ž Rion said. In a space like this, its so intimate that it has to be real. I didnt want it to look fake. If it looks fake, I havent done my job.ŽGCSCs Visual and Performing Arts Division will present The WolvesŽ for two weekends. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 28-29 and Oct. 5-6, and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 7. All shows are in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the main campus, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. General admission tickets are $20; $10 for high school students, seniors and military; or free for GCSC and FSU PC students, faculty and staff with a valid ID. Advance tickets can be purchased at www.GulfCoast.edu/arts.The cast consists of cur-rent GCSC students including Lauren Frandsen, Suzanne Nelson, Natalie Sorrento, Faith Gunn, Megan McDon-nell, Amy Tinch, Mia Salaveria, Jamiah Morris, Ceairra Orr and Tiffany Fraioli. Scenic design is by Brian Baillif and light design by Erica Burger Baillif. Seat-ing is limited, and the show is recommended for mature audiences because of its adult content.I think its pretty amazing. Its so centered on girls and their day to day life,Ž Salave-ria said. Its figuring out the lives of these girls, uncover-ing it line by line. Its fun to dive into our characters and realize we really are much like them.ŽThe play depicts teenage girls who make up a soccer team, and the scenes center on Leader of the Pack: Soccer drama stars all-female cast GO & DOTHE WOLVESWhen: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 28-29 and Oct. 5-6; 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 30, and Oct. 7 Where: Amelia Center Theatre Lab on the Main Campus of Gulf Coast State College, Panama City Tickets: $20 general admission; $10 for high school students, seniors and military; advance tickets can be purchased at www.GulfCoast. edu/arts; GCSC and FSU PC students, faculty and staff admitted free with a valid ID Details: Jason Hedden at 850-872-3887 or jhedden@ gulfcoast.edu The Wolves is an ensemble drama featuring 10 female actors and set on a soccer practice “ eld. [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] Mia Salaveria Jamiah Morris See WOLVES, E7

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E7their day-to-day experiences of high school through their daily afternoon warm-ups at an indoor field. By seating the audience uncomfortably close to the action, Rion said, they become almost like voyeurs eavesdropping on private conversations.It was tough,Ž he said of the effort required to make the cross-talk feel unforced. You want it to be organic. ... In my 25 years of working in theater, it was the hardest script Ive ever worked on.ŽThe WolvesŽ originally premiered at The Duke at 42nd Street in New York City in September 2016. It received the American Playwriting Foundations inaugural Relentless Award, and the 2017 Obie Award for Ensemble work presented by the American Theatre Wing.The script is unique in its design, with overlapping dialogue „ girls participate in separate conversations taking place at the same time, then comment on the bits of a conversation theyve overheard between other girls. These talks include everything from a classroom assignment on the Khmer Rouge to boy-friends, the coachs hangover, vacation trips and speculation about the new girl on the team.You have to listen for a cue line that doesnt even relate to whatever scene youre working on, so you cant really bounce off of each other as easy as you might in another show,Ž Salaveria said. Its super high energy, because we have to exercise during it and say lines at the same time, so its hard not to crash right after that.ŽEach scene includes warm-ups and stretching routines led by the team captain (Nelson). But as the play progresses, the topics of conversation begin to deepen. Theres talk of an abortion and an anxiety dis-order, friends fall out, injuries plague the team, and tragedy unfolds in reactions that are carried onto the practice field.Having to keep your active energy while also getting your lines together is kind of hard to do, but luckily we have amazing ladies that are up for the challenge (and) help each other out,Ž said Morris, who wears jersey No. 8. She added that the play provides insight into the secret lives of girls: It shows the audience what its really like to be in the mind of girls. Oftentimes, you hear the chatter of girls going around and you dont really know what theyre talking about.Ž WOLVESFrom Page E6The Wolves opens Friday, Sept. 28, in the black box theatre lab at Gulf Coast State Colleges Amelia Center. The audience seating is literally at the sidelines of the practice “ eld.

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E8 Friday, September 28, 2018 |

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Greatest Hits of Billy Joel and Elton JohnWhat: Dinner theater show to bene“ t Panama City Pops Orchestra; presented by Pineapple Willys and The Wicked Wheel When: 5:30-8:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28 Where: The Barn at the Wicked Wheel, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach; casual attire Tickets: $100, includes smoked prime rib dinner with sides and drink; available at TheWickedWheel.com/Pops E10 Friday, September 28, 2018 | Concert at The Barn bene ts Panama City Pops OrchestraBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Create new memories with The Greatest Hits of Billy Joel and Elton John „ a dinner theater show from 5-30-8:30 p.m. Friday at The Barn at The Wicked Wheel to benefit the Panama City Pops Orchestra.This was a great idea by Bill Buskell, Pineapple Willy. He has been a supporter of the Pops and wanted to do some-thing to help keep symphonic music in the community,Ž said Tammala Spencer, past president of the Pops. Billy Joel and Elton John are very popular. We sold tables and tickets and still have a few tickets left. Were thrilled to have Dr. David Ott as a conductor. He is a nationally-recognized composer. To have someone of his stature in the music world to be here is just outstanding.ŽTickets, $100 for individuals or $150 for couples, include a smoked prime rib dinner with sides and a drink at The Barn, 10025 Hutchison Blvd. The casual-attire evening also will include hors doeuvres and Champagne, as well as a full bar open for service.Ive been a fan of Billy Joel and Elton John since I took up piano at 20 years old,Ž said Chaz Butler, fea-tured performer on keys and vocals. Its timeless music thats lasted all these years. Artists write hits about stuff they been through so a lot can relate to the stories. Imagine being a piano man in the bar and what youre going to see are Billy Joels true stories.ŽFriday night will include two 30-minute sets back to back, starting with Joel. The song lists includes You May Be Right,Ž Big Shot,Ž Its Still Rock and Roll to Me,Ž Movin Out,Ž Just the Way You Are,Ž Vienna,Ž Piano Man, and Scenes from an Italian Restaurant.Ž The second half of the program features Elton Johns Bennie and the Jets,Ž Daniel,Ž Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,Ž Rocket ManŽ, Tiny Dancer,Ž Dont Go Breaking My Heart,Ž and Saturday Nights Alright for Fighting.ŽButler will be backed up by a six-piece band with special guest vocalists James Austin and Kevin Jacobs. The band will include Austin on synth, Mo Dee on drums, Michael Thompson on bass/vocals, Drew Herring on guitar/ vocals, Jason Bennit on sax/ vocals, and Kathleen Lacour Dinner theater: Relive hits of Billy Joel, Elton John GO & DO: LIVE MUSIC Fridays fundraiser will bene“ t The Panama City Pops Orchestra, led by Dr. David Ott, as it continues its mission of presenting outstanding symphonic music to the community. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See POPS, E11

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E11on background vocals.I thought it would be nice to include other singers,Ž said Butler, who has been perform-ing for 36 years. Kevin Jacobs is one of my best friends from many years ago. Hes probably the most amazing talent around this area „ a local legend. And James Austin is an up-and-coming singer, 21, who plays in Sound Arcade, and Ive played with him in Go Big or Go Home. Jason Bennit also sings.Ž Butler and Herring also are members of Sound Arcade, which led this years Backstage Pass Concert Series in August at the Marina Civic Center, and Butler played bass guitar in the Go Big or Go Home Band. In addition to keyboards and piano, Butler also plays trumpet and is a musical director for several different projects.Its my first time to be front and center,Ž said Butler, who has performed at The Barn with the Go Big or Go Home Band and Jacobs. I love this place; its just great. The sound is very good, the size and stage is nice. Its just a very relaxing atmosphere. Id like to thank Bill for giving me the opportunity to do a show for him.ŽAll proceeds from Fri-days event go directly to the Panama City Pops Orchestra, which began in 1996 as a small group of string players. The not-for-profit organization relies on dona-tions from the community, as well as ticket sales during its concert season, as it contin-ues its mission of presenting symphonic music to engage audiences of all ages.The Panama City Pops Orchestra begins its 23rd season Oct. 20. This years regular four-concert season includes Music of the NightŽ on Oct. 20, Cruising the MedŽ on Jan. 19, Heroes and Super HeroesŽ on March 9 and Myths and MusesŽ on April 27 „ all at 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 9 Harrison Ave., in downtown Panama City.We also are doing a Christmas concert for the first time this year at the Marina Civic Center,Ž Spen-cer said. As new industry and business is recruited to Northwest Florida ... a ques-tion often asked is, What arts do you have in the com-munity? For the community leaders to be able to say we have the Panama City Pops Orchestra is a great benefit to the community, and we want to remain strong.ŽSpencer served as president of the Pops for two seasons, including last year when Fridays fundraiser was first organized. Connie Gittard now serves president of the Panama City Pops, which is led by conductor and composer Dr. David Ott. Ott, who once was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in music by cellist and conductor Mstislav Rostropovich, has composed a large portfolio of compositions performed by the National Symphony and orchestras. The awardwinning composer also has penned two books on composers and created a 13-part TV series distributed for the Florida Education Channel. And during live per-formances, Ott also has a way of weaving in American his-tory with symphonic music. For more on the Pops, visit PanamaCityPops.org. POPSFrom Page E10The Barn is used for special events, such as Friday nights fundraiser, but also is used as a commissary kitchen for The Wicked Wheel. [JAN WADDY/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Chaz Butler will perform The Greatest Hits of Billy Joel and Elton John on Friday at The Barn at The Wicked Wheel in Panama City Beach. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E13 LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAMBy Anthony Watson Special to The News HeraldTwo weeks from the Emerald Coast Redfish Circuit Championship in Apalachicola, and Jake and I are in second place in Team of the Year. Were 5 points from first and needing a strong finish in the upcoming tournament tosurpass first and take Team of the Year. In the two times we have fished Apalachicola in the past year, our highest weight was 8.5 pounds, whichisnt a good weight for Apalachicola and probably wouldnt help us move up a position, either. Jake and I decided to go over this past weekend, make tracks on the machine, and find big fish. Trailering the boat to Apalach, itstarted raining on us and the sky was dark all around. Rain is never a good thing when pre-fishing and looking for signs and Vs. We launched the boat and headed up the river, used a cut-through to get into East Bay and go to Big Bay. Last year, we saw big reds in Big Bay, and the winning weight came from there. We made it to Big Bay, pulled up at the mouth on the right bank, deployed the trolling motor, and slowly started beating the banks,looking for big fish. Jake threw a spoon, and I threw a 4-inch paddle tail with a ‡th-ounce jig head. About five minutes in, Jake and I doubled up. We both thought we had figured it out until we landed 2-pound large-mouth bass. Kind of interesting, catching redfish and bass in the same bay on the same baits. We kept working down the bank, and Jake bowed up. I saw pink in the water, grabbed the net and netted a 21-inch redfish. At least it was a redfish this time, but the same size reds we have caught every time there. I bowed up on a rat, released it, and cast again. I hooked up on another red; it must have been the twin to Jakes red. The two slot reds we had caught so far were the same length and size, go figure, but we were roughly looking at 8 pounds. We continued down the bank and I hooked up an 18-inch trout; next cast, a 17-inch trout. Then the water burst beside us, and it was about a 5-foot tarpon. We boththrew at it, fast retrieving, jigging and slow rolling. We could never get the silver king to strike our baits. We were packing up to move to a different bay and Jake said, Something is moving by the boat.Ž I looked over and saw a light spot and said, You mean the sand?Ž He said, Watch the sand. It will move,Ž and lo and behold, the sand was moving. As we watched,a giant gray area surfaced. Its nose broke the surface of the water „ a sea cow with a baby. Its the first time I have seen a manatee north of Crystal River, much less had one swim up to the boat like a dolphin begging for food. We watched it for a minute, waiting for it to leave the trolling motor alone so we could start backwithout hurting the manatee, andso I could fire up the outboard. The baby stayed back where we first saw them, and the big manatee followed behind us for about 5 minutes around the bayou „ right at the outboard so I couldnt fire up. We made it away from the manatee, finally, and as I was about to fire up the outboard we saw another manatee about 20 feet in front of the boat. It was awesome seeing the first one, dont get me wrong. But now I was ready to go, and manatees kept showing up so I couldnt fire up the outboard. We poled down and waited a while until we didnt see any more of them, then we fired up the outboard and idled out of Big Bay. We decided to check Little Bay, since we were told good information about it as well. We arrived at the mouth of Little Bay, deployed the trolling motor and began casting. Jake hooked up „ 18-inch trout. I cast and hooked up a 17-inch trout. The trout bite was unreal. Too bad we werent targeting trout. It seemed every cast for a good 5 to 10 minutes produced trout. We caught 10 trout: 9 of them were longer than 16 inches, and onewas 12 inches. It was 3:30 p.m., and we decided it was time to go. We never found the right reds, but to have tarpon busting beside the boat and manatees swimming by the boat „ it was still a crazy, awesome, unbelievable trip.Apalach trip o ers crazy shing dayA manatee follows the boat. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] The manatee watches beside the boat. A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony Watson

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E15 SEEN-ON-SCENECommunity goes green for SheilaFood trucks, from left, Dovalinas Catering & Events, I Roll Lumpia, and Temperleys British Eatery are set up at A.L. Kinsaul Park on Sept. 22 during Go Green for Sheila, while Who We Are plays music under the pavilion. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Who We Are „ from left, Rickie Jay Smith, Riley Marie Smith, Jonathan Richard Moyer, and Jessica Lane Smith „ performs Christian music during the Sept. 22 fundraiser for Sheila Phillips at A.L. Kinsaul Park in Lynn Haven. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Danielle Dovalina, left, and Tania Philpot pose for a quick photo, while Guillermo Dovalina makes a pizza aboard the food trailer. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Sheila Phillips listens to the Christian music of Cori & Kelly, while her husband, Paul Phillips, takes a break from greeting guests and passing out green ribbons during the fundraiser. The event was organized to raise funds for Sheilas life-saving medical treatments for her Chronic Lyme Disease. To donate and learn more, visit GoFundMe. com/SavingSheilaPhillipsFromChronicLymeDisease. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD]

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E18 Friday, September 28, 2018 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Philip Cunningham III Age: 37 Occupation: Investment Adviser Representative Where you grew up: Panama City Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: The Hippie Chick at Lizas Kitchen Favorite hang-out: Jenks Avenue Church of Christ (great people!) What you do for fun: I play golf and watch college football (Roll Tide!). Name: Jonathan England Age: 36 Occupation: Spiritual capitalist, author, speaker, mentor Where you grew up: Bowling Green, Kentucky Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Zen Garden/Power wrap Favorite hang-out: Home What you do for fun: Learn, travel, surf, teach. Name: Tim Jacobi Age: 53 Occupation: Owner Angry Tuna Seafood Co. Where you grew up: Pensacola Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Panama Pizzeria/ Garlic Bread Knots Favorite hang-out: St. Andrews State Park/ Sur“ ng

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E19 BEACH INSIDERISSUE NO. 188 € Friday, September 28, 2018 Bluegrass at the Beach: Bluegrass at the Beach:Twin Kennedy headlines 2-day festival | 2021

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E21 E20 Friday, September 28, 2018 | BEACH INSIDERBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Bluegrass at the Beach is ready to grow this weekend at its new home at Aaron Bessant Park with two days of music, square dancing, food trucksand old-fashioned family fun. Trinity River Band is the headliner for Friday night, and Twin Kennedy from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada is the headliner for Saturday evening,Ž said Mike Burton, event promoter.Billy Rader is emceeing the event both days. Hes going to do a little singing and tell jokes between sets; were excited about it.Ž Bluegrass at the Beach is from 6-10 p.m. Friday, and noon to 9 p.m. Saturday.Musicians also include Jeff Brown & Still Lonesome, Frances Mooney & Fontanna Sunset, Judge Talford Band, Blue Holler, Kristi Stanley & Running Blind, The Wiseman Brothers, SwiftWater Band, and Melanie A. Davis. We have four new bands: Trinity River Band out of Northeast Florida, Melanie Davis from West Kentucky, The Judge Talford Bandrockin bluegrass, and Kristi Stanley and Running Blind„ shes the relative of the famous Ralph Stanley,Ž Burton said. All are members of the IBMA (International Bluegrass Music Association).Ž Twin Kennedy, performing both nights, is a two-time Vancouver Island Music Awardswinner for Country Recording and Song of the Year, John Lennon Songwriting Contest Grand Prize Winner (Secondhand GoldŽ), 12 British Columbia County Music Association Award nominationsand three-time Canadian Country Music Award (CCMA) nominee. Most recently, Twin Kennedy was nominated for the CCMA Roots Artist of the Year. The duo is comprised of sisters Carli Kennedy and Julie Kennedy, with Carli on vocals and guitar and Julie on vocals and violin. We are attracting tourists that would never come to Panama City because they are here for the beach. They had country music, rock and roll and jazz festivals on the beach, but they wanted to have bluegrass out there,Ž Burton said. The TDC made a donation to the Boys & Girls Clubs and helped with national promotion. It alsobenefits them with putting heads in beds. Its going to open the door for more performers to want to come here.Ž The 11th annual festival benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Formerly named Gulf Coast Bluegrass & Folk Music Festival, the event was moved from Under the Oaks in Parker to the larger beach venuethis year in hopes of raising more money for the club. Thats our main focus „ to raise money for our kids and provide scholarships for those who couldnt afford childcare,Ž said Hank Hill, CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Since the Boys & Girls Clubs came on boardin 2015, the event has raised $41,000 for the local organization. We served over 3,300 kids lastyear through different programs „ community programs and thesummer food program,Ž Hill said. The Boys & GirlsClubs junior staff members will be selling drink concessions on Saturday to raise money for their teen programs.Other food vendors will be set up Friday and Saturday, including the Filipino American Association of Bay County, Temperleys British Eatery, Garys Oyster Shack, Dovalinas Wood Fired Pizza, Culvers, Its Tamale Time, Smok n Butts BBQ, and Dixieland Funnel Cakes. A12-by-24 stage also will be set up for square dancing with Tommy Jackson and the Rocky Top Revue square dancing team of Nashville, where they have performed at the Grand Ole Opry. A good fun team that not only square dances and clogs, but get audience participation,Ž Burton said.At last years (festival),they got Chief Hutto, police chief in Parker, and they worked him out pretty good.Ž Craft vendors include Teresas Sparkling Sensations, Mumpower Farms, Terra Bella Soaps, SC Crafts, Tina Louise Boutique, Bling by the Bay 2, Tastefully Simple, Southern Glitter Girls, Grandma Dis Kettle Corn, Why Knot Crafts & More, SunniRaes Boutique, Bills Deals, Cottage Collages, Soap Tree Emporium, and Mermaids and Moonbeams. Children also can get on board for free train rides during the festival. The train is all cleaned up, and everything moving and ready to go,Ž said Burton, who built the train (which holds up to 10 children) before the 2016 festival. I enjoy it, dont get paid or anything. I volunteer to do this just because I love music. Ive been a musician all my life, and my dad was a musician. Anything to do with musicand I can be a part of, Im happy. I work on this thing six or seven months ahead of the event.Ž While Burton booked all of the entertainment this year, he is able to step back from this yearstechnical aspects „ light and sound„ which are being handling by Mike Frimet of HMX Productions. It will be nicer; thegreen room is air-conditioned with his and her dressing rooms,Ž said Burton, who admitted this is abig change from the RV performers had in Parker. Chilis, OCharleys, T.G.I. Fridays, Texas Roadhouse and PoFolksthis year are all donating food to feed the 100-plus band members and their stage crew.Ž By the Sea Resorts is providing hotel rooms for the bands this year. BAND SCHEDULEFriday, Sept. 28 6-6:30 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (square dance team) 6:30-7:15 p.m.: SwiftWater Band (bluegrass music) 7:30-8:15 p.m.: Twin Kennedy (bluegrass/country music) 8:30-9:30 p.m.: Trinity River Band (bluegrass/Gospel music) Saturday, Sept. 29 Noon to 12:30 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (square dance team) 12:30-1:15 p.m.: Melanie A. Davis (folk music) 1:30-2:15 p.m.: The Wiseman Brothers (bluegrass music) 2:30-3:15 p.m.: The Blue Holler (bluegrass music) 3:30-4:15 p.m.: Frances Mooney & Fontanna Sunset (bluegrass music) 4:15-5 p.m.: Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue (bluegrass music) 5-5:45 p.m.: Judge Talford Band (bluegrass music) 6-6:45 p.m.: Kristi Stanley & Running Blind (bluegrass music) 7-7:45 p.m.: Jeff Brown & Still Lonesome (bluegrass music) 8-9 p.m.: Twin Kennedy (bluegrass/country music)Bluegrass at the Beach: What: Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for children, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County When: 6-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, and noon to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29 Where: Aaron Bessant Park, 600 S. Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach Tickets: $20 per day or $30 for weekend; free for ages 12 and younger; available at EventBrite, BluegrassAtTheBeach.org or at the gate (same price) Bring: Chairs and blankets Details: 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.orgBluegrass at the BeachTwin Kennedy headlines Bluegrass at the Beach with Friday and Saturday evening performances at Aaron Bessant Park. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Trinity River Band performs bluegrass and Gospel music Friday night. Tommy Jackson & Rocky Top Revue lead both days with square dancing „ bringing a few out of the audience onto the dance ” oor. Melanie A. Davis performs folk music Saturday afternoon. Judge Talford Band performs bluegrass Saturday. Local musician Billy Rader will be the master of ceremonies for the event, as well as doing a little singing and comedy of his own. Music festival grows at Aaron Bessant Park

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHEdward Knight plays with his son, Holdyn, 3. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Ajasnia Gasca runs an obstacle course in swim “ ns. James Walker, 2, runs along the water. Jason and Natalie venture into the water. Sheri Brosz and Jacky Miller enjoy their day.

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E25 BOOK NOTESBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Joanne Hunter Del Re is 86 years old and a firsttime writer. Her memoir, Tales of Rural Life Georgia 19381946,Ž was recently published by Lightning Source Press. This is my only attempt at writing anything!Ž she said of the book, which is written in couplets. Heres an example from Tale Twenty-FiveŽ: We always knew where Daddy was because he whistled all day long./Each tune was so cheerful it could have been a lovely song./I felt strongly about that because I always loved to sing./I even dreamt of becoming famous for that very thing.Ž Born in Rome, Ga., in 1932, Del Re attended business college in Birmingham, Ala., before moving to San Francisco in 1965. She was married in 1972, and lost her husband to cancer in 2005. She moved to Florida to rejoin family members who had settled there, and she said she began writing limericks in 2013. If youve ever lived in the country, Im pretty sure you relate to some of these stories,Ž Del Re writes. If you were raised in the city, youll probably realize how different your life could have been. I dont profess to be another Emily Dickinson „ never have, never will be „ but I had fun trying to be.Ž The book is illustrated throughout with drawings by the authors neice, Pamela Jo Hunter, who also designed the color cover. Del Re also credits her sister, Sandra Hunter Buckland, for encouraging her to write a book about their rural life. She plans to make arrangements for a book-signing event locally as soon as possible. In the meantime, the book is available through Barnes & Nobles website, and directly from the author; email pamelajo56@ me.com for details.Octogenarian shares poetic Tales of Rural LifeBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The author of Ms. Magdalenes HalloweenŽ said her latest project wasa step outside her comfort zone. Yvette Doolittle Herr (The Lucky TwoŽ) wrote the slim volume forchildren as well as adults, with spooky events that she hopes will open readers eyes to the concept of a larger purpose at work in the world. Its a Halloween story thats not too scary „ but it is a little spooky,Ž Herr said. Its been in my head for about 10 years. ... Scary things happen, but (the ending includes) an angel. You dont usually have angels in a Halloween story.Ž Herr spent three weeks sitting in the public library and writing the slim volume by longhand. She then transcribed it onto a computer and spent weeks editing and rewriting it. She said that when she didnt know exactly what to write down, she kept reminding herself what former News Herald editor Frank Pericola told her when she worked for the newspaper: Just write. Just type.Ž This is the second book for the author, who has lived in Panama City since 1978. She said her writing is influenced by living and working near the Gulf of Mexico, as well as herlove of cats. (Theres even a ghost cat in this tale.) Herr graduated from high school in Rochester, N.Y., and she earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism from the University of Florida, and a Master of Science Degree in Psychology fromFlorida State University. Ms. Magdalenes HalloweenŽ is now available through Amazon. com ($9.95 in print and $7.95 in ebook format), and locally at Carousel Supermarket, 19400 Front Beach Road in Panama City Beach. For more information, visit Herrs page at Facebook. com/TheLuckyTwo. The focal character, Hollie, is a sixth grader whose family recently moved in a house across the street from a cemetery. Herr was inspired to write the story because of memories of a house she lived in as a child. Parts of the story did happen, and others are sort of figments of the imagination,Ž she said. Theres a bigger thing in control of whats going on. We can play a part in that. ... My intent was for fourth-graders and older, to help them believe in something bigger than them.Ž Herr willsign books at Gypsy Beach Treasured Kreations, 1107 Beck Ave., during the Spirit of St. Andrews Bar Haunt from 5-9 p.m. Oct. 27. She willalso be atthe St. Andrews Waterfront Farmers Market that same day, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., as she is most Saturdays. In addition, she will have a signing at thePanama City Publishing Co. Museum and Visitors Center from 1-3 p.m. Nov. 24, as part of local events tied toNational Novel Writing Month.Herr pens Halloween tale for all agesTales of Rural Life is the “ rst writing project for 86-year-old poet Joann Hunter Del Re. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] Ms. Magdalenes Halloween is an all-ages tale by Yvette Doolittle Herr. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Doolittle Herr

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E28 Friday, September 28, 2018 |

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E29 MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEach week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com. Matt: OK House with a Clock still charms The House with a Clock in Its WallsŽ is wonderfully unique in modern cinema; a live-action family film based on a largely-unknown horror-comedy tale. However, in the history of movies, its really not that groundbreaking. Released by Amblin Entertainment, Spielbergs iconic production company that gave so many of us the movies we grew up loving (Goonies,Ž Gremlins,Ž E.T.Ž), bleeds that familiar essence from every scene. Is it as great as those influences? Not at all. Still, for a movie largely dependent on its charm and nostalgic creativity, its not bad. We follow Lewis, who moves into his strange and estranged warlock uncles home after his parents death „ a home that reveals itself to be a living, breathing organism. As a story dependent on magic, convenient coincidences and dei ex machina are expected, but this one really leans into those cheap screenwriting tools, along with an abundance of childishly unnecessary bathroom jokes. Nonetheless, the universe created is a fun one. Lewis is an engaging protagonist, with a solid character quirk of loving dictionaries and words. Best of all, Jack Black and Cate Blanchett prove to be a great pair, and are clearly having a good time here, especially in their loving jabs at each other. One thing that is fairly indisputable is that this is Eli Roths greatest directorial effort to date. For a man who loves to work in extreme-gore horror, he restrains himself well here. Like Tim Burton before he became a self-parody, his kid-friendly horror imagery is solid, and his noble support of all things odd is welcome. These positives point to some strong potential for any future franchise entries we may get, even if this film is only just OK.Ž Rating: out of Cole: Lacking surprises, House minimizes awe The cinemas newest kids movie is The House with a Clock in Its Walls.Ž The film follows an orphan boy named Lewis who moves in with his uncle, whom he finds out is a warlock living inside a house with „ you guessed it „ a clock in its walls. Lewis begins to learn a little magic of his own and makes his own contributions to the tales resolution in such a way that youve already imagined. While The House with a Clock in its WallsŽ is admirably strange in terms of tone, its as basic as they come in terms of its story elements. Not only does it lack a surprising turn, but its characters seem disenchanted. Lewis never strains to understand this new magical world, instead accepting it in stride. This means the audience is left feeling the full weight of the banality of the story with no sense of magical bewilderment or world-building adventure to distract us. There are pleasant moments, but they lack a real liveliness about them. There are flourishes of fun, but theres no real mirth. Its all approximations of the kind of childish joy found in better kids movies. The talented duo of Jack Black and Cate Blanchett do their best to elevate the mundanity of the script, especially in their almost-jovial scenes of bickering and banter, but its a futile attempt. The house with a clock in its titleŽ cant even manage to be a good ticking-clock thriller. The stakes are huge (end of the world), but the felt drama of the story is minimized to an absurd degree. Ultimately, parents can do worse on Redbox, but no theatrical rush is necessary. Rating: out of The House with a Clock in Its Walls holds potential Director: Eli Roth Starring: Jack Black, Cate Blanchett, Kyle MacLachlan, Eli Roth, Owen Vaccaro, Colleen Camp, Sunny Suljic, Renee Elise Goldsberry Rated: PG (thematic elements including sorcery, some action, scary images, rude humor and language)The House with a Clock in Its WallsFrom left, Owen Vaccaro, Jack Black and Cate Blanchett star in The House with a Clock in Its Walls. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E30 Friday, September 28, 2018 | PANAMA CITY „ A big highlight of the ninth annual Panama City Creative Con was the imaginative costumes worn by so many of the con-goers. This is barely a sample of the cosplay on display. [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD]Creative Con-goers rock the cosplay SEEN-ON-SCENEDont keep all of the good times to yourself! Send your photos of people who make the scene around town to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@ pcnh.com, and well share them with our readers.SHARE YOUR PHOTOS

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E31 THE ARTISTS TOUCHWorkshops o ered in advance of eventBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Beach Art Group and the Sheraton Bay Point Resort are teaming up in October to host a live art competition and and exhibition, following a series of classes on plein air painting. The Bay Point Plein Air Art Festival will take place Oct. 20 at the Sheraton, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. The public is invited to stroll the property and watch artists at work upon their canvases as they capture the views. This annual event... is dedicated to enhancing the publics awareness of outdoor painting while providing a venue for established and emerging artists alike to share creative endeavors with collectors and the public,Ž said Helen Ballance, spokeswoman for Beach Art Group. Together, artists and spectators are immersed in the creative process, enjoying the great outdoors and how the artists interpret what they see.Ž Plein airŽ is simply a French term for painting outdoors. Artists attempt to capture the view in the available light and the time they have on-site. For the purposes of this event, artists will participate in two ways: an All-Day Paint-Out and a 2-Hour Quick-Draw. The Plein Air/Quick Draw fundraiser is open to all artists,Ž Ballance said, inviting them to paint the best natural landscapes and wildlife on the Emerald Coast.Ž Meanwhile, she added, the public can catch the excitement of watching paintings come to life before your eyes and being able to purchase your favorite, all to benefit the arts here on the worlds most beautiful beaches.Ž The All-Day Paint-Out will be from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; registration is $35 per artist registering by Oct. 10. Pre-registration is available at BeachArtGroup.com. The 2-Hour Quick-Draw, including adult and youth categories, will be 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is $10 per canvas, with early registration available, or register at 9:30 a.m. on the morning of the event. Youth category awards will be announced at 1:30 p.m.; adult category awards will be announced along with the All-Day PaintOut awards at 4 p.m. Twenty percent of all funds raised will go to benefit the Sunshine Art Center. Ballance said Beach Art Group has been holding small plein air events for the past four years, and the new venue will help this one grow. Sheraton wants to make the Plein Air Art Festival an annual draw, and is offering a two-night stay at the resort as part of the Grand Prize package. The St. Joe Foundation is also a sponsor. WORKSHOPOFFERED In the days leading up to the festival, Beach Art Group will host a three-day Plein Air Workshop taught by Perry Austin, an artist with more than 35 years experience. He will focus on techniques to help artists capture more than just what they see in front of them. When teaching a workshop, I notice that too many artists are trying to copy either the landscape in front of them or a photograph,Ž Austin said.They are immediately off on the wrong track. The painting alone is the finished product, regardless of source material. The intent should be making the painting reflect what you feel about the subject, not a copy. There is always some part of the subject matter that really grabs your attention „ there is your painting. The rest is to be structured to lead the eye into and around the center of interest. Sometimes it is noteasy to get everything you want into the painting and maintain the integrity of the center of interest.Ž Austin is a charter member of the Plein Air Artists of the Southeast,theAmerican Impressionist Society and Oil Painters of America.He was first published in Southwest Art in 1998 and has received many first-place wins at plein air events.The workshop „ Austins third forBeach Art Group „will beat the Sheraton on Oct. 17, 18 and 19. Cost is$400, and class size is limited;acceptance will be on a first come/first serve basis.To register,go to BeachArtGroup.com, or contactBalance at 850-541-3867 or beachartgroup@att.net. In addition, BeachArtGroup is hosting classes on Plein Air Sketching by Lynn Haven artist Don Taylor on Oct. 4, 5 and 6. Taylor is a past president of the Southern Watercolor Society and an award winning artist. He has traveledthe world, keeping watercolor journals of his adventures. This workshop will share his methods for capturing the moment in watercolor. For details, visit BeachArtGroup.com.Plein air festival planned for OctoberWhat: Art competition and exhibition bene“ ting the Sunshine Art Center When: Oct. 20 Where: Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach; 850-2366000 or SheratonBayPoint.com Event Details: BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867BAY POINT PLEIN AIR ART FESTIVALOil painting by Perry Austin, who will lead a 3-day workshop on plein air techniques leading up to the festival and competition Oct. 20. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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E32 Friday, September 28, 2018 | HAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh. com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, Sept. 28 6th ANNUAL FORE HER GOLF OUTING: At the Santa Rosa Golf & Beach Club, 334 Golf Club Drive, Santa Rosa Beach. Cost is $110 per golfer and includes breakfast, lunch, the green fee, and a cart. Proceeds will bene“ t local breast cancer patients. To register, visit www.foreher.org or email info@thehivecreativeconsulting.com WALLY WHITE AFRICA: Exhibit runs through Saturday at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com STEPHEN BENNETT SMITH LANDSCAPES: Exhibit runs through Oct. 6, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com F:/STOP NORTH FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION AND EXHIBIT: Exhibit runs through Sept. 29, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com VIVA CUBA PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com MADE IN GREECE VII ART EXHIBITION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details, GulfCoast.edu/arts BLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: 6-10 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for kids, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Tickets $20 per day or $30 for weekend. Free for children 12 and younger. Details: 850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org JAM SESSION STRING THEORY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook. com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. GREATEST HITS OF BILLY JOEL AND ELTON JOHN: 5:30-8:30 p.m. at The Barn at the Wicked Wheel, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach to bene“ t the Panama City Pops Orchestra. Dinner theater show performance by Chaz Butler on keys and vocals with special guest vocalists James Austin (synthesizer) and Kevin Jacobs, along with Mo Dee on drums, Michael Thompson on bass/vocals, Drew Herring on guitar/ vocals, Jason Bennit on sax/vocals, and Kathleen Lacour on background vocals. Tickets include smoked prime rib dinner with sides and drink; $100 for individual, $150 for couples or VIP tables available at TheWickedWheel. com/Pops. Event is casual attire. GO & DO : CALENDARRides spin and pulsate light at the Central Panhandle Fair, which returns Oct. 1-6. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 33

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARBACKSTAGE PASS ANTHONY PEEBLES: 6:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets are $5. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Details, BayArts.org BEER DINNER BENEFIT: 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Back Beach Barbecue, 19714 Panama City Beach Parkway. To bene“ t Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Tickets are $75 and can be reserved by calling 850-249-0822 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 7:30 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 for adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Details and tickets, EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts Saturday, Sept. 29 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 North Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com AUTHORS, READERS & CONVERSATIONS: 10 a.m. to noon at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Featuring local authors Craig Bush, Janeen O'Kerry and Katie Clark. Drop in for talking, reading, signing and to add to your book collection. Details: Facebook.com/Floriopolis BLUEGRASS AT THE BEACH: Noon to 9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live bluegrass and folk music, square dancing, free train rides for kids, food trucks and craft vendors; fundraiser for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bay County. Tickets $20 per day or $30 for weekend. Free for children 12 and younger. Details850-763-2076 or BluegrassAtTheBeach.org FAMILY FRIENDLY COMEDY SHOW: 7-9 p.m. at The Little Mustard Seed, 437 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring The Side Splitters. Tickets: $7 at EventBrite.com. KIM RICHEY CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep. com G.E.M.S IN CONCERT: 8-11 p.m. at Moon Lodge Cafe, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring Birmingham-based Future Elevators with locals The Jerry Riddle and Dad Johnston. Cover: $5. Sunday, Sept. 30 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 North Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: waterfrontmarkets. org 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 2 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 for adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Details and tickets, EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 2:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts Monday, Oct. 1 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. OLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. Tuesday, Oct. 2 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. Wednesday, Oct. 3 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. Thursday, Oct. 4 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palms Conference CALENDARFrom Page 32 See CALENDAR, 34

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E34 Friday, September 28, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARCenter, Panama City Beach. Taught by Don Taylor. Learn to journal in watercolor. Details: www. BeachArtGroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 BEGINNER WHEEL THROWING POTTER: 5-8 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Instruction from potter Sara Pearsall will include handbuilding for beginners with glazing and “ re process included. Supplies included. Ages 15 and older; $200 members ($240 non-members). BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: Anne Cline. Details: CityOfLynnHaven.com BEST OF THE '80S TRIBUTE CONCERT: 7 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. Admission: $20. Multiple artists will sing their favorite 1980s songs in a variety of genres. Proceeds go to the Bay Youth Music Association. 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 for adults and $32 for seniors, students, and military. Presented by the Emerald Coast Theatre Co. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/tickets or call 850-684-0323 Friday, Oct. 5 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. STEPHEN BENNETT SMITH 'LANDSCAPES': Exhibit runs through Oct. 6, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST: Oct. 5-7 in Panama City Beach; 5 p.m. Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone Open at Grand Theatre Plaza; 6 p.m. Kids Parade begins/ ends at The Back Porch; 6:45 p.m. Opening Ceremonies and Treasure Drop at Center Stage in Pier Park; 7:15 p.m. Pirate Crawl/ Second Line Parade runs South to North, ends at Celebration Stage in Pier Park; 8 p.m. live music by Victor Wainwright & The Train on the Celebration Stage; 9:15 p.m. “ reworks at Russell-Fields City Pier. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com 'MADE IN GREECE VII' ART EXHIBITION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Room 112, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details, GulfCoast.edu/arts PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palms Conference Center, Panama City Beach. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. Details: www. beachartgroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alice's on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer, and music. 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 for adults and $32 for seniors, students, and military. Presented by the Emerald Coast Theatre Co. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts Saturday, Oct. 6 CENTRAL PANHANDLE FAIR: Oct. 1-6 at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 15th Street and Sherman Avenue, Panama City; includes Bay County Art Exhibition. PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST: Oct. 5-7 in Panama City Beach; 8 a.m. Pirates of the High Seas Fest 5K Run/Walk at Frank Brown Park; noon Festival Village and Little Pirates Fun Zone Open at Grand Theatre Plaza; 1:30 p.m. Commodore Mayhem Magic Show at the Celebration Stage in Pier Park; 2:30 p.m. Pirate Invasion at the Pier Stage; 3:30 p.m. live music by Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on the Celebration Stage; 5 p.m. Main Parade in Pier Park; 7 p.m. live music by Landsharks on the Celebration Stage; 8:30 p.m. “ reworks at RussellFields City Pier. Details, CALENDARFrom Page 33 See CALENDAR, 35

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E35 GO & DO : CALENDARVisitPanamaCityBeach.com SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org PLEIN AIR JOURNALING: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palms Conference Center, Panama City Beach. Learn to journal in watercolor with master painter Don Taylor. Details: www. BeachArtGroup.com/ plein-air-sketching-withdon-taylor CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMER'S MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com FALL FESTIVAL AND PUMPKIN SALES: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, Panama City Beach. Fun, food, music, and games. Pumpkins will be sold from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sept. 29 through Oct. 31. Details: 850-233-5059 'A VINTAGE SCARE' MOVIE POSTER EXHIBITION: Oct. 6-20 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR APP LAUNCH PARTY: 2 to 3 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, 1134 Beck Ave. Join the Historic St. Andrews Waterfront Partnership to celebrate the launch of their new Walking Tour App. 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 2 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or call 850-684-0323 OKTOBERFEST: 4-10 p.m. at Alice's on Bayview, 1000 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Traditional German food, beer, and music. MEET THE ARTIST RECEPTION: 6-9 p.m. at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission. Featuring artist Stephen Bennett Smith. Light hors d'oeuvres. Details: PCCenterForTheArts.com 'THE WOLVES': 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts Sunday, Oct. 7 PIRATES OF THE HIGH SEAS FEST: Oct. 5-7 at Grand Lagoon; noon Festival Village opens at Capt. Anderson's Marina parking Area, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive; noon Kids Fishing Clinic on the Marina Dock; noon live music by Tom Mason & the Blue Buccaneers on the Main Stage; 1:15 p.m. StorytellingThe Legend of Dominique Youx on the Main Stage; 2 p.m. Pirate Battle-Flotilla drives out the pirates on Grand Lagoon/Marinas; 3:15 p.m. Treasure Hunt announcement (Main Stage); 3:15 p.m. Commodore Mayhem Magic Show (Capt. Anderson's Stage); 5 p.m. Pirate Pet Parade (Capt. Anderson's Stage); 6 p.m. live music; 7:15 p.m. “ reworks over Grand Lagoon. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.WaterfrontMarkets.org 'THE SPITFIRE GRILL': 2 p.m. at the Emerald Coast Theatre Co., Miramar Beach. Tickets: $35 adults, $32 for seniors, students and military. Doors open at 2 p.m. Details and tickets: EmeraldCoastTheatre.org/ tickets or call 850-684-0323 'THE WOLVES': 2:30 p.m. in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City.. Presented by GCSC's Visual and Performing Arts Division. Details: www.GulfCoast.Edu/Arts BILLY RADER IN CONCERT: 5 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Callaway, 6930 E. State 22, Panama City. Free admission. Details: FBCCallaway.com or 850-871-2772 Monday, Oct. 8 GLOBAL ARTS SOCIETY GRAND OPENING: 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Panama City Mall. Free admission. Enjoy make and take arts and crafts, live music, dancing and more. Learn about programs, classes, performance companies and how to join the team. Details at www.globalartssociety.org OLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. CALENDARFrom Page 34 See CALENDAR, 36

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E36 Friday, September 28, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARTHREE WAY MIRROR IN CONCERT: 7-10 p.m. at Moon Lodge Cafe, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Atlanta-based jazz trio. Cover: $3. Includes wine tasting. Tuesday, Oct. 9 JOYFUL PAINT PARTY: 6-8 p.m. in Grand Lagoon D at Sheraton Bay Point, Panama City Beach. Short presentation by Gulf World Marine Institute. To bene“ t the Gulf World Marine Institute; $40 each or $65 per couple. Tickets include all art materials, one drink ticket (wine/beer) and one raf” e ticket. Details: www.BeachArtGroup.com/ reservations-on-line Wednesday, Oct. 10 BUDDY GUY THE LEGEND COMES ALIVE: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com or 850-763-4696 Thursday, Oct. 11 PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach; $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 BEGINNER WHEEL THROWING POTTER: 5-8 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Instruction from potter Sara Pearsall will include handbuilding for beginners with glazing and “ re process included. Supplies included; ages 15 and older; $200 members ($240 non-members). BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: True Soul. Details: CityOfLynnHaven. com Friday, Oct. 12 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com OKTOBERFEST 2018: 4-11 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, 3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest. com WINE TASTING: 5-7 p.m. at Somethin's Cookin', 93 E. 11th St., Panama City; complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. RSVP: 850-769-8979 JAZZ BY THE BAY FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. at Oaks By The Bay Park, 2715 W. 10th St., Panama City. A free concert hosted by Gulf Jazz Society. HAUNTED WALKING TOUR: 6-10 p.m. in downtown Panama City, starting in the 300 block. Hear all of the ghost stories; last tour is at 9:30 p.m. Tickets: $10, available at Panama City Center for the Arts the night of the event. This event is kid friendly, but remember there are some scary parts. Saturday, Oct. 13 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www. WaterfrontMarkets.org OKTOBERFEST 2018: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, 3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest.com JAZZ BY THE BAY FESTIVAL: 5-8 p.m. at Oaks By CALENDARFrom Page 35Nevaeh-Rayne Schallenberger, 7, poses with a crew of pirates in October 2015 during the Pirates of the High Seas Fest, returning Oct. 5-7. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 37

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| Friday, September 28, 2018 E37 GO & DO : CALENDARThe Bay Park, 2715 W. 10th St., Panama City. A free concert hosted by Gulf Jazz Society. ALLMAN GOLDFLIES BAND GOES POPS: 6 p.m. at SweetBay, 1980 Discovery Loop, Panama City. Allman Gold” ies Band to perform in concert with the Panama City POPS Orchestra. Details: 850-785-7677 or www.PanamaCityPops.org PETER BRADLEY ADAMS CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Sunday, Oct. 14 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.WaterfrontMarkets.org OKTOBERFEST 2018: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music, German beer and food, contests, vendors, family activities. 3-day General Admission tickets start at $14 for entry into the event, 3-day Stein and Beer pass starts at $34. VIP packages available. Details or tickets: PCBOktoberfest.com Monday, Oct. 15 OLD ONE-ROOM SCHOOL HOUSE AND MUSEUMS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tours are free. Tuesday, Oct. 16 'REPORTERO' SCREENING: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Part of the Point-ofView documentary series showcased by PBS. Details: 850-522-2107 Wednesday, Oct. 17 PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by awardwinning published artist, Perry Austin. Details, BeachArtGroup.com/ austin-perry-oilacrylic Thursday, Oct. 18 PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by awardwinning published artist, Perry Austin. Details, BeachArtGroup.com/ austin-perry-oilacrylic PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: Kelley & The Healers. Details: CityOfLynnHaven.com JULIA OTHMER CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Friday, Oct. 19 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com 'A VINTAGE SCARE' MOVIE POSTER EXHIBITION: Oct. 6-20 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth st., Panama City. See amazing vintage posters from some of the most bone-chilling movies ever made. From the collection of Larry T. Clemons. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Workshop on composition using oil and acrylic by awardwinning published artist, Perry Austin. Details, BeachArtGroup.com/ austin-perry-oilacrylic 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'The Birds,' 4:30 p.m. 'Rear Window,' and 7 p.m. 'Psycho,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com GRIFFIN HOUSE CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Saturday, Oct. 20 MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER 5K WALK/ RUN: at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 W. Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosted by the American Cancer Society to CALENDARFrom Page 36 See CALENDAR, 38

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E38 Friday, September 28, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARhonor those affected by breast cancer and raise awareness to “ ght the disease. Details, MakingStridesWalk.org SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon on the green behind Raw & Juicy in Seaside. Details, SeasideFL.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www.WaterfrontMarkets.org BAY POINT PLEIN AIR ART FESTIVAL: 8 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Grand prize is a two-day stay at the Sheraton. Details: beachartgroup@att.net or visit BeachArtGroup.com/ plein-air-festival-info.html THIRD ANNUAL BLOODY MARY & MUSIC FESTIVAL: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 20 behind the beach at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Live music from Kyle Mitchell & Southern Sunday; 20 bars and restaurants compete for "Best Bloody Mary in the Grand Lagoon"; sample and vote for your favorite. Tickets: $25 per person; $20 for military, active duty and “ rst responders. 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'Rear Window,' 4:30 p.m. 'Psycho,' and 7 p.m. 'The Birds,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com OKTOBERFEST PANAMA CITY: 4-10 p.m. Oct. 20 on Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. Free admission. With live music from True Soul and traditional Oktoberfest music from Krankenhaus; games; stein hoisting, brat eating and pretzel-catching contests; beard and mustache contest, cornhole, giant Jenga, Mr. and Mrs. Oktoberfest; street vendors and merchants lining the street. Free kids' zone. Come in costume for contest, bring chairs for bands, traditional Oktoberfest cuisine at street vendors and participating restaurants, as well as American dishes. Large selection of craft and domestic beers and wines. Vending spaces available. Details at 850-785-2554 SONGWRITERS CIRCLE: 6 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Featuring Ellen Robertson, Kristen Barkuloo and Kristan Mikala. Seating limited to 35 guests. Tickets: $20 each at the door or at EventBrite.com LAKE POWELL MOONLIGHT PADDLE: 7-9 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway. A moonlight paddle on Florida's largest coastal dune lake; $35 cash, ages 12 and older. Reservations required. Details: 850-233-5059 GRIFFIN HOUSE CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25; details at LoveTheRep.com Sunday, Oct. 21 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, in the parking lot of Capt. Anderson's Restaurant, Panama City Beach. Details: www. WaterfrontMarkets.org 'HITCHCOCK PRESENTS' FILM FESTIVAL: 2 p.m. 'Psycho,' 4:30 p.m. 'The Birds,' and 7 p.m. 'Rear Window,'at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $7.50 per “ lm or $20 for weekend pass to view as many “ lms/as many times as you want. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre.com Wednesday, Oct. 24 18th ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Oct. 24-28 in Panama City Beach. Of“ cial venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and Harley-Davidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com Thursday, Oct. 25 18th ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Oct. 24-28 in Panama City Beach. Of“ cial venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and Harley-Davidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com PAINT PARTY THURSDAYS: 5-7 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach; $35 per person. Details and reservations: www.BeachArtGroup. com or 850-541-3867 SPOOKY SKEDADDLE: 5-7 p.m. in downtown Panama City. A safe night of trick or treating as businesses open to “ ll those baskets with treats. BEAM FLOW MOTION: 5:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts. Taught by Tara Dent, licensed dance/movement instructor; $15 per person. LYNN HAVEN FALL CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Sharon Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven. Free admission. Food and beverages available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chair for seating. Tonight: Cross Cut. Details: CityOfLynnHaven. com Friday, Oct. 26 18th ANNUAL THUNDER BEACH AUTUMN RALLY: Oct. 24-28 in Panama City Beach. Of“ cial venues and vendor villages include Frank Brown Park (with the Thunder Beach Saloon and Main Stage), Pier Park North and Harley-Davidson of Panama City Beach, and of“ cial partner venues include Hammerhead Fred's and Sharky's Beach Club. Details: ThunderBeachProductions.com 'VIVA CUBA' PHOTOGRAPHS OF BARBARA TALAN: Exhibit on display through Nov. 3 at The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details, TheLightRoomPC.com 'DEATH TRAP': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, Lynn Haven. A successful writer of Broadway thrillers struggles to overcome a dry spell, a string of failures and shortage of funds. Then a possible solution arises in the form of a students script he recognizes as a potential Broadway hit, leading to conspiracy and murder. Advance tickets: $18 for adults ($20 at the door); $17 for military and seniors ($19 at the door); $10 for students ($12 at the door). Details at 850-2653226 or KT-online.org CALENDARFrom Page 37Oktoberfest returns to Aaron Bessant Park on Oct. 12-14. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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