Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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** Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-5 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports........................C1-4 Viewpoints ....................A6 SUNDAYT-shower 87 / 74SATURDAYA t-storm 88 / 74TODAYStray t-storm 88 / 73 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Friday, July 6, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com LOCAL & STATE | B1OSCAR PATTERSONS GRADEMath coach raising funds for shirts to celebrate achievement SPORTS | C1CHASE SEIFFERTFormer Mosley star struggles in opening round of PGAs The Greenbrier ENTERTAINER | INSIDESEASON PREVIEWSArea stages prepare for falls opening nights By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Following up on a promise city officials made in April, Panama City is moving forward with building a skate park.Earlier this week, the city posted a request for qualifications (RFQ)for companies who can build a state of the art concrete skate park, skate spots and/or skate dots.Ž The contractor is being asked to help select the site location, which has not been determined, and work within a budget of $250,000.The goal is to create a space that will challenge both beginners and experienced usersŽ and will include such elements as ledges, rails, hand-rails, banks, banks to ledges and walls, volcanoes,Ž lot to high ledges, jersey barriers, slappy curbs and transitions, according to bid documents.The design, the RFQ states, should be easy to expand if more funding becomes available and complements the surrounding environment.This is what people have been expressing they would like to see,Ž said Panama City Public Information Officer Caitlin Lawrence. The com-munity really rallied together to lift the skating ban and asked for a park.ŽOfficials have been talking about building a skate park in Panama City for more than 20 years, starting when commis-sioners banned skateboarding in downtown in 1997 and con-tinuing to as recently as two years ago when the county and city were talking about partnering. When the city decided to do away with the skateboard ban earlier this year, the commis-sion also became more serious about building a skate park as many people who spoke against the ban also spoke about the need for a park.At one meeting, 16-year-old Travis Carlson spoke about having seen dozens of articles about a skate park that was going to beŽ built.A lot of skateboarders in this community feel the idea of a skate park or anything along the line has kind of been pro-crastinated on for years now,Ž he said.It would just make us so happy and light up our entire world,Ž he continued. A skate park is someplace we can go and express ourselves in a way we havent been able to do in years.ŽBids for the skate park are due by July 19, and work is expected to start by Septem-ber. The documents say time is of the essenceŽ for getting this project finished.PC issues skate park RFQ Summer Work Foundation o ers work, role models, mentoringBy Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comBAY COUNTY „ A local foundation has committed to creating partnerships between youth and local businesses andisasking businesses to pledge their support.Willie Pollard, president of the Bay Youth Summer Work Foundation, said during the past two years, local teenagers have wit-nessed violence in schools, and mentors are needed more than ever.Modeling and mentoring positive behaviors and eth-ical values are desperately needed now from the busi-ness community, because it strengthens our resolve to create a better tomorrow,Ž he said. It fosters connections with students through mentoring, networking and professional development.Ž The foundation was cre-ated in April 2017 to ensure local youths have oppor-tunities, Pollard said. This year, eight local children ages 15-18 began the program in June, workingat businesses such as Peters and Scoons Attorneys at Law, Family of God Bap-tist Church, Willie Pollard Insurance Agency and other locations.This is a first-of-itskind, summer partnership that will allow business to grow young men and women in the local area and provide additional manpower during the peak season summer months,Ž Pollard said. Summer is the busiest season for tour-ist and service industries.ŽIn addition to part-time work, the foundation offers educational training via workshops to improve skills and knowledge of the various job opportunities „ which is why its so important to continue adding those opportunities. Pollard said he hopes more local businesses will part-ner with the foundation, as students can provide emer-gency support staffing for jobs while some staff mem-bers go on vacations. He said the foundations participants can handle daily operations at a reduced cost to businesses.The academic requirement to attend classes for earning credentials and certificates set this foun-dation apart from any other Foundation helps put youth to work Alyssa, Hailey, David and Kaitlen pose with their adopted mother, Joanne Uszuko, for a family photo Tuesday. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Region still critically short of foster, adoptive homesBy Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Joanne Uszukos proudest moment, possibly in her life but defi-nitely as a foster parent, came as she watched a girl she had fostered walk across the stage in a beauty pageant.When she came to the Uszuko house, the girl wore only hooded sweatshirts and kept her head down. It took a few years, but the walls even-tually came down. Now, even though Uszuko wasnt able to formally adopt her, she still considers the girl „ now a woman with a family „ to be one of her own.That was phenomenal,Ž Uszuko said. That made all the hard and the hurt and everything, it made it all worth it right there, to see that child whole and happy and successful.ŽBig Bend Community Based Care, the managing entity that handles fostering and adoption through local pro-viders, recently celebrated its 2,000th adoption, but theres still an urgent shortage of foster and adoptive homes in the area. Last November, there were only 62 foster homes available for the 356 children in out-of-home care in the 14th Judicial Circuit, enough for less than 20 per-cent of the children.The need definitely isnt a new one. The Uszukos, originally intending to adopt an extended relatives child, signed up for the mandatory classes about 13 years ago, and continued on to foster children when that arrange-ment fell through because they realized there was a desperate needŽ for foster parents.When that fell through, I called the worker and told them what happened,Ž Uszuko said. And they said, Oh dont worry, we still have plenty of children. ŽIt was certainly an interesting way to end an early retirement. After selling their business a number of years before, the couple spent time playingŽ „ fishing on their boat, traveling on vacations and visiting grandchildren. It was only a short time after the previous adoption fell through that they got a call about two little girls who were in two different foster homes, with one needing to be moved right away.We got Hailey,Ž Uszuko said. She just bebopped into our life, and it hasnt been the same since.ŽSince then, the Uszukos have had more than 50 children come through their home, some staying as little as a night, others staying for years. And some, like Haileys sister Kaitlen, DJ and Alyssa, never left and were adopted by the family.Though the other children are gone and theyve reluctantly had to stop fostering Big Bend group marks 2,000th adoptionSee ADOPTION, A5 See YOUTH, A5

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** A2 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News HeraldGary Wilson, of Newnan, Georgia, sent this Picture Perfect submission via email of the way sailing use to be on the high seas.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] PICTURE PERFECT We want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CATCH OF THE DAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@ pcnh.com. In a recent letter to the editor, Steve Geczy, of Panama City, said, The immigration policies are not broken. The only reason Democrats and fake newsŽ media are making this a crisis is that the Trump administration, for the first time in many years, is enforcing our immigration laws!Ž Steve Hough: Would it be too much to ask that we make the distinction between illegal border crossing and presenting oneself at the border seeking asylum?Ž Joe Budd: This letter writer would better comprehend what Trump initiated if he could accept the fact that Trump created a policy of incarcerating refugees for misdemeanors as a tactic to take their children and lock them up. Jeff Sessions (AG) cackled with glee and amusement on camera as he announced it. If Geczy had paid attention to real news and not the fakeŽ he relies on, he would know that those children who had relatives here were denied access to those relatives who would have taken them in. No US citizen is so ignorant (or at least I once thought) as not to know that if he was arrested, that his relatives could keep his child, and the child not be seized and shipped off and penned up somewhere a 1000 miles away. The entire narrative from Fox and the rightŽ depends on sycophants who do not reason and become indoctrinated not to know the difference between lies and the truth..Ž A 15-year-old was chased up a tree Friday as an alligator crept ever closer to her raft in Ocala National Forest. Wildlife officials said the gator likely was extra aggressive because it is mating season. The girl ultimately was rescued by a deputy „ and his AR-15. Ken Conley: Did you really need a AR-15?? Did you really need a 30 round magazine of“ cer??? This post comes to you “ lled with sarcasm.Ž Jason Maddux: IMO a rocket launcher is an acceptable use of lethal force in this situation. Lol.ŽREADER FEEDBACKToday is Friday, July 6, the 187th day of 2018. There are 178 days left in the year. Todays Highlights in History On July 6, 1957, Althea Gibson became the “ rst black tennis player to win a Wimbledon singles title as she defeated fellow American Darlene Hard 6-3, 6-2. The Harry S. Truman Library, the nations “ rst presidential library, was dedicated in Independence, Missouri. Sixteen-year-old John Lennon “ rst met 15-year-old Paul McCartney when Lennons band, the Quarrymen skif” e group, performed a gig at St. Peters Church in Woolton, Liverpool. On this date In 1535 Sir Thomas More was executed in England for high treason. In 1777, during the American Revolution, British forces captured Fort Ticonderoga. In 1885, French scientist Louis Pasteur tested an anti-rabies vaccine on 9-year-old Joseph Meister, who had been bitten by an infected dog; the boy did not develop rabies. In 1917, during World War I, Arab forces led by T.E. Lawrence and Auda Abu Tayi captured the port of Aqaba from the Ottoman Turks. In 1933, the “ rst All-Star baseball game was played at Chicagos Comiskey Park; the American League defeated the National League, 4-2. In 1942, Anne Frank, her parents and sister entered a secret annexŽ in an Amsterdam building where they were later joined by four other people; they hid from Nazi occupiers for two years before being discovered and arrested. In 1944, an estimated 168 people died in a “ re that broke out during a performance in the main tent of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in Hartford, Connecticut. In 1964, the movie A Hard Days Night,Ž starring The Beatles, had its world premiere in London. TODAY IN HISTORYKelsey Lynn shared this Catch of the Day photo with us through email that was taken on a “ shing charter boat named Kelley Girl.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] 1 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3-D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case.2 BEACH CLEAN-UP: 8-10 a.m. Friday at Beach Access 5 at 5201 Gulf Dr Panama City Beach; hosted by Gulf World and Divers Den. The public is invited; guests are encouraged to bring gloves, buckets and a reusable water bottle. Everyone who participates will be entered to win a Dolphin Meet N Greet from Gulf World and a Discover Scuba from Divers Den.3 ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR : 1:30-2:30 p.m. Friday at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208.4 HAPPY SILK AT FLORIOPOLIS: 2-5 p.m. Friday at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Design your own silk art scarf. $35 per scarf. Details: 850-249-9295.5 BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30 8:30 p.m. Friday at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Rd., Panama City. For all levels beginners and up. Come enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For more info call 850-277-0566 or email at dpgordon01@ yahoo.com.GO AND DOJarrod Pettiford of Callaway is 14. Former President George W. Bush is 72. Actor-director Sylvester Stallone is 72. Actor Brian Posehn is 52. Actor Robb Derringer is 51. Political reporter/ moderator John Dickerson is 50. Actor Brian Van Holt is 49. Rapper Inspectah Deck (WuTang Clan) is 48 TV host Josh Elliott is 47. Rapper 50 Cent is 43. Actress Tamera Mowry is 40. Actress Tia Mowry is 40. Comedian-actor Kevin Hart is 39. Actress Eva Green is 38. Actor Gregory Smith is 35. Rock musician Chris WoodyŽ Wood (Bastille) is 33. Rock singer Kate Nash is 31. Actor Jeremy Suarez is 28.Send your birthday information to pcnhnews@pcnh.com.HAPPY BIRTHDAYPettiford FLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 04-07-21-30-36 Lotto: 12-28-34-43-48-52; estimated jackpot, $2 million Lotto XTRA: 04 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot, $283 million Pick 2 Evening: 9-7 Pick 2 Midday: 3-1 Pick 3 Evening: 1-1-7 Pick 3 Midday: 9-5-9 Pick 4 Evening: 9-8-4-5 Pick 4 Midday: 4-5-5-3 Pick 5 Evening: 8-5-2-0-1 Pick 5 Midday: 1-0-9-9-3 Powerball: 04-07-15-41-44; Powerball: 10; Power Play: 2; estimated jackpot, $70 million YOUNG ARTISTRhapsody. Grade 4. Tyndall Elementary School. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 A3

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** A4 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Michael Biesecker, Zeke Miller and Ellen KnickmeyerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned Thursday amid ethics investigations of outsized secu-rity spending, first-class flights and a sweetheart condo lease.With Pruitts departure, President Donald Trump loses an administrator many conservatives regarded as one of the more effective members of his Cabinet. But Pruitt had also been dogged for months by a seemingly unending string of scandals that spawned more than a dozen federal and con-gressional investigations.In a resignation letter released to media outlets, Pruitt expressed no regret for any actions he had taken since being tapped by Trump to lead EPA last year.It is extremely difficult for me to cease serving you in this role first because I count it a blessing to be serving you in any capacity, but also, because of the transformative work that is occurring,Ž Pruitt wrote. However, the unrelenting attacks on me personally, my family, are unprecedented and have taken a sizable toll on all of us.ŽPruitt had appeared Wednes-day at a White House picnic for Independence Day, wearing a red-checked shirt and loafers with gold trim. Trump gave him and other officials a brief shout-out, offering no sign of any immediate change in his job. Trump said in a tweet that Deputy Administrator Andrew Wheeler, a former coal industry executive, will assume the acting administrator position Monday.Pruitts resignation came days after two of his former senior staffers spoke to House oversight committee investigators and revealed new, embarrassing details in ethics allegations against Pruitt.Samantha Dravis, Pruitts former policy chief at EPA, told the investigators last week that Pruitt had made clear to her before and after he became EPA administrator that he would like the attorney generals job, held then and now by Jeff Sessions.Pruitt had hinted at that (sic) some sort of conversation had taken place between he and the president,Ž Dravis told congressional investigators, according to a transcript obtained Thursday by The Associated Press. That was the position he was originally interested in.ŽA former Oklahoma attorney general close to the oil and gas industry, Pruitt had filed more than a dozen lawsuits against the agency he was picked to lead. Arriving in Washington, he worked relentlessly to dismantle Obama-era environmental regulations that aimed to reduce toxic pollution and planet-warming carbon emissions.During his one-year tenure, Pruitt crisscrossed the country at taxpayer expense to speak with industry groups and hobnob with GOP donors, but he showed little interest in lis-tening to advocates he derided as the environmental left.Ž Those groups applauded his departure.Despite his brief tenure, Pruitt was the worst EPA chief in history,Ž said Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity. His corruption was his down-fall, but his pro-polluter policies will have our kids breathing dirtier air long after his many scandals are forgotten.ŽLike Trump, Pruitt voiced skepticism about mainstream climate science and was a fierce critic of the Paris climate agree-ment. The president cheered his EPA chiefs moves to boost fossil fuel production and roll back regulations opposed by corporate interests.But despite boasts of slash-ing red tape and promoting job creation, Pruitt had a mixed record of producing real-world results. Many of the EPA regu-lations Pruitt scraped or delayed had not yet taken effect, and the tens of thousands of lost coal mining jobs the president pledged to bring back never materialized.Pruitt was forced out following a series of revelations involving pricey trips with first-class airline seats and unusual security spending, including a $43,000 soundproof booth for making private phone calls. He also demanded 24-houra-day protection from armed officers, resulting in a swollen 20-member security detail that blew through overtime budgets and racked up expenses of more than $3 million.Pruitt also had ordered his EPA staff to do personal chores for him, picking up dry cleaning and trying to obtain a used Trump hotel mattress for his apartment. He had also enlisted his staff to contact conservative groups and companies to find a lucrative job for his unemployed wife, including emails seeking a Chick-fil-A franchise from a senior executive at the fast-food chain. Pruitts job had been in jeop-ardy since the end of March, when ABC News first reported that he leased a Capitol Hill condo last year for just $50 a night. It was co-owned by the wife of a veteran fossil fuels lobbyist whose firm had sought regulatory rollbacks from EPA.Both Pruitt and the lobby-ist, Steven Hart, denied he had conducted any recent business with EPA. But Hart was later forced to admit he had met with Pruitt at EPA headquarters last summer after his firm, Williams & Jensen, revealed he had lob-bied the agency on a required federal disclosure form. Scandal-plagued Pruitt resignsEnvironmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee, May 16 on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Trump tweeted Thursday he accepted the resignation of Pruitt. [ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE] EPA administrator faced months of ethics investigations before stepping down NATION & WORLD DATELINESPHUKET, THAILAND HARRISBURG, PA.AG argues church abuse grand jury report should be publicPennsylvanias attorney general told the state Supreme Court on Thursday he supports a request by news organizations that the court order the release of an exten-sive report into child sexual abuse and attempts to cover it up in several of the states Roman Catholic dioceses.Attorney General Josh Shapiro also said in the court filing that his office opposes requests by unnamed parties to present their own evi-dence, question witnesses and rewrite the grand jury report in accordance with their preferred view of the facts.ŽHe argued the report should not be delayed, calling it a matter of exceptional public interest.JERUSALEMIsrael lays down red lines for postwar relations with SyriaAs Syrian government forces press on with a furious offensive against rebel-held areas in the countrys south, Israel is quietly acknowledging that President Bashar Assads forces will soon be on its doorstep, laying down red lines for postwar relations with the Syrian leader.Israels main concern is to keep archrival Iran, an Assad ally, as far away from its border as possible „ along with its proxy, the Lebanese militia Hezbollah.It is a turnaround from a few years ago, when Israeli leaders were publicly predicting Assads overthrow and some voices even mused about peace with a future democratic Syria.SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICOPuerto Ricans accused of misusing $8M in fundsA mayor and two former gov-ernment officials in Puerto Rico face public corruption charges in separate cases that involve a total of $8 million in federal and local funds, authorities said Thursday.The suspects are the mayor of the town of Sabana Grande and the former directors of finance for the town of Toa Baja, which has struggled to pay its employ-ees amid an 11-year recession.U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez told reporters that the former officials from Toa Baja are accused of using nearly $5 million worth of federal funds to pay the towns public employees and municipal contractors.Not only is that illegal, its immoral,Ž she s aid.SACRAMENTO, CALIF. Trump loses effort to block two California sanctuary lawsA U.S. judge on Thursday rejected a request by the Trump administration to block two California laws that protect immigrants in the country ille-gally, but put key parts of a third sanctuary law on hold.Judge John Mendez refused to block a law requiring the state to review detention facilities where immigrants are held and another that prevents local law enforcement from providing release dates and personal information on jail inmates.But he said California could not enforce a third law that pro-hibits employers from allowing immigration officials on their premises unless the officials have a warrant. The Associated PressRescued tourists from a boat that sank are helped onto a pier from a “ shing boat Thursday on the island of Phuket, southern Thailand. A boat carrying dozens of Chinese tourists overturned in rough seas off southern Thailand and 49 passengers were unaccounted for, the Phuket governor said. Strong winds were still blowing as searchers looked for the missing people off the tourist island of Phuket in the Andaman Sea. [THAILAND ROYAL POLICE VIA AP] PARISPeople walk past a charred car during a march Thursday in Nantes, western France, after police shot a driver apparently trying to avoid an identity check. Residents laid ” owers near the place where the 22-year-old driver was killed. The march came after Nantes saw a second night of violence, as protesters clashed with riot police overnight into Thursday, burning stores and cars. Eleven people were detained in connection with the violence. [MICHEL EULER/AP] ANNAPOLIS, MD.Rick Hutzell, right, the editor for Capital Gazette, is joined by staff members (from left) reporter Selene San Felice, and photojournalists Paul W. Gillespie and Joshua McKerrow, as he rings a bell during a moment of silence at 2:33 p.m., Thursday in Annapolis, Md., for their “ ve colleagues who were killed a week ago in one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in U.S. history. [BRIAN KRISTA/THE BALTIMORE SUN VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 A5The Bay Youth Summer Work Foundation was created in 2017 to give students opportunities. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] because of Uszukos health issues, its clear they all have left a mark on the household and on the adopted siblings. They effortlessly recall at least a dozen names of children who have stayed, and some who have grown up and still come back. Its a unique household, Uszuko said, one with its own aggravations, but one thats also filled with love.Ive always been com-passionate,Ž Uszuko said. But this has really given me a compassionate heart for children.ŽTo become a local foster parent or start the adop-tion process, contact Life Management Center or go to http://lmccares.org/services/foster-adopt/. ADOPTIONFrom Page A1summer job,Ž Pollard said. Workshops and or college mini-courses will provide added skills for students to excel through association with various local businesses over the course of their employ-ment weeks.ŽLocal churches and pri-vate donors funded the foundation, he said, and additional funding from the community would help safeguard the suc-cess of the program.The primary purpose of the Bay Youth Summer Work Foundation is to help improve the overall academic success of high school students,Ž Pollard said. The foundations vision is to form a lasting relationship between the civic, business and religious communities for support in the develop-ment of the young adults in Bay County.Ž YOUTHFrom Page A1 3 federal appeals court judges top presidents listBy Catherine Lucey and Lisa MascaroThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ President Donald Trump is moving closer to deciding his next Supreme Court nominee amid intense jockeying from various factions seeking to influence his choice to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.Trumps current top contenders are federal appeals court judges Amy Coney Barrett, Brett Kavanaugh and Raymond Kethledge, said a person familiar with Trumps thinking who was not authorized to speak publicly.With customary fanfare, Trump plans to announce his selection Monday night. But as he builds suspense for his second court pick in two years „ a nominee who could tip the balance toward conserva-tives and revisit landmark rulings on abortion access, gay marriage and other issues „ momentum is also growing among GOP supporters and detractors of the top contenders.Conservatives and some libertarian-leaning Repub-licans, including Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, have raised concerns about Kavanaugh, warning he could disappoint Repub-licans if his past decisions are a guide.To counter that, Kavanaughs allies have begun pushing back, reaching out to influential Republicans to ward off potential criti-cisms, according to one conservative who was the recipient of such outreach and spoke on condition of anonymity Thursday to discuss the situation.With the Senate narrowly divided, 51-49, in favor of Republicans, Trumps announcement will launch a contentious confirmation process as Republicans seek to shift the court to the right and Democrats strive to block the effort.Tapping into Trumps understanding of the importance of the choice, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., told the president this week that nominating someone hostile to abortion access, or the 2010 health care law, would tarnish his legacy.Schumer told Trump that such a choice would be cataclysmicŽ and create more division than the country has seen in years, according to a person familiar with the conversation who said Trump called Schumer on Tuesday.The senator also told the president he could unify the country by nominating Merrick Garland, President Barack Obamas choice for the Supreme Court who was blocked by Republicans in 2016.Working closely with a White House team and consulting with lawmakers and outside advisers, Trump has spent the week deliberating on the choice. He conducted interviews on Monday and Tuesday. He has not yet publicly indicated that he has nar-rowed the list and could still consider others in the mix.Vice President Mike Pence also met with some of Trumps contenders in recent days, according to a person familiar with the search process. The person did not specify which can-didates Pence met with and spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday to describe the private search process.Trump is choosing his nominee from a list of 25 candidates vetted by con-servative groups. Earlier in the week, he spoke with seven of them.The president also spoke by phone with Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah on Monday. The White House did not characterize that call as an interview, and Lee, the only lawmaker on Trumps list, is not viewed as a top prospect.But Lee has consistent support among conservative and libertarian activists, including some Republicans who worry about a nominee not upholding their principles and who say the Utah senator could bring more certainty.Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, advocated Thursday for Lee in a Fox News op-ed, warning Trump not to repeat mistakesŽ of past Republican presidents by picking a Supreme Court nominee who turns out to be insufficiently conservative.Cruz said President George H.W. Bushs selection of liberal David Souter was one of the most consequential errors of his presidency.Ž He also pointed to former justices William Brennan, John Paul Stevens and Harry Blackmun, the latter of whom wrote the Roe v. Wade decision that estab-lished a womans right to abortion. All three were nominated by Republican presidents.Lee, he said, would be a sure thing.Ž Trump closes in on court pickBrett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee in April 2004, on Capitol Hill, in Washington. Kavanaugh is on President Donald Trumps list of potential Supreme Court Justice candidates to “ ll the spot vacated by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. [DENNIS COOK/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE]

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** A6 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald ANOTHER VIEWFor citrus growers throughout Florida, 2018 will be the season to forget. The persistence of the citrus greening disease combined with Hurricane Irma to drive production in the groves to the lowest level since World War II. Then, as the industry was digesting that depressing circumstance, Canada last week announced that effective July 1 it was following through on retaliatory tariffs on orange juice to smack the Trump administration for its increased levies on imports of aluminum and steel. Roughly 95 percent of the oranges grown in Florida end up as juice, and Canada is Americas largest foreign market for that liquid variety. The tariffs appear so draconian that one of President Donald Trumps natural allies, the 3-million-member U.S. Chamber of Commerce, recently unveiled a campaign to torpedo them. Reuters reported the chamber is highlighting the debilitating effects state by state „ more than $700 million in Florida goods are affected „ and spending to help elect like-minded candidates who back free trade, immigration and reduced taxes.Ž Still, hope springs eternal. We look forward to a quiet, resilient season in the fall,Ž Shannon Shepp, executive director of the Florida Department of Citrus in Bartow,said when the U.S. Department of Agricultures final crop estimates in mid-June confirmed the misery. For now, though, the staggering citrus industry may get a much-needed boost. Last week U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson announced the updated farm bill contains $125 million for citrus research. The funding, which the Florida Democrat included in the measure, would be doled out in $25 million increments, beginning in 2019. That would continue an ongoing program that, with Nelsons advocacy, was included in the current farm bill. Over the last few years, the USDA has spread the current pot of dough to researchers dotting the nation from the University of Florida to Washington State University. Scientists have studied, for example, how to combat greening at the genetic level, how to develop bactericides and therapeutic proteins for plants, how to fend off greening with heat therapy. Florida Citrus Mutual CEO Mike Sparks noted research funding has fueled an evolution in grove level solutionsŽ for greening. The practices have sustained and in some cases improved yields even with 100 percent (greening) infection,Ž Sparks wrote. These are real life production improvements uncovered by growers and scientists over the past decade. And although they wont garner flashy headlines that the media will latch onto, they will provide a bridge until long-term answers are uncovered.Ž No one wants to consider Nelsons observation about the outcome if greenings devastating effects are not arrested. If we dont find a cure to this deadly disease soon, we wont be growing oranges in Florida much longer,Ž Floridas senior senator said last week after the Senate voted 86-11 for the bill that included his funding request. A version of this editorial first appeared in The Gainesville Sun, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.Life or death for citrus industryWe celebrate the Fourth of July because thats the day the Declaration of Independence was signed, 242 years ago. You might call JulyFourth Americas birthday. The Declaration didnt just declare our independence from Britain; it vowed to create a government that respected all peoples rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.Ž It said nothing about patriotism. Or making America great.Ž America became great because the Declaration (and the Constitution that followed) set down rules that kept government small and out of the way. That let creative individuals flourish. When the Declaration was signed, the founders didnt know what America would look like. They knew, though, that they were sick of being bossed around by the British king, so they worried about government having too much power. Thomas Jefferson and his colleagues wrote the Declaration to assert our natural rightsŽ could not be taken away by any government, and to set the stage for the creation of a government through which people could rule themselves. At the time, America was considered a backwater. Just a few years later, America had become the most prosperous, and probably the freest, country in the world. The Fourth of July is not about barbecues, fireworks or even patriotism. Its about that idea: that people have the right to rule themselves. Ironically, government has grown so much since the founding that you might not even be able to buy fireworks where you live. In much of America they are now illegal because government officials have declared them to be too dangerous. Yet the Declaration and Constitution werent written to make government provide for public safety. The founders assumed that was something adults would do for themselves. The founding documents are about freedom „ about limiting what government can do. Trust no man with too much government power,ŽJefferson wrote. (B) ind them with the chains of the Constitution.Ž Its good that the Declaration and Constitution have those chains.Ž No matter how insistent the states busybodies get, they may not arbitrarily search our homes or jail us. We have a right to bear arms, to practice whatever religions we choose, to exercise free speech and more. Growing government has eroded some of our freedoms, but we still have more freedoms than most countries in the world. Consider the country from which we declared independence, Great Britain. Authorities there recently locked up a man merely because he made a Facebook live video outside a courthouse. He wanted to draw attention to child abusers on trial, but Britains government puts limits on what reporters may cover. England has no First Amendment. Some people who write critical things on Facebook or Twitter get visits from police. Great Britain also has no Second Amendment, and has far more restrictions on guns than we have. That hasnt stopped crime. London had more murders than New York City this spring. Now Londons mayor wants knife control.Ž Really. One British police department even bragged about its weapon sweepŽ that confiscated scissors and pliers.Ž But dont worry, tweeted the Regents Police Agency; they were safely disposed and taken off the streets.Ž Im glad I live in America, where I can carry pliers around. And speak freely. Of course, the Constitution has more limits on government power than just the ones stated in the Bill of Rights. The Constitution divided government in ways meant to limit authoritarian politicians from any party. John Stossel is host of "Stossel" on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.One nation, many individuals Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY WRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com What has Trump achieved? Donald Trump has achieved practically nothing. Outside of a Supreme Court appointment and a tax cut for the wealthy, he has more things pending than he has accomplished. The tax cut promises to raise the national debt to unprecedented levels while Trump will alienate women in this country when he attempts a reversal of Roe vs Wade in the Supreme Court. He has snubbed farmers in this country with the results of his trade war and EPA head Pruitts policy on ethanol. Even Harley Davidson has felt the pressure of trade reprisals as well as peanut butter companies and bourbon distilleries. His vain attempts to please the moron in the Midwest who voted for him has led this country into a phase that will take years to repair. The bull-headed New York real estate boss has, indeed, been that a bull in a china shop. Trump has a chance to do something good with his administration ... but hell blow it. He talks a good game with his supporters. Tom Heil, Panama City BeachLETTER TO THE EDITORWay to go, tough guy Trump! By calling out Germany and other countries for not contributing enough to NATO for their own defense, they are now begrudgingly going to increase their spending. A liberal college professor (yes, that's redundant) said patriotic parades energize Republican voters and make kids grow up to vote Republican. Hmmm..... what do you think? Follow and complete the pattern. We will start in 1981. Tax cuts, deregulation, crash, tax stabilization, recovery. Repeat. Repeat. Now we are at tax cuts and degregulation. What could be next!? There is a huge difference between illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. Bravo! Richard Weber's response to a comment made on Readers Feedback was spot on. Now that is what you call speaking truth to power. When you pay a pretty good premium for health care as far as I am concerned they SHOULD pay for everything! NONE of this deductible crap and only paying for certain procedures and you pay for the others. That is disgusting and needs changing! God bless those wonderful people helping to rescue those poor kids in that cave in Thailand. Hopefully their efforts will pay off and they can be all brought up safe and sound. Watermelon eating contest. Good grief. After shoving all that water melon down their throats they would be holding more water than Niagara Falls! What fortitude those young Thai boys are showing. Trapped in a cave for all that time. God bless them. Hopefully the wonderful rescuers will have them out of their safe and sound soon. Life really does have a reset button. It's called tomorrow. It cost us significantly less money to build a new fire station than it does to pay the salary and retirement benefits to 18 new government employees. SQUALL LINE VIEWPOINTS John Stossel

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 A7 BUSINESS MARKET WATCHDow 24,356.74 181.92 Nasdaq 7,586.43 83.75 S&P 2,736.61 23.39 Russell 1,679.48 19.06 NYSE 12,585.23 90.53COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,257.30 5.70 Silver 16.008 .056 Platinum 837.10 4.70 Copper 2.8140 .0920 Oil 72.94 1.20THE DOW 30COMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $197.34 +1.15 Am. Express $98.53 +1.04 Apple $185.40 +1.48 Boeing $333.18 +0.25 Caterpillar $135.81 +1.98 Chevron $123.98 -0.75 Cisco $42.56 -0.22 Coca-Cola $44.66 +0.67 DowDuPont $66.07 +0.92 Exxon $82.31 +0.07 Gen. Electric $13.43 +0.06 Goldman Sachs $220.74 +0.36 Home Depot $194.41 +0.79 Intel $50.75 +1.28 IBM $141.43 +1.86 J&J $125.00 +2.29 JP Morgan $103.72 +0.67 McDonalds $157.32 +0.84 Merck $61.64 +0.93 Microsoft $99.76 +0.71 Nike $76.55 +0.27 P“ zer $36.87 +0.52 Porc. & Gamble $79.21 +1.31 Travelers $122.60 -0.17 United Tech. $124.95 +0.03 Verizon $51.28 +0.58 Walmart $84.57 +0.13 Walt Disney $105.34 +1.30 United Health $250.50 +3.52 Visa $133.29 +1.84STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG AT&T $32.60 -0.11 DARDEN RESTS $110.19 +1.52 GEN DYNAMICS $188.70 -0.06 HNCOCK WHTNY $47.65 +0.65 HANGER INC $17.19 -0.01 HOME BANCS $22.85 +0.02 ITT CORP $52.13 +0.23 THE ST JOE $18.30 +0.05 KBR INC $18.08 +0.23 L-3 COMMS $193.63 +0.00 OCEANEERING $25.87 +0.28 REGIONS $17.46 -0.10 SALLIE MAE $11.57 +0.03 SOUTHERN $47.56 +0.56 SUNTRUST $66.94 +0.36 WESTROCK $56.71 +0.12 ING-RAND $90.46 +0.52 ENGILITY $31.41 +0.08Source: Matt Wegner Financial Advisor The Edward Jones Co. Panama City, 769-1278FOREIGN EXCHANGEU.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.31 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 19.22 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.86 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.76Special to The News HeraldYour future employee is a man who has worked at both the Amazon Distri-bution Center and Lowes Distribution Center in South Florida.To say he knows his way around a warehouse is an understatement. He is new to Panama City and would like to work in a warehouse, distribu-tion center or stocking somewhere. He is organized, honest, respectful and hard-working. He would like to work full time, has reliable transportation and can begin work immediately.Also, he is eligible for OJT, a program where his salary, workers comp. and liability insurance are at no cost to the employer for a 90-day work trial period. You know you need him in your organization, will you take a chance on him?For information about this or any of the other clients or services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTMariah, an Arc of the Bay client, is shown pricing merchandise in the gift shop at ZooWorld. She is working at ZooWorld this summer in an on-thejob training program. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] BRIEFCASEIran tells Trump to stop tweeting about oil pricesIrans representative to OPEC says U.S. President Donald Trump should stop tweeting about wanting lower oil prices, saying that doing so has the opposite effect.Hossein Kazempour Ardebili was quoted by the oil ministrys website Thursday as telling Trump to please stop,Ž adding that with your frequent and indecent tweets oil prices have gone up 10 dollars.ŽTrump has repeatedly called on the oil cartel to reduce prices. On Wednesday he tweeted that OPEC is doing little to help,Ž adding that, if anything, they are driving prices higher.ŽTehran blames rising prices on U.S. sanctions imposed on Iran and Venezuela, founding members of the cartel. The Associated PressBales of cotton sit packed and labeled while waiting to be shipped from the South Central Georgia Gin Company, June 21 in Enigma, Ga. The company estimates that 40-50 percent of the cotton processed at the gin is exported out of the country, China being one of the main recipients. [DAVID GOLDMAN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Paul Wiseman and Christopher RugaberThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The U.S. and Chinese governments have been flashing a lot of bravado just before firing the first shots in a conflict that risks erupting into a mutually damaging trade war.China will not bow in the face of threats and blackmail, nor will it be shaken in its resolve to defend global free trade,Ž a spokesman for Bei-jings Commerce Ministry declared Thursday, one day before the two sides were to subject billions of dollars of each others goods to punishing tariffs.President Donald Trump, who ran for the White House on a vow to force China and other nations to reform their policies, has insisted that a trade war would be easy to win.Yet among the people and business in both coun-tries that are suddenly under threat from higher costs, closed-off markets and deep uncertainties, theres far less confidence. A trade war between the worlds two biggest econ-omies will leave casualties „ from makers of musical instruments to farmers in Americas Midwest to a manufacturer of soldering irons south of Shanghai.In some areas and indus-tries, pain is already being felt.Theres going to be an awful lot of battles lost on the way,Ž said Tim Velde, a fourth-generation farmer in western Minnesotas Yellow Medicine County who is bracing for Chinas tariffs on American soy-beans. I dont see anybody winning.ŽTong Feibing, general manager of Chinas Ningbo Top East Technology Co., which makes soldering irons and had been exporting 30 percent of its output to the United States „ before sales plunged in advance of tariffs „ is worried.There is a chance the company will lose money and might bankrupt,Ž Tong warned. I will do whatever I can, including layoffs.ŽAt 12:01 a.m. Eastern time Friday, the United States was set to slap tariffs on $34 billion in Chinese products. And Beijing was ready to respond in kind. From there, the hostilities could escalate quickly and drastically. Trump has threatened to slap tariffs on up to $450 billion in Chinese imports „ nearly 90 percent of all goods China sent the U.S. last year „ if Beijing continues to retali-ate and doesnt yield to Trumps demands.The Trump administration wants China to drop what it calls its predatory drive to supplant American technological dominance, through tactics that include forcing U.S. companies to reveal trade secrets in return for access to the Chinese market and com-mitting cyber-theft.Trade wars can draw blood in several ways. Exporters face taxes on what they ship across the Pacific. This makes their products more expensive and less competitive.And importers must pay more for the foreign machinery and components they buy „ and then decide whether they can afford to pass along those higher costs to their customers.In choosing the Chinese goods to tax, the Trump administration tried to limit the impact on Ameri-can consumers. It aimed instead mainly at industrial products. Yet those tariffs will hurt American companies that rely on Chinese-made compo-nents and machinery.Most Americans wouldnt recognize the vast majority of the Chinese imports that the Trump administration is targeting. But they would recognize the companies that use them.PetSmart, for example, says the administrations tariffs will inflate the cost of imported water filters for home aquariums. Jacuzzi has said its hot tubs and bathtubs will be affected by higher U.S. tariffs on pumps. Newell Brands, which owns Rubbermaid, says Americans may face higher costs for its imported FoodSaver vacuum sealer products, which are used to store and preserve food.Moog Music Inc. in Asheville, North Carolina, known for synthesizers used by the likes of David Bowie and Michael Jackson, warns that the tariffs on imported Chinese cir-cuit boards and other parts will immediately and drasticallyŽ increase the cost of its instruments and might require layoffs. In a worst-case scenario, Moog said, it might have to move some manufacturing over-seas. Its urging employees to call their congressional representatives to protest the tariffs. Bracing for impactBluster aside, US and China vulnerable to pain from tari sBy David KoenigThe Associated PressBoeing and Brazilian jet maker Embraer have agreed to form a joint venture that would push the U.S. aerospace giant into the market for smaller passenger planes.The new company is being valued at $4.75 billion. Boeing Co. said Thursday that it will own 80 percent while Embraer SA takes the remain-ing 20 percent.The venture will be con-trolled by Boeing „ managers in Brazil will report to Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg.The preliminary agreement follows long negotiations that have been scrutinized closely in Brazil, where lawmakers fear losing control of a major industrial and defense asset. President Michel Temer rejected the sale of a controlling stake in Embraer to Boeing.The government has veto power over any change in Embraers controlling interest, an indication of how highly the company is prized in Brazil.In a statement, Boeing and Embraer said financial and operational details still need to be worked out and they expect negotiations over transaction terms to con-tinue in the coming months.Ž Any partnership would need the approval of shareholders and Brazils government. The whole process could take until the end of 2019, they said.The Chicago plane maker said the venture would add to its earnings per share begin-ning in 2020.Boeing and its main rival, Europes Airbus, have been looking for ways to enter the market for planes that are smaller than the Boeing 737 and the Airbus A319 single-aisle jets. The introduction of larger planes like the Boeing 787 and Airbus A380 have attracted more attention in recent years, but most of the growth in airliners sales is expected to be tied to single-aisle planes.The deal would give Boeing and the joint venture a lineup of planes from 70 to more than 450 seats. Boeing exited the niche for planes with around 100 seats in 2006, when it stopped building the 717 jet, which it had inherited with the acquisition of McDonnell-Douglas. Boeing, Embraer attempt joint venture

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** A8 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE HIGHER EDUCATION B1ROOM TO IMPROVEState looks to boost college-to-university pipeline FORT WALTON BEACH | B4FIREWORKS EXPLOSIONTechnicians not injured in  ower potting malfunction AREA BRIEFS | B5HOUSEBOAT RESTAURANTJust the Cook moves, wont be put up for auction By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH„ June marked the first time Steve Millaway had visited the White House, but unlike most of the thousands of tourists who visit annually, he was there on a special invitation.The Trump administra-tion needed his help.Millaway is CEO of TechFarms, a technology incubator in Panama City Beach that helps tech entrepreneurs hatch and grow their businesses. He was at the White House on Gov. Rick Scotts invitation to help the Trump administration figure out how to get students interested in science, tech-nology, engineering and mathematics, commonly referred to as STEM. The lack of STEM gradu-ates in America is a national security concern, with STEM education impor-tant to military engineering and cybersecurity, said TechFarms CEO speaks at White HouseTechFarms President and CEO Steve Millaway, left, was one of numerous STEM leaders in America who attended a STEM education summit hosted last month by the White House. Attendees discussed how to increase interest in STEM careers and education in America. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Millaway o ers ideas to boost students interest in math, science See MILLAWAY, B4By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comYOUNGSTOWN „ A Bay County man has been arrested after police said he attacked a woman with a soda can in front of a 5-year-old child, according to official reports.Jesse James Elmore, 24, appeared in court Thursday in connection with the incident. The Bay County Sheriffs Office arrested him after a Tuesday incident in which a woman said she had been choked on two occasions, beaten and struck over the head with a Dr Pepper can. Elmore was charged with two counts of felony bat-tery, one count of aggravated battery with a weapon and child cruelty, court records show. BCSO reported the woman sustained bruising to her forehead and on her left cheek. She showed officers areas on her head where she claimed Elmore had pulled out her hair during the altercation. She also had busted blood vessels, consistent with being strangled, BCSO reported. Elmore spoke with officers before his arrest and report-edly told them he had not attacked the woman. Elmore stated on the statement he might have BCSO: Man battered woman in front of young kidElmore See BCSO, B4Patterson raising celebration fundsBy Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ It takes more than one person to spin straw into gold, and at Oscar Patterson Elementary, it was a whole-school effort to turn around its grade from an F to a C and stay open.There were the teachers, who poured everything into making school a safe space for the students. There were the coaches, like Eureka math coach Tanja Roulhac, who went into overdrive to get students who were perform-ing at the lowest levels on the FSA exams to make those learning gains. There were the third-, fourthand fifth-grade students who took the FSAs, but there also were the kindergarten, firstand second-graders who made banners and held parades to support the older students.And against all odds, together, they did it. Patterson turned around from an F school grade to a C and will remain open.To celebrate, and to com-memorate their achievement, Roulhac is raising money to buy each of the 250 students at the school a T-shirt they can wear and be proud of what they accomplished, reading C, we made it!Ž The shirts will cost about $1,700 total. She has managed to raise about $447 but needs more help from the community. It would mean so much to them to have these,Ž Roulhac said.For her, and for the students, its about more than just shirts. Its about what they went through this year and what the students go through every day, coming from the kind of poverty Roulhac said she never had seen before. Parents in jail or sick with cancer, taking care of siblings, getting them up and ready for school, the stu-dents still were expected to come in every day and learn. We tried to take them out of the environment that they Math coach Tanja Roulhac: T-shirts would mean so much to the studentsMath coach Tanja Roulhac is raising money for T-shirts to celebrate Oscar Pattersons C school grade. [CONTRIBUTED] See T-SHIRTS, B4A non-rush-hour traf“ c jam brings the westbound lanes of Panama City Beach Parkway to a standstill Wednesday afternoon. Holiday traf“ c had U.S. 98 at a relative standstill for much of the afternoon. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] PCB Parkway tra c jam

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** B2 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 88/72 88/75 91/71 88/75 87/76 89/72 90/72 92/73 89/70 90/71 89/72 90/72 89/71 87/76 88/76 88/75 89/72 88/7388/7487/7489/7588/75Periods of sun with a thunderstorm Partly sunny, a t-storm in spots An afternoon thunderstorm possible Partly sunny with a thunderstorm8872858473Winds: WSW 6-12 mph Winds: SSE 6-12 mph Winds: SSE 4-8 mph Winds: SE 4-8 mph Winds: SSW 4-8 mphBlountstown 6.75 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 6.81 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 34.90 ft. 42 ft. Century 7.67 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 5.00 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 10:27a 3:29a 11:14p 5:54p Destin 7:43a 10:18p ----West Pass 10:00a 3:02a 10:47p 5:27p Panama City 6:54a 9:44p ----Port St. Joe 8:42a 11:31p ----Okaloosa Island 6:16a 9:24p ----Milton 9:56a 1:43a ----East Bay 9:00a 1:13a ----Pensacola 8:16a 10:52p ----Fishing Bend 8:57a 12:47a --11:43p The Narrows 9:53a 2:47a ----Carrabelle 9:02a 1:16a 9:49p 3:41pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018LastNewFirstFull Jul 6Jul 12Jul 19Jul 27Sunrise today ........... 5:47 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 7:47 p.m. Moonrise today ...... 12:40 a.m. Moonset today ......... 1:10 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 88/76/t 88/76/t Daytona Beach 85/72/t 87/73/t Ft. Lauderdale 89/77/t 90/78/t Gainesville 88/72/t 87/72/t Jacksonville 88/72/pc 88/73/t Jupiter 87/75/t 89/74/t Key Largo 89/80/pc 88/81/t Key West 90/81/pc 89/82/s Lake City 88/71/t 89/71/t Lakeland 87/72/t 88/72/t Melbourne 87/74/t 89/75/t Miami 89/76/t 90/77/t Naples 91/77/t 91/77/t Ocala 86/72/t 86/71/t Okeechobee 87/71/t 89/72/t Orlando 85/72/t 87/72/t Palm Beach 87/76/t 88/76/t Tampa 88/75/t 87/76/t Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 117/85/s 114/85/s Berlin 78/54/pc 78/58/pc Bermuda 82/76/s 83/77/pc Hong Kong 90/81/sh 90/82/c Jerusalem 87/67/s 88/67/s Kabul 91/63/s 96/65/s London 86/64/pc 87/63/pc Madrid 89/64/pc 93/66/s Mexico City 72/52/t 72/53/t Montreal 73/55/pc 80/60/s Nassau 90/79/pc 89/79/pc Paris 83/63/pc 87/63/pc Rome 84/66/s 87/68/t Tokyo 82/76/r 83/77/c Toronto 74/55/s 80/59/s Vancouver 71/56/pc 69/57/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 88/68/s 87/69/pc Anchorage 73/59/pc 72/57/c Atlanta 88/72/t 82/70/t Baltimore 85/61/t 80/60/s Birmingham 89/71/t 85/68/t Boston 83/63/t 76/64/s Charlotte 90/70/t 79/65/t Chicago 79/60/s 82/63/s Cincinnati 81/60/pc 82/62/s Cleveland 74/59/s 78/60/s Dallas 96/75/pc 94/75/t Denver 92/62/t 96/62/s Detroit 80/57/s 81/62/s Honolulu 88/75/r 87/75/sh Houston 90/73/t 90/73/t Indianapolis 82/59/s 81/60/s Kansas City 88/63/t 87/61/s Las Vegas 111/89/s 106/89/s Los Angeles 106/82/s 101/72/pc Memphis 91/73/pc 88/73/s Milwaukee 75/59/s 79/62/s Minneapolis 83/63/s 84/66/s Nashville 87/66/t 87/70/s New Orleans 88/75/t 89/75/t New York City 83/65/t 78/64/s Oklahoma City 91/68/pc 89/66/t Philadelphia 83/64/t 81/61/s Phoenix 112/93/s 111/92/s Pittsburgh 79/55/s 78/55/s St. Louis 88/63/pc 84/64/s Salt Lake City 102/78/s 98/76/pc San Antonio 92/73/t 92/72/pc San Diego 88/75/s 89/73/pc San Francisco 76/60/pc 75/59/pc Seattle 75/58/pc 75/57/pc Topeka 91/64/t 91/62/s Tucson 106/83/s 104/82/t Wash., DC 87/67/t 81/65/sSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 86 Today: Wind from the south at 4-8 knots. Seas less than a foot. Visibility less than 2 miles in an afternoon thunderstorm; otherwise, clear. Tomorrow: Wind from the west-southwest at 4-8 knots. Seas less than a foot. Visibility less than 2 miles in a shower or thunderstorm.Clouds and sun today with a thunderstorm in the afternoon. Winds west-southwest 4-8 mph. Partly cloudy tonight.High/low ......................... 86/74 Last year's high/low ....... 90/76 Normal high/low ............. 90/75 Record high ............. 98 (1998) Record low ............... 66 (1982)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.02" Month to date ................... 1.13" Normal month to date ....... 1.15" Year to date ................... 22.52" Normal year to date ....... 29.76" Average humidity .............. 82%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 86/74 Last year's high/low ....... 93/80 Normal high/low ............. 89/76 Record high ............. 96 (1997) Record low ............... 64 (1938)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.13" Month to date ................... 1.94" Normal month to date ....... 1.08" Year to date ................... 33.13" Normal year to date ....... 30.58" Average humidity .............. 77%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachBy Lloyd DunkelbergerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE„ Last fall, more than one out of every four students enrolled at state uni-versities came from the Florida college system.But data, presented last week to the Florida Board of Governors, showed that more students from state and community colleges could be moving into universities, where they could earn bach-elors degrees that would likely correlate with higher earnings over their lifetimes.In the 2016-2017 academic year, 61 percent of the 57,864 students who earned associate of arts degrees at the 28 schools in the college system applied for admission to state universities. More than 30,000 students, or 86 percent, were accepted, but only 25,000 of those students enrolled. That data is being collected as part of an effort to improve Floridas two plus twoŽ articulation system. The system allows students to start their post-high-school careers at colleges and earn associate degrees in two years. They then move on to state uni-versities, where after another two years, they can earn bachelors degrees.Wendy Link, a member of the university systems Board of Governors, said Floridas college-university articula-tion system is the envy of the nation.Ž But she said the university and college systems are look-ing to make it better.As with all things, there are ways to improve upon it,Ž said Link, who leads the boards Two (Plus) Two Articulation Committee.Among the issues state higher-education officials will be looking at in the next few months are:€The 5,000 students who are accepted at state universities but never enroll.€The 38.8 percent of college students who earn associate degrees but never apply to a state university, a percentage that has increased from 35.5 percent in 2013-2014.€The 91 percent of college students who apply to only one state university. Some 95 percent of the students denied university admission applied to only one school, although they are guaranteed admission to at least one of the 12 state uni-versities once they earn their associate degrees.€The 27 percent graduation rate, after two years, when col-lege students transfer to state universities. That is much lower than the 49 percent graduation rate for students who enroll for four years at state universities. However, the six-year graduation rate for the college transfer students, at 68 percent, is similar to the 72 percent for the non-transfer university students.Madeline Pumariega, chan-cellor of the college system, said Florida produces more associ-ate degrees than any other state and that 63 percent of Florida high school students who move into post-secondary programs do so at state colleges.Pumariega said there are opportunities for improvement in such areas as the 5,000 stu-dents accepted at universities who never enroll. But she also said there are other factors that influence the students decisions, including being place boundŽ because of financial, family or work obligations and not being able to attend schools distant from their hometowns. She said financial aid and the ages of the students are other factors. The new data showed the average age of the enrolled col-lege transfer student was 25.5 years in 2017, compared to a little more than 20 years for the four-year university students.Pumariega also said her review of her systems data showed that younger students who earn associate degrees are much more likely to transfer to state universities than older students. She said 84 percent of the students under the age of 25 enrolled at a university, while that percentage is reduced for older students who are bal-ancing work and life.ŽBoard of Governors members also heard testimony about the University of Central Floridas DirectConnect program, which is designed to help state college students transfer to UCF. The Orlando school leads the state university system by taking more than 30 percent of the college transfers.A key member of that program is Valencia College, the third-largest school in the state college system.Sandy Shugart, president of Valencia, said his school has worked closely with UCF to develop the transfer program that guarantees college students admission at the uni-versity once they earn their associate degrees. The program is enhanced by UCF placing counselors on the Valencia campus to advise students who are part of the program.Shugart said the university system leaders should seek a variety of solutionsŽ to improving the transfer programs and not a single, silver-bullet solution.ŽHe also said while the state-wide system should set broad policies, it should look to the schools on a regional basis to develop specific programs.The problem we have to solve in Central Florida is noth-ing like the problem they have to solve for access in the Pan-handle,Ž he said.Although Florida has tried to bring uniformity to its state college and university courses, Shugart said the No. 1 inhibi-torŽ for transfer students earning their bachelors degrees is the loss of credits when they move to universities. He said there has been an ever-creeping demand for specializationŽ in many of the upper-division majors that has affected the transfer students.He also warned against simplistic policiesŽ aimed at measuring performance. For instance, he said college trans-fer students are much more likely to be part-time students at the universities than the four-year students who are more likely to be full-time.Shugart said metrics seek-ing to measure the time it takes to earn a degree need to be nuancedŽ enough to take that factor into account.State looks to boost college-to-university pipeline TALLAHASSEEStudent gets backing in residency caseAn appeals court Thursday ordered Florida Atlantic Uni-versity to reconsider its decision that a student didnt qualify as a resident for in-state tuition purposes.Student Johnson H. Cobb went to the 4th District Court of Appeal after the university reg-istrar and a university appeals committee turned down a determination of residency. The universitys decision stemmed from Cobbs failure to show he had been employed at least 30 hours a week for a 12-month period, according to Thursdays ruling. But a three-judge panel of the appeals court said state law makes clear that employment is not the sole circumstance to be consideredŽ when determining residency.Cobb provided documenta-tion to the university such as voter-registration informa-tion, a drivers license, a vehicle registration and bank-account information, the ruling said. But the appeals court stopped short of ordering that Cobb is entitled to a determination of residency. TALLAHASSEEPatronis bolsters fundraising lead in CFO raceFlorida Chief Financial Offi-cer Jimmy Patronis picked up about $88,000 in contributions during the first three weeks of June, as he continued to build a fundraising wall against Demo-cratic challenger Jeremy Ring.With about $3.2 million in cash on hand in his campaign account and political commit-tee as of June 22, the three-week haul included $10,000 from California-based Zenith Insur-ance Co., $5,000 from the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association and $5,000 from Introdynamics Group, a health-care company from Brooklyn, New York, according to numbers posted on the state Division of Elections website. Patronis contributions were broken into $54,800 raised for his campaign account and $32,900 for his political com-mittee Treasure Florida. Patronis, from Panama City, who is unopposed in the Repub-lican primary and will face Ring in the November general elec-tion, also received a $78,084 in-kind contribution to his committee from Walt Disney Parks and Resorts. The donation is listed as covering the cost of lodging and entertain-ment on June 15. From wire reportsSTATE BRIEFS

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com View todays obituaries and guest books at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIESCalling hours for Ethel Spencer, 81, will be from 6-8 p.m. Friday, July 6, 2018, at the mortuary. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 7, 2018, at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, 1942 E. Seventh St., Panama City, Florida, with the Rev. Parnell Smith, pastor, officiating. Interment will follow at Redwood Cemetery in Panama City. Arrangements entrusted to: The wRight Choice.Ž Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary, 1547 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, 850-640-2077.ETHEL SPENCERGraveside funeral services for Mrs. Jessie P. Core, 96, of Port St. Joe, Florida, who died July 2, 2018, will begin at 10 a.m. EDT Saturday, July 7, 2018, at Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. Visitation will begin at 9:30 a.m. Southerland Family Funeral Home is handling arrangements.JESSIE P. CORE Funeral services for Tamara Shanae Fenn, 24, of Panama City, Florida, who died June 24, 2018, will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 7, 2018, at Neals Temple First Born Church. Interment will follow at Redwood Cemetery. Battle Memorial Funeral Home is handling arrangements.TAMARA SHANAE FENN A celebration of life service for Edward E. Finch, 78, of Marianna, Florida, will begin at 11 a.m. Monday, July 9, 2018, at Welcome Assembly of God Church in Grand Ridge, Florida. Visitation will begin at the church at 10 a.m. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home is handling arrangements.EDWARD E. FINCH Funeral services for Mr. Frank Harper, 89, of Lynn Haven, Flor-ida, will begin at 11 a.m. today, July 6, 2018, at First Baptist Church of Lynn Haven. Interment will follow in Lynn Haven Cemetery. Visi-tation will begin at the church at 10 a.m.Southerland Family Funeral Home is han-dling arrangements.FRANK HARPER A celebration of life for James Montgomery, 63, of Panama City, Florida, who died June 28, 2018, will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 12, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home. The family will receive friends beginning at 5:30 p.m. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.JAMES MONTGOMERY Funeral services for Susan Elizabeth Rodger, 43, of Panama City, Florida, who died July 4, 2018, will begin at 11 a.m. Monday, July 9, 2018, at St. Johns Catholic Church. Visitation will be from 3-5 p.m. Sunday, July 8, 2018, at Wilson Funeral Home.SUSAN ELIZABETH RODGERGraveside services for Olis L. NannaŽ Sage, 80, of Panama City Beach, Florida, who died Sunday, July 1, 2018, will begin at 10 a.m. today, July 6, 2018, in Piney Grove Church Cemetery in Chipley, Florida. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrangements.OLIS L. NANNA SAGEFuneral services for Ronnie Lee PlugŽ Stanley, 64, of Wewahitchka, Florida, will begin at 11 a.m. CDT Saturday, July 7, 2018, at Dalkeith Baptist Church with interment to follow in Roberts Cemetery. Visitation will begin at the church at 10 a.m. CDT.RONNIE LEE PLUG STANLEY Visitation for Jerry Wyche Jr., 74, who died June 21, 2018, will be from 1-8 p.m. today, July 6, 2018, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home. Funeral services will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 7, 2018, at the funeral home. Interment will follow in Hillside Cemetery.JERRY WYCHE JR.WHATS HAPPENINGTodayDOGLOVEŽ WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. BEACH CLEANUP: 8-10 a.m. at Beach Access 5 at 5201 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach; hosted by Gulf World and Divers Den. Public invited; guests are encouraged to bring gloves, buckets and a reusable water bottle. Everyone who participates will be entered to win a Dolphin Meet N Greet from Gulf World and a Discover Scuba from Divers Den. ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208. HAPPY SILK AT FLORIOPOLIS: 2-5 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Design your own silk art scarf. $35 per scarf. For details, 850-249-9295 JAM SESSION „ BONE DADDY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. LIGHT UP THE GULF FIREWORKS SHOW: 8:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Celebrate Independence Day with a front row seat to the private Light Up the GulfŽ Fireworks Show. BALLROOM DANCING: 6:308:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. Enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.comSaturdayABSTRACT CITYŽ ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. For details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. For details, 850-769-2645 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Live music. For details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers. For details, WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. For details, 850-265-2121 or communications@cityo” ynnhaven.com BLUES & BARBECUE: 4 p.m. (music begins at 5 p.m.) at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven, with Kelly & The Healers and The Aaron Sheppard Trio. Tickets $15 to bene“ t Roberts Hall. SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY: CHRIS GODBER: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the Sweetbay neighborhood of Panama City. Free; open to the public. JOE WAYNE WALKER SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATE DISTRICT 3 CAMPAIGN MEET AND GREET: 6-8 p.m. at the Shrine Temple, 1101 W. 19th St., Panama City.SundayPANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Live music. For details, 850-774-5367MondayCALLAWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS AND ONE-ROOM SCHOOL TOUR: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave., Callaway. Tour is free, but donations are welcome. ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLINGŽ: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. For details, LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPERŽ: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. For details, LoveTheRep.com GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Daric Freeman on the Village Green in Carillon Beach and concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute.TuesdayHEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATUREŽ SOLO PAINTING EXHIBIT: Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Free admission. For details, 850-640-3670 or www.CenterfortheartsPC.com GAZING THROUGH WINDOWS, STARING AT CLOSED DOORSŽ: Exhibit on display through Aug. 11. The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Photography exhibit by Teressa Longo. For details, www.thelightroompc.com or 850-818-0475 LETTERPRESS IN ACTION: 1:30-4 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City. Watch letterpress artists create print pieces and see rare collection of operational vintage letterpress machines.WednesdayAWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOPŽ: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. For details, LoveTheRep. com PANHANDLE FEDERATED REPUBLICAN WOMEN MEETING: 11 a.m. social/ buffet lunch and 11:45 a.m. program at the Shipyard Grill (upstairs), Sun Harbor Marina. Guest speaker: School Superintendent Bill Husfelt speaking on Keeping Our Schools Safe & Half-Cent Sales Tax Referendum.Ž ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208. MEMORY CAFEŽ: 2 p.m. at Fatty Pattys on Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. A fun event for those diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers sponsored by the Bay County Alzheimers Alliance. For details, Vivian Smith, 850-625-0737 MOVIES AND MORE „ MADAGASCARŽ: 5:30 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park Recreation Hall. Admission is free but donations are accepted. Donations will go to the Friends of Camp Helen State Park to bene“ t the parks resource management projects and interpretive programs. A parent or guardian must accompany all children. For details, facebook.com/ FriendsOfCampHelenStatePark or 850-233-5058 PANAMA CITY GROWING STRONG MEETING: 6 p.m. at Bay County Government Center, 11th Street, Panama City. Guest speaker: Victor Dover of Dover-Kohl and Partners from Coral Gables. For details, Robert Barnes, president, 866-3138; Teresa Shef“ eld, treasurer/secretary, 276-8591 BEAUTY AND THE BEASTŽ: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. For details, LoveTheRep.comSubmit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before LOCAL & STATEBy Emiliano Rodriguez MegaThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ A new study provides fresh evi-dence that the first dogs of North America all but dis-appeared after the arrival of Europeans.The only surviving legacy appears to be a cancer that arose from the cells of a dog that lived more than 8,000 years ago and has since spread to other canines throughout the world, an international team reported Thursday in the journal Science.Researchers compared the genomes of ancient and modern American dogs. Results confirm that the first domesticated dogs of North America arrived with people from Asia over the same Bering land bridge used much earlier by humans. These dogs thrived for thou-sands of years, but mostly vanished after contact with Europeans. Scien-tists dont know why they disappeared.I just find it really sur-prising,Ž says geneticist Elinor Karlsson from the University of Massachu-setts Medical School in Worcester, who did not participate in the study. There were millions and millions of dogs all over the continent (that) died out after the Europeans arrived. And the fact that we dont know anything about it is kind of a big hole.ŽIn an attempt to fill in the historical gaps, researchers sequenced the genetic material of 71 dog remains collected from bones found in Sibe-ria, the United States and Mexico.When they compared it to the genetic makeup of modern pooches, they confirmed what other scientists have long sug-gested: The first dogs of North America, similar to Arctic dogs like Siberian huskies or Alas-kan malamutes, were brought to the continent when people crossed the land bridge that formed between Russia and Canada. Its not known when the dogs first arrived.For Elaine Ostrander, a canine genetics expert from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, this finding reveals something about our own behavior.Where people go, so go their dogs,Ž said Ostrander, who was not part of the study. This study reinforces that idea and takes it back to nearly the beginning of dogdom.ŽResearchers could not find any trace of ancient dog DNA in modernday village dogs from South America or pre-Columbian breeds like the xoloitzcuintli, the Mexi-can hairless dog. Less than 4 percent of the genome of modern American dogs can be traced back to those that lived before the Europeans came, the study found. Study provides clues to the fate of early North American dogsA xoloitzcuintli is shown in the ring during the nonsporting group competition at the 140th Westminster Kennel Club dog show, Feb. 15, 2016, at Madison Square Garden in New York. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** B4 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Heraldpulled her hair out when he pushed her head,Ž officers wrote. He then stated he only poured the Dr. Pepper on her, however the can might have hit her head.ŽBCSO noted that the can appeared to have been used to hit something and looked as if it had busted with pressure rather than being opened the proper way.According to BCSO, the incident took place about 10 p.m. Tuesday because Elmore did not want the woman to get on Facebook. Most of the ensuing physical violence also occurred in the presence of a 5-year-old child, BCSO reported.The woman told officers Elmore first pulled out a chunk of her hair and began choking her with both hands until she could not talk or breathe. She said he forced her to the ground, where he began hitting her head on the ground before dragging her by the hair out of the house and into his truck, BCSO reported.While in the vehicle, (Elmore) was driving erratically and stopped down the road from their house and began hitting the victim in the head with a full Dr. Pepper can to the back of the victims head,Ž officers wrote. All in front of the 5-year-old ƒŽBCSO reported that the woman also told officers of a previous altercation during which Elmore had choked her until she lost consciousness. Afterward, he alleg-edly threatened to put a bullet in her headŽ if she called law enforcement, BCSO reported.Elmore was arrested and taken to the Bay County Jail. His bond amount was not released. BCSOFrom Page B1Millaway, who has an extensive career in the tech industry.Theres not enough STEM graduates these days to fill the jobs of today and tomorrow,Ž he said. Theres a lack of skilled graduates to fill positions.ŽMore than 200STEM leadersmet at the June 25-26 education summit to talk about how to motivate students. The conversation included the importance of emphasizingSTEM at home, noting other countries are much more focused on STEM degrees and education than America, and emphasizing the importance of childhood education and strict education regimens, Mil-laway said.Students also should know computer coding so they can design phone apps, he said.Pick something in this area that you like doing,Ž Millaway said. Go to these STEM events that they have at the college. Thats all about getting kids interested in science. Math basically underlies all of that. You need to know math for science and engineering. ... Get (children) curious and doing experiments.ŽAttendees „ who came from every state, territory and some tribes „ heard from Ivanka Trump, Sec-retary of Education Betsy DeVos and other high-ranking federal officials. The summit was part of the Trump Administrations efforts to come up with a new five-year federal STEM Education Strategic Plan. Encouraging innovation and entre-preneurship, integrating computer science with existing education and improving peoples access to STEM programs also were mentioned during the summit, according to an event summary.On a personal level, Millaway said going to the White House was amaz-ing.Ž I got to meet a lot of people echoing these concerns,Ž he said. MILLAWAYFrom Page B1 have to exist in and get them to focus on school, and just school,Ž she said. Let them know this is a safe place. You dont have to be an adult here, but we know when they go home, a lot of them have to watch younger siblings, get them up and get them breakfast. Its reality, and some of it will crush your heart,Ž she said.The teachers, Roulhac said, werent immune from what their students were going through, and with the extra scrutiny from the state, all eyes were on them. There were so many days that we all cried,Ž she said. We all had moments wondering if we could do it. I cant tell you the number of days Ive gone into my portable and just cried. But we always came out with a smile and got back to it.ŽFor Roulhac, beyond just the students, the mission this year was personal. Her first school experi-ence was at Patterson, as a sprightly 5-year-old in its pre-kindergarten summer program. Decades later and through countless trying times, she said its time for a new era of stability and achievement at her old school.People dont realize how historic it is,Ž she said. We have to give it life again, for those kids.ŽBecause the funds cant be connected to the school, Roulhac is collecting money through PayPal, at PayPal.ne/builttoprosper. If people dont have PayPal but would like to contribute, they can either contact the school or bring a check to the front office, where the staff will make sure it gets to her and to the T-shirts. T-SHIRTSFrom Page B1Oscar Patterson Elementary soared from an F grade to a C in the latest state ratings. [PATTI BLAKE/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] It was the most serious incident on an otherwise calm Fourth of July, beach safety o cials sayBy Annie Blanks315-4450 | @DailyNewsAnnie ablanks@nwfdailynews.comDESTIN „ A Fourth of July beach party turned deadly for a man after he disappeared while wading in water late Wednesday night and his body was found by divers Thursday morning.According to a press release from the Okaloosa County Sheriffs Office, 20-year-old Pethiley Deusete Lopez Maximo of Destin was last seen by his friends about 8 p.m. Wednesday wading in waist-high water near the west side of the Marler Bridge.Maximo, who could not swim, was reported missing later. Crews from the Coast Guard and the Sheriffs Office searched for him by air and by water, and a Sheriffs Office dive team found his body in the water off the west side of the bridge Thursday morning, not far from where he had last been seen.Authorities say Maximo, who was from Brazil, had been attend-ing a Fourth of July beach party with his friends. His belongings were still on the beach when officials began looking for him.The cause of death wont be officially determined until an autopsy is completed, but authorities say he likely drowned.Maximos death hap-pened on an otherwise calm day for beach safety officials. Walton County Beach Safety Director David Vaughan said his lifeguards had a surprisingly quietŽ Fourth of July holiday. There were only a few water rescues, and none required hospitalization.Okaloosa County Beach Safety Direc-tor Rich Huffnagle said the beach on Okaloosa Island was crowded Wednesday, but life-guards did not perform any rescues or public assists.In Destin, Beach Safety Director Joe DAgostino said lifeguards had a busy day Tuesday, pulling 43 people from the water, including three who had to be taken to hospitals. However, DAgostino said things were quiet Wednesday.Things were also quiet on Navarre Beach, according to firefighter Matt Harris.Maximo is the second person to drown near the Marler Bridge so far this year. In May, 36-yearold Essie Mitchell of Mobile, Alabama, died in an apparent drown-ing at Crab Island.Man apparently drowns near Marler Bridge Authorities say Maximo, who was from Brazil, had been attending a Fourth of July beach party with his friends. His belongings were still on the beach when o cials began looking for him. By Heather Osbourne315-4440 | @heatheronwfdnhosbourne@nwfdailynews.comFORT WALTON BEACH „ The fireworks show at Fort Walton Landing on Wednesday night gave onlookers an explosion they werent expecting.Buddy Carter, a specialist for Pyro Shows Inc., said Thursday that the malfunction, called flower potting,Ž occurs about once in every 15 fireworks shows. Flower potting occurs when a firework shell explodes in its mortar, causing the firework not to reach its expected altitude, he said.Some spectators watching the show over the Santa Rosa Sound questioned whether the explosion was inten-tional and, if not, whether anyone was harmed. Nearby boats retreated to a safe distance.However, other spectators thought the low-flying fireworks was all part of the 15-minute, $23,000 production.Carter said the two technicians on the barge during the display were not injured.All that happens is the shell doesnt leave like its supposed to,Ž Carter said. Other than that, I think it was nearly flaw-less. Instead of lasting 15 minutes, it lasted 15 min-utes and 5 seconds.ŽFirework malfunction at Fort Walton BeachStaff reportThe Florida Depart-ment of Health in Walton County (DOH-Walton) found unacceptably high levels of enterococci at Grayton Beach during its latest saltwater quality tests at local beaches.Water samples are analyzed for enteric bac-teria (enterococci) that normally inhabit the intestinal tract of humans and animals, which may cause human disease, infections, or rashes. The presence of enteric bacteria is an indication of fecal pollution, which may come from stormwater runoff, pets and wildlife, and human sewage.The purpose of the Healthy Beaches Monitoring Program is to determine whether Flor-ida has significant coastal beach water quality prob-lems and whether future beach monitoring efforts are necessary.Most other Walton County beaches were found to have good water quality. The water at Miramar Beach was deemed to be moderate quality, according to the latest report.Water quality classifications are based upon United States Environmental Protection Agencys (EPAs) recommended criteria and Florida Healthy Beaches Program Categories:Good = 0 35 Enterococci CFU per 100 ml of marineModerate = 36 70 Enterococci CFU per 100 ml of marine waterPoor = 71 or greater Enterococci CFU per 100 ml of marine waterA health advisory was issued for the Grayton Beach access. While the access remains open, the bacterial levels should be considered a potential health risk to swimmers.Water quality at Grayton Beach agged A “ rework shell exploded in its mortar on a barge Wednesday night during the “ reworks show at Fort Walton Landing. [JACKIE BRUCE/CONTRIBUTED PHOTO ]

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 B5 PANAMA CITYJust the Cook moves, won't be put up for auctionJust the Cook wont be put up for auction after all.Panama City put a pos-sessory lien last month on the popular houseboat restaurant after months of missed rent pay-ments to the St. Andrews Marina. However, city officials confirmed Just the Cook owner Ernie Hall paid in full last week and will get to keep his boat.The missed payments totaled more the $7,500.The houseboat has been moved from the St. Andrews Marina, and Hall has said he plans to reopen it. The location has not been announced.Just the Cook will reopen to continue making great food for the community,Ž Hall said previously.Just the Cook has been featured on Food Network and spotlighted in tourism advertisement, in part because of the novelty of being a float-ing houseboat and in part because of a menu with dishes like the Dan-D burger, made with two locally made glazed doughnuts for buns. Its also beloved by the com-munity, which helped raise funds after the first version of the restaurant sank.LYNN HAVENTrial date set in capital sexual battery caseA Bay County man now has a trial date set on four counts of capital sexual battery in connection with reports of a 10-year-old being molested, according to official reports.Joseph Lee Kosier, 31, appeared in court Thurs-day in connection with the case. He initially faced a charge of lewd and lascivious molesta-tion on a child under 12 after the child disclosed to authorities she had been molested in June 2017 while at Kosiers Lynn Haven home. However, authorities recently upgraded the charges against Kosier to four counts of capital sexual battery of a child under 12, which carry a life sen-tence without the chance for parole.Kosier posted a $100,000 bond in the case. His tentative trial date has been set for Aug. 20.PANAMA CITY BEACHBCSO: Georgia trio caught selling crystal meth in PCBAuthorities have arrested three Georgia men and recovered a large quantity of methamphetamine after serving a search warrant at a Panama City Beach hotel, according to offi-cial reports.Roger A. Farmer, 29; Quintavis D. Mathis, 25; and Shaquille R. Mathis, 24, all of Albany, Georgia, were arrested in the case.The Bay County Sheriffs Office reported serving a search warrant early Tuesday at a Panama City Beach hotel room. Inside, they found the three men from Georgia and more than a pound of crystal methamphetamine, as well as a small amount of marijuana. BCSO investigators said they believe the three traveled to Bay County for the sole purpose of selling the crystal meth before returning to Georgia. They each face charges of trafficking methamphetamine over state lines.MIAMISecond tropical storm of season forms in AtlanticThe second tropical storm of the season, Beryl, has been recorded in the Atlantic.The National Hurri-cane Center said satellite imagery indicates maximum sustained winds of about 40 mph around the storm, which is currently moving west toward the Caribbean islands at about 16 mph.The path for Beryl will not be an easy one, as it is expected to hit hostile, upper-level winds this weekend, and the strong wind sheer and dry air likely will pull the system apart before it reaches the Lesser Antilles.In addition to Beryl, the hurricane center is watching a second disturbance that is east of the Florida-Georgia border area, or southwest of Bermuda. The Hurricane Center called it a trough of low pressure and said conditions were conducive for development before the end of the week, when it is expected to run into a frontal system and be absorbed.The disturbance is moving west-northwest and is expected to turn more to the north later in the forecast period. It poses a 40 percent chance of development during the next five days.PANAMA CITYTCC, Verizon giving away backpacks, supplies July 22Bay County students can get donated school supplies later this month as part of a nationwide back-to-school drive by TCC and Verizon.Backpacks full of school supplies will be given away from 1-4 p.m. July 22 at Round Room TCC stores in Lynn Haven, 419 Ohio Ave., and Panama City Beach, 15750 Panama City Beach Parkway, Suite 260. The give-away is part of a national campaign involving about 1,000 TCC and Verizon Wireless Zone stores.Since 2013, TCC has donated more than 752,000 backpacks filled with supplies to ensure children are well prepared for the start of the school year,Ž a news release stated. Participating TCC stores are inviting local families to bring their children to the store to pick up a backpack filled with pencils, paper, a pencil box, folders, glue and more.ŽEach TCC store is donating up to 220 back-packs. Backpacks are available on a first-come, first-served basis to stu-dents 18 or younger. All leftover backpacks will be donated to local schools. News Herald staff reportAREA BRIEFS By Jim TurnerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE„ Fun-draising appeared to slow last month as candidates seeking to replace Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam ramp up ads and appearances before the Aug. 28 pri-mary election.And it would have been slower if the Florida Chamber of Commerce had not split $30,000 in contributions between political committees linked to three Republicans running for agriculture commissioner „Rep. Matt Caldwell, Sen. Denise Grimsley and former Rep. Baxter Troutman, according to finance reports posted on the state Division of Elec-tions website covering the period June 1-22.Meanwhile, Democrat Nikki Fried, who entered the race last month, posted $44,754 in contri-butions and loans to her campaign account in her first report.Florida Consumers First, a political committee linked to Fried, raised another $43,400 from June 1-22„ more than half from cannabis-related agriculture and dispensing businesses„ and had raised an overall total of $101,900.Candidates and politi-cal committees were required by the end of last week to file reports showing finance activity through June 22. Candidates running for statewide offices, such as agriculture commissioner, and committees face another deadline Friday to file reports showing activity through June 29.Troutman, a former House member from Winter Haven who has pumped $3 million of his own money into the cam-paign, posted $26,725 in contributions to his cam-paign account and the committee iGrow during the three-week span, while he spent $53,727, mostly on consulting.Troutman, who had a combined total of $1.47 million on hand as of June 22, did not appear at the Republican Party of Floridas Sunshine SummitŽ last week, unlike other Cabinet can-didates. Becky Troutman, the candidates wife, appeared in his place and said he was attending a previously scheduled event in Miami.Caldwell, R-North Fort Myers, posted $42,925 in contributions during the recent period to his campaign account and the committee Friends of Matt Caldwell. The campaign and committee spent $77,870 in the same period and had a combined total of $1.2 million on hand.Grimsley, a Sebring Republican who on June 22 had a combined total of just more than $1 million on hand in her campaign account and the Saving Floridas Heartland political committee, raised $72,015 between June 1-22 while spending $71,005.For Caldwell and Grimsley, the Florida Chambers $10,000 contributions were the only money that came into their respective political committees during the three-week span.For Troutman, his iGrow political commit-tee also got $10,000 from the Florida Prosperity Fund, which is tied to the business group Associ-ated Industries of Florida.The Florida Chamber and Associated Industries of Florida, through vari-ous political committees, have funneled tens of thousands of dollars to Caldwell, Grimsley and Troutman throughout the campaign.A fourth Republican in the primary, Mike McCalister, a Plant City businessman and retired Army National Guard and Reserves colonel, loaned his campaign $7,738 during the recent filing period. The money allowed him to cover the cost of qualifying for the Republican primary during last months formal qualifying period.The owner-operator of a small tree farm, McCalister also posted a single $100 donation from a retired Boca Raton resident during the three-week period.McCalister, who ran for governor in 2010 and the U.S. Senate in 2012, had $1,903 on hand as of June 22.Reports for the filing period for Democratic candidates Jeff Porter, the Homestead mayor, and David Walker, a bio-logical scientist from Fort Lauderdale, were not available.Money ow slows in ag commissioner race Kosier

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** B6 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News HeraldARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Beware of collective delusion. When you have an unpopular opinion, it's easy to think that you're the delusional one „ when you're actually the only one who understands the reality of what's going on. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Take a picture of the moon or a sunset and it becomes clear that life often looks a lot better than the picture of life. But then there are times when the picture looks better. You'll go out of your way because of a photograph. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ In the animal kingdom, enemies are simply other creatures competing for resources. In human terms, enemies seem more nefarious. Are they? Figure out if the opposition is sinister or just competing for the same thing as you. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ You'll be wise to spend several hours cultivating good fortune by way of talking with others, sharing your heart, serving, helping and cleaning and clearing your environment to make way for good luck to drop on in. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Friendship is the most valuable thing that the day has to offer. A spontaneous opportunity to connect will pop up and it will be worthwhile for you veer from your original plan and be social. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ You've been paying attention. Your best guess is a strong one. Act on it. Don't talk about it “ rst or you could talk yourself out of it. Action will begin a fortunate chain reaction. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ You'll gravitate to the strong personalities, the intimidating presence, the people who are sure to impress and even intoxicate you. Get ready: They're sure to throw you off balance. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ Dissatisfaction is part of the human experience, so don't blame yourself or anyone else. Offer yourself some kindness, and wish the best for everyone around you. You'll be surprised how that turns it around for the better. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ You can only experience life from your own point of view. So even though you know that you are not the center of the universe, you have to live as though you are, taking the very best care of yourself that you can. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ Socrates said, "I know only one thing: that I know nothing." And if Socrates (widely regarded as one of the “ nest minds of antiquity) knew nothing, then you really have to excuse yourself for being under-informed today. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ This is not a game you win once and become champion of forever. Life's battles are fought over and over. Truly, some of them are getting old. But persist anyway. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ Don't skimp on the details today. It's important to be faithful in your attention and commitment to small things because it's the small things that will build your strength.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy. com 1. From fun surveys, whats the most popular response when asked to name a place cars line up to get in? Funeral procession, Car wash, Sporting venue, Drive through restaurant 2. Which animated superheros theme song includes, Speed of lightning, roar of thunderŽ? Atom Ant, Underdog, Space Ghost, Mighty Mouse 3. What country has the worlds largest swamp called Grand Pantamal? USA, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico 4. Who died in 1955 at the wheel of his Porsche Spyder? Ernie Kovacs, Kirby Grant, James Dean, Jim Morrison 5. What was introduced in 1965 by Andre Courreges? Mini skirt, Yellow tennis balls, Popcorn shrimp, Clip-on tie 6. Which year marked the death of cowboy entertainer Roy Rogers? 1986, 1992, 1998, 2004 ANSWERS: 1. Drive through restaurant, 2. Underdog, 3. Brazil, 4. James Dean, 5. Mini skirt, 6. 1998TRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) SALSAFENCE MINING FORBID Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Running up a hillside can be great exercise if you are „ SO INCLINED Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. PRAGH RFAWH PUYTED BBOANO 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE appŽ  SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBYSon strives to revive faded memories of mom long goneDEAR ABBY: Im 52. My mom died when I was 11. It wasnt until I reached my mid-20s that I realized I have no memories of her, and few memories of my childhood before I was 11. Dad and I lived a few hours away from family, and after Mom passed, no one spoke about her much. I imagine that was because it was painful. She was only 29. I never cried over her death, and I dont remember missing her as a child or teenager. There are only a handful of photos of her and a couple of passed-down stories. I understand that people block memories of traumatic events and things they dont want to remember. I remember the night it happened in detail, but not the memory of her. I have seen a few psychiatrists at different times during the course of my life to deal with stress and daily life issues, and while they were aware of my background, we never really got into this. For some reason its bothering me more and more now. I want to remember my mother. When I ask her friends and relatives about her, I get general answers „ she was a nice person, very loving and crafty, etc. How does someone get their memories back? Ive heard hypnosis can help, but Im not sure. Do you have any advice? „ SON LEFT BEHINDDEAR SON: Many people are reluctant to talk about family members who have passed on because they are afraid it will be painful for the listener. Perhaps if you approached your relatives and explained why you are asking for more details, it might jog some memories. However, if that doesnt bear fruit, then talking with a mental health professional about the fact that this is increasingly bothering you would be a good idea. That person can recommend hypnosis if its appropriate. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.

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** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 B7 COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JULY 6 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Lady Antebellum performs. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Maury The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Jerry Springer Jerry Springer DermaWandSkin Care WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America G-Eazy performs. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The SistersŽ Diagnosis Murder The Big ValleyGunsmoke (Part 2 of 2) WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning (N) Lets Make a Deal The Price Is Right The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Forensic FilesJerry Springer (N) The Real The Wendy Williams Show (N) Paternity CourtCouples CourtJudge FaithJudge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVRegrow HairPaid ProgramJudge Mathis The Peoples Court The Peoples Court Cityline WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature Cat: OcCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplas h A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: Rewind Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: Patrol AMC 30 62 131 254 MedicareLifeLockThree Stooges (:25) ‰‰‰‚ Lethal Weapon (87) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Gary Busey.(10:55) ‰‰‰‚ Lethal Weapon 2 (89) Mel Gibson, Joe Pesci. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Cat vs. Dog Vampire Cats!Ž My Cat From Hell Hope for Wildlife (N) Bondi Vet Bondi Vet Animal Cops Houston ChaseŽ Animal Cops Houston BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceHouse/Payne House/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Scrubs Futurama Futurama (:05) Futurama (:40) Futurama (:10) Futurama (:45) Futurama (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Airplane Repo Airplane Repo Airplane Repo Hired GunsŽ Airplane Repo Airplane Repo Airplane Repo E! 63 57 114 236 KardashianThe KardashiansKardashianKardashianThe KardashiansKardashianE! News: Daily Pop (N) KardashianKardashian ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) 2018 Wimbledon Championships Third Round. From the All-England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, England. (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) Get Up (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Outside LinesNFL Live (N) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Sexy HairMedicareCindys SkinPioneer Wo.ContessaContessaContessaContessaContessaGiada-BeachPioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny 700/InteractiveThe 700 Club Reba Reba Reba Reba The Middle The Middle FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstFIFA World Cup Live (N) 2018 FIFA World Cup Uruguay vs France. (N) (L) FIFA World Cup Today (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‚ Getaway (13) ‰‰ White House Down (13) Channing Tatum. Paramilitary soldiers take over the White House. How I MetHow I MetHow I MetMike & Molly HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family Guest co-host Kavan Smith. (N) Home & Family Guest co-host Kavan Smith. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, TooLove It or List It, TooLove It or List It, TooLove It or List It, TooFixer UpperHouse HuntersHouse Hunte rs HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Possible evidence of alien visitors. LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesThe First 48The First 48The First 48 PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Jon of the DeadŽ Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Two/Half MenTwo/Half Men SUN 49 422 656 Sport FishingScubaNationReel TimeShip Shape TVFishing FlatsAddict. FishingSportsmanFlorida Insider Fishing Report Sport FishingFlorida Sport. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:00) ‰‚ Skyline (10) ‰‰‚ Saw (04) Cary Elwes, Danny Glover, Monica Potter.(:15) ‰‰‰ Hanna (11) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana, Cate Blanchett. (:45) Elektra TBS 31 15 139 247 MarriedKingKingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‚ Satellite in the Sky (56) Kieron Moore. ‰‰ From the Earth to the Moon (58) Joseph Cotten. ‰‰‰‰ Forbidden Planet (56) Walter Pidgeon.(:15) ‰‰‚ Countdown (68) TLC 37 40 183 280 Outdaughtered Say YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLFour Weddings TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Charmed Supernatural First BornŽ Supernatural Sharp TeethŽ Supernatural The PurgeŽ Supernatural CaptivesŽ USA 62 55 105 242 Chicago P.D. Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarBeyond TodayMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JULY 6 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) HarryPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramBig DealPaid ProgramToday (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) SpringsteenMarie OsmondSex pillsPaid ProgramSex pillsPaid ProgramDr. Ho Reliev.H2O SteamDermaWandTry Total GymFlawless Body WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramOpen HouseCredit?Tri-StatesGood Morning Amer ica (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 MannixCannon The TorchŽ 77 Sunset Strip 5Ž Gomer PyleGomer PylePetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. Hillbillies WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Mo rning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesUnexplainedPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid P rogramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Two/Half MenHow I MetImp. JokersImp. JokersPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPiYo Workout!LifeLockPaid ProgramLif eLock WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Food FlirtsFood FlirtsPOV Brimstone & GloryŽ CivilizationsThe This Old House HourMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob BuilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindBarry WhiteMakeup!BBQ SecretsCookSmartBrand New! Rehab?Flipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:35) Turn (:36) Turn Valley ForgeŽ(:37) Turn ProvidenceŽ(:38) Preacher SonsabitchesŽ(:40) Turn The ProdigalŽ Three StoogesThree StoogesThe Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 Insane Pools: Deep EndInsane Pools: Deep EndInsane Pools: Deep EndTreehouseTreehouseTankedTanked BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxPaid ProgramPaid ProgramFresh PrinceFresh Prince COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkBroad CityOrganicAgeless BodyTry Total GymPaid ProgramScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 Coopers TreasureEdge of AlaskaEdge of AlaskaOutdoorsGiven RightAmerican ChopperAmerican Chopper E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityS ex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterBreakfast at Wimbledon (N) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Tennis From July 6, 2014. World of X GamesFormula 1 RacingSportsCenter (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QueTai ChengTai ChengSexy HairCindys SkinGuys Big Bite Brunch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Paid ProgramHair LoveThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramPaid ProgramMyoHealthSexy HairPaid ProgramPaid Programgrown-ishOdd Life-Tim FS1 24 27 150 219 Skip and Shannon: Undisputed2018 FIFA World Cup Teams TBA. From Russia. FIFA World Cup Tonight2018 FIFA World Cup Teams TBA. From Russia. FX 45 51 136 248 Good-Die Hard (:45) ‰‰ A Good Day to Die Hard (13) Bruce Willis.FXM PresentsBarry WhiteNew BissellTry Total GymGrillHow I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyThe Convenient Groom (16) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeCredit?PiYo Workout!Hair LoveCindys SkinPiYo!PiYo Workout!Fixer Upper HIST 35 42 120 269 (11:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified UFOs; black holes. CoinCoinCoinCoin CoinYardSwamp Mysteries LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) The Closer FlashpointŽ(:04) The CloserAgeless BodyCredit?LifeLockHair LoveCindys SkinGet EnergyLifeLockPhilips Kitchen PARMT 28 48 241 241 (12:30) ‰‰‚ The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (06) Sex pillsPaid ProgramYoga Retreat!Paid ProgramCookSmartAirfryer OvenRelieve painPaid Program SUN 49 422 656 After Midnight PostgameTummy TuckFoot PainCleanseSex pillsProstateCredit?Dr. HoPaid ProgramFacing WavesAddict. Fishing SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:04) Futurama (:33) Futurama (:03) ‰‚ Skyline (10) Eric Balfour, Scottie Thompson. Twilight ZoneTwilight ZoneLifeLockLifeLockMyPillowTry Total Gym TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰ American Ultra (15) Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart. ‰ Wild Wild West (99) Will Smith, Kevin Kline. MarriedMarriedMarriedMarried TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰ Trigger Jr ‰‰‚ Im Gonna Git You Sucka (88)(:15) ‰‰ Brothers (77) Bernie Casey, Vonetta McGee. ‰‰‚ The Crowd Roars (38) Robert Taylor, Edward Arnold. TLC 37 40 183 280 Four WeddingsSuddenly RichSuddenly RichSuddenly Rich Going ViralŽ Suddenly RichSuddenly Rich TNT 29 54 138 245 Castle CrossfireŽ CastleLaw & Order Cry WolfŽ Law & OrderLaw & Order EnemyŽ Law & Order FixedŽ USA 62 55 105 242 (12:00) ‰‰‚ Mamma Mia! (08) Meryl Streep. ChrisleyDateline (Part 1 of 2) Dateline (Part 2 of 2) Queen of the SouthMyPillowLarry K WGN-A 13 239 307 EngagementHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetPerson of Interest QSOŽ Try YogaJoint ReliefPaid ProgramLifeLockGet EnergyLifeLock FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JULY 6 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray The Doctors Harry Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramMaury The Robert Irvine Show The GoldbergsThe GoldbergsAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show Dr. Phil NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza The StrongholdŽ The RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainCharlies AngelsMamas FamilyThe JeffersonsM*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Divorce CourtDivorce CourtAndy GriffithAndy GriffithDateline DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury Men take paternity tests. Crime Watch DailySteve ThisMinuteThisMinuteJudge Judy Judge Judy Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD: PatrolLive PD Live PD -06.30.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 Lethal Wpn 2 (:25) ‰‰‰ Lethal Weapon 3 (92) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. ‰‰ Lethal Weapon 4 (98) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Lone Star Law North Woods Law Ice OutŽ Insane Pools: Deep EndInsane Pools: Deep End BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, Browns (:40) ‰‰‰ House Party (90) Robin Harris, Full Force. Two teenage rappers try to throw a party. The Wood (99) COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office The CarpetŽ(:15) The Office (:45) The Office (:15) The Office (:45) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Airplane Repo Repo 911Ž Airplane Repo Coopers Treasure Coopers Treasure BattleBots BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 KardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianKardashianThe KardashiansE! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 2018 Wimbledon Championships Third Round. (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) The JumpBasketball ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:30) NFL Live (N) (L) NBA: The Jump (N) (L) Intentional Talk (N) (L) Russia TonightSportsNationSpecial Olympics USANFL Live FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle ‰‰‰ Tarzan (99) Voices of Tony Goldwyn, Glenn Close. (:40) ‰‰‰ A Bugs Life (98) Kevin Spacey FS1 24 27 150 219 2018 FIFA World Cup Brazil vs Belgium. (N) (L) FIFA World Cup Today (N) Speak for YourselfUFC Weigh-In (N) (L) UFC Prefight Show (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 Mike & MollyMike & MollyMike & Molly ‰‰‚ The Wolverine (13) Hugh Jackman. Wolverine confronts the prospect of real mortality. ‰‰‰ Thor (11) Chris Hemsworth. HALL 23 59 185 312 Date With Love (16) Shenae Grimes, Andrew Walker. A Harvest Wedding (17) Jill Wagner, Victor Webster.Falling for Vermont (17) Julie Gonzalo, Benjamin Ayres. HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse Hunt ersHouse Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Evidence of 20th-century alien contact. Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 The First 48Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy The Closer PilotŽ The Closer Puzzling murder. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenMom Mom Mom Mom Mom Mom Mom Friends Friends Friends SUN 49 422 656 Facing Wavesto Do FloridaP1 SuperstockP1 AquaX USA True Fishing Florida Insider Fishing Report Inside RaysRays PregameMLB Baseball: Rays at Mets SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:45) ‰‰ Elektra (05) Jennifer Garner.(:45) ‰‚ Gods of Egypt (16) Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Brenton Thwaites, Chadwick Boseman. ‰‰ Predators (10) Adrien Brody, Alice Braga. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy ‰‰ Bad Teacher (11) TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:15) ‰‰‚ Countdown (68)(:15) ‰‰‰‰ 2001: A Space Odyssey (68) Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester. ‰‰‰ 2010 (84) Roy Scheider, John Lithgow, Helen Mirren. TLC 37 40 183 280 (12:00) Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Bones Fire in the IceŽ Bones The Hero in the HoldŽ NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans CarrierŽ NCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods M*A*S*HM*A*S*H FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JULY 6 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 American Ninja Warrior Competitors face six obstacles. Dateline NBCNewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Masters ofMasters ofPenn & Teller: Fool UsPage Six TVSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKingKing of the HillCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Quantico Fear FeargachŽ (N)(:01) What Would You Do? (N)(:01) 20/20News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss: CelebrityHawaii Five-0Blue BloodsModern FamilyLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenModern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 American Ninja WarriorAmerican Ninja Warrior2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsAnger MgtAnger MgtThe GameThe GameCorrupt CrimesKiller WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 BIG3 Basketball Week 3 Oakland. (N) (L) Two/Half MenTMZ (N) Pawn StarsPawn StarsFIFA World Cup Tonight (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashFiring-HooverThe Great British Baking ShowFood Flirts (N) Food Flirts (N) Amanpour-PBSWorld NewsPBS NewsHour (N) The Great British Baking Show A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -03.24.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 ‰‰‰‰ GoodFellas (90) Robert De Niro. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York Mafia. ‰‰‰‚ A Bronx Tale (93) Robert De Niro, Chazz Palminteri, Lillo Brancato. (:35) Turn ANPL 46 69 184 282 Insane Pools: Deep EndInsane Pools: Deep EndTreehouseTreehouseInsane Pools: Deep EndTreehouseTreehouseInsane Pools: Deep End BET 53 46 124 329 (6:30) ‰‰ The Wood (99) Omar Epps, Taye Diggs. ‰‰ Daddys Little Girls (07) Gabrielle Union, Idris Elba, Louis Gossett Jr. MartinMartinMartin COM 64 53 107 249 (:15) The Office (:45) ‰‰‚ Bruce Almighty (03) Jim Carrey, Morgan Freeman. The Comedy Central Roast Charlie SheenŽ Playlist-JakSouth ParkSouth Park DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots Ice, Ice, BabyŽ (N) Coopers Treasure (N) Street Outlaws Road RalliesŽ Coopers TreasureStreet Outlaws Road RalliesŽ BattleBots Ice, Ice, BabyŽ E! 63 57 114 236 ‰‰‰ Forgetting Sarah Marshall (08) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis. ‰‰ No Strings Attached (11) Natalie Portman, Ashton Kutcher, Cary Elwes. E! News ESPN 9 23 140 206 NBA Summer League BasketballNBA Summer League Basketball: Mavericks vs Suns NBA Summer League Basketball: Clippers vs Warriors SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) NFL Live2018 World Series of Poker Main Event. From Las Vegas. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterSC Featured FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 (5:40) ‰‰‰ A Bugs Life (98)(7:50) ‰‰‰‚ Brave (12) Voices of Kelly Macdonald. The 700 Club ‰‰‰ Casper (95) Christina Ricci, Bill Pullman, Cathy Moriarty. FS1 24 27 150 219 The Ultimate Fighter Finale: Tavares vs. Adesanya PrelimsUltimate Fighter Undefeated Finale: Tavares vs. Adesanya (N) (L) UFC Post Fight Show (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (5:30) ‰‰‰ Thor (11) ‰‰‚ Thor: The Dark World (13) Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman. Pose Mothers DayŽ (:45) ‰‰ A Good Day to Die Hard (13) HALL 23 59 185 312 Campfire Kiss (17) Danica McKellar, Paul Greene. The MiddleThe MiddleGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeMy AlohaDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersHunters IntlMy AlohaDream HomeHouse HuntersHunter s Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens: Declassified Conspiracies and EvidenceŽ UFOs; black holes. (N)(:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified UFOs; black holes. LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Closer The Big PictureŽ The Closer Show YourselfŽ(:03) The Closer FlashpointŽ(:03) The Closer (:01) The Closer (12:01) The Closer PARMT 28 48 241 241 FriendsFriends ‰‰ Men in Black II (02) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. ‰‰‚ I, Robot (04) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan, Bruce Greenwood. Tokyo Drift SUN 49 422 656 (6:00) MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at New York Mets. (N) PostgameInside RaysInside RaysInside RaysAfter Midnight With the Rays From July 6, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (5:30) ‰‰ Predators (10) 12 Monkeys (N) (Part 1 of 2)(:04) 12 Monkeys (Part 2 of 2)(:05) Futurama (:34) Futurama (:03) Futurama (:35) FuturamaFuturama (:34) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 Bad Teacher (:45) ‰‰‰ Dumb & Dumber (94) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. ELEAGUE ‰‰‚ Keanu (16) Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰ That Brennan Girl (46) James Dunn.(:45) ‰‰ The Inside Story (48) Marsha Hunt, William Lundigan. ‰‰ City That Never Sleeps (53) Gig Young.(12:15) ‰‰ Trigger Jr (50) TLC 37 40 183 280 90 Day Fianc: Happily Ever After? (N) 90 Day FiancCounting On90 Day Fianc: Happily Ever After?90 Day FiancCounting On TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰ Ant-Man (15) Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly. ‰‰ Green Lantern (11) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard. Castle Hell to PayŽ USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family ‰‰‚ Mamma Mia! (08) WGN-A 13 239 307 M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HEngagementEngagementEngagementEngagement B8 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS

PAGE 17

** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 C1 SPORTS NASCAR | C3JUST AN ABERRATIONForget the Daytona 500 nishes, veterans still rule the show BASEBALL | C2MLB ROUNDUPScores, stats, standings, and leaders from Thursdays games Failure to nd fairways leads to 3-over 73By Pat McCannThe News HeraldSULPHUR SPRING, W.Va. „ The low scores put up by the leaders on Thursday showed what was possible to produce from the fairway in the first round of A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier.Chase Seifferts 3-over par 73 was a prime example of what The Old White TPC course could exact from out of the rough.Webb Simpson led the onslaught on par with a 9-under 61 on the 7,292yard, par 70 layout. Whee Kim brought in 62 and Joaquin Niemann a 63.More concerning for Seiffert was that 87 players in the 156-man PGA field bettered par on Thursday, leaving a very good chance the cut could come as low as 2-under 138 today. Seiffert could have to shot as low as 65 to in his second round to guarantee himself of playing into the weekend.Seiffert is a 26-year-old Bay County pro without status on any tour. He was playing at The Greenbrier due to an exemption he earned from a Top 10 finish in the Travelers Championship two weeks ago. For one day, he couldnt make advanced tournament prepa-ration pay off as he simply could not put his tee shot in play on a number of holes.Seifferts trouble was immediate as he hit errant tee shots on the opening par 4s while pulling his drive well left each time. Both miscues led to bogeys.He easily could have bogeyed the 205-yard par 3 No. 3 when his iron off the tee was well left of even the Sei ert struggles in Greenbrier By Howard FendrichThe Associated PressLONDON „ Garbine Muguruza insisted she wasnt thinking about attempting to collect a second consecutive Wimbledon championship. She was adamant that she was not focusing on defend-ing her title.It doesnt really matter,Ž she would say, what happened in 2017.ŽWell, it seems safe to say shell really want to forget what happened at the All Eng-land Club in 2018. Muguruza was stunned in the second round 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 by 47th-ranked Alison Van Uytvanck of Belgium on Thursday, the latest upset in a series of them at the grass-court major tournament.Its a little bit sad,Ž Mugu-ruza said. But today didnt go my way.ŽThats become a familiar refrain for prominent women at this topsy-turvy Wimbledon.Only two of the top eight seeded women are still in the field after four days of action.17 champ Muguruza, nalist Cilic out at WimbledonFrances Kylian Mbappe celebrates after scoring his sides third goal during their round of 16 match against Argentina, June 30 at the 2018 soccer World Cup at the Kazan Arena in Kazan, Russia. [DAVID VINCENT/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE] By Jerome PugmireThe Associated PressST. PETERSBURG, Russia „ Kylian Mbappe and Thierry Henry both attended Frances Clairefontaine academy before playing as left wing-ers at Monaco, and they both won French league titles as teenagers.Mbappe wants to replicate another one of Henrys accomplishments „ a World Cup title for France in his first tournament.Henry, 40, is Frances lead-ing scorer with 51 goals, the 19-year-old Mbappe is Les Bleus new sensation, with three, matching Henrys total from 1998 and 2006. If Mbappe scores again, France plays Uruguay in Fri-days quarterfinal he would become the first Frenchman since 1958 to score four at a World Cup since Just Fontaines record 13 over six games in 1958.Henry and Mbappe both share the electric pace Fon-taine had, but with a far more rounded game than their illustrious predecessor.I dont really like to com-pare players from different generations, but they have a similar profile, with their speed and ability to beat play-ers,Ž said France coach Didier Deschamps, captain of the 1998 champions. I can only wish Kylian the same career as Thierry.ŽDeschamps said that after Mbappes debut in a quali-fier at Luxembourg in March 2017. He already was hailing Mbappes maturity. His biggest strength is his French connectionI dont really like to compare players from di erent generations, but they have a similar pro le, with their speed and ability to beat players. I can only wish Kylian the same career as Thierry. ... His biggest strength is his composure when hes through on the goalkeeper. Thats very rare at his age, and its why hes so e cient.ŽFrance coach Didier Deschamps, captain of the 1998 World Cup champion teamSee SEIFFERT, C3 See WIMBLEDON, C3 See FRENCH, C3

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** C2 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald AMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 59 29 .670 „ „ 8-2 W-3 28-12 31-17 New York 56 28 .667 1 „ 6-4 W-2 33-13 23-15 Tampa Bay 43 43 .500 15 11 7-3 L-1 23-17 20-26 Toronto 40 46 .465 18 14 5-5 L-1 23-23 17-23 Baltimore 24 62 .279 34 30 1-9 L-3 12-29 12-33 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 48 37 .565 „ „ 6-4 W-4 27-13 21-24 Minnesota 36 48 .429 11 17 2-8 W-1 21-20 15-28 Detroit 38 51 .427 12 18 2-8 L-3 23-22 15-29 Chicago 30 57 .345 19 25 4-6 L-2 16-27 14-30 Kansas City 25 61 .291 23 29 2-8 L-6 11-32 14-29 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 58 31 .652 „ „ 6-4 W-3 26-17 32-14 Seattle 55 32 .632 2 „ 8-2 L-1 29-15 26-17 Oakland 48 39 .552 9 7 8-2 W-2 24-21 24-18 Los Angeles 44 43 .506 13 11 3-7 W-1 20-21 24-22 Texas 39 49 .443 18 16 5-5 W-1 19-28 20-21 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 49 37 .570 „ „ 5-5 L-3 23-17 26-20 Philadelphia 47 37 .560 1 „ 6-4 W-4 30-16 17-21 Washington 43 43 .500 6 5 2-8 W-1 20-23 23-20 New York 34 49 .410 13 12 3-7 W-1 14-26 20-23 Miami 36 53 .404 14 13 4-6 L-1 19-26 17-27 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 52 35 .598 „ „ 7-3 W-4 28-17 24-18 Chicago 49 35 .583 1 „ 7-3 W-6 26-14 23-21 St. Louis 44 41 .518 7 3 5-5 W-1 23-22 21-19 Pittsburgh 40 46 .465 11 8 4-6 L-3 21-21 19-25 Cincinnati 38 49 .437 14 10 6-4 W-1 21-26 17-23 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Arizona 48 39 .552 „ „ 4-6 L-1 24-21 24-18 Los Angeles 47 39 .547 1 6-4 W-4 26-23 21-16 San Francisco 45 43 .511 3 4 6-4 L-3 26-14 19-29 Colorado 44 43 .506 4 4 6-4 W-3 18-22 26-21 San Diego 37 51 .420 11 12 2-8 L-3 19-25 18-26 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLNATIONALS 14, MARLINS 12MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dietrich lf 5 3 2 0 1 2 .289 Anderson rf 4 2 2 3 0 0 .284 Realmuto c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .310 Bour 1b 4 2 2 3 1 2 .238 Prado 3b 5 1 1 3 0 1 .194 Maybin cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Rojas 2b-ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .253 Rivera ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .189 Peters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 e-Holaday ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Lopez p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rucinski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Castro 2b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .296 TOTALS 42 12 14 11 2 10 WASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Turner ss 5 3 3 8 0 0 .280 Soto lf 4 0 2 3 1 0 .312 Rendon 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Harper rf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .213 Adams 1b 5 3 4 0 0 0 .291 Murphy 2b 3 1 0 1 1 0 .191 Taylor cf 3 3 2 0 1 0 .247 Severino c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .170 b-Reynolds ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Kieboom c 1 1 1 1 0 0 .233 Hellickson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Eaton ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .296 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Goodwin ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .182 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Herrera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 33 14 12 14 8 5 MIAMI 160 200 030„12 14 0 WASHINGTON 000 145 40X„14 12 1 a-walked for Rodriguez in the 5th. b-walked for Severino in the 6th. c-struck out for Kelley in the 6th. d-walked for Kintzler in the 7th. e-” ied out for Peters in the 9th. E„Rendon (2). LOB„Miami 7, Washington 4. 2B„Anderson (22), Castro (20), Soto (10), Adams (8). HR„Prado (1), off Hellickson; Bour (14), off Hellickson; Anderson (6), off Herrera; Turner (10), off Lopez; Turner (11), off Conley. RBIs„Anderson 3 (44), Realmuto 2 (40), Bour 3 (40), Prado 3 (6), Turner 8 (37), Soto 3 (24), Murphy (8), Eaton (11), Kieboom (4). SF„Murphy. Runners left in scoring position„Miami 3 (Dietrich, Prado, Maybin); Washington 2 (Rendon 2). RISP„ Miami 4 for 10; Washington 6 for 11. Runners moved up„Anderson, Realmuto. GIDP„ Adams, Murphy. DP„Miami 2 (Rojas, Rivera, Bour), (Rojas, Bour). MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lopez 5 5 5 5 2 3 83 5.73 Conley, L, 2-1, BS, 1-1 .2 2 5 5 4 1 35 3.66 Rucinski .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.18 Peters 2 5 4 4 2 1 37 7.16 WASHINGTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 4 9 9 8 1 2 75 3.81 Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 5.52 Kelley, W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.09 Kintzler, H, 14 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.05 Miller 0 1 2 2 1 0 15 3.57 Herrera 1 1 1 1 0 2 14 1.89 Doolittle, S, 22-23 1 2 0 0 0 2 13 1.49 Miller pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBP„Hellickson (Anderson), Kelley (Realmuto). T„3:15. A„24,314 (41,313).TWINS 5, ORIOLES 2BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Beckham 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .210 Jones cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .287 Machado ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .308 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .152 Valencia rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Schoop 2b 4 2 2 2 0 1 .207 Mancini lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .229 Joseph c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .173 a-Sisco ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .203 TOTALS 31 2 5 2 2 6 MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mauer dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .254 Rosario lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .307 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .218 Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Morrison 1b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .194 Polanco ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .286 Kepler rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .223 Cave cf 3 1 3 1 1 0 .265 Wilson c 4 1 0 0 0 1 .114 TOTALS 34 5 9 4 2 7 BALTIMORE 000 010 100„2 5 1 MINNESOTA 002 100 02X„5 9 0 a-grounded out for Joseph in the 8th. E„Cashner (1). LOB„Baltimore 5, Minnesota 7. 2B„Jones (21), Machado (18), Polanco (2), Kepler (19), Cave 2 (4). HR„Schoop (9), off Slegers; Schoop (10), off Reed; Morrison (10), off Cashner. RBIs„Schoop 2 (23), Rosario (53), Morrison (30), Kepler (30), Cave (8). Runners left in scoring position„Baltimore 3 (Machado, Trumbo 2); Minnesota 4 (Kepler, Wilson 3). RISP„Baltimore 0 for 3; Minnesota 2 for 7. Runners moved up„Polanco. GIDP„Beckham. DP„Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Polanco, Morrison). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner, L, 2-9 6 6 3 2 2 3 107 4.39 Scott 1 0 0 0 0 3 10 6.04 Brach 1 3 2 2 0 1 22 4.05 MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slegers, W, 1-0 6 3 1 1 1 2 72 2.38 Reed, H, 10 1 1 1 1 0 0 20 4.28 Hildenberger, H, 12 1 1 0 0 1 2 16 3.00 Rodney, S, 18-23 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.07 HBP„Slegers (Mancini). T„2:29. A„22,895 (38,649).BREWERS 7, BRAVES 2ATLANTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Inciarte cf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .253 Albies 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .280 F.Freeman 1b 3 0 0 1 1 0 .305 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .319 Flowers c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Camargo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Acuna lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Fried p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Carle p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Winkler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 TOTALS 29 2 3 2 1 9 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Villar 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .258 Yelich rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .289 Aguilar 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .299 Braun lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Perez 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .250 Broxton cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .179 Saladino ss 2 1 1 1 1 0 .319 Kratz c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .235 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .207 a-Orf ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667 TOTALS 28 7 7 6 4 8 ATLANTA 200 000 000„2 3 1 MILWAUKEE 130 000 03X„7 7 0 a-struck out for Chacin in the 7th. b-grounded out for S.Freeman in the 8th. E„Winkler (1). LOB„Atlanta 3, Milwaukee 2. 2B„Albies (28), Villar (9), Yelich (12). 3B„Albies (3), Perez (1). HR„Perez (5), off Winkler. RBIs„Albies (50), F.Freeman (57), Yelich (35), Aguilar (56), Perez 2 (18), Saladino (9), Kratz (6). SB„Villar (12), Broxton (3), Saladino (1). CS„Braun (3). SF„Aguilar. Runners left in scoring position„Atlanta 1 (F.Freeman). RISP„Atlanta 0 for 3; Milwaukee 3 for 7. Runners moved up„F.Freeman, Kratz. GIDP„ Markakis, Villar. DP„Atlanta 1 (Albies, F.Freeman); Milwaukee 1 (Perez, Aguilar). ATLANTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fried, L, .1 3 4 4 4 3 1 60 3.92 Carle 3 0 0 0 0 2 40 2.74 S.Freeman 1 0 0 0 1 3 19 4.75 Winkler 1 3 3 3 0 2 26 3.03 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin, W, 7-3 7 3 2 2 1 7 93 3.63 Jennings, S, 1-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 20 3.38 HBP„Chacin 2 (Inciarte,Acuna). WP„Fried. Umpires„Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, James Hoye; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T„2:45. A„27,557 (41,900).RANGERS 7, TIGERS 5TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. DeShields cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .228 Andrus ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Mazara rf 4 0 0 1 0 0 .271 Beltre dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .233 Profar 3b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .247 Gallo lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .192 Kiner-Falefa c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .255 Guzman 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .244 TOTALS 36 7 8 6 2 6 DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mahtook lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 a-Candelario ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Castellanos rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .305 Goodrum 2b 5 2 1 1 0 1 .241 Hicks c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .284 Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .241 Adduci 1b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .333 Ro.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 3 1 0 1 .179 Iglesias ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Reyes cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .227 TOTALS 38 5 12 5 1 7 TEXAS 022 300 000„7 8 3 DETROIT 000 301 001„5 12 2 a-out on “ elders choice for Mahtook in the 9th. E„Profar (15), Guzman 2 (3), Adduci (1), Ro.Rodriguez (2). LOB„Texas 4, Detroit 7. 2B„Andrus (6), Hicks (11). HR„Gallo (21), off Boyd; Guzman (8), off Boyd; Goodrum (8), off Gallardo. RBIs„Mazara (56), Gallo 2 (48), Kiner-Falefa (24), Guzman 2 (32), Goodrum (27), Hicks (29), Adduci (1), Ro.Rodriguez (2), Reyes (7). SB„Profar (8), Kiner-Falefa (7). CS„Hicks (1). Runners left in scoring position„Texas 1 (DeShields); Detroit 4 (Mahtook, Goodrum, Adduci, Iglesias). RISP„Texas 1 for 4; Detroit 4 for 15. Runners moved up„Mazara, Reyes, Martinez. GIDP„Andrus, Mahtook, Iglesias, Reyes. DP„Texas 4 (Kiner-Falefa, Andrus), (Gallardo, Andrus, Guzman), (Odor, Andrus, Guzman), (Profar, Odor, Guzman); Detroit 1 (Goodrum, Iglesias, Adduci). TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo, W, 3-0 5.1 8 4 3 1 2 92 8.17 Ri.Rdriguez, H, 1 1.2 1 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Diekman, H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.56 Kela, S, 21-21 1 2 1 1 0 1 18 3.48 DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd, L, 4-7 4 7 7 6 0 3 79 4.58 Lewicki 2 1 0 0 1 2 30 4.94 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.62 Stumpf 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.68 Alcantara 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 0.00 T„2:55. A„21,248 (41,297).ASTROS 4, WHITE SOX 3CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .230 Sanchez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .257 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .265 A.Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Palka lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .230 Davidson dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Narvaez c 3 1 2 1 0 0 .263 L.Garcia cf-ss 3 1 1 1 0 2 .280 Anderson ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Engel cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224 TOTALS 31 3 6 3 0 11 HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Springer rf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .250 Bregman ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .278 Altuve 2b 3 1 1 2 2 1 .332 Gurriel 3b 3 0 2 1 2 1 .300 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Reddick lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266 White 1b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .250 Stassi c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .252 a-Kemp ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .301 Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .191 b-Gonzalez ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .230 TOTALS 31 4 8 4 9 9 CHICAGO 000 002 010„3 6 0 HOUSTON 000 020 002„4 8 0 One out when winning run scored. a-walked for Stassi in the 9th. b-singled for Marisnick in the 9th. LOB„Chicago 2, Houston 11. 2B„Sanchez (17), Bregman (28). HR„Narvaez (2), off Verlander; L.Garcia (3), off Devenski; Altuve (8), off Rodon. RBIs„Sanchez (40), Narvaez (11), L.Garcia (17), Springer (43), Altuve 2 (43), Gurriel (40). SB„Anderson (20), Gurriel (3). Runners left in scoring position„Chicago 2 (Sanchez, Abreu); Houston 3 (Springer, Gattis, White). RISP„Chicago 0 for 3; Houston 3 for 11. Runners moved up„Moncada, Gattis. GIDP„ Palka, Gattis, Marisnick. DP„Chicago 2 (Sanchez, Moncada, Abreu), (Sanchez, Moncada, Abreu); Houston 1 (Bregman, White). CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodon 6 5 2 2 6 6 109 4.29 Minaya 1.1 0 0 0 1 1 28 3.71 Cedeno, H, 3 .1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.75 Rondon, H, 5 .1 0 0 0 0 1 6 7.62 Soria, L, 0-3, BS, 3-15 .1 3 2 2 2 1 27 3.00 HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander 7 4 2 2 0 10 107 2.15 Devenski 1 1 1 1 0 1 15 1.78 Smith, W, 3-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 5.23 HBP„Devenski (Anderson). T„3:05. A„34,955 (41,168).STATISTICAL LEADERSAMERICAN LEAGUE RUNS: Lindor, Cleveland, 75; Trout, Los Angeles, 67; Betts, Boston, 66; Judge, New York, 61; Martinez, Boston, 60; Segura, Seattle, 60; Springer, Houston, 60; Benintendi, Boston, 58; Ramirez, Cleveland, 58; Rosario, Minnesota, 57. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 71; Haniger, Seattle, 62; Lowrie, Oakland, 59; Machado, Baltimore, 59; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 58; KDavis, Oakland, 57; Gattis, Houston, 57; Judge, New York, 57; Ramirez, Cleveland, 56; 2 tied at 55. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 115; Segura, Seattle, 110; Castellanos, Detroit, 106; Martinez, Boston, 104; Lindor, Cleveland, 103; Rosario, Minnesota, 101; Machado, Baltimore, 100; Lowrie, Oakland, 97; AJones, Baltimore, 96; Ramirez, Cleveland, 94. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 26; Judge, New York, 24; Ramirez, Cleveland, 24; Trout, Los Angeles, 24; Lindor, Cleveland, 23; Cruz, Seattle, 22; Betts, Boston, 21; Machado, Baltimore, 21; Stanton, New York, 21; 3 tied at 20. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 19; Ramirez, Cleveland, 17; Benintendi, Boston, 16; RDavis, Cleveland, 16; DeShields, Texas, 16; Merri“ eld, Kansas City, 16; Betts, Boston, 15; Smith, Tampa Bay, 15; Segura, Seattle, 14. ERA: Severino, New York, 1.98; Verlander, Houston, 2.12; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.24; Sale, Boston, 2.40; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.45; Morton, Houston, 2.55; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.64; Skaggs, Los Angeles, 2.64; Cole, Houston, 2.70; Sabathia, New York, 3.02. STRIKEOUTS: Sale, Boston, 164; Cole, Houston, 158; Bauer, Cleveland, 156; Paxton, Seattle, 145; Verlander, Houston, 144; Severino, New York, 138; Morton, Houston, 133; Snell, Tampa Bay, 123; Kluber, Cleveland, 120; Berrios, Minnesota, 114. NATIONAL LEAGUE RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 66; Blackmon, Colorado, 63; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 58; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 58; Arenado, Colorado, 57; Pham, St. Louis, 57; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 54; Baez, Chicago, 54; Freeman, Atlanta, 54; 3 tied at 52. RBI: Arenado, Colorado, 63; Suarez, Cincinnati, 63; Baez, Chicago, 61; Story, Colorado, 60; Markakis, Atlanta, 58; Rizzo, Chicago, 58; Gennett, Cincinnati, 57; Freeman, Atlanta, 56; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 55; Kemp, Los Angeles, 55. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 108; Gennett, Cincinnati, 105; Albies, Atlanta, 102; Freeman, Atlanta, 101; Castro, Miami, 100; Arenado, Colorado, 96; Anderson, Miami, 95; Turner, Washington, 94; Story, Colorado, 93; 2 tied at 91. HOME RUNS: Arenado, Colorado, 22; Harper, Washington, 21; Muncy, Los Angeles, 20; Aguilar, Milwaukee, 19; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 19; Albies, Atlanta, 18; 5 tied at 17. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 23; MTaylor, Washington, 23; Turner, Washington, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 18; Cain, Milwaukee, 16; Dyson, Arizona, 16; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 16; Baez, Chicago, 15; Peraza, Cincinnati, 14; 2 tied at 13. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.85; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.02; Scherzer, Washington, 2.16; Lester, Chicago, 2.25; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.40; Mikolas, St. Louis, 2.63; Guerra, Milwaukee, 2.88; Corbin, Arizona, 3.05; Newcomb, Atlanta, 3.11; Freeland, Colorado, 3.25. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 174; Corbin, Arizona, 140; deGrom, New York, 134; Gray, Colorado, 119; Nola, Philadelphia, 116; Greinke, Arizona, 112; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 107; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 107; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 104; Stripling, Los Angeles, 96.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSNationals 14, Marlins 12: Trea Turner hit two homers, including his “ rst career grand slam, and drove in eight runs to help Washington rally from a nine-run de“ cit and defeat Miami in a wild slugfest to end a “ ve-game losing streak. The Nationals, who dropped 17 of their previous 22, have won 12 consecutive games against Miami dating to last season „ their longest winning streak against any team since the franchise moved to Washington in 2005. Twins 5, Orioles 2: Aaron Slegers got his “ rst major league win by “ nished six smooth innings in his “ rst start of the season, and Minnesota stopped their six-game losing streak by hanging on to beat Baltimore. Rangers 7, Tigers 5: Joey Gallo and Ronald Guzman homered as Texas beat Detroit. Yovani Gallardo (3-0) got the win, giving up four runs and eight hits in 5 1/3 innings. He walked one and struck out two while winning his third straight start. Keone Kela allowed a run in the ninth before “ nishing off his 21st save as Texas snapped a three-game losing streak. Brewers 7, Braves 2: Jhoulys Chacin threw seven solid innings and Hernan Perez homered among his three hits, leading Milwaukee over Atlanta in a matchup of “ rst-place teams. Astros 4, White Sox 3: Jose Altuve hit a two-run homer in the “ fth inning and Yuli Gurriels RBI single with one out in a two-run ninth lifted Houston over Chicago. LATE L.A. Angels at Seattle San Diego at Arizona St. Louis at San FranciscoTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISON THIS DATE IN BASEBALLJULY 6 1929: The St. Louis Cardinals scored 10 runs in the “ rst and “ fth innings in beating the Philadelphia Phillies, 28-6, in the second game of a doubleheader. The Cardinals had 28 hits and set an NL record with the 28 runs. 1933: The “ rst major league All-Star game was played at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The AL, managed by Connie Mack, defeated the NL, managed by John McGraw, 4-2 on Babe Ruths two-run homer. 1966: Boog Powell of the Baltimore Orioles knocked in 11 runs in a doubleheader against the Kansas City As to tie an AL record. In the “ rst game, Powell hit two home runs, including a grand slam, two doubles and a sacri“ ce ” y to drive in seven runs as the Orioles won 11-0. Powell had four RBIs in the nightcap. 1983: On the 50th anniversary of the All-Star game, Fred Lynns grand slam off Atlee Hammaker, the “ rst in All-Star competition, capped a record seven-run third inning. The AL also set a one-game record for runs scored in a 13-3 victory that ended an 11-game NL winning streak. Chicagos Comiskey Park was the site, as it was for the “ rst All-Star game in 1933. 1986: Atlantas Bob Horner became the 11th player in major league history to hit four home runs in a game and it still wasnt enough to win the game. The Montreal Expos pounded the Braves pitching staff for an 11-8 victory. 2009: Chase Utley hit a three-run homer and Shane Victorino and Greg Dobbs each had two-run shots during a 10-run “ rst inning, helping the Philadelphia Phillies rout the Cincinnati Reds 22-1. Todays birthdays: Andrew Benintendi 24; Manny Machado 26; Nick Goody 27; Preston Tucker 28. A R t g s, TOP TENAMERICAN LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Betts Bos 68 260 66 88 .338 Altuve Hou 88 346 56 115 .332 Segura Sea 80 333 60 110 .330 JMartinez Bos 83 318 60 104 .327 Simmons LAA 76 282 42 89 .316 MDuffy TB 70 277 26 87 .314 Trout LAA 87 300 67 93 .310 Castellanos Det 85 343 47 106 .309 Rosario Min 82 328 57 101 .308 MMachado Bal 84 325 42 100 .308 NATIONAL LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Gennett Cin 83 317 51 105 .331 Almora ChC 79 249 46 82 .329 Markakis Atl 85 335 52 108 .322 Kemp LAD 82 264 39 84 .318 Arenado Col 81 308 57 96 .312 BCrawford SF 83 294 38 91 .310 Suarez Cin 70 263 43 81 .308 FFreeman Atl 85 328 54 101 .308 Dickerson Pit 77 287 35 87 .303 Belt SF 71 259 39 77 .297 Through July 4NATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Cincinnati Mahle (R) 6-6 3.83 10-7 1-0 16.2 3.24 Chicago Montgomery (L) 1:20p 3-2 3.55 5-2 1-0 17.0 4.24 Miami Straily (R) 3-4 4.70 6-6 1-2 14.2 6.14 Washington Gonzalez (L) 6:05p 6-5 3.77 9-8 0-2 10.0 9.90 Philadelphia Pivetta (R) 5-7 4.66 9-8 0-1 14.0 7.07 Pittsburgh Williams (R) 6:05p 6-6 4.22 8-9 1-2 17.2 3.57 Atlanta Foltynewicz (R) 6-4 2.02 8-8 1-0 15.0 0.60 Milwaukee Peralta (R) 7:10p 3-1 2.28 4-1 2-1 18.0 1.50 San Diego Lucchesi (L) 4-3 3.26 5-7 1-1 10.2 3.38 Arizona Godley (R) 8:40p 9-6 5.07 10-7 2-1 15.0 6.60 St. Louis Gant (R) 2-3 3.92 1-4 1-2 17.2 3.57 San Fran. Rodriguez (R) 9:15p 3-1 3.16 5-1 2-0 18.1 1.96AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA New York Gray (R) 5-6 5.44 7-9 1-2 14.0 7.71 Toronto Gaviglio (R) 6:07p 2-2 3.97 4-4 0-0 15.2 4.60 Oakland Blackburn (R) 2-2 6.46 3-2 1-1 16.1 4.41 Cleveland Carrasco (R) 6:10p 8-5 4.24 8-7 2-1 15.1 2.93 Texas Colon (R) 5-5 4.76 8-7 2-1 18.0 4.00 Detroit Zimmermann (R) 6:10p 3-0 4.10 6-4 1-0 17.0 2.65 Baltimore Bundy (R) 6-7 3.75 7-9 2-0 20.1 2.66 Minnesota Lynn (R) 7:10p 5-7 5.49 6-10 1-2 11.2 8.49 Chicago Lopez (R) 4-5 3.68 6-11 2-1 17.0 5.29 Houston McCullers Jr. (R) 7:10p 9-3 3.55 12-5 1-0 19.0 2.37 Boston Sale (L) 8-4 2.41 10-8 2-0 21.0 0.86 Kansas City Hammel (R) 7:15p 2-10 5.74 4-13 0-3 15.2 9.77INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM LAST THREE STARTS TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Tampa Bay Stanek (R) 1-2 1.98 4-5 0-0 3.2 0.00 Mets (NL) deGrom (R) 6:10p 5-4 1.84 6-11 1-2 20.0 3.15 Dodgers (NL) Maeda (R) 5-5 3.36 7-7 1-1 17.2 2.55 Angels (AL) TBD 9:07p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Colorado Marquez (R) 6-8 5.14 8-9 2-1 17.1 5.19 Seattle Hernandez (R) 9:10p 8-6 5.20 10-8 2-0 16.0 3.94 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. VS OPP-Pitchers record versus this opponent. WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League L.A. Angels 7, Seattle 4 Houston 5, Texas 4, 10 inn. Cleveland 3, Kansas City 2 National League Colorado 1, San Francisco 0 L.A. Dodgers 6, Pittsburgh 4 St. Louis 8, Arizona 4 Interleague Boston 3, Washington 0 N.Y. Yankees 6, Atlanta 2 Miami 3, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Detroit 2 Oakland 4, San Diego 2 Philadelphia 4, Baltimore 1 Milwaukee 3, Minnesota 2 N.Y. Mets 6, Toronto 3 Cincinnati 7, Chicago White Sox 4 SATURDAYS GAMES American League Baltimore at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 3:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Houston, 3:10 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 3:10 p.m. Texas at Detroit, 3:10 p.m. Boston at Kansas City, 6:15 p.m. National League Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 3:05 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 3:10 p.m. Miami at Washington, 6:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 9:10 p.m. Interleague Colorado at Seattle, 3:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Mets, 3:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels, 6:15 p.m.

PAGE 19

** The News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 C3greenside bunkers. A par save from 30 yards kept him at 2-over, and Seiffert made his first birdie with a 348-yard drive to the fairway on No. 6 leading to a 13-foot putt.He bogeyed the par 3 No. 8, however, when he pulled his tee shot into a bunker guarding the left side of the green. After a 90-minute delay because of adverse weather in the area, Seiffert left his second shot in the bunker, then nearly holed out for par before carding his third bogey.Seiffert missed a 6-footer for birdie on No. 9, but that was balanced against an outstanding par save, an up and down from 65 yards on No. 11.A bogey on No. 14, again from the rough took him to 3-over, but pre-ceded a chip-in birdie on the par-3 15 that brought him back to 2.Seiffert found water off the tee on the par 5 No. 17 for his fifth bogey of the day.A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier has a $7.3 million purse. SEIFFERTFrom Page C1 Van Uytvanck, meanwhile, began this week with a 1-4 record at Wimbledon and only one Grand Slam quarterfinal appearance to her name. Muguruza, meanwhile, owns two major titles, including the 2016 French Open, and was the runner-up at the All England Club in 2015.But that didnt matter on this day.Van Uytvanck was aggressive from the base-line, compiling a 29-18 advantage in winners, and broke in seven of Muguru-zas 13 service games. Still, it was not easy finishing off the most significant vic-tory of her career.Inside,Ž the 24-yearold Belgian said, I was, like, dying.ŽThe No. 3-seeded Muguruza joined No. 2 Caroline Wozniacki, No. 4 Sloane Stephens, No. 5 Elina Svitolina, No. 6 Caroline Garcia and No. 8 Petra Kvitova on the way out so far, along with five-time major champion Maria Sharapova. Those departures leave No. 1 Simona Halep, the French Open champion who won in straight sets Thursday, and No. 7 Karolina Pliskova in the field, along with seven-time Wimbledon champion Serena Williams, who is seeded 25th, and five-time champ Venus Williams, who is No. 9.I mean, anyone, on a good day, can beat anyone,Ž Van Uytvanck said. Thats what I think. I still think the top players, their average level is higher than, lets say, sub-top players. But anyone on a good day can beat anyone, for sure.ŽSure seems that way, particularly this week. Among the men, too.Resumes and past per-formances do not matter. At all.Marin Cilic, for example, entered his second-round match with all sorts of advantages in experience and success over his opponent, including a runner-up finish at the All England Club a year ago and a U.S. Open title in 2014.So when Cilic took a two-sets-to-none lead against a guy who began the week with records of 0-2 at Wimbledon and 6-15 at all majors, it appeared the No. 3 seed was on his way to a straightforward victory and a step closer to a potential semifinal rematch against defending champion Roger Federer.Hold that thought. The outcome that seemed obvious vanished, and Cilic is gone, giving away a big edge in a 3-6, 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (3), 7-5 loss to 82nd-ranked Guido Pella of Argentina in a match completed Thursday after being suspended midway through the third set because of rain the eve-ning before. WIMBLEDONFrom Page C1composure when hes through on the goalkeeper,Ž Deschamps said. Thats very rare at his age, and its why hes so efficient.ŽMbappe showed that in a 4-3 win against Argen-tina last Saturday, scoring two clinical second-half goals after earning a first-half penalty kick with an astonishing run from deep inside his own half. Mbappe stole the spot-light from five-time FIFA Player of the Year Lionel Messi, and he emerged as a candidate to join Neymar in the conversa-tion for who is the worlds best player after Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo move on. Mbappe has played as a wide forward and as a central striker for both France and Paris SaintGermain, joining from Monaco last year in a deal worth 180 million euros ($216 million). Playing alongside Neymar and Edinson Cavani in a star-studded attack, he helped PSG win all three domes-tic titles.Like Henry, Mbappe grew up in a Paris suburb: Mbappe in Bondy, Henry in Les Ulis. Mbappe has been active in the community and he says he will donate his World Cup earnings to a charity that organizes sports for children with disabilities.Mbappe scored six goals in his first 19 international games and Henry seven: three at the 1998 World Cup and two when France won the European Championship in 2000.Henrys pro career was launched in 1994 by Monaco coach Arsene Wenger, who brought him to Arsenal from Italian side Juventus five years later. Henry scored at least 20 league goals in six consecutive seasons for Arsenal, and a club record 228 in all competitions for the Gunners. Wenger moved Henry to Monacos first team after Henry scored more than 40 goals the under-17 team in one year.Henry already had a great attitude. He was already mature and didnt need anyone to control him,Ž youth coach Paul Pietri told The Associated Press. He crushed everyone with his physique, his strength. He could carry the attack all by himself, he could do everything.ŽA 76-year-old Corsican now in retirement after nearly 30 years on Monacos staff, Pietri recalled exactly when Henrys natural classŽ first stood out.We went to a tourna-ment in Italy, which we always did at the start of the year,Ž Pietri said. We beat Lazio 5-3, with three goals from Henry. Then we drew 3-3 against AC Milan, with three goals from Henry. I told myself This lad can play with the pros. Wenger took him.ŽBut Pietri adds a note of caution when predict-ing Mbappes future.What we need to see is if Mbappe lasts 15 years. You shouldnt forget Henry is Arsenals leading scorer, the best they ever had,Ž Pietri said.Spains Garbine Muguruza falls trying to return the ball to Alison Van Uytvanck of Belgium, during their womens singles match, on the fourth day at the Wimbledon Championships Thursday in London. [BEN CURTIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] FRENCHFrom Page C1 The Associated PressMOSCOW „ What to watch for in Fridays matchups at the World Cup quarterfinals: Teammates vs. TeammatesThe first match features a number of teammates on their pro-fessional clubs facing off against each other when France takes on Uruguay in Nizhny Novgorod. France for-ward Antoine Griezmann plays at Atletico Madrid alongside Uruguayan defenders Diego Godin and Jose Maria Gimenez; Godin is godfather to Griezmanns daughter. Those ties are so thick that Uruguay striker Luis Suarez needled Griezmann this week for trying to be Uruguayan. Suarez him-self will find a Barcelona teammate on the other side of the pitch in French defender Samuel Umtiti.With so much talent on both sides, the late game in Kazan features even more intrasquad intrigue: Manchester Citys Gabriel Jesus, Fernandinho and Danilo against teammates Vincent Kompany and Kevin De Bruyne of Bel-gium; Brazils Willian against Chelsea teammates Eden Hazard, Michy Batshuayi and Thibaut Courtois, all Belgian; and Belgiums Thomas Meunier against his Brazilian teammates at Paris Saint-Germain „ Marquinhos, Thiago Silva and Neymar. Speed and skill vs. Solid DBelgium is scoring almost a goal a game more than any other team in the tournament, with 12 in four matches. Brazil, to the surprise of some, has allowed just one goal in its four games. Only one other team has been that stingy: Uruguay, which will face a France attack loaded with speed and scorers. In both cases, something will have to give. Neymar being NeymarThe most expensive player in the world has had a strong tournament so far and is the biggest star whose team is still alive. Some think Neymar could even win his first FIFA player of the year award if Brazil wins it all. But hes increasingly catching grief about his flopping, diving and writhing around after minor contact. Will that prompt the referee to give the Belgian defend-ers more leeway, or will Neymar keep getting the calls?First face-o in nals features familiar foesFrance captain Thierry Henry celebrates after scoring a penalty against Austria during their World Cup 2010 qualifying soccer match, in October 2009 at Stade de France in Saint Denis, on the north outskirts of Paris. [FRANCOIS MORI/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE] By Dan GelstonThe Associated PressDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. „ It was the finish NASCAR banked on as the genesis of its ballyhooed youth movement.Austin Dillon and Darrell Wallace Jr. finished 1-2 in the Daytona 500, a promising pair of 20-somethings behind the wheel of iconic car numbers that could excite old-school fans, yet a pair with enough social media savvy that might attract millennials to a sport in dire need of a spark. The kids were coming!Wallace and good buddy Ryan Blaney, Chase Elliott, William Byron and Daniel Suarez were among the relative newcomers in NASCAR who had their images plastered on bill-boards and program covers and hailed as NASCARs version of The Next Big Thing.Yet, at NASCARs halfway point, the series returns this weekend to Daytona Inter-national Speedway with the so-called Young Guns in danger of becoming The Next Big Bust.Theyre not winning races „ or even fans inside their sport.International Speed-way Corp. President John Saunders pinned some of NASCARs woes on the failure of the new crop of drivers that have failed to replace retired stars Dale Earnhardt Jr., Tony Stewart, Jeff Gordon, Carl Edwards and even Danica Patrick in performance or popularity.We still have an issue with star power, and hope-fully this stable of young drivers coming along will start to win and build their brands,Ž Saunders said Thursday.ISC owns tracks in Cali-fornia, Kansas, Virginia, Arizona and Alabama and reported a 10 percent dip in attendance this season for the six races held on its properties from March through May.Weather and travel; ticket prices and event oversaturation; and long, boring races „ all kinds of critical issues and mundane nuisances „ have been blamed for NAS-CARs tumble. Now its Saunders turn to gripe about the dearth of stars, and the drivers have had enough of serving as NASCARs whipping boys.Honestly, this whole young guys need to win now thing is getting old,Ž the 24-year-old Blaney said. Were trying. Were trying our hardest. Its not like I go out there and Im happy for fifth every single week.Any other guy under the age of 25, Ill just say is the same way. Its not a competition here between young guys and old guys. Its a competition between 39 other cars and your-self. No matter what your age is or your experience level, everyone is trying to accomplish the same goal.Ž Wallace threw the criti-cism back at Saunders, saying outdated tracks that fail to keep pace with modern-day amenities are just as much at fault for driving away fans.NASCARs Young Stars tired of blame for sports woesDarrell Wallace Jr. looks up at the sky before a NASCAR Monster Energy Cup series practice at Daytona International Speedway, Thursday in Daytona Beach, Fla. [JOHN RAOUX/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** C4 Friday, July 6, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO MondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m.WednesdayMatinee : Thoroughbred simulcast: Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening : Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 2:05 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Belmont 12:30 p.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. Evening: Ebro live race 6:30 p.m. POKER ROOM … (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. LOCATION … Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION …234-3943. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Chicago -155 Cincinnati +145 at Washington -185 Miami +170 at Pittsburgh -105 Philadelphia -105 at Milwaukee -121 Atlanta +111 at Arizona -139 San Diego +129 at San Francisco -110 St. Louis +100American League New York -144 at Toronto +134 at Cleveland -180 Oakland +165 at Detroit -105 Texas -105 at Minnesota -120 Baltimore +110 at Houston -270 Chicago +240 Boston -300 at Kansas City +270 Interleague at N.Y. Mets -165 Tampa Bay +155 at L.A. Angels Off L.A. Dodgers Off at Seattle -125 Colorado +115Updated Odds Available at Pregame.com PRO BASKETBALL WNBAAll times CentralEASTERN C ONFERENCE W L PCT GB Washington 11 6 .647 „ Connecticut 10 7 .588 1 Atlanta 8 8 .500 2 Chicago 6 11 .353 5 New York 5 13 .278 6 Indiana 2 17 .105 10WESTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT GBPhoenix 13 5 .722 „ Seattle 13 5 .722 „ Los Angeles 12 7 .632 1 Minnesota 11 7 .611 2 Dallas 9 8 .529 3 Las Vegas 6 12 .333 7Wednesdays GamesNone scheduledThursdays GamesDallas 90, Indiana 63 Washington 86, New York 67 Minnesota 83, Los Angeles 72 Connecticut at Phoenix, late Chicago at Las Vegas, lateTodays GameSeattle at Atlanta, 6 p.m.Saturdays GamesWashington at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Connecticut at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m. SOCCER FIFA WORLD CUPAll times Central SECOND ROUND (ROUND OF 16) June 30 At Kazan, RussiaFrance 4, Argentina 3At Sochi, RussiaUruguay 2, Portugal 1July 1 At MoscowRussia 1, Spain 1 (Russia wins 4-3 on penalty kicks)At Nizhny Novgorod, RussiaCroatia 1, Denmark 1 (Croatia wins 3-2 on penalty kicks)July 2 At Samara, RussiaBrazil 2, Mexico 0At Rostov-on-Don, RussiaBelgium 3, Japan 2July 3 At St. Petersburg, RussiaSweden 1, Switzerland 0At MoscowEngland 1, Colombia 1 (England wins 4-3 on penalty kicks)QUARTERFINALS Today At Nizhny Novgorod, RussiaFrance vs. Uruguay, 9 a.m.At Kazan, RussiaBrazil vs. Belgium, 1 p.m.Saturday At Samara, RussiaSweden vs. England, 9 a.m.At Sochi, RussiaRussia vs. Croatia, 1 p.m.SEMIFINALS Tuesday At St. Petersburg, RussiaFrance-Uruguay winner vs. Brazil-Belgium winner, 1 p.m.Wednesday, July 11 At MoscowSweden-England winner vs. Russia-Croatia winner, 1 p.m.THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 14 At St. Petersburg, RussiaSemi“ nals losers, 9 a.m.WORLD CUP CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 15 At MoscowSemi“ nals winners, 10 a.m. TENNIS ATP WORLD TOUR/WTA TOURWIMBLEDONThursdays results from Wimbledon, at The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club, London (seedings in parentheses):Mens Singles Second RoundKaren Khachanov, Russia, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-7 (4), 7-5. Frances Tiafoe, United States, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Kyle Edmund (21), Britain, def. Bradley Klahn, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (0), 6-2. Novak Djokovic (12), Serbia, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3. Nick Kyrgios (15), Australia, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-4, 7-5. Kei Nishikori (24), Japan, def. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 2-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7), 7-5. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Damir Dzumhur (27), Bosnia-Herzego vina, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3, 1-6, 6-3. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 6-1, 6-2. Benoit Paire, France, def. Denis Shapovalov (26), Canada, 0-6, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Gilles Simon, France, def. Matteo Berrettini, Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Stephane Robert, France, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-1. Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Diego Schwartzman (14), Argentina, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Fabio Fognini (19), Italy, def. Simone Bolelli, Italy, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1. Alex De Minaur, Australia, def. Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, 6-2, 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-3. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.Womens Singles Second Round Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Saisai Zheng, China, 7-5, 6-0. Su-Wei Hsieh, Taiwan, def. Lara ArruabarrenaVecino, Spain, 6-3, 6-3. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Johanna Konta (22), Britain, 6-3, 6-4. Elise Mertens (15), Belgium, def. Sachia Vickery, United States, 6-1, 6-3. Jelena Ostapenko (12), Latvia, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-1, 6-3. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, def. So“ a Kenin, United States, 6-4, 6-1. Daria Gavrilova (26), Australia, def. Samantha Stosur, Australia, 6-4, 6-1. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, def. Taylor Townsend, United States, 6-0, 6-4. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Garbine Muguruza (3), Spain, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1. Anett Kontaveit (28), Estonia, def. Jennifer Brady, United States, 6-2, 7-6 (4). Ashleigh Barty (17), Australia, def. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, 6-4, 7-5. Daria Kasatkina (14), Russia, def. Yulia Putintseva, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-3. Angelique Kerber (11), Germany, def. Claire Liu, United States, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4. Naomi Osaka (18), Japan, def. Katie Boulter, Britain, 6-3, 6-4. Carla Suarez-Navarro (27), Spain, def. Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, 6-4, 6-1. Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, def. Alison Riske, United States, 1-6, 7-6 (10), 6-2. Barbora Strycova (23), Czech Republic, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-4. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, def. Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, 5-7, 6-4, 9-7.Mens Doubles First Round Leonardo Mayer, Argentina and Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. Fernando Verdasco, Spain and David Marrero Santana, Spain, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 6-7 (7), 6-1. Philipp Petzschner, Germany and Tim Puetz, Germany, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada and Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (8), 6-2. Vishnu Vardhan, India and N. Sriram Balaji, India, def. Wesley Koolhof, Netherlands and Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, 7-6 (5), 6-4, 7-6 (4). Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany and Ben Mclachlan (14), Japan, def. Nicholas Monroe, United States and John-Patrick Smith, Australia, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France and Rohan Bopanna (12), India, def. John Millman, Australia and Alex De Minaur, Australia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4. Frederik Nielsen, Denmark and Joe Salisbury, Britain, def. Julien Benneteau, France and Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-4, 1-0, ret. Robert Farah, Colombia and Juan Sebastian Cabal (6), Colombia, def. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain and Pablo Carreno-Busta, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (10), 2-6, 6-1. Alexander Peya, Austria and Nikola Mektic (8), Croatia, def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria and Daniel Nestor, Canada, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico and Marcelo Demoliner, Brazil, def. Marius Copil, Romania and Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Mike Bryan, United States and Jack Sock (7), United States, def. Daniele Bracciali, Italy and Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 2-0, ret. Matwe Middelkoop, Netherlands and Sander Arends, Netherlands, def. Austin Krajicek, United States and Jeevan Nedunchezhiyan, India, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3), 7-6 (2). Kevin Krawietz, Germany and Andreas Mies, Germany, def. James Cerretini, United States and Romain Arneodo, Monaco, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3. Artem Sitak, New Zealand and Divij Sharan, India, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia and Radu Albot, Moldova, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (8), 6-3, 6-2.Womens Doubles First Round Kristina Mladenovic, France and Timea Babos (1), Hungary, def. Miyu Kato, Japan and Eri Hozumi, Japan, 6-4, 6-3. Johanna Larsson, Sweden and Kiki Bertens (9), Netherlands, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic and Monique Adamczak, Australia, 6-2, 6-3. Arina Rodionova, Australia and Maryna Zanevska, Belgium, def. Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia and Makoto Ninomiya, Japan, 6-4, 6-2. Abigail Spears, United States and Alicja Rosolska, Poland, def. Eva Hrdinova, Czech Republic and Giuliana Olmos, Mexico, 6-1, 6-4. Shuai Peng, China and Latisha Chan (5), Taiwan, def. Jimmy Wang, Taiwan and Raluca-Ioana Olaru, Romania, 7-5, 6-3. Barbora Krejcikova, Czech Republic and Katerina Siniakova (3), Czech Republic, def. Alexa Guarachi Mathison, Chile and Erin Routliffe, New Zealand, 6-2, 2-6, 6-2. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany and Raquel Atawo (11), United States, def. Anna Smith, Britain and Xenia Knoll, Switzerland, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Tatjana Maria, Germany and Heather Watson, Britain, def. Shuai Zhang, China and Chen Liang, China, 6-2, 6-2. Vera Zvonareva, Russia and Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic and Anna Blinkova, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania and Irina Begu (15), Romania, def. Daria Gavrilova, Australia and Vera Lapko, Belarus, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia and Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Lidziya Marozava, Belarus and Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, 7-5, 6-3. Katarina Srebotnik, Slovenia and Vania King, United States, def. Irina Khromacheva, Russia and Dalila Jakupovic, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-2. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States and Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia and Lyudm yla Kichenok (16), Ukraine, 7-6 (6), 7-5. Katy Dunne, Britain and Harriet Dart, Britain, def. Katerina Bondarenko, Ukraine and Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia, 6-1, 6-3. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic and Andrea Sestini Hlavackova (2), Czech Republic, def. Pere Riba, Spain and Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. GOLF PGA TOURA MILITARY TRIBUTE AT THE GREENBRIERThursdays leaders at The Greenbrier (The Old White TPC), White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $7.3 million. Yardage: 7,286; Par: 70 (34-36)First RoundWebb Simpson 31-30„61 Whee Kim 30-32„62 Joaquin Niemann 32-31„63 Kelly Kraft 31-33„64 Keegan Bradley 34-31„65 J.J. Henry 32-33„65 Jason Kokrak 33-32„65 Chad Campbell 31-34„65 Steve Wheatcroft 33-33„66 Tom Hoge 33-33„66 Austin Cook 29-37„66 Xander Schauffele 31-35„66 Ryan Moore 31-35„66 Billy Hurley III 32-34„66 Ollie Schniederjans 34-32„66 Harold Varner III 32-34„66 Robert Streb 30-36„66 Zecheng Dou 35-31„66 David Lingmerth 33-33„66 Kevin Chappell 32-34„66 Phil Mickelson 34-32„66 Brandt Snedeker 33-33„66 Stephan Jaeger 32-34„66 Steve Marino 33-34„67 Danny Lee 34-33„67 Fabian Gomez 34-33„67 Dominic Bozzelli 32-35„67 Abraham Ancer 36-31„67 Cameron Percy 33-34„67 Joel Dahmen 32-35„67 Blayne Barber 32-35„67 Jonathan Randolph 32-35„67 Brett Stegmaier 33-34„67 Anirban Lahiri 33-34„67 Corey Conners 32-35„67 Harris English 34-33„67 Ryan Armour 31-36„67 Peter Malnati 33-34„67 Brian Harman 34-33„67 Tony Finau 31-36„67 Jamie Lovemark 33-34„67 Bronson Burgoon 32-35„67 Denny McCarthy 34-33„67 Sam Saunders 34-34„68 J.J. Spaun 34-34„68 John Merrick 33-35„68 James Hahn 33-35„68 Jim Furyk 34-34„68 Charles Howell III 32-36„68 Bubba Watson 34-34„68 Tyrone Van Aswegen 32-36„68 Michael Thompson 32-36„68 Ben Silverman 33-35„68 Adam Schenk 34-34„68 Martin Piller 35-33„68 Tyler Duncan 36-32„68 David Hearn 34-34„68 Zac Blair 34-34„68 Alex Cejka 33-35„68 Russell Henley 32-36„68 Johnson Wagner 34-34„68 Ryan Blaum 31-37„68 John Peterson 35-33„68 Andrew Putnam 34-35„69 Brice Garnett 33-36„69 Mackenzie Hughes 35-34„69 Matt Every 34-35„69 Dicky Pride 34-35„69 Bill Haas 34-35„69 Ben Crane 35-34„69 Norman Xiong 33-36„69 T.J. Vogel 33-36„69 Wes Homan 33-36„69 J.T. Poston 35-34„69 Keith Mitchell 32-37„69 William McGirt 34-35„69 Nick Watney 31-38„69 Wesley Bryan 34-35„69 Vijay Singh 34-35„69 Kevin Kisner 33-36„69 Hudson Swafford 34-35„69 Kevin Na 34-35„69 Talor Gooch 30-39„69 Rory Sabbatini 32-37„69 Lanto Grif“ n 32-37„69 Ethan Tracy 32-37„69 Will Claxton 33-36„69 Scott Brown 36-34„70 Seamus Power 36-34„70 Scott Piercy 36-34„70 Jonas Blixt 36-34„70 Aaron Wise 35-35„70 Patton Kizzire 32-38„70 Brian Gay 33-37„70 Steven Bowditch 33-37„70 Derek Fathauer 35-35„70 Blake Taylor 37-33„70 Tommy Gainey 33-37„70 J.B. Holmes 35-35„70 Patrick Rodgers 35-35„70 Scott Stallings 36-34„70 Nicholas Lindheim 34-36„70 David S. Bradshaw 33-37„70 Tom Lovelady 34-36„70 Roberto Diaz 34-36„70 Sam Ryder 38-32„70 Logan Lagodich 33-37„70 Jason Gore 33-38„71 Richy Werenski 36-35„71 Stuart Appleby 34-37„71 Parker McLachlin 36-35„71 Michael Kim 37-34„71 Vaughn Taylor 33-38„71 Jonathan Byrd 34-37„71 Andrew Yun 35-36„71 Omar Uresti 36-35„71 Rob Oppenheim 33-38„71 George McNeill 35-36„71 Trey Mullinax 37-34„71 Nick Taylor 37-34„71 Daniel Summerhays 32-39„71 Cameron Tringale 33-38„71 C.T. Pan 34-37„71 Ken Duke 36-35„71 Chris Couch 34-37„71 Xinjun Zhang 33-38„71 AUTO RACING UPCOMING RACESAll times CentralNASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUP COKE ZERO SUGAR 400Site: Daytona Beach, Florida. Schedule: Thursday, practice, 1:05 & 3:05 p.m. (NBCSN); today, qualifying, 3:10 p.m. (NBCSN); Saturday, race, 6 p.m., NBCSN. Track: Daytona International Speedway (oval, 2.5 miles). Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps. Last year: Ricky Stenhouse Jr. won after starting sixth. Last race: Kyle Busch took the checkered ” ag at Chicagoland for the “ fth time in 2018. Fast facts: Busch and Kevin Harvick each have “ ve wins in their “ rst 17 starts of the season. Thats only happened one other time since 1977, as Denny Hamlin and Jimmie Johnson had “ ve victories by this point in the season in 2010. ...The last six races at Daytona have been determined by less than a half-second, and a 2007 race was the third closest since the inception of electronic scoring and timing. Jamie McMurray beat Kyle Busch by 0.005 seconds 11 years ago. ... William Byron leads Bubba Wallace by 37 points in the rookie of the year standings. Next race: Quaker State 400, July 14, Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Kentucky. Online: www.nascar.comNASCAR XFINITY COCA-COLA FIRECRACKER 250Site: Daytona Beach, Florida Schedule: Thursday, practice, 12:05 & 2:05 p.m. (NBCSN); today, qualifying, 1:10 p.m. (NBCSN), race, 6:30 p.m., NBCSN. Track: Daytona International Speedway. Race distance: 250 miles, 100 laps. Last year: William Byron won at Daytona, his second straight victory. Last race: Kyle Larson won at Chicagoland from the pole. Fast facts: The last six series races at Daytona have produced six different winners. ...JR Motorsports has taken “ rst in “ ve of the last nine events at the track, including Tyler Reddick earlier this season. ...Cole Custer is atop the series standings for the “ rst time in his career. Custer is three points ahead of Daniel Hemric and four points better than Elliott Sadler. ...Justin Haley will make his series debut in the No. 23 Chevrolet for GMS Racing. Next race: Alsco 300, July 13, Kentucky Speedway. Online: www.nascar.com NASCAR CAMPING WORLD TRUCKLast race: Brett Mof“ tt won for the second time in three starts at Chicagoland. Next race: Buckle Up in Your Truck 225, July 12, Kentucky Speedway. Online: www.nascar.com VERIZON INDYCAR IOWA CORN 300Site: Newton, Iowa Schedule: Saturday, practice, 10:15 a.m., qualifying, 2:30 p.m. (NBCSN), practice, 5:45 p.m.; Sunday, race, 1 p.m., NBCSN. Track: Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.894 miles) Race distance: 268.2 miles, 300 laps. Last year: Former series star Helio Castroneves took “ rst at Iowa. Last race: Josef Newgarden won for the third time in 2018 at Road America. Fast facts: Iowa will be the fourth oval race of the season. Newgarden (Phoenix), Will Power (Indianapolis) and Scott Dixon (Texas) won the “ rst three. ... Ryan Hunter-Reay is the only active driver to take “ rst at Iowa more than once. He won in 2012, 2014 and 2015. ... No pole sitter has won in Newton in 11 tries. ... Matheus Leist took the Indy Lights race at Iowa in 2017 after starting 10th. Next race: Honda Indy Toronto, July 15, Streets of Toronto, Toronto. Online: www.indycar.com FORMULA ONE BRITISH GRAND PRIXSite: Silverstone, England Schedule: Today, practice, 4 & 8 a.m.; Saturday, practice, 5 a.m., qualifying, 8 a.m.; Sunday, race, 8:10 a.m. Track: Silverstone Circuit (3.66 miles). Race distance: 190.3 miles, 52 laps. Last year: Lewis Hamilton won from the pole on his home track. Last race: Max Verstappen won his “ rst race of the season in Austria. Fast facts: Hamilton, Valterri Bottas and Daniel Ricciardo were among six drivers whose races ended early last week. Those issues helped shake up the standings, with Sebastian Vettel vaulting over Hamilton for “ rst place. But Vettels lead is by just one point (146-145). ... McLaren racing director Eric Boullier resigned this week after the team notched just four points in the last four races. Next race: German Grand Prix, July 22, Hockenheimring, Hockenheim, Germany. Online: www.formula1.com NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACING NEW ENGLAND NATIONALSSite: Epping, New Hampshire. Schedule: Today, qualifying, 4 & 6:30 p.m.; Saturday, qualifying, 1 & 3:30 p.m.; Sunday, “ nals, 2:37 p.m. Track: New England Dragway Last year: Brittany Force won in New Hampshire in early June 2017. Last race: Blake Alexander claimed his “ rst career win in Top Fuel in Ohio. Fast facts: Alexander quali“ ed 12th and beat Antron Brown, Tony Schumacher and Leah Pritchett before entering his second career “ nal round, where he took down Terry McMillen. ... Matt Hagan (Funny Car), Tanner Gray (Pro Stock) and Eddie Krawiec (Pro Stock Motorcycle) also claimed victories in Norwalk two weeks ago. It was the second win of the season for Hagan, a two-time world champion. Next race: Mile High Nationals, July 20-22, Bandimere Speedway, Morrison, Colorado. Online: www.nhra.com TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBALTIMORE ORIOLES „ Recalled OF Joey Rickard from Norfolk (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX „ Signed SS Nick Madrigal, RHPs Davis Martin and Jason Morgan and 3B Bryce Bush to minor league contracts. CLEVELAND INDIANS „ Sent LHP Tyler Olson to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment. DETROIT TIGERS „ Designated 2B Dixon Machado for assignment. Optioned RHP Warwick Saupold to Toledo (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Victor Alcantara from Toledo. Recalled 3B Ronny Rodriguez from Toledo. Signed LHP Kory Behenna to a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS „ Placed RHP Ian Kennedy on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Trevor Oaks from Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS „ Optioned OF Jobari Blash to Salt Lake (PCL). Reinstated INF Jefry Marte from the 10-day DL. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Optioned LHP Gabriel Moya to Rochester (IL). Released RHP Felix Jorge. Recalled RHP Aaron Slegers from Rochester. Signed OF Trevor Larnach to a minor league contract and assigned him to Elizabethton (Appalachian). OAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Named Vince Vengapally vice president of technology. SEATTLE MARINERS „ Released LHP Ariel Miranda. Signed LHP Wade LeBlanc to a oneyear contract for the 2019 season. TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Placed LHP Vidal Nuno on the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Austin Pruitt to Durham (IL). Selected the contract of RHP Ryan Weber from Durham. Recalled RHP Andrew Kittredge from Durham. Transferred RHP Wilmer Font to the 60-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS „ Placed RHP Chris Martin on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Ricardo Rodriguez from Round Rock (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS „ Optioned LHP Tim Mayza to Buffalo (IL). Designated RHP Preston Guilmet for assignment. Selected the contracts of RHPs Luis Santos and Rhiner Cruz from Buffalo. Signed SS Orelvis Martinez and RHPs Zach Stewart and Brandon Cumpton to a minor league contract.National LeagueCHICAGO CUBS „ Signed LHP James Buckelew to a minor league contract. CINCINNATI REDS „ Optioned LHP Cody Reed to Louisville (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS „ Designated RHP Daniel Corcino for assignment. MIAMI MARLINS „ Designated OF JB Shuck for assignment. Placed RHP Tayron Guerrero on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Reinstated RHP Jose Urena and 3B Martin Prado from the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Ben Meyer from New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS „ Activated INF Tyler Saladino from the 10-day DL. Designated INF Eric Sogard for assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES „ Sent C Francisco Cervelli to Altoona (EL) for a rehab assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS „ Optioned INF Kelby Tomlinson to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated RHP Johnny Cueto from the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS „ Assigned LHP Tim Collins outright to Syracuse (IL). Placed RHP Erick Fedde on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Jefry Rodriguez from Syracuse (IL).American AssociationCHICAGO DOGS „ Signed RHP Brandon T. White. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS „ Signed RHP Christian Herstine. KANSAS CITY T-BONES „ Signed RHP Kevin Hill. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES „ Released RHP James Jones.Can-Am LeagueOTTAWA CHAMPIONS „ Signed RHP Alex Vargas. SUSSEX COUNTY MINERS „ Released OF Alex Glenn.Frontier LeagueEVANSVILLE OTTERS „ Sold the contract of RHP Luc Rennie to the N.Y. Mets. GATEWAY GRIZZLIES „ Acquired OF John Price, Jr. from Gary SouthShore (AA). LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS „ Signed RHP Micah Beyer. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS „ Signed INF Michael Hartnagel. WASHINGTON WILD THINGS „ Signed LHP B.J. Sabol.BASKETBALLNational Basketball AssociationBOSTON CELTICS „ Signed F/C Robert Williams. NEW YORK KNICKS „ Signed F Kevin Knox to a multiyear contract.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueANAHEIM DUCKS „ Signed D Andrej Sustr to a one-year contract. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS „ Signed F Boone Jenner to a four-year contract extension. NEW YORK ISLANDERS „ Agreed to terms with G Jakub Skarek on a three-year, entry-level contract. Named Lane Lambert associate coach. ST. LOUIS BLUES „ Signed F Robby Fabbri to a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING „ Re-signed F Cedric Paquette to a one-year contract.ECHLIDAHO STEELHEADS „ Agreed to terms with G Tomas Sholl on a one-year contract. READING ROYALS „ Agreed to terms with D Nick Neville on a one-year contract. SCOREBOARD ON THE AIR IN BRIEFToday AUTO RACING 7:55 a.m. ESPNU „ Formula One, British Grand Prix, practice, at Silverstone, England 1 p.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Coca-Cola Firecracker 250, qualifying, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 3 p.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Coke Zero Sugar 400, qualifying, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 6:30 p.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, CocaCola Firecracker 250, at Daytona Beach, Fla. BASKETBALL 7 p.m. FOX „ Big3, Week 3 games, at Oakland, Calif. GOLF 4:30 a.m. GOLF „ European PGA Tour, Dubai Duty Free Irish Open, second round, at Donegal, Ireland 12:30 p.m. GOLF „ Web.com Tour, LECOM Health Challenge, second round, at Clymer, N.Y. 2:30 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier Classic, second round, at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 5:30 p.m. GOLF „ LPGA Tour, Thornberry Creek LPGA Classic, second round, at Oneida, Wis. MLB 1 p.m. MLB „ Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs 6 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, Philadelphia at Pittsburgh OR Oakland at Cleveland NBA 2 p.m. NBA „ Summer League, Houston vs. Indiana, at Las Vegas 2:30 p.m. ESPNU „ Summer League, Toronto vs. New Orleans, at Las Vegas 4 p.m. NBA „ Summer League, Brooklyn vs. Orlando, at Las Vegas 4:30 p.m. ESPNU „ Summer League, Oklahoma City vs. Charlotte, at Las Vegas 6 p.m. NBA „ Summer League, Milwaukee vs. Detroit, at Las Vegas 6:30 p.m. ESPN „ Summer League, Boston vs. Philadelphia, at Las Vegas 8 p.m. NBA „ Summer League, Cleveland vs. Washington, at Las Vegas 8:30 p.m. ESPN „ Summer League, Dallas vs. Phoenix, at Las Vegas 10 p.m. NBA „ Summer League, Denver vs. Minnesota, at Las Vegas 10:30 p.m. ESPN „ Summer League, L.A. Clippers vs. Golden State, at Las Vegas SOCCER 9 a.m. FS1 „ FIFA World Cup, quarter“ nal, Uruguay vs. France, at Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 1 p.m. FS1 „ FIFA World Cup, quarter“ nal, Brazil vs. Belgium, at Kazan, Russia SPECIAL OLYMPICS 5 p.m. ESPN2 „ 2018 Special Olympics USA Games, at Seattle SPECIALS 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ 2018 World Series of Poker, Main Event, at Las Vegas TENNIS 6 a.m. ESPN „ Wimbledon Championships, third round, at London ATHENS, GA.Georgia QB Fromm has broken bone in handGeorgia quarterback Jake Fromm has a broken bone in his left hand but isnt expected to miss any summer workouts.School athletics spokesman Leland Barrow said Thursday that Fromm has a small fractureŽ in his nonthrowing hand, though he is already throwing the football.Barrow didnt have details on how Fromm was injured, while coach Kirby Smart told ESPN on Wednesday that the injury happened earlier this week.Fromm won the start-ing job as a freshman last season and led the Bulldogs to the Southeastern Conference championship before losing in overtime to Alabama for the national championship.MONTREALHabs defenseman Weber out after knee surgeryMontreal Canadiens defenseman Shea Weber will be out for an extended period after undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his right knee.The Canadiens said Thursday that Webers recovery time is expected to be five to six months, meaning he wont be suiting up until December at the earliest.Its the second surgery this year for Weber, who had a torn tendon in his left foot repaired in March.Team surgeon Dr. David Mulder said the damage to Webers knee was discovered last month as part of his rehabilitation from foot surgery.The 32-year-old Weber said earlier this year that his foot injury occurred in Montreals season opener against the Buffalo Sabres.He continued to play with the torn tendon until a Dec. 16 game in Ottawa, when he real-ized the situation wasnt improving. Weber had six goals and 10 assists in 26 games despite the injury.COLUMBUS, OHIOBlue Jackets give Jenner four-year, $15M contractThe Columbus Blue Jackets re-signed forward Boone Jenner to a four-year, $15 million contract, locking up a player who has been a stalwart presence in the teams emergence as a playoff contender.The Blue Jackets announced the deal on Thursday. The contract pays the 25-year-old Jenner $3.75 million annually through the 2021-22 season, accord-ing to a person with direct knowledge of the contract who spoke to The Associ-ated Press on condition of anonymity because the Blue Jackets didnt reveal the value of the deal. The Associated Press

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 C C 5 5 20847 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 18000186CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. JOEL H. SANDERS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN PARTY # 1; UNKNOWN PARTY # 2; UNKNOWN PARTY # 3; UNKNOWN PARTY # 4, THE NAMES BEING FICTITIOUS TO ACCOUNT FOR PARTIES IN POSSESSION; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): JOEL H. SANDERS 925 BAY AVE PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA 32401 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: THE EAST HALF OF LOT 20, BLOCK 4 OF BAYOU PLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 13, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 925 BAY AVE, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA 32401 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE NEWS HERALD and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 8th day of June, 2018. BILL KINSAUL As Clerk of the Court By: Debbie Roberson As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486, Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com Pub: June 29, July 6, 2018 20855 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2018-CP-000421 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF LEONARD VANE CARROLL, JR., a/k/a Leonard V. Carroll, Jr., a/k/a L. Vane Carroll, Jr., Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LEONARD VANE CARROLL, JR., deceased, whose date of death was December 24, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is, 300 E. Fourth Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first publication date of this notice is June 29, 2018 NANCY F. WEEKS 3982 Fugler Loop NE Sontag, MS 39665 Personal Representative H. BART FLEET Florida Bar No.: 0606900 FLEET & SMITH 1283 N. Eglin Parkway, Suite A Shalimar, FL 32579 (850) 651-4006 / (850) 651-5006 Fax bart@fleetsmithlaw .co m ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Pub: June 29, July 6, 2018 20895 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF EIOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA JOHNNY FITZPATRICK HELMS, III, PLAINTIFF, VS AMBER KADIJAH HELMS, DEFENDANT. NOTICE OF COMPLAINT FOR DIVORCE AMBER KADIJAH HELMS, WHOSE WHEREABOUTS ARE UNKNOWN, MUST ANSWER JOHNNY FITZPATRICK HELMS III’S COMPLAINT FOR DIVORCE AND OTHER RELIEF BY A UGUST 24, 2018 OR, THEREAFTER, A JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT MAY BE RENDERED AGAINST HER N CASE NO. DR 2018-000193 CIRCUIT COURT OF HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA. DONE THIS 19th DAY OF JUNE, 2018. CARLA WOODALL CLERK CIRCUIT COURT HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA DAVID A. JONES P.O. BOX 536 DOTHAN, AL 36302 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Pub: June 29, July 6, 13, 20, 2018 20861 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: The personal property, household goods, and contents of the following rental spaces will be sold for cash or otherwise disposed of to satisfy liens for unpaid rent in accordance with Florida Statute Chapter 83, Section 801 et seq. Call for info.20861 On July 16, 2018 at 3:30pm At Southern Self Storage -Panama City Beach 18436 Panama City Bch Pkwy Panama City Beach, FL 32413 850-588-2767 Name: Maureen Baker Space No: C121 Contents : Household Items Pub: June 29, July 6, 2018 20929 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18000310CA CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC., Plaintiff, vs. SAMUEL J. CUMBEST; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL J. CUMBEST;, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, et.al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: SAMUEL J. CUMBEST (Current Residence Unknown) (Last Known Address(es)) 607 KRYSTAL LN LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444 4256 LIDDON ST MARIANNA, FL 32446 2601 BRUCE AVE PANAMA CITY, FL 32408 UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 (Last Known Address) 607 KRYSTAL LN LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444 ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, INCLUDING, IF A NAMED DEFENDANT IS DECEASED, THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING, BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS (Last Known Address) 607 KRYSTAL LN LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK “E” BELAIRE ESTATES, UNIT SIX, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 125, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A: 607 KRYSTAL LN, LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, POPKIN & ROSALER, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442., Attorney for Plaintiff, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the (Please publish in News Herald) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P. O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850) 747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711 OR EMAIL ADAREQUEST@JUD14 .FLCOURTS.ORG. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 18th day of June, 2018. BILL KINSAUL As Clerk of the Court By: Jennifer Sullivan As Deputy Clerk Pub: June 29, July 6, 2018 20988 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 03-2017-CA-000709 MIDFIRST BANK. Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN M. PURSER, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: GALE L. PURSER AKA GALE LOUISE WOLBERT, 8210 WOODLEIGH ROAD, YOUNGSTOWN, FL 32466 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST, AND THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 22, 1875.58 FEET TO THE NORTH S*DE OF A 60 FOOT STREET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF SAID STREET, 960.02 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE OF A 60 FOOT STREET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID STREET, 250 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT; THENCE CONTINUING NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID STREET, 130 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST, 300 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 130 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST, 300 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT. SAID LOT BEING IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 6 6 Friday, July 6, 2018| The News Herald Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen Adult/Child Care Manager needed to provide case management services in our Apalachicola and Bristol Florida Offices. Requirements: *Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services field and 1 year of mental health experience with adults and children required. Bachelor’s Degree in non-related field acceptable with 3 years of mental health experience with adults and children. *Official transcripts required. *Valid Driver’s License with no more than 6 points over 3 years. $15.40 per hour (includes location differential) Please apply at www.apalacheecenter.org or call Stephanie Luckie at 850-523-3212 or email at stephaniel@apalacheecenter .org for details. The Panama City News Herald is in need of aSingle Copy Independent ContractorFor the Panama City/Lynn Haven/Southport area. This person will deliver papers to our coin operated racks as well as our inside store locations. Must have a dependable vehicle, and be able to work early hours 7 days a week. This is a good opportunity for someone wanting to earn extra cash. Come by 501 W. 11th St. in Panama City & complete an application or email: sfristoe@pcnh.com Where Everybody Knows Your Name! Join Our Team Today! Experience Preffered for Servers, Cooks, Expeditors, Bussers, & Shuckers. Send Resume To: harrisbama30@aol.com And/ Or Apply In Person At: 275 South Hwy. 79 SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1.3 WEST, A/K/A THE SOUTH 130 FEET OF LOT THREE (3), BLOCK “G”, FLORIBAY EAST. PARCEL NUMBER: 05452-416-000 has been flied against you and you are required to file a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Amelia Hallenberg Beard, McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St. Suite 155, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court 30 days from the fist publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 20th day of June, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Debbie Roberson Deputy Clerk Pub June 29, July 6, 2018 21041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 18000330CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR REGISTERED HOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-2, Plaintiff, VS. JOHN SHANNONHOUSE; et al, Defendants. TO: John R. Shannonhouse 1419 Inverness Rd Lynn Haven, FL 32444 Mary S. Shannonhouse 1419 Inverness Rd Lynn Haven, FL 32444 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to wit: LOT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF MOWAT HIGHLANDS PHASE X AMENDED PLAT, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 17, PAGES 54 AND 55, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jennifer Ngoie, Esq., Lender Legal Services, LLC, 201 East Pine Street, Suite 730, Orlando, Florida 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of the said Court on the 26th day of June, 2018 Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850-747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: AD ARequest@jud14.fic ourts.org BILL KINSAUL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Debbie Roberson Deputy Clerk Lender Legal Services, LLC 201 East Pine Street, Suite 730 Orlando, Florida 32801Pub: July 6, 13, 2018 21054 NOTICE OF LIEN PURSUANT TO FL FAC.ACT 83.806 Ed’s Sheds of PCB, LLC 8224 P.C.Bch., Pkwy, PCB, FL 32407 will Enforce a Storage Lien against the following units due to non-pm.t of rent and/or related charges. Said contents will become the sole property of Ed’s Sheds of PCB, LLC Tenants may redeem the contents of their units by paying Bal. Due Pmt. in full cash only accepted. # 09 Larita Calvert # 18 Jarrad L. Hauser # 31 Steven B. Jones # 36 Jay M. Vickery # 43 Tonya Heverly # 47 Christian M Smith # 48 Billy F Hansen # 70 Corrine M Chaput # 71 Corey Z Jordan # 79 Krystal Glasscock # 98 Dustin Sliva/David Brannon/Bottom’s Up Cleaning & Detailing #103/104 Henry Collier #105 Sarah Barwick #112 Stephanie Squires #123 Melody Olivadese/ Marsha Cupp #126 Henry Collier # 131 S Brooks # 134 S Brooks # 132 Michael Wing #141 Amy L Giles #165 Kyle R Culley # 167 C. Cook #199 J. Robinson Tom’s Hot Dogs #205 Ryland S Mitchell # 212 William White # 213 Nora Maxwell # 226 Marissa/Mark Watson #243 Tonya Heverly #254 Geronimo Cornejo # 262 Iris/Richard Anderson #294 John D Wilson #307 Christian M Smith #309 Christian M Smith #351 Kimberly/Kenneth Cole # 352 Kelly Brown #400 Michael F Wing #403 Kenneth E Broome #408 Marcus Bishop Faith Christian Fellowship Unit Contents consist of Unknown Miscellanious Hshold/Commercial property. Upon taking possesion said unit contents will be disposed of by either by private or public sale/ auction at the Owners discretion. 9amJuly 20, 2018 Ed’s Sheds of PCB,LLC reserves the right to cancel without notice. (850)235-0908 Pub July 6, 13, 2018 21046NOTICE OF SALEPursuant to FL ST. 713.78, Mack’s Towing will sell at public auction by sealed bid the following: SALE DATE: 07/21/18 2004 Chevy 2GCEC19T641217143 SALE DATE: 7/25/18 2003 Nissan 1N4AL11D73C196076 Location: 7726 Panama City Beach Pkwy (Bay County) PCB, FL 32407 Time: 9:00 A.M. Pub: July 6, 2018 21057 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College District Board of Trustees will hold a meeting. Contact person for the meeting is Dr. John Holdnak, president, Gulf Coast State College. WHEN : 10 a.m., July 26, 2018 WHERE : William C. Cramer Jr. Seminar Room (Room 306), Robert L. McSpadden Student Union West, Gulf Coast State College PURPOSE : Regular Meeting Pub: July 6, 2018 PRAISE TABERNACLE CHIPLEY Spiritual gifts that operate in this church My son was prayed for and they went to the right spot that was hurtling without him telling them a thing about it.Check it out the presence of God is strong there. Sunday 11 on main st AKC Lab RetreiversBlack, male and female puppies. Home raised, vet checked and health certificate. $500 -$550. 8 Weeks June 1st! Call: 850-547-9291 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar: 239-324-4650www .noahslittleark.com Proudly Serving For Over 25 years! Jackson F arms Now Open!You pick Tomatoes, Peppers! 7 days a week. Bring your own 5 gallon bucket. 850-592-5579 7681 Shady Grove Rd Grand Ridge FL 32442 1999 JOHN DEERE GATORWELL MAINTAINED 195 PSI ON EACH CYLINDER $1500 Call:(205) 387-3145 FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com Electrician & Helper: Blair Electric is looking for hard working, positive attitude individuals that can work full time Mon-Sat, show up on time, willing to learn, and have good communication skills. Please Call (850)258-1555 Survey Rodman Outdoor work. Will train! Apply at 1219 Maine Ave., Lynn Haven or call 265-4800. Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple Positions Small Engine MechanicPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park First Presbyterian Church, 508 16thStreet, Port St Joe, Florida is seeking a pianist for Sunday morning church services, 10 -11am Eastern Standard Time. Salary is negotiable. Contact Pastor Glenn Hodges at (850)545-5791. Hiring Crew Leaders and Technicians for both lawn Maintenance and construction. Noles Scapes 1812 West 27th Street, Panama City, FL. 850-248-0973 Panama City 3113 G Street Near the water treatment plant on transmitter road July 7th 7am -1pmYard SaleSchool clothes, some tools, lamps. Come see what we have! Parker 4936 S. Lakewood Dr. July 6th & 7th 8am -untilMulti Family Yard Sale Parker 910 Center Street July 6th & 7th 8am 4pm/ July 8th 8am 12pmEstate SaleNew items Each Day! St. Andrews 1301 Oakland Drive Frankford Ave and 13th Street/across from Oakland Terrace Elementary July 6th & 7th 8am -12pmSt Andrews AreaFurniture, household items, miscellaneous Mall Area2413 Harris Avenue Behind IHOP & Microtel Inn July 7th 8am -12pmTHE ROCK CHURCH RUMMAGE SALESound Equipment, Furniture, Exercise Equipment, Lots of Assorted Items. Panama City 1814 West 23rd Court July 7th 7am -11amMulti Family Yard SaleMisc. items, bikes, books, clothes, and tools. Panama City 2411 W. 21st Ct. July7th 8am -11amEverything Goes Taking OffersFur Coat, China, Appliances, Wall Art, Collectibles,Handmade Vintage Quilts, Vintage Glassware and much much more!! 38 years of stuff!! All must go! Beach East End 130 North Glades Trail July 7th 7am-noonMoving/ Garage Sale Callaway5610 Boat Race Road &Tyndall Parkway Sat. 8am-12pmGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERANShare MinistryThrift Shop Clothing Sale!!! Drop in gas stove, sofa/couch, loveseat, household items, dining room table w/chairs, electric stove, remote control bed, gas dryer. Free Books!!! Lynn Haven 607 Carrie Lane From East 24th Street go straight to four way stop sign. Continue straight take right Jason Drive and take third left to Carrie Lane July 7th 7amGarage SaleWood working tools/machines, electric smoker, weedwacker, truck ramps, car jacks, other miscellaneous items. Bay Harbour 1648 Acre Circle Allison to Georgette July 7th 7am -2pmRummage SaleBedroom set, tables, knick knacks, clothes, pictures and lots more. Beach East End 125 Twilight Bay Drive, Colony Club July 6th & 7th 8am -2pmBeach Estate SaleGold and silver jewelry, vintage costume jewelry, furniture, Yashica and Canon cameras and lens, vintage film projector and screen and slide projector, lots of crafting supplies (beautiful lace!), kitchen items, collectibles, tools, power tools, ladder, and yard tools, and much, much more! Callaway4816 E. Hwy 22 Corner of Oleander July 6th & 7th 8am tilRain or shineFurniture, kitchen appliances, dishes, ladies clothes and shoes; excercise equipment, antique piano, and lots of miscellaneous. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, July 6, 2018 C C 7 7 Press OperatorThe News Herald in Panama City, Florida, home of the “World’s Most Beautiful Beaches” is looking for a press operator preferably with at least 2 years of experience using Web Press, must have great work history, be self-motivated, disciplined & be a team player. Ability to use a computer is required. We will train the right person in this rapidly advancing, high tech field. The position is full time & includes night and weekend work. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including 401(k), paid vacation and sick leave, medical, dental, vision & life insurance. Send your resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later time. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Web ID#:34351513 NF-1116606 2004 Sea Ray 260 Sundancer Cabin Cruiser28’ Length, Bridge clearance 9’2’, Max Draft 2’10, Beam 8’6 Cabin Headroom 6’.Powered by MerCruiser 260hp 5.0 L MPI Bravo 111 Stern Drive. Electronics: Depth Sounder, TV, Radio, CD Player, On Board Battery Charger. Electrical Equipment: Shore Power Inlet and Generator (Gas) Windlass Anchor System, Trim Tabs with Trim Indicator, Cockpit Cover and Bimini Top for rear deck area. This is a Luxury Cabin Cruiser that allows for a peaceful, easy feeling every time you step aboard. The floor plan is inviting and family oriented. The extended V-plane running surface is predictable and true with plenty of headroom, legroom, and storage space. Step thru windshield allows for easy access to front deck area. Walk thru transom area equipped with lockable storage and an extender platform for boarding or debarking. The cabin area consists of AIR CONDITIONING, dinette eating for 4, small kitchenette, small TV, enclosed vacuum flush head with holding tank and pump out and sleeping capacity up to 6 people. Engine Hours: 320. Generator Hours: 410. Includes new drive on trailer with warranty. Asking $38,000 Contact Freddy Brown at (850)873-4939 Mechanics Save $2002 DodgeDurango RT5.9 3 rows everything excellent except weak transmission 1300/offer Phone # 850-624-5051 2012 Harley Davidson Dayna Wide Glide. 103 cubic inches like new only 2000 miles $7000 (850)872-1062 Blue 2012 Harley Davidson Street Glide $14,500 OBO GARAGE KEPT, 14,800 miles, air shocks, double cruiser seat. Call Jim (850)832-4468 27 foot Tiara 1984 fresh bottom twin 350’s loaded $17,000 850-991-0045 770-231-3573 1999 Chaparrao Sunespa 233 limited edition 5.7 volvo penta 337 hours, new douple bimini, updated very good condition. $19,000 850-276-0124 06 Dodge Charger Senior Owned, Excellent condition, well cared for. $2500 OBO Please Call (850)814-2178 Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 Pressure Washing Ext Painting 35 yrs exp. Free est. Call Jordan (850)319-1275 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794Text FL91927 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Kevin WilliamsAll Areas of Home Repair and Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Additions No Job too Small! 30 Years Experience! Call (843)270-9251 Quality Work Guaranteed Free Estimates Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 BJs Tree Removal & Lot Clearing! Offering military and senior citizen discounts on excavating services, tree removal, and lot clearing. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 CNA AvailableI will take care of your loved ones in their home. For more info call 850-688-5244. Total Care Of Your Loved OnesIn Your Home, Refs, 20 Years Experience Day or Night!850-960-1917 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting, Clean-Ups/Sod, Epoxy floors, Rock/Flower Beds, Gutter & Roof Cleaning, Drainage systems. Lot Clearing, Haul-Offs. Weeding, Tree Trimming, Pressure Washing, Deck Renovations. Save 10%-20% 850-303-8526 ACLASSIC TOUCH An Honest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 18yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 774-3977 txt FL88189 to56654 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Driveway SpecialistWHITE’S CONCRETELic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 527-2933/874-1515 Kipple & Son Concrete and Pool RepairPool Replaser & all types of concrete work, drive ways, patio, pool deck & blockwork. We accept most major credit cards. Free Estimate Call: 850-866-4618 Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569Text FL91517 to 56654 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. NOW HIRING Established, growing and upscale Cosmetic Medical Practice seeking an OFFICE MANAGER, Medical Assistant and Licensed Aesthetician. Medical background required. Apply now to join our wonderful team on the beach. Email resumes and cover letter to tarek1.cvlc@ gmail.com Wanted Experienced Hair StylistVirgie’s Perfect Cuts 850-265-0084 or 850-624-5339 Promenade Mall Panama City Beach 880sq.ft $1,000 per month; 1560sq.ft. $1,900 per month. Call Owner/Broker Don Nations (850)814-4242 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. Andrews 1 br, 1 ba 3803 W 17th St. $180 wk, incl Util, no Dep. or Pets, PLUS others! Call or text 850-258-1889 House for Rent in Springfiield area. Has 3 bed rooms with large closets, 2 full baths. large laundry room, kitchen living room with fireplace. house has central heat and air. no pets of any kind allowed. must be able to pass background check and have good credit. Rent $900 month+ deposit Call 850-769-7103 For Responsible working person, no drugs or exc drinking env, $90/wk. $25 dep Call 850-769-8496 Bayou George 3bd/2ba, 16x80. 1 bedroom also available. Clean, quiet, lrg yrd, no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.com 4001 Riverside Dr. Beautiful custom built 3br/2ba. 3126sqft. $399,900. MLS #668301 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL92794 to 56654 Convenient to Tyndall. Move-in condition. 3 bdrm/2 bath brick, 1,550 sq ft H/C, dbl car garage,18x10 sunroom, fenced yard, well, sprinkler sys. $172,900. (850)624-3955. Lake Front LotsAvailable within 2 blocks of the beach. One lot is 42x115 that would completment the larger lot next to it that is currently for sale also. Purchase the 2 lots & make a wonderful home site. Contact Hope Abbott 850-596-7653 119 Park Place Palmetto Trace$224,900 3 bedroom 2.5 bath furnished, community pool Joni M. Johns Lic. Real Estate Broker. (850)832-4088 100 Acre State of the Art Horse Farm Over $1,500,000 invested. Adjacent to destin and Panama City Beach. Drastically reduced for quick sale. 575,000 firm. Call Agent (850)865-0838 Text FL96630 to 56654 17 Acres (can divide) for sale within Wewahitchka city limits close to Land’s Landing. $55,000 OBO Call for more details (706)566-6277 or email: rlena404@gmail.com ***Like New*** 3bd/2ba Double wide Set up in quiet mobile home park. 200 ft. from swimming pool. ***$27,455*** In the heart of Panama City ***850 960-8452*** Mobile Home trailer for sale. 12’x70’ in good shape in Callaway. Call 850-871-2629 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Slow Reader? Free tutoring for adults.Call Literacy Volunteers of Bay County Public Library, 872-7500 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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Dining: Boricuba Cafe | 10-11 Saturday Morning Music | 15 Beach Insider: Summer Shelling | 17-19 The Artists Touch: Abstract City | 25 SEASON PREVIEWS:Area stages prep for falls opening nights | 6-7ENTERTAINERISSUE NO. 176 €F riday, July 6, 2018 FREE

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E2 Friday, July 6, 2018 | Beach celebrates Fourth of July INSIDE Share your photosSend us your pictures of places youve enjoyed in the area, events youve attended, parties youve crashed „ and well share them with the rest of the world. You can email photos to tsimmons@pcnh. com or post them to our Facebook page at Facebook.com/PanamaCityBeachGuide. Let us know about the fun youre having „ dont keep all the good times to yourself! SEEN ON SCENEUndercurrents ............. 4 Season Previews ........6-7 Dining: Boricuba .....10-11 Liquid Dream Fishing ... 13 Jam Session ................ 15 Community Spotlight .. 16 Beach Insider: Shelling .... .............................17-19 Nightlife ...................20 Lifes A Beach ............. 21 GO & DO: 5 Best Bets ... 23 Artists Touch ............25 Movietown ................. 27 GO & DO: Calendar 28-33 ABOUT US Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com Area theater companies and musical groups are looking to reopening in the fall. See what's scheduled for local stages in the article on pages E6-7. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]About the Cover [BILL LOGSDON/CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] PANAMA CITY BEACH „ News Herald reader and local photographer Bill Logsdon submitted these long-exposure photos of the 2018 Indepen-dence Day fireworks from a vantage point behind the Holiday Inn on PanamaCity Beach. It was a beautiful night.Way offshore, there were big clouds occasionally lit up with lightning „ nature celebrating the event, too,Ž he said.

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E4 Friday, July 6, 2018 | UNDERCURRENTSGRAYTON BEACH „ I was walking along the Gulf shoreline, letting the surf splash my legs and sometimes send me staggering, as the sun went down one evening last week. I had three small sand dollars in one hand, and a blue plastic bottle cap and an orange hair band that Id pulled from the water in the other „ the only trash I had found on my walk. To the west, the sun had transformedthe sky into a psychedelic poster from the 1970s, all purple and lavender, red and orange. To the east, a nearly full moon in shades of blood and bonerose above a deep blue sea, its reflected light in turn being reflected on the waves and across the wet sand. Beachcombers were sparse as the dark came on, though brilliant flashlights danced farther to the east, where massive beach houses perched atop the dunes. A gentle breeze blew away the heat of the day, and the crunch-smash-hush of the waves was the only sound. Paradise,Ž I thought. Further down the beach, my wife, her sisterand brother-in-lawhad metal detectors out, scanning this way and that above the powdery, squeaking sand. They found lots of can toppers and enough change to rattle in a pocket, though not enough to threaten the treasures in an average couchs cushions. My niece chased after ghost crabs and helped them dig for buried treasure, while I wandered off down the beach to contemplate nature. It was our last night atGrayton Beach State Park, where we had spent a few days and nights in one of the parks cabins. We grilled sausage dogs and hamburgers, made smores, and ate watermelon. We walked the trails through the woods, enjoyed the beach early in the morning and late in the afternoon, and took naps in the hottest part of the day. One afternoon, we visited Seaside for browsing in stores and a treat at the gelato shop. There were board games in the night „ no television „ and reading before bed. I also took the opportunity to get in some writing and editing on a couple of private projects. Our strolls to the beach often included encounters with groups of deer, and the fat squirrels came to the back porch door each morning to beg forscraps. One night, walking back to our cabin in the dark, I told my niece the Laura Ingalls Wilder story of her Pa confronting a bearŽ on a dark night just like this one! It was better than a ghost story, by far. Though thunder sometimes threatened, we never had rain or lightning. The weather was hot, but nearly perfect. The water was clear and emerald during the day, with only a bit of June grass, and we only spotted a pair of small sharks once. I taught my niece, who has grown up mostly around freshwatercreeks and rivers in Alabama,to body-surf and ride a boogie board. It was a chance to decompress and de-stress, and as I stood there on the beach that last evening of our vacation, I realized how quickly I could get used to this. Im a beach bum at heart. Returning to the family with their metal detectors, they regaled me about the cents they had discovered. I showed them my three dollars. Its a toss-up as to which find was more valuable. Peace.A beach bum by natureSunset fades on a night last week at Grayton Beach. The cabin where we stayed at Grayton Beach State Park was nestled back among the pines and scrub oaks. [TONY SIMMONS PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] Tony Simmons

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E6 Friday, July 6, 2018 | THE ARTISTS TOUCHBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comSummer is in full force, but area entertainment organizations are already touting their upcoming autumn seasons of music, comedy and thrills. Here is the fall forecast for local viewers and patrons: Kaleidoscope Theatre LYNN HAVEN „Season 48 was previewed during a celebration June 23 at the theater, located at 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven, including afirst look at the opening musical, Schoolhouse Rock Live!Ž I chose Schoolhouse Rock Live! as a way to be able to include children in the arts community, not necessarily as actors, but to be in the audience experiencing it,Ž said director Hillary McAlinden. Schoolhouse has a nostalgic feel. I am in my 30s and I remember seeing it Saturday mornings. This allows this show to appeal to the adults and not just children. Now that the show has been cast, I am most looking forward to the numbers we will be doing on roller skates and in black light. The ultimate hope is to spark an interest in theatre into kids, while also taking the opportunity to teach them something about math, social studies and language.Ž Schoolhouse Rock Live!Ž runs Aug. 10-26. The cast includes Ian Bingham, Tyler Kent, Nick Taylor, Mia Salaveria, Lina Crowe and Hannah Roberson. The season continues with the twisting thriller Deathtrap,Ž Oct. 26 through Nov. 11; On Golden Pond,Ž a comedy/dramaclassic, Jan. 4-20, 2019; and a comedy about mixed up luggage, Baggage,Ž Feb. 8-24, 2019.Love+Laughter=Life,Ž March 8-24, 2019, features three one-act romantic comedies (two written by Kaleidoscope regular Harley Benner). The Murderous Mansion of Mr. Uno,Ž a mystery with alternate endings chosen by the audience, is April 26 through May 12, 2019. The season closes withThe Legend of Georgia McBride,Žwith performances May 31 through June 9, 2019.Written by Gulf Coast State College alumnus and rising star playwright Matthew Lopez, the show focuses ona young Elvis Presley impersonator barely making a living, who finds a path to prosperity by becoming a lip-syncing drag queen. Season ticket membership is good for one admission to each show and are now on sale for$100. For more details, visit KT-Online. org or call850-265-3226. The Martin Theatre PANAMA CITY „ The Martin Theatre is going to be closed for maintenance during the last two weeks in September and the first two weeks in October, but the stage will still be busy throughout the coming season. In addition to live performances, the Martin hasseries of films and film festivalsscheduled. The series started last week with three iconic Westerns. Tickets for each three-day festival are $25 (to watch as many times as youd like) or $7.50 for each individual showing. Films will be shown at 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily. See details at MartinTheatre.com/cinema, call 850-763-8080, or visit the box office at 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Celebrate the films of Mel Brooks on Aug. 9-11 with a rotating schedule of Blazing Saddles,Ž Young Frankenstein,Ž and Silent Movie.Ž Enjoy chills with the Alfred Hitchcock Retrospective on Oct. 18-20 with Psycho,Ž The Birds,Ž and Rear Window.Ž The new year will bring aPaul Newman Retrospectiveon Jan. 10-12, 2019, with showings of Hud,Ž Cool Hand Luke,Ž and The Sting.Ž A Bette Davis Retrospective on Feb. 28 and March Community theater, music groups tout new seasonsGulf Coast State Colleges division of Visual and Performing Arts will start its 2018-19 academic season with The WolvesŽ on Sept. 28. Above, cast members of Lucky YouŽ gather in February. [TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] Kaleidoscope Theatre in Lynn Haven opens its new season Aug. 10 with the musical School House Rock Live!Ž [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] AccompliceŽ was one of the productions in Kaleidoscope Theatres recently closed season. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Pop culture, chills, laughs coming this fallSee THEATER, E7

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E7 THE ARTISTS TOUCH1-2, 2019,will include Now Voyager,Ž AllAbout Eve,Žand Whatever Happened to BabyJane?Ž The Martin will also show The Rocky Horror Picture ShowŽ at midnight on Aug. 3, and 7 p.m. onAug. 4, for$15 (includes a goody bag); and the original GhostbustersŽ at 7 p.m. on Oct. 28, for $7.50. And the Stratford Festival From Stage to ScreenŽ will showcase live Shakespeare plays on Jan. 15 and 29, and Feb. 12 and 26, 2019. The Martin Ensemble, comprised of local actors, will present Fifth Planet and Other PlaysŽ by David Auburn onSept. 7-15,directed by Pam Sutton and her daughter, Liz Sutton Stone. Then the Ensemblewill present A Christmas StoryŽ on Dec. 7-15. The Martin PresentsŽ series gets rolling in the new year withlive performances byThe Kingston Trio on Jan. 18,Mutts Gone Nuts on Jan. 25,Jim Witters tribute to James Taylor and Carole King on Feb. 1,Supreme Reflections (a tribute to the Supremes) on Feb. 8,CSN Express (a tribute to Crosby, Stills & Nash) on Feb. 15, andModern Gentlemen (Frankie Vallis backup band) on Feb. 22, 2019. Panama City Pops Orchestra PANAMA CITY „ Since forming in 1996 as a small group of string players, the Panama City Pops Orchestra has grown into a distinguished and accomplished symphonic orchestra. The Pops20182019 season, Symphonic Splendor,Žopens Oct. 20 withMusic of the Night.Ž The other three performances of the season are in 2019:Cruising the MedŽ on Jan. 19; Heroes and SuperheroesŽ on March 9; and Myths and MusesŽ on April 27. Conductor David Ott also provides Moments with the MaestroŽ before each performance, during which he talks about the evenings selections; this is free for Baton Level members, $20 for all others. All performances are at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Season tickets and sponsorships are available, as well as more information about the Pops, online at PanamaCityPops.org. In addition to these official season performances, the Popswill play the Summer Nights at SweetBay series in the neighborhoods amphitheater on July 21, and will join the Allman Goldflies Band at SweetBay on Oct. 13. SweetBay is located on the former grounds of the Panama City Airport, at the end of Airport Road. And the Pops will present a full Christmas concert, Holiday by the Bay,Ž at the Marina Civic Center on Dec. 18. Gulf Coast State College PANAMA CITY „ The faculty and students at GCSC, 5230 U.S. 98, as well as community actors that often join in the productions, have a schedule of drama, comedy and musical shows planned for the academic year 201819. The season starts with The WolvesŽ by Sarah DeLappe, showing Sept. 28-30 and Oct 5-7, in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, directed by Hank Rion. Professor Jason Hedden, head of the Visual and Performing Arts Department, will directWilliam Shakespeares Much Ado About NothingŽ in a post-Civil War setting. The shows will beNov. 9-11 and16-18, in the Amelia Center Theatre. The new year will bring alumnus Mat Birmingham to direct Anatomy of GrayŽ by Jim Leonard Jr., showingFeb. 15-17 and 24, 2019, in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab. And the spring musical will be the original Broadway version of Hairspray -The Musical,Ž directed byHank Rion and Carissa Hosea on April 5-7 and 12-14, 2019. For details on GCSC programs and productions, visit GulfCoast.edu/arts. Emerald Coast Theatre Co. MIRAMAR BEACH „ The 2018-19 season at Emerald Coast Theatre Co. will include four main stage productions: The Spitfire Grill,Ž Sept. 20-Oct. 7; Its a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play,Ž Dec. 6-23; Dancing Lessons,Ž Jan. 17-Feb. 3, 2019; Bad Dates,Ž March 7-10; and Around the World in 80 Days,Ž March 28-April 7. ECTC will also presentthree Theatre for Young Audiences (TYA) productions: Curious George and the Golden Meatball,Ž Oct. 19-27; The Snowy Day and Other Stories,Ž Feb. 15-23, 2019; and So You Think Its Easy Being the Tooth Fairy?,Ž May 16-19, 2019. The company will also present numerous special events, childrens theater classes and performances. Our sixth season has already started with so much excitement and growth,Ž said artistic director and co-founder Nathanael Fisher. We are thrilled about the opportunities we are able to provide to our community through paid professional theater gigs.Ž The ECTC performances are held on the second floor at 560 Grand Blvd., in the Grand Boulevard at Sandestin in Miramar Beach. For details on shows, tickets, memberships and more, visit Emerald CoastTheatre.org. THEATERFrom Page E6The Martin Ensemble will open its 2018-19 season Sept. 7 with Fifth Planet and Other Plays.Ž Above, the two-man play A Couple of BlaguardsŽ starred Mike Stone and Harry Schaefer, presented at the Martin Theatre in March. Panama City Pops Orchestra opens its new season Oct. 20 with Music of the Night.Ž Emerald Coast Theatre Co. in Miramar Beach will kick off its upcoming season Sept. 20 with The Spit“ re Grill.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS]

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E10 Friday, July 6, 2018 | FOOD & DRINKDiscover plantain possibilitiesBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Boricuba Cafe celebrates the Spanishorigins of Puerto Rico and Cuba „ combining the Caribbean islands cuisine on one menu. Lillian Canalesserves her mothers Puerto Rican recipes,while her co-owner Leonell Castillo recreates the flavors of his Cuban heritage. This is Puerto Rico and Cuba together,Ž said Canales, whose motherowned restaurants in Puerto Rico when she was younger. I love both. The flag is almost the same, only change one color.Ž The Puerto Rican flag features a blue triangle with red and white stripes, while the Cuban has a red triangle with blue and white stripes. The co-ownerseven came up with a name to pay tribute to bothcountries „ BoricubaŽ is acombination of the wordsboriqua,Ž meaning someone of Puerto Rican descent, and Cuba.Ž Canales sister, Ivonne Alvarez, also carries on the family tradition by managing the restaurant and making the flan. Im from South Florida and this place is authentic. Even the atmosphere is reminiscent of mom and pop places you find on every street in Miami. Good, home cooked food. The people who own it are friendly and say that this has always been their dream. Its nice to have a taste of South Florida here in Panama City Beach,Ž said Zell Pearce, who wrote to me in May after visiting Boricuba. The cafe features 10 tables as well as a handful of seats and barstools along the front window and the coffee bar. The walls are lined with Cuban and Puerto Rican artwork, some depicting the same scenes from different points of view. While customers peruse the menu, they are given Tajaditas to whet the appetite. We give these to everybody to eat while they wait for their food,Ž Canales said. I love to cook. We both have passion for food.Ž The crispy plantains are thinly sliced lengthwise, then fried, and served with Puerto Rican mayo-ketchup. Aperitivos (appetizers) include sorullitos(fried cornmeal sticks) andbesito de yuca (yuca stuffed with Provolone), whichCanales brought as asampler for me to try with the tostones. The besito de yuca were little kissesŽ of warm comfort food „ a mild starchy root vegetable paired with creamy Provolone that oozed out with every bite. The tostones are plantains that are smashed and then fried in slices, with a similar taste to a hashbrown. We press and fry, and press and put them in the fryer,Ž said Canales, who fries the tostonesin peanut oil. The sorullitos provided a sweet finish. Tostones also are used as a sturdy base for the Jibaro, a Puerto Rican sandwich, filled with steak sliced into thin squares and doublelayered with tomatoes, lettuce, avocados, onions, mayo-ketchup, and cheese. I opted to cut the thick sandwich in half to try to tackle it with a fork. The warm and crispy tostones complemented the crisp lettuce and tomato and cold mayo-ketchup; the flavors reminded me of a burger. While Canales favorite sandwich is the Cuban sandwich, which Castillo Boricuba Cafe combines Cuban, Puerto Rican cuisineThe name of the Boricuba Cafe, which serves Cuban and Puerto Rican cuisine, is a combination of the words boriqua,Ž used to describe someone of Puerto Rican heritage, and Cuba. [PHOTOS BY JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] The Cuban Congri Rice with black beans, left, and the Puerto Rican Arroz con Gandules (rice with green pigeon peas and pork) are served with Maduros (sweet plantains) at Boricuba Cafe. What: Authentic Puerto Rican and Cuban cuisine Where: 11206 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach Hours: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday Details: 850-249-0087BORICUBA CAFESee BORICUBA, E11

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E11 FOOD & DRINKprepares with in-house roasted pork that he cooks for five hours, her favorite Puerto Rican entree is the Camarones with Mofongo (smash plantains with pork rinds and garlic). Everything starts with the same plantains,Ž Canales said. We cut and fry them or cut in pieces and mash like potatoes.Ž When the plantains are green, they are not as ripe, making them perfect for the tostones or mofongo. The savory mofongo features mashed plantains with garlic, butter and olive oil and a little adobo. Paired with the garlic shrimp it reminded me of the flavors of a shrimp and grits dish „ but with more texture like a chunky potato. But the sweet maduros (served in both countries) are made from ripe, sweet, plumpplantains. The Arroz Blanco y Habichuelas (white rice and bans) also are served in Cuba and Puerto Rico. I couldnt pick a favorite between the Cuban Congri Rice with black beans (garlic and onion)and the Puerto Rican Arroz con Gandules (rice with green pigeon peas and pork). A Cuban specialty on the chalkboard menu is the ropa vieja, a flavorful stewed beef with tomato sauce, peppers, onions and a lot of garlic. Another popular beef dish is the Churrasco, skirt steak marinated with adobo and mojo. After being transportedthrough the islands (home to El Yunque National Forest), the Cortadito (espresso with steamed milk and sugar) provides a sweet, strong bolt of energy. But it also is available straight. The Espresso is very black and put in you is like electric,Ž Canales said. Other drinks include juices, aka frescos,Žsuch as the sweet Parcha (passion fruit), slightly sour Tamarindo (tamarind) and Guanabana (soursop fruit) „ a milkywhite juice with a mild sweetness. BORICUBAFrom Page E10Lillian Canales, whose family hails from Puerto Rico, owns Boricuba Cafe with Leonell Castillo, who is of Cuban descent. Popular entrees include the Chuleta (pork chop). Boricuba Cafes Sandwich Jibaro features steak, tomatoes, lettuce, mayo-ketchup and cheese layered between fried plantains. Lillian Canales favorite Puerto Rican entree is the Camarones (shrimp) with Mofongo (smash plantain with pork rinds and garlic). The ” avorful ropa vieja is a Cuban specialty, a beef which co-owner Leonell Castillo prepares with tomato sauce, peppers, onions and a lot of garlic. Puerto Rican appetizers include, from left, sorullitos (corn fritters), besito de yuca (yuca stuffed with P rovolone cheese) and tostones (fried plantains).

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E12 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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Special to The News HeraldTwo weeks leading up to last weekends tournament, I started fishing bass tournaments with Bubba. It was something new, fun and exciting. We decided to fish the Tuesday night tournaments at High Point Landing, Deerpoint Lake. It was only $25 dollars a person to buy in, and it was something different. The two tournaments we fished, we managed to weigh inthree fish with the biggest being 1.5 pounds. With all the previous described, I lost sight and track of the redfish and redfish tournaments, which showed our last tournament performance. I decided it was time to go fish the flats, do what I know and love, and have some fun. I left the landing about 9:45a.m. and headed for a flat I havent fished insix months. The tide was coming in, overcast conditions, with 10 mph winds. I deployed the trolling motor, rigged with my new favorite bait and rig, and just went fishing.There was notime crunch, no stress of having to land, no pressure, just fishing. Iwas about 10 minutes into the flat, felt a thump, and landed a 16-inch trout. I continued down the flat, threw in about 5 inches of water, felt a thump, the water busted and the drag took off, and Ilanded a oneeyed, 21-inch red. When they have a damaged eye, they look like a zombie; it is awesome to see. I finished the flat and headed for a drop-off that has produced in the past, and I was ready to catch some weight. I got to the drop-off, started drifting the ledge with the wind and the trolling motor, throwing shallow and deep, looking for the big girls. The drop-off I like to fish isextended about ahalfmile with amixed bottom, and I have caught 30-inch trout and 30-inch reds here. I slowly worked the drop-off, and the water was busting around me. I saw Vs in the shallows, baitfish moving, and mullet jump. I got anxious, expecting every cast to produce something big. I threw to the Vs with no reaction. I threw to the bust, no reaction. I went to throw to the deep again and I saw movement out of the corner of my eye. I looked over to see a 5-foot bull heading for the boat, and then knew why I wasnt catching. I pulled the trolling motor and headed to one last flat and point I hadnt fished since last September. I arrived at the flat that leads to the point. I was creeping up on the trolling motor, casting while headed toward shore. I felt a thump and landed a15.5-inch trout. I threw again, thump, and it was a small trout. The pattern of small trout continued the whole flat. I got to the point, poled down, and threw the current. On the third cast, I felt a thump, set the hook, the drag screamed and could feel weight on the rod. I knew then it was either a big red, or another cobia like last tournament. I fought the fish to the boat and landed a 26 ‡inch with a pinched tail at 7 pounds. I released the red, threw back to the same current, thump, hooked up again. Landed a 24-inch red, probably 4.5 pounds, and released. The nextthree casts in a row, the same thing happened with 4to 5-pound reds. I was having a blast but wasnt trying to sore lip every red. I wanted some more trout to take home for dinner. I lifted the pole andmoved to the back side of the drop-off of the point. I threw, thump, set hook, and got a 19-inch trout. That gave methree trout in the livewell, and enough for dinner and for Mr. Tom. The sky was darkening and raining just east of me. I felt it was a good time to head back to the landing before the storm caught up with me. It was just pure fun, catching reds and trout, with no ultimatum, stress, pressure or time crunch. | Friday, July 6, 2018 E13 LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAM A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony WatsonFishing ats for funA.J. Watson shows off a zombieŽ red with a damaged eye from a previous hook. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] A.J. Watson shows off a 7-pound red. A.J. Watson lands a 16-inch trout.

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E14 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E15By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Riley Woodrum remembers the Saturday mornings of his childhood as carefree times for cartoons, breakfast cereal and play. Thats what he wants out of his music, too, when he gets together to share it with friends and patrons. Riley and his wife, Temple Woodrum, play under the name Saturday Morning Music. Theyperformed forthe News Heralds live Jam Session on June 29. (See video of the performance at NewsHerald. com or Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald.) Back in the day, the only time there werecartoons (on TV) was on Saturday mornings, so that made it special,Ž Riley said. You could sleep in, but we didnt want to sleep in too long because youd miss too many cartoons. ... You knew the rest of the day was free and open for whatever adventure, going swimming, playing in the yard „ or if it was snowing outside, building a snowman. I grew up in Michigan. The idea for me of Saturday morning was wide open possibilities, free spirit, no obligations. That kind of appealed to me and Temple in terms of the music that we wanted to do.Ž Our music is kind of like that, we do what we like,Ž Temple said, adding that they combine different tastes in music and also take some requests. Riley moved to the Panama City Beach area in 1993, but visited here often during his childhood. During the 60s, we were here almost every other year,Ž he said. Wed get an efficiency kitchenette on the beach off-season. It was cheaper or as cheap as buying fuel oil for heating our house in Michigan.Ž His father was a traveling evangelist, so his mother would pack up Riley and his brother, Rob, and bring them to the beach for a few months in the winter. When his mother and father relocated there later in life, both sons moved to join them in the 1990s. Rob is now the pastor of Eastgate Christian Fellowship in Panama City Beach, and Riley leads the worship music for Woodlawn United Methodist Churchs beachside service at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant at 8:30 a.m. each Sunday. Its right there on the deck of Sharkys facing the beach,Ž Riley said of the Worship on the Water service, which he joined at the beginning of 2018. We always say its the best stained glass windows. ... Thats one of my primary callings, if you wish. You know, Ive been doing that (leading worship music) for a good number of years. Its a good experience out there.Ž Temple grew up in the Anniston and Talladega areas of Alabama, only moving to this area about six years ago. She met Riley and his late wife Lynn at Eastgate, becoming good friends with them. I reached out to Riley to sing with me when I was singingŽ at various downtown venuesafter Lynns death, Temple said. So he came and sang with me. Something happened there, we got together, and weve been married for a year now.Ž Temple was about 6 years old when her mother taught her to play three chords on a guitar „ G, C, and D. Her first live performance was in fourth grade for showand-tell, where she recalls singing You Get a Line, Ill Get a Pole.Ž She also plays bass and keyboards. My roots are country and Gospel, so I grew up playing that,Ž she said. I started out like every other teenage boy, trying to impress girls,Ž Riley said, adding that he gravitated toward folk music and James Taylor. Im not a very prolific songwriter. I wrote a couple of sappy love songs to a girl named Cindy in high school.Ž Some of the first songs Riley and Temple played together were Country RoadsŽ and Sweet Baby James.Ž Theyve played venues as diverse as area farmers markets, downtown cafes and local hotel restaurants. I like the idea of people coming together. For my generation especially, playing some of those old favorites that youve known or grew up with ... thats what I enjoy,Ž Riley said. I love doing the farmers market, because you see people start to dance,Ž Temple said. If you can see that youre touching other people and helping them along, thats what its all about for me. Spreading happiness.ŽHaving fun with Saturday Morning MusicSaturday Morning Music (Riley and Temple Woodrum) performed at the News Herald Jam Session on June 29. [KRISTY SMITH/THE NEWS HERALD] Next jam sessionWho: Bone Daddy When: 3 p.m. Friday, July 6 Where: Streaming live on Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald; limited seating available at the newsroom Listen to the Jam Session Podcast at NewsHerald. com for the interview with Saturday Morning Music JAM SESSIONS

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E16 Friday, July 6, 2018 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Ryan Neal Age: 37 Occupation: Internet Marketing Specialist at Resort Marketing 101 Where you grew up: Destin Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Billys Seafood Restaurant/Craw“ sh Favorite hang-out: Sharkys on the Beach What you do for fun: We love to hit the beach and relax! Name: Dave Zank Age: 48 Occupation: Director of Business Development for MMG Where you grew up: Omaha Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: The Front Porch on the beach/The Porch Burger Favorite hang-out: We just moved here from Dallas, so were still “ guring it out. What you do for fun: So far, the Panama City Sunset Series has been pretty fun! Name: Jim Hammar Jr. Age: 26 Occupation: Business Development Manager at Tristate Graphics Where you grew up: Frankfort, Ill. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Reggae Rolls at Pompano Joes Favorite hang-out: Volleyball courts in front of Sharkys What you do for fun: Volleyball, kickball, spikeball, “ shing and reading

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Summer Shelling:Find seashells by the seashore | 18-19 BEACH INSIDERISSUE NO. 176 € Friday, July 6, 2018

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E19 E18 Friday, July 6, 2018 |By Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITYWhile summer isnt necessarily the best time to find seashells by the seashore, its definitely the most popular. This time of year, especially after a storm, sheltered bays are the best places to look „ unless you want to dive into the Gulf of Mexico to check out the natural and artificial reefs. The Gulf Coast Shell Club, whichpresented the 21st annual Shell ShowinJune at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, also hosts monthly shelling field trips. The public is invited to join the club and help identify shell species „ and just relax along the picturesque shore. Wading along the shore at St. Andrews Soundon June 23turned up finds I previously only had seen in Seashells of the Florida Panhandle,Ž the clubs 40-page color guidebook edited by Linda and Jim Brunner. We never know what well find. Theres just a variety of things, (like) cones,Ž said Linda Brunner, as we carpooled from Bonita Bay to St. Andrews Sound. Sometimes we findBabys Ears or moonsnails, Lace Murex or Apple Murex, Cockles, occasionally a Nutmeg, and Scallops we cant pick up.Ž It is illegal to pick up Bay Scallops west of Mexico Beach. This years Summer Shelling: Discover sound of season BEACH INSIDER Gulf Coast Shell Club member Jim Brunner collects shells on a shell excursion to Crooked Island Beach. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] recreational open season is Aug. 17-30in Gulf County, including St. Joseph Bay, and July 1 through Sept. 24 in Franklin County (including Carrabelle). For details, visithttp:// myfwc.com/fishing/saltwater/ recreational/bay-scallops/. Recently,Linda Brunnercounted 45 adult scallops. Linda Fitzhugh said it was encouraging but not enough,Ž said Linda Brunner, whose club donates to Fitzhughs ongoing seagrass study program at Gulf Coast State College. Gulf Coast Shell Club aims to educate the public and help maintain natural resources. (In addition to shells, members also pick up trash.) The Brunners, who came to Northwest Florida for the shelling,have been going to St. Andrews Sound since 1980. Although since they started, the16 miles of sandy beach has eroded about 100 yards, the Brunners estimate.But they are always looking to explore and add to the more than 10,000 shells in their personal collection. A Recreational Permit is required by non-military members of the public ages 16 and older to access Tyndall Air Force Base property, including Crooked Island Beach, Davis Beach Boat Launch, Buck Beach, DuPont Bridge Boat Launch, Bonita Bay, Farmdale Bayou, Strange Bayou and Redfish Point. For more information on permits, visit https:// tyndall.isportsman.net/. A couple of years ago, a treasure trove of coquina in bright colors poured in where the surf was breaking in Mexico Beach and hundreds of live, brownsand dollars were waist deep at Crooked Island Beach. Jim Brunner, a former diver,chose St. Andrews Sound for a field trip June 23 forits nice walk and beautiful sunsetŽ as well as the shelling possibilities at low tide, which was set to be at 0.0 at 5:52 p.m. If youre looking for unspoiled Florida, this is it,Ž Jim Brunner said. Armed with bug spray, sunblock, nets andbuckets, theclub allows for three to four hours of shelling time from an hour before low tide tillsunset. The Gulf Coast Shell Club has nearly 80 members, including winter visitors,with about half of those regularly attending monthly meetings. Some of the shells on the cement rocks, formerly a boatlaunch,at St. Andrews Sound have hermit crab occupants not to be disturbed. Other hermit crabs could be seen traveling by Tulip and Crown Conch underwater. A couple of club members jumped right into the 85-degreewater in their swimsuits to search for shells waist deep, while others wore watershoes and rolled up their pants. Walking in the water, rather than on the sand, seems to help when trying to avoid yellow flies. Some members are just there to enjoy nature, some to search for new species, and others to look for shell crafts. Though I had been told experienced shellers look for a shape rather than color to identify shells, I experienced one reason this is important. Some of the shells were coated with sediment, blending into the concrete and rocks, and it was only their shape that led me to their discovery. The next shelling field trip is set for 3 p.m. Sunday, July 8. Meet at the corner of West Beach Drive and East Caroline Boulevard to wade or snorkel in St. Andrew Bay. The club picnic alsois coming up later this month in Cape San Blas, another perfect shelling place where two currents meet. For more information, visit GulfCoastShellClub.weebly.com.What: Group of people interested in shells, where they live, how and where to “ nd them, their beauty and uses Next field trip: 3 p.m. Sunday, July 8, at the corner of West Beach Drive and East Caroline Boulevard to wade or snorkel in St. Andrew Bay; public invited to join the club Monthly meetings: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays (except June and December) at Lake Huntington Club House, 3504 W. 15th St., Panama City Annual dues: $8 per person or $12 per family For Summer Shelling video from the June 23 trip to St. Andrews Sound, visit NewsHerald.comGULF COAST SHELL CLUBA Banded Tulip is spotted June 23 along the shore at St. Andrews Sound. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] A shiny Lettered Olive is spotted in the water at St. Andrews Sound on June 23. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Gulf Coast Shell Club members shell near oyster beds on a shelling “ eld trip. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] An Angel Wing is discovered on a shelling “ eld trip. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Gulf Coast Shell Club member Linda Brunner searches for shells in St. Andrews Sound. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E20 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E21 LIFES A BEACHConnor Colon, 12, catches minnows with his net. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Osiris Paz, 3, builds a sand castle with her brother, Gustavo. Friends play a game of catch in the water. Isabelle Guanya, 1, makes a face after tasting the sand.

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E22 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E23 GO & DO : 5 BEST BETS FOR THIS WEEKEND 1 In theaters this weekend is another Marvel ” ix, AntMan and the Wasp,Ž rated PG-13, wherein Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) tries to balance being both the superhero Ant-Man with being a dad, meanwhile Hope van Dyne and Dr. Hank Pym present an urgent new mission that “ nds the Ant-Man “ ghting alongside The Wasp to uncover secrets from their past;  The First PurgeŽ an R-rated action-horror “ lm that is a prequel to 2013s The PurgeŽ that focuses on the events that lead up to the very “ rst Purge event. 2 Invite your friends over for some gaming this weekend as Saturday is Video Games Day. Play your favorite new releases or vintage games or go online to watch recaps of last months Electronic Entertainment Expo presentations to learn what video game publishers are planning to release in the coming months. 3 If you want to get out of the house this weekend, we suggest you plan a picnic. If you need a menu suggestion, you cant go wrong with hot dogs and ice cream (among other delights) … July is National Hot Dog Month and National Ice Cream Month. 4 On July 8, 1947, a public information of“ cer at the Roswell Army Air Field in New Mexico issued a press release stating that personnel there had recovered a ” ying discŽ, which had crashed on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico. So began one of the worlds most famous „ and most debunked „ UFO claims. While theres still no hard evidence of alien life to celebrate, you can still celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Roswell UFO incident: Watch some alien-themed TV shows (such as the recent X-Files reboot) or movies (Independence DayŽ or its sequel Independence Day: ResurgenceŽ), or make some alien-themed crafts. 5 If your favorite team has been kicked out of the World Cup, dont worry, theres plenty of other sports on. This weekend we have NASCARs Overtons 400 at the Chicagoland Speedway, as well as the usual Major League Baseball and Major League Soccer games, so youll have plenty to watch on TV. Check your newspaper for schedules.„ More Content NowAnt-Man (Paul Rudd) attempts to keep professional and personal lives in balance when hes asked to team up with the Wasp (Evang eline Lilly) under the guidance of mentor Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) in Ant-Man and The Wasp.Ž [MARVEL STUDIOS]

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E24 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E25By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The objective world often presents itself in abstract ways, as explored in Abstract City,Ž anew exhibit of photography by Erin Mason. Mason received the Best of ShowŽ award for her entry, Cypress Rain,Ž in the Panama City Center for the Arts 2017 F:\Stop North Florida competition. The prize was $200 cash and a solo show „ Masons first solo exhibition. Abstract CityŽ opens in the Mary Ola Miller Gallery at the Center on Saturday, July 7, and runs through Aug. 10,during regular gallery hours.Admission is free and open to the public. The Center, located at 19 E. FourthSt. in Panama City,is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For details, visit CenterForTheArtsPC.com or call 850-640-3670. Mason grew up running on the docks of her fathers bait shop and marina in Englewood, andwas inhigh school when she got her first 35 mm camera. She was told to find one tree and use it to create photos that evoked five different emotions,alessonthat remains in her mind every time shepresses the shutter button. Today, one might findherclimbing through construction sites, alleys and old Florida towns searching for the unexpected. Often, one of her sons or her 6-year-old grandson will be beside her with cameras of their own. I love to shoot with kids and see the world through their lenses,Ž Mason said. I think it makes me a more patient and observant photographer.Ž Mason spent countless hours shooting and developing film at Appalachian State University, where she studied photography, journalism and anthropology. She worked as a staff writer and photographer on the college and local newspapers for several years. In 2008, after a hiatus from what she called serious photographyŽ to concentrate on raising a family, Mason bought her first digital camera and returned to the woods to see if trees could still laugh and cry. Turns out that they can,Ž she said. During that period, Masonrealizedshe had apassion for finding beauty in the most ugly and mundane subjects. Bricks, pipes and metal, circles and anglesfascinate her. She loves bringing attention to things that everyone else may have missed. Asked if someone went to that exact spot and looked at the samebuilding, would they seewhat she saw through her lens, she replied:If your brain works like mine, you will see it. I like to stare at a subject and squint my eyes just right until I see it. I know when I am seeing it just right because it takes my breath away or makes me giggle.ŽPhoto exhibit explores abstract reality THE ARTISTS TOUCHBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „Lynn Haven-based watercolorist Don Taylor is the featured artist for July and August at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort.A longtimeleader within the local art community, Taylor has receivednumerous awards in national watercolor competitions across the country. My paintings employ a combination of realism and impressionism, with a touch of abstract design,Ž Taylor said. My hope is to evoke the same felling to the viewer that I felt when first seeing the subject, the sense that there is more to the subject than a mere rendering. Lights, darks, bold colors, lost edges and more hopefully come together to recreate that feeling. I attempt to apply the illusion of detail in many works so that viewers can use their imagination to complete the image. Sometimes less is more.Ž An opening reception will be 6-7 p.m. Friday, July 6, at the Sheraton, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. The work will be displayed in the resorts Art Exhibit Hallway. Complimentary champagne and hors doeuvres will be served. The event is free and open to the public. Taylor is a native of St. Augustine,a former U.S. Marine Corps officer and a veteran of Vietnam. He worked as aveterinarian in Panama City since 1972 and is now semi-retired. A past president of the Panama Art Association and a member of the Board of Directors of the former Visual Art Center of Northwest Florida, Taylor isa signature member of the Transparent Watercolor Society of America, Florida Watercolor Society, Western Federation of Watercolor Societies, numerous state watercolor societies, an elected member of Allied Artists of America anda Fellow Maxima Cum Laude in the American Artists Professional League. The thing I really enjoy, probably more than anything else,Ž Taylor said during a 2015 conversation, is sketching and painting from real life. Hes filled books with sketches and watercolors of sites hes visited in his travels, and he said every detail of that day is imprinted in his memory when he does so. He started painting as a form of stress relief, and found he loved doing it:You forget all your problems and worries. Its not like work, its something I totally enjoy.ŽTaylor watercolor show opens Abstract City,Ž featuring photographs by Erin Mason, will open at the Panama City Center for the Arts on Saturday. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Artist Don Taylor ” ips through watercolor artwork in his home studio in Lynn Haven in 2015. He has a solo exhibit opening Friday at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort in Panama City Beach. [TONY SIMMONS/ NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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E26 Friday, July 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E27 MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEach week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com. Cole: Uncle Drew led by Dax Kyrie Irving has finally brought his Uncle Drew character to the big screen, and unlike so many other one-joke sketch characters that couldnt make the jump in runtime, Uncle Drew does so with the same effortless cool hes known for. His film, Uncle Drew,Ž is corny and dumb, but in such a way that it should rather be called sweet and earnest, and really its not his movie. Its Lil Rel Howerys character, Dax, who drives the plot, and its Uncle Drews geriatric teammates who win the laughs. Dax is a nobody from Harlem trying to win the Rucker Classic in hopes of restoring both his dignity and bank account to something resembling mediocrity. He stumbles into Uncle Drew, the legend from the 70s who suddenly disappeared from the courts; and Uncle Drew, even old and gray, can still play. Drew agrees to play, but only if he can bring back his old teammates. The narrative structure is somewhat of a cross between the kind of high concept American films we used to get more of (Space JamŽ immediately comes to mind) and an old Chinese martial arts film where the master returns to his domain, but the narrative isnt the draw. Its the committed silliness coupled with a real love for the game that makes Uncle DrewŽ work. It goes beyond the ludicrousness of merely adding makeup to NBA legends. Chris Webber, for instance, truly dives into his character as an over-the-top former baller turned preacher, and gives a great comic performance, not just a passable one from a non-actor. And Kyrie delivers his platitudes with swagger and real belief, just like all the old guys at the Rec. Rating: out of Matt: Uncle Drew unifies crowd Some movies need to be seen with a crowd to be experienced properly. The act of sitting in a dark room full of strangers is an odd one, but if given a central, easily-understood yet undeniably entertaining focus, that group of random individuals creates a common emotional kinship. Uncle DrewŽ is one such movie, providing such simple, stupid fun from beginning to end, anyone who gives in to its admittedly cheap premise (old people acting like young people) will find their joy not only irrefutable but oddly communal. NBA star Kyrie Irving plays the titular geriatric who, with the help of down-and-out coach Lil Rel Howery, is putting his team of now-past-theirprime ballers back together to compete in a tournament against guys much younger than they. Its filled with all-star basketball talent, and director Charles Stone shoots the court scenes with great care and excitement. However, the real appeal of the movie is its athlete stars. Kyrie is shockingly great; funny, in-character, and an unexpected emotional anchor. Shaq is basically playing his own larger-than-life self to great wry effect, Reggie Millers legally-blind shooter is hilarious, and Webber steals nearly every scene hes in. Of course, like most sports comedies, the story is as predictable as the Globetrotters beating the Generals. Its full of gettingthe-team-back-together clichs: big egos and suspect talent initially getting in the way, making strides towards teamwork, an 11th hour adversity with a last-minute solution, a final sports moment that helps define the character. Nonetheless, Uncle Drews silly story and lack of a real/unique point-of-view are bolstered by consistent laughs, a constant smile and an unexpectedly unifying spirit. Rating: out of Uncle Drew jumps onto big screen NBA basketball player Kyrie Irving stars as Uncle Drew. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Director: Charles Stone III Starring: Kyrie Irving, LilRel Howery, Shaquille ONeal, Nick Kroll, Tiffany Haddish, Chris Webber, Reggie Miller, Nate Robinson, Lisa Leslie, J.B. Smoove, Mike Epps Rated: PG-13 (intense sequences of science-“ ction violence and peril)Uncle Drew

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E28 Friday, July 6, 2018 | HAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh. com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, July 6 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. GAZING THROUGH WINDOWS, STARING AT CLOSED DOORS: Exhibit on display through Aug. 11. The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Photography exhibit by Teressa Longo. Details, www.thelightroompc. com or 850-818-0475 BEACH CLEAN-UP: 8-10 a.m. at Beach Access 5 at 5201 Gulf Dr Panama City Beach; hosted by Gulf World and Divers Den. The public is invited; guests are encouraged to bring gloves, buckets and a reusable water bottle. Everyone who participates will be entered to win a Dolphin Meet N Greet from Gulf World and a Discover Scuba from Divers Den. ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Co. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208 HAPPY SILK AT FLORIOPOLIS: 2-5 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Design your own silk art scarf. $35 per scarf. Details, 850-249-9295 JAM SESSION BONE DADDY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook. com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. LIGHT UP THE GULF FIREWORKS SHOW: 8:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Celebrate Independence Day with a front row seat to the private Light Up the GulfŽ Fireworks Show. Saturday, July 7 ABSTRACT CITY ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant GO & DO : CALENDARBoneDaddy will play at the News Herald Jam Session at 3 p.m. Friday, July 6. Catch the live video stream at Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 29

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E29 GO & DO : CALENDARparking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com BLUES & BARBECUE: 4 p.m. (music begins at 5 p.m.) at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven with Kelly & The Healers and The Aaron Sheppard Trio. Tickets are $15 to bene“ t Roberts Hall. SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY CHRIS GODBER: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the SweetBay neighborhood of Panama City. This event is free and open to the public. Sunday, July 8 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 Monday, July 9 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CALLAWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS: Open 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave. on Callaway Bayou. Explore two museums and old OneRoom School House, which was used from 1911-1936. Admission is free. THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Daric Freeman on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. MONSTER MOVIE MONDAYS THE FLY (1958): 7 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $5 suggested donation. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre. com CALENDARFrom Page 28Monster Movie Monday at the Martin Theatre will feature the 1958 version of The Fly,Ž starring Vincent Price, at 7 p.m. Monday, July 9. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 30

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E30 Friday, July 6, 2018 | Tuesday, July 10 CAPTAIN & MAYBELLE SIDESHOW PERFORMANCE: 1-3 p.m. at Ripleys Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. A classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, showcasing acts like sword swallowing, the human blockhead, and “ re breathing. Outdoor performance is free to the public. Details, www.ripleys.com/ panamacitybeach LETTERPRESS IN ACTION: 1:30-4 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City. Watch letterpress artists create print pieces and see rare collection of operational vintage letterpress machines. DRAG QUEEN BINGO: 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosted by Envy DuVall. Free Bingo card with every drink purchase. Prizes including Free Cover Coupons and bar tab. Games start at 10 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Wednesday, July 11 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CAPTAIN & MAYBELLE SIDESHOW PERFORMANCE: 1 and 3 p.m. at Ripleys Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. A classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, showcasing acts like sword swallowing, the human blockhead, and “ re breathing. Outdoor performance is free to the public. Details: www.ripleys.com/ panamacitybeach ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208 MOVIES AND MORE MADAGASCAR: 5:30 p.m. at the Camp Helen State Park Recreation Hall. Admission is free but donations are accepted. Donations will go to the Friends of Camp Helen State Park to bene“ t the parks resource management projects and interpretive programs. A parent or guardian must accompany all children. Details, Facebook.com/ FriendsOfCampHelenStatePark or 850-233-5058 BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, July 12 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 REASONABLE DOUBT CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details, 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, July 13 ABSTRACT CITY ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com GAZING THROUGH WINDOWS, STARING AT CLOSED DOORS: Exhibit on display through Aug. 11. The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama CALENDARFrom Page 29 GO & DO : CALENDARThe Jam Kings will play for Groovin on the Green at Carillon Beach from 7-9 p.m. July 16. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 31

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E31 GO & DO : CALENDARCity. Photography exhibit by Teressa Longo. Details, www.thelightroompc. com or 850-818-0475 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208 HAPPY SILK AT FLORIOPOLIS: 2-5 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Design your own silk art scarf; $35 per scarf. Details, 850-249-9295 JAM SESSION LIN-DON: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. Saturday, July 14 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 SKATEBOARD DECK ART CHALLENGE EXHIBIT AND AWARD RECEPTION: 6:308:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. 4th St., Panama City; open to the Public. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Details, 850-640…3670 or www.CenterfortheartsPC. com SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY READERS THEATRE: 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park Campground, 4916 State Park Circle, Panama City Beach. Presentation at the “ re circle will cover portions of the classic play in monologue form. Details at St. Andrews Readers Theatre on Facebook.com YUHUA HAMASAKI: 8 p.m. till 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From VH1s RuPauls Drag Race Season 10. Also featuring Envy DuVall and China Moon. Showtimes midnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, July 15 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 Monday, July 16 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CALLAWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS: Open 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave. on Callaway Bayou. Explore two museums and old OneRoom School House, which was used from 1911-1936. Admission is free. THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by Sus Mathers, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Jam Kings on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, July 17 LETTERPRESS IN ACTION: 1:30-4 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City. Watch letterpress artists create print pieces and see rare collection of operational vintage letterpress machines. STRANGER THINGS TEEN PROGRAM: 3 p.m. at the CALENDARFrom Page 30 See CALENDAR, 32

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E32 Friday, July 6, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARBay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Free admission. Fans of Stranger Things can meet for themed games, crafts and snacks. Program geared for middle and high school students. Details at the Youth Services department, 850-522-2118 SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by Jess Jones and Sus Mathers Duo, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. DRAG QUEEN BINGO: 8 p.m. till 2 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosted by Envy DuVall. Free Bingo card with every drink purchase. Prizes including Free Cover Coupons and bar tab. Games start at 10 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Wednesday, July 18 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Co. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208 BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, July 19 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 AN EVENING WITH AUTHOR JONATHAN F. PUTNAM: 6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Author of the Lincoln and Speed mystery series. Light refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. Free admission. Details, NWRLS.com PORCH 40 CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.coM Friday, July 20 ABSTRACT CITY ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com GAZING THROUGH WINDOWS, STARING AT CLOSED DOORS: Exhibit on display through Aug. 11. The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Photography exhibit by Teressa Longo. Details, thelightroompc. com or 850-818-0475 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208. HAPPY SILK AT FLORIOPOLIS: 2-5 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Design your own silk art scarf. $35 per scarf. Details, 850-249-9295 JAM SESSION BONITA UNDERGROUND: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. Saturday, July 21 UP STEVE WIGGINS PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 25, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details: 769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 SHADDAI SHRINE GOSPEL SING: 5-8 p.m at the Shaddai Shrine Temple, 1101 19th St., Panama City. Featuring local talent, Mitchell Johnson, Joe Paul, Loretta Watkins, Barbara Stanley, Olivia Taylor and more. All proceeds to bene“ t the Shaddai Shrine. Details, Joe Paul at 850-819-6688 SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY THE POPS: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the SweetBay neighborhood of CALENDARFrom Page 31Tuesday and Wednesday, July 10 and 11, the Captain and Maybelle Sideshow Performance will be free to view outside Ripleys Believe It or Not in Panama City Beach. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 33

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| Friday, July 6, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARPanama City. Free and open to the public. Sunday, July 22 HOPE FOR HEROES AND HORSES 5K WALK/RUN: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 792 Highway 20, Youngstown. A fundraising event for the HOPE Project, which rescues horses to help bring hope to heroes who may have been injured physically or emotionally. Services are provided to veterans, “ rst responders and their family members. Details, 850-527-5534 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 NEWSBOYS UNITED: 6 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center. Tickets and details, MarinaCivicCenter.com Monday, July 23 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CALLAWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS: Open 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 522 Beulah Ave. on Callaway Bayou. Explore two museums and old OneRoom School House, which was used from 1911-1936. Admission is free. THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by Matt Law, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Legacy on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. MONSTER MOVIE MONDAYS INCUBUS (1966): 7 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Admission: $5 suggested donation. Rated R. Refreshments for sale. Details at MartinTheatre. com Tuesday, July 24 CAPTAIN & MAYBELLE SIDESHOW PERFORMANCE: 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at Ripleys Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. A classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, showcasing acts like sword swallowing, the human blockhead, and “ re breathing. Outdoor performance is free to the public. Details, www.ripleys.com/ panamacitybeach LETTERPRESS IN ACTION: 1:30-4 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City. Watch letterpress artists create print pieces and see rare collection of operational vintage letterpress machines. AN EVENING WITH SINATRA: 6:30 p.m. at The Place Downtown, 429 Harrison Ave., Panama City; hosted by the Gulf Jazz Society. Nick Martino will be joined by the Amanda Matthews Jazz Trio as he performs songs from the great American/Sinatra songbook. The Amanda Matthews Jazz Trio features Amanda Matthews on keyboard, Steve Gilmore on bass, and Charles Pagano on drums. For reservations, call Larry or Amy at 850-784-2106. Pay at the door. Admission is $10 for GJS members and $12 for others. Membership applications will be available. (Arrive early and have dinner before performance.) SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by Jeffery Bouet, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. DRAQ QUEEN BINGO: 8 p.m. till 2 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosted by Envy DuVall. Free Bingo card with every drink purchase. Prizes including Free Cover Coupons and bar tab. Games start at 10 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida.com or 850-236-3450 Wednesday, July 25 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CAPTAIN & MAYBELLE SIDESHOW PERFORMANCE: 1 and 3 p.m. at Ripleys Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. A classic sideshow entertainment with a contemporary twist, showcasing acts like sword swallowing, the human blockhead, and “ re breathing. Outdoor performance is free to the public. Details, Ripleys.com/ panamacitybeach ST. ANDREWS WALKING TOUR: 1:30-2:30 p.m. at the Panama City Publishing Company. To schedule a tour for a different time, call 850-872-7208. MOVIES AND MORE FERNGULLY: THE LAST RAINFOREST: 5:30 p.m. at the Camp Helen State Park Recreation Hall. Admission is free but donations are accepted. Donations will go to the Friends of Camp Helen State Park to bene“ t the parks resource management projects and interpretive programs. A parent or guardian must accompany all children. Details: facebook.com/ FriendsOfCampHelenStatePark or 850-233-5058. FILM FAN CLUB DEADPOOL: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th st., Panama City. Free admission. Rated R. Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, July 26 FIRST RESPONDERS APPRECIATION DAY: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, Oat“ eld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane. Dish/Beverage to share appreciated but not required. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5065. PETER AND THE WOLF: 3 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Learn about orchestral instruments while watching the musical childrens tale, presented in in full costume by students from Brooks Music Studio. Details at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 850-522-2118 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 TYLER MAC BAND CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com CALENDARFrom Page 32

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