Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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** Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-5 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints ....................A6 SUNDAYT-storms 86 / 75SATURDAYT-shower 85 / 74TODAYStray t-storm 85 / 72 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Friday, June 8, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com ENTERTAINERWORLD OCEANS DAYHelp clean up a beach and celebrate the Gulf of Mexico By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ With two separate Bay County motor-cycle wrecks claiming the lives of a single mother and a 17-year-old boy in as many days time, law enforcement and local riders are urging caution on the road.The Florida Highway Patrol reported both fatal crashes, separated by little more than 24 hours, occurred under similar circumstances.The most recent wreck took the life of 17-year-old Christopher D. Peoples, of Southport. He was riding his Harley Davidson east-bound on State 20 about 7:15 p.m. Wednesday when a Jeep driven by Milton Amos, 54, of Youngstown, failed to real-izeŽ Peoples was approaching and turned left in front of the motorcycle, FHP reported.Peoples motorcycle collided with the right side of the Jeep. The wreck is being investigated by the FHP Traf-fic Homicide Unit.Peoples was wearing a helmet at the time of the wreck.A day earlier, Veronica M. Jett, 33, of Panama City Beach, was riding her Harley Davidson westbound on Thomas Drive about 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the inside lane near the intersection with Luff Street while Sandy Stone, 40, also of Panama City Beach, was driving a Lincoln MKX eastbound on Thomas Drive. Stone attempted to turn left onto Luff Street, but failed to yield the right of way and pulled out in front of Jett, causing the motorcycle to strike the right side of her vehicle, FHP reported.Jett suffered fatal injuries in the wreck and died at a local hospital. Stone was uninjured. Charges in both wrecks are pending investigating, as is an alcohol test on Milton, FHP reported.2 motorcyclists dead in 2 daysFHP: Motorcycles common in warm months; be cautious By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Bay County veterans tentatively applauded an overhaul of VA health care signed into law by President Donald Trump this week.On Wednesday, Trump officially approved the VA MIS-SION Act of 2018, which expands private care options for veterans. The MISSION Act removes the 30-day and 40-mile barrier under the Choice Program, allowing vet-erans enrolled in VA care to get local treatment at an eligible non-VA facil-ity if they deal with long wait times or live far from a VA facility.The Choice Program itself was intended to alleviate long wait times and other problems with VA care, but it has received mixed reaction from veterans, some of whom say they Local vets cautiously optimistic about VA overhaul MISSION Act removes 30-day, 40-mile clinic barrier By John Henderson522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.comWEST BAY „ Some of the passengers on Thursday's Flight 2855 into Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport had no clue what was going on when their jet was sprayed with a water cannon coming in.Then, they got another surprise when they stepped into the terminal and people were clapping and cheeringwhile theUkulele Orchestra of St. Andrews was belting out tunes to greet them.The passengers „ also given a commemorative air-port souvenir bag filled with items from tourism partners and cookies „ might not have known it, but they were on the inaugural American Air-lines flight from Charlotte, N.C., to ECP.The full flight was about 15 minutes late, but that didnt curb the enthusiasm at Thursday's celebration. Dean Blocksom, who lives in Char-lotte and has been coming to Panama City for 20 years, was elated at the new non-stop service.After he got off the inaugural flight, he said hed been waiting for some time for non-stop service. In years past, hes had to take flights to Pensacola or Tallahassee first before getting a rental car and driving here.My wifes parent moved down here 20 years ago,Ž he said, pointing out that he has a condo here as well.Fire“ ghters create a water cannon salute for the “ rst American Airlines plane at the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport on Thursday. [PATTI BLAKE PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] LEFT: Eric Morgan, senior vice president of American Airlines, speaks at the grand opening for the new American ticket counter Thursday at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. RIGHT: T ravelers check in at the new American Airlines ticket counter Thursday. Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport welcomed the airlines with a water cannon salute. Non-stop service o ered to Charlotte, Dallas ECP welcomes American Airlines See AIRLINE, A3 See OVERHAUL, A3 See CAUTION, A3 SPORTS | C11A PLAYER OF THE YEARWewas Bailey now will lead to state championship

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** A2 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CATCH OF THE DAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.READER FEEDBACK TODAY IN HISTORYGO AND DOHAPPY BIRTHDAY FLORIDA LOTTERY YOUNG ARTIST CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY The Associated PressToday is Friday, June 8, the 159th day of 2018. There are 206 days left in the year.Today's Highlight in History:On June 8, 1968, authorities announced the capture in London of James Earl Ray, the suspected assassin of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.On this date:In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1042, Edward the Confessor became King of England, beginning a reign of 23 years. In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1917, during World War I, Maj. Gen. John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force, arrived in Liverpool, England, while en route to France; also, the 1st Expeditionary Division (later the 1st Infantry Division) was organized at Fort Jay in New York. In 1920, the Republican National Convention opened in Chicago; its delegates ended up nominating Warren G. Harding for president. In 1939, Britain's King George VI and his consort, Queen Elizabeth, arrived in Washington, D.C., where they were received at the White House by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1948, the "Texaco Star Theater" made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the “ rst program. (Berle was later named the show's permanent host.) In 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigan's Lower Peninsula, killing 126 people. Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller is 91. Actress Millicent Martin is 84. Actor James Darren is 82. Singer Nancy Sinatra is 78. Singer Chuck Negron is 76. Musician Boz Scaggs is 74. Author Sara Paretsky is 71. Actress Sonia Braga is 68. Actress Kathy Baker is 68. Country musician Tony Rice is 67. Rock singer Bonnie Tyler is 67. Actor Griffin Dunne is 63. "Dilbert" creator Scott Adams is 61. Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 60. Singer Mick Hucknall (Simply Red) is 58. Musician Nick Rhodes (Duran Duran) is 56. Rhythm-and-blues singer Doris Pearson (Five Star) is 52. Actress Julianna Margulies is 51. Actor Dan Futterman is 51. Actor David Sutcliffe is 49. Actor Kent Faulcon is 48. Rhythmand-blues singer Nicci Gilbert is 48. Actress Kelli Williams is 48. Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords D-Ariz., is 48. Actor Mark Feuerstein is 47. Contemporary Christian musician Mike Scheuchzer (MercyMe) is 43. Actor Eion Bailey is 42. Tennis player Lindsay Davenport is 42. Rapper Kanye West is 41. TV personality-actress Maria Menounos is 40. Country singer-songwriter Sturgill Simpson is 40. Blues-rock musician Derek Trucks (The Derek Trucks Band) is 39. Rock singer Alex Band (The Calling) is 37. Folk-bluegrass singer-musician Sara Watkins (Nickel Creek) is 37. Tennis player Kim Clijsters is 35. Actress Torrey DeVitto is 34. Tennis player Jelena Ostapenko is 21. Send your birthday information to pcnhnews@pcnh.com. The TDC reported more gains bed tax collections for March and April 2018, but readers were not impressed. Michael Marciniak Sr.: Sorry but I'm gonna have to see the rental prices last year vs this year to believe this story and the number of units rented also. It's the only way I'm gonna buy this bs Welch Lorenz: Indeed. Other local media outlets says the local businesses had a very slow spring and numbers were down. So which is it? Slow or a good spring? Flavia Whosoever Grubbs: Michael Allen Grubbs n I just died of laughter Jason Maximus: Been working on the beach last two months and compared to last 2 seasons this is Dead!! So where's all these people staying because I'm not seeing any upticks in cars or pedestrians anywhere?!! Todd Austin: I wonder if Floribama had anything to do with it? After Environmental Protection Agency Chief Scott Pruitt reportedly used his contacts to try to get his wife a Chick-fil-A franchise, the Washington Post discovered just how difficult it can be to earn a franchise at the chicken giant. Zac Thomas: Unless you're one of Trump's gang of morons like Scott Pruitt. When will we wake ... up and stop these gritters from destroying anything else! Jake Norton: If it's so hard, then why are they everywhere? Derrick Evans: Great fast food and good people that own them! Larry Clemons: They are very successful James Snodgrass: You're the man Michael Sexton Connor Corbitt. Grade 5. St. Andrew School. These Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 03-19-27-30-31 Lotto: 19-21-38-43-47-48; estimated jackpot, $4.5 million Lotto XTRA: 05 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot, $127 million Pick 2 Evening: 8-4 Pick 2 Midday: 9-2 Pick 3 Evening: 2-0-7 Pick 3 Midday: 7-1-3 Pick 4 Evening: 3-2-0-4 Pick 4 Midday: 4-1-4-2 Pick 5 Evening: 6-6-1-7-1 Pick 5 Midday: 9-2-2-4-8 Powerball: 23-28-41-53-56; Powerball: 14; Power Play: 3; estimated jackpot, $87 million Tommy St. Amant sent in this pair of woodpeckers enjoying their early morning breakfast in Lynn Haven. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] TJ Carrington shared this Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, Check out this albino or piebald red snapper caught out of Port Fourchon in Louisiana...Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] 1WORLD OCEANS DAY: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday at various locations in Panama City Beach. Join the fun starting with a beach clean up at the M.B. Miller County Pier from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. There will also be activities and shows at Gulf World from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. After that, head to Diver's Den for an underwater dive from 1-4 p.m., and “ nish off the day at Sharky's for the after party from 5-7 p.m.2JAM SESSION HELVETICA EFFECT: 3 p.m. Friday live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom.3'OH MY' MICK HUBERT, VOICE OF THE GATORS: 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Lyndell Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Mick will talk about his 29-year career as sports radio announcer for the Florida Gators. Pre-registration required. Call Mike Varner 850-527-7184. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Gator Club scholarship fund.4BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30 8:30 p.m. Friday at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Rd., Panama City. For all levels beginners and up. Come enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For more info call 850-277-0566 or email at dpgordon01@ yahoo.com.5MOVIE "KUNDUN": 7 p.m. Friday at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Ave. Panama City, FL. A biographical movie based on the life and writings of the 14th Dalai Lama, the exiled political and spiritual leader of Tibet. Details: www.unityofpanamacity. org unitypc” @gmail.com or 769-7481

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 A3The volume of fatal crashes in such a brief time reminded some local riders of the precarious nature of their passion. Bryan Allen, owner of Southern Iron Kustoms, said he often gets called to tow wrecked bikes to his shop for repair. When he arrived Tuesday evening to the scene of the Thomas Drive wreck, he recognized the bike but couldnt place it „ yet a sick feeling still filled the pit of his stomach, he said.It doesnt matter if you know the person,Ž Allen said. When you see two wheels on the ground, its heart-breaking.ŽIn this case, Allen did know the rider, Jett. The single mother had been bringing her bike to Allen for repairs for a couple of years and would often stop by just to say hey. And while he described her as the shy type,Ž Allen said she stood out among others and seemed to never be in a bad mood.She just had a charis-matic energy,Ž he said. She was one person you wouldnt pass without noticing.ŽAllen said over the years, hes lost more than 10 friends to motor-cycle wrecks, most of which werethe other vehicledrivers fault. And they often were dis-tracted by a cell phone or not paying attention otherwise.Unfortunately, we have a saying,Ž Allen added: Youre either a rider who has gone down or youre a rider on the way down.ŽIn total, 501 motorcyclists died in wrecksin Florida in 2016, FHP reported.Lt. Eddie Elmore said in the summer months, conditions become more conducive for motorcyclists, which in turn means more motorcycles on the road. While the influx of tourism traf-fic can also contribute to crash figures, in both of the recent fatal crashes all the drivers were locals, he said.Elmore said the best way to prevent a tragic incident like the recent two is awareness and cau-tion. He harkened back to the familiar slogan Look twice, save a life.ŽAnytime youre moving your vehicle, traversing a lane, its a good habit to be extra cautious,Ž Elmore said. The summer months are here, and summer travel is here. So we just ask people to look twice.ŽThe odds of surviving a motorcycle wreck are greatly increased by wearing a helmet. However, a helmet can only do so much: According to the most recent available FHP stats from 2016, 50 percent of motorcyclists in fatal wrecks were wearing a helmet. CAUTIONFrom Page A1still werent able to get adequate care. The MIS-SION Act will replace the Choice Program.Kent Hansen, who served in the Marine Corps from 1977 to 2005, said removing the 30-day and 40-mile barrier should significantlyŽ decrease wait times. However, hes still a bit skeptical of the full overhaul of the often criticized VA system.Ill believe it when I see it,Ž Hansen said, though adding he thinks the idea is great. Trump is saying the VA is streamlined. I hope it happens, but Im skepti-cal. Removing the 30-day barrier is outstanding. The veterans deserve to have good medical care.ŽHansen doesnt go to the VA but knows veter-ans who do and has heard them complain about long wait times. How-ever, those same vets also have said the VA clinic in Panama City Beach, which opened in Decem-ber 2016 and replaced a previous clinic at Naval Support Activity Panama City, is a great improve-ment in service.ŽTrump is looking out for veterans and shaking upŽ the VA, Hansen said.Shannon Daub, who served in the Navy from 1986 to 2006, has never used the Choice Program but receives care from the VA and agreed the local system works well. He said the MISSION Act will probably be a good thingŽ and is curious to see how its effects will play out in Bay County and the Florida Panhandle. Having more health care options and short-ening wait times is better for veterans, Daub said.Congressman Neal Dunn, who represents Floridas 2nd Congressional District that includes Bay County, attended Wednesdays signing. Dunn, recently named chairman of the VA health subcommit-tee, is a vocal supporter of the MISSION Act, which also incor-porated legislation he introduced that helps veterans seek life-saving transplant care closer to their home and aims to prevent opioid abuse by allowing the VA to access prescribing data through a nationwide sharing net-work of prescription drug monitoring systems.I feel good about both of those,Ž Dunn, who served as an Army surgeon, said in a phone interview. This is great news for veterans. ... It was a great and moving ceremony.ŽHe said increasing health care options for veterans is important because they sometimes need to see medical spe-cialists they couldnt access under previous VA guidelines. Plus, some towns dont have special-ists, which meant a long drive to the VA facility in Biloxi, Miss., instead of to a nearby neighboring area. OVERHAULFrom Page A1Dunn Weve been waiting so long for this,Ž he said. This is wonderful for us. When we found out about it, we said, Were going to be on that first flight. Were going to take advantage of this.ŽAmerican Airlines offi-cially opened for business locally Thursday morning. To commemorate the official ticket counter opening, airport officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and praised the new service before an audience that included numerous public officials. They were treated to cup-cakes and bottled water, and were then escorted out to the runway to see the water cannon blast over the jet as it came in.The worlds largest airline is now offering ECP passengers nonstop daily service on the 65-seat CRJ-700 jet to Charlotte Douglas and Dallas-Fort Worth air-ports, American Airlines hubs that offer connect-ing flights to destinations around the world.These two airports represent two of Americans largest hubs, opening East and West Coast destinations for local passengers and guests,Ž Airport Author-ity Board member Del Lee said. Its just two hours to Dallas and less than an hour now to Charlotte.Ž He said year after year, the airport continues to grow.Our relationship with American didnt happen overnight,Ž he said. It was a multi-year relationship that happened over time. And instrumental in this process were the efforts of our economic and tourism partners to grow and attract business to the region.ŽLee said the addition of American Airlines to the already strong lineup of legacy airlines at the air-port „ including Delta, United and Southwest „ means our passengers have options this summer and beyond. More daily flights. More non-stop destinations. And seamless access to global connections.ŽEric Morgan, senior vice president of Ameri-can Airlines, said the with the new service to Char-lotte and Dallas-Fort Worth, your community now has access to what we believe is the worlds best airline network. You have access to over 1,500 connecting flights out of Charlotte and Dallas, destinations of 200-, 300-plus around the world.ŽHe said it is exciting to provide the service to the community and the hope is it will be a long and strong partnership.The hospitality that weve experienced here has just been tremendous,Ž Morgan said. And this is one of the nicest looking facilities that weve opened service here in quite a while.Ž AIRLINEFrom Page A1 By Zeke Miller, Jill Colvin and Catherine LuceyThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Heading into his North Korea summit with charac-teristic bravado, President Donald Trump said Thurs-day that attitudeŽ is more important than prepara-tion as he looks to negotiate an accord with Kim Jong Un to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.Preparing to depart Washington for the next weeks meeting, Trump dangled before Kim visions of normalized relations with the United States, economic investment and even a White House visit. Characterizing the upcoming talks with the third-generation autocrat as a friendly negotia-tion,Ž Trump said, I really believe that Kim Jong Un wants to do something.ŽTrumps comments came as he looked to reas-sure allies that he wont give away the store in pursuit of a legacy-defin-ing deal with Kim, who has long sought to cast off his pariah status on the international stage. The North has faced crip-pling diplomatic and economic sanctions as it has advanced d evelopment of its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.I dont think I have to prepare very much,Ž Trump said. Its about attitude. Its about willingness to get things done.ŽDeclaring the summit to be much more than a photo-op,Ž Trump predicted a terrific success or a modified successŽ when he meets with Kim next Tuesday in Singapore. He said the talks with Kim would start a process to bring about a resolution to the nuclear issue.I think its not a onemeeting deal,Ž he said. Asked how many days hes willing to stay to talk with Kim, Trump said, One, two three, depending on what happens.ŽStill Trump forecast that hell know very quickly whether Kim is serious about dealing with U.S. demands.They have to de-nuke,Ž Trump said. If they dont denuclearize that will not be acceptable. And we cannot take sanctions off.ŽTrump, who coined the term maximum pressureŽ to describe U.S. sanctions against the North, said they would be an indicator for the success or failure of the talks.We dont use the term anymore because were going into a friendly negotiation,Ž Trump said. Perhaps after that nego-tiation, I will be using it again. Youll know how well we do in the negotia-tion. If you hear me saying, Were going to use maxi-mum pressure, youll know the negotiation did not do well, frankly.ŽTrump spent Thursday morning firing off a dozen unrelated tweets „ on the Russia investigation and other subjects „ before meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to talk about summit preparations and strategy.I think Ive been pre-pared for this summit for a long time, as has the other side,Ž he said. II think theyve been preparing for a long time also. So this isnt a question of preparation, its a question of whether or not people want it to happen.ŽTrump: Summit depends on attitudePresident Donald Trump shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday in the Oval Of“ ce of the White House in Washington. [SUSAN WALSH/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] President downplays diplomatic prep as meeting with Kim Jong Un draws near

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** A4 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald BERLINGerman police seek fugitive Iraqi over killing of girl, 14German authorities investigating the rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl said Thursday they are seeking a fugitive Iraqi asylum-seeker, but released a Turkish suspect in the latest high-profile crim-inal case involving migrants.The body of the girl, who had been missing since May 22, was found Wednesday buried on the outskirts of the western German city of Wiesbaden.Prosecutors initially told reporters at a news conference Thursday that two men „ a 20-year-old Iraqi and a 35-year-old Turkish citizen, both of whom lived at homes for asylum-seekers in the city „ were suspected of raping and killing the girl on the evening she went missing.BRUSSELSNATO trumpets resolve over Russia, plays down divisionsNATO defense ministers met Thursday in a fresh show of resolve against Russia and played down a series of fes-tering trans-Atlantic disputes that threaten to undermine unity across the 29-nation military alliance.At a meeting in Brussels, the ministers unveiled a new plan to reinforce their presence in any European crisis with the deployment of 30 troop battalions, 30 squadrons of aircraft and 30 warships within 30 days. Details of the plan, drawn up by the U.S. and to be in place by 2020, remain sketchy.The meeting comes just five weeks before a summit of NATO leaders, to be attended by U.S. President Donald Trump.MADRIDSpanish royal couple to visit US, meet President TrumpSpains King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia will travel later this month to the United States, where they will visit the White House as well as Louisiana and Texas.Authorities said in a statement Thursday that the royal couple will begin their trip June 14 with stays in New Orleans and San Antonio, cities that this year are celebrating the 300th anniversary of their foundation and which have close historical ties with Spain.The royals will be in Washington on June 19, where they will be received by President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump.The statement said the foreign minister of Spains new Socialist government, Josep Borrell, will also be on the trip. WESTBOROUGH, MASS. Grocery store workers “ nd rare orange lobsterWorkers at a Massachusetts supermarket have found a rare orange lobster.Roche Bros. Supermarkets said in a Facebook post on May 29 workers at their Westborough store found the lobster in a shipment of crustaceans from Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.It has since donated the lobster to the New England Aquarium in Boston.The Lobster Institute at the University of Maine says the likelihood of a lobster being orange is about 1 in 30 million.The New England Aquarium says the lobster is about 7 to 9 years old. It says the crustacean is lucky to be alive because its color was flashing a neon signŽ to predators.ORLANDO, FLA.Pulse nightclub shooting survivors sue Orlando, policeAlmost two years after a massacre at an Orlando nightclub left 49 people dead and 53 injured, some of the surviving victims were filing a lawsuit in federal court Thursday saying the city and police didnt do enough to try to stop the shooter.More than 35 victims have signed on as plaintiffs, accus-ing the city and its officers violated the Constitutional rights of those who were injured and killed on June 12, 2016, when Omar Mateen opened fire at Pulse. Plaintiffs contend that officers should have more aggressively confronted Mateen to prevent mass casualties. The Associated PressBy Juliet Linderman and Larry FennThe Associated PressCHARLESTON, S.C. „ Housing Secretary Ben Carson says his latest proposal to raise rents would mean a path toward selfsufficiency for millions of low-income households across the United States by pushing more people to find work. For Ebony Morris and her four small children, it could mean homelessness.Morris lives in Charleston, South Carolina, where most households receiving federal housing assistance would see rents rise an aver-age 26 percent, according to an analysis done by Center on Budget and Policy Priori-ties for The Associated Press. Her increase would be nearly double that.Overall, the analysis shows that in the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas, lowincome tenants „ many of whom have jobs „ would have to pay roughly 20 percent more each year for rent under the plan. Thats about six times greater than the growth in average hourly earnings, putting poor work-ers at an increased risk of homelessness because wages havent kept pace with hous-ing expenses. I saw public housing as an option to get on my feet, to pay 30 percent of my income and get myself out of debt and eventually become a homeowner,Ž said Morris, whose rent would jump from $403 to $600. But this would put us in a homeless state.ŽRoughly 4 million low-income households receiving HUD assistance would be affected by the proposal. HUD estimates that about 2 million would be affected immediately, while the other 2 million would see rent increases phased in after six years. The proposal, which needs congressional approval, is the latest attempt by the Trump administration to scale back the social safety net, under the belief that being less generous will prompt those receiving federal assistance to enter the workforce. Its our attempt to give poor people a way out of poverty,Ž Carson said in a recent interview with Fox News.At an event in Detroit on Thursday, Carson said the proposal is a product of budget constraints. He said that the plan could change based on funding for the agency, adding that HUD has already begun working with Congress. The reason that we had to even consider rent increases is because were working with a specific budget,Ž Carson said. And in order not to have to raise rents on the elderly and the disabled or to displace people who are already in programs, that was the only option.ŽThe original rent increases were to make sure we didnt have to raise rents on elderly and disabled people,Ž Carson said. Now we have some increased funding, were not going toŽ have to, he said.The analysis shows families would be disproportionately impacted. Of the 8.3 million people affected, more than 3 million are children.Morris, a pediatric assistant, said she sometimes works 50 hours a week just to get by. Her four young children would be hit hard if her rent increases, she said.Food, electricity bills, school uniforms,Ž she said. Internet for homework assignments and report cards. All of their reading modules at school require the internet, without it theyll be behind their classmates. The kids are in extracurriculars, those would be scrapped. I would struggle just to pay my bills.ŽThe impact of the plan would be felt everywhere.Rent for the poorest tenants in Baltimore, where Carson was a neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and where his own story of overcoming poverty inspired generations of children, could go up by 19 percent or $800 a year. In Detroit, where Carsons mother, a single parent, raised him by working two jobs, rents could increase by $710, or 21 percent. Households in Washington, D.C., one of the richest regions in the country, would see the largest increases: $980 per year on average, a 20 percent hike.This proposal to raise rents on low-income people doesnt magically create well-paying jobs needed to lift people out of poverty,Ž said Diane Yentel, CEO of the National Low Income Hous-ing Coalition. Instead it just makes it harder for strug-gling families to get ahead by potentially cutting them off from the very stability that makes it possible for them to find and keep jobs.ŽWhile the Department of Housing and Urban Develop-ment says elderly or disabled households would be exempt, about 314,000 households could lose their elderly or disabled status and see higher rents, according to the analy-sis by the policy center, which advocates for the poor.Carsons Make Affordable Housing Work Act,Ž announced April 25, would allow housing authorities to impose work requirements, would increase the percent-age of income that tenants are required to pay from 30 per-cent to 35 percent, and would raise the minimum rent from $50 to $150. Analysis: HUD plan would raise rents by 20 percentIn this May 14 photo, two young boys walk across the grass of the Bridgeview Village Apartments in Charleston, S.C. A new data analysis by the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities shows that tenants in Charleston receiving housing assistance could see the second-highest average annual increase in the United States under a new proposal by HUD Secretary Ben Carson. [ROBERT RAY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] DATELINESRICHMOND, VA. Emergency personnel surround a National Guard armored personnel carrier stolen Tuesday from Fort Pickett, Nottoway County, Va. An Army National Guard of“ cer charged with driving the carrier off base while under the in” uence of drugs insisted Thursday he was ordered to do so as part of a training exercise and called the charges against him completely bogus.Ž [GRACE HOLLARS/RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] BILLINGS, MONT.Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk speaks at an Aug. 17 event marking a conservation agreement for a former mining site just north of the park in Jardine, Mont. Wenk said Thursday that hes being forced out as a punitive actionŽ following disagreements with the Trump administration over how many bison the park can sustain, a longstanding source of con” ict between park of“ cials and ranchers in neighboring Montana. [MATTHEW BROWN/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE] KIBBUTZ NAHAL OZ, ISRAELAn Israeli worker extinguishes a “ re started by a kite with attached burning cloth launched by Palestinians from Gaza, Tuesday on the Israel and Gaza border. The Israeli military on Thursday said it dropped lea” ets across the Gaza Strip, warning residents to stay far from the Israeli border during a mass protest. Military of“ cials are expecting a large turnout at Fridays demonstration, raising the likelihood of bloodshed. [TSAFRIR ABAYOV/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 A5By Carla K. JohnsonThe Associated PressSEATTLE „ Suicide rates inched up in nearly every U.S. state from 1999 through 2016, according to a new government report released Thursday.More than half of suicides in 2015 in a subgroup of 27 states were among people with no known mental health condition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found. Suicide is rarely caused by any single factor, health officials said, but information from coroners reports suggest many of the deaths followed relationship problems, sub-stance use and financial crises.Prevention efforts, often focused on mental health, could be broadened to focus on people undergoing life stresses like job losses or divorces, the CDCs Dr. Anne Schuchat said in a media briefing.Suicide is more than a mental health issue,Ž Schuchat said. We dont think we can just leave this to the mental health system to manage.ŽSuicide is the 10th leading cause of death and one of just three leading causes that are on the rise. The others are Alzheimers disease and drug overdoses.There were nearly 45,000 suicides in 2016. Middle-aged adults „ ages 45 to 64 „ had the largest rate increase, rising to 19.2 per 100,000 in 2016 from 13.2 per 100,000 in 1999.The report said people without known mental health problems were more likely to die by firearms than those with known mental health problems. Family members or friends concerned about someone who is struggling can ask directly about suicide and remove firearms or any other means the person is considering from the home, said Jennifer Stuber, director of Forefront Suicide Prevention at the University of Washing-ton in Seattle.Prevention efforts are best done when people can get help solving the underlying drivers of the problems caus-ing them to feel hopeless and despair,Ž Stuber said. The CDC report comes at a time of heightened attention to the issue with the suicide this week of designer Kate Spade. The designers husband, Andy Spade, has said she suffered from depression and anxiety for many years.Overall, the rate rose to 15.4 per 100,000 in 20142016 from 12.3 per 100,000 in 1999-2001. Rates ranged from 6.9 per 100,000 in the District of Columbia to 29.2 per 100,000 in Montana.Twenty-five states saw percentage rate increases of more than 30 percent over the 17 years.The overall data came from coded death certificate records. The information on contributing factors reflect what family and friends told coroners and police in a sub-group of states participating in the CDCs National Violent Death Reporting System. In the one-year analysis of 27 states, opioids were found in 31 percent of the 3,003 suicides involving drug overdoses.The CDC said the 27 states represent nearly half the U.S. population but cannot be considered nationally representative.Sobering report teases out factors leading to suicidesBy Elliot Spagat and Nomaan MerchantThe Associated PressTIJUANA, Mexico „ Undaunted by President Donald Trumps tough talk on immigration, asylum-seekers are forming unusually long lines at the Mexican border, with parents and children sleeping on cardboard in the sweltering heat and waiting for days or even weeks to present themselves to U.S. inspectors.Wait times of a few hours or longer are not uncommon at the border. But the backlogs that have developed over the past several weeks at cross-ings in California, Arizona and Texas „ and people sleeping out in the open for days at a time „ are rare.Telma Ramirez made the trip from El Salvador to seek asylum in the U.S. She arrived at the border in Tijuana with her 5-year-old son and year-old daughter, only to find a crush of others ahead of her.The 27-year-old mother kept checking in at the border cross-ing to see if civilian volunteers were close to calling their num-bers, in a scene that resembled the host station at a crowded restaurant.Finally, on the 20th day, Ramirez made it to the front of the line.You must come every day to see if its your turn. If you dont come, youll lose your place in line,Ž Ramirez said.The exact reasons for the bottleneck are unclear. But the U.S. has been seeing a surge in requests for asylum over the past few years.A top Homeland Security Department official told lawmakers last month that new asylum filings tripled between 2014 and 2017 to nearly 142,000, the highest level in more than 20 years.The official, Francis Cissna, director or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said the asylum backlog stood at 318,000 cases.U.S. Customs and Border Protection said in a statement that any waits in Mexico are expected to be temporary. It said the number of people the agency can take depends on such factors as detention space, complexity of cases, translation requirements, medical needs and traffic at the crossing.Some advocates insist the administration has enough resources to avoid the delays and is dragging its feet to discourage people from trying to come across.The Trump administration has declared a new zero-tol-eranceŽ policy of prosecuting every immigrant arrested for illegal entry, a practice that is separating parents from their children. Asylum-seekers who turn themselves in to border inspectors usually do not face such a fate.At the Hidalgo, Texas, border crossing, parents and children sleep on cardboard on a bridge separating the two countries, waiting for U.S. authorities to signal their time has come, according to volunteers bring-ing them food and water.Lawyers said asylum-seekers at the Nogales, Arizona, cross-ing are camping out for up for five days to make a claim.Across from San Diego, more than 100 asylum-seekers gath-ered Monday in a large plaza at the Tijuana side of the nations busiest border crossing, along-side pushcart vendors selling oatmeal, tamales, burritos and smoothies. Families whose numbers arent called return to Tijuana migrant shelters to pass the time.Volunteer Carlos Salio told them the wait is about three weeks.Salio consulted his tattered notebook of people who left their names with him, calling them out when their turn came.When U.S. authorities said 50 would be allowed to claim asylum that day, Salio encouraged people to go back to their shelters.Everyone knows that when your number is close, you better be here,Ž he told the crowd, many of them women with young children.Separately, in another indi-cation that Trumps hardline actions and rhetoric have had limited effect, the administration said Wednesday that border arrests topped 50,000 for a third straight month in May.That is roughly three times what they were a year earlier and higher than the levels seen during much of the Obama administration. It is not uncommon for asy-lum-seekers to have to wait. A caravan of Central Americans who provoked Trumps anger earlier this spring waited nearly a week.The recent waits have not reached levels seen in 2016, when thousands of Haitians overwhelmed border inspectors in San Diego and had to bide their time for up to five weeks.Under federal law and inter-national treaties, people can obtain asylum in the U.S. if they have a well-grounded fear of persecution back home. Trump administration officials and their allies have charged that the system is rife with fraud and groundless claims and have demanded stricter standards.Senior White House aide Stephen Miller said last month that the integrity of the immi-gration system is completely shatteredŽ and legitimate asylum cases have become a needle in a haystack.Ž About 8 of every 10 asylum-seekers pass an initial screening and are then either held in an immigration detention center or released on bond into the U.S. while their cases wind through immigration courts, which can take years. Many asylum claims are eventually denied.Asylum-seekers form long lines at the borderPeople seeking political asylum in the United States line up to be interviewed Monday in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego. [ELLIOT SPAGAT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Gary DemuthGatehouse Media KansasSALINA, Kan. „ It was no mistake „ a one and six zeroes were popping up on the screen.On March 18, a Kansas Lottery ticket that turned out to be worth $1 million had been left on the counter at the Pit Stop convenience store at Cloud Street and Broadway Boulevard. After running the numbers and verifying its worth, store clerk Andy Patel called the son of the stores owners to find out what to do.He said six zeroes were popping up on the screen,Ž said Kal Patel, no relation to Andy. We couldnt believe it.ŽKal Patel said he was determined to find the rightful owner of the win-ning ticket, even if keeping it would be life-changing for him and his family. I knew it was a longtime customer who had left it here,Ž he said. They didnt know they had the winning ticket, so they never would have known if I hadnt found them. But then youd have to live through the guilt of that all your life.ŽIts been nearly three months since Patel tracked down the lucky $1 million lottery ticket winner, who has chosen to remain anonymous. Lottery officials said the man lived in Lincoln County. Patel said he doesnt regret the deci-sion because it was the right thing to do.Good deeds come back to help you, and bad deeds come back to haunt you,Ž he said. It felt good to find it and then find them.Ž The lost ticket This is how it went down on that fateful Sunday:Earlier that day, a regular male customer had come into the convenience store with three folded-up lottery tickets he had purchased at a store in Lincoln. He asked the clerk to check to see if any of them were winners. Andy Patel checked two of the tickets. After the man left the store, Andy Patel realized a third ticket had been left on the counter „ which, of course, was the $1 million winner.After being called by Andy, Kal Patel rushed to the store. He thought he knew who the customer was from Andys description. He got in his car and began to search for the man.I went into the neighborhood where I knew he lived, but I couldnt find him,Ž he said. Their cars werent outside or anything, and I couldnt find their house, exactly which one it was.Ž Chasing the ownersPatel finally drove back to the store, figuring hed give the customer the ticket the next time he came in. Then Patel decided to take one more drive around the same neighborhood. This time, he saw the customer and his brother driving away. Patel followed them, and eventually they recognized him and stopped.I showed them the ticket and told them they were winners,Ž he said. They started shaking. They couldnt believe it.Ž They all went back to the Pit Stop, where the num-bers were checked yet again just to be sure.All of them matched with winning numbers,Ž Patel said. And thats how they were millionaires.Ž No regrets Patel said he has seen the millionaire customer only once since informing him of the win.The day after they went to Topeka, they stopped in for soda,Ž he said. I havent seen them since. It surprised me. I had no indication where they were going.ŽPatel said friends have chastised him for giving up $1 million. But if given a second chance, he would do the exact same thing.Million-dollar gestureKal Patel, left, tracked down the owner of a $1 million winning lottery ticket on March 18 after the man left a ticket on the counter of the Pit Stop convenience store in Salina, Kan. The ticket was discovered by clerk Andy Patel, right. [TOM DORSEY/ GATEHOUSE MEDIA KANSAS] Man reunites Kansas lottery ticket with rightful owner

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** A6 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com SQUALL LINE ANOTHER VIEW OUR VIEWTim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTSPresident Donald Trumps hostile takeover of the Republican Party continues with his latest destructive moves to increase tariffs against our countrys best allies. Trumps tariff increase of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminum imports will make a few domestic industries happy, but it will hurt many more. The Wall Street Journal editorial board called Trumps recent moves as more like a mess than mastery ... a pile of impulsive, ill-considered threats that are increasing business uncertainty, slowing the economy and irritating friends the U.S. needs on Iran and Korea.Ž As Republican Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska tweeted: Blanket protectionism is a big part of why we had a Great Depression.Ž Frankly, the president risks playing Russian roulette with the world economy. Trump „ who campaigned against Chinese protectionism „ recently moved to help save ZTE, a giant Chinese telecommunications company, yet his tariff increases will hit Canada and Europe much harder than China. Its a textbook case of hurting your friends while helping your enemies. Consider Americas steel and aluminum imports last year: € Canada: $12.4 billion. € European Union: $7.7 billion. € Mexico: $2.9 billion. € China: $2.9 billion. € Japan: $2 billion. Trump has the authority to raise tariffs without congressional approval by simply declaring its in the interest of national security, but thats a stretch since the tariffs will dramatically increase the cost of fighter jets and other weapons. Trump is defending the tariffs by claiming they will protect our domestic steel and aluminum industries, but just imagine the hullabaloo if former President Barack Obama had done something like this. Steel and aluminum are used in all kinds of products sold in the U.S., so Americans will pay more for all kinds of steel and aluminum products. The price of a $5,000 car would jump to $6,000, The Wall Street Journal estimated. Already Canada has responded with its own series of tariffs on steel products, as well as yogurt and beer kegs. Mexico has announced tariffs on steel, lamps and cheese. The European Union has slapped tariffs on $3.3 billion of U.S. products like bourbon, motorboats and cranberries. And, yes, even China has threatened tariffs on imported soybeans, which is justifiably frightening Americas farmers. Even worse, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce estimated the Trump administrations trade policies threaten as many as 2.6 million American jobs. Clearly, there are better ways to protect U.S. trade interests. After all, our allies share our complaints about Chinas habit of dumping products and stealing intellectual property, and the U.S. should forget pressing for new negotiations on NAFTA: Canadian and Mexican leaders are in no mood for that now that theyre facing domestic pressure to stand up to Trump. Can you blame them? A version of this editorial appeared in the Providence (R.I.) Journal, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.Trumps tari s will hurt our economy and our friends Are you on the take?Ž When I tried to get Edgewater, New Jersey, politicians to answer that question, the mayor wouldnt discuss it, ultimately telling me, You may sit down.Ž The town of Edgewater is right across the Hudson River from Manhattan. Anyone fortunate enough to live there gets a spectacular view of New York Citys skyline. But the Edgewater city government wants to seize a choice piece of waterfront land for itself. The spot in question is owned by a developer, the Maxal Group. Maxal bought the property for about $26 million and then spent millions more to clean it up. They planned to build apartments and, to please the town, parks, a school and a ferry stop for commuters. This whole pier would be open to the public,Ž says Thomas OGara of the Maxal Group, showing off the spot in my latest YouTube video. In addition, Maxals development would generate about $12 million a year in taxes for Edgewater. Sounds good to me, or at least good enough to see how the market responds. But Edgewaters politicians just said no. Now theyre using eminent domain law to try to seize the property and spend taxpayer dollars to put Edgewaters Department of Public Works there „ a department of just 13people. Why would they do that? The unsuccessful bidder is a fellow named Fred Daibes,Ž says Maxals lawyer. After Maxal bought the property, Daibes told us, You will never be able to develop this property!  Apparently, Fred Daibes knew something they didnt. Daibes is the biggest apartment developer in the area. He told a reporter, You cant be in Edgewater and not be affiliated with me.Ž I suspect that means Daibes controls Edgewaters politicians. A lawsuit filed by Maxal Group says four city council members got loans from a Daibes-controlled bank, and Mayor Michael McPartland pays below-market rent to live in a Daibes apartment building. (The mayor told a reporter that he doesnt pay below-market rent.) Of course, the politicians give a different reason for seizing Maxals land. They said Maxals project was too big. But they approved an even larger project nearby! That one happens to be controlled by „ you guessed it „ Fred Daibes. Daibes development will have 250 more apartments than Maxals and buildings twice as tall. I tried to ask Daibes about all this, but he declined to be interviewed. Edgewaters mayor and the city council would not agree to talk either. So I went to the Edgewater city council meeting and asked, Are you on the take ... rejecting one building in favor of the one owned by the guy where you live?Ž A town lawyer quickly spoke up, Mr. Mayor, as your legal counsel, Im going to suggest and recommend that you dont answer the question from this gentleman ... certainly not with that tone, that objectionable tone.Ž I asked, Is it true that four of you are getting loans from Mr. Daibes bank, and is it true that you (Mayor McPartland) get a discounted apartment in Mr. Daibes building?Ž The lawyer spoke up again, Mr. Mayor, I dont think its appropriate.Ž Eventually the mayor, without answering my questions, closed the meeting. The lawyer said, Hes done.Ž And that was that. Maybe well get more answers from Edgewater after my video about this circulates. John Stossel is host of StosselŽ on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Misadventures of crony developmentsSerial Trump Squall writer should be advised: Hate is never good. Education is learning how to spot the signs of history repeating itself. Republicans have always loved legislators that dont toe the party line. They lovingly refer to them as RINOs.Ž Way to go, FSU softball girls!!! Trump doesnt need a pardon;Ž hes just playing with the foolish media and nave Democrats. Soon all us old vets will be dead and forgotten waiting on the proper VA health care we earned! Seeing as Trump thought Canada burned down the White House, he probably also thinks there are Canadian Mounties patrolling the streets of the United Kingdom! This guy knows diddly squat about history. How embarrassing. Beam me up, Scotty! Heres a thought for a new conservative strategy. Push for making logic a required course in high school. It would be a death blow to liberalism. Invite this old marine to the White House, Mr. President. Id be proud to come there! Semper Fi. A counter-point to letter writer Myers: Laws allowing government employees to legally purchase military grade weapons are outrageous and disgraceful.Ž Supreme Court justices have lost their minds! Corporations are people! Religion rules the roost! We are going backward instead of forward with their stupid decisions. What in Gods name is happening to our country? What era are we living in?! Kudos to Sam Zell for refusing to be intimidated by the wussies of the Me-Too Movement. Republican Paul Ryan retiring. Then hell turn Democrat and run for president in 2020. Its a sad day for American citizens when Congress is not smart enough to solve the illegal immigration problem! Boy Scouts have to accept girls now, so Im thinking Miss America should now accept men into the competition. Female impersonators could make it more lively! John Stossel

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 A7 BUSINESSPresident Donald Trump shakes hands with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Oct. 11 in the Oval Of“ ce of the White House. When Trump visits Canada this week theres speculation he could walk out of meetings with allies furious over his belligerent t rade policies. [EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Rob Gillies and Paul WisemanThe Associated PressWhen President Ronald Reagan visited Canada three decades ago, he was so friendly with Prime Minister Brian Mul-roney they sang a song together. Expect no duets when President Donald Trump makes his first presidential visit to Canada on Friday for a summit in a picturesque Quebec town with the leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy democracies. The mood will likely be something less than harmonious.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hasnt been shy about venting his fury with Trump for imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports „ including Canadas „ and for justifying the protectionist move by call-ing those imports a threat to U.S. national security.Trudeau has charged that he found the tariffs insultingŽ and said such tactics are hardly how two close allies and trading partners that fought side-by-side in World War II, Korea and Afghanistan should treat one another. The Trump adminis-tration has also clashed with Canada over his insistence that the 24-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement involving the United States, Canada and Mexico be written to better serve the U.S. The prime minister had at first refrained from criticizing Trump, apparently in the hope that he could forge a personal relationship that might help preserve the landmark free trade deal, a forerunner of which Reagan and Mulroney negotiated. Those two leaders became fast friends and famously sang When Irish Eyes Are Smil-ingŽ together in Quebec City in 1985.Trudeaus courting of Trump appeared to work for a time. The president had initially exempted Canada from the steel and alumi-num tariffs in March. But Trudeau became exasperated and took a shot after Trump let the exemption expire last week.Well continue to make arguments based on logic and common sense,Ž he said, and hope that eventually they will prevail against an administration that doesnt always align itself around those principles.ŽThe prime minister had hoped to visit Washington last week to complete what he thought would be the final stages of the NAFTA renegotiation. But Vice President Mike Pence called and demanded he agree to sunset clauseŽ that would end NAFTA unless the three countries agreed to extend it every five years.Trudeau refused, and he canceled the proposed visit. NAFTA talks stalled. Since then, Trump has sounded hostile at times toward Canada.Nelson Wiseman, a professor at the University of Toronto, said he cant recall relations between U.S. and Canada being worse. He said the G-7 meeting will appear to be six lined up against one. There has even been speculation that Trump might walk out of the meetings „ or even decide not to show up.We can never underestimate the pres-idents capability to provide theater in a scenario like this,Ž said Daniel Ujczo, a trade lawyer with Dickson Wright. And it would play well in places like Ohio, where I live. It is world leaders in one these globalist meet-ings, and they are ganging up on him.ŽUnder Trump, the United States has abandoned its traditional role in the G-7. American presidents from Reagan to Barack Obama pressed for freer global trade. And they championed a trading system that required countries to follow World Trade Organization rules.MARKET WATCHDow 25,241.41 95.02 Nasdaq 7,635.07 54.17 S&P 2,770.37 1.98 Russell 1,667.77 8.17 NYSE 12,788.50 10.27COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,298.70 1.60 Silver 16.766 .124 Platinum 900.30 7.30 Copper 3.2680 .0135 Oil 65.95 1.22Trump to nd a chilly host in Canada visit amid trade riftCOMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $205.07 +1.21 Am. Express $101.48 +1.66 Apple $193.46 -0.52 Boeing $368.53 -3.03 Caterpillar $156.29 -0.22 Chevron $126.96 +3.58 Cisco $43.65 -0.61 Coca-Cola $43.44 -0.02 DowDuPont $69.42 -0.62 Exxon $82.88 +0.82 Gen. Electric $13.78 +0.14 Goldman Sachs $233.45 +1.22 Home Depot $196.17 +2.58 Intel $55.88 -1.15 IBM $145.36 +0.65 J&J $123.33 +0.54 JP Morgan $110.80 +0.44 McDonalds $169.48 +7.10 Merck $61.99 +0.06 Microsoft $100.88 -1.61 Nike $74.76 +0.01 P“ zer $36.49 +0.11 Proc. & Gamble $75.76 +1.41 Travelers $129.77 +1.77 United Tech. $127.58 +0.76 Verizon $49.01 +0.60 Walmart $84.95 +0.39 Walt Disney $102.47 +0.56 United Health $248.98 +0.33 Visa $133.84 -2.44THE DOW 30U.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.30 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 20.48 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.85 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.74FOREIGN EXCHANGE At&T $33.81 +0.43 Darden Restaurants $91.40 +0.49 General Dynamics $202.86 +1.34 Hncock Whtny Cor $52.85 -0.15 Hanger Inc $18.00 +0.50 Home Bancshares $23.54 -0.12 Itt Corp $54.62 +0.29 The St. Joe Co $17.85 -0.05 Kbr Inc $18.64 +0.00 L-3 Comms Hldgs $202.31 +1.33 Oceaneering Intl $24.52 +0.71 Regions Financl $19.06 -0.10 Sallie Mae Corp $11.93 -0.01 Southern $43.18 +0.29 Suntrust Banks $70.33 -0.03 Westrock Co $60.56 -0.35 Ingersoll-Rand $90.60 +0.91 Engility Holdings $31.63 -0.43STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST IN BRIEFFree seminar on business exporting next weekA free seminar on export-ing for small businesses will be offered next week at Gulf Coast State College. Business Beyond Borders: Facets of Exporting will be at 7:30 a.m. June 15 in Room 303 of Gulf Coasts Advanced Technology Center.Jorge Arce, director of the U.S. Department of Commerces Export Assistance Center for Jacksonville, Tallahassee and Pensacola; and Andrea Moore, Enterprise Floridas regional manager for international trade develop-ment, will outline a systematic approach to exporting for small business and the resources available through both agencies. The seminar, hosted by Gulf Coasts Business Innovation Center and Veterans Business Outreach Center, is free and open to the public. Register at https://bit.ly/2Jlwxfo, and for more information, call 850-913-2904. News Herald staff reportNEW YORKStarbucks raises price of coffee in most US storesThat Starbucks habit has gotten got a little more expensive.Starbucks said Thursday it has raised the price of a regular drip coffee by 10 cents to 20 cents in most U.S. stores, putting a small brewed coffee at $1.95 to $2.15 in most locations.The company said prices havent changed on drinks such as lattes and iced cof-fees in most stores.Overall, Starbucks Corp. says it has hiked prices by an average of 1 to 2 percent in the past year, which it said was in line with indus-try practices „ though the increase may be higher for particular drinks. TOKYOHonda, GM to team up on electric vehicle batteriesHonda Motor Co. of Japan and U.S. automaker General Motors Co. agreed Thursday to work together in developing batteries for electric vehicles, mainly for the North American market.The companies will col-laborate based on GMs next-generation battery system, both sides said. That will allow both man-ufacturers to continue to keep distinct products, while saving on costs for customers, they said. HONOLULUUber decries price cap passed in HonoluluHonolulu leaders approved a measure Wednesday to limit prices that ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft can charge during peak demand, a cap that the companies say would be the first restriction of its kind in the United States.The measure would prevent surge pricingŽ if increased rates are higher than the maximum fare set by the city.Honolulu attorneys will review the measure before it goes to Mayor Kirk Caldwell, who would have 10 days to sign it into law, allow it to become law without his signature or veto it. The Associated PressSpecial to The News HeraldYour future employee is a young man who has recent work experience as a volunteer custodian at the Boys and Girls Club in Springfield. He is eager to start what would be his first paid job.He prefers working day shift, if possible. He has reliable transportation and is eager to work. Wiping down tables and cleaning a busy lobby or food service area at a restaurant or fast food chain would be ideal for him.He is eligible for OJT, a program where his salary, workers comp and liability insurance are at no cost to the employer for a 90-day work trial period. Will you take a chance on him and help make this young mans dream come true?For information about this client or any of the other services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTMisty, an Arc of the Bay client, recently celebrated ten years working at Wendys in Lynn Haven. Stop by Wendys on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday at lunchtime and say hi to Misty and congratulate her on 10 successful years. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] BRIEFCASE

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** A8 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE PANAMA CITY | B2CITY BEHIND ON TRASH PICKUPSStorms, bad weather put yardwaste services behind schedule ON THE WATER | B4DRILLING IN THE GULF?Despite White House no, drilling proponents still pushing for Gulf to be opened By Genevieve Smith850-522-5118 | @PCNHGenevieve gsmith@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Pastor Rickey Rivers knows hunger doesnt end when school is out. Thats why Rivers founded the Free Summer Lunch for Kids and Teens program, providing tasty and nutritious lunchtime meals for local kids 18 years of age and younger all summer.Theres no qualifying „ all you have to do is show up," Rivers said. "Theres no paperwork, theres no certain income that you have to bring in. ... (If) youre breathing, 18 (years old) and under, you can come here.ŽRivers, who is retired from the Air Force and currently serves at the Praise and Empowerment Center in Panama City, grew up in Savannah, Ga., relying on a free lunch program.Ive been alone since I was Programs o er youth free summer lunchesPiquieta White and Dot Shelby packs carrots into bags at A.D. Harris Learning Village on Thursday for Free Summer Lunch, which provides free lunch to kids for eight weeks during the summer. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ It might have been an hour-and-ahalf drive from Paxton to the Florida State University Panama City campus, but for Makalynn Cassady, that car ride opened up a whole new world of possibilities.For much of Thursday afternoon, Sight Savers America took over the college's Bland Conference Center and introduced local children to a device had the potential to change their lives „ brand new visual aid machines designed for chil-dren with vision disabilities.Sarah Jennings, the grant program manager for Sight Savers, said the organization was able to purchase machines for seven children from Bay and Walton counties, who were identified through their local partners. Each child was given a low vision evaluation to determine which product would be the best fit, and then were given an Onyx desktop video magnifier and a Ruby handheld video magnifier to take home. The funding was provided by the St. Joe Com-munity Foundation and the product manufacturers.The desktop machines, Jen-nings said, run on average about $2,600 each and arent covered by health insurance, putting them well out of reach for many families.Without it, these children wouldnt be able to see,Ž she said.The desktop machine works by plugging into a computer and using a camera to project an image onto the monitor. The gift of sightJennifer Power, 14, uses a portable electronic video magni“ er on Thursday. The device can be taken anywhere to help read or any other visual tasks. [JOSHUA BOUCHER PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] DeVareus Hayes, 9, uses an electronic video magni“ er to check on a loose tooth with Leigh Irvin on Thursday. The magni“ ers were donated to seven children through grants organized by Sight Savers America. The controller for an electronic video magni“ er is pictured Thursday. The device can magnify up to 180 times and has other features to help with different sight disabilities. By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ A local man has been arrested after he allegedly left his dogs „ two of which would later be found dead „ in a van while he went to get intoxicated, accord-ing to official reports.Jason Matthew Reece, 39, appeared in court Wednes-day on charges of disorderly con-duct and animal cruelty resulting in death. The Bay County Sheriffs Office reported arresting him Sunday night at a Beach condo only to learn the next morning that dogs found dead inside a nearby van belonged to him. Reece is currently being held at the Bay County Jail on a combined bond of $10,000, court records stated.2 dogs die in hot car; 1 man chargedReece By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The building that formerly housed the African American Cultural Center, 1412 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., is set to be torn down Monday to pave the way for more parking at the nearby MLK Recreation Center.The building „ which was always meant to be temporary „ is in bad shape, according to Leisure Service Director Keith Baker.Its really dilapidated,Ž he said. The integrity of the roof, the walls, everything is an issue.ŽA leaky building made a poor home for artifacts the cultural center is trying to preserve, so the center moved to the A.D. Harris Learning Center on 11th Street earlier this year, lured by both the promise of a solid roof and more space. Whether A.D. Harris will be the permanent home for the center is still under discussion, and depends largely on what the public wants.However, the center's move left an unwanted build-ing and prime lot right next to one of the citys most popular parks, where parking is often a problem, creating an oppor-tunity for leisure services.In the busy season, or when there is a basketball tournament or an event, there is nowhere to park,Ž Baker said. We really need that space.Ž The plan is to demolish the building Monday, and then hopefully pave the lot and add lighting this fall, Baker said.ECS Inc., which stands for Erosion Control Special-ists, has been hired to do the demolition work for the city. The paving work has not been put out for bid yet. In total, the project is expected to cost $280,000 and is being paid for by the Downtown North Commu-nity Redevelopment Agency.Baker views this as step one in an effort to enhance the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Center.That park is very active, and there is a huge community that supports it,Ž he said. We want people to want to come and spend some time there.ŽOne day, he added, he also would like to renovate the inside of the recreation center.In the meantime, those looking to tour the African American Cultural Center can call the CRA at 215-3869 to request a tour.Former African American Cultural Center to be demolished 1 dog survives days inside hot kennel in van Organization gives out free visual aids to local children Property will become rec center parking lot See FREE, B5 See SIGHT, B5 See CRUELTY, B5

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** B2 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 93/72 91/74 93/68 88/73 88/74 89/70 90/71 91/71 89/69 91/69 89/69 91/71 89/70 86/73 86/73 87/72 87/69 85/7285/7486/7586/7485/74Clouds and sun, a t-storm in spots Cloudy, a shower and t-storm around Mostly cloudy Some sun with a thunderstorm8574848172Winds: W 3-6 mph Winds: W 4-8 mph Winds: WSW 6-12 mph Winds: SW 4-8 mph Winds: ESE 4-8 mphBlountstown 14.21 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 8.18 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 34.80 ft. 42 ft. Century 10.27 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 10.01 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 12:10p 5:27a --7:36p Destin 9:12a 1:01a ----West Pass 11:43a 5:00a --7:09p Panama City 8:23a 12:17a --11:18p Port St. Joe 9:46a 12:25a ----Okaloosa Island 7:45a 12:07a --11:12p Milton 11:25a 3:22a ----East Bay 10:29a 2:52a ----Pensacola 9:45a 1:35a ----Fishing Bend 10:26a 2:26a ----The Narrows 11:22a 4:26a ----Carrabelle 10:45a 3:14a 11:43p 5:23pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018NewFirstFullLast Jun 13Jun 20Jun 27Jul 6Sunrise today ........... 5:41 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 7:42 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 2:07 a.m. Moonset today ......... 2:25 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 86/73/t 88/75/c Daytona Beach 87/71/t 87/72/t Ft. Lauderdale 89/78/t 88/76/c Gainesville 89/70/t 88/70/pc Jacksonville 89/71/t 87/71/t Jupiter 87/75/t 87/74/pc Key Largo 87/79/pc 86/78/pc Key West 87/80/t 87/78/pc Lake City 89/68/t 87/69/t Lakeland 88/71/t 90/71/pc Melbourne 88/74/t 88/74/pc Miami 89/78/t 87/76/t Naples 90/76/t 90/75/pc Ocala 87/68/t 88/70/pc Okeechobee 88/71/t 88/71/pc Orlando 90/72/t 91/73/pc Palm Beach 87/77/t 87/75/pc Tampa 88/74/t 90/75/pc Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 113/83/s 112/84/s Berlin 86/62/pc 86/65/t Bermuda 81/75/pc 80/74/pc Hong Kong 88/82/t 90/81/sh Jerusalem 88/65/s 86/65/s Kabul 93/59/s 89/60/s London 71/54/t 72/55/pc Madrid 71/55/t 70/51/pc Mexico City 78/58/pc 79/59/pc Montreal 74/55/s 74/51/pc Nassau 86/80/pc 86/77/pc Paris 78/61/pc 80/63/t Rome 76/60/t 77/61/pc Tokyo 80/69/pc 83/66/pc Toronto 74/58/pc 77/57/c Vancouver 62/50/r 62/49/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 94/65/pc 91/65/s Anchorage 62/50/c 63/51/pc Atlanta 90/69/pc 89/71/pc Baltimore 83/67/pc 83/64/t Birmingham 93/70/s 90/70/pc Boston 78/60/pc 77/57/s Charlotte 88/68/pc 90/68/pc Chicago 72/62/t 74/64/c Cincinnati 89/68/pc 86/67/pc Cleveland 80/64/pc 73/61/r Dallas 95/75/pc 96/76/pc Denver 93/59/pc 95/65/s Detroit 81/63/pc 74/60/r Honolulu 88/75/pc 87/75/pc Houston 94/75/pc 94/76/pc Indianapolis 90/70/pc 85/68/pc Kansas City 86/67/t 90/70/pc Las Vegas 102/78/s 103/75/s Los Angeles 81/62/pc 81/61/pc Memphis 94/73/pc 92/74/pc Milwaukee 65/56/r 67/55/c Minneapolis 76/62/t 77/64/c Nashville 95/70/s 92/70/pc New Orleans 92/74/s 91/75/t New York City 82/66/pc 80/62/t Oklahoma City 91/72/pc 95/72/pc Philadelphia 84/65/pc 80/63/t Phoenix 108/82/pc 110/82/s Pittsburgh 82/63/pc 76/59/t St. Louis 91/74/pc 90/73/pc Salt Lake City 89/67/s 95/59/s San Antonio 97/75/s 96/77/pc San Diego 75/62/pc 76/63/pc San Francisco 69/57/pc 67/54/pc Seattle 66/50/sh 63/48/t Topeka 88/70/t 94/72/pc Tucson 105/74/pc 104/75/s Wash., DC 85/70/pc 84/67/tSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 79 Today: Wind from the southsoutheast at 4-8 knots. Seas less than a foot. Visibility less than 2 miles in an afternoon thunderstorm. Tomorrow: Wind from the south-southwest at 4-8 knots. Seas less than a foot. Visibility less than 2 miles in a shower or thunderstorm.Partly sunny today with a thunderstorm in spots during the afternoon. Winds south-southwest 4-8 mph. Cloudy tonight.High/low ......................... 85/70 Last year's high/low ....... 82/69 Normal high/low ............. 88/71 Record high ............. 94 (2010) Record low ............... 59 (1997)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date ................... 1.18" Normal month to date ....... 1.15" Year to date ................... 19.82" Normal year to date ....... 23.58" Average humidity .............. 84%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 87/72 Last year's high/low ....... 88/75 Normal high/low ............. 86/74 Record high ........... 100 (1985) Record low ............... 55 (1954)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.18" Normal month to date ....... 1.30" Year to date .................... 27.11" Normal year to date ....... 25.30" Average humidity .............. 76%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachBy Katie Landeck 522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Bad weather and a severe staffing shortage have put the Panama City about a week behind for yard waste pickups.But dont worry, Director of Public Works Neil Fravel said, theyre still coming.We will eventually get there,Ž he promised, adding his crew is working 10 hours day and six day weeks.Normally, 19 employees handle the yard waste pick-up of the city trash collection services, but an unlucky combination of medical con-ditions and vacancies have put the force at about half staff.This week, seven of the positions are not here, either because they are vacant or have a long term medical issue,Ž Fravel said. The week before it was nine.ŽThe timing was very, very bad for the department.Alberto „ though not a major storm „ was the first time the city had experienced sustained winds in a while. As a result, it knocked down a handful of trees and a lot of branches, which didnt nec-essarily seem like a big deal, until all the debris had to picked up.The level of trash was about twice what it would normally be,Ž Fravel said. We are still trying to get through that hump.ŽAs a result, the city is hiring.Bottom line, if you have a Commercial Drivers License, Class B, you should apply,Ž he said. If you want a career in garbage, we are a good place to look.ŽAccording to the city website, the pay is about $25,000 a year with a competitive benefits package. Applicants should be able to pass a drug test.Fravel said this is the first time he can remember the department falling behind since they made the switch from pitchforks to the knuckle trucks over 10 years ago. Staff, he added, is doing everything they can to get back on schedule.P.C. hiring drivers after falling behind on yard pick-upPANAMA CITY BEACHMonday PCB City Hall forum canceledA Monday forum on plans for the new Panama City Beach City Hall has been postponed.City officials said the event, which was to be hosted by newly seated Councilman Geoff McConnell, was canceled after McConnells fathers death in New York. Our thoughts and prayers are with the McConnell family during this time,Ž offi-cials wrote in a news release.Construction on the new $3 million building could begin as soon as July and be com-plete in less than a year.PANAMA CITYDowntown P.C. scavenger hunt this weekendThis is your chance to be a sleuth.Downtown Panama City is a holding a freefamily scavenger hunt from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Participants can pick up a map Saturday morning at Main Street Antiques on Harrison Avenue, Bou Cou Dancewear-Panama City, The Little Mustard Seed or Vinny & Bays Coffee and Eatery and start searching.The hunt will feature over 30 businesses as well as some public locations. People can win prizes by gettingtheir map punched at participating locations and posting photos to social media with the hashtag #downtownpanamacity.The event is not a competition, but prizes will be awarded. For more information, go to down-townpanamacity.com. FREEPORTWalton SO: Have you seen this teen?The Walton County Sheriffs Office is asking for the publics help locating a missing juvenile. WCSO reported Xavier Khaled, 16, ran away from a home on Mallet Bayou Road in Freeport. He last was seen about 10:30 p.m. June 3 and is believed to have gone with friends contacted via Instagram to the Navarre area. Khaled also has friends in Cantonment.Khaled is as a Hispanic male, 5-foot-7, 165 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes. He last was seen wearing a Foley football compression shirt, blue jeans and a yellow bag.Anyone with information is asked to call WCSO at 850-892-8186 or remain anonymous by calling Emerald Coast Crime Stoppers at 850-863-TIPS. Submit a web tip at www.emeraldcoastcrimestoppers.com/ or send a mobile tip using the P3 Tips mobile app.PANAMA CITY BEACHNarcotics, counterfeit found during arrestWhen the Bay County Sher-iffs Office Warrant Division went to arrest a man for alleg-edly assaulting a pregnant woman and violating proba-tion, they also found evidence of counterfeiting and drugs.Bobby Gene Brogdon, III, was arrested June 6 on three outstanding warrants at his home at 6501 S. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach.Brogdon was wanted for Aggravated Battery on a Pregnant Female, Fleeing and Eluding a Law Enforcement Officer, and Violation of Probation. Brogdon was on probation for Aggravated Assault, Obstruction of a crime Scene, and Introduc-tion of Contraband into a Jail.During his arrest he was found in possession of con-trolled substances, according to a press release. Special Investigations were called to the scene and „ after a search warrant obtained „ found narcotics. As a result of nar-cotics found, Brogdon was charged with Possession of Methamphetamine, Posses-sion of Drug Paraphernalia, and Keeping a Public Nui-sance Structure.Also found during the search were various items related to the manufacture of counterfeiting United States currency as well as a large amount of printed counter-feit currency, the release said. The printed currency and all items used to create it were confiscated. Now, Brogdon faces additional charges of Possession of Counterfeit Bills and Possession of Equipment to Manufacture Counterfeit Bills. News Herald Staff ReportsAREA BRIEFSKhaled

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 B3WHATS HAPPENINGGuidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIESTodayHEATHER CLEMENTS 'WE ARE NATURE': Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com NELE ZIRNITE 'ANOTHER SKY': Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details: TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 WORLD OCEANS DAY: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at various locations in Panama City Beach. Join the fun starting with a beach clean up at the M.B. Miller County Pier from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. There will also be activities and shows at Gulf World from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. After that, head to Diver's Den for an underwater dive from 1-4 p.m., and “ nish off the day at Sharky's for the after party from 5-7 p.m. JAM SESSION HELVETICA EFFECT: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. 'OH MY' MICK HUBERT, VOICE OF THE GATORS: 5:30 p.m. at the Lyndell Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Mick will talk about his 29-year career as sports radio announcer for the Florida Gators. Pre-registration required. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Gator Club scholarship fund. Details: Mike Varner, 850-527-7184 BALLROOM DANCING: 6:308:30 p.m. Friday at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. Come enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. Details: 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com MOVIE 'KUNDUN': 7 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. A biographical movie based on the life and writings of the 14th Dalai Lama, the exiled political and spiritual leader of Tibet. Details: www.unityofpanamacity. org unitypc” @gmail.com or 769-7481 SaturdayBAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details: 769-2645 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Siena Gardens Apartments Community Building, 901 W. 19th St., Panama City. AARP members w/card $15; nonAARP participants $20. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 HYPERTENSION AND KIDNEY DISEASE WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at AD Harris Learning Village, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. Talks on hypertension, blood pressure, diet and salt, dialysis and testimonies and experiences. Details: Ella Williams, 358-9879 HERMIT CRAB FESTIVAL: 4-8:30 p.m. at Kinsaul Park in Lynn Haven. Details, CityOfLynnHaven.com FAMILY SCAVENGER HUNT: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. More than 30 businesses and public areas will be involved. Free to participate. Get your map and prize details at Bou Cou Dancewear, Vinny & Bay's, The Little Mustard Seed, and Main Street Antiques. Details, DowntownPanamaCity.com/ ScavengerHunt PARADISE GOSPEL FEST: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at McKenzie Park, in memory of Doris L. Pruitt Gipson. Activities for children, local artists, gospel DJ, food vendors, health care services information and more. The festival will highlight Panama City First Ladies and gospel recording artist Adrian Dunn. Details: paradisegospelfest.wixsite. com/mysite MURDER MYSTERY DINNER, 'STAYING ALIVE': 6 p.m. 350 N. Cove Blvd., Panama City, presented by the GFWC Woman's Club of Panama City. Tickets are $25 per person for dinner and a mystery. Details: Lois Lawrence, 763-5876 SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY: THE LITTLE MERMAID: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the SweetBay neighborhood of Panama City. This event it free and open to the public. SundayPANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 FREE ACTOR WORKSHOP: June 10-12 at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Focus on discovering and developing character using ensemble work, improvisation, voice and body techniques and more. Teacher Liz Sutton Stone is the founder of Old Hat Theatre Co. based in Brooklyn, NY. No cost to participate. Details, METShakespeareLab@gmail. com SAUVIGNON BARK WINE FOR PAWS: 2-7 p.m. at Funky Mermaid Lounge, 474 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Help raise funds for homeless dogs in Bay County by supporting Quincy's Hope Canine Non-Pro“ t Rescue & Education. Wine tasting, silent auction, raf” e baskets, art, music, snacks and food menu. Wine tasting includes souviner glass, $20$25 suggested donation. GAY THE HATHAWAY: 3 p.m. at Carl Grey Park. PRIDE Weekend ends with a march across the Hathaway, with pride ” ags. After the march, swim and chat at the park. Hosted by PFLAG of Panama City. LIVE A LIFE WORTH LIVING WITH ART: 4-8 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. A variety of local artists, musicians, writers, dancers and theatrical perfo rmers will share their talents, skills and awareness of how life is worth living through participation in the arts, and that it brings healing and direction to those living with mental illness or other brain disorders. Help raise awareness of mental health disorders while bene“ ting local children on the verge of suicide. All money raised will go to getting help for local youth contemplating suicide. Details at ArtLifePC. com MondayWEIGHT-LOSS SUPPORT GROUP MEETING: 9-11 a.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, corner of Beck Ave. and 14th St. Sponsored by TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). Details 769-8617 or TOPS.org. 'ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com CALLAWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUMS AND ONE-ROOM SCHOOL TOUR: 10 a.m. 1 p.m. located at 522 Beulah Ave. Callaway. The tour is free, but donations are always welcome. 'ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com GROOVIN' ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Nite“ re on the Village Green in Carillon Beach & concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. TuesdaySPRING FLORAL SHOW EXHIBIT: Noon to 4 p.m. at The Artist Cover studio gallery, 36 West Beach Dr., Panama City. Free admission. Open TuesdaySaturday until July 1st. Details: 850-215-2080 or TheArtistCoveStudio.com NANCY SPRINGER AUTHOR VISIT: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach; and6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. The award winning author of The Books of Isle fantasy series, the Enola Holmes mystery series, and a plethora of other novels will discuss her latest release, "The Oddling Prince." Free admission. Books will be available for purchase. BAY COUNTY REPUBLICAN ROUNDTABLE MEETING: 5:30 at the St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club, 218 Bunkers Cove Rd., Panama City, FL. Guest Speaker: President /CEO Bay County Chamber of Commerce, Ms. Carol Roberts. Details: 850-541-8039. JAZZ-QUARTET AT 'THE PLACE DOWNTOWN': 6:30 p.m. at The Place Downtown, 429 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring classic jazz of the 1950s and 1960s. Admission is $10 for Gulf Jazz Society members and $12 for others. Call 784-2106 for reservations.Submit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday beforeDwayne Earl Atkins, 89 of Sanford, N.C., a United States Air Force veteran of the Korean War, died Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, 2018, in Pinehurst, N.C. He was born April 5, 1929, in Columbus, Ga. Raised in Bonifay, Fla., he is a son of a farmer, Aaron Curtis Atkins, and Nellie Mae Sapp Atkins, and a 1962 graduate of Florida State University with a Masters degree in Business Administration. He was a lifelong member of the Assemblies of God, serving the Lord as Sunday School Superintendent for 60+ years in various churches across the country. Teaching children about Jesus was his passion. He was married to his church youth group sweetheart, Mildred Elizabeth Addison Atkins, on June 5, 1949, and they were marriedfor 69 years. They spent their honeymoon in 1949 at Niagara Falls in Canada. It started with a hello as she saw him walking up the sidewalk to church in Panama City, Florida. They had a lifelong love story. Dwayne was an example of how a husband should honor and love his wife. He preceded her in death, and she followed him on Friday, June 1, 2018. Mildred, 87, of Sanford N.C., was the first baby to be born the year Bay County was formed in Panama City, to Ezra Amos Addison and Clyde Brookins Addison on Jan. 3, 1931. She is a 1949 graduate of Bay County High School. Mildred comes from a wonderful Assembly of God heritage. Her father, Ezra Addison, was, and her brother, Rev. Leslie Milford Addison, is retired Assembly of God pastors. Her sister Linda Mead and her husband, Rev. James Ray Mead, and niece, Alicia Joy Addison Craft, were Assembly of God missionaries. Their final years were in North Carolina; however, they had lived in several cities in Florida, Illinois, Georgia, Wyoming and Colorado. They are survived by two daughters, Lisa Winkie and husband, Billy Winkie, of Sanford, and Lora Middleton and husband, Kevin Middleton, of Athens, Ga.; three grandchildren, Alisa Winkie of California, Kaylee Atkins and fianc Philip Jennings, and Kody Nixon and fianc Crystal Weaver of Athens, Ga. Dwayne is survived by one sister-in-law, Carolyn Atkins of Georgia. Mildred is survived by one brother, Leslie Milford Addison and wife, Joyce, of Macon, Ga.; and two sisters, Mary Loyce France of Panama City and Janice Temples and her husband, Ron Temples, of Marietta, Ga.; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. A visitation was held from 6-8 p.m. last Saturday, June 2, 2018, at Miller-Boles Funeral Home in Sanford, N.C. The funeral services were held at 4 p.m. Sunday, June 3, 2018. at 1Hope Assembly of God with Pastor Greg Davenport and Pastor Ronnie Whitaker Jr. officiating. A graveside service will be held for family and friends on Saturday, June 9, 2018, at 10 a.m. Live Oak Assembly of God in Bonifay, Fla. Pastor Edwin Bell and Pastor Chuck Glass officiating.DWAYNE EARL ATKINS & MILDRED ELIZABETH ADDISON ATKINS Jerome W. Gerhart Sr., 89, of Panama City, died June 3, 2018. Per Jeromes request, no services are being held. To extend condolences, please visit www. heritagefhllc.com.JEROME W. GERHART SR.Mr. Michael Ray Hancock, 52, of Panama City, died June 5, 2018. Funeral services will be 10 a.m. Saturday, June 9, 2018, at First Baptist Church of Deerpoint Lake. The family will receive friends from 5-7 p.m. Friday evening at Southerland Family Funeral Home.MICHAEL RAY HANCOCKCalling hours for Mrs. Angelia Y. Hand, 50, will be held at the mortuary today,June 8, 2018, from 7-8 p.m. The funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 9, 2018, at Carter Temple F.B. Church 308 Williamsburg Road,Wewahitchka, Fla. Internment will follow in the Buckhorn Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary, 1547 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, 850-640-2077.ANGELIA Y. HANDA memorial service for Junie TomŽ Hawthorne, 84, of Panama City, whodied Friday, June 1, 2018, will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 9, 2018, in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel.JUNIE 'TOM' HAWTHORNEInfant Hope Sariah McClain's graveside rites will be held Saturday, June 9, 2018, at 1 p.m. at Hillside Cemetery, Panama City, Fla. Arrangements entrusted to Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary, 1547 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, 850-640-2077.HOPE SARIAH MCCLAINDorothy Jean Pippin, 87, of Panama City, died Monday, June 4, 2018. A celebration of Dorothys life will begin at 2 p.m. Friday, June 8, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home. The family will receive friends beginning at 1:30 p.m., prior to the service. To extend condolences, please visit www. heritagefhllc.com.DOROTHY JEAN PIPPINDonald Floyd Schaaf,61, of Columbus, Ga, died Sunday, June 3, 2018. Visitation for Mr. Schaaf will be heldSunday, June 10, 2018, from 2-4 p.m. at McMullen Funeral Home and Crematory in Columbus, Ga.DONALD FLOYD SCHAAF

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** B4 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News HeraldTerry SpencerThe Associated PressSUNRISE „ The commission investigating the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School received an overview Thursday of the states police diversion programs for juveniles accused of minor crimes as the members try to ascer-tain whether something could have been done to prevent the Valentines Day shooting that left 17 people dead.The presenters told the 15 members of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission the programs have been successful in reducing juvenile crime and repeat offenders, along with decreasing the number of school suspensions, expulsions and offenses. They could not specifically discuss Niko-las Cruz, the 19-year-old former Stoneman Douglas student charged with the killings. Critics have said he should have been arrested after more than 20 contacts with law enforce-ment officers over the years along with numer-ous incidents at school that included threats, vandal-ism and violent outbursts.Mark Greenwald, the director of research for the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, told the commission that diversion programs for low-level offenders are widely suc-cessful. For example, only 4 percent of juveniles who are referred to community programs through a widely used civil citation program reoffend within a year.Under that program, juveniles who commit minor offenses such as underage drinking, petty shoplifting and minor vandalism are required to perform community service, often within days of the offense, rather than have a criminal case that will drag for months through the court system and leave them with a record that could hurt their ability to attend college, get a job or join the military. He also said locking up such low-level offend-ers also has a tendency to lead them into more seri-ous crimes as they are exposed to violent and felonious teens.Greenwald pointed out that almost all law-abid-ing, responsible adults did something as a teenager that could have gotten them arrested if they had been caught or if a police officer had not decided to cut them a break. For him, an officer let him go for drinking beer under the school bleachers.For most youth, we start with a light touch,Ž Greenwald said, adding that usually works. We know that two-thirds of the kids are arrested in Florida are arrested once and dont come back.ŽFor those who do repeat, he said, they get put into the juvenile justice system and often wind up on probation or in detention.Broward County schools do offer a Promise program, a diversion system that has received criticism since the massacre. Cruz was referred to the program in middle school after committing vandalism, but for unknown reasons never completed it. School officials say he was never referred to Promise in high school although he allegedly threatened other students and teachers.Critics have said the program has allowed teenage criminals to remain in regular schools like Stoneman Douglas instead of being expelled, sent to alternative schools or arrested. One of its most outspoken critics, the father of slain student Meadow Pollack, resigned from the commission Thursday. Andrew Pollack says he wants to concentrate on getting new members elected to the Broward County school board to eradicate the Promise program and to tighten campus security.The commission must submit a report to Gov. Rick Scott by Jan. 1 detailing the members findings on the cause of the massacre and their recom-mendations for preventing future school shootings.Meanwhile, Cruzs attorneys have asked a judge to block the release of parts of what police call his confession. The motion filed Wednesday contends that parts of the statement will cause significant trauma to an already belea-guered communityŽ and its release would violate Cruzs constitutional rights to a fair trial and against self-incrimination. A hearing is scheduled for Friday.Cruzs attorneys have said he would plead guilty in return to a sentence of life without parole. Pros-ecutors are seeking the death penalty.Justice o cials: Student diverision programs often workLori Alhadeff,center, the mother of Parkland shooting victim Alyssa Alhadeff, looks on during the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission Meeting on Thursday. [DAVID SANTIAGO/AP] By Jim TurnerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Pro-ponents of drilling for oil and natural gas havent given up on tapping areas closer to Floridas shoreline despite repeated assurances those waters will be exempt from a White House plan to expand exploration. The Washington, D.C.-based American Petroleum Institute announced Wednesday a multi-state Explore OffshoreŽ coalition to support the Trump administrations plan to open previously protected parts of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling.The coalitions Florida team, which is focused on the eastern Gulf waters, includes former Lt. Gov. Jeff Kottkamp, former Okaloosa County Commissioner Wayne Harris, former Puerto Rico state Sen. Miriam Ramirez and Florida Petroleum Council Executive Director David Mica.Mica said Floridians use more than 25 million gallons of motor fuel a day, while the industry is restricted from some very, very good areasŽ that potentially have oil.We need to do it in an environmentally respon-sible manner, but we must go forward,Ž Mica said. I think that its really put-ting your head in the sand if you think that were not going to need a lot more oil and gas into the future and that we can rely only on alternative fuels.ŽMany Florida officials, including Gov. Rick Scott, Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Noah Valenstein and members of Floridas congressional delegation from both sides of the political aisle have denounced the possibility of opening to drilling almost all of the nations outer continental shelf „ a jurisdictional term describing submerged lands 10.36 statutory miles off Floridas west coast and 3 nautical miles off the east coast.Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke appeared briefly Jan. 9 in Tallahassee to announce drilling would not occur off the Florida coast. But the Trump administrations stance has not been formalized and continues to draw questions.U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., on Wednesday equated the petroleum industrys new coalition with lingering skepticism over Zinkes assurances that waters off the Florida coast will be exempt from the plan.Here we go. Like us, Big Oil doesnt believe Florida is really off the table to new drilling „ despite what Scott and the Trump Administration keep saying „ and now they are making a new push to drill closer to Floridas shores,Ž Nelson tweeted. We cant let that happen!ŽThe federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Manage-ment is expected to release a draft report on the offshore proposal before the end of the year. That will kick off a second round of public hearings.Drilling proponents have hailed the prospects of exploring for oil and gas closer to shore as benefiting consumers by potentially creating jobs and additional government revenue while strengthen-ing national security.The American Petroleum Institute said its coalition features more than 100 businesses, organizations and offi-cials from Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.In its release, the institute highlighted Floridas dependence on natural gas, which generates 67 percent of the states elec-tricity, and forecast that offshore development could result in $2.6 billion in private investment in Florida and $1 billion per year in state revenues.Petroleum Institute announces Explore O shore coalitionThe multi-state Explore OffshoreŽ coalition will support the Trump administrations plan to open previously protected parts of the Atlantic Ocean and eastern Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling. [FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 B5Reece recently had pleaded no contest to a disorderly conduct charge officers believe occurred June 2, the night he left the dogs in the van. But during his arrest, Reece did not mention the dogs, BCSO reported.At no time did Reece tell deputies he had left his vehicle nearly a half mile away parked in front of a Dollar General Store,Ž officers wrote. Reece also did not inform the deputy he had left three small dogs locked inside the vehicle.ŽAccording to BCSO reports, deputies responded June 3 to a complaint about a man who appeared intoxicated and was pulling on handles of vehicles at condo complex. Deputies approached Reece in the nearby parking lot, and he claimed he thought the vehicle belonged to a friend of his, officers reported.Deputies reported smelling alcohol on Reeces breath. He reportedly claimed to be from Tennessee but was not able to provide the name of anyone he knew locally, so he was taken to jail for disorderly conduct, BCSO reported.Days later, Reeces wife contacted BCSO wondering where her van was and expressed concern about the three dogs that were inside. Officers told her Reece had been arrested but had never mentioned anything about a vehicle or dogs.Reece, still in custody at the jail, reportedly told officers he did not know where he left the van. Officers began canvassing the area for the van, and found it in the park-ing lot of a nearby Dollar General. Inside the locked van, deputies found two of the dogs had died inside the kennels where they were being kept, but one was still alive, BCSO reported.Authorities opened an investigation into animal cruelty charges on Reece as Animal Control took possession of the living and dead dogs.When Reece appeared in court earlier that morn-ing, he was conditionally released on the disorderly conduct charge. BCSO had begun attempting to find him again as part of their animal cruelty investigation when he called from a business in Southport, claiming he was in mental distressŽ because his wife was angry with him and needed to talk to a deputy, BCSO reported.Deputies responded and brought Reece to BCSO for questioning about the animal cruelty charges. Reece allegedly admitted to knowing about the vehicle and the dogs left inside and said he failed to act upon that knowledge, causing the death of two of his dogs. He was arrested and taken back to the Bay County Jail. CRUELTYFrom Page B1The camera can be used to magnify books, or it can be swiveled forward to magnify whiteboards in class, or even to show the children themselves and help with getting ready in the morning. It can also increase contrast and has special color modes, like a black background with yellow text for even higher contrast, or blue colors for children who are colorblind.Sometimes we encounter children who are reading with the pages touching their nose,Ž Jennings said. Some children we encounter are able to see their faces clearly for the first time.ŽFor Makalynn Cassady, who was trained on the new machine at FSU Panama City before taking it home, school work has always been a little bit too small. She also likes to make jewelry, but has never been able to see well enough to string beads or open the clasps and needs her mothers help. While she was a little nervous about the new machine, her mother, Dakota Cas-sady, was excited enough for both of them.I was excited,Ž Dakota Cassady said. We dont have anything like that at home to help her. I thought, 'Wow, this is going to open up a brand new door for her.ŽBecause they have such trouble seeing, Jennings said many times, people with visual impairments are reading in ways that are actually more dam-aging to their eyes „ way up close or in too bright of light. And if they cant see the board at school or read their homework, their schoolwork, and self esteem, can take a hit.This is really life changing for the children we encounter,Ž Jennings said. Its a big help for the children with their independence, their schoolwork, their life in general. It helps with their self esteem, to see and just do something as simple as writing your name.Ž SIGHTFrom Page B113,Ž he said. If it wasnt for that (program), I may have turned to a different type of life instead of having a doctorate degree, instead of grad-uating college, instead of retiring in the Air Force. So what I always want to do is give back to those people who gave to me.ŽIn order for the program to qualify for reimbursement from the state, all meals served must meet federal nutri-tional requirements, whichcall forspecific portions of each food group. But it was impor-tant to Rivers that the food taste good while remaining nutritional.I said, 'I want the best. I want kids to want to come and eat here,'Ž he said. So I found out the best meals and I just duplicate it every year, and they love it. And they dont have all the food they dont like „ the bland things.ŽThere are different meals every day „ from sandwiches, hamburgers, hot dogs and corndogs, to ordering pizza from a local shop, in addition to the fruits, veggies, and container of milk received with every meal.We do everything that you would have at home,Ž Rivers said.So far, the program hasnt encountered chil-dren with complicated dietary needs, but if the kid says I cant have cheese on this cheese-burger, Ms. White will go back there and fix them up," Rivers said. "We take care of that. I mean, its not difficult because thats what were here to do; to serve.ŽThe program is entering its eighth year of supplying meals to local children. Last year, the program provided 3,200 meals over the course of the eight weeks.This year, Rivers believes there will be an increase in numbers. He hopes more church youth programs over the summer will utilize the free lunch program so they can save money to access more fun activities instead of spending it on food.This is my way of giving back to the communities; feeding the kids, because one kid may turn out to be a whole lot better than me,Ž Rivers said. The more kids we can serve, the better it is for the community.ŽThe program operates 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the A. D. Harris Learn-ing Village cafeteria, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. FREEFrom Page B1Leigh Irvin demonstrates an electronic video magni“ er for DeVareus Hayes, 9, on Thursday. The machines can magnify up to 180 times. [JOSHUA BOUCHER PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] Jennifer Power, 14, uses a portable electronic video magni“ er on Thursday. The device can be taken anywhere to help read or any other visual tasks. Only one of three dogs discovered in the back of a van left in the heat for several days survived. Jason Reece, 39, has been charged with animal cruelty resulting in death. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] SUMMER BREAKSPOTFree Summer Lunch isn't the only program providing free meals for students this summer. All three Bay County Boys & Girls Clubs will serve free meals for students 18 and under until Aug. 10 through Summer BreakSpot, a nationwide program. The centers are at the following locations: C.C. & Vivian Moore Boys & Girls Club: 3404 W. 19th St., Panama City Joseph F. Chapman Boys & Girls Club: 3030 E. Third St., Panama City Frank Brown Beach Boys & Girls Club: 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach More local centers providing free lunch or free breakfast can be found at SummerBreakSpot.org. Piquieta White cleans carrots at A.D. Harris Learning Village on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] Dot Shelby packs lunches into coolers at A.D. Harris Learning Village on Thursday. Instead of taking the students from Little People Learning Center to A.D. Harris, the day care takes lunch to the program.

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** B6 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News HeraldDEAR ABBY: I have a friend who brags nonstop about her boyfriend, her job, her new car, etc. She only comes out of the woodwork every so often to text me things like, Roy just got a $13 raise at work!Ž I respond with wholehearted support and congratulations, then dont hear from her again until days later, when I receive another text saying something like, My boss said I can work any hours I want from now on!Ž Im not sure why she sends me these messages. Could it be to make me jealous of her fairytaleŽ lifestyle, which Im not sure I believe she even truly lives? We have no other meaningful conversation or time together, and I am growing tired of texts that are solely meant to showcase her wins in life. I have tried to distance myself by responding less and less and not initiating conversations, but then she asks why Im madŽ at her. I feel like I am nothing more than a wall she posts her accomplishments on. I have no desire to be friendsŽ with her anymore, but Im not sure how to get out of it. Thoughts? „ EX-FRIEND IN THE EASTDEAR EX-FRIEND: Continue to respond to her texts less and less frequently. If she asks if you are mad at her, tell her you arent mad, you are busy. If she wants more detail, tell her you have noticed that she has shown no interest in what your life is like, and to you thats not friendship.DEAR ABBY: My mother is getting up in years. Because of a multitude of health problems, she will soon have to enter a nursing home. She currently lives in her own home with her dog, Skippy,Ž and is facing the problem of what to do with Skippy when she has to move. Skippy has growled at people in the past, including children, and has a brief biting history, which limits Moms options and makes it impossible for her to bring the dog with her to a group nursing home. Were unable to take Skippy on because were at our legal limit, according to the laws of our municipality, and we know of no one we can place a dog with such issues with. Any ideas? „ NEEDS A HOME FOR NIPPY SKIPPYDEAR NEEDS: Contact the dog rescue groups in your area. Perhaps they can locate a home for an older dog „ I assume Skippy is older „ in a household where there are no children. Its regrettable that your mother didnt socialize her pet when it was a puppy, because it would have made it easier to keep Skippy with her. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.DEAR ABBYWoman looks for exit ramp out of one-way friendshipTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@ TriviaGuy.com 1. In what country are parents of newborns required to choose from one of 7,000 governmentapproved names, or get church approval? Denmark, Japan, Brazil, India 2. During World War II, what was the American atomic bomb development program? Philadelphia Experiment, Tommy Boy, Manhattan Project, Fat Boy 3. What did Beethoven often pour over his head when he sat down to create music? Seawater, Ice water, Goat milk, Wine 4. Wooden clarinets are most always made from the wood of which tree? Granadilla, Cedar, Mahogany, Redwood 5. What type tree is struck most often by lightning? Oak, Pine, Maple, Palm 6. In which ocean would you find Iceland? Paci“ c, Atlantic, Indian, Arctic ANSWERS: 1. Denmark, 2. Manhattan Project, 3. Ice water, 4. Granadilla, 5. Oak, 6. AtlanticHOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) TWIRLWEDGE SMOOTH GOVERN Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: Jim Morrison and his band had so many fans, it was difficult to „ GETIN THE DOORS Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. SYIRK OSNOW CAYNUL NNIALD 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudoku Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold. ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Close your eyes and breathe through the intense moments of the day. Without visual stimulus youll get internally focused. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Were told over and over that life isnt fair. We see with our own eyes that its not. And yet, the belief that life should be fair still permeates our thinking. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Commercial purposes serve the client. Artistic purposes serve the muse. It will bene“ t your soul and your pocketbook to do a little of each type of service in the days to come. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Stick your neck out and seek opportunity, because even though its fallen in your lap before (and will again), the best options will arise from a concerted effort on your part. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Were all just trying to get along using what we have to work with. Perhaps it will help you to think of someone whom you once would have called disabledŽ as, more aptly, differently abled.Ž VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ Metaphorically speaking, instead of short seats or tall seats, consider an adjustable seat. It will cost more, but unlike short and tall seats, which are only totally correct in one scenario, adjustable seats will be continually useful. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ When people wont listen to you, listen to them. Theyll (indirectly and accidentally) tell you where their weaknesses are and what theyre missing. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ You think you know what theyre trying to say, but you ask questions anyway. Conversely, you dont expect others to readily understand your message, so you pose it a few different ways, making it bulletproof. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ The outcome youre worried about is unlikely „ that is, unless you keep up the worry, in which case your “ xation will trick your mind into assuming you want that scenario, and it will do everything in its power to make it so. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ There is only one person in your life you can truly change, and thats you. Even that takes a considerable amount of effort. Remember this fact of life and save yourself some trouble. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ More people getting involved doesnt necessarily mean more productivity. The work will still only be done by the same people who were doing it before „ namely, you and your crew. Seek ef“ cient solutions for a tight team. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ In text, email and conversations that happen in real time, there are no take-backs. Be thoughtful. Plan it out. Consider where it could go wrong.

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 B7 COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** B8 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 C1 SPORTS NBA | C3SIXERS COLANGELOBryan Colangelo resigned as president of 76ers a er internal investigation PRO BASEBALL PERISCOPE | C2STAY UP TO DATEFollow the progress of local players in the major and minor leagues By Beth HarrisThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Walking into Belmont Park is like old home week for Mike Smith.The jockey knows the vast track with its sweeping turns like the back of his hand. Fans who remember him from his successful years riding the New York circuit will hoot and holler.Smith feels a comfort level at the track that has spelled heartbreak for so many other Triple Crown attempts over the years.Now he and Justify will take their turn, with a win in the Belmont Stakes on Saturday making the colt racings 13th Triple Crown winner and second since 2015. I pray that we just get our chance and all those years of experience over it come into play because if thats the case, well be tough,Ž Smith said recently. Its actually one of my favorite racetracks. You can do so many different things that can win you a race when you might not be on the best horse.ŽAs the Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, Justify is the best horse in the field. Whether the chestnut colt is the best on Saturday remains to be seen.I think hell run big,Ž Smith said.Belmont Park is the site of one of the jockeys saddest days in racing.In the 1993 Belmont, Smith was aboard Preakness winner Prairie Bayou. The gelding was running 10th of 13 horses on the backstretch when his left front leg snapped, tossing Smith onto the wet dirt. Smith wasnt hurt, but his Jockey Mike Smith back on familiar turf at BelmontHall of Fame jockey Mike Smith takes questions about horse Justify from the media, May 24 at the Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. Justify will race at the 150th installment of the Run for the Carnations June 9. [DAMIAN DOVARGANES/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See BELMONT, C2By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comBrianna Bailey started her varsity softball career at Wewahitchka back in 2013 when she was in just the seventh grade. There were many individual and team highlights through the first five seasons, as Bailey helped lead the Gators to a region final in 2014, a state final in 2016, and a state semifinal in 2017, putting up impressive numbers in the circle and at the plate along the way.But Bailey saved her best for last in her senior season, and as a result gets to leave Wewahitchka with a state championship in hand and the honor of being named the best player in Class 1A.The 5-foot-11 right-hander was named the 2018 Florida Dairy Farmers Asso-ciation Player of the Year for 1A Wednesday after a dominant senior campaign in which she went 25-1 in the circle with a 0.31 ERA with 282 strikeouts to just 30 walks in 157 innings. She also batted .279 with two home runs, six doubles, 24 hits, 29 RBI, and 12 runs. Bailey, who has signed to play college softball at Chi-pola, said she was excited to learn that she had won the award but that it was a byproduct of what she and her teammates accom-plished as a group.We had a great year,Ž she said. Early on, we had some girls playing new positions and we had a new head coach and we were getting used to everything. We all got into our roles of what we were supposed to do and started coming together. Once we started winning, we couldnt be stopped.ŽThe Gators were 5-4 through their first nine games before finishing the season with 21 straight vic-tories culminating with a 2-1 win over Trenton in the state championship game. Bailey was in the circle for all 21 victories, allowing just four earned runs in that span and posting double digit strikeouts on 10 dif-ferent occasions. She was especially domi-nant in the postseason, pitching 42 straight innings starting with the District 4-1A tournament semifinals and allowing just one unearned run. Bailey struck out 69 batters in the postseason while walking only two and giving up 16 hits. She had 10 strikeouts to only one walk in the two combined state semifinal games in Vero Beach.I guess you just kind of know that its do-or-die,Ž Bailey said of her postsea-son performances. You can get all the way to district Bailey named 1A Player of the YearWewahitchkas Brianna Bailey delivers a pitch during the District 4-1A tournament against Port St. Joe at Bozeman High School on April 24. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See BAILEY, C2By Greg BeachamThe Associated PressLAS VEGAS „ After 43 seasons, the Washington Capitals are finally sitting on top of hockey.Lars Eller broke a tie with 7:37 to play, and the Capitals raised the Stanley Cup for the first time in franchise history after a 4-3 victory over the Vegas Golden Knights in Game 5 on Thursday night.Devante Smith-Pelly tied it with a full-stretch goal midway through the final period of the Capitals fourth consecutive victory over the Golden Knights, whose incredible expansion season finally ended in the desert.So did the Capitals agonizing wait for their first championship since the fran-chises debut in 1974. After so many years of postseason flops and crushing disappointment, these Capitals won their fourth consecutive closeout game with a tena-cious third-period comeback.Captain Alex Ovechkin, who scored an early power-play goal and was the playoff MVP, and his teammates are Washingtons first championship hockey team „ and the citys first champion in a major pro sport since the Redskins won the Super Bowl in early 1992.After Vegas won the opener, the Capitals capped their four-game surge by rallying from a third-period deficit in Game 5, banishing so many years of playoff failure with big goals and tenacious play across their lineup.Ovechkin scored his franchise-record 15th goal of the postseason in a cathartic victory for the Capitals, who had never been this close to the NHLs ultimate prize.Braden Holtby made 28 saves in Game 5, outplaying three-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury in the other net one final time.The Caps couldnt win a Capitals take home Stanley CupSee CAPITALS, C2

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** C2 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald The News HeraldThe following is a list of area athletes who have played or are currently playing professional baseball this season and their statistics as of June 6. Position playersJose Bautista (Chipola), 6-0, 205 (10/19/80), OF, New York Mets, MLB National League „ .281 avg., 32 AB, 4 R, 9 H, 5 2B, 3 RBI, 1 SB, 9 BB. Statistics for Atlanta Braves, MLB National League „ .143 avg., 35 AB, 3 R, 5 H, 1 2B, 2 HR, 5 RBI, 5 BB. Andrew Bechtold (Chipola), 6-1, 185 (4/18/96), IF, Cedar Rapids Kernels (Minnesota Twins), Single-A, Midwest League „ .195 avg., 164 AB, 19 R, 32 H, 6 2B, 13 RBI, 4 SB, 19 BB. Jose Caballero (Chipola), 5-10, 185 (8/30/96), IF, Missoula Osprey (Arizona Diamondbacks), Rookie, Pioneer League „ Caballero hasnt played yet this season. Adam Duvall (Chipola, Louisville), 6-1, 2015 (9/4/88), 3B, Cincinnati Reds, MLB, National League „ .182 avg., 192 AB, 17 R, 35 H, 9 2B, 10 HR, 33 RBI, 2 SB, 21 BB. Tyler Flowers (Chipola), 6-4, 245 ( 4/86), C, Atlanta Braves, MLB, National League „ .265 avg., 68 AB, 9 R, 18 H, 2 2B, 3 HR, 9 RBI, 14 BB. Darren Ford (Chipola), 5-9, 190 (10/1/85), OF, New Britain Bees, Independent, Atlantic League „ .244 avg., 123 AB, 19 R, 30 H, 5 2B, 2 3B, 2 HR, 11 RBI, 8 SB, 19 BB. Terrance Gore (Gulf Coast), 5-7, 165 (6/8/91), OF, Omaha Storm Chasers (Kansas City Royals), TripleA, Paci“ c Coast League „ .200 avg., 75 AB, 12 R, 15 H, 2 3B, 4 RBI, 12 SB, 9 BB. Michael Hickman (Chipola), 6-1, 215 (11/5/96), C, Kannapolis Intimidators (Chicago White Sox), Single-A, South Atlantic League „ .250 avg., 108 AB, 11 R, 27 H, 6 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR, 13 RBI, 9 BB. Danny Mars (Chipola), 6-0, 195 ( 2/94), OF, Portland Sea Dogs (Boston Red Sox), Double-A, Eastern League „ .226 avg., 177 AB, 26 R, 40 H, 9 2B, 1 HR, 12 RBI, 6 SB, 18 BB. Russell Martin (Chipola), 5-11, 205 (2/15/83), C, Toronto Blue Jays, MLB, American League „ .165 avg., 139 AB, 17 R, 23 H, 4 2B, 5 HR, 14 RBI, 24 BB. Jeff Mathis (Marianna), 6-0, 205 (3/31/83), C, Arizona Diamondbacks, MLB, National League „ .182 avg., 55 AB, 4 R, 10 H, 1 2B, 3 RBI, 11 BB. Carlos Moncrief (Chipola), 6-0, 220 (11/3/88), OF, Generales de Durango, Triple-A, Mexican League „ .372 avg., 156 AB, 30 R, 58 H, 14 2B, 2 3B, 2 HR, 19 RBI, 3 SB, 15 BB. Roman Quinn (Port St. Joe), 5-10, 170 (5/14/93), OF, Lehigh Valley IronPigs (Philadelphia Phillies), Triple-A, International League„ .289 avg., 90 AB, 14 R, 26 H, 2 2B, 3 3B, 2 HR, 11 RBI, 12 SB, 7 BB. Reynaldo Rivera (Chipola), 6-6, 250 (6/14/97), OF, West Michigan Whitecaps (Detroit Tigers), Single-A, Midwest League „ .255 avg., 137 AB, 16 R, 35 H, 12 2B, 2 3B, 4 HR, 25 RBI, 19 BB. Christian Williams (Gulf Coast), 6-3, 210 (9/14/94), IF, Lansing Lugnuts (Toronto Blue Jays), SingleA, Midwest League „ .285 avg., 123 AB, 19 R, 35 H, 10 2B, 4 HR, 18 RBI, 10 BB.PitchersAustin Bizzle (Mosley, Gulf Coast), 6-1, 205 (3/16/95), RHP, GCL Twins (Minnesota Twins), Gulf Coast League „ Bizzle hasnt played yet this year. Adam Bleday (Gulf Coast), 5-11, 175 (1 /94), LHP, Buies Creek Astros (Houston Astros), Adv-A, Carolina League „ 1 G, 6.75 ERA, 1.1 IP, 1 R, 1 ER, 5 BB, 1 K. Stastistics for Quad Cities River Bandits (Houston Astros), Single-A, Midwest League „ 11 G, 2-2, 1 SV, 1.96 ERA, 23 IP, 11 H, 6 R, 5 ER, 13 BB, 37 K. Ryan Chaffee (Chipola), 6-2, 195 (5/18/88), RHP, Southern Maryland Blue Crabs, Atlantic League, Independent „ 18 G, 1-0, 3 SV, 5.63 ERA, 16 IP, 13 H, 10 R, 10 ER, 13 BB, 9 K. Jaye Chapman (Mosley, Chipola), 6-0, 195 (5/22/87), RHP, Round Rock Express (Texas Rangers), Triple-A, Paci“ c Coast League „ Chapman hasnt pitched yet this season. Patrick Corbin (Chipola), 6-3, 210 (7/19/89), LHP, Arizona Diamondbacks, MLB, National League „ 13 G, 13 GS, 6-2, 2.87 ERA, 81.2 IP, 55 H, 26 R, 26 ER, 22 BB, 105 K. Dylan Cyphert (Gulf Coast), 6-0, 186 (9/10/96), LHP, GCL Marlins (Miami Marlins), Rookie, Gulf Coast League „ Cyphert hasnt played yet this season. Andrew Deramo (Mosley), 6-6, 210 (5/26/95), RHP, Lansing Lugnuts (Toronto Blue Jays), Single-A, Midwest League „ 5 G, 2-0, 3.38 ERA, 10.2 IP, 8 H, 5 R, 4 ER, 6 BB, 11 K. Matt Foster (Gulf Coast), 6-0, 195 ( 7/95), RHP, Winston-Salem Dash (Chicago White Sox), Adv-A, Carolina League „ 17 G, 2-1, 4 SV, 2.63 ERA, 24 IP, 21 H, 9 R, 7 ER, 6 BB, 33 K. Bowden Francis (Chipola), 6-5, 240 (4/22/96), RHP, Wisconsin Timber Rattlers (Milwaukee Brewers), Single-A, Midwest League „ 11 G, 9 GS, 2-3, 4.84 ERA, 48.1 IP, 53 H, 29 R, 26 ER, 18 BB, 50 K. Junior Harding (Chipola), 5-9, 180 (7/21/96), RHP, AZL Reds (Cincinnati Reds), Rookie, Arizona League „ Harding hasnt played yet this season. Taylor Lewis (Chipola), 6-1, 170 (10/4/93), RHP, Rome Braves (Atlanta B raves), Single-A, South Atlantic League „ Lewis hasnt played yet this season. Adam Loewen (Chipola), 6-6, 245 (4/9/84), LHP, Round Rock Express (Texas Rangers), Triple-A, Paci“ c Coast League „ 5 G, 0-1, 1.80 ERA, 5 IP, 5 H, 2 R, 1 ER, 4 BB, 4 K. Michael Mader (Marianna, Chipola), 6-2, 205 (2/18/94), LHP, Gwinnett Stripers (Atlanta Braves), Triple-A, International League „ 2 G, 2 GS, 1-0, 3.60 ERA, 10 IP, 8 H, 4 R, 4 ER, 2 BB, 7 K. Statistics for Mississippi Braves (Atlanta Braves), Double-A, Southern League „ 12 G, 3 GS, 1-1, 2 SV, 3.10 ERA, 29 IP, 26 H, 11 R, 10 ER, 16 BB, 25 K. Nick Nelson (Rutherford, Gulf Coast), 6-1, 195 (12/5/95), RHP, Tampa Tarpons (New York Yankees), Adv-A, Florida State League „ 6 G, 6 GS, 2-2, 4.00 ERA, 27 IP, 19 H, 12 R, 12 ER, 17 BB, 26 K. Statistics for Charleston River Dogs (New York Yankees), Single-A, South Atlantic League „ 5 G, 5 GS, 1-1, 3.65 ERA, 24.2 IP, 18 H, 10 R, 10 ER, 7 BB, 35 K. Evan Steele (Chipola), 6-5, 210 (11/14/96), LHP, AZL Royals (Kansas City Royals), Rookie, Arizona League „ Steele hasnt played yet this season. Austin Wright (Chipola, Mississippi), 6-4, 235 (9/26/89), LHP, Montgomery Biscuits (Tampa Bay Rays), Double-A, Eastern League „ 6 G, 0-1, 13.50 ERA, 7.1 IP, 10 H, 12 R, 11 ER, 9 BB, 8 K.Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area players now playing pro baseball is asked to call The News Herald at (850) 747-5065 or e-mail dkent@pcnh.com.PRO BASEBALL PERISCOPE horse ran on and sustained a compound fracture. Prairie Bayou was euthanized. I often think of him,Ž Smith said. I miss him a lot.ŽSmith began riding in New York in 1989. He left for California in 2001 before briefly returning to New York and then settling permanently in California in 2007. He returned to win the Belmont in 2010 with Drosselmeyer and again in 2013 with 13-1 shot Palace Malice.Now 52, Smith is enjoying a career revival at an age when many riders have hung it up or no longer get called to ride the top horses.Hes the all-time leader in Breeders Cup wins among jockeys with 26. That success in lucrative stakes races helped garner him the nickname Big Money Mike.Ž His mounts have earned more than $300 million in his career.In recent years, he was the regular rider for superstar mare Zenyata, Royal Delta, Songbird, Shared Belief and Game On Dude, among others. In the 1990s, he made a name riding Lure and Holy Bull.Last year, Smith won 15 Grade 1 races, the most since he won 20 in 1994. Of those, nine were with horses trained by Bob Baffert in a part-nership that really took hold two years ago when Smith rode Arrogate to victories in the Travers Stake and Breeders Cup Classic.This years Kentucky Derby and Preakness were Smith and Bafferts first two wins together in Triple Crown races.A lot of these riders, they get nervous. Theres a lot of pressure on them, but Mikes been there so many times,Ž Baffert said. The thing about Mike, he knows that Im not worried about him so theres not that extra pressure. He knows hes not going to get fired.ŽSmith has curtailed his work schedule to focus on riding the best horses in the biggest races. Gone are the days when he would hit the backstretch at the crack of dawn to hustle business in the afternoons by exercising horses in the mornings.If I can make just as much money with riding a whole lot less horses, why not?Ž he said, smil-ing. Ive been blessed to have done really well. Now Im just enjoying it.ŽHe adheres to a daunt-ing physical regimen that involves riding his bicy-cle downhill to a gym, where he exercises for an hour six days a week doing strength training and intense cardio, and then bikes back uphill to go home. He typi-cally rides at 118 pounds, which includes his saddle, boots and padded safety vest. BELMONTFrom Page C1 and have one bad game and its all over, so you just have to rise to the occasion. Thats the best way I couldve finished my career. We had been so close so many times. I knew this was my last chance to actually go all the way and to finish this year like that was great.ŽWewahitchka coach Tony Price, who served as an assistant for the Gators before taking over for former head coach Judith Husband this season, said Baileys poise and toughness on the mound were just as important for her success as her talent.Shes so mentally prepared,Ž he said. She plays travel ball year round since she was in 12U. She never shows any emotion on the mound. She could strike somebody out or give up a home run and its always the same Brianna. She never lets anything get to her and that makes a big difference.ŽThat mentality combined with her physical skills allowed Bailey to lead the Gators on a remarkable run of success, which includes 69 wins over the past three seasons and a 9-2 record in the playoffs in that time. Her final season, however, was her most impressive.Her stats pretty much speak for themselves,Ž Price said. To have 25 wins with just one loss and a 0.31 ERA, thats as good as it gets to me. She was a leader on the team and an all-around team player. She put in a great six years and she deserved every bit of it. Shes going to be greatly missed on the Lady Gators squad next year.Ž BAILEYFrom Page C1 title without a little weird-ness, however: The game clock stopped working on the T-Mobile Arena scoreboards during the final minutes, and the Capitals angrily protested while they played on. Vegas never got close to a tying goal.Reilly Smith scored a go-ahead goal late in the second period for the Golden Knights, who won seven of their first eight home playoff games before dropping the last two.Nate Schmidt and David Perron also scored in the second period, but Fleurys 29 saves included a stopped puck that dropped underneath him where Eller swept it home for the Cup-winning goal.Washingtons Cupclinching win was its 10th on the road in this postseason, tying the NHL playoff record and illustrating the superior toughness of this team. While past editions of the Caps created their teams reputation for postseason flops in part by losing five playoff series in which they had three of the first four games, Ovechkins latest group promptly closed out all four of its series this year on the very first try.And the remarkable Golden Knights hadnt lost four consecutive games in their entire inau-gural season before the Caps rolled them.The Capitals had thou-sands of red-clad fans in the Vegas crowd and a building full of supporters watching back home along with countless thousands outside in the crowded D.C. streets. CAPITALSFrom Page C1 Washington Capitals left wing Alex Ovechkin celebrates as the Capitals defeated the Vegas Golden Knights Thursday in Game 5 of the NHL Stanley Cup Finals to win the Stanley Cup. [MARK J. TERRILL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Errin Haines WhackThe Associated PressPHILADELPHIA „ For victorious sports teams these days, the confetti and champagne are apt to be accompanied by a politically fraught ques-tion: Are you going to the White House?What used to be one of the most innocuous photo-ops in sports is anything but. Going „ or not going „ has become a political statement in the era of President Donald Trump, who has managed to draw athletes into his game, whether they want to play or not.If you do go, youre associating yourself with his policies,Ž said Howard Bryant, author of The Heritage: Black Athletes, A Divided America and the Politics of Patriotism.Ž If you dont go, you run the risk of brand-ing yourself as not having enough respect for the office.ŽThis week, Trump canceled a White House celebration for the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles after it became clear very few players planned to attend.Trump instead went to his go-to play: attacking as un-American the NFL players who have knelt during the national anthem to protest police killings of black men. (In truth, none of the Eagles took a knee this past season.)In the NBA, both the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Golden State Warriors have already rejected a White House celebration, however their championship matchup turns out.And the Villanova Wildcats „ this years NCAA mens basketball champions, who also won in 2016 and celebrated with President Barack Obama „ will have to decide, if an invitation comes, whether to return to Washington for a ceremony with Trump.White House visits become political litmus test for athletes President Donald Trump sings the national anthem during a Celebration of AmericaŽ event Tuesday at the White House in Washington, in lieu of a Super Bowl celebration for the NFLs Philadelphia Eagles that he canceled. [PHOTOS BY EVAN VUCCI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 C3By Tom WithersThe Associated PressCLEVELAND „ LeBron James was relaxed, reflec-tive and even resigned to his fate.The end of the series, season and maybe his second stint in Cleveland, are near.The Golden State War-riors have made his eighth straight NBA Finals „ and their seasonal rivalry with the Cavaliers „ very one-sided.Still weary and wrestling with emotions after losing Game 3 on Wednesday night, when Kevin Durant scored 43 points and shot the Warriors within one win of their third title in four years, James pointed out Thursday what has become terrifyingly obvious.The Warriors are at another level. And may be for a while.Obviously, from a talent perspective, if youre looking at Golden State from their top five best players to our top five players, you would say theyre stacked better than us. Lets just speak truth,Ž James said before rattling off Golden States embar-rassment of riches.Kevin Durant,Ž he said. Youve got two guys with MVPs on their team. And then youve got a guy in Klay (Thompson) who could easily be on a team and carry a team, scored 40 in a quarter before. And then you have Draymond (Green), who is arguably one of the best defenders and minds we have in our game. So you have that crew.Then you add on a Finals MVP coming off the bench (Andre Iguodala), a No. 1 pick in (Shawn) Liv-ingston and an All-Star in David West and whatever the case may be. So they have a lot of talent.ŽToo much, it seems, for these Cavs.James wasnt making excuses for Clevelands postseason pickle because if not for a reversed officials call or J.R. Smiths brain-lock in the closing seconds of regulation in Game 1 or Durants bril-liance in Game 3, the Cavs could be leading the series.The three-time champion, though, was being open and honest about the Cavs chances to become the first team to overcome a 3-0 deficit in the playoffs.To this point, 131 have tried, and 131 have failed.Weve been in a position where we could win two out of these three games,Ž said James, who had 33 points and his 10th Finals triple-double in Game 3. So what do we have to do? Do we have to make more shots? Is it we have to have our minds into it a little bit more? Is it if there is a ball on the ground we cant reach for it but youve got to dive for it?ŽThose were todays rele-vant questions. Tomorrow, theyll be different ones if the Warriors, who have dealt with adversity all season, sweep the Cavs.James is headed toward free agency and then where: Los Angeles? Phila-delphia? Houston?Or will he decide its too painful to part again with Cleveland, his basketball home for 11 seasons and just up the highway from his actual home in Akron?The 33-year-old plans to consider everything once the season ends, but he offered some clues about what hell consider before making his next move, a decision that will dwarf any other NBA news in July. James also laid out a potential blueprint for the Cavs to follow if they want to keep him.Bottom line: James needs better, smarter teammates.No player in the league understands the current climate better than James, who formed a super-team in Miami with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh and won two NBA titles before returning to Cleveland and joining forces with All-Stars Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving. The Cavs reign lasted only one year, destroyed by Durants shocking departure from Oklahoma City for the 73-win Warriors, a team he couldnt beat but was glad to join.James said his decision to bolt from the Cavs the first time was simple.I knew that my talent level here in Cleveland couldnt succeed getting past a Boston, getting past the San Antonios of the league or whatever the case may be,Ž he said.But beyond the talent disparity, James said the key to winning a champi-onship is youve got to be very cerebral too.ŽJames then explained what it takes to be the last team standing, and in the process seemed to take a swipe at unnamed current and former teammates.So now everyone is trying to figure that out,Ž he said. How do you put together a group of talent but also a group of minds to be able to compete with Golden State, to be able to compete for a championship? Thats what GMs and presidents and cer-tain players, its not every player. Every player does not want to „ sad to say „ but every player doesnt want to compete for a championship and be in a position where every pos-session is pressure.ŽFacing Finals sweep, LeBron praises stacked WarriorsCleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James takes questions at a press conference after the teams practice during the NBA Finals, Thursday in Cleveland. The Warriors lead the series 3-0 with Game 4 on Friday. [CARLOS OSORIO/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Rob MaaddiThe Associated PressPHILADELPHIA „ Bryan Colangelo may not have authored any of the tweets himself, but he seemed to provide private information that went into them.And when his wife used those details to criticize his own players or rival colleagues, Colangelo and the Philadelphia 76ers knew he could no longer remain their top basket-ball executive.Colangelo resigned Thursday as president of basketball operations for the 76ers in the wake of what an investigation found was careless and in some instances reck-lessŽ sharing of sensitive team information.The independent review by a law firm did not determine that Colangelo operated or was even aware of Twitter accounts that anonymously trashed some of his own players and fellow executives, and defended him against criticism from fans and the sports media.Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP said evidence supported the conclusion that Colangelos wife, Barbara Bottini, operated the four accounts it investigated, and she admitted to doing so „ though also said she deleted contents of her iPhone with a factory reset of the device prior to surrendering it for forensic review, limiting the investigation.Our investigation revealed substantial evidence that Mr. Colangelo was the source of sensitive, non-public, club-related information contained in certain posts to the Twitter accounts,Ž the report said. We believe that Mr. Colangelo was careless and in some instances reckless in fail-ing to properly safeguard sensitive, non-public, club-related information in communications with individuals outside the 76ers organization.ŽAs for Colangelo, there was no evidence he knew of the accounts before a May 22 inquiry from the sports website The Ringer for a story it reported linking him to five Twitter accounts that took aim at Philadelphia players Joel Embiid and Markelle Fultz, former Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie, Toronto Raptors executive Masai Ujiri and former Sixers players Jahlil Okafor and Nerlens Noel.Colangelo released a statement disputing that his conduct was reckless.At no point did I ever purposefully or directly share any sensitive, non-public, club-related information with her,Ž he said.Her actions were a seriously misguided effort to publicly defend and support me, and while I recognize how inappropriate these actions were, she acted independently and with-out my knowledge or consent. Further, the content she shared was filled with inaccuracies and conjecture which in no way represent my own views or opinions.ŽEvidence found that Bottini established and operated four of the accounts „ Eric jr, Still Balling, Enoughunkown-sources, and HonestAbe „ but it seemed some of the information being posted, such as details of trade discussions or med-ical reports, was coming from Colangelo himself.As such, the team said it had become clear Bryans relationship with our team and his ability to lead the 76ers moving forward has been com-promisedŽ and that it had accepted his resignation.Its a stunning fall for Colangelo, a former two-time Executive of the Year who was expected to lead the improving 76ers into an important summer when they are hoping to pursue LeBron James or another All-Star player to add to a young core that includes Embiid and Ben Simmons.Instead that role will be led for now by coach Brett Brown. The 76ers said he would oversee basketball operations on an interim basis and that the search for a new general manager would begin immediately.We find the situation to be disappointing for our entire organization,Ž 76ers managing partner Josh Harris said. We are determined to continue the tremendous progress we have made over the last two seasons in our quest to win an NBA championship.ŽColangelo, the son of longtime sports execu-tive Jerry Colangelo, was hired as president of bas-ketball operations in 2016 after Hinkie abruptly resigned. Hinkie was the architect behind what has been called The ProcessŽ „ the long-term tearing down and rebuilding of the Sixers.Colangelo previously served as Raptors gen-eral manager, adding the 2007 Executive of the Year award to the one he won two years earlier in Phoenix. But he lost his job there after Toronto missed the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season, and Ujiri took over bas-ketball operations.Over the last two years, I have worked hard to help build a foundation for what I hope will soon be many championship seasons for the 76ers,Ž Colangelo said. I am grateful to team owners Josh Harris and David Blitzer for the opportunity they gave me to be part of such a great orga-nization. I am saddened to have to leave under these circumstances.ŽColangelo resigns as 76ers presidentPhiladelphia 76ers President of Basketball Operations Bryan Colangelo speaks with members of the media during a May 11 news conference at the NBA teams practice facility in Camden, N.J. [MATT ROURKE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Howard FendrichThe Associated PressPARIS „ When the French Open final was played a year ago, Sloane Stephens was nowhere near Roland Garros. She was in Chicago with coach Kamau Murray, working her way back from a foot injury that required surgery and sidelined her for 11 months.Indoors on a hard court. Getting ready for grass. Barely walking. Playing tennis next to a bunch of 5and 6-yearold screaming kids,Ž Murray recalled. So to be here from there, I think, is rewarding, because those times were not easy.ŽThe times are good now. Stephens closed in on her second Grand Slam title by beating pal Madison Keys 6-4, 6-4 on Thursday in the first all-American semifinal at the French Open since 2002. It also was a rematch of the U.S. Open final won by Ste-phens last September.Its always hard playing someone from your country and such a good friend,Ž Stephens said, so I was really pleased to be able to get through that and play some good tennis.ŽThe 10th-seeded Stephens opponent in Saturdays final will be Simona Halep, who emphatically ended the impressive French Open run of 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza by defeating her 6-1, 6-4.Halep, who assured her-self of retaining the No. 1 ranking with the victory, earned a fourth chance to win her first major title.She twice has lost in the final at Roland Garros „ to Maria Sharapova in 2014 and to Jelena Ostapenko in 2017 „ and was the runner-up to Caroline Wozniacki at the Austra-lian Open in January.I lost three times until now and no one died,Ž Halep said, so it will be OK.ŽMuguruza, a two-time major champion, entered the semifinals having not lost a set in the tourna-ment. She also was coming off a lopsided victory in the quarterfinals a day earlier, overwhelming Sharapova 6-2, 6-1.Stephens eyes 2nd Slam title, Halep 1st in French Open nal

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** C4 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11:55 a.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Belmont 1 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m., Churchill 4 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 2:05 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 10:35 a.m., Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill a.m. 11:45 a.m., Parx 11:55 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION…234-3943. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Today National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Chicago -170 Pittsburgh +158 at Philadelphia -125 Milwaukee +115 at Washington -215 San Fran. +195 St. Louis -139 at Cincinnati +129 at Miami -130 San Diego +120 at Colorado -107 Arizona -103 at Los Angeles -186 Atlanta +171American Leagueat Boston -305 Chicago +275 at Toronto -182 Baltimore +167 Cleveland -154 at Detroit +144 Seattle -135 at Tampa Bay +125 Houston -220 at Texas +200 Los Angeles -122 at Minnesota +112 at Oakland -156 Kansas City +146InterleagueN.Y. Yankees -119 at N.Y. Mets +109NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION NBA Finals TodayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOGGolden State 5 215 at Cleveland Updated odds available at Pregame.com PRO BASKETBALL NBAPLAYOFFSAll times EasternNBA FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) GOLDEN STATE 3, CLEVELAND 0May 31: Golden State 124, Cleveland 114, OT June 3: Golden State 122, Cleveland 103 Wednesday: Golden State 110, Cleveland 102 Today: Golden State at Cleveland, 9 p.m. x-Monday: Cleveland at Golden State, 9 p.m. x-Thursday, June 14: Golden State at Cleveland, 9 p.m. x-Sunday, June 17: Cleveland at Golden State, 8 p.m.WEDNESDAYS LATE BOX SCORE WARRIORS 110, CAVALIERS 102GOLDEN STATE (110) Durant 15-23 7-7 43, D.Green 4-8 2-2 10, McGee 5-7 0-0 10, Curry 3-16 4-4 11, K.Thompson 4-11 0-0 10, Bell 4-5 2-4 10, Looney 0-0 0-0 0, West 0-2 0-0 0, Livingston 4-5 0-0 8, McCaw 0-0 0-0 0, Young 0-0 0-0 0, Iguodala 3-4 2-2 8. Totals 42-81 17-19 110. CLEVELAND (102) James 13-28 6-7 33, Love 6-13 5-5 20, T.Thompson 4-8 0-1 8, Hill 2-6 0-0 5, Smith 5-14 0-0 13, Nance Jr. 2-4 1-2 5, J.Green 1-4 0-0 3, Korver 0-4 0-0 0, Hood 7-11 1-2 15. Totals 40-92 13-17 102. GOLDEN STATE 28 24 31 27 „ 110 CLEVELAND 29 29 23 21 „ 102 3-Point Goals„Golden State 9-26 (Durant 6-9, K.Thompson 2-5, Curry 1-10, D.Green 0-2), Cleveland 9-31 (Love 3-7, Smith 3-10, Hill 1-2, J.Green 1-3, James 1-6, Hood 0-1, Korver 0-2). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Golden State 37 (Durant 13), Cleveland 47 (Love 13). Assists„ Golden State 27 (D.Green 9), Cleveland 20 (James 11). Total Fouls„Golden State 20, Cleveland 18. Technicals„D.Green, Golden State coach Warriors (Defensive three second), T.Thompson. A„20,562 (20,562).WNBAEASTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT GB Connecticut 6 1 .857 „ Washington 5 4 .556 2 Atlanta 3 3 .500 2 Chicago 3 3 .500 2 New York 2 4 .333 3 Indiana 0 6 .000 5WESTERN CONFERENCE W L PCT GB Los Angeles 4 1 .800 „ Seattle 5 2 .714 „ Phoenix 5 3 .625 Dallas 3 3 .500 1 Minnesota 3 5 .375 2 Las Vegas 1 5 .167 3Wednesdays GamesNone scheduledThursdays GamesMinnesota 88, Washington 80 Connecticut 88, New York 86 Seattle at Los Angeles, lateTodays GamesAtlanta at Las Vegas, 3 p.m. Dallas at Indiana, 7 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.Saturdays GameMinnesota at Connecticut, 2 p.m. HORSE RACING BELMONT STAKESODDSThe “ eld for Saturdays 150th Belmont Stakes, with post position, horse, jockey and odds: PP Horse Jockey Odds 1. Justify Mike Smith 4-5 2. Free Drop Billy Robby Albarado 30-1 3. Bravazo Luis Saez 8-1 4. Hofburg Irad Ortiz 9-2 5. Restoring Hope Florent Geroux 30-1 6. Gronkowski Jose Ortiz 12-1 7. Tenfold Ricardo Santanao Jr. 12-1 8. Vino Rosso John Velazquez 8-1 9. Noble Indy Javier Castellano 30-1 10. Blended Citizen Kyle Frey 15-1 Trainers (by post position): 1. Bob Baffert. 2. Dale Romans. 3. D. Wayne Lukas. 4. William Mott. 5. Bob Baffert. 6. Chad Brown. 7. Steve Asmussen. 8. Todd Pletcher. 9. Todd Pletcher. 10. Doug ONeill. Owners (by post position): 1. China Horse Club, Head of Plains Partners LLC, Starlight Racing, WinStar Farm. 2. Albaugh Family Stables. 3. Calumet Farm. 4. Juddmonte Farms Inc. 5. Gary & Mary West Stables. 6. Phoenix Thoroughbred LLC. 7. Winchell Thoroughbreds. 8. Repole Stable and St. Elias Stable. 9. WinStar Farm LLC and Repole Stable. 10. Greg Hall, SAYJAY Racing LLC and Brooke Hubbard. Weights: 126 pounds. Distance: 1 miles. Purse: $1.5 million. First place: $800,000. Second place: $280,000. Third place: $150,000. Fourth place: $100,000. Fifth place: $60,000. Post time: 6:46 p.m. EDT. PRO HOCKEY NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFSAll times EasternSTANLEY CUP FINAL (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) WASHINGTON 4, VEGAS 1May 28: Vegas 6, Washington 4 May 30: Washington 3, Vegas 2 June 2: Washington 3, Vegas 1 June 4: Washington 6, Vegas 2 Thursday: Washington 4, Vegas 3CAPITALS 4, GOLDEN KNIGHTS 3WASHINGTON 0 2 2 „ 4 VEGAS 0 3 0 „ 3First Period„None. Penalties„Miller, VGK, (interference), 11:44. Second Period„1, Washington, Vrana 3 (Kuznetsov, Wilson), 6:24. 2, Vegas, Schmidt 3 (Marchessault, Smith), 9:40. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 15 (Backstrom, Carlson), 10:14 (pp). 4, Vegas, Perron 1 (Miller, Tatar), 12:56. 5, Vegas, Smith 5 (Tuch, Theodore), 19:31 (pp). Penalties„Theodore, VGK, (tripping), 0:21; Djoos, WSH, (high sticking), 3:19; McNabb, VGK, (tripping), 9:51; Ovechkin, WSH, (tripping), 17:46; Smith, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Orpik, WSH, (roughing), 19:31; Tuch, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Beagle, WSH, (roughing), 19:31. Third Period„6, Washington, Smith-Pelly 7 (Orpik), 9:52. 7, Washington, Eller 7 (Bura kovsky, Connolly), 12:23. Penalties„ Tatar, VGK, (hooking), 5:37. Shots on Goal„Washington 9-11-13„33. Vegas 7-13-11„31. Power -play opportunities„Washington 1 of 4; Vegas 1 of 2. Goalies„Washington, Holtby 15-7 (31 shots-28 saves). Vegas, Fleury 13-6 (33-29). T„2:44. Referees„Marc Joannette, Wes McCauley. Linesmen„Matt MacPherson, Jonny Murray. COLLEGE BASEBALL NCAA DIVISION I SUPER REGIONALSAll times Eastern(Best-of-3; x-if necessary)Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin ” ip determines home team for Game 3At Boshamer Stadium, Chapel Hill, N.C.Today: North Carolina (41-18) vs. Stetson (48-11), 11 a.m. Saturday: North Carolina vs. Stetson, noon x-Sunday: North Carolina vs. Stetson, noonAt Hawkins Field, Nashville, Tenn.Today: Vanderbilt (34-25) vs. Mississippi State (35-26), 8 p.m. Saturday: Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi State, 9:30 p.m. x-Sunday: Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi State, 6 p.m.At Goss Stadium at Coleman Field Corvallis, Ore.Today: Oregon State (47-10-1) vs. Minnesota (44-13), 5 p.m. Saturday: Oregon State vs. Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. x-Sunday: Oregon State vs. Minnesota, 9 p.m.At Goodwin Field, Fullerton, Calif.Today: Cal State Fullerton (35-23) vs. Washington (33-23), 2 p.m. Saturday: Cal State Fullerton vs. Washington, 6:30 p.m. x-Sunday: Cal State Fullerton vs. Washington, 9 p.m.At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium, Gainesville, Fla.Saturday: Florida (45-18) vs. Auburn (42-21), noon Sunday: Florida vs. Auburn, noon x-Monday: Florida vs. Auburn, 8:30 p.m.At Baum Stadium at George Cole Field, Fayetteville, Ark.Saturday: Arkansas (42-18) vs. South Carolina (36-24), 6:30 p.m. Sunday: Arkansas vs. South Carolina, 3 p.m. x-Monday, June 11: Arkansas vs. South Carolina, 7 p.m.At Dan Law Field at Rip Grif“ n Park, Lubbock, TexasSaturday: Texas Tech (42-17) vs. Duke (4416), 3 p.m. Sunday: Texas Tech vs. Duke, 6 p.m. x-Monday: Texas Tech vs. Duke, 4 p.m.At UFCU Disch-Falk Field, Austin, TexasSaturday: Texas (40-20) vs. Tennessee Tech (52-10), 3 p.m. Sunday: Texas vs. Tennessee Tech, 3 p.m. x-Monday: Texas vs. Tennessee Tech, 1 p.m. od, Kan. TENNIS ATP WORLD TOUR/WTA TOURFRENCH OPENResults Thursday from the French Open at Stade Roland Garros (seedings in parentheses): Mens Singles Quarter“ nalsRafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Diego Schwartzman (11), Argentina, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2. Juan Martin del Potro (5), Argentina, def. Marin Cilic (3), Croatia, 7-6 (5), 5-7, 6-3, 7-5. Womens Singles Semi“ nalsSimona Halep (1), Romania, def. Garbine Muguruza (3), Spain, 6-1, 6-4. Sloane Stephens (10), United States, def. Madison Keys (13), United States, 6-4, 6-4. TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLCOMMISSIONERS OFFICE „ Suspended free-agent LHP Fernando Abad 80 games and Chicago Cubs RHP David Garner (Iowa-PCL) 100 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.American LeagueBOSTON RED SOX „ Optioned LHP Bobby Poyner to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled LHP Jalen Beeks from Pawtucket. CHICAGO WHITE SOX „ Optioned RHP Juan Minaya and LHP Aaron Bummer to Charlotte (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Xavier Cedeno from Charlotte. DETROIT TIGERS „ Signed RHP Jacob Turner to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Alex Wilson from the 10-day DL. Optioned 3B Ronny Rodriguez to Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS „ Reinstated RHP Trevor May from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Rochester (IL). Transferred C Jason Castro to the 60-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Optioned C Bruce Maxwell to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Paul Blackburn from the 60-day DL. Transferred OF Boog Powell to the 60-day DL. TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Designated INF Brad Miller for assignment. TEXAS RANGERS „ Signed president of baseball operations and general manager Jon Daniels to a multi-year contract extension.National LeagueARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS „ Designated 3B Kristopher Negron for assignment. LOS ANGELES DODGERS „ Placed LHP Tony Cingrani on the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Caleb Ferguson to Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled RHP Pedro Baez and LHP Edward Paredes from Oklahoma City. MIAMI MARLINS „ Optioned RHP Tyler Cloyd to New Orleans (PCL). Recalled RHP Trevor Richards from New Orleans. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS „ Assigned C Steven Baron outright to Memphis (PCL). Designated RHP Preston Guilmet for assignment. Reinstated 2B Greg Garcia from paternity leave. Sent RHPs Greg Holland and Matt Bowman to Memphis for rehab assignments.American AssociationCHICAGO DOGS „ Released C Wilfredo Rodriguez. SIOUX FALLS CANARIES „ Signed RHP Zach Staniewicz. TEXAS AIRHOGS „ Signed RHP Julio Eusebio. WICHITA WINGNUTS „ Released OF Isaiah Aluko.Can-Am LeagueQUEBEC CAPITALES „ Signed INF Maxx Tissenbaum.Frontier LeagueFLORENCE FREEDOM „ Sold the contract of INF Jose Brizuela to the N.Y. Mets. Released UT Mike Morris. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS „ Signed RHP Sam Myers.BASKETBALLNational Basketball AssociationNEW ORLEANS PELICANS „ Agreed to terms with coach Alvin Gentry on a contract extension through the 2020-21 season. NEW YORK KNICKS „ Named Keith Smart, Jud Buechler, Pat Sullivan and Royal Ivey assistant coaches. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS „ Announced the resignation of president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueCLEVELAND BROWNS „ Agreed to terms with RB Duke Johnson on a three-year contract extension. WASHINGTON REDSKINS „ Named Steve Ziff chief marketing of“ cer.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueCHICAGO BLACKHAWKS „ Agreed to terms with F Andreas Martinsen on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING „ Re-signed D Daniel Walcott to a one-year, two-way contract.American Hockey LeagueMILWAUKEE ADMIRALS „ Signed D Matt Donovan to a one-year contract.SOCCERNational Womens Soccer LeagueSKY BLUE FC „ Signed D Cassidy Benintente as a national team replacement player.COLLEGESALBANY (N.Y.) „ Granted a release to junior FS TD Ierlan from the mens lacrosse program. FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE AT JACKSONVILLE „ Named Frank Burnell mens basketball coach. KANSAS STATE „ Announced sophomore womens basketball G Sarah Bates will transfer from UC Santa Barbara. NYIT „ Named Frank Catalanotto baseball coach. UTSA „ Named Katie Douglass executive senior associate athletics director for external affairs. VANDERBILT „ Named Jake Kirkendall director of football operations and Dr. Christiana Russell director of player development. GOLF PGA TOURFEDEX ST. JUDE CLASSICThursdays leaders at TPC Southwind, Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $6.6 million. Yardage: 7,244; Par: 70 (35-35)First RoundSeamus Power 33-32„65 Troy Merritt 32-34„66 Wesley Bryan 32-34„66 Fabian Gomez 33-33„66 Brooks Koepka 33-33„66 Phil Mickelson 32-34„66 Chris Kirk 35-31„66 Michael Kim 32-34„66 Brandon Harkins 31-35„66 Steve Stricker 33-33„66 Mackenzie Hughes 33-33„66 Stuart Appleby 35-31„66 Matt Jones 33-34„67 C.T. Pan 33-34„67 Byeong Hun An 34-33„67 Chez Reavie 35-32„67 Dustin Johnson 34-33„67 Dominic Bozzelli 33-34„67 Scott Stallings 34-33„67 Retief Goosen 35-32„67 Ryan Blaum 35-32„67 Andrew Putnam 33-34„67 Chad Campbell 33-35„68 John Peterson 34-34„68 George McNeill 35-33„68 Charl Schwartzel 34-34„68 Henrik Stenson 35-33„68 William McGirt 34-34„68 Padraig Harrington 33-35„68 Stewart Cink 34-34„68 Ryan Palmer 35-33„68 Richy Werenski 34-34„68 Denny McCarthy 35-33„68 Grant Hirschman 33-35„68 Corey Conners 35-33„68 Shawn Stefani 38-31„69 D.J. Trahan 35-34„69 Robert Garrigus 34-35„69 Cody Gribble 36-33„69 Luke List 34-35„69 Keith Mitchell 33-36„69 Steve Wheatcroft 34-35„69 Trey Mullinax 34-35„69 Nate Lashley 34-35„69 Peter Uihlein 35-34„69 Joaquin Niemann 33-36„69 Tyler Duncan 36-33„69 Brian Gay 36-33„69 Austin Cook 34-35„69 J.B. Holmes 36-33„69 Danny Lee 33-36„69 Abraham Ancer 33-36„69 Cameron Beckman 34-35„69 Bronson Burgoon 34-35„69 Casey Wittenberg 36-33„69 Brendon de Jonge 33-37„70 Harold Varner III 36-34„70 Hunter Mahan 36-34„70 Aaron Baddeley 35-35„70 James Hahn 34-36„70 Tony Finau 33-37„70 Joel Dahmen 35-35„70 Nick Taylor 35-35„70 Conrad Shindler 37-33„70 J.T. Poston 34-36„70 Ben Silverman 34-36„70 T.J. Vogel 35-35„70 Jonathan Byrd 37-33„70 Daniel Chopra 35-35„70 Billy Horschel 35-35„70 Charles Howell III 33-37„70 Daniel Berger 37-33„70 Parker McLachlin 35-35„70 Omar Uresti 34-36„70 Sam Ryder 34-36„70 A.J. McInerney 38-32„70 Ricky Barnes 35-36„71 Matt Every 36-35„71 Brice Garnett 37-34„71 Tim Herron 36-35„71 Tyrone Van Aswegen 35-36„71 Tom Hoge 37-34„71 Cameron Tringale 38-33„71 Jon Curran 35-36„71 Brian Stuard 39-32„71 Vaughn Taylor 38-33„71 Brandt Snedeker 35-36„71 David Lingmerth 35-36„71 Cameron Percy 35-36„71 Scottie Schef” er 36-35„71 Talor Gooch 36-35„71 Adam Schenk 37-34„71 Jonathan Randolph 35-36„71 Nicholas Lindheim 37-34„71 Zecheng Dou 36-35„71 Zac Blair 36-36„72 Martin Flores 36-36„72 D.A. Points 35-37„72 Grayson Murray 36-36„72 Shane Lowry 35-37„72 Robert Streb 37-35„72 Ken Duke 37-35„72 Johnson Wagner 37-35„72 Stephan Jaeger 33-39„72 Roberto Diaz 35-37„72 Bob Estes 37-35„72 Derek Fathauer 39-33„72 J.J. Henry 37-35„72 Martin Piller 36-36„72 Kelly Kraft 36-36„72 Peter Malnati 35-37„72 David Hearn 37-35„72 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 38-34„72 John Merrick 34-38„72 Brian Davis 39-34„73 Scott Brown 35-38„73 John Huh 36-37„73 Braden Thornberry 37-36„73 Dawson Armstrong 33-40„73 Brett Stegmaier 37-36„73 Zachary Olsen 35-38„73 Dicky Pride 37-36„73 Sam Saunders 36-37„73 Billy Hurley III 38-35„73 Harris English 35-38„73 John Rollins 36-37„73 Ben Crane 37-36„73 Ethan Tracy 36-37„73 Kyle Thompson 38-35„73 Kevin Chappell 38-36„74 Mark Wilson 41-33„74 Blayne Barber 35-39„74 Rob Oppenheim 37-37„74 Tom Lovelady 39-35„74 Robert Allenby 38-36„74 Scott Piercy 38-36„74 Kevin Tway 38-36„74 Rick Lamb 39-35„74 Andrew Yun 38-36„74 Tommy Gainey 34-41„75 Eric Axley 37-38„75 Daniel Summerhays 37-38„75 Xinjun Zhang 37-38„75 Lanto Grif“ n 40-35„75 Matt Atkins 37-38„75 Ben Martin 36-39„75 Charlie Beljan 38-37„75 David Berganio, Jr. 40-35„75 Ben Crancer 40-35„75 Will Claxton 38-38„76 Sung Kang 38-38„76 Troy Matteson 37-39„76 Johan Kok 40-37„77 John Daly 41-38„79 Smylie Kaufman 40-39„79 Greg Chalmers 42-38„80EUROPEAN TOURSHOT CLOCK MASTERSThursdays leaders at Diamond CC, Vienna Purse: $1.18 million. Yardage: 7,458; Par: 72 (36-36)First RoundOscar Lengden, Sweden 33-33„66 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 34-33„67 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 36-31„67 Peter Hanson, Sweden 33-34„67 Justin Walters, South Africa 35-33„68 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 32-36„68 Anders Hansen, Denmark 34-34„68 Bradley Neil, Scotland 33-35„68 Connor Syme, Scotland 36-32„68 Jeppe Pape Huldahl, Denmark 33-35„68 Ross McGowan, England 35-34„69 Mikael Lundberg, Sweden 35-34„69 Ashun Wu, China 34-35„69 Austin Connolly, Canada 34-35„69 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 36-33„69 Matthias Schwab, Austria 34-35„69 Mark Foster, England 33-36„69 Sepp Straka, Austria 34-35„69 Oscar Stark, Sweden 34-35„69 Tom Lewis, England 35-34„69 Jeff Winther, Denmark 37-32„69 Oliver Farr, Wales 35-34„69 Steve Webster, England 33-36„69AlsoDaniel Im, United States 31-39„70 Chase Koepka, United States 35-38„73WEB.COM TOURRUST-OLEUM CHAMPIONSHIPThursdays leaders at Ivanhoe Club, Ivanhoe, Ill. Purse: $600,000. Yardage: 7,059; Par: 72 (36-36)First RoundAndrew Novak 32-33„65 Wes Roach 34-32„66 Jacques Blaauw 35-31„66 Ben Taylor 34-33„67 Kyle Jones 33-34„67 Richard H. Lee 34-33„67 Jared Wolfe 35-32„67 Chase Wright 34-33„67 Dan McCarthy 34-33„67 Armando Favela 35-33„68 Roland Thatcher 34-34„68 Sebastian Cappelen 34-34„68 Maverick McNealy 34-34„68 Billy Kennerly 35-33„68 Alex Prugh 35-33„68 Mark Anderson 33-35„68 Jonathan Hodge 37-32„69 Brandon Crick 33-36„69 Jimmy Stanger 37-32„69 Josh Teater 35-34„69 Justin Lower 34-35„69 Brady Schnell 36-33„69 Julian Etulain 34-35„69 Michael Putnam 35-34„69 Carlos Sainz Jr 36-33„69 Steven Ihm 35-34„69 Seth Reeves 34-35„69 Jimmy Gunn 35-34„69 Chris Naegel 34-35„69 Sebastian Munoz 38-31„69 Robby Shelton 34-35„69 Brandon Hagy 36-33„69 Anders Albertson 35-34„69 Ryan Yip 36-33„69 Jin Park 34-35„69 Curtis Thompson 35-34„69 Chris Thompson 33-36„69 Mac McClung 34-35„69 Brian Campbell 34-36„70 Jordan Niebrugge 36-34„70 Alex Kang 36-34„70 Peter Tomasulo 34-36„70 Brad Hop“ nger 34-36„70 Mark Baldwin 35-35„70 Jose de Rodriguez 37-33„70 Matthew Oshrine 35-35„70 Curtis Luck 36-34„70 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 36-34„70 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 33-37„70 Tom Whitney 35-35„70 Ben Kohles 38-32„70 Tag Ridings 34-36„70 Christian Brand 32-38„70 Brian Richey 37-33„70 Vince India 37-33„70 Michael Schachner 34-36„70 Samuel Del Val 37-34„71 Adam Long 37-34„71 Lee McCoy 34-37„71 Ken Looper 35-36„71 Daniel Mazziotta 36-35„71 Shaun Micheel 35-36„71 Chris Smith 35-36„71 Scott Langley 36-35„71 Kevin Stadler 35-36„71 Jamie Arnold 35-36„71 Michael Arnaud 36-35„71 Justin Hueber 35-36„71 Rhein Gibson 36-35„71 Andrew Loupe 35-36„71 Max Homa 37-34„71 Mike Weir 36-35„71 Bryan Bigley 36-35„71 Max Marsico 35-36„71 Brett Drewitt 33-38„71 Matt Fast 37-34„71 Mito Pereira 36-35„71 Matt Hill 35-36„71 Seann Harlingten 34-38„72 Brad Brunner 36-36„72 Roberto Castro 36-36„72 David Skinns 38-34„72 Albin Choi 37-35„72 Nelson Ledesma 37-35„72 Cameron Champ 36-36„72 Stuart Macdonald 35-37„72 Kramer Hickok 37-35„72 Nick Hardy 35-37„72 Dan Woltman 34-38„72 Joseph Bramlett 38-34„72 Joey Garber 35-37„72 Fernando Mechereffe 37-35„72 Derek Ernst 37-35„72 Dawie van der Walt 34-38„72 SCOREBOARD Today AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. FS2 „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Series, FireKeepers Casino 400, practice, at Brooklyn, Mich. Noon FS2 „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, LTi Printing 250, practice, at Brooklyn, Mich. 2 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, LTi Printing 250, “ nal practice, at Brooklyn, Mich. 3 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Series, FireKeepers Casino 400, qualifying, at Brooklyn, Mich. NBCSN „ IndyCar, DXC Technology 600, qualifying, at Fort Worth, Texas 4:30 p.m. FS2 „ NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, PPG 400, qualifying, at Fort Worth, Texas 8 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, PPG 400, at Fort Worth, Texas BOXING 11:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ Diego De La Hoya vs. Jose Salgado, junior featherweights, at Verona, N.Y. (same-day tape) COLLEGE BASEBALL 10 a.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Tournament, Super Regionals, Stetson vs. North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, N.C. 1 p.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Tournament, Super Regionals, Cal St.-Fullerton vs. Washington, at Fullerton, Calif. 4 p.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Tournament, Super Regionals, Minnesota vs. Oregon St., at Corvallis, Ore. 7 p.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Tournament, Super Regionals, Mississippi St. vs. Vanderbilt, at Nashville, Tenn. COLLEGE TRACK & FIELD 7:30 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA Division I, Men's and Women's Outdoor Championships, at Eugene, Ore. CYCLING 1 a.m. (Saturday) NBCSN „ UCI World Tour: Critrium du Dauphin, Stage 5, from Grenoble to Valmorel, France (sameday tape) GOLF 8 a.m. GOLF „ European PGA Tour, Shot Clock Masters, second round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria (same-day tape) 10:30 a.m. FS1 „ USGA, Curtis Cup, United States vs. Great Britain and Ireland, foursomes, at Scarsdale, N.Y. GOLF [--] Web.com Tour, Rust-Oleum Championship, second round, at Mundelein, Ill. 12:30 p.m. GOLF „ LPGA Tour, ShopRite LPGA Classic, “ rst round, at Galloway, N.J. 3 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, FedEx St. Jude Classic, second round, at Memphis, Tenn. 4 p.m. FS1 „ USGA, Curtis Cup, United States vs. Great Britain and Ireland, four-ball matches, at Scarsdale, N.Y. 6 p.m. GOLF „ Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic, “ rst round, at Des Moines, Iowa (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 4 p.m. NBCSN „ Belmont Stakes Access (two live races including the Belmont Gold Cup), at Elmont, N.Y. MLB 1 p.m. MLB „ Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs 6 p.m. MLB „ Regional coverage, N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets OR San Francisco at Washington NBA 8 p.m. ABC „ NBA Finals, Game 4, Golden State at Cleveland SWIMMING 7 p.m. NBCSN „ TYR Pro Series, at Santa Clara, Calif. TENNIS 10 a.m. NBC „ French Open, men's semi“ nals, at Paris (all time zones, live ET) NBCSN „ French Open, men's semi“ nals, at Paris (live)ON THE AIRFOXBOROUGH, MASS.Reports: Edelman headed for suspension Reports broke later Thursday that one of Tom Bradys favorite receivers, Julian Edelman, could be suspended for violating the leagues performance-enhancers policy.According to the report, the 32-year-old Edelman is appealing the suspension, saying he had passed hundreds of testsŽ in the past. If the suspension stands, he would miss a home game against Houston, at Jack-sonville and Detroit, and home against Miami. Terrell Owens wont attend Hall inductionTerrell Owens always likes being the center of attention. His decision to skip the induction ceremony for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August will keep him far from the spotlight.Owens was voted into the hall in February after being denied in his first two years of eligibility. His announcement Thursday is unprec-edented by an enshrinee. In a statement released Thursday by his publicist, Owens said: While I am incredibly appreciative of this opportunity, I have made the decision to pub-licly decline my invitation to attend the induction ceremony in Canton.After visiting Canton earlier this year, I came to the realization that I wish to celebrate what will be one of the most memorable days of my life, elsewhere,Ž Owens added. At a later date, I will announce where and when I will celebrate my induction.ŽNEW ORLEANSGentry, Pelicans agree on two-year extensionAlvin Gentrys ability to coach the Pelicans into the second round of the playoffs despite the mid-season loss of AllStar DeMarcus Cousins persuaded the club that Gentry deserved to be under contract beyond next season.Gentry agreed on Thursday to an extension covering two additional years, running through the 2020-21 season.He did a tremendous job last season,Ž Pelicans general manager Dell Demps said. When we faced adversity, Alvin and his staff continually dis-covered ways to place the team in situations where we could be successful.Ž The Associated PressIN BRIEF

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** The News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 C5AMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 43 20 .683 „ „ 7-3 L-1 22-9 21-11 New York 40 18 .690 „ 8-2 W-2 22-9 18-9 Tampa Bay 28 33 .459 13 9 3-7 L-7 11-14 17-19 Toronto 27 35 .435 15 10 3-7 W-1 13-19 14-16 Baltimore 19 42 .311 22 18 2-8 L-1 10-18 9-24 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 32 28 .533 „ „ 7-3 W-2 20-11 12-17 Detroit 30 34 .469 4 8 6-4 W-1 20-14 10-20 Minnesota 27 32 .458 4 9 5-5 W-1 16-15 11-17 Kansas City 21 41 .339 12 16 4-6 L-4 10-21 11-20 Chicago 20 40 .333 12 16 4-6 L-1 10-19 10-21 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Seattle 39 23 .629 „ „ 7-3 W-1 20-12 19-11 Houston 39 25 .609 1 „ 5-5 W-2 19-14 20-11 Los Angeles 35 28 .556 4 3 6-4 W-4 17-18 18-10 Oakland 31 31 .500 8 7 4-6 L-2 15-15 16-16 Texas 27 38 .415 13 12 5-5 L-1 13-20 14-18 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Washington 35 25 .583 „ „ 7-3 W-2 14-14 21-11 Atlanta 36 26 .581 „ „ 5-5 L-1 16-12 20-14 Philadelphia 32 28 .533 3 3 3-7 L-2 19-9 13-19 New York 27 32 .458 7 7 2-8 L-6 12-19 15-13 Miami 22 40 .355 14 14 3-7 L-1 10-18 12-22 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Milwaukee 37 25 .597 „ „ 5-5 L-3 18-11 19-14 Chicago 35 24 .593 „ 8-2 W-2 17-12 18-12 St. Louis 33 27 .550 3 2 5-5 W-1 19-14 14-13 Pittsburgh 31 31 .500 6 5 3-7 L-1 18-15 13-16 Cincinnati 22 41 .349 15 14 3-7 W-1 10-21 12-20 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Arizona 32 29 .525 „ „ 6-4 L-1 19-13 13-16 Colorado 32 30 .516 4 5-5 L-1 11-16 21-14 Los Angeles 31 31 .500 1 5 7-3 W-1 14-17 17-14 San Francisco 31 31 .500 1 5 6-4 W-1 19-11 12-20 San Diego 29 35 .453 4 8 7-3 W-1 18-21 11-14 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL T WINS 7, WHITE SOX 2CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .242 S anchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 A breu 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .299 Palka rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .272 Davidson dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Narvaez c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .187 Rondon ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .256 T ilson lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .229 T hompson cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .125 T OTALS 31 2 6 2 0 10 MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dozier 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .247 Rosario lf 3 2 2 3 1 0 .312 Escobar 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Morrison 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .197 Grossman rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Garver dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 LaMarre cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 A drianza ss 3 2 1 1 1 0 .236 W ilson c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .174 T OTALS 32 7 9 7 3 6 CHICAGO 000 002 000„2 6 0 MINNESOTA 210 400 00X„7 9 0 LOB„Chicago 2, Minnesota 4. 2B„Moncada (12), Abreu (23), Narvaez (6), Rosario (16), Morrison (9), LaMarre (4). HR„Escobar (12), off Shields; Adrianza (2), off Shields; Rosario (14), off Shields. RBIs„Moncada (22), Abreu (36), Dozier (26), Rosario 3 (43), Escobar 2 (38), Adrianza (9). DP„Chicago 1 (Moncada, Abreu). CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S hields, L, 1-7 6 8 7 7 2 6 99 4.92 Cedeno 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 0.00 Beck 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.18 MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, W, 7-5 9 6 2 2 0 10 109 3.66 T „2:14. A„21,469 (38,649).REDS 7, ROCKIES 5, 13 INN.COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. LeMahieu 2b 5 2 1 1 0 1 .278 Blackmon cf 6 0 2 0 0 1 .289 A renado 3b 5 0 2 0 1 1 .327 Gonzalez rf 5 0 2 1 1 0 .268 S tory ss 6 0 1 0 0 2 .242 T auchman lf 5 2 2 0 0 3 .103 S haw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f -Desmond ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 McMahon 1b 6 1 1 1 0 2 .210 W olters c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .169 A nderson p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .105 b-Cuevas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Parra lf 2 0 2 0 0 0 .287 T OTALS 47 5 13 4 3 11 CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. S chebler rf 6 1 3 1 0 2 .277 Blandino ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Gennett ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .344 Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Barnhart ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Floro p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 V otto 1b 3 1 0 1 2 1 .304 S uarez 3b 6 0 0 1 0 1 .295 Duvall lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .185 d-Winker ph-lf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .263 Casali c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .500 Dixon 2b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .235 Mahle p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 a-Lorenzen ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Peraza ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Hamilton cf 4 2 0 0 1 2 .195 T OTALS 42 7 10 6 5 9 COLORADO 101 102 000 000 0„5 13 0 CINCINNATI 010 010 021 000 2„7 10 1 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Mahle in the 5th. b-grounded out for Anderson in the 8th. c-pinch hit for Peralta in the 8th. d-singled for Duvall in the 8 th. e-grounded out for Iglesias in the 10th. f -lined out for Shaw in the 12th. E„Blandino (5). LOB„Colorado 11, Cincinnati 6. 2B„LeMahieu (10), Gonzalez (6), Tauchman (1), Schebler (6), Casali (2). 3B„McMahon (1). HR„Winker (2), off Rusin. RBIs„LeMahieu (18), Gonzalez (26), McMahon (4), Anderson (1), Schebler (23), Votto (25), Suarez (45), Casali (2), W inker 2 (15). SF„LeMahieu. S„LeMahieu, A nderson, Casali. DP„Colorado 3 (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (Story, LeMahieu, McMahon); Cincinnati 3 (Blandino, Dixon, Votto), (Duvall, Dixon), (Peraza, Dixon, Votto). COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A nderson 7 5 2 2 1 5 105 4.81 Dunn 0 1 2 2 2 0 14 9.00 Oberg, H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 4.08 Davis, BS, 3-23 1 1 1 1 0 3 25 3.42 S haw 2 1 0 0 2 0 24 6.89 Rusin, L, 0-2 1.1 1 2 2 0 1 16 7.77 CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mahle 5 6 3 2 2 6 96 4.33 Garrett 2 3 2 2 0 1 24 2.34 Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.76 Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.08 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.08 Floro, W, 2-1 3 3 0 0 1 1 34 3.12 Dunn pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Oberg 3-2. HBP„ Mahle (Wolters), Garrett (Wolters), Davis (Casali), Rusin (Votto). WP„Davis 2. T „4:15. A„15,957 (42,319).CUBS 4, PHILLIES 3PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .256 Herrera cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .305 Kingery ss 5 0 1 2 0 1 .212 S antana 1b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .221 A ltherr rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Cozens lf 3 0 0 0 2 3 .222 Knapp c 2 0 1 0 2 1 .169 e-Alfaro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Crawford 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .191 a-Franco ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Pivetta p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 b-Valentin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 33 3 6 3 9 12 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Almora cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .314 La Stella 2b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .329 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .292 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .253 Baez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Schwarber lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Happ rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Gimenez c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Chatwood p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Duensing p 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 27 4 6 4 1 9 PHILADELPHIA 000 012 000„3 6 3 CHICAGO 000 130 00X„4 6 2 a-popped out for Crawford in the 5th. bsingled for Pivetta in the 6th. c-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. d-struck out for Wilson in the 7th. e-struck out for Knapp in the 9th. E„Knapp 2 (6), Pivetta (2), Bryant (8), Chatwood (1). LOB„Philadelphia 13, Chicago 3. 2B„Kingery (12), Almora (13). HR„Rizzo (10), off Pivetta. RBIs„Kingery 2 (16), Santana (35), La Stella (13), Bryant (29), Rizzo 2 (42). CS„La Stella (1). SF„Rizzo. DP„Philadelphia 1 (Morgan, Hernandez, Santana); Chicago 1 (Chatwood, Baez, La Stella). PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, L, 4-5 5 6 4 4 1 6 86 3.76 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.47 Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.81 Morgan 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.24 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 4.2 4 1 1 7 6 107 3.86 Dnsing, W, 2-0 1 2 2 1 0 1 23 2.29 Cishek, H, 7 .1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.95 Wilson, H, 4 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 2.45 Strop, H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.13 Mrrw, S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 1.66 Inherited runners-scored„Duensing 3-0, Cishek 1-0. HBP„Chatwood (Altherr). WP„Chatwood. T„3:20. A„40,057 (41,649).CARDINALS 4, MARLINS 1MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Castro 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .292 Dietrich lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .284 Bour 1b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .245 Anderson rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .297 Riddle ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Brinson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .168 Rivera 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Rojas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Holaday c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .164 Richards p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Meyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Shuck ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 1 4 1 2 8 ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Carpenter 3b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Pham cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .276 Martinez 1b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .311 Gyorko 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Ozuna lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .275 Fowler rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .182 Munoz ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Wong 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .193 Pena c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Mikolas p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .042 a-Garcia ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 b-Voit ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .667 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Norris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 34 4 11 4 1 6 MIAMI 000 001 000„1 4 0 ST. LOUIS 200 001 10X„4 11 1 a-pinch hit for Mikolas in the 7th. bhomered for Garcia in the 7th. c-grounded out for Meyer in the 8th. d-grounded out for Rivera in the 9th. E„Fowler (4). LOB„Miami 6, St. Louis 7. 2B„Bour (6). HR„Martinez (6), off Richards; Voit (1), off Conley. RBIs„Bour (27), Martinez 2 (35), Ozuna (30), Voit (3). CS„Wong (3). MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rchards, L, 0-3 5 7 3 3 0 4 83 5.02 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 1 13 7.27 Conley 0 2 1 1 0 0 6 2.45 Meyer 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Guerrero 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 5.67 ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mikolas, W, 7-1 7 3 1 0 1 5 99 2.27 Hicks, H, 6 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 2.32 Norris, S, 12-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.96 Richards pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Conley pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Ziegler 2-1, Meyer 1-0. WP„Richards. T„2:42. A„41,297 (45,538).DODGERS 8, PIRATES 7LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Pederson lf 5 3 3 3 0 1 .272 Muncy 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .254 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grandal c 5 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Kemp rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .349 Bellinger 1b 4 2 3 2 1 1 .237 Taylor ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Valera 2b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .208 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .207 Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Baez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Puig ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paredes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Forsythe ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .212 Stewart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Turner 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243 TOTALS 38 8 13 8 4 10 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Harrison 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Polanco rf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .208 Glasnow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .367 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Cervelli ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .275 Marte cf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .289 Bell 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .237 Dickerson lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .323 Moran 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .274 c-Freese ph-3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Diaz c 3 1 1 4 0 0 .288 Mercer ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .254 Taillon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 a-Frazier ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 TOTALS 34 7 9 7 2 8 LOS ANGELES 100 111 220„8 13 1 PITTSBURGH 001 002 031„7 9 0 a-singled for Taillon in the 5th. b-doubled for Garcia in the 6th. c-singled for Moran in the 6th. d-”ied out for Glasnow in the 7th. e-walked for Goeddel in the 8th. f-homered for Feliz in the 9th. E„Muncy (4). LOB„Los Angeles 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B„Pederson (11), Bellinger (11), Hernandez (4), Puig (10), Bell (12). HR„Pederson (5), off Taillon; Bellinger (11), off Glasnow; Pederson (6), off Feliz; Diaz (4), off Stewart; Cervelli (9), off Jansen. RBIs„ Pederson 3 (25), Kemp (40), Bellinger 2 (30), Valera (4), Puig (20), Polanco (28), Bell (34), Diaz 4 (13), Cervelli (35). SB„Muncy (1), Marte (13). SF„Polanco, Diaz. S„Alexander, Taillon. LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.84 Alexander 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.38 Baez, W, 3-3 2 2 1 1 0 0 22 3.34 Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.50 Fields 0 1 2 2 1 0 14 2.79 Paredes, H, 1 .1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Goeddel, H, 3 1.2 2 0 0 0 1 35 0.51 Stewart .1 2 3 2 0 0 17 5.60 Jnsn, S, 15-17 1.2 1 1 1 0 2 22 2.83 PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 3-5 5 8 3 3 1 7 92 4.08 Glasnow 2 3 3 3 1 2 37 4.89 Feliz 2 2 2 2 2 1 40 6.31 Fields pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored„Paredes 1-0, Goeddel 1-1. HBP„Garcia (Harrison). WP„Glasnow. T„3:37. A„19,713 (38,362).MARINERS 5, RAYS 4Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .341 Haniger rf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .274 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .255 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Healy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Span lf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .247 Heredia cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Freitas c 4 1 1 0 0 3 .208 TOTALS 33 5 8 5 3 10 TAMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Robertson ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .263 Cron dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Wendle 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Ramos c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .289 Duffy 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .311 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gomez rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Smith cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .265 Field lf 4 0 2 3 0 1 .256 TOTALS 35 4 10 4 1 4 SEATTLE 031 010 000„5 8 0 TAMPA BAY 001 000 003„4 10 1 E„Robertson (5). LOB„Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2B„Ramos (9), Field (7). 3B„Duffy (1). HR„Span (6), off Pruitt; Haniger (13), off Pruitt; Robertson (7), off Leake. RBIs„ Gordon (15), Haniger 3 (46), Span (31), Robertson (18), Field 3 (14). CS„Gordon (3). SF„Gordon. Runners left in scoring position„Seattle 3 (Cruz, Healy 2); Tampa Bay 3 (Robertson, Bauers, Field). RISP„Seattle 1 for 4; Tampa Bay 2 for 10. GIDP„Cron, Wendle. DP„Seattle 2 (Leake, Gordon, Healy), (Seager, Segura, Healy). SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake, W, 6-3 8 8 2 2 1 3 100 4.46 Colome 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 4.05 TAMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1 0 0 2 2 30 3.38 Pruitt, L, .1 7 7 5 5 1 6 93 4.57 Roe 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.63 Leake pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored„Colome 1-1. HBP„Colome (Gomez). Umpires„Home, Ben May; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Chris Guccione. T„2:43. A„10,342 (42,735).TIGERS 7, RED SOX 2DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Jones lf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .219 Castellanos rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .331 Cabrera 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .306 V.Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Candelario 3b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .272 Hicks c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .278 Martin cf 4 2 2 2 0 2 .259 Iglesias ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .261 Machado 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 TOTALS 37 7 10 7 3 11 BOSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Benintendi cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .299 Bogaerts ss 5 0 0 1 0 1 .284 J.Martinez rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .314 Holt rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Moreland 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .303 Nunez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Travis lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Devers 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Vazquez dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .199 Swihart c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .167 TOTALS 33 2 7 2 5 8 DETROIT 501 000 010„7 10 0 BOSTON 100 010 000„2 7 0 LOB„Detroit 6, Boston 9. 2B„Castellanos (21), Candelario (15), Iglesias (17), Moreland (13), Swihart (2). 3B„Martin (3). HR„Martin (8), off Beeks; Benintendi (11), off Boyd. RBIs„Candelario (27), Hicks 2 (22), Martin 2 (22), Iglesias 2 (23), Benintendi (44), Bogaerts (34). Runners left in scoring position„Detroit 4 (Jones 2, Candelario 2); Boston 6 (Benintendi, Bogaerts, Nunez 2, Devers 2). RISP„Detroit 4 for 11; Boston 1 for 11. Runners moved up„V.Martinez, Bogaerts, Swihart. GIDP„Benintendi. DP„Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Cabrera). DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd, W, 4-4 6.1 4 2 2 4 6 101 3.20 Wilson .2 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.35 Jimenez 1 2 0 0 1 2 23 2.37 Greene 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.38 BOSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beeks, L, 0-1 4 7 6 6 3 4 88 13.50 Johnson 4 3 1 1 0 5 56 4.83 Velazquez 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.99 Inherited runners-scored„Wilson 1-0. WP„Boyd 3. Umpires„Home, Jeremie Rehak; First, Mark Wegner; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T„2:55. A„36,556 (37,731).BLUE JAYS 5, ORIOLES 4, 10 INN.BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mancini lf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .231 Rickard lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .322 Valencia 3b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .277 Trumbo dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .292 Schoop 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .229 Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .152 Gentry rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Wynns c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .286 TOTALS 36 4 7 4 3 11 TORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Granderson rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .215 a-Pillar ph-cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Solarte 2b-3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .253 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .248 Morales dh 5 0 2 0 0 1 .203 Maile c 3 1 0 0 2 2 .263 Diaz ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Grichuk cf-rf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .146 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .156 b-Travis ph-2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .196 TOTALS 38 5 12 5 5 6 BALTIMORE 100 000 120 0„4 7 0 TORONTO 100 000 003 1„5 12 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Granderson in the 8th. b-walked for Urshela in the 9th. LOB„Baltimore 6, Toronto 9. 2B„Mancini (10), Hernandez (14), Diaz (6), Grichuk 2 (5). HR„Wynns (1), off Clippard; Valencia (6), off Axford; Trumbo (3), off Axford; Granderson (5), off Hess. RBIs„Machado (50), Valencia (15), Trumbo (9), Wynns (1), Granderson (17), Diaz (15), Grichuk 2 (12), Pillar (23). CS„Hernandez (3). SF„Machado. Runners left in scoring position„Baltimore 3 (Davis 3); Toronto 3 (Solarte, Diaz, Urshela). RISP„Baltimore 0 for 3; Toronto 3 for 11. Runners moved up„Jones. GIDP„ Granderson, Solarte. DP„Baltimore 3 (Wynns, Machado), (Schoop, Machado, Davis), (Schoop, Machado, Davis). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hess 6 5 1 1 2 4 99 3.07 Givens, H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.77 Bleier, H, 9 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.05 Brach, BS, 2-12 .1 3 3 3 2 0 21 4.24 Castro, L, 1-2 1.1 2 1 1 1 2 30 3.00 TORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garcia 6 4 1 1 3 6 91 5.57 Clippard 1 1 1 1 0 3 15 3.52 Axford .2 2 2 2 0 0 12 3.77 Loup .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.91 Oh 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.86 Barnes, W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.30 Hess pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Givens 1-0, Castro 2-0. WP„Garcia. T„3:13. A„24,494 (53,506).ASTROS 5, RANGERS 2HOUSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Springer rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .289 Bregman 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .268 Altuve 2b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .338 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Gattis dh 4 1 2 3 0 0 .234 Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Stassi c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Marisnick cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .155 TOTALS 34 5 9 5 2 5 TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Choo lf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .267 Profar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Mazara rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .267 Beltre dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Gallo cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .204 Kiner-Falefa 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Guzman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 a-Chirinos ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .203 TOTALS 34 2 8 2 3 10 HOUSTON 000 301 010„5 9 0 TEXAS 100 000 001„2 8 1 a-doubled for Perez in the 9th. E„Choo (2). LOB„Houston 4, Texas 8. 2B„Bregman (19), Kiner-Falefa (8), Chirinos (8). HR„Gattis (10), off Hamels; Bregman (7), off Hamels. RBIs„Bregman (29), Altuve (31), Gattis 3 (31), Beltre (15), Chirinos (22). SB„Altuve (9). CS„Odor (5). Runners left in scoring position„Houston 2 (Gattis, Marisnick); Texas 4 (Choo, Profar, Gallo, Kiner-Falefa). RISP„Houston 2 for 7; Texas 2 for 11. Runners moved up„Gurriel, Guzman. GIDP„ Altuve, Kemp. DP„Texas 2 (Profar, Odor, Guzman), (Guzman, Profar). HOUSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, W, 7-1 6 3 1 1 3 8 102 2.16 Harris, H, 10 .2 3 0 0 0 1 14 4.71 Devenski, H, 12 .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.88 Peacock 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.52 Giles 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 5.40 TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, L, 3-6 7.1 7 5 5 2 5 104 3.86 Chavez 1.2 2 0 0 0 0 20 3.58 Inherited runners-scored„Devenski 2-0. T„2:36. A„30,236 (49,115).THIS DATE IN BASEBALLJUNE 8 1927: New Yorks Tony Lazzeri hit three homers in the Yankees 12-11 11-inning win over the Chicago White Sox. Lazzeris “rst two homers come off Red Faber and his third was a tworun line drive off George Connally to tie game in the ninth inning. The Yanks were behind 11-6 going into the last inning. 1933: Philadelphias Jimmie Foxx homered in his “rst three at bats all off Lefty Gomez as the As beat the New York Yankees 14-10. 1950: The Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Browns 29-4 at Fenway Park and set major league records for runs scored; most long hits, 17 (nine doubles, one triple and seven homers); most total bases, 60; most extra bases on long hits, 32; most runs over two games, 49; most hits in two games, 51, including 28 this game. Bobby Doerr had three homers and 8 RBIs, Walt Dropo hit two homers and drove in seven runs and Ted Williams added two homers and “ve RBIs. 1968: Howie Bedells sacri“ce ”y in the “fth inning ended Don Drysdales record streak of 58 2-3 consecutive scoreless innings. The Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-3.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSTwins 7, White Sox 2: Jose Berrios pitched a six-hitter for his second complete game this season, and Minnesota hit three home runs against James Shields in a rout of Chicago. Reds 7, Rockies 5, 13 innings: Jesse Winker hit a two-run homer in the 13th inning, completing Cincinnatis rally to avert a sweep by Colorado. Dodgers 8, Pirates 7: Joc Pederson went deep twice, and Cody Bellinger hit his third home run in as many games. Cardinals 4, Marlins 1: Miles Mikolas rebounded from his “rst loss of the season to pitch three-hit ball over seven innings. Cubs 4, Philies 3: Anthony Rizzo hit a solo homer and added a second RBI with a sacri“ce ”y to lead Chicago past Philadelphia. The Cubs won for the “fth time in six games. Mariners 5, Rays 4: Mike Leake pitched into the ninth inning, Mitch Haniger homered and drove in three. Leake (6-3) was lifted with a 5-1 lead after allowing his eighth hit, a leadoff double in the ninth to Wilson Ramos. Tigers 7, Red Sox 2: Leonys Martin had a two-run homer to cap a “ve-run “rst inning. Detroits victory ended a four-game win streak for Boston, which had outscored Detroit 13-1 in the “rst two games of the series. Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4, 10 innings: Aledmys Diaz hit a game-winning single in the 10th inning and Toronto rallied from a three-run de“cit in the ninth. Astros 5, Rangers 2: Evan Gattis hit a two-run homer and an RBI single, and Gerrit Cole allowed one run over six solid innings. LATE Kansas City at OaklandTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Pittsburgh Kuhl (R) 4-3 3.86 7-5 0-1 6.0 1.50 Chicago Montgomery (L) 2:20p 1-1 3.89 2-0 1-0 7.2 3.52 San Fran. Suarez (L) 2-4 4.74 2-6 0-0 0.0 0.00 Washington Strasburg (R) 7:05p 6-5 3.20 6-6 0-0 0.0 0.00 Milwaukee Chacin (R) 4-1 3.39 10-3 0-0 0.0 0.00 Philadelphia Velasquez (R) 7:05p 4-6 3.82 5-7 0-0 0.0 0.00 San Diego Lauer (L) 2-3 6.82 2-6 0-1 2.1 19.29 Miami Smith (L) 7:10p 4-6 4.03 5-7 1-0 7.0 1.29 St. Louis Weaver (R) 3-5 4.41 5-7 1-0 6.0 3.00 Cincinnati Harvey (R) 7:10p 1-4 5.79 5-4 0-0 2.0 4.50 Arizona Greinke (R) 4-4 3.44 6-6 0-0 5.2 1.59 Colorado Marquez (R) 8:40p 4-5 4.38 6-6 0-0 5.0 0.00 Atlanta McCarthy (R) 5-2 4.83 7-5 0-0 0.0 0.00 Los Angeles Buehler (R) 10:10p 3-1 2.74 5-3 0-0 0.0 0.00AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Baltimore Cashner (R) 2-7 5.02 3-9 0-0 7.0 0.00 Toronto Happ (L) 7:07p 7-3 4.08 8-4 1-0 6.0 1.50 Chicago Covey (R) 1-1 2.82 2-2 0-0 0.0 0.00 Boston Sale (L) 7:10p 5-3 3.00 7-6 0-0 0.0 0.00 Seattle Gonzales (L) 6-3 3.37 8-4 1-0 6.2 1.35 Tampa Bay Font (R) 7:10p 0-2 9.78 0-0 0-0 2.0 4.50 Cleveland Bauer (R) 4-4 2.77 6-6 2-0 15.0 1.20 Detroit Fulmer (R) 7:10p 2-5 4.73 4-8 0-1 3.0 18.00 Houston Verlander (R) 7-2 1.24 8-5 1-1 20.0 0.90 Texas Fister (R) 8:05p 1-6 4.13 4-7 1-1 11.1 3.18 Los Angeles Richards (R) 4-4 3.25 6-6 0-0 5.1 5.06 Minnesota Lynn (R) 8:10p 4-4 5.46 5-6 0-0 4.2 7.71 Kansas City Junis (R) 5-5 3.62 7-5 0-1 7.1 3.68 Oakland Cahill (R) 10:05p 1-2 2.77 3-5 0-0 4.2 7.71 INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP TEAMS PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Yankees Tanaka (R) 7-2 4.74 9-2 0-0 0.0 0.00 Mets deGrom (R) 7:10p 4-0 1.49 5-7 0-0 0.0 0.00 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. VS OPP-Pitchers record versus this opponent. WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League N.Y. Yankees 3, Toronto 0, 13 innings Boston 7, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Oakland 2 Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 2 Houston 7, Seattle 5 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 National League San Diego 3, Atlanta 1 San Francisco 5, Arizona 4, 10 innings Pittsburgh 11, L.A. Dodgers 9 Colorado 6, Cincinnati 3 Chicago Cubs 7, Philadelphia 5 Miami 11, St. Louis 3 Interleague Washington 11, Tampa Bay 2 Baltimore 1, N.Y. Mets 0 Cleveland 3, Milwaukee 1 SATURDAYS GAMES American League Baltimore at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Chi. White Sox at Boston, 4:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 4:10 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Houston at Texas, 7:15 p.m. National League San Francisco at Washington, 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m. San Diego at Miami, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 7:15 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m. Interleague N.Y. Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:15 p.m.BASEBALL CALENDARJUNE 15: International amateur signing period closes. JULY 2: International amateur signing period opens. JULY 6: Last day to sign for amateur draft picks subject to deadline. JULY 17: All-Star Game, Washington. JULY 29: Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. JULY 31: Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. OCT. 2-3: Wild-card games. DEC. 10-13: Winter meetings, Las Vegas. TOP TEN A MERICAN LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Betts Bos 48 184 52 66 .359 Segura Sea 58 245 45 83 .339 Castellanos Det 60 243 31 81 .333 Altuve Hou 63 256 35 85 .332 Simmons LAA 59 215 32 71 .330 Brantley Cle 50 203 33 66 .325 MMachado Bal 60 232 32 75 .323 JMartinez Bos 59 227 40 72 .317 Rosario Min 59 234 39 73 .312 Trout LAA 63 222 52 69 .311 NATIONAL LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Kemp LAD 60 192 28 67 .349 Gennett Cin 61 227 32 78 .344 FFreeman Atl 62 237 39 80 .338 Markakis Atl 62 247 39 81 .328 Arenado Col 57 214 39 70 .327 BCrawford SF 60 213 26 69 .324 Dickerson Pit 57 220 31 71 .323 Almora ChC 54 175 35 55 .314 Martinez StL 57 212 25 66 .311 Belt SF 53 192 32 59 .307 Through afternoon games of June 7

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** C6 Friday, June 8, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JUNE 8 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Kelly Clarkson; Samantha Barry. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & Hoda2018 French Open Tennis Mens Semifinals. (N Same-day Tape) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Maury The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show Jerry Springer Jerry Springer DermaWandPaid Program WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Ne-Yo performs. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The Dating GameŽ Diagnosis Murder The Big ValleyGunsmoke WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Singer Francois Clemmons. (N) Lets Make a Deal The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Forensic FilesJerry Springer The Real (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) Paternity CourtCouples CourtJudge FaithJudge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVLifeLockPaid ProgramJudge Mathis The Peoples Court The Peoples Court (N) CityLine WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplash A&E 34 43 118 265 Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Live PD Live PD -06.17.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 TraegerLifeLockDietland Pilot; Tender BellyŽ Plum makes risky choices. ‰‰‰‚ The River Wild (94) Meryl Streep, Kevin Bacon, David Strathairn. Groundhog ANPL 46 69 184 282 Too Cute! Buying HawaiiBuying HawaiiDr. Dee: Alaska Vet Hope for Wildlife (N) Animal Cops Houston Animal Cops Houston BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsHouse/PayneHouse/PayneTyler Perrys House of PayneFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceHouse /PayneHouse/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Scrubs FuturamaFuturama (:05) Futurama (:40) Futurama (:10) Futurama70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Moonshiners Moonshiners Moonshiners Moonshiners Tickle takes risks. Moonshiners The ShiningŽ Bering Sea Gold E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News: Daily Pop (N) The Kardashians ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) Get Up (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) High Noon (N) (L) Outside LinesNFL Live (N) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Get UpCollege Baseball NCAA Tournament -Stetson vs North Carolina. Super Regional, Game 1. (N) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Ageless BodyNew BissellCindys SkinPioneer Wo.Giada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada in ItalyGiada in ItalyGiada in ItalyGiada-BeachPi oneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny 700/InteractiveThe 700 Club (N) ‰‰‰‚ The Incredibles (04) Voices of Craig T. Nelson, Holly Hunter. Cloak-Dagger FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstSkip and Shannon: Undisputed (N) (L) Womens Golf Curtis Cup, Foursomes. (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‰ Parental Guidance ‰‚ After Earth (13) Jaden Smith, Will Smith. How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetMike & MollyMike & Molly HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family Puppeteers Sid and Marty Krofft. (N) Home & Family Guest co-host Cameron Mathison. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, TooLove It or List It, TooSarah--GridSarah--GridFixer Upper Waco, Texas. Fixer UpperFixer UpperFixer Upper HIST 35 42 120 269 Haunted History Haunted History Haunted History Haunted History Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved Mysteries Cleveland Abduction: BeyondColleen Stan: The GirlColleen Stan: The Girl PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Vulgar VixensŽ Bar Rescue (:36) Bar Rescue Helping a failing Irish bar. (10:48) Bar Rescue Two/Half MenTwo/Half Men SUN 49 422 656 Florida Sport.Reel TimeReel AnimalsShip Shape TVFishing FlatsSport FishingSportsmanFlorida Insider Fishing Report Sport FishingInto the Blue SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:00) ‰‰ Odd Thomas (13) ‰‰‚ Silent House (11) Elizabeth Olsen, Adam Trese. ‰‰ The Possession (12) Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Kyra Sedgwick. ‰‰ Backtrack (15) Sam Neill TBS 31 15 139 247 MarriedKingKingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‚ Her Highness and the Bellboy (45) Hedy Lamarr. ‰‰‰ Hotel Reserve (44) James Mason. ‰‰‰ Hotel Berlin (45) Helmut Dantine.(:15) ‰‰‰‰ Grand Hotel (32) TLC 37 40 183 280 Linda and Drew Say I Do90 Day Fianc: Happily Ever After? My 600-Lb. Life My 600-Lb. Life Four Weddings TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Chris CrossedŽ Charmed WitchstockŽ Supernatural Supernatural Swan SongŽ Supernatural Supernatural USA 62 55 105 242 Chicago P.D. Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarBeyond TodayMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JUNE 8 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) HarryPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramBig DealPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Program CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) Barry WhiteLuminess AirSkin SecretsPaid ProgramSkin SecretsL King ReportSkin SecretsDermaWandSkin SecretsBBQ SecretsMarie Osmon d WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 (:07) MomJudge KarenPaid ProgramCookSmartCookSmartCook FastPaid ProgramOpen HousePaid ProgramTri-StatesGood Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 MannixCannon Death ChainŽ 77 Sunset StripGomer PyleGomer PylePetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. Hillbillies WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Mo rning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesUnexplainedPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid P rogramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Imp. JokersImp. JokersStevePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramLifeLockPaid ProgramPaid ProgramDr. Ho Reliev. WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Memory Rescue3 Steps to Incredible Health! With Joel Fuhrman, M.D.Survival Guide for Pain-FreeMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob Bu ilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindCookSmartKnee BraceBBQ SecretsMakeup!Facelift in Min.CookSmartFlipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 (:03) Dietland Pilot; Tender BellyŽ Plum makes risky choices.(:03) Humans (:04) Fear the Walking DeadThree StoogesThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:02) TankedTankedTankedTankedDr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain VetDr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithFresh PrinceFresh Prince COM 64 53 107 249 ChappellesChappellesChappellesChappellesChappellesAnother PeriodLifeLockCredit?Try Total GymMyPillowScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:04) Bering Sea GoldShipwreck MenShipwreck MenOutdoorsMartin Chall.Sticker ShockThe Fish GuyzChasin Sun E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityS ex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) 2018 NBA Finals Golden State Warriors at Cleveland Cavaliers. SportsCenterSportsCenter W/Van PeltSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 BoxingSportsCenterSportsCenter W/Van PeltSportsCenterSportsCenter W/Van PeltSportsCenterWorld of X Games FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QuePaid ProgramNew BissellShark IONCindys SkinGuys Big BiteBrunch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Luminess AirSexy HairThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramMakeup!Paid ProgramCindys SkinMyPillowPiYo Workout! ‰‚ The Smurfs (11) FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC Weigh-InUFC CountdownUFC Main EventDrag RacingNASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Rattlesnake 400. FX 45 51 136 248 (11:37) Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (15) (:37) ‰‚ After Earth (13) Jaden Smith, Will Smith. Paid ProgramTry Total GymShark IONHow I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyJune in January (14) HGTV 32 38 112 229 Tiny HouseHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeDr. DrewMakeup!Sexy HairEvenSkinCindys SkinLifeLockProperty Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 (11:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien WeaponsŽ CoinCoinCoinCoinCoinCredit?Swamp People LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) ‰‚ Addicted (14) Sharon Leal, Boris Kodjoe. Ageless BodyCue VaporHair LovePhilips!Cindys SkinAge SpotsBaldingDr. Ho Reliev. PARMT 28 48 241 241 (10:30) CreedAmerican Ninja WarriorTattoo Night.CookSmartKnee BraceHydroShot!Credit?Cindys SkinAirfryer OvenPaid ProgramWeight SUN 49 422 656 After Midnight PostgameFoot PainSex PillsCleanseCredit?OrganicOrganicHow to Tighten Crepey SkinFacing WavesReel Animals SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:02) ‰‰ Backtrack (15) Adrien Brody, Sam Neill.(:01) ‰‰ Bones (01) Snoop DoggyŽ Dogg, Pam Grier. LifeLockLifeLockCredit?LifeLock TBS 31 15 139 247 (12:00) ‰‰‰ Batman Begins (05) Christian Bale, Liam Neeson. MarriedMarriedMarriedMarriedMarried ‰‰ Jack the Giant Slayer (13) Nicholas Hoult. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰ Twilight People (72) John Ashley. ‰‰‰ Island of Lost Souls Distant DrumDistant DrumDuck & Cover ‰‰‚ The Cats Paw (34) Harold Lloyd, Una Merkel. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes to the DressSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: AT LSay Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 (12:20) Claws (:27) Claws AmbrosiaŽ(:38) Claws AvalancheŽ Desna is on the run. Law & Order MergerŽ Law & Order JusticeŽ Law & Order MarathonŽ USA 62 55 105 242 (:01) NCIS: Los Angeles (:01) NCIS: Los Angeles (:01) Dateline CollisionŽ Dateline Heart of DarknessŽ NCIS: Los AngelesTry Total GymMyPillow WGN-A 13 239 307 EngagementHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetPerson of InterestPaid ProgramHelp Now!Regrow HairTai ChengBrand New! Ageless Body FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JUNE 8 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 French OpenThe Doctors Harry Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramRegrow HairMaury The Robert Irvine Show The GoldbergsThe GoldbergsAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show Dr. Phil NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza The Gentle OnesŽ The RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainCharlies AngelsMamas FamilyThe JeffersonsM*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Divorce CourtDivorce CourtAndy GriffithAndy GriffithDateline DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury Crime Watch DailySteve ThisMinuteThisMinuteJudge Judy (N) Judge Judy Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsFSU Headlines A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -01.19.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Live PD -06.02.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:30) ‰‰‰‚ Groundhog Day (93) Bill Murray, Chris Elliott. ‰‰ The Great Outdoors (88) Dan Aykroyd, John Candy. ‰‰‚ National Lampoons Vacation (83) Chevy Chase. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Lone Star Law Gator BaitŽ North Woods Law OutfoxedŽ Tanked Tank of JerichoŽ Tanked BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, Browns (:35) ‰‰ The Wood (99) Omar Epps, Taye Diggs, Richard T. Jones. COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office LiceŽ (:15) The Office The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold BattleBots BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News (N) Sex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:30) NFL Live (N) (L) NBA: The Jump (N) (L) QuestionableAround/HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Baseball NCAA Tournament -Washington vs Cal State Fullerton. (N) (L) College Baseball NCAA Tournament -Minnesota vs Oregon State. Super Regional, Game 1. (N) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 Cloak-Dagger ‰‰‰ 13 Going on 30 (04) Jennifer Garner, Mark Ruffalo. (:40) ‰‰ Shes All That (99) Freddie Prinze Jr., Rachael Leigh Cook. (5:50) ‰‚ Zookeeper (11) FS1 24 27 150 219 Wom. GolfRace HubNASCAR RacingNASCAR RacingWomens Golf Curtis Cup, Four-Ball. From Quaker Ridge Golf Club in Scarsdale, N.Y. (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 Mike & Molly ‰‰ Battleship (12) Taylor Kitsch. Earth comes under attack from a superior alien force. ‰‰‰ Everest (15) Jason Clarke, Josh Brolin, John Hawkes. HALL 23 59 185 312 Autumn Dreams (15) Jill Wagner, Colin Egglesfield. The Birthday Wish (17) Jessy Schram, Luke Macfarlane. Once Upon a Prince (18) Megan Park, Jonathan Keltz. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Fixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer Upper HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens The MissionŽ Possible alien missions on Earth. Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Elizabeth Shoaf: The GirlGreys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Love by the 10th Date (17) Meagan Good, Kelly Rowland. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenMom (:36) Mom (:12) Mom (4:48) Mom (:24) Mom Friends Friends SUN 49 422 656 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays. True Fishing Florida Insider Fishing Report Baseball BeginRays PregameMLB Baseball SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:00) ‰‰ Backtrack (15) ‰‰ Seventh Son (14) Jeff Bridges, Julianne Moore. ‰‰‚ Journey to the Center of the Earth (08) Anita Briem Journey 2-Mysterious Isl. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy Bobs BurgersBobs Burgers TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:15) ‰‰‰‰ Grand Hotel (:15) ‰‰‰ Weekend at the Waldorf (45) Ginger Rogers, Lana Turner.(:45) ‰‰‰ Hotel (67) Rod Taylor, Catherine Spaak, Karl Malden. TLC 37 40 183 280 Four Weddings Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay Yes to the Dress TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Suspects. Bones The Man in the WallŽ Bones NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans ‰‰‰ Unstoppable (10) USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Ties That BindŽ Blue Bloods The BogeymanŽ M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JUNE 8 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 American Ninja Warrior Competitors face six obstacles. Dateline NBC The WatcherŽ NewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 My Last DaysLife Sentence Love FactuallyŽ Page Six TVSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKingKing of the HillCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Jimmy KimmelNBA2018 NBA Finals Golden State Warriors at Cleveland Cavaliers. (N) (L) News 13 at 10 (:05) Jimmy Kimmel Live (N) Nightline (N)(:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss: CelebrityHawaii Five-0Blue BloodsModern FamilyLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenModern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 American Ninja WarriorAmerican Ninja Warrior2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsAnger MgtAnger MgtThe GameThe GameCorrupt CrimesKiller WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Phenoms (N) Phenoms (N) Two/Half MenTMZ (N) Crime Watch DailyPawn StarsPawn StarsTwo/Half MenHow I Met WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashThe Highwaymen Live at Nassau ColiseumRetire Safe & Secure With Ed SlottAmanpour-PBSFace to FaceMemory Rescue A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -06.08.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 ‰‰ Die Another Day (02) Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens. Fear the Walking Dead (:02) Into the Badlands (12:03) Talking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Tanked (:01) Tanked (N)(:02) Tanked (:02) Tanked (:02) Tanked (12:02) Tanked BET 53 46 124 329 (6:55) ‰‰ Soul Plane (04) Kevin Hart, Tom Arnold. MartinMartinMartinMartinIn Contempt BLM, Part OneŽ(12:01) MartinMartin COM 64 53 107 249 The OfficeThe OfficeThe Office ‰‚ Tammy (14) Melissa McCarthy, Susan Sarandon, Kathy Bates. Julian McCullough: MaybeChappellesChappelles DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots (N) Bering Sea Gold (N)American Chopper: Rebuilt (N)(:04) Bering Sea GoldAmerican Chopper: Rebuilt (12:04) BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityS ex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 NBACollege Track and Field NCAA Mens and Womens Outdoor Championships. SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter W/Van PeltSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Baseball NCAA Tournament -Mississippi State vs Vanderbilt. Super Regional, Game 1. SC FeaturedNBA at the Mic (N) (L) Boxing Diego De La Hoya vs. Jose Salgado. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 (5:50) ‰‚ Zookeeper (11) Marvels Cloak & DaggerMarvels Cloak & DaggerThe 700 Club ‰‰ Shes All That (99) Freddie Prinze Jr., Matthew Lillard. FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RaceDay NCWTSNASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Rattlesnake 400. (N) (L) MLB Whiparound (N) (L) TMZ SportsUFC Tonight FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰‰ Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (15) Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg. Pose Damon aspires to join a dance company. (:37) ‰‰‰ Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation HALL 23 59 185 312 Love on the Sidelines (16) Emily Kinney, John Reardon. The MiddleThe MiddleGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlTiny HouseHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunte rs Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien WeaponsŽ Advances in technology and weapons. (N)(:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien WeaponsŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 ‰‰ Tyler Perrys The Single Moms Club (14) Nia Long.(:03) ‰‚ Addicted (14) Sharon Leal, Boris Kodjoe.(:01) ‰‰ Tyler Perrys The Single Moms Club (14) Nia Long. PARMT 28 48 241 241 FriendsFriends ‰‰‰ Remember the Titans (00) Denzel Washington, Will Patton. ‰‰‰ Creed (15) Michael B. Jordan, Sylvester Stallone, Tessa Thompson. SUN 49 422 656 (6:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays. (N) PostgameInside RaysInside RaysBaseball BeginAfter Midnight With the Rays From June 8, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 Journey 2-Mysterious Isl.FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturama (:32) FuturamaFuturama (:32) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰‰ Transformers (07) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. ELEAGUE Street Fighter Invitational Group B. (N) ‰‰‰ Batman Begins (05) TCM 25 70 132 256‰‰‰ Warlock (59) Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda.(:15) ‰‰‰ The Left Hand of God (55) Humphrey Bogart. ‰‰‰ Obsession (49) Robert Newton, Sally Gray. TLC 37 40 183 280 90 Day Fianc: Happily Ever After? (N) 90 Day FiancMy 600-Lb90 Day Fianc: Happily Ever After?90 Day FiancMy 600-Lb TNT 29 54 138 245 (6:00) ‰‰‰ Unstoppable (10) ‰‰‚ Focus (15) Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Adrian Martinez. Claws Self-PortraitŽ(:11) Claws EscapeŽ(:20) Claws USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family (12:01) NCIS: Los Angeles WGN-A 13 239 307 M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HEngagementEngagementEngagementEngagement

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 C C 7 7 20641 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 032018CA000295CAX XXX WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, VS. The Unknown Heirs,Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, Or Other Claimants Claiming By, Through,Under, Or Against John S Keen A/K/A John Steven Keen, Deceased; et al Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: John Steven Keen, II, As An Heir Of The Estate Of John S. Keen A/K/A John Steven Keen, Deceased and John Steven Keen, II, As Personal Representative Of The Estate Of John S. Keen A/K/A John Steven Keen, Deceased Last Known Address: 425 E. 19th Street, Apt. 904 Panama City, Fl. 32405 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Bay County, Florida: A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST AND THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST HALF OF SECTION 22, 1875.58 FEET TO THE NORTH SIDE OF A 60 FOOT STREET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF SAID STREET, 960.02 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE OF A 60 FOOT STREET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID STREET, 1500 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT; THENCE CONTINUING NORTH 1 DEGREE 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID STREET, 250 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST, 300 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 1 DEGREE 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 250 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST, 300 FEET TO THE STARTING POINT. SAID LOT BEING IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST, ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 13, BLOCK G, FLORIBAY EAST. A ND A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WEST HALF OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID WEST HALF OF SECTION 22, 1875.58 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF A 60 FOOT STREET, 960.02 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE OF A 60 FOOT STREET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID STREET, 1400 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINTUES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG STREET, 100 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST, 300 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 100 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES WEST, 300 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LOT BEING IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTON 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST, ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 11, BLOCK G, FLORIBAY EAST. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jonathan Mesker, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33309, within thirty (30) days of the first date of publication o before and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on May 18th, 2018 BILL KINSAUL As Clerk of the Court By: Debbie Roberson As Deputy Clerk Pub: June 1, 8, 2018 20543 NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE WITH MINOR CHILDREN CASE NO.: 18-170DR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY IN RE: The Marriage of MATTIEU ‘KALEB THOMAS HARPER, Husband, and KASSANDRA ANN HARPER, Wife. TO: MATTIEU KALEB THOMAS HARPER 7238 Miller Road Panama City, FL 32404 (last known address) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage with minor children has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: Kassandra Ann Harper c/o Julia G. Duke, Attorney for W ife, whose address is: 1021 Grace A venue, P anama City FL 32401 on or before June 25, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at Juvenile Justice Courthouse, 533 East 11th Street, Panama City, FL 32401 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. I f you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your address. Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed or e-mailed to the address(es) on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Date: May 4, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Greg Gladden Deputy Clerk Pub: May 18, 25, June 1, 8, 2018 20671 Notice to be Published State of Connecticut Judicial district of WATERBURY At WATERBURY Docket number UWY-FA17-5020904-s Plaintiff’s name LIVINGSTON, CHARJOHNA Defendent’s name LIVINGSTON, RYAN S. Notice to RYAN S. LIVINGSTON of parts unknown A Complaint / Application / Motion has been filed with this court that asks for (“x” all that apply): Dissolution of Marriage You are named as a party in this case. To participate in your case, you must file an Appearance, form JD-CL-12, with the court. Failure to file an Appearance in accordance with the law of the State of Connecticut may result in judgment against you or granting of the relief requested by the party who filed the action or motion. You may obtain the Appearance form from any Connecticut Judicial District Court Clerk’s Office, Court Service Center, or online at http://www jud.ct.gov/webforms/for ms/c1012.pdf If this notice is to inform you of a divorce, dissolution of civil union, legal separation, annulment, custody, or visitation case, Automatic Court Orders have been issued in this case as required by section 25-5 of the Connecticut Practice Book and are a part of the Complaint / Application on file with the Court. Ahearing on this matter has been scheduled for June 28, 2018 AT 10:00 A.M. at SUPERIOR COURT, 300 GRAND ST., WATERBURY, CT06702 Anna M. FIECTO, JUDGE Tracy Barraco Assistant Clerk Date signed: May 5th, 2018 Pub: May 31, June 3, 13, 20, 2018 20668 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE The personal property, household goods, and contents of the following rental spaces will be sold for cash or otherwise disposed of to satisfy liens for unpaid rent in accordance with Florida Statute Chapter 83, Section 801 et seq. Call for info. On: June 18, 2018, at 3:30 PM At: Southern Self Storage -Panama City Beach 18436 Panama City Bch Pkwy Panama City Beach, FL 32413 850-588-2767 Name: Michelle Cope Space No.: F123 Contents: 2007 Harley Davidson Motorcycle, Household goods Name: Jeffrey Clinton Space No.C125 Contents 2006 Chevrolet Suburban, Houshold goods Name: Suzanne Thompson Space No:A358 and A171 Contents Household goods. Pub June 1, 8, 2018 20696 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 17001058CA BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION PLAINTIFF VS. DEBORAH CALD WELL, ET AL., DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 21, 2018 entered in Case No. 17001058CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein Branch Banking and Trust Company is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, and all other parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against The Estate of Deborah Caldwell a/k/a Deborah Lee Caldwell a/k/a Deborah L. Caldwell f/k/a Deborah L. Hines, Deceased; James Harless Caldwell, III a/k/a James H. Caldwell, III a/k/a James Harless Caldwell a/k/a James H. Caldwell; The Riverside Property and Homeowners’ Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www .bay .realfore close.c om, beginning at 11:00 AM on July 6, 2018. the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 11, RIVERSIDE PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 19, PAGE 28, PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21 day of May, 2018 Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court Ladyne Swearingen Deputy Clerk Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 1, 8, 2018 20726 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION, FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, BAY COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2016-DP-260-A Division: A IN THE INTEREST OF: K.B., DOB: 09/09/2016 MINOR CHILD NOTICE OF ACTION (TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS) TO:BRANDON GIVENS 402 MCEWEN DRIVE NICEVILLE, FLORIDA 32578 CHANTEL BLOUNT 2405 ALLISON AVENUE, APT. B PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA 32408 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the State of Florida, Department of Children and Families, has filed a Petition to terminate your parental rights and permanently commit the following child for adoption: K.B., born on September 9, 2016. A copy of the Petition is on file with the Clerk of the Court. You are hereby commanded to appear on 1 1th day of July, 2018, at 8:30 a.m., C.T. before the Honorable Judge Ana M. Garcia, Juvenile Division, at the Bay County Juvenile Justice Courthouse, 533 11th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, for an ADVISORY HEARING. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN NAMED IN THIS NOTICE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand as Clerk of said Court and the Seal thereof, this 31st day of May, 2018. BILL KINSAUL, as Clerk of Court By: Viola Cushman, as Deputy Clerk Pub June 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018 20718 GOVERNMENT SURPLUS AUCTION 6/09/18 at 8:00 a.m. 3847 E. Bus Hwy 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-896-2343 facebook.com/flauc tion networkauctionzip.com ID# 42719 Items from Bay County, City of Mexico Beach, City of Springfield and other consignors. Florida Auction Network LLC Jon Sewell, Manager/Auctioneer 13% Buyer’s Premium 3% Discount for cash/check cash, check, credit cards accepted + tax, tag, and title fees AB# 3488 AU# 4677 June 1, 8, 2018 20762 NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF A COUNTY ORDINANCE Notice is hereby given of the intent of the Board of County Commissioners of Bay County to consider the enactment of an ordinance entitled “AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING BAY COUNTY CODE CHAPTER 23, ARTICLE II, MUNICIPAL SERVICE TAXING UNIT FOR FIRE PROTECTION TO ADD THE CITY OF MEXICO BEACH INTO THE TAXING UNIT.” Beginning at 9:00 a.m., during the regular meeting of the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday June 19, 2018 in the Commission Meeting Room of the Bay County Government Center, 840 West 11th Street, Panama City, Florida. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Commissioners at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings. For that purpose, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The ordinance may be inspected during normal business hours at the County Administration offices, 840 West 11th Street, Panama City. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the County’s Administrative Office at (850) 248-8140 at least 48 hours prior to the date of the hearing. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Pub June 8, 2018 20728 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Beef ‘O’ Brady’s located at 11226 Hutchison Blvd, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City Beach, Florida, 32407 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Lynn Haven, Florida, this 31st day of May, 2018 Cotton’s Cookin’, Inc. Pub June 8, 2018 20740 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College District Board of Trustees will hold a meeting. Contact person for the meeting is Dr. John Holdnak, president, Gulf Coast State College. WHEN: 10 a.m., June 28, 2018 WHERE: William C. Cramer Jr. Seminar Room (Room 306), Robert L. McSpadden Student Union West, Gulf Coast State College PURPOSE: Regular Meeting Pub June 8, 2018 20749 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College Foundation, Inc. Finance Committe will meet on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 in Student Union West, Room 302 at 4:00p.m. CST at Gulf Coast State College. Pub: June 8, 2018 20760 PUBLIC NOTICE “The PAEC Florida Buy program is seeking to receive proposals, RFP #18-10, to establish contracts for factory-built buildings for schools and other public and non-profit entities in the PAEC Districts. To access RFP documents, go to www .floridabuy .org .” Pub June 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 2018 20761 PUBLIC NOTICE Attorney Toni Craig has passed away. The Florida Bar is seeking any of her prior clients who wish to obtain their legal files. For more information please contact Debra Peel at DP eelFloridaBar@aol. com or 850-896-4725 to have your legal files returned to you. Pub: June 8, 9, 22, 23, 2018 20768 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 18594DR Division No: F2 NICOLA NICKESER STREETE Plaintiff, and AHMED TIDIANE DIALLO Respondent, AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO AHMED TIDIANE DIALLO last known address 2607 W. 16th St. Panama City Florida 32405 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it on NICOLE NICKESER STREETE whose address is 2215 Edgewood Dr. Panama City Florida 32405 on or before July 16, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 533 E. 11th St. Panama City Florida 32401 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: NONE Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-Mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed or e-mailed to the address(es) on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated June 6, 2018 Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Greggory Gladden Deputy Clerk Pub June 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018 20772 CITY OF PANAMA CITY BEACH NOTICE OF INTENT The City of Panama City Beach intends to issue approval of the following site plan for which application was made. Name of applicant: Joe and Julie Cummings Location of property for which approval is sought: 17629 Cordova Place. Nature of approval sought by the applicant: Development Order Approval The application has been reviewed and will be approved five (5) days from the date of the publication of this notice. An adversely affected person may file a written request for a hearing with the Building and Planning Department prior to approval in five (5) days. The written request for a hearing shall identify the specific sections of the Comprehensive Plan and/or the LDC that the application violates and describe how such sections are not met. Upon receipt of the written request for a hearing, the Building and Planning Department will schedule a quasi-judicial hearing on the application before the Planning Board. Pub June 8, 2018 Registered Australian Labradoodle Puppies miniature, fat & healthly $1900. 229-886-5555 GE Heavy Duty stacked washer and dryer lightly used for sale for use or parts $350 Call (850)832-7195 For Sale Husqvarna riding mower. Model #YTH2348. 48” cut, 271 hours. Runs great. $475. Also for sale Deluxe Gorilla dump cart. Heavy duty $80, Riding mower jack high lift $70. Call (850)532-4408 FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com PLOT AND VAULT FOR SALE Garden of Memories Lot 29 A #2, asking $2,000 for ground and $1500 for vault OBO Call: 434-688-6619 Under counter 3 c.u. refrigerator/freezer, $300 good working condition. Call 850-227-1067 Administrative AssistantPosition Available that would require bookkeeping and accounting knoledge. Salary based on skill and experience. This position is available immediately. Please contact Paul Penn (850)227-6242 or paul@floridagulf coast.com or send Resume`to: 700 Country Club Road, port Saint Joe, FL, 32456. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 8 8 Friday, June 8, 2018| The News Herald Competitive Wages • Paid Holidays • Paid Vacation Paid Personal Time Off • Please send your resume to Apply in person at SHORES OF PANAMA Maintenance Technicians HVAC Maintenance TechniciansNOW HIRING NF-1182667 DODGE CHRYSLER JEEP RAM HYUNDAI MITSUBISHI LINCOLNSALARIED SALES POSITIONS! Come join the largest and busiest dealership in Bay County! We are looking to hire sales consultants for our New & Used Departments. Join our team and be able to sell from the largest selection of vehicles in the area. No experience necessary. We are offering a full training program! • $500/week plus commission! Please apply in person: 636 W. 15th Street Panama City, FL 32401Ask for Wayne Bailey. NF-1182158 Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen Experienced Office WorkerOffice experience required. Looking for a candidate with the following skills: *Computer Literate Strong Phone Skills Professional organization Commited Work Ethic Permanent work, with opportunity to develop into Full-Time position. Senior citizens welcome to apply! Contact Henry at 850-814-9994 or email prof t axhenry@comcast.net Licensed Massage Therapists Wanted!!!Are you looking for a dynamic working environment with lots of perks? Then look no further because Hand and Stone wants to talk to you!!! We are in search of Massage Therapists looking for a long term role in a stable and positive environment. You are a critical link in ensuring that our customers’ experience in our spa is nothing other than OUTSTANDING!!! BONUS FOR CANDIDATES COMMITTING AND CONTRACTING TO AT LEAST SIX MONTHS Call 732-740-6390 or email ereilly@handandstone.com today!!! Line Service Technician with Sheltair Aviation at Panama City Jet CenterResponsibilities: *Greet, park, tow, move and marshal aircraft arriving or departing, ramp area. *Provide lavatory and water service as required. *Provide shuttle service for passengers/crew as required. *Fuel aircraft Jet-A-100LL as required. *Assist with customer service duties as required. *Provide oil for aircrafts as required. *Assist with general cleaning and clearing of debris from ramp, building and customer area. *Assist passengers and/or crew with baggage/ cargo as needed. *Assist with wing walking duties as required. *Sump fuel tanks and trucks daily and record finding. *Comply with all company and airport regulations. *Perform other duties as needed. Qualifications: *High school diploma or GED *Complete NATA safety 1st initial training and recurrent every 2 years. *Must possess a valid state driver’s license, CDL preferred. *Must successfully complete the company’s training program. *Require moderate to heavy physical exertion to fuel aircraft and handle baggage. In order to provide equal employment and advancement opportunities to all individuals, employment decisions at Sheltair will be based on merit, qualifications and abilities. Sheltair fully supports the concept of equal employment opportunity. We administer our Human Resources program to comply with all applicable antidiscrimination laws. Sheltair does not discriminate in employment opportunities or practices on basis of race, color, creed, sex, national origin, age, disability, or any other characteristic protected by law. Send resume to: sbegani@sheltairaviation.com Now hiring for: Massage Therapists Estheticians Nail Techs Brazilian WaxersP/T or F/T Email your resume to: indigoearthspa@gmail.com or apply in person: 443 Grace Ave, Panama City, FL Call (850)303-3669 Press OperatorThe News Herald in Panama City, Florida, home of the “World’s Most Beautiful Beaches” is looking for a press operator preferably with at least 2 years of experience using Web Press, must have great work history, be self-motivated, disciplined & be a team player. Ability to use a computer is required. We will train the right person in this rapidly advancing, high tech field. The position is full time & includes night and weekend work. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including 401(k), paid vacation and sick leave, medical, dental, vision & life insurance. Send your resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later time. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Web ID#:34351513 The Panama City News Herald is in need of aSingle Copy Independent ContractorFor the Panama City/Lynn Haven/Southport area. This person will deliver papers to our coin operated racks as well as our inside store locations. Must have a dependable vehicle, and be able to work early hours 7 days a week. This is a good opportunity for someone wanting to earn extra cash. Come by 501 W. 11th St. in Panama City & complete an application or email: jmilner@pcnh.com Web ID#: 34379182 WANTED: granite/stone countertop installers and finishers/polishers. Experience preferred. Will train motivated people. Hours of work are M-F, with each work day starting at 7am. Benefits available: 401K, health insurance, life insurance, and more! Family-oriented team. Pay based on experience, and is renegotiable after a brief period. Clean background helpful. Come grow with us! Apply through this ad anytime. Apply on-site M-F, 10am-4pm: 635 Briggs Ln, Southport, FL 32409. Text FL92490 to 56654 Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple Positions Small Engine MechanicPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Exp Receptionist Office AssistantFor busy medical practice. Fax resume to: 850-763-1477 LandscapingHiring for all positions in landscape construction and lawn maitenance. Good pay. Benefits. Year round employment. Apply at Noles Scapes 1812 West 27th Street Panama City, FL 850-248-0973 Leon’s DonutsNear Tyndall AFB is now hiring. Will train. Bakery/kitchen exp desired. 11 pm until 7 am shift. $11/hr. Call 850-832-1457. Local Company Needs A & B CDL Drivers and Truck Mechanics 850-769-8031 Sanders/ TapersAuto paint shop needs an experienced sander/taper. Call M-F 8am-5pm (850)785-8275 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 1br furnished condo for rent at Pirates Cove at inlet Beach. West end of Panama City Beach. 2 pools, carport, storage shed, boat launch with private acess to Lake Powell. $950 month Available July 1st Call (850)819-6929 3 BR/ 1.5 B in the Cove. Large driveway, fenced back yard, no pets. $1,000 + Deposit Call (850)769-9019 Lynn Haven 914 Alabama Ave June 7th & 8th 7am -6pmYard SaleGolf clubs, fishing poles, scrubs, and childrens books. Panama City Beach105 Bid A We Court June 9th 7am -12pmMulti Family Yard and Moving SaleMisc items and some furniture, evrything must go! Panama City Beach13217 Petunia Street June 9th &10th 7am -tillEstate SaleCollectible dolls, books, DVD’s, Elvis memorabilia, vintage albums, and misc. household items. Springfield318 Bayou Avenue June 8th & 9th 8am -2pmYard SaleTools, Tools, Misc., and Clothes St. Andrews 3119 W. 23rd Ct. Behind G. Foley’s. Saturday Only 7 amLarge Yard SaleMany collectibles, military memorabilia, and antiques. Panama City2206 Edgewood Dr. off Airport Rd. between 19th St. and 23rd St. June 8th & 9th 8am -2pmPanama City Estate SaleFurniture (beds, dressers, chests, dining table, china cabinets, curio cabinets, misc end tables cedar chest, Howard Miller grandfather clock and more), dishes (Corelle, stoneware Corning, Tupperware and more), large collection of angel figurines, misc. collectibles, glassware, bird figurines, framed pictures and art, linens, Singer sewing machine in cabinet, wash and dryer, lamps, Underwood typewriter, and more! This house is bigger than it looks form the outside! Panama City7009 Benton Drive & 7011 Benton Drive June 9th 7am -tillMulti Family Yard SaleHunting & fishing equipment, mens & womens clothing, lots of things that need to go! Beach West End 17829 PCB Pkwy, Inside Fellowship Hall, June 9th 8:00am -1:00pm1st Assembly of God Yard & Bake Sale!Kitchenware, Furniture, lots of clothes and misc. Something for everyone! Beach West End93 Emerald Cove Ln N. Just west of Camp Helen State Park June 9th 8am -2pmMOVING SALEFurniture, books, tools, appliances, etc. Lynn Haven739 Baywood Drive Off Northshore Rd. June 8th & 9th 8am -12pmEstate SaleMany household goods. Too much to mention! Lynn Haven 809 College Oaks Lane (From 390 go North on Harvard Blvd. Turn right on 9th St. Turn left on College Oaks Ln.) Saturday, June 9th 7:00am -12:00pmCOLLEGE POINT GARAGE SALE1 day only -2 families sale! Household items, many Christmas items, men and women’s clothing, electronics, yard equipment and much more! Bayou George5417 Woodhurst Drive June 1st & 2nd 7am -3pmGarage SaleFurniture, misc. household items, small vintage items lots of interesing things! Rain permitting. Beach West End 114 Coral Dr. (One mile W. of Hwy 79 off Back Beach Rd.) Friday, June 8th Saturday, June 9th 8:00am to NoonNo Early Birds!Lots of stuff! Golf Cart, new batteries $3,000. Some furniture, tools. Beach West End16405 E Lullwater Dr June 9th 7am -tillOne Day Only!Childrens toys, adult and children’s clothing, furniture, shoes and other various nik-naks and doo-hickeys. Beach West End 205 Nancy Avenue ( From 98 take Downing at Fire Sta Signal) Saturday, June 9th 8:00am to 4:00pmHOUSE / GARAGE SALEwell kept furn, leather sofas, din table, china, kitchen, tools, ref, freezer, w/d, mattresses, etc $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY A. Pearce Tree & Stump Service“We go out on a limb for you!” Lic. & Ins. 850-596-5067 ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices. Licensed and insured call for your F ree estimate ( 850)819-9987 House / Pet Sitting Services. Call (850)832-6254 BJs Tree Removal & Lot Clearing! Offering many discounts on tree removal, lot clearing, excavater services, and instilation of drainage systems! Licensed & Insured. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 We offer military and senior Discounts. Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 Pressure Washing houses, decks, sidewalks, driveways, ext. painting, 35 yrs exp. Free est. Call (850)319-1275 Kevin WilliamsAll Areas of Home Repair and Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Additions No Job too Small! 30 Years Experience! Call (843)270-9251 Quality Work Guaranteed Free Estimates FREEAppliance removal Discount Small Hauling. 850-257-1180 Arabic Classes All levels Semesters are: July 9, 2018 Oct. 29, 2018 March 15, 2019 $100.00 a month + Course materials. Call Malak at IUI (850)215-4840 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 !!Bob’s Home Repairs!!Roof, soffit, facia, door & window replacement or repair.and light remodeling. Call or Text850-257-6366Panama City & Surrounding Area Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting, Clean-Ups/Sod, Epoxy floors, Rock/Flower Beds, Gutter & Roof Cleaning, Drainage systems. Lot Clearing, Haul-Offs. Weeding, Tree Trimming, Pressure Washing, Deck Renovations. Save 10%-20% 850-303-8526 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Happy HouseDetail CleaningLic, bonded, insured850-258-1204 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Driveway SpecialistWHITE’S CONCRETELic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 527-2933/874-1515 WHITE’S CONCRETESpring Special Lic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 / 896-6864 CNA AvailableI will take care of your loved ones in their home. For more info call 850-688-5244. Private Home Health Care24 Years of Experience. Referrences Available. Call: (850) 630-5451

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, June 8, 2018 C C 9 9 Cozy 2 br 1 ba Old Orchard area. $650 mo + $650 dep.; 2 br 1 ba $750 mo + $750 dep. No dogs. 1 yrs work & references required. Middle aged to elderly couple prefered. 850769-8496; after 9 am Under the OaksLovely Country 3/2 Home fenced 3 acres. Central AC. Fireplace. Screened front and back porch. Pole barn 24’x48’ oversized cement slab, 2 closed in bays with electric, water. Stable, tack room, chicken coop. $1100/mo. 9158 Indian Bluff Road, Bayou George. (850)271-8188. Appt. only.For Sale Buy Owner For Responsible working person, no drugs or exc drinking env, $90/wk. $25 dep Call 850-769-8496 Bayou George 3bd/2ba, 16x80. 1 bedroom also available. Clean, quiet, lrg yrd, no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 Cove 3br/2ba Lg Brick HomeAll electric, remod. & hardwood floors. Landsc. Spacious backyard workshop. (850) 832-4590. ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL91926 to 56654 4001 Riverside Dr. Beautiful custom built 3br/2ba. 3126sqft. $399,900. MLS #668301 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL92794 to 56654 Gulf Views!Stunning 4BR large corner lot, 3 story home. 108 Derondo St. 850-851-8402 or alex@sandseekerre alty .com Kings PointWaterfront home for sale. 4 BR/ 3B, hottub, inground pool with enclosure, covered boatlift, waverunner lift. $530,000 Call (850)527-6326 Panama City 3bd/2ba, SS appl, fireplace, tool stor room, XL garage, sec sys. REDUCED $184,900 850-832-7332 Lake Front LotsAvailable within 2 blocks of the beach. One lot is 42x115 that would completment the larger lot next to it that is currently for sale also. Purchase the 2 lots & make a wonderful home site. Contact Hope Abbott 850-596-7653 100’ open water on Deerpoint Lake, 2.5ac beautiful, natural homesite, 4300 Edwards Rd. Lagoon Realty 850-624-1074, MLS#6692008. 640ac in Bay County best acreage price, just off Hwy 77, perfect farm, hunting or timberbland. Call 850-258-9677 ******************** 100’ open water on Deerpoint Lake, 2.5ac beautiful, natural homesite, 4300 Edwards Rd. Lagoon Realty 850-624-1074, MLS#6692008. Burial PlotsTwo adjoining plots, vaults, openings and closings at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. $8,000 OBO. 843-209-8605. For Sale or LeaseLarge property with double wide mobile home (approx. 2,000sqft). 4 beds/ 2 baths, formal LR, DR, and Den w/ fireplace. NOT LOCATED IN A MOBILE PARK. Good area near Deer Point Lake, close to everything! $129,500 Call (850)573-5748 NF-1116606 06 Dodge Charger Senior Owned, Excellent condition, well cared for. $3800 OBO Please Call (850)814-2178 2006 Hummer H31 owner, excellent condition, 5I, 108,900 miles, onStar, 4wheel drive, sunroof, runningboards $10,500 Call (850)851-3725 2008 Mercedes Benz E 350 4maticEmaculate; 1 owner; well maintained; excellent tires. $5900. Call (850) 227-7800. 2013 Honda Civic LX 34k miles/ 36mpg garage Kept, like new, $12,500 OBO Call (850)871-0333 08 Jeep Liberty Limited 4x4 151,000 miles Leather, tow package, nice $6875 Call (850)819-1740 2006 Nissan XTerra180,900 miles. New transmission a few years ago. In good condition. $4,500. Call: 850-630-3168 2015 Dodge Ram Big Horn crew cab 4x2 Hemi, luxury group, towing package, rear camera, and navigation, spray in bedliner with hard truck bed cover, grey interior. 51,500 miles. $27,999 Call (850)819-4407 Truck and Trailer for hauling heavy equipment with hydraulic ramps in very good condition Call Larry (850)258-5806 2017 GMC Savannah 2500 HD cargo V8 privately owned, Excellent condition, special ordered, keyless entry, CD player, backup camera, comfort package, chrome package, etc. 14,500 miles $24,950 Call or text (850)866-5032 2011 GulfStream Travel Trailer33 ft., 2 BR, 2 Slides, Sleeps 8. $13,000 Call (850)271-1014 26’ Custom Built Enclosed Lark Trailer. Set up for motorhome toy trailer. Extra height, drive-up ramp, two side doors, heat and air, and awning. $8,995 Call (850)832-6254 POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING.There are more ways than ever to market your business, and News Herald is here to help! Weve added the power of ThriveHive „ everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think. Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us). SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 1 1 0 0 Friday, June 8, 2018| The News Herald NF-1182137

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Jam Session: Melissa Bowman | 7 Dining: AutentiKa Mexican Grille| 10-11 Beach Insider: AirBnBoat | 19-21 Artists Touch: Live | 25 World Oceans DayDive into family fun, pr otect local beaches | 6 ENTERTAINERISSUE NO. 172 €F riday, June 8, 2018 € FREE

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E2 Friday, June 8, 2018 | Undercurrents .................. 4 World Oceans Day ............. 6 Jam Session ...................... 7 Dining: AutentiKa ....... 10-11 HaolePino: Aloha Fridays .. 13 Liquid Dream Fishing Team ................... 15 Community Spotlight ....... 18 Beach Insider: AirBnBoat .................. 19-21 Nightlife ......................... 22 Lifes A Beach .................. 23 Artists Touch: Live ........ 25 GO & DO: 5 Best Bets ....... 26 Movietown: Upgrade ..... 28 Book Notes ..................... 29 GO & DO: Calendar .... 30-38Brent shares Impressions of France INSIDE SEEN ON SCENECelebrate World Oceans Day on Friday with activities across Panama City Beach. See the article on E6 for details. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] ABOUT US Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com ABOUT THE COVERPANAMA CITY „ The Paul Brent Gallery opened a new exhibit of watercolor works by the local artist, "Impressions of France," with a reception on May 30. The work, which Brent painted during a recent trip abroad, is on display this month at his gallery, 413 W. Fifth St., Panama City, and includes scenes of Paris, the Normandy coast, the villages and chateaux of the Loire Valley, as well as architecture, market scenes and spring ” owers. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS]Share your photosSend pictures of people who made the scene around town to tsimmons@pcnh. com and jwaddy@pcnh.com, and we'll share them with readers. Don't keep all the fun to yourself!

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E3

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E4 Friday, June 8, 2018 | PANAMA CITY BEACH „I dont remember if it was the second shark or the second catsh that my wife caught Sunday that made me think of the missing seahorse. But the long and short of it is that all of them were returned to their respective homes by the end. I received a message early Saturday morning from Maxwell Miller, the son of the late artist and gallery owner Mary Ola Miller and owner of the buildings that house The Artist Cove and Artisan Enclave in Panama City. Hehoped Id help get the word out that a metallic seahorse had walked offŽ from the mobile/sculpture outside the PanamaCity Center for the Arts. He had looked for it around the grounds twice, to no avail. It may have been blown loose by the wind, but it was still picked up by someone. Hope someone has a conscience, because its too difficult a piece to reproduce,Ž Miller said in a Facebook post appealing for the seahorses return. The lost seahorse was understandably on my mind the next day as my wifeand I went to St. Andrews State Park. We walked the seagrass in the lagoon to see if blue crabs were about (they werent), then went to the pier for Debra to get some fishing time. The Gulf waschurned up, the water murky and brown. Waves pounded the pier pylons hard enough to make you reconsider your safety. A single red flag was flying, and the beachgoers were being cautious, not venturing beyond knee-deep in the rough surf. Very few people were even trying to fish under the bright sun that afternoon, but my wife was determined. Her first catch was a small shark that dropped off the line and swam away before she could reel it all the way in. Her next two catches were small catfish, both of which went back into the water. A young man from Georgia who was fishing with his father remarked that the second one was so little shed have had no more than a fish McNugget left after cleaning it. He was a funny guy, and gave Debra lots of tips on her fishing. They also showed her a better way to rig her lines, which I appreciated; to say Im no fisherman is an understatement. The youngster produced a pair of pliers to yank the hook out of her second shark, at which point shecouldnt help but tell him the story of a time nearly two decades ago when we were fishing with our kids on this same pier; Debra landed a good size flounder and a nearby fisherman handed me his pliers, to whichI replied, Do you want me to tighten it or loosen it?Ž I claim it was a joke. Debra knows better. Watching those little fishreturn to the sea on Sunday made me wonder if someone would throw backŽ the missing seahorse. In fact, someone did.Kim GriffinWhite, the director at the Center for the Arts,reported that a staff memberdiscovered the sculpture on Monday morning. It had been placedon a step at theentrance like a shell washed up on the shore. Talk about a refreshed view of humanity,Ž Miller remarked. The seahorse has since been returned to its place on the mobile, hooked and displayedbeside other metallic sea creatures. Check it out by the front parking lot on the corner of Harrison and Fourth, the next time youre downtown. Peace.UNDERCURRENTSCatches of all kinds get thrown backThis seahorse sculpture went missing from its place on a mobile outside the Center for the Arts last weekend. It was returned [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] A young man from Georgia removes the hook from a shark caught by Debra Simmons. Tourists on the pier took photos or touched its skin before it was returned to the sea. [TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] A seahorse sculpture is seen hanging beside a metal “ sh on a mobile. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Missing sculpture returned to art center T o n y S i m m o n s Tony Simmons

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E6 Friday, June 8, 2018 | By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ It covers most of the world, and its essential to the economy of the Gulf Coast. On Friday, the planets interconnected ocean will be celebrated with World Oceans Day. Locally, Gulf World Marine Park and Institute, Divers Den dive shop and Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant are joining together to host a series of World Oceans Day events from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all,Ž said event spokesman Sam Tuno of Gulf World in a news release. The festivities will start at the M.B. Miller County Pier, 12213Front Beach Road, where from 7-9 a.m.the public is invited to do a beach cleanup along the shore or dive with Divers Den as they clean up the waters around the pier. Following the beach cleanup, the fun moves to Gulf World, 15412 Front Beach Road. The parkwill host many family-friendly and educational activities, as well as photo opportunities and face painting from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Gulf World also will be open for normal operating hours (9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) with shows and exhibits; normal admission prices apply for shows and exhibits. Visit GulfWorldMarinePark.com for details. At 1 p.m., Divers Den will take a special trip into the Gulf of Mexico to clean two of the areasfavorite diving and fishing spots. Any interested divers are invited tocall the dive shop at 850-234-8717 to reserve a spot on the WreckreationŽ excursion.Space will be limited. For more information on diving, visit Divers Den, 3120 Thomas Drive, orthe website DiversDenPCB.com. The celebration will continue at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant, 15201 Front BeachRoad,from 5-7 p.m. Children andadults alike will have a chance to meet a live mermaid and GW,Ž the dolphin mascot, for photo opportunities. Enjoy educational activities and local art while listening to live entertainment and having ameal (regular menu prices apply). A healthy world ocean is critical to our survival,Ž Tuno said. Every year, World Oceans Day provides a unique opportunity to honor, help protect, and conserve our worlds shared ocean. The public is invited to join in this global initiative for a portion or the entire day full of activities.Ž The Ocean Project (TheOceanProject.org) has promoted and coordinated World Oceans Day globally since 2002, using ateam based in the U.S. andadvisors and volunteers in dozens of countries. A collaborative organization, The Ocean Project works in partnership with hundreds of organizations, including World Ocean Network, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and many others. According to information at WorldOceansDay.org, the ocean is important because it generates most of the oxygen we breathe; helps feed us; regulates our climate; cleans the water we drink; offers a pharmacopoeia of medicines; and provides limitless inspiration.World Oceans Day allows people around the planet to change perspective andencourage individuals to think about what the ocean means to them and what it has to offer, with hopes of conserving it for current and the future generations. Participants are encouraged todiscover the wealth of diverse ocean creatures and habitats, learn how humans daily actions affect them, and how we are all interconnected. The hope is that, with this knowledge, people will change their ways and becomecaretakers of the ocean. Making small modifications toeveryday habits can make a difference, organizers said, and involvingfamily, friends and community will benefit the planet even more.Dive into World Oceans DayAnn Webb holds hands with 1-year-old Shannon as Skyler, middle left, and Saige look on while meeting a Gulf World mascot in 2016 as part of the World Oceans Day celebration. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Rikki Gravois reacts to a squirming hermit crab at a touch tank with her daughter, Hannah. World Oceans DayWhat: Beach and water cleanup activities and educational opportunities, family fun When: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, June 8 Where: Starting at M.B. Miller Pier, moving to Gulf World Marine Park, and ending at Sharky's Beachfront Restaurant, with a limited-space dive trip via Diver's Den Admission: Free for cleanup and educational activities Details: GulfWorldMarinePark.com/ world-oceans-day-2018/ GO & DOActivities include cleanups, music, photos, more

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E7By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Melissa Bowman said her father, though not a musician himself, was one of her major influences when she began playing music at a young age. He grew up in Muscle Shoals (Ala.) in the 60s and the 70s, when the No. 1 hit recording studio in the world was there,Ž she explained. He was friends with all the Swampers that were studio musicians. Though he wasnt a musician, he always looked at musicians like they were other-worldly. He loved music so much. So, it was always around and it was really important to him.Ž Bowman, who performed live in The News Heralds newsroom on June 1 for the weekly Jam Session, told her story during a followup podcast. (View the performance and listen to the podcast via links at NewsHerald.com.) Once she started playing at restaurants and other venues, her father would show up and make song requests „ sometimes inappropriate for the venue. But she recognized how cool it was to have her father showing up at small gigs, even seedy bars,Ž just to hear her play and sing. When he died, my band the Krickets went up to Muscle Shoals,Ž Bowman said. We had just scattered his ashes a year before in that area. So it was cool to go pay tribute and homage to him and to all the greats that had been through there.Ž Bowman had a guitar since third grade, but never really picked it up untilmiddle school. At that time, shejoked,she was the Gothic chick and big loser and didnt have friends and stuff, so I would just sit at home and play my guitar. It was like my only friend. ... Im really glad I went through that, because it forced me to get acquainted with a guitar.Ž Shes been playing ever since. She currently performs solo in Mexico Beach, Apalachicola and Panama City. With the Krickets, which recently recorded a new album in Nashville, she plays all around the Southeast. The Krickets will play a free concert at theAlys Beach amphitheatre off 30A from 7-9 p.m. on July 18. The band includesBowman (vocals, guitar, banjo), Emily Stuckey (vocals, guitar, percussion, mandolin), Lauren Spring (vocals, guitar, fiddle, mandolin) and Katrina Kolb (bass). The Krickets website (TheKrickets.com) describes the band asa female swamp folk group. Their debut album, Spanish Moss SirensŽ was released in May2016. The band wasnamed the 2016 IMEA Folk Artist of the Year,and receivedthe 2016 Folk/Singer Songwriter Song of the Year at The Independent Music Awards. Theyoriginally came together to play a cancer benefit in honor of Cristina CricketŽ Russell, who died at age 22 from the disease.Now, theysupport the cause by donating a portion of every album sale to The Cricket Fund Beyond Diagnosis, which provides womens health services to the uninsured. Its a really, really cool cause,Ž Bowman said. Bowman grew up listening to classic rock and soul music, but said shes inspired by a wide range of musical styles and performers. Its really all over the place,Ž she said. I really like dramatic stuff, from opera to Meatloaf, like rock operas. But then I really love folky stuff thats very simple withthe guitar andvoice. ... Right now there are some amazing bands and good new music coming out. For a long time I didnt feel like there really was new music thatI attached myself to.Ž She listed Shovels & Rope, a South Carolina folk duo, and Colin Hay, the Australian former lead singer of Men At Work as two of her current favorites. Everything. All music is moving to me as long as its heartfelt and „ and weird, probably, in my caseŽ she said, laughing. As long as its obscure, then I typically just love it.Ž In her News Herald session, Bowman played an original song dedicated to her father. She counts herself lucky to have bandmates who can help her with melodies and structure, butwriting her own music is frightening. Its really scary for some reason to put words from your mind out into the world,Ž she said. I dont know why I struggle with that so much. ... Im still learning.ŽBowman charts personal course through musicMelissa Bowman performs at the News Herald on June 1. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Next jam sessionWhat: Acoustic musical performance Who: The Helvetica Effect from Fort Walton Beach When: 3 p.m. Friday, June 8 Where: Live streaming on Facebook. com/PanamaCityNewsHerald; limited seating available in the newsroom JAM SESSIONSales of bands albums bene t cancer victims

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E10 Friday, June 8, 2018 | By Jan Waddy 747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „A native of Michoacn, Mexico, Lucy Rodriguez serves recipes passed down from her grandmother at AutentiKa Mexican Grille, opening the door to more conversations about her heritage. They would have big fiestas in Mexico in the center of town, and we would go after church,Ž Lucy recalled Wednesday. Vendors would be selling aguas frescas or making enchiladas. This gives me an opportunity to relive those memories. Michoacn was known for their carnitas, so I am happy and proud to bring in those dishes.Ž She and her husband, Richard Rodriguez,relocated to the beach from Los Angeles nearly four years ago with their children „ Lucy Mireya,Ž 18, and Richard Steven,Ž 15. The couple wasfollowing in the footsteps of Richards brother, who passed away just before they opened AutentiKa Mexican Grille on Jan. 26. The most important thing to me is the love of my family,Ž saidRichards dad, Jose Rodriguez, who also moved to the beach not long after his sons. The menu and daily specialsat AutentiKa are extensions ofwhat Lucy prepared at home. Weve always had gettogethers. I love to cook, and Lucy loves to cook as well. Everybody would come over,Ž said Richard, whose sister-in-law is helping make tortillas. We always made it a habit to sit at the table. One day, Lucy (Mireya) said, Dad, we can sell this; theres nothing like this. Theres good food, but not this. We always had businesses and had worked together. They always helped out.Ž Mireyasaid they went through about 50 names before deciding on AutentiKa, a varied spelling idea by Lucy to catch customers attention. What it means really is to come taste the authenticity of our food,Ž Lucy said. The genuine exchange often leads to customers becoming part of the family. We have a lot of people who become part of us,Ž said Lucy, who has seen customers twice in one day. ThoughRichards parents are from Cuba,hewas born and raised in Los Angeles,where he grew up visiting theneighborhood street cornerstaqueria. I saw people line up enjoying something so simple with the flavors,Ž he recalled. Lucy added, One of our first dates we ended up eating tacos.Ž But the family all agreed „Lucys tacos are the best. Tacos at AutentiKa are served on a soft corn tortilla, which occasionally Lucy fries to make hard shells. Just like with their family, they make to order, so everything can be customized „ down to raw or grilled onions. Thats why we went with a la carte style menu. You eat what you decide to eat,Ž Lucy said.AutentiKa Mexican Grille shares love of family, foodAutentiKa Mexican Grille is all about family „ and food. From left, Jose Rodriguez and his wife, Ana Rodriguez, are pictured with their daughter-in-law Lucy Rodriguez, grandson Richard Steven Rodriguez, granddaughter Lucy Mireya Rodriguez, and son Richard Rodriguez. [PHOTOS BY JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] What: Family-owned restaurant serving authentic Mexican cuisine Where: 14662 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday Details: 850-890-0759, Facebook. com/AutentiKaMexicanGrille, or autentikamexicangrille@gmail. comAutentiKa Mexican GrilleRichard Rodriguezs Wet Burrito is covered with Lucy Rodriguezs homemade enchilada sauce, then topped with oaxaca cheese, Mexican crema, fresh tomato and cilantro and a sprinkle of cotija cheese. The Torta features Al Pastor on a toasted roll with onion, cilantro and freshly made salsa. Customers can wash everything down with Jarritos „ or a Mexican coke. FOOD & DRINKSee AUTENTIKA, E11

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E11 FOOD & DRINKOrder enchiladas a la carte and add rice and beans to create a traditional platter „ or whatever you want. But everything is still affordable. Chips are made three times a day. I made salsa every day, sometimes twice a day,Ž Lucy said. Salsas include salsa verde, as well as a red salsa and a spicy black salsa; just ask. We are heating up the tortillas,Ž said Lucy, who moved from Mexico to Los Angeles at age 8. I remember sitting with my grandmother and when the tortilla puff up, thats the lucky tortilla.Ž And if you arethe lucky customer, you will get that one, too. Its about sharing these memories,Ž Lucy said. I told the customer thank you so much. I just get a joy out of that. I think were doing the right thing, doing some good. It makes me warm my heart. If we can get people to try the real authentic flavor, they really enjoy it.Ž And if you walk byAutentiKa a little early, you just might find Lucy making a traditional Mexican breakfast „ chilaquiles. Itsa tortilla, cut up in triangles and fried with egg, chorizo, seasoning, cheese, salsa on top, sour cream „ Mexican crema „ on top,Ž explained Lucy, who has even been known to cook up an extra at a customers request. The customer said, You just took me back to my moms house; I feel like Im a home. ... Every single plate comes out for you, not cookie cutter.Ž And just like the Rodriguezchildren have nicknames, one customer has given a special one to Richard, aka Torta guy,Ž for his amazing Al Pastor on a toasted roll with onion, cilantro and salsa. When my family and I first visited and I tried my Chicken Quesadilla at AutentiKa, I am sure I gave what the family said is a signature nodŽ they have seen at their restaurant so many times „ a sign to the rest of the table that this is the real thing. (But I dont know if they noticed, because my son was busy cleaning his plate of beef enchiladas, rice and beans, and my husband was trying to conquer the burrito.) For the quesadilla, themeat is cooked on the flat-topgrill, and then the 12-inch homemade flour tortilla picks up the flavor of the meat as the meat and cheese „ Monterey Jack, cheddar and oaxaca „ melts inside. The chicken is all marinated. We use different spices. All the meats are marinated,Žsaid Richard, whoexplained they dont make a lot at one time, just a lot throughout the day. Beans are on the stove right now. With a family setting, we are used to making enough for six people.Ž While the recipes are Lucys, Richard came up with the idea for the Wet Burrito „ an option tosmother the burrito. This is now his favorite (with Al Pastor) „ and his mothers favorite „ menu item. The burrito starts with a 12-inch homemade flour tortilla, filled with rice, beans, cilantro, salsa, and Mexican crema, and a choice of meat. The wetŽ is topped with Lucys homemade enchilada sauce, melted oaxaca cheese, more crema, tomatoes and cilantro and a pinch of cotija cheese. My enchilada sauce has three different kinds of chiles, chile guajillos, chile California and a little chile de arbol,Ž Lucy said. Whenever Im making it, my father-in-law says Im in the sauces lab.Ž Steven loves the tamales, although on Wednesday, he helped himself to a quesadilla he prepared. And Mireya goes for the Chile Relleno. Carnitas are made the way I remember. I remember my grandpa making carnitas,Ž Lucy said. He would stir it in a big, huge pot, mixing it with a big wooden spoon, which we have here. I relive these times, I remember a big crowd, people wanted to be around it so they could taste it.Ž And its not just the recipes and memories the Rodriguezs brought with them to AutentiKa. The picture on the wall was in the entrance of the house,Ž Lucy said. Its a strong Mexican woman getting help from those behind her through the beauty of life. I knew this was going in the restaurant. We have a strong family, strong family values.Ž From the walls, which Ana helped paint, to the restaurant counters put together by three generations „ Jose, Richard and Steven „ the family paints a picture of teamwork.Ž His Spanish has gotten so much better,Ž Richard said of his son. He said, we have a Spanish restaurant, so I have to speak Spanish.Ž Lucy added, We should always feel proud of our roots.Ž But oftentimes, the family doesnt have to say anything. After over 20 years of marriage, I can look at her and know what shes thinking,Ž Richard said. AUTENTIKAFrom Page E10Richard Rodriguez prepares Al Pastor for the Torta. Carnitas are served with onion and cilantro on a corn tortilla. The Chicken Quesadilla features seasoned chicken and three kinds of cheese in a 12-inch homemade ” our tortilla. Made from scratch Ground Beef Enchiladas are topped with Mexican crema, salsa verde, tomato and cilantro and served alongside freshly made rice and beans.

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E13Be on the lookout for locationsBy Jan Waddy 747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ I have big plans of trying new things ... but I had not had the Kalua Pork since the Panama City Beach Food Truck Festival in February ... and I could not resist. It was just as good and hot and juicy as I remembered „ the tender roasted pork and cabbage swimming in juices over the bed of perfectly sticky white rice alongside a bed of cool, creamy macaroni salad „ and I dont regret a bite. HaolePino Hawaiian-Filipino Island Cuisine, a staple during the week on the Tyndall Flight Line at Tyndall Air Force Base, now does Aloha Fridays „ going off-base so their fans can try to fulfill their cravings without waiting for the next festival. After my son recently finished school, HaolePino was our first plan for summer break „ and the Ace Hardware parking lot, 3911 E. 15th St., was so convenient. James still raves about the salmon he first had a year ago after I brought him home a box from Bonita Bay. I could eat this for breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mom; couldnt you?Ž he recently asked as he scarfed down the salmon. Its so juicy. ... And I love capers.Ž I uttered some gutteral response, as I was deep in Kalua. But for those who dont want salmon or kalua for every meal, HaolePino will begin serving an additional Tropical Breakfast menu on Monday for their Tyndall customers „ with items such as Beef Salpicao (sauteed steak in garlic and mushrooms), Crispy Adobo, and Spam and Eggs, a HawaiianFilipino favorite. Crispy Adobo with egg and Spam and Eggs also are now available as lunch items on the regular menu, along with other new dishes such as Lechon Kawali (tender deep-fried pork belly for ultra indulgence), Teriyaki Chicken, Pork Barbecue (Pinoy StyleŽ on a stick), and Spam Musubi. Spam Musubi is more like a snack,Ž explained Amanda Vicente, who owns the food truck with her husband, Martin. Its Spam and rice wrapped in seaweed, like a Spam sushi.Ž Menu additions have been inspired by customer requests, as well as family. My husband went to the Philippines (where he grew up) in the spring and came back and said we have to have pork barbecue,Ž said Amanda, adding they would stick with the menu they have now. Weve been selling out of the Pork Barbecue, and a lot of people are trying the Spam sushi and are coming back for it, and the Teriyaki Chicken is doing really well.Ž Spam and Eggs „ thats what Im having next time, I decided. Its good,Ž she reassured. And I trust her „ everything Ive had is good. ... If only I can resist the Kalua „ the pork thats so good it makes my husband talk like hes gone back to Hawaii. No, Im not kidding; his accent even changes. Also on my list to try is the Kalua Pork Nachos. Catch them at Ace from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. this Friday, and check out the Facebook page (www.Facebook.com/ HaolePinoHFIC) for other Friday locations and times, and special events.Aloha Friday! HaolePino goes o -base FOOD &DRINKAmanda Vicente, who owns HaolePino with her husband, Martin, serves a refreshing Pineapple Dole Whip. [JAN WADDY/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] The HaolePino Hawaiian-Filipino Island Cuisine food truck, a lunch (and breakfast) staple during the week at Tyndall Air Force Base, is off-base on Aloha Fridays.Ž Check out Facebook for locations. HaolePino also will be serving customers Saturday during the Lorrie Morgan concert. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Create a seafood plate with Baked Salmon and Chili-Garlic Shrimp. [JAN WADDY/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E15PANAMA CITY „ My wifes family came in town and wanted fish tacos for dinner. As a red fish tournament angler, I dont eat redfish, so I had to find trout, black drum or flounder. As many of you know, fishing reds is a totally different style and techniquethan fishing trout, flounder and drum, especially with artificial baits. When fishing reds, you are in 2 feet or less of water, the shallower the better. When I fish for flounder, I fish over 2-foot-deep in potholes bouncing the bottom and slow rolling paddle tails and buck tails. When I fish trout, I fish flats and drop-offs 3 feet or deeper, jigging stick baits, jerk shads, paddle tails or mirrodines by Mirrolure. My son and I re-rigged the rods and headed out for flounder first. I prefer mixed mud bottoms or just mud bottoms when fishing flounder. We arrived at a bayou with mixed mud bottom that I have had good luck in the past with flounder on rod and reel; normally I go at night and gig them. Ithrew a saltwater assassin sea shad on a 3/ 16th eye strike trout eye, and my sonthrew a trick shot worm on a 1/ 8th ounce pro elite head. We worked around the bayou from 5 feet deep to 2 feet deep casting potholes, ledges and just grass. We caught small trout and lizard fish. Wecould see a storm off in the distance and decided to make a move for trout. We went to a flat with mixed bottom in about 4 feet of water with a good moving current. We deployed the power pole where the boat would turn and half the boatwas facing the ledge and the other half of the boatwas facing the flat. I threw andhooked up a small trout. Jake Wright threw and hooked up a small trout. We continued this pattern until we found some size, Jake landed a 19-inch trout and I landed a 16-inch trout. The strikes started getting harder with a lot of short strikes; it was lady fish. After about the fifth lady fish, which were fun to catch but dont feed the family, we loaded up and moved to the next flat. We got to the flat, set the pole the same as previous, and began casting. Jakeworked his bait a little faster covering the upper column, as I worked a little slower and covered the lower column. We caught trout on every cast, a lot small with some 16and 17-inch trout mixed in. We started catching ladyfish again and decided it was time to move. We hadseven trout in the live well and needed 3.5 pounds of cleaned trout for the recipe, and we had a storm moving toward us on the horizon. We talked about it and decided to try one more spot before heading in and beating the weather. The next flat was about 2 miles from our current location. Wehad never fished it before but itwas aboutfive minutes from the landing, so if the weather turned for the worse, it would be a short run. This flat didnt have a distinct ledge and gradually dropped off. We poled down at the 3.5-foot-deep mark and began fan casting, since it was overcast and we couldnt see anyway. The first few casts returned nothing, and then we hooked up with an 18-inch trout. We spent another 35 minutes at that flat, lifting the pole, drifting 25 yards, and poling back down to catch a few small trout here and there. It was time to head in before the storm hit, and the bite had died down anyway. We hadeight trout between 15 and 19 inches, which equals a bunch of 1to 1.25-pound trout. We got to the house, cleaned the boat, cleaned the trout, and weighed the fillets to see if we made the 3.5pound goal for the recipe. We put the fillets in a Walmart bag and weighed them; we brought home 3.59 pounds of filleted trout for the amazing fish tacos my wife made.Trout tacos feed family A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony Watson LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAMEight trout are enough for a “ sh taco recipe. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] A storm rolls in after the trout were caught.

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E18 Friday, June 8, 2018 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Lisa Tirado Age: 53 Occupation: Server at The Egg & I and owner of PartyPix Photo Booth Where you grew up: Seattle, Wash. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Runaway Island and the best crab cakes ever! Favorite hang-out: My back porch with my husband What you do for fun: Tennis at Edgewater resort and spending time with my grandkids Name: Marc Levesque Age: 48 Occupation: Managing partner of Leveck Imports/Realtor Where you grew up: Andover, Mass. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: The Sandbar Seafood and BBQ Joint/Royal Red Shrimp (They taste like Lobsta.) Favorite hang-out: Hookd at the Pier What you do for fun: Creative projects for the home like barn doors or functional art Name: Richard Chaillou Age: 50 Occupation: Owner of Sea Breeze Small Engine Where you grew up: Bricktown, N.J. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Saltwater Grill/Creme Brulee Favorite hang-out: At home with the kids What you do for fun: Watch Dallas Cowboys, play video games

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AirBnBoat: BEACH INSIDER ISSUE NO. 172 €F riday, June 8, 2018AirBnB vacation option sets sail | 20-21

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E20 Friday, June 8, 2018 | | Friday, June 8, 2018 E21By Katie Landeck 522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Near the end of the dock at St. Andrews Marina, the Emmanuel, with its black hull and towering mast, floats serenely between the dozens of sailboats and yachts. This is a boat that has sailed the world over multiple times since it was built in the 1970s. It has smuggled Bibles into Cuba and continues to serve as a floating sanctuary for weary ministers and their wives 12 weeks out of the year. But, with just a click on AirBnb, the Emmanuel could be your sanctuary for only $82 a night. For every 100 people coming here to stay near the water, I figured theres got to be 10 that want to stay on the water,Ž said Seth Chandler, who rents out the Emmanuel and two other boats. It took off.Ž The Emmanuel is one of nine boats available for rent via AirBnb „ a website and app that allows people to rent out their spare spaces directly to travelers „ in the Bay County area, a search of the platform showed. Prices range from $65 to sailboats to $200 yachts, with a few outliers. While AirBnB presence is rapidly growing in Panama City „ there has been 70 percent year-overyear growth fornew AirBnB listings popping up, according to local data „ waterfront locations, and in particular the boats, seem to do best and attract the most attention. Because as it turns out, the 10 out of 100 people Chandler is looking AirBnb boats draw the attention of travelers Pentam is a ship that is available to stay on through AirBnB at St. Andrews Marina. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Audacious$75 per night The 1978 Cheribini sailboat is billed as relaxing experience with a beautiful marina view for those who want to try their hand at the live-aboard lifestyle. Guests can batten down the hatches and stay below in the air conditioning or sit on top and enjoy a cocktail and a brilliant sunset.Ž A complimentary one-hour cruise of the bay is included in the price.The Meander$65 per night A 32-foot Lazy Jack Schooner, the Meander sleeps four if you really love each otherŽ and two if you want to be comfortable, said owner Seth Chandler. The low price makes it one of the most popular rentals, Chandler said, but the charm of the squeeze and the view of the marina is what makes it beloved. The boat is seaworthy, and it can be arranged for a captain to sail the boat to Shell Island.The Pentam$175 per night The Pentam, a 56-foot Hatteras Motor Yacht named for a lost island Marco Polo wrote about, is a little taste of luxury recently brought to Panama City from Hong Kong. Unlike the sailboats, this boat has proper beds, plenty of room and multiple decks to watch the sunset. Cruises in the bay can be arranged.The Emmanuel$82 per night The Emmanuel is 47-foot Olympic Adventure Ketch Rigged Sailboat that has been around the world since it was built in Greece in 1975. For 12 weeks out of the year the boat still serves as an escape for ministers and their wives of the Christian ministry Anathallo „ the Greek word meaning to re-bloom, regenerate or renew „ to sail the Caribbean and reconnect with nature. The rest of the year its available to rent and cruises can be arranged locally.The Joyride$199 per night The largest rental, at 60 feet, this yacht is marketed as a private oasis.Ž There are hammocks, lounging chairs, ” at-screen TVs, real beds, a “ re pit and even a washer and dryer. Hosts promise it will be a unique and memorable experience.5 AIRBNB BOATS AVAILABLE FOR RENTThe Audacious. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] The Meander. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Pentam. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Emmanuel. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Joyride. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie LandeckThe News HeraldWant a taste? Here are five boats for rent at the St. Andrews marina. for tend to be the type of people AirBnb attracts as customers, according to AirBnb spokesman Ben Breit. People are looking for something super unique, quirky and magical, whether thats a boat in Panama City or a treehouse or a castle that they cant get anywhere else,Ž Breit said. You certainly see a lot of passion for those unique listings.Ž Chandler said his boats are booked just about every night,Ž and are so popular its at times hard to schedule maintenance work. The boats remain at dock, unless a licensed captain is contracted to take the overnight occupants for a cruise. We get people from all over the country. All over the world,Ž Chandler said. We had someone from Germany. People really want to stay in the little 32-foot schooner (the Meander). Its cheap. It sleepsfour if you really love each other. If youre not all that close, it sleeps two.Ž Staying on the boats presents a bit of an adventure, both in the sense it gives vacationers a chance to be the captain of their vacationŽ and look out the window to see rays and dolphins and in the sense the accommodations can be a little like glamping,Ž Chandler said. Its a boat. It looks like a boat. I smells like a boat. It has toilets like a boat,Ž Chandler said, noting some people dont like it, but most people do. Once you get on board and relax on the water, turn the cable on, its just like a condo, only you look down and you might see dolphins.Ž The uniqueness of the boats has the potential to be a big selling point for the region, according to Jennifer Vigil, the president of Destination Panama City. For example, the New York Post recently did an article about 7 fabulous Florida escapes you shouldnt miss,Ž and the sailboat and yacht rentals in Panama City made the cut. In the end, Breit thinks the appeal boils down to a single concept. Where you are staying should be as special as the place you are staying,Ž he said. The Meander, a 32-foot schooner, is one of the most popular rentals. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] BEACH INSIDER

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E22 Friday, June 8, 2018 |

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHMadeline Fernandez and Jerry Mendenhall enjoy the sunset. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Friends walk along the water. A swimmer practices handstands in Mexico Beach. Kids play in the surf. Ladies relax with books on the beach.

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E24 Friday, June 8, 2018 |

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E25Focus is preventing suicide, promoting mental healthBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comLYNN HAVEN„ A oneday-only art exhibition, Live: A Life Worth Living With Art,Ž will combine a variety of visual and performing arts to raise funds and awareness ofmental health issues, including suicide prevention and anorexia nervosa. The art show and fundraiserwill cover the deep and dark subject matter of mental illness through a variety of ways of expression „art, writing, dance and music,Ž said Garret DeChellis, one of the featured artists. All theseexpressive forms of art (will be) collaborating to raise awareness and money for local youths battling mental illness and contemplating suicide.Ž The event will be from 4-8 p.m. on Sunday, June 10, at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. A suggested donation of $5 will grant entry into the event. For more information, or to donate or volunteer, contact Art Life by email at ArtLifePC@gmail.com or call 859-366-2999. Art Life was established in 2012 to develop an annualevent to feature the artwork of individuals living with mental illness and/or other related disorders alongside other local artists. Organizers hope to bridge the gap between both groups, raise the understanding of these talented individuals in the community and lower the stigma associated with mental illness. For details, visit ArtLifePC.com. We are a group of agencies, artists, and individuals in Bay County working together to raise awareness of mental illness and other brain disorders,Ž said Colleen F. Cox, president of ArtLife. We are focused on not only raising awareness of mental illness and other related disorders, but more specifically this year we are focused on suicide prevention and helping our youth find creative ways to manage their life issues/ circumstances through the arts and other creative outlets. We hope to raise funds and short term scholarships for young people to either grow in their art skill or learn something new as a way to reduce their risk of suicide and help them find a new way to move forward in the journey of life.Ž Sundays event will feature a variety of local artists, musicians, writers, dancers and theatrical performers whoshare their talents, skills, and awareness of how life is worth living through participation in the arts „that it brings healing and direction to those living with mental illness or other brain disorders, Cox said. Artists include Kat Benford, Tesa Burch, Sarah Burris, Stacy Swiftand Melinda Hall. Performers include the Global Arts Society dance team, Lauren Kolmetz and Redeemer Dance, Kristen Barkuloo, Gypsy Parvana belly dance, Dave Schwartz and Natalie Sorrento. Twoauthors will read:Dr. Sofia Castro with Lindas Childhood Memories,Ž and James Riles with Crack in the Wall.Ž Several Lynn Haven businesses have donated food and items for the silent auction; Escape Manor donated a pair of tickets, and Seventh Seal Tattoo has donated $150 toward a tattoo. Global Arts Society is not only performing at our event but they have also offered to donate three months worth of their art programming for two or three individuals,Ž Cox said. Bill Arrants, with Awesome Music in Lynn Haven, has offered a months worth of lessons to a deserving youth.We have been reaching out to various agencies, counselors and programs for referrals and hope to be able to provide a minimum of three short-term scholarships for activities and outlets for the youth.Other activities could be martial arts, yoga, tai chi, and more.Art has no boundaries and helping others learn an art or skill they can utilize for the rest of their life is our goal.Ž Proceedswill go toward helping specific individuals in the community who are currently in need of developing creative, healthy outlets to better manage their mental illness and decrease the risk of suicide. They are partnering with Second Chance of Northwest Florida, Life Management Center, Mental Health America, NAMI, Global Arts Society, Pyramid Inc., Catalyst Church, SPARE and other local agencies and individuals. I began organizing these art shows and fundraisers to use my talents for good. To make a difference in an individuals life. But also to add an additional layer to my art,Ž said DeChellis. I like to think that my art has a story attached to each piece. It isnt just a piece of art that hangs on someones wall, rather a symbol that art can truly influence society for good. Art that helps a couple adopt a child or a widow of a veteran repair a damaged roof. It is so much more than paint on canvas, but a symbol of how art is important and can help shape the world.ŽArt show, fundraiser goes Live THE ARTISTS TOUCHWhat: Visual and performing artist exhibition to raise awareness about mental health issues and raise money for scholarships Where: Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven When: 4-8 p.m. Sunday, June 10 Admission: $5 donation Details: ArtLifePC.com or 850-366-2999LIVE: A Life Worth Living With Art[GARRET DECHELLIS/CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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E26 Friday, June 8, 2018 | GO & DO : 5 BEST BETS FOR THIS WEEKENDFrom foreground left, Sandra Bullock Sarah Paulson, Rihanna, Cate Blanchett and Awkwa“ na in a scene from Oceans 8.Ž [BARRY WETCHER/WARNER BROS. VIA AP] 1 In theaters this week is Oceans 8Ž PG-13, the much-anticipated all-female lead remake of the popular crime “ lms where a crew led by Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) attempts an impossible heist at New York Citys annual Met Gala; the R-rated horror “ lm HereditaryŽ stars Toni Collette as a woman whose family begins to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying secrets about their ancestry after their matriarch (Ann Dowd) dies; and lastly Hotel ArtemisŽ an R-rated thriller, takes place in a riot-torn, near-future Los Angeles, where Jean Thomas (Jodie Foster) is a nurse who runs a secret members-only hospital for criminals. 2 The 72nd Annual Tony Awards will be held on Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on CBS and hosted by musicians Josh Groban and Sara Bareilles. Mean GirlsŽ and SpongeBob SquarePantsŽ each received 12 nominations, tying as the most-nominated shows of the season. To see the full list of nominees and print out a ballot so you and friends can try to guess the winners, head over to www.tonyawards.com. 3 The 150th Belmont Stakes take place Saturday at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York. TV coverage begins at 4:00 p.m. ET on NBC, with the race scheduled for 6:37 p.m. ET. Or check out the livestream at NBCSports.com or through the NBC Sports app. Justify is the odds-on favorite to claim the Belmont Stakes and horse racings second Triple Crown since 2015. 4 Lastly, Sunday is Iced Tea Day, a day to celebrate the creation of the refreshing beverage in 1904 at the St. Louis World Fair. In honor of the day, whip up a batch yourself, or hit the town to cool off with some iced tea. 5 While Flag Day isnt of“ cially until Thursday (as it commemorates the adoption of the ” ag on June 14, 1777), some events are happening this weekend in observance. Check your local paper for details. For example, The National Flag Day Foundation, based in Waubeka, Wisconsin, has its annual observance on the second Sunday in June. „ More Content Now

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E28 Friday, June 8, 2018 | MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEach week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com Cole: Upgrade reeksof brilliance A welcome throwback to David Cronenbergs 80s movies (Scanners,Ž Videodrome,Ž The FlyŽ), UpgradeŽ is a smart, schlocky sci-fi thriller with big ideas and gory bodyhorror. Set in a grimy, high-tech near future, a low-tech romantic is pushed into a dire situation. Seeking revenge, he turns to an experimental computer chip implant. His journey from there is a violent, hypermasculine hunt for the guilty party. Its simple and mostly predictable, but no less brilliant because of it. The camera movements and editing rhythms are just as masculine as the plots trajectory. Its compositions and use of shadow recall the less-romantic film noirs and its action scenes are nothing like the poetry of recent similar movies, such asJohn Wick.Ž UpgradeŽ isnt interested in poetry. The camera here doesnt move with grace, but with blunt force. Meanwhile, Logan MarshallGreen is doing the same work in the lead role, giving us a strange and wonderful new kind of android. He doesnt have Arnold Schwarzeneggers imposing stature, but he has all his menace and has retained more of his own personhood. UpgradeŽ has everything you want from a B-movie: action, ideas, brutality, cause and pitchblack humor. It exists within a small window of place and time, but its reaches, both narratively and thematically, are so much wider. Perhaps best of all, its the rare movie that actually has the gall to carry through with its promise. I wont explain what that means in an effort to avoid spoiling things, but its certainly rare to find this kind of dedication to integrity in films. I wanted it to end differently and yet Im exceedingly glad it didnt.Rating: out of Matt: Upgrade steps up the stakes UpgradeŽ is RoboCopŽ meets John WickŽ meets Big Hero 6Ž „ a mash-up we never knew we wanted but should be glad we got. It hearkens back to a time when filmmakers made movies that were fun, dark and thoughtful all at the same time. An age-old fable about the relationship between humans and developing technology, it posits that maybe the tech itself isnt to be feared, but the power technology can give to those who wield it should be. Set in the near future, a man loses his wife and his limbs all in one night after their self-driving car malfunctions, leaving them to the mercy of a group of non-feeling muggers. He opts for an experimental surgery that places a powerful chip in his body that allows him to gain back full controlŽ over his faculties. Quickly, the implanted chip, Stem (think a dark, disembodied Baymax), begins to assert more power than expected, dramatically and thematically capturing how trauma can split us into two different people. Its like a RoboCop 2.0, with Logan Marshall-Green fully realizing the physicality of his character, even if his more nuanced vocal and emotional delivery are lacking (a la Schwarzenegger or Van-Damme). Theres some slight inconsistencies in the coolness of the tech and in its thoughts on hyper-violence. Fortunately, the action is strong and clear, shot with a kinetic insanity thats as brutal as it is awesome. Like a tech-based John Wick,Ž it couches the action and brains within some fantastic world-building. Its a fully lived-in future; familiar, punctuated with notes of otherworldly futurism. A hard-R, hard-sci-fi B-movie flick, its Ready Player OneŽ in its digital-world warnings, only with more moral conviction and violent creativity.Rating: out of Head to theaters for movie UpgradeLogan Marshall-Green stars in Upgrade. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] UpgradeDirector: Leigh Whannell Starring: Logan MarshallGreen, Betty Gabriel, Harrison Gilbertson, Linda Cropper, Richard Cawthorne, Christopher Kirby Rated: R (strong violence, grisly images, and language)

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E29 BOOK NOTESNews Herald Staff ReportPANAMA CITY „ Author Nancy Springer will bring her latest high fantasy novel to Bay County readers at a pair of book signing events on Tuesday, June 12. The Bonifay-based author will discuss the origins of her latest fable for all ages, The Oddling Prince,Ž at2 p.m. Tuesday at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd.; and from 6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St. inPanama City. Admission to the events is free, and books will be available for purchase. (The novel is also available in multiple formatsthrough all online booksellers and bookstores.) Nancy Springer is the awardwinning author of more than 50 novels, including The Books of Isle fantasy series, the Enola Holmes mystery series, and a plethora of other novels,Ž said library spokeswoman Sarah Burris. She writes for adults and young adults. The Northwest Regional Library System is thrilled to have her visit two library branches.Ž The Oddling PrinceŽ (from Tachyon Publications) opens onthe ancient moors of Scotland, wherethe king of Calidon lies on his deathbed, cursed by a ring that cant be removed from his finger. A mysteriousstranger appears to save the king, but he also carries a secret that could tear the royal family apart. The kingdoms only hope will lie with two young men raised worlds apart: Aric, the beloved heir to the throne of Calidon, andAlbaric,whio is clearly of noble origin yet strangely out of place. The story is atale of brothers whose love and loyalty to each otherdefies impending warfare, sundering seas, fated hatred and thecourse of time itself. Springer has been named as winner or nominee of multiple awards for juvenile, young adult and adult literature, including the Edgar Allan Poe Award two years in a row, winner of the Carolyn W. Field Award, the Hugo for Best Short Story, andwinner of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature (Best Novel). Her Enola Holmesserieswas recently optioned for film adaptation by young actress Millie Bobby Brown. Springer also announced this week that a French graphic novel adaptation of her Enola Holmesseries will be published in English later this year by IDW. For details on these and other work, visit her website, NancySpringer.com The 17 Hour Fast Inspired by his best friends battle with cancer, Dr. Frank Merritt wroteThe 17 Hour Fast,Ž a diet plan thatoffers maximum benefits from a minimum fasting method and promotes an enriched mind, body and soul experience, according to promotional materials. The program draws on years of medical practice as well as VitalityPro research protocols developed with iconic athletes, respected nutritionists and behavioral/exercise psychologists. Independently published, The 17 Hour Fast embodies a minimum effective dose (MED) strategy, harnessing the powerful health and performance advantages of longer fasts while avoiding many of their pitfalls,Ž according to information available at Amazon.com. The program is also carefully synchronized and choreographed with diurnal/nocturnal hormone patterns, sleep hygiene, personal growth and relationship-building techniques, and suggested training/recovery activities to create a potent combination for success.Ž Originally from Enterprise, Ala., Merritt lives in Panama City Beach and practices atBay Medical Sacred Heart in Panama City. His book is available for $21.39 in paperback from Amazon.com. Persons using The 17 Hour FastŽ cancut cholesterol, reduce bacterial overgrowth, and lower toxins;start making lifestyle changes that lower body weight and BMI and reduce body fat;improve digestive issues like IBS, fatty liver disease and acid reflux;boost physical and cognitive performance;break free from habitual and boredom-related eating;create a rich, fully engaged experience before, during and after fasting;achieve many of the benefits of a 48-hour fast in less than half the time, while avoiding many of the risks of more extreme fasts;overcome food-related psychological and behavioral issues while turning destructive habits into healthy ones. Promoters saythe fast will help usersreduce sugar dependence,achieve more restful and restorative sleep,and use fasting to strengthen work/life balance, improve relationships and focus on helping others. It isfounded on a bedrock of cutting-edge scientific data and presented in an intuitive and approachable way by Dr. Merritt andwriter Phil White (Unplugged,Ž Game Changer,Ž and Waterman 2.0Ž). The book includesinsights fromHall of Fame football coach Gene Stallings,NCAA All-American and NFL player Jeremiah Castille,Cy Young winner Barry Zito and many others.Springer releases new fantasy, graphic novel[CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] Nancy Springer will discuss the origins of her latest fable for all ages, The Oddling Prince,Ž at a pair of book signing events. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] Inspired by his best friends battle with cancer, Dr. Frank Merritt wrote The 17 Hour Fast.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Dr. Merritt promotes fasting for good health

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E30 Friday, June 8, 2018 | HAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, June 8 HEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATURE: Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio. com or 850-215-2080 WORLD OCEANS DAY: 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. at various locations in Panama City Beach. Join the fun starting with a beach clean up at the M.B. Miller County Pier from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. At the same time, there will also be activities and shows at Gulf World. After that, head to Divers Den for an underwater dive from 1-4 p.m., and “ nish off the day at Sharkys for the after party from 5-7 p.m. JAM SESSION HELVETICA EFFECT: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. OH MY MICK HUBERT, VOICE OF THE GATORS: 5:30 p.m. at the Lyndell Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Mick will talk about his 29-year career as sports radio announcer for the Florida Gators. Pre-registration required. Call Mike Varner 850-527-7184. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Gator Club scholarship fund. MOVIE KUNDUN: 7 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. A biographical movie based on the life and writings of the 14th Dalai Lama, the exiled political and spiritual leader of Tibet. Details, unityofpanamacity.org, email unitypc” @gmail. com or call 850-769-7481 Saturday, June 9 BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 HERMIT CRAB FESTIVAL: at Kinsaul Park in Lynn Haven. Details, CityOfLynnHaven.com FAMILY SCAVENGER HUNT: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. More than 30 businesses and public areas will be involved. Free to participate. Get your map and prize details at Bou Cou Dancewear, Vinny & Bays, The Little Mustard Seed, and Main Street Antiques. Details, DowntownPanamaCity. com/ScavengerHunt PARADISE GOSPEL FEST: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at McKenzie Park in downtown Panama City, in memory of Doris L. Pruitt Gipson. Activities for children, local artists, gospel DJ, food vendors, health care services information and more. The festival will highlight Panama City First Ladies and gospel recording artist Adrian Dunn. Details, paradisegospelfest.wixsite. com/mysite MURDER MYSTERY DINNER, STAYING ALIVEŽ: 6 p.m. 350 N. Cove Blvd., Panama City, presented by the GFWC Womans Club of Panama City. Tickets: $25 per person for dinner and a mystery. Details, Lois Lawrence at 850-763-5876 SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY THE LITTLE MERMAID: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the Sweetbay neighborhood of Panama City. Free and open to the public. LORRIE MORGAN CONCERT RESCHEDULED: Because of a death in her family, the concert scheduled for tonight at Aaron Bessant Park in Panama City Beach has been cancelled, with plans to reschedule for a later date. Presold tickets will be honored at the makeup date, which has yet to be announced. For details, see Lorrie.com or call Key Of Sea Inc at 850-381-6988. Sunday, June 10 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse GO & DO : CALENDARThe Helvetica Effect from Fort Walton Beach will perform live in the News Herald newsroom at 3 p.m. Friday, June 8. The weekly acoustic jam session will be livestreamed on Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, E31

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E31 GO & DO : CALENDARthe works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 FREE ACTOR WORKSHOP: June 10-12 at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Focus on discovering and developing character using ensemble work, improvisation, voice and body techniques and more. Teacher Liz Sutton Stone is the founder of Old Hat Theatre Co. based in Brooklyn, NY. No cost to participate. Details, METShakespeareLab@gmail. com SAUVIGNON BARK WINE FOR PAWS: 2-7 p.m. at Funky Mermaid Lounge, 474 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Help raise funds for homeless dogs in Bay County by supporting Quincy's Hope Canine Non-Pro“ t Rescue & Education. Wine tasting, silent auction, raf” e baskets, art, music, snacks and food menu. Wine tasting includes souviner glass, $20$25 suggested donation. LIVE A LIFE WORTH LIVING WITH ART: 4-8 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. A variety of local artists, musicians, writers, dancers and theatrical performers will share their talents, skills and awareness of how life is worth living through participation in the arts, and that it brings healing and direction to those living with mental illness or other brain disorders. Help raise awareness of mental health disorders while bene“ ting local children on the verge of suicide. All money raised will go to getting help for local youth contemplating suicide. Details at ArtLifePC.com PRIDE BENEFIT SHOW: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Live performance by Sharon Record plus Pharrah Dynamics and Zamareyah Dawn from B Bobs Mobile, Ala., and Discord Adams from Berlin Nightclub Chicago. Also featuring Envy DuVall, China Moon, Roxxie Wilde and more. Showtime is midnight. $5 cover. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Monday, June 11 'ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com 'THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER': 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com MONSTER MOVIE MONDAY 'MARS ATTACKS': 7 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets: $5. Details: MartinTheatre.com or 850-763-8080 GROOVIN' ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Nite“ re on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, June 12 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 NANCY SPRINGER AUTHOR VISIT: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach; and6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. The award winning author of The Books of Isle fantasy series, the Enola Holmes mystery series, and a plethora of other novels will discuss her latest release, "The Oddling Prince." Free admission. Books will be available for purchase. Wednesday, June 13 'AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com PCB SENIOR CENTER OPEN HOUSE: 11:30 a.m. at the Oat“ eld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama Citgy Beach. Meet and greet members, board and staff. Free cookout; may bring potluck dish and beverage to share. Recognition awards; raf” e drawing for a 50CC motor scooter donated by California Cycles ($10 per ticket to bene“ t the Senior Center); raf” e tickets may be purchased in advance at the Senior Center. Free and open to the public. Donations to food drive CALENDARFrom Page E30 See CALENDAR, E32

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E32 Friday, June 8, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARappreciated. Details, 850233-5065 or PCBSC.com 'BEAUTY AND THE BEAST': 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, June 14 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 WINE TASTING: 5-7 p.m. at Avenue Sea, Pier Park, Panama City Beach. Sample 8-10 wines from local importer/distributor Tom Dibacco and others. With light hors d'oeuvres. Cost is $15. Live music with VIP Jazz Trio. RSVP to reserve your glass to 850-708-3210 or email avenueseapc@knology.net WINE TASTING: 5-7 p.m. at Somethin's Cookin', 93 E. 11th St., Panama City with complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres. Details, 850-769-8979 or SomethinsCookin.com BAY STORYTELLERS: 6-8 p.m. at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Local tellers Wayne Garrett, Carol Bryan, Norm Capra, Paul McAuliffe and Pat Nease will be joined by Madison tellers Wanda Violet and James Glaser. This story concert is free, open to the public, but not recommended for youngsters. Details, Pat at 850-871-0165 ROCKIN DOPSIE JR. CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, June 15 NELE ZIRNITE 'UNDER ANOTHER SKY': Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 JAM SESSION ALLMAN GOLDFLIES BAND: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. 6th ANNUAL PATCHAPALOOZA: 4-10 p.m. at Patches Pub and Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach with Gary Nichols playing from 4-7 p.m. followed by Two Beards & a Ponytail. Locals music festival bene“ ts Veterans Task Force helping local veterans; Patches will have food and drink specials all weekend. Details, 850-2338879 or patchespub.com INKED ART OPENING: 6-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. On display through June, featuring artwork by tattoo artists from A Sailors Grave Tattoo Parlor and Time Piece Tattoos: Darren Anderson, Lance McIntosh, Katelynn Rhea, Sean Flood, Derek Nail and Joshua Gonzalez. Additional artists include Shaun Topper (Captured Tattoo in California), Mowgli Olenason (Coven Tattoo in Colorado), Cynthia Rudzis (Maryland), and Tea Cake (London). Free admission, open to the public. Light refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. Enter drawings to win giveaways such as literary-themed temporary tattoos by Litographs. Details at NWRLS.com 3RD ANNUAL SHRINERS RODEO: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Admission: $10; children 4 and under free. Details, 850-819-6688 Saturday, June 16 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. CALENDARFrom Page E31 See CALENDAR, E33Rockin Dopsie Jr. will perform live 7-9 p.m. Thursday, June 14, at Aaron Bessant Park in Panama City Beach. The free show is part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARto 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 BREAKFAST POINT BLOCK PARTY: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Palmetto Park in the Breakfast Point neighborhood of Panama City Beach. Live music, face painting, photobooth, Back Beach BBQ. Free and open to the public. Details, joe.com/community/breakfast-point6th ANNUAL PATCHAPALOOZA: 1-10 p.m. at Patches Pub and Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach with Ben Walker at 1 p.m., Tyler Arnold at 2 p.m., Chuck Foster at 3 p.m., Derrick Dorsey at 4 p.m., Sarah Moranville and 5 p.m. and David Auen from 6-10 p.m. Locals music festival bene“ ts Veterans Task Force helping local veterans; Patches will have food and drink specials all weekend. Details, 850-233-8879 or patchespub.com BAY DAY COMEDY JAM: 7 p.m. at Dave & Busters, 15701 LC Hilton Drive, Pier Park, Panama City Beach. Featuring the hottest comedians from BET Comic View, Carolines on Broadway, HBO Comedy and more. General admission $20; VIP $30. Details, 678-886-9416 3RD ANNUAL SHRINERS RODEO: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Admission: $10; children 4 and under free. Details, 850-819-6688 AN EVENING OF MAGIC WITH MATTHEW HOLTZCLAW: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. One of New York Citys most in-demand entertainers and consultants, he is also an alumnus of GCSC. Proceeds bene“ t the GCSC Foundation Ray H. Stanley Memorial Musical Theatre Scholarship. The show contains mature content and is recommended for those 16 years of age and older. General admission: $25 for adults, $15 for high school students, military personnel and senior citizens. Seating is limited; advanced tickets are suggested. Tickets can be purchased online at GulfCoast.edu/arts. GCSC and FSU PC students, faculty and staff are admitted free with a valid ID. MAYHEM MILLER: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From VH1s RuPauls Drag Race Season 10. With China Moon, Envy DuVall and Roxxie Wilde. Showtimes at midnight and 2 a.m. Free meet and greet. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, June 17 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 PANAMA JACK SUMMER SLAM: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Sharkys Beach Front Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. The largest professional beach volleyball tournament in the Panhandle. Athletes from all over the Southeast will battle for thousands of dollars in prize money. Free admission. Details, 321-277-1599 Monday, June 18 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by Chuck Foster, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Reasonable Doubt on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert CALENDARFrom Page E32 See CALENDAR, E34

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E34 Friday, June 8, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARseries sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, June 19 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio. com or 850-215-2080 TIBETAN BUDDHIST MONKS SACRED ART TOUR OPENING CERMONY: 10 a.m. Mandela Viewing until 7 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Details, 850769-7481 or email unitypc” @ gmail.com TEEN PROGRAM SONGWRITING WITH ANTHONY PEEBLES: 4 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Program geared for Middle and High School students. Free admission. Details at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 850-522-2118 BEYOND THE LENS THE MONUMENTS MEN: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Free admission. Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay county Public Libraries. Film rated PG-13. SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by the Ukulele Orchestra of St. Andrews, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. Wednesday, June 20 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com MONKS CULTURAL DINNER: 6:30 p.m. Mandela viewing daily until 7 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Details and reservations, 850-769-7481 or email unitypc” @gmail.com PRIDE GLOW PARTY: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Free body painting, free Glow Sticks and party favors. Week “ ve of Drag Wars hosted by Envy DuVall. Showtimes 11:30 p.m. and 1 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida.com or 850-236-3450 Thursday, June 21 AVENUE SEA GRAND OPENING: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Pier Park, Panama City Beach. With light refreshments and sale prices. PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 SHADDAI SHRINE GOSPEL SING: 5-8 p.m at the Shaddai Shrine Temple, 1101 19th St., Panama City. Featuring local talent, Mitchell Johnson, Joe Paul, Loretta Watkins, Barbara Stanley, Olivia Taylor and more. All proceeds to bene“ t the Shaddai Shrine. Details, Joe Paul at 850-819-6688 TRIPLE CROWN PUB STROLL: 5-10 p.m. in downtown Panama City. 2018 Belmont Stakes Pub Stroll. The Belmonst Stakes race will be televised at most venues and starts at 5:30 p.m. Walk around to enjoy themed specialty drinks and food. Wear bowties and Derby hats for the chance to win the Best Dressed Contest. Play Pub Stroll games or participate in store specials for a chance to win big prizes. ENjoy Mint Juleps while listening to live music! A family-friendly event, hosted by business owners of downtown Panama City. MONKS MEDITATION AND CHANT: 6:30 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Mandela viewing daily until 7 p.m. Details, 850769-7481 or email unitypc” @ gmail.com DEVON GILFILLIAN CONCERT: 7 to 9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, June 22 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio. com or 850-215-2080 JAM SESSION KRISTEN BARKALOO: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. MONKS STONE PAINTING: 6:30 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Bring your own large stone. Viewing daily until 7 p.m. Details, 850-769-7481 or email unitypc” @gmail.com Saturday, June 23 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 MONKS CULTURAL PAGEANT: 2:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Mandela viewing daily until 7 p.m. Details, 850-769-7481 or email unitypc” @gmail.com PRINCESS AND THE POET: Doors open for silent auction CALENDARFrom Page E33Magician Matthew Holtzclaw will perform at 7:30 p.m. June 16 at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at Gulf Coast State College in Panama City. Proceeds bene“ t the GCSC Foundation Ray H. Stanley Memorial Musical Theatre Scholarship. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, E35

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E35and art show at 5 p.m.; curtain rises at 6 p.m. at the Gulf Coast State College Amelia Center Theater, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. The Pyramid Players of Panama City present an original family friendly musical fairy tale based upon an African folk tale. Free admission, donations accepted. Details, 850-872-8105 SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY JOEY SHALING: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the Sweetbay neighborhood of Panama City. Free and open to the public. SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY READERS THEATRE: 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park Campground, 4916 State Park Circle, Panama City Beach. Presentation at the “ re circle will cover portions of the classic play in monologue form. Details at St. Andrews Readers Theatre on Facebook.com KENNEDY DAVENPORT: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From RuPauls Drag Race Season 7 and RuPauls All-Stars Season 3. Free entry for residents with a valid Bay County drivers license. Showtimes midnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, June 24 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 MONKS CELEBRATION SERVICE: 11 a.m. at at Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Closing ceremony at 1 p.m. on the bay. Mandela viewing daily until 7 p.m. Details, 850-769-7481 or email unitypc” @gmail.com Monday, June 25 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by Melissa Bowman, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Tony Vegas on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, June 26 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Exhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by Chuck Foster, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. Wednesday, June 27 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com FILM FAN CLUB SPACEBALLS: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th st., Panama City. Free admission. Rated PG. Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, June 28 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 THE LEE BOYS CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, June 29 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: CALENDARFrom Page E34 GO & DO : CALENDARTibetan monks will begin a weeklong series of events with an opening ceremony at Unity Spirtual Center in Panama City on June 19, including a daily viewing of Madala art. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, E36

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E36 Friday, June 8, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARExhibit on display at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, through July 1. Featuring ” oral art by most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Open from noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 JAM SESSION SATURDAY MORNING MUSIC: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook. com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. Saturday, June 30 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 BEGINNER MOUNTAIN DULCIMER WORKSHOP: 2-4 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Taught by professional dulcimer player, Jessica Comeau. Spare dulcimers will be available but you are encouraged to bring your own. Workshop is free. Details: 850-522-2120 or www.nwrls.com Sunday, July 1 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 LIGHT UP THE BAY FIREWORKS: After sunset at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Details, 850-236-6065 Monday, July 2 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by the Ukulele Orchestra of St. Andrews, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. Tuesday, July 3 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by 2Saxy, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. FREEDOM ROCKS! FIREWORKS: 9 p.m. at Grand Lagoon, Panama City Beach. Come early and dine at any Freedom Rocks participating waterfront restaurants, rock a spot with the glorious sunset above the Grand Lagoon Bridge or bring a chair/blanket to the green grassy lawn at Treasure Island Marina. Choreographed music simulcast on the Kickin 103.5 app, available on Kickin1035. com Wednesday, July 4 VETERANS MEMORIAL CEREMONY: Time yet to be announced, at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Honor those who have served this nation. AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com FOURTH OF JULY CONCERT AND FIREWORKS: 6-9 p.m. at Alys Beach amphitheatre, off County 30A. Live music by the Celebrity Allstar Band. Food and beverages for sale. Free admission, open to the public. Bring blankets and low-back chairs. Details, Alysbeach.com/ event BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Sonic Boom on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. STAR SPANGLED SPECTACULAR: After sunset at M.B. Miller County Pier, 12213 Front Beach Road, and City Pier at Pier Park, Panama City Beach. Fireworks are “ red from the City and County piers, with choreographed music simulcast on the Kickin 103.5 app. Thursday, July 5 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 TOBACCO ROAD CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, July 6 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will CALENDARFrom Page E35On June 27, the Bay County Public Library will host the Film Fan Club showing of Spaceballs. Admission is free and refreshments are provided. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, E37

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| Friday, June 8, 2018 E37 GO & DO : CALENDARbe in the lobby display case. JAM SESSION BONE DADDY: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. LIGHT UP THE GULF FIREWORKS SHOW: 8:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Celebrate Independence Day with a front row seat to the private Light Up the GulfŽ Fireworks Show. Saturday, July 7 ABSTRACT CITY ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY CHRIS GODBER: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the Sweetbay neighborhood of Panama City. This event it free and open to the public. Sunday, July 8 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 Monday, July 9 ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Daric Freeman on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Wednesday, July 11 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com BEAUTY AND THE BEAST: 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, July 12 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 REASONABLE DOUBT CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details, 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com Friday, July 13 ABSTRACT CITY ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. JAM SESSION LIN-DON: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. Saturday, July 14 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details, 850-769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. CALENDARFrom Page E36Summer Nights at SweetBay presents jazz musician Chris Godber for a free show on July 7. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, E38

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E38 Friday, June 8, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARDetails at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 'SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY' READERS THEATRE: 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park Campground, 4916 State Park Circle, Panama City Beach. Presentation at the “ re circle will cover portions of the classic play in monologue form. Details at St. Andrews Readers Theatre on Facebook.com Sunday, July 15 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 Monday, July 16 'ADVENTURES IN ALYS STORYTELLING': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com 'THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER': 6:30 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheater, Santa Rosa Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep. com SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the Panama City Marina. Enjoy live music by Sus Mathers, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. GROOVIN' ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Jam Kings on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, July 17 'STRANGER THINGS' TEEN PROGRAM: 3 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Free admission. Fans of 'Stranger Things' can meet for themed games, crafts and snacks. Program geared for middle and high school students. Details at the Youth Services department, 850-522-2118 SUMMER SUNSET SERIES: 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Andrews Marina. Enjoy live music by Jess Jones and Sus Mathers Duo, food trucks and family fun. Free admission. Bring coolers and lawn chairs to watch the sun sink. Wednesday, July 18 'AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV WORKSHOP': 10 a.m. at Fonville Press, 147 W. Garza Lane, Alys Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com 'BEAUTY AND THE BEAST': 6:30 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Free admission to this live show presented by the Seaside Repertory Theatre. Details, LoveTheRep.com Thursday, July 19 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 AN EVENING WITH AUTHOR JONATHAN F. PUTNAM: 6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Author of the Lincoln and Speed mystery series. Light refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. Free admission. Details, NWRLS.com PORCH 40 CONCERT: 7-9 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 500 W. Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Part of the PCB Parks and Recreation Summer Concert Series. Free and open to the public. Details: 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.coM Friday, July 20 'ABSTRACT CITY' ERIN MASON PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 10, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com 'DOGLOVE' WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. JAM SESSION BONITA UNDERGROUND: 3 p.m. live stream of concert at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald. Limited seating available in the newsroom. Saturday, July 21 'UP' STEVE WIGGINS PHOTOGRAPHY: Exhibit on display through Aug. 25, at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. BAY COUNTY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 4230 E. 15th St. Variety of produce and baked goods. Market runs Monday through Saturday until Aug. 4. Details: 769-2645 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 SUMMER NIGHTS AT SWEETBAY THE POPS: 6:30 p.m. at the Founders Pavilion in Academy Square Park in the Sweetbay neighborhood of Panama City. Free and open to the public. Sunday, July 22 HOPE FOR HEROES AND HORSES 5K WALK/RUN: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 792 Highway 20, Youngstown. A fundraising event for the HOPE Project, which rescues horses to help bring hope to heroes who may have been injured physically or emotionally. Services are provided to veterans, “ rst responders and their family members. Details, 850-527-5534 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 CALENDARFrom Page E37The Newsboys bring their United tour to Panama Citys Marina Civic Center on July 22. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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