Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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** Business .........................A7 Diversions ......................B7 Local & State ...............B1-6 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints ....................A8 SUNDAYT-shower 85 / 69SATURDAYClouds, sun 87 / 71TODAYShowers 85 / 73 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Friday, May 18, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com NATION & WORLD | A4OFF THE HOOK, FOR NOWNOAA removes red snapper from over shed list BUSINESS | A7TRUMP & TRADEPresidents team running out of time to rewrite NAFTA this year LOCAL & STATE | B1FLORI-BAM-A!MTV cast member Aimee Hall charged with battery SPORTS | C1JAMBOREE ALMOST POINTLESSBozeman only team to score as Rutherford and North Bay Haven held scoreless By John Henderson522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.comWEST BAY „ The St. Joe Co.s plans to develop a 3,000-plus-home active adult community north of Panama City Beach is being met with praise by Beach officials and business leaders but has some residents concerned it will clog highways even more.The St. Joe Co. is partnering with singer Jimmy Buffetts Margaritaville Holdings and home builder Minto Commu-nities to develop the Latitude Margaritaville Watersound over-55 community north of Panama City Beach. St. Joe and Minto are entering into an agreement to develop the project, and Minto has an agreement with Margarita Holdings to market the proj-ect. Singer Jimmy Buffett is a principal in that company.We have a license to be an exclusive provider of the Latitude Margaritaville adult community when it comes to branding,Ž said William Bullock, president of Mintos Latitude Margaritaville division. We are almost in daily conversation with the Margaritaville team, and everybody always asks: Is Jimmy involved? Hes definitely involved. Hes been out to the Daytona project numerous times.ŽLatitude Margaritavilles first two locations are in Day-tona Beach and Hilton Head, South Carolina.The first phase of the com-munity north of Panama City Beach is slated to be up to Reactions mixed on Latitude planSenior community expected to boost tourism „ and tra cThe Intracoastal Waterway through Watersound is the announced site of Latitude Margaritaville. [COURTESY OF LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE] See LATITUDE, A9 By Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Daniel Rhodes shifted gears in his 2002 Jeep Wrangler, pressing the vehicle through a mound of rocks and large cement blocks. He tackled the mound of tires with a little more ease, though the Jeep leaned precariously sideways while tumbling over the tires.Rhodes was among Jeepers putting their pedals to the metal and showcasing their Jeeps torque and skills while trying to conquer the obstacle course at the third annual Jeep Beach Jam at Frank Brown Park on Thursday.It was a little difficult,Ž said Rhodes, one of thousands of Jeepers who dropped their tops and doors to venture out Jeep culture rolls into PCBA Jeep driver braves the obstacle course during Jeep Beach Jam at Frank Brown Park on Thursday. As of midday, most had not succ essfully completed the course. See more photos and video from the day and the obstacle course at newsherald.com. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Enthusiasts try out obstacle course, enjoy camaraderieBy Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ It was all stars and stripes for Gulf Coast State College on Thursday, as Gov. Rick Scott and officials honored military students for their service at a host of events that included a groundbreaking ceremony and a dinner. To celebrate Armed Forces Day on Saturday, officials took their shovels to the GCSC, Scott honor military studentsGov. Rick Scott and other attendees of the Military & Veterans Resource Center groundbreaking at Gulf Coast State College look up at an Air Force ” yover Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See JEEP, A9 See BANQUET, A9

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** Ernie Wagner of Panama City Beach is 93. Ronnie Thompson of Panama City Beach, is 71. Rock singermusician Page Hamilton is 58. Contemporary Christian musician Barry Graul (MercyMe) is 57. Contemporary Christian singer Michael Tait is 52. Singeractress Martika is 49. Comedianwriter Tina Fey is 48. Rapper Special Ed is 44. Rock singer Jack Johnson is 43. Country singer David Nail is 39. Rhythm-andblues singer Darryl Allen (Mista) is 38. Actor Matt Long is 38. Actor Allen Leech is 37. Christian-rock musician Kevin Huguley (Rush of Fools) is 36. Send your birthday information to pcnhnews@pcnh.com. A2 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald READER FEEDBACK TODAY IN HISTORY HAPPY BIRTHDAY Wagner FLORIDA LOTTERY YOUNG ARTIST Thompson CATCH OF THE DAY GO AND DOWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY #MTV #Floribama cast member Aimee Hall is charged with punch-ing a woman in the face because she told Hall the show makes #PCB look ratchet,Ž according to court records.Anthony Blueridge: If they wanted this to be an authentic reality tv show, should have made the entire cast come from working class areas of Lower Alabama (LA) like Dothan. Roll Tide Roll !ŽBarbara Pike: As a professional house cleaner on the weekends in Pcb. I can promise you that 99.6 percent of people are great. These are young clue less adults to say the least. And yes i believe this show really doesnt represent the majority of guest who visit !!! And yes people get drunk things happen. Every where in the world. If your gonna create a show, then get people who for one actully live there. Who work every day The real peoplele of Panama city Beach Florida.ŽGreg Cash: Theres trashy people and trashy places every-where and every city and every town. Panama city is repre-sented well why does it matter you know theres trashy people in this town theyre exposed all the time.Ž St. Joe announces its plan for an active adultŽ retirement community in northwest Bay County, and its an interesting one that includes a partnership with Margaritaville and Jimmy Buffet and a brand with two developments under its belt in Daytona Beach and Hilton Head, S.C. What do you think?Earl Bradley: Geriatrics: BAN SPRING BREAK! WE DONT NEED THESE DISEASED GANGBANGS HERE!!! Also geriatrics: Hey, lets make this a retirement community that is a statistic cesspool of STDs. Bring back the college kids, no one wants to see the overweight one-piece Betsys on the beach. Locals should be petitioning to ban those instead of scooters. Obese geriatrics are the real eyesore.ŽFrankie Sewell: These retire-ment communities tend to have their own shops and restau-rants that work directly for the community. Be cautious local business owners. Another fun fact about a place like this called the villages, highest concentra-tion of STDs and the highest number of registered golf cars too. I know how locals here hate/love those.ŽThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 08-11-19-20-22 Lotto: 01-11-17-42-45-49; estimated jackpot, $10 million Lotto XTRA: 02 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot, $55 million Pick 2 Evening: 8-9 Pick 2 Midday: 2-8 Pick 3 Evening: 5-5-1 Pick 3 Midday: 4-2-6 Pick 4 Evening: 4-7-0-8 Pick 4 Midday: 1-1-5-7 Pick 5 Evening: 9-2-9-5-0 Pick 5 Midday: 7-5-6-8-1 Powerball: 17-19-21-22-51; Powerball: 19; Power Play: 2; estimated jackpot: $280 million Logan Scoggins Grade 4. Cedar Grove Elementary. Today is Friday, May 18 the 138th day of 2018. There are 227 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On May 18, 1953, Jacqueline Cochran, 47, became the “ rst woman to break the sound barrier as she piloted a Canadair F-86 Sabre jet over Rogers Dry Lake, California. On this date: In 1152 Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, married Henry, Duke of Normandy (the future King Henry II), two months after her marriage to King Louis VII of France was annulled. In 1642 the Canadian city of Montreal was founded by French colonists. (On this date in 1765 one-quarter of Montreal was dest royed by a “ re.) In 1652 Rhode Island became the “ rst American colony to pass a law abolishing African slavery; however, the law was apparently never enforced. In 1781 Peruvian revolutionary Tupac Amaru II, 43, was forced to witness the execution of his relatives by the Spanish in the main plaza of Cuzco before being beheaded. In 1896 the U.S. Supreme Court, in Plessy v. Ferguson, endorsed "separate but equal" racial segregation, a concept renounced 58 years later by Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. In 1926 evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson vanished while visiting a beach in Venice, California. (McPherson reappeared more than a month later, saying she'd escaped after being kidnapped and held for ransom, an account greeted with skepticism.) In 1933 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a measure creating the Tennessee Valley Authority. In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces occupied Monte Cassino in Italy after a fourmonth struggle with Axis troops.1 JEEP BEACH JAM: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach; Vendor Village, Obstacle Course and JBJ Vendor Raf” e open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Vendor Village with music and contests at 10 a.m. Jeep Wash is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Scavenger Hunt awards from 2-4 p.m., Raf” e Mini Drawing 4-5 p.m.; free concert 7 p.m. till on main stage at Vendor Village. After-show party at Ms. Newby's. Details, jeepbeachjam.com2 SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven. com3 BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30 8:30 p.m. Friday at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Rd., Panama City. For all levels beginners and up. Come enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For more info call 850-277-0566 or email at dpgordon01@ yahoo.com.4 'END DAYS': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Sixteen-year-old Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father hasn't changed out of his pajamas since 9/11, her new neighbor, a sixteen-year-old Elvis impersonator, has fallen for her hard and the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is that Stephen Hawking will save them all. Tonight's show is followed by a wine and hors d'oeuvre reception. Details and tickets, 850-265-32265 DIGITAL GRAFFITI: Three-night event at Alys Beach off County 30A. Projection art festival. Details and tickets, DigitalGraf“ ti.com Judy Ransom, of Southport, emailed this photo to us and said, Toward the end of the downpour I saw the sunshine, and ran to the back yard to “ nd this perfect double rainbow over Deerpoint Lake.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Kimberly Foxx shared this photo with the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, First one ever!!! Finally!!!Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 A3

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** A4 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Sophia Yan and Caleb JonesThe Associated PressHONOLULU „ Hawaiis Kilauea volcano erupted anew before dawn Thursday, spewing a steely gray plume of ash about 30,000 feet (9,100 meters) into the sky that began raining down on a nearby town.The explosion at the summit came shortly after 4 a.m. following two weeks of volcanic activity that sent lava flows into neigh-borhoods and destroyed at least 26 homes. Scientists said the eruption was the most powerful in recent days, though it probably lasted only a few minutes. Geologists have warned that the volcano could become even more violent, with increasing ash production and the poten-tial that future blasts could hurl boulders from the summit.Toby Hazel, who lives in Pahoa, near the mountain, said she heard a lot of booming soundsŽ Thurs-day. Those came after days of earthquakes.Its just time to go „ it really, really is,Ž she said, preparing to leave town. I feel so sorry for the people who dont go, because they dont have the money, or dont want to go to a shel-ter and leave their houses.ŽSome people in the community closest to the volcano slept through the blast, said Kanani Aton, a spokeswoman for Hawaii County Civil Defense, who spoke to relatives and friends in the town called Volcano. At least one person who was awake heard nothing. Epic Lava tour operator John Tarson is an early riser and said he only learned about the eruption because he received an alert on his phone.Tarson said the ash plume looked different than others hes witnessed because of its sheer height. A video he shared on Face-book showed a towering column of ash reaching into a hazy sky.What I noticed is the plume was just rising straight into the air, and it was not tipping in any direction,Ž he said. Weve been expecting this, and a lot of people are going to see it and get excited and scared.Ž Residents as far away as Hilo, about 30 miles from Kilauea, were noticing the volcanos effects. Puaena Ahn, who lives in Hilo, complained about having labored breathing, itchy, watery eyes and some skin irritation from airborne ash.A National Weather Ser-vice ash advisory was in effect until noon. Several schools closed because of the risk of elevated levels of sulfur dioxide, a volca-nic gas.The crater sits within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which has been closed since May 11 as a safety precaution over risks of a violent eruption.Scientists warned May 9 that a drop in the lava lake at the summit might create conditions for an explosion that could fling ash and refrigerator-sized boulders into the air. Geol-ogists predicted such a blast would mostly release trapped steam from flash-heated groundwater. If it happens, communities a mile or two away could be showered by pea-size fragments or dusted with ash.Kilauea, one of the worlds most active vol-canoes, has been erupting continuously since 1983. Its among the five volca-noes that form Hawaiis Big Island, and the only one thats actively erupting. An eruption in 1924 killed one person and sent rocks, ash and dust into the air for 17 days.Hawaii volcano sends ash plume 30,000 feet into skyA plume of volcanic steam rises from the alignment of “ ssures Wednesday in the East Rift zone on Hawaiis Kilauea volcano. Earthquakes were damaging roads and buildings Wednesday on Hawaiis Big Island as ash emissions streamed from Kilauea. [CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL/ HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Lisa MascaroThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ The Senate confirmed Gina Haspel on Thursday as the first female director of the CIA following a difficult nomination process that reopened an emotional debate about brutal interrogation techniques in one of the darkest chapters in the spy agencys history.The 54-45 vote split both parties, with six Democrats joining most Republicans in support. Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, who is battling brain cancer, was absent for the vote.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., called President Donald Trumps choice of Haspel to lead the agency the right woman at the right time.ŽMcConnell steered the confirmation swiftly past opponents, includ-ing the ailing McCain, whose long-distance rejection of the nominee over her role in the CIAs torture program hung over an impas-sioned debate.Ahead of voting, McConnell said Haspel demonstrated candor, integrity, and a forthright approachŽ throughout the confirmation process and has quietly earned the respect and admirationŽ of intelligence community leaders at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, and abroad.Supporters cited Has-pels 33-year career at the agency. Former top intelligence officials said she earned the chance to take the helm of the intelligence agency.But Haspels nomi-nation was contentious because of her role in a former CIA program to brutally detain and interrogate terror suspects at covert sites abroad following 9/11.Her opponents said it wasnt right to promote someone who supervised a black site in Thailand. They said the U.S. needs to close the book forever on the program that marred Americas image with allies abroad.Several senators said Haspel was not forthcoming in answering questions about her role in the torture program or the CIAs decision to destroy videotaped evidence of the sessions. They also had questions about her rejection of the now-banned techniques.Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said in a floor speech that Haspel offered up almost the classic Washington nonapology.ŽHe asked how the Senate could take seriously Haspels con-version on torture.ŽSens. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Jeff Flake of Arizona were among the Republicans who voted against Haspel.Among Democrats supporting Haspel are several who are up for re-election this fall in states where Trump is popular, including Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Sen. Joe Don-nelly of Indiana and Sen. Bill Nelson in Florida. Other Democrats voting yes were Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Intelligence Committee, and Sen. Jeanne Sha-heen of New Hampshire.Other Trump-state Democrats, though, including Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama, opposed the nominee. Most other Democrats, including those eyeing presidential runs in 2020, voted against Haspel in what may become a defining issue for Democrats.Senate con rms Haspel as rst female CIA directorCIA nominee Gina Haspel testi“ es during a May 9 con“ rmation hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. [ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] Patrick WhittleThe Associated PressPORTLAND, Maine „ The number of Ameri-can fish stocks that can be described as over-fishedŽ has hit an all-time low, the U.S. government announced on Thursday.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made the statement as part of its annual Status of Stocks Report to Congress. Six populations of fish are being removed from its list of overfished stocks, including the popular commercially fished stocks of Gulf of Mexico red snapper and Georges Bank winter flounder, the agency said.NOAA Fisheries classifies jeopardized fish stocks as overfishedŽ or experiencing overfishing.Ž The agencys report stated that 35 stocks out of 235 are overfished, which is the lowest number since the agency started tracking fish populations in this way in 2000.The news of improved fish stocks is welcome, but U.S. fisheries still must contend with envi-ronmental changes, said Alan Risenhoover, director of the Office of Sustainable Fisheries for NOAA Fisheries. Several fish species that are still subject to overfishing, including populations of Atlantic cod and halibut, are located in New England waters, where they also face pressure from swiftly warming waters.One of the major concerns we have is the environment changing along the Northeast coast or the New England coast, and is that having an effect on those stocks,Ž Risenhoover said. Our scientists are looking at that.ŽThe stocks removed from the overfished list also include types of gray triggerfish, yelloweye rockfish and Pacific ocean perch. Western Atlantic bluefin tuna was changed to unknownŽ because of a lack of data. Stocks of red grouper, shortfin mako and red hake were added to the overfished list.The report also stated that 30 stocks out of 317 are subject to overfishing, which is the same as last year and near an all-time low according to the agency. Some fish stocks have unknown status.The NOAA said one population of Coho salmon was removed from the overfishing list, while another of the same fish was added to the same list. Both stocks are in Puget sound. Other species removed from the overfishing list included stocks of sailfish, winter flounder and blue king crab, while other additions included stocks of greater amberjack, red grouper and red hake.Three stocks were added to the NOAAs rebuiltŽ list. They were populations of bocaccio, darkblotched rockfish and Pacific ocean perch. The agency said it has rebuilt 44 marine fish stocks since 2000. NOAA Fisheries assis-tant administrator Chris Oliver said rebuilding fish stocks is part of the agencys commitment to ending overfishing.It strengthens the value of U.S. fisheries contribution to the economy, which in 2015 exceeded $208 billion dollars,Ž he said.NOAA: Number of over shed stocks at all-time lowRed snapper removed from over shed listNOAA on Thursday removed red snapper from its list of over“ shed stocks in the U.S. [FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 A5By Saleh Mwanamilongo and Carley PeteschThe Associated PressKINSHASA, Congo „ Congos Ebola outbreak has spread to a cross-roads city of more than 1 million people in a trou-bling turn that marks the first time the vast, impoverished country has encountered the lethal virus in an urban area.This is a major, major game-changer in the outbreak,Ž Dr. Peter Salama, the World Health Organizations deputy director-general of emergency prepared-ness and response, warned on Thursday.A single case of Ebola was confirmed in Mbandaka, a densely populated provincial capital on the Congo River, Congos Health Minister Oly Ilunga said late Wednesday. The city is about 150 kilometers (93 miles) from Bikoro, the rural area where the outbreak was announced last week.Medical teams rushed to track down anyone thought to have had contact with infected people, while WHO continued shipping thousands of doses of an experimental vaccine.A total of 44 cases of Ebola have been reported in Congo in this outbreak: three confirmed, 20 probable and 21 suspected, according to WHO. Twenty-three of those people have died.Until now, the outbreak was confined to remote rural areas, where Ebola, which is spread by bodily fluids, travels more slowly.Were certainly not trying to cause any panic in the national or international community,Ž Salama said. But urban Ebola can result in an exponential increase in cases in a way that rural Ebola struggles to do.ŽMbandaka, a city of almost 1.2 million, is in a busy travel corridor in Congos northwest Equateur province and is upstream from the capital, Kinshasa, a city of about 10 million. It is an hours plane ride from Kinshasa or a fourto seven-day trip by river barge.Salama also noted Mbandakas proximity to neighboring countries, including Central African Republic and Republic of Congo.The scenario has changed, and it has become most serious and worrying, since the dis-ease is now affecting an urban area,Ž said Henry Gray, emergency coordinator in Mbandaka for Doctors Without Borders.The aid organization said 514 people believed to have been in contact with infected people are being monitored. WHO said it is deploying about 30 more experts to the city.Those exposed will for the first time in Congo receive Ebola vaccinations, the health minister said. WHO has sent 4,000 doses to Congo and said it will dispatch thousands more in the coming days as needed.This is a concerning development, but we now have better tools than ever before to combat Ebola,Ž Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general, said of the new urban case.The vaccine has been shown to be highly effec-tive against Ebola. It was tested in Guinea during the outbreak that killed more than 11,300 people in West Africa from 2014 to 2016.WHO has said it will use the ring vaccina-tionŽ method. It involves vaccinating contacts of those feared infected, contacts of those contacts, and health care and other front-line workers. This is the ninth Ebola outbreak in Congo since 1976, when the disease was first identified. The virus is initially transmitted to people from wild animals, including bats and monkeys.Ebola spreads to densely populated city in CongoCongos latest Ebola outbreak has now spread to Mbandaka, a city of more than 1 million people, a worrying shift as the deadly virus risks t raveling more easily in densely populated areas. [MARK NAFTALIN/ UNICEF VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Gerry ShihThe Associated PressALMATY, Kazakhstan „ Hour upon hour, day upon day, Omir Bekali and other detainees in far western Chinas new indoctrination camps had to disavow their Islamic beliefs, criticize themselves and their loved ones and give thanks to the ruling Communist Party.When Bekali, a Kazakh Muslim, refused to follow orders each day, he was forced to stand at a wall for five hours at a time. A week later, he was sent to solitary confinement, where he was deprived of food for 24 hours. After 20 days in the heavily guarded camp, he wanted to kill himself.The psychological pressure is enormous, when you have to criticize yourself, denounce your thinking „ your own ethnic group,Ž said Bekali, who broke down in tears as he described the camp. I still think about it every night, until the sun rises. I cant sleep. The thoughts are with me all the time.ŽSince last spring, Chinese authorities in the heavily Muslim region of Xinjiang have ensnared tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of Muslim Chinese „ and even foreign citizens „ in mass internment camps. This detention campaign has swept across Xinjiang, a territory half the area of India, leading to what a U.S. commission on China last month said is the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today.ŽChinese officials have largely avoided comment on the camps, but some are quoted in state media as saying that ideological changes are needed to fight separatism and Islamic extremism. Radical Muslim Uighurs have killed hundreds in recent years, and China considers the region a threat to peace in a country where the major-ity is Han Chinese.The internment program aims to rewire the political thinking of detainees, erase their Islamic beliefs and reshape their very identities. The camps have expanded rapidly over the past year, with almost no judicial process or legal paperwork. Detainees who most vigorously criticize the people and things they love are rewarded, and those who refuse to do so are punished with solitary confinement, beatings and food deprivation.The recollections of Bekali, a heavyset and quiet 42-year-old, offer what appears to be the most detailed account yet of life inside so-called re-education camps. The Associated Press also conducted rare interviews with three other former internees and a former instructor in other centers who corroborated Bekalis depiction. Most spoke on condition of anonymity to protect their families in China.Bekalis case stands out because he was a foreign citizen, of Kazakhstan, who was seized by Chinas security agencies and detained for eight months last year without recourse. Although some details are impossible to verify, two Kazakh dip-lomats confirmed he was held for seven months and then sent to re-education.The detention program is a hallmark of Chinas emboldened state security apparatus under the deeply nation-alistic, hard-line rule of President Xi Jinping. It is partly rooted in the ancient Chinese belief in transformation through education „ taken once before to terrifying extremes during the mass thought reform cam-paigns of Mao Zedong, the Chinese leader sometimes channeled by Xi.Cultural cleansing is Beijings attempt to find a final solution to the Xinjiang problem,Ž said James Millward, a China historian at Georgetown University.Rian Thum, a professor at Loyola University in New Orleans, said Chi-nas re-education system echoes some of the worst human rights violations in history.The closest analogue is maybe the Cultural Revolution in that this will leave long-term, psy-chological effects,Ž Thum said. This will create a multigenerational trauma from which many people will never recover.ŽAsked to comment on the camps, Chinas For-eign Ministry said it had not heardŽ of the situation. When asked why non-Chinese had been detained, it said the Chi-nese government protects the rights of foreigners in China and they should also be law-abiding. Chinese officials in Xinjiang did not respond to requests for comment.However, bits and pieces from state media and journals show the confidence Xinjiang officials hold in methods that they say work well to curb religious extremism. Chinas top prosecutor, Zhang Jun, urged Xinjiangs authorities this month to extensively expand what the government calls the transformation through educationŽ drive in an all-out effortŽ to fight separatism and extremism.Chinese indoctrination camps evoke Cultural RevolutionOmir Bekali cries as he details the psychological stress endured while in a Chinese internment camp during a March 29 interview in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Since 2016, Chinese authorities in the heavily Muslim region of Xinjiang have ensnared tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of Muslim Chinese, and even foreign citizens, in mass internment camps. Chinese of“ cials say ideological changes are needed to “ ght Islamic extremism. [NG HAN GUAN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A6 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 A7 BUSINESS By Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Investors are fearfully watching for signs that inflation is picking up. Stocks tumbled in February when Wall Street thought a big increase was coming, and since then, stocks have rallied when the market received signs that inflation was in check.Most experts agree that inflation is going to speed up eventually as the economy expands, and that the Federal Reserve will keep raising interest rates in order to keep inflation pressures from getting out of control.While its not clear exactly when greater inflation will arrive, Steve Wood, chief market strategist for Russell Investments, says its not too soon to prepare.Also, Wood says inves-tors need to pay attention to a global disconnect in interest rate policy.Even as the Federal Reserve, under Chairman Jerome Powell, raises borrowing costs in the U.S. to stave off inflation, central banks in Europe and Japan are still keeping interest rates low and buying bonds in order to stimulate their own economies.Answers have been edited for length and clarity.Q: What trajectory do you expect for inflation?A: The goal is to figure out where inflation is going within the context of Fed policy. The under-lying data is that inflation is increasing toward the Feds target of 2 percent. The improvement in inflation is going to give the Fed confidence that it can remove much of the emergency accommoda-tion it afforded following the global financial crisis. One ignores the Fed and Fed policy at ones own peril.Since February, the market is beginning to process the policy positions of a Powell Fed, which is looking at an improving economy, improved labor markets, and inflation that they feel is on target. As we all know, its not inflation, its inflation expectations which are important, and the Fed wants an environment where inflation expecta-tions are anchored at that 2 percent range.Q: What kind of adjustments are you making as you see signs inflation is on the rise?A: To many the most obvious would be the impact of rising rates in fixed-income, and over a shorter time environment thats true. In a rising rate environment, the price of fixed income assets (like bonds) drops.There are also implica-tions in asset classes with an equities base. Also there are implications in terms of the economic cycle.MARKET WATCHDow 24,713.98 54.95 Nasdaq 7,382.47 15.82 S&P 2,720.13 2.33 Russell 1,625.29 8.92 NYSE 12,747.83 4.03COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,288.20 2.00 Silver 16.413 .116 Platinum 892.10 2.30 Copper 3.0770 .0185 Oil 71.49 Unch.Of Mutual Interest: Reacting to rising in ation and rates Special to The News HeraldYour future employee is a young lady who recently graduated from Chautauqua Learn and Serve. She is kind, well groomed, conscientious and reliable. She would like to work as a store clerk or greeter or perhaps cleaning. She has food service experience and would like to work part-time in a position where there is an oppor-tunity for her to learn job skills to help her grow.She has volunteered extensively, works well with others and can begin working immedi-ately. Also, she is eligible for OJT, a program that provides an incentive for employers who hire clients of The Arc of the Bay. clients. Will you take a chance on her?For information about this client or any of the other services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTGeorge, right, an Arc of the Bay client, is shown with Ken, manager at Charlie Corams Place on 23rd Street. Come on down to Corams, have a great lunch and say hi to George, who works lunchtime on Tuesday and Wednesday. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] By Paul WisemanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Presi-dent Donald Trumps team is running out of time to rewrite a trade pact with Canada and Mexico this year just as its confronting China and spar-ring with its allies over U.S. tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.If negotiators cant agree on a revamped the North Ameri-can Free Trade Agreement soon „ House Speaker Paul Ryan set an informal Thurs-day deadline „ the talks could drag into 2019. Or Trump could carry out his threat to abandon the agreement hes labeled a job-killing disasterŽ and throw commerce among the three NAFTA countries into disarray.The window is closing rapidly,Ž said Dan Ujczo, a trade lawyer at Dickinson Wright in Columbus, Ohio.NAFTA is hardly the only urgent item on the administrations trade agenda. Trump was expected to meet Thursday with Chinas Vice Premier Liu He to try to avert a trade war. Liu will also meet with a U.S. team led by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.The U.S. and China, locked in a conflict over Beijings demand that American com-panies turn over technology to gain access to the Chinese market, have threatened to slap tariffs on $50 billion of each others goods. And Trump has asked U.S. Trade Rep. Robert Lighthizer to find an additional $100 billion in Chinese products to tax.The prospect of a trade war between the worlds two big-gest economies has unnerved global financial markets and alarmed major companies.The stakes are too high for these talks to fail,Ž said Christine McDaniel, a senior research fellow at George Mason Universitys Mercatus Center. The U.S. economy, its firms, its workers, and its people all depend on being able to buy and sell with their counterparts at home and across the globe every day.ŽTalking to reporters Thurs-day, Trump downplayed the prospect of a successful negotiation with Beijing: Will that be successful?,Ž the president asked. I tend to doubt it.Ž Trade sanctions could dis-rupt business between the countries and potentially threaten jobs. Consumers would be hurt by higher prices for imported products that are hit by tariffs.In the meantime, Japan, a staunch U.S. ally, is threatening to go to the World Trade Organization to protest Trumps tariffs on imported steel and alumi-num. The president imposed the tariffs in March, arguing that reliance on imported metals posed a threat to Americas national security. He exempted the European Union, Canada, and Mexico „ but not Japan „ until June 1.The steel and aluminum tariffs have antagonized traditional American allies. Those counties want permanent exemptions from the tariffs. Or they want them withdrawn altogether. Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, tweeted Monday of the United States that with friends like that who needs enemies.ŽNAFTA has long been a focus of Trumps ire. But achieving a NAFTA do-over to the presidents satisfaction has always seemed a longshot. When it took effect in 1994, NAFTA ended most trade barriers among the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Trade surged within the NAFTA bloc. American farmers who export corn and other prod-ucts benefited from the deal.Clock ticking on NAFTA rewritePresident Donald Trumps team is running out of time to rewrite the North American Free Trade Agreement this year. [THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] COMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $200.36 +1.51 Am. Express $101.22 +0.63 Apple $186.99 -1.19 Boeing $344.14 +3.17 Caterpillar $153.69 -0.11 Chevron $129.46 +1.02 Cisco $43.46 -1.70 Coca-Cola $42.30 +0.75 DowDuPont $68.16 +0.13 Exxon $81.88 -0.14 Gen. Electric $15.03 0.00 Goldman Sachs $239.10 -1.86 Home Depot $185.33 -1.05 Intel $54.81 +0.17 IBM $144.50 -0.13 J&J $123.85 -1.50 JP Morgan $112.96 -0.38 McDonalds $161.31 -1.56 Merck $59.07 -0.68 Microsoft $96.18 -0.97 Nike $70.94 -0.40 P“ zer $35.71 +0.03 Proc. & Gamble $73.96 +0.43 Travelers $130.72 +0.57 United Tech. $124.61 +0.53 Verizon $47.85 -0.01 Walmart $84.49 -1.64 Walt Disney $104.34 -0.70 United Health $242.96 +1.24 Visa $129.93 -0.75THE DOW 30U.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.28 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 19.73 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.85 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.74FOREIGN EXCHANGE STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG. AT&T $31.93 -0.37 DARDEN RESTS $85.94 -1.28 GEN DYNAMICS $201.76 +1.26 HANGER INC $18.01 -0.14 HANCOCK HLDG $52.25 +0.36 HOME BANCS $23.79 -0.03 ITT CORP $54.06 +0.78 THE ST JOE $17.90 -0.15 KBR INC $17.44 +0.42 L-3 COMMS $193.95 +1.38 OCEANEERING $24.26 +0.39 REGIONS $19.32 +0.02 SALLIE MAE $11.67 +0.12 SOUTHERN $43.62 -0.27 SUNTRUST $69.38 +0.47 WESTROCK $62.28 +0.39 ING-RAND $89.97 +1.47 ENGILITY $29.83 +0.09 Source: Matt Wegner Financial Advisor The Edward Jones Co. Panama City, 769-1278 IN BRIEFTEHRAN, IRANIran signs oil deal with UK group; Frances Total exits Iranian state TV is reporting that the country has signed an agreement with a British con-sortium to develop an oil field, just as another major company, Frances Total, says it will withdraw from Iran because of renewed U.S. sanctions.The new agreement is the first between Iran and a com-pany from a key Western ally of the United States since Wash-ington last week announced it will pull out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers.The U.S. said it would rein-state sanctions that were lifted under the deal, which would potentially bar European com-panies from doing business in both the United States and Iran. The Associated Press

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** A8 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR SQUALL LINE ANOTHER VIEW Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTSTwo U.S. senators from Maine „ Republican Susan Collins and independent Angus King „ this week filed S 2835, legislation that would suspend tariffs on newsprint and other paper imported from Canada. Eight of their colleagues, two Democrats and eight Republicans, are co-sponsors. The News Herald's Editorial Board thanks them and supports the bill because: 1. The tariffs on uncoated groundwood paper threaten the financial viability of news organizations that produce print and digital products. News organizations across the United States fear, rationally, that rising newsprint costs related to the tariffs could eventually force publishers to cut staff, reduce the size of newspapers, raise costs to consumers „ or a combination of all three. We recognize our financial interest in this matter, but none of these outcomes would be good for the workers, readers, advertisers and communities that depend on professional journalism published in print, as so many News Herald subscribers still desire, or in digital form. 2. The tariffs dont make sense and are not supported by the vast majority of the affected paper producers in the United States and Canada. Technically labeled as anti-dumping and countervailing duties, the tariffs were initiated by the U.S. Department of Commerce in response to a petition by one paper producer in Washington state. Thats right: one producer. North Pacific Paper Company (NORPAC), which has fewer than 300 employees and is owned by a hedge fund, alleged that the Canadian government subsidizes paper exports. The Commerce Department agreed and imposed the two duties „ combined, ranging up to 32 percent „ preliminarily in January and March. Final determinations are pending until August. The newspaper industry isnt the only one in opposition. Most notable among the opponents is the American Forest and Paper Association. The uncoated groundwood and newsprint market is a North American market, and AF&PA has opposed the request for duties to be imposed on imports from Canada,Ž the associations chief executive, Donna Harman, said. Imports are necessary, in part, because many U.S. companies have abandoned newsprint production in favor of products with higher profit margins. Nevertheless, consider this: Two of the leading Canadian producers have a total of nearly 4,000 U.S. employees, more than 13 times the number of NORPAC, the petitioner. More than 600,000 workers in the U.S. are employed in the publishing, printing and paper-producing industries that overwhelmingly oppose the tariffs because of their potential to kill jobs and depress economic activity. 3. The tariffs will raise the costs of print advertising on companies with brick-and-mortar stores and businesses. Print ads remain valuable to local and national companies that sell taxable products and employ millions of Americans. In sum: The tariffs harm the valuable newspaper industry, are opposed by all but one paper producer and impose unnecessary costs on businesses that rely on print. As we have stated: If the U.S. goal is to have smart trade, then these tariffs are dumb.Suspend new tari s on paper importsThree weeks ago, I attended the funeral of two deputy sheriffs, both in their 20s. Sgt. Noel Ramirez Jr. and Deputy Taylor Lindsey were fatally ambushed at a local restaurant in Gilchrist County. They were killed because their uniforms represented law and order. Tragedies like these have become far too common. In 2017, 93 law enforcement officers died on duty throughout the nation, with 46 of them killed in lineof-duty incidents as the result of felonious acts. On May 13, the names of the 93 fallen officers were formally dedicated on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C., during the 30th annual Candlelight Vigil. Three of them were from the Northern District of Florida: Master Sgt. William Trampas Bishop of the Florida Highway Patrol, Escambia County Corrections Officer Joe William Heddy Jr., and Florida Department of Agriculture Officer Joshua Sanchez Montaad. These brave officers made the ultimate sacrifice. Sometimes we forget that all officers make sacrifices every day, even when the rest of us are off duty. They work hurricanes, holidays and homecoming games. How many nights and weekends was Sgt. Ramirez away from his two young children? How many times do we expect officers to put our needs above their own? A career in law enforcement means decades of constant vigilance. As we enjoy the comfort their security provides, officers are responding to situations that can turn from routine to risky instantaneously. Those of us who dont wear badges may fret about deadlines at work, but we dont worry that someone will try to kill us. With alarming frequency, criminals try to avoid apprehension by aiming their cars directly at the arresting officers and stepping on the accelerator. In the civilian world, we may question the air quality of our unventilated office space. Officers must wonder whether that white powder drifting through the air at a drug scene will be fentanyl, which can stop their breath entirely. When officers respond to a report of an armed man or make a traffic stop alone late at night, the only thing certain is that afterward, people who were not there will leisurely dissect their every move and decision. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes once famously wrote, detached reflection cannot be demanded in the presence of an uplifted knife.Ž Yet this superhuman self-detachment is what our society increasingly demands. National Police Week is May 13-19. This week, we especially recognize the grace law enforcement officers show in the face of these demands and celebrate the everyday heroes they are. Christopher P. Canova is the United States attorney for the Northern District of Florida, which includes the state capital and the 23 counties from Escambia to Alachua. Canova has devoted his career to public service and working with law enforcement to build safe communities in Florida.Honor the daily sacri ces of law enforcement C h r i s t o p h e r P C a n o v a Christopher P. Canova Kudos to the road workers It seems to me that hardly a week goes by we dont hear someone complain about the potholes, the uneven pavements or detours concerning the roads in the Panama City area. Whether in line at a supermarket, doctors office or fast food establishment, its the same old complaints over and over again. But I also think the ones complaining the most would be the last in line to apply for any type of job on a road crew. You hear about road men or women leaning on their shovels and rakes or just standing around talking while nothing gets done. Well, they need a little bit of slack in all those departments. No matter the weather „hot, cold, or rainy „ they are out there helping make our getting around a little easier and safer day after day. Whether having to wade up to their waist in runoff water putting up barricades so we wont get washed away to helping motorists jump-start a dead battery, they are always there ready to help. The road crews resurfacing Tyndall Parkway have done a great job and even worked nights so as not to inconvenience motorists during peak travel times. That alone deserves a pat on the back. Watching the line of huge dump trucks carrying asphalt operate as if choreographed by a dance instructor was a sight to see. Moving them in and out of traffic without any time delay, in either direction, had to take a lot of teamwork. So, let me be the first to give a job well doneŽ to all the road crews who has changed Tyndall Parkway again into a very nice thoroughfare. In my opinion its about as smooth as it could possibly be. I travel up and down Tyndall Parkway many times during the week and I am thankful for their hard work. It doesnt take a Rhodes ScholarŽ to see they take a lot of pride in their work too. Every day we should slow downcarefully and show our appreciation by yelling out your window, Thank you for all the hard work.ŽWilliam C. Meadows, Parker Tillerson and others speak truth to power about Trump when out of his orbit or are not going to run again for office. NONE have the guts to do it when working for him. Such a bunch of spineless morons! Palestinians dead. North and South Korea cancel talks. Trump leaves Iran plan. This is Trumps foreign policy? Poor. Was Trump lying when he was adamant no payment was made to Stormy? Was he lying? Its not citizens driving on the Beach that is detrimental to wildlife. Its government employees who do that. Israel asked by our allies for restraint! Their response and fans of Israel is that it is the fault of Hamas! Israel like Trump NEVER take responsibility for anything! Cost of lumber and steel is soaring due to Trumps tariffs. Hope the steel and lumber companies who voted for him send his a BIG THANK YOU card. As they lose business! Still, as they say, you get what you vote for!

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 A9ground for the groundbreaking of Gulf Coasts Military and Veterans Resource Center, which is scheduled to open later this year.Scott said he felt a personal connection to the groundbreaking, as he joined the United States Navy at age 18. He said he went on to attend college after he enlisted.I want to thank Gulf Coast for its commitment to the military,Ž he said. This is a great day. This country, and clearly this state, believes in the military.ŽThe groundbreaking is part of the colleges ongoing effort to support our military and veteran students achieve their educational goals,Ž said Lori Eldridge, the colleges donor relations coordinator.The renovated center will give military students an area for studying, peer support, recreation and counseling. The Student Veterans Association also will operate out of the center, which once housed the WKGC radio station.Suzanne Remedies, Mil-itary and Veteran Services director, said the cost of the center is unknown at this time but Gulf Coast (GCSC) will fund the facility. DAG Architects Inc. designed and donated blueprints for the building.Later Thursday, officials held the Gulf Coast State College Foundation dinner, where the foundations progress was recognized, along with notable alumni and benefactors.The colleges Thanks a MillionŽ Campaign was the shining star of the night. The campaign „ initiated in October „ was founded for the colleges Military and Veteran Ser-vices office to aid veterans and military students in gaining resources for tuition and other finances.The campaigns goal was set at $1 million, and the campaign currently sits at about $950,000.Since the campaign, officials have helped about 1,000 students, said Bill Cramer, the campaign chairman.Thats about $100 per student,Ž he said.Micah Welch, an Auburn University student and Marine Corps member, spoke to the audience about his journey from the military to college.Welch attended GCSC and said the Thanks A MillionŽ Campaign means a lot to many veterans.When you walk into the veterans area at Gulf Coast, you can feel the love,Ž he said. I wouldnt be where I am today, if it wasnt for the Thanks A Million Campaign and those at Gulf Coast.ŽHe said the college set the bar for other institu-tions to follow.All proceeds from Thursdays dinner will go to the Thanks A MillionŽ Campaign.In addition, two GCSC alumni were honored at the event.Michael Papajohn won the 2018 Distinguished Alumnus of the Year award. Papajohn is a Hollywood actor and stuntman, and has appeared in movies such as Spiderman,Ž TitanicŽ and Deepwater Horizon.ŽTimothy Garner was presented the Rising Star Alumnus of the Year Award. Garner is the co-founder of Garner IT Consulting. BANQUETFrom Page A1to this years Jeep Beach Jam.The event, in its third year, was created to bring Jeep lovers to the area to expose them to Panama City Beachs beautiful beaches, said Mark Hess, executive producer.Jeepers love to drive around and show off their Jeeps to the other Jeepers,Ž he said.About 6,000 people and 2,000 Jeeps were registered for this years event.The Jeep Beach Jam falls right in line with Panama City Beachs move to make the area a year-round des-tination, said Catie Feeney, Visit Panama City Beach public relations manager.Jeep Beach Jam is expecting to bring in over 2,000 jeeps from 14 differ-ent states, which is great for the destination,Ž she said. Because this event has activities spanning an entire week, it is bringing the visitors in for a longer period of time.ŽThe obstacle course was Rhodes first off-road experience. He said his Jeep, which hes had for a few months now, is a project „ along with most other Jeeps „ as owners enhance their vehicles with bigger tires, suspension, custom paint and more. In fact, Rhodes said he still has to add more features to his project.ŽIts got to be lifted,Ž he said. I have to get bigger tires. Its a never-ending project.ŽRhodes, a self-titled country boyŽ from Ala-bama, said he saw people in the state with big Jeeps and decided to join the culture.The obstacle course and the Jeep parade are some of the events biggest hits, said Andrea Hess, marketing coordinator. For the first time, this years parade will be held on the beachs sands, from 6-8 p.m. Saturday.This is a family-friendly event,Ž she said. You can put an entire family in the Jeep. People bring their dogs.Ž JEEPFrom Page A13,000 homes, but that could be only the begin-ning, the developers said. The property is in the middle of the Bay-Walton Sector Plan, which has been approved for the development of 170,000 homes on 100,500 acres. The first tract of land being developed is 1,500 acres at the northwest quadrant of State 79 and the Intracoastal Waterway.Panama City Beach Mayor Mike Thomas said the project has many positives.I imagine if it gets going pretty good it will help us, because a lot of the people that retire up there, when their kids and grandkids come to see them, they are going to want to stay at the Beach, which falls right in line with our more year-round, family friendly-type atmosphere,Ž he said, adding the development also should bring more jobs into Bay County and boost sales at stores in the city.Theyll have a small shopping area and the (main) shopping will be at the Beach and in Panama City, so its going to be a boost to everybody,Ž Thomas said.Becca Hardin, executive director of the Bay Economic Development Alliance, said the development makes the area more appealing, which helps business recruitment.We are always looking to increase the tools in our tool box,Ž she said. This is definitely an attractive amenity we can market in Bay County.ŽBay County Chamber of Commerce President Carol Roberts also praised the project. The St. Joe Co. is cer-tainly to be commended for all they have done and continue to do for Bay County and this region,Ž she said. But some residents say traffic already is beyond capacityon the Beach, and this new develop-ment will make it worse.To me, this island is going to sink because they have too many people on it,Ž said Mugsy Parens, who works at the Panama City Beach Senior Center.Barbara Salvator, who was at the senior center Thursday, said she also is concerned.They are going to have to do something with the roads,Ž she said. Its a huge concern.ŽBullock said the new community wont be put-ting as much traffic on the highways during the peak hours of the day as would a community with younger families.The great thing about the active adult buyer is they are mostly retired, so you dont get peak a.m. and p.m. trips,Ž he said. They are not leav-ing to go to jobs more like a typical family-based community where the mom and dad get up and they have to be to work at 8 a.m. or 9 a.m. every day of the week.ŽBefore building can start, the developers must have a detailed specific area plan approved by Bay Countys Planning Board and the Bay County Com-mission, said Community Development Director Martin Jacobson.Jacobson said the pro-posed development is a big deal for Bay County because it begins to implement the sector plan and its proposed 170,000 homes, which he said essentially creates a new city.ŽIt shifts the development center (of the county) to that area if this is successful,Ž he said. LATITUDEFrom Page A1WANT TO GO?The rides and thrills of the Jeep Beach Jam continue through Sunday. Today 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.: Vendor Village, Obstacle Course, JBJ Vendor Raf” es at Frank Brown Park 10 a.m. until: Live music, contests, raf” e drawings at 4x4 Saloon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Jeep Wash at Vendor Village 2-4 p.m.: Scavenger Hunt awards ceremony at 4x4 Saloon 4-5 p.m.: Raf” e mini drawing at 4x4 Saloon 6 p.m.: Gates open for concert at Frank Brown Park 7-11 p.m.: American Supermodel and The Band Eli at main stage 11 p.m.: Of“ cial After-Concert Party at Ms. Newbys

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** A10 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE HOLMES COUNTY | B5SCHOOL VAN TORCHED3 teens charged a er district vehicle is stolen, burned FLORIDA CONSTITUTION | B2MEDICAL MARIJUANACourt to decide whether medical pot can be smoked GROWING TREND | B6FIGHTING THE POVERTY PENALTYProsecutor no longer will request bail for small crimes By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Before he joined the Army, Panama City native Brittian BrittŽ Walker wasnt sure where his life was headed.He had graduated from Florida State University in 1992 but with the economy not doing well, he wasnt able to find a job. He enlisted in the Army, thinking it would be a three-year gig.ŽNow 48 years old, hes an Army colonel working in the Pentagon. If you would have told me on the day I enlisted I would be a colonel in the Pentagon, I wouldnt have taken you seriously,Ž Walker said by phone. I packed up everything I owned in my pickup truck. I ended up enlisting in the Army in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... I wanted to see the world and was a patriotic young person.ŽWalker now spends his days as an operations research analyst leading a team that manages the equipping and sustainment portion of the Armys five-year financial plan.But it came from humble beginnings. While growing up in St. Andrews, Walker played in the Gulf of Mexico and fished in St. Andrew Bay like all the other local chil-dren. He also delivered copies of The News Herald when he was a teen. His father, Joe Wayne Walker, is a former teacher and current school board member.As a young man, Walker gravitated toward sports, including football and wrestling.Wrestling was my favorite sport,Ž he said.He graduated from Bay High in 1988 and headed off to college, and though his dreams of getting into sports medicine didnt pan out, he instead fell in love with military service and has turned it into a career span-ning more than 20 years.In 1994, Walker was commissioned a second lieutenant. He was a major in 2004-05 when he was deployed to Iraq, where he briefed senior leaders on logistics operations. While deployed in Afghanistan several years ago, he was a lieutenant colonel and trained the countrys Ministry of Defense and Ministry of Inte-rior Affairs officials on how to maintain a budget.Hes traveled to Korea, Germany, Iraq, Afghanistan and other locations From Panama City to the PentagonBay native Britt Walker an Army colonel in D.C.Army Col. Brittian BrittŽ Walker, who grew up in St. Andrews, now works in the Pentagon as an operations research analyst. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See COLONEL, B4 By Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson@nwfdailynewsWASHINGTON, D.C. „ Members of Floridas del-egation to the U.S. House of Representatives are unanimously opposed to any expansion of oil and gas exploration in the Gulf of Mexico, according to Rep. Matt Gaetz.That opposition has formed along two fronts, said Gaetz, the Republican congressman from Fort Walton Beach. One concern is the potential adverse impact of drilling on the states tourism industry. A second is the threat that expanding opportunities for oil and gas exploration could pose for the militarys Gulf Test Range.Tourism and the military are cornerstones of the states economy.Im encouraged ... that the entire Florida delegation is united against it,Ž Gaetz said Thursday.Currently, oil and gas leas-ing in the Gulf is prohibited within 125 miles of the Florida coastline under terms of the federal Gulf of Mexico Energy and Security Act of 2006. However, that ban is set to expire in 2022.Gaetz and the rest of the State House delegation opposes o shore drillingWorries center on possible adverse e ects on tourism, military operationsA laser-guided GBU-10 bomb dropped from a “ ghter aircraft targets a boat on the Gulf Test Range in this 2013 photo. Members of the Florida congressional delegation are opposed to a plan to open more of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas exploration, in part because of the potential advese effects on the test range. [U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO] See HEARING, B4By Mike Cazalas@PCNHMikeCaz | mmcazalas@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Anyone who watched Season 1 of Floribama ShoreŽ and wondered how long it would be before one of their alco-hol-fueled disturbances led to an arrest can write down May 16, 2018, which saw Aimee Hall charged for allegedly punching a woman who told her the show makes Panama City Beach look ratchet.ŽHall, 25, of Perdido, Alabama, was issued a notice to appear on a misdemeanor charge of battery early Wednesday after the Bay County Sheriffs Office responded to a call of a disturbance at Newbys, 8711 Thomas Drive. Everyone involved, with the exception of bar security, appeared to be intoxicated, according to deputies.Hall is the feisty blonde country cast member of the show who, along with seven other 20-somethings, starred MTV cast member charged with batteryWitnesses: Aimee Hall punches local woman in nose for saying show makes PCB look ratchet Hall See FLORIBAMA, B4Collin Breaux 747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY „ Some law enforcement officers dont get to go home to their families at the end of the day, like the 143 officers killed in the line of duty while protecting the public in 2017, officials said Thursday during a ceremony honoring their fallen brethren.Bay County Sheriff Tommy Ford and several police chiefs spoke during the Bay County Law Enforcement Memorial Service about the responsibilities and dangers officers face every day. The ceremony was jointly hosted by Bay Countys law enforce-ment agencies at First Baptist Church in Panama City. Law enforcement officers, mili-tary representatives, and city and state leaders attended.Panama City Beach Police Chief Drew Whitman read the names of Bay County officers who have died over the years „ including BCSO More than a callingBCSO Sgt. Larry Grainger sings Policemans PrayerŽ during a ceremony Thursday honoring fallen law enforcement of“ cers. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Ceremony honors fallen law enforcement o cersSee FALLEN, B4INSIDE | A8U.S. Attorney Canova op-ed: Honor the daily sacri“ ces of law enforcement

PAGE 12

** B2 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 89/72 89/76 90/68 87/76 87/77 88/72 90/71 89/71 83/66 83/66 88/70 90/71 88/69 85/74 86/75 86/73 86/69 85/7387/7185/6982/6985/70Humid with times of clouds and sun Clouds and sun, a t-storm in spots Some sun with a shower or t-storm Pleasant with clouds and sun8574848273Winds: S 6-12 mph Winds: SSE 6-12 mph Winds: S 7-14 mph Winds: S 6-12 mph Winds: SSW 8-16 mphBlountstown 4.23 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 2.68 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 34.90 ft. 42 ft. Century 3.81 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 2.73 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 8:50a 12:58a 5:22p 12:26p Destin 12:31p ------West Pass 8:23a 12:31a 4:55p 11:59a Panama City 11:59a 11:16p ----Port St. Joe 10:22a ------Okaloosa Island 11:04a 11:06p ----Milton 2:44p 1:12a ----East Bay 1:48p 12:42a ----Pensacola 1:04p ------Fishing Bend 1:45p 12:16a ----The Narrows 2:41p 2:16a ----Carrabelle 7:25a 10:13a 3:57p 11:39pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018FirstFullLastNew May 21May 29Jun 6Jun 13Sunrise today ........... 5:47 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 7:31 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 8:51 a.m. Moonset today ....... 11:05 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 84/72/pc 86/73/t Daytona Beach 82/69/t 82/70/t Ft. Lauderdale 84/75/t 80/74/t Gainesville 84/69/t 85/69/t Jacksonville 83/68/t 84/68/t Jupiter 82/72/t 80/74/t Key Largo 83/77/pc 80/75/t Key West 84/76/pc 82/75/t Lake City 85/68/t 86/69/t Lakeland 84/70/t 84/70/t Melbourne 83/72/t 83/74/t Miami 84/74/t 80/74/t Naples 85/72/t 84/72/t Ocala 83/68/t 84/68/t Okeechobee 83/71/t 81/70/t Orlando 85/70/t 84/69/t Palm Beach 82/75/t 80/75/t Tampa 86/73/t 86/72/t Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 98/70/s 100/72/s Berlin 70/49/pc 72/47/pc Bermuda 79/72/s 78/72/s Hong Kong 90/82/c 91/80/t Jerusalem 92/69/s 94/68/s Kabul 67/48/t 66/47/pc London 64/46/s 70/46/s Madrid 74/54/pc 75/55/pc Mexico City 84/57/pc 83/58/pc Montreal 63/42/pc 62/52/r Nassau 84/74/t 84/76/t Paris 65/44/s 66/49/s Rome 74/57/pc 75/59/s Tokyo 80/69/pc 78/58/r Toronto 62/51/pc 62/56/r Vancouver 67/52/pc 68/53/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 82/53/s 83/55/pc Anchorage 54/45/r 55/44/sh Atlanta 79/69/t 83/69/pc Baltimore 65/56/r 78/68/r Birmingham 81/67/t 88/69/pc Boston 56/48/pc 56/53/r Charlotte 77/67/t 82/68/t Chicago 71/56/pc 72/53/pc Cincinnati 74/65/t 80/66/pc Cleveland 70/59/r 78/60/t Dallas 95/73/s 93/72/s Denver 70/45/t 49/41/sh Detroit 68/57/pc 72/59/sh Honolulu 85/72/s 85/74/pc Houston 94/71/s 92/75/s Indianapolis 73/64/t 81/65/pc Kansas City 85/63/pc 87/63/t Las Vegas 91/71/s 93/72/s Los Angeles 71/57/pc 71/59/pc Memphis 82/69/sh 92/73/s Milwaukee 64/53/s 63/48/c Minneapolis 83/60/pc 75/50/c Nashville 82/66/t 88/68/pc New Orleans 92/72/pc 93/73/s New York City 62/52/r 63/62/r Oklahoma City 88/69/pc 90/63/s Philadelphia 62/52/r 71/68/r Phoenix 94/70/s 96/71/s Pittsburgh 69/57/r 79/64/t St. Louis 76/64/c 90/71/pc Salt Lake City 70/51/t 72/52/pc San Antonio 96/73/s 93/74/s San Diego 67/60/pc 66/60/pc San Francisco 66/54/pc 64/54/pc Seattle 67/54/pc 73/54/pc Topeka 86/65/pc 90/63/t Tucson 92/60/s 93/61/s Wash., DC 67/60/r 79/70/rSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 78 Today: Wind south-southwest at 7-14 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Wind southsouthwest 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Partly cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the south at 6-12 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility generally unrestricted.Some sunshine giving way to clouds and humid today with a couple of showers. Winds south-southwest 8-16 mph. Mainly clear tonight.High/low ......................... 84/69 Last year's High/low ...... 86/68 Normal high/low ............. 85/66 Record high ............. 90 (1977) Record low ............... 49 (1973)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... 0.01" Month to date .................. 0.16" Normal month to date ....... 1.53" Year to date .................... 14.01" Normal year to date ....... 20.88" Average humidity .............. 89%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 84/71 Last year's High/low ...... 86/73 Normal high/low ............. 82/68 Record high ............. 95 (1998) Record low ............... 46 (1956)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.08" Month to date ................... 1.72" Normal month to date ....... 1.57" Year to date ................... 22.54" Normal year to date ....... 22.28" Average humidity .............. 76%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachBy John Kennedy jkennedy@gatehousemedia.comTALLAHASSEE „ Florida lawmakers are violating the state constitution by banning the smoking of medical marijuana, attorneys for supporters of a 2016 ballot measure argued Wednesday in court.Manatee Countys Cathy Jordan, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also called Lou Gehrigs disease) and is one of the plaintiffs in the case, told Leon County Circuit Judge Karen Gievers that she is alive only because she smokes pot „ in defi-ance of state law. It just makes my life a lot more bearable,Ž said Jordan, diagnosed with the disease more than 30 years ago and smoking marijuana as treatment since 1989. Jordan, 68, uses a wheelchair and has difficulty speaking because of her illness. Her husband, Bob, stood by her side, helping repeat her testimony in court.The couple have battled for years to legalize medi-cal marijuana use.The Jordans thought they had accomplished that goal two years ago, when voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment that expanded the use of medical marijuana in the state. But it also allowed Florida to regulate the practice, and Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature last year enacted a law that bans patients from smoking marijuana.Lawyers for People United for Medical Mari-juana and Florida United for Care, which backed the 2016 ballot proposal, said the state law conflicts with the constitutional amendment, and the intent of voters.You cant pass a statute that is directly inconsistent with the constitution,Ž said Jon Mills, a former state House speaker and past dean of the University of Florida law school, who is representing the plaintiffs.John Morgan, the Orlando trial lawyer who largely bankrolled the campaign for the constitutional amendment, said allowing patients to smoke marijuana was always contemplated. The measure even barred medical marijuana from public places where smoking is prohibited, Morgan said, a clear acknowledgment that it would be smoked.He called Jordans tes-timony dramatic.ŽToday we saw a woman literally fighting for her life, hoping to smoke marijuana,Ž said Morgan, who called Jordan a Florida heroŽ who could change the future for many ill Floridians.Morgan also asked Scott and Attorney Gen-eral Pam Bondi to review Jordans testimony and conclude, enough is enough ... lets let these people live their final years, with dignity. Thats all theyre fight-ing to do.ŽBut attorneys for Bon-dis office defended the smoking ban „ saying the voter-approved amendment clearly gave the state power to regu-late the parameters of medical marijuana use.ŽIts not 'everything goes,'Ž Deputy Solicitor General Rachel Nordby said.Attorneys for the state conceded Jordan had legal standing to bring the lawsuit, but asked Gievers to dismiss the pro-medical marijuana organizations and another seriously ill patient from the chal-lenge. They argued these parties could not be con-sidered directly affected by the new law.Gievers said she will consider the states motions, but added at the end of the almost three-hour hearing that she planned to rule quickly.Anticipating an appeal whatever the outcome, Gievers said, I suspect this is not the last stop for the case.ŽCourt to decide whether medical pot can be smoked in FloridaA man smokes marijuana in a smoking lounge at Barbary Coast Dispensary in San Francisco. [JEFF CHIU/AP FILE]

PAGE 13

** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES Charlotte Ann McVay Boyer, 78, passed peacefully away Tuesday, May 8, 2018, at home in Chipley, Florida. Charlotte was born Aug. 21, 1939, in Florala, Alabama, to Floyd Young and Wynona Barton McVay. On Nov. 14, 1959, she married Ronald Boyer in Parker, Florida. An Air Force wife and mom to four boys, Charlotte loved children and became an educator to in-home child care providers for military families. She loved and enjoyed her large extended family and often expressed her love through her cooking and baking, especially at Christmastime. In addition to her parents, Charlotte was preceded in death by her beloved husband; and sons, Lloyd Jefferson Boyer and Michael Steven Boyer; as well as siblings George McVay, Wesley McVay, Alice Antone and Floyd ButchŽ McVay Jr. She is survived by sons, Ronald Boyer Jr. and wife Carriemay and Floyd Boyer and wife Kimberly; grandchildren, Jason Boyer and wife Melanie, Christofor Boyer and wife Sarah, Meghan Boyer, Garrett Boyer, Charlee Boyer, Chase Boyer and Matthew Boyer; great-grandchildren Kayden Boyer and Ellie Rose Boyer; and sister, Georgette Bloomfield. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 6-8 p.m. Friday, May 18, 2018. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19, 2018, at Southerland Family Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow in Evergreen Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Fisher Center for Alzheimers Research in memory of Mrs. Boyer. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com.Southerland Family Funeral Homes 100 E. 19th St. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-785-8532CHARLOTTE ANN MCVAY BOYER Visitation for retired Master Sgt. Anthony Goodwin, 59, will be from 4-8 p.m. today, May 18, 2018, at Russell A. Wright Sr. Mortuary. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 19,2018, at First Providence Community M.B. Church in Panama City, Florida. Final disposition is private.ANTHONY GOODWINFuneral services for Michael MikeŽ Bruner Sr., 68, of Callaway, Florida, who died May 16, 2018, will begin at 2 p.m. Monday, May 21, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home. The family will receive friends beginning at 1 p.m. Interment will follow at Callaway Cemetery. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.MICHAEL MIKE BRUNER SR. A celebration of life ceremony for Mary Jean Hester will begin at 4 p.m. today, May 18, 2018, at Wilson Funeral Home. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 3-4 p.m.MARY JEAN HESTERVisitation for Mrs. Joyce Ann Peterson Hyppolite, 71, will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19, 2018, at New Hope M.B. Church in Lynn Haven, Florida. Funeral services will begin at 2 p.m. Interment will follow in Lynn Haven Community Cemetery. Russell A. Wright Sr. Mortuary is handling arrangements.JOYCE ANN PETERSON HYPPOLITEA memorial service for Dianna Melton, 59, of Panama City Beach, Florida, who died May 14, 2018, will be announced at a later date. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.DIANNA MELTONMrs. Martha H. Kiessig, 78, of Callaway, FL,passed away on Wednesday, May 16, 2018. She was born on March 12, 1940, in Bensonville, Illinois. She graduated from Northern Illinois University with her degree in education. Martha was preceded in death by her parents, Anthony J. and Helen Poss. She is survived by her husband, Richard J. Kiessig; nine children; and multiple grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018, at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Callaway.MARTHA H. KIESSIG James William Penny went home to his heavenly Father on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. William was born in his parents home, the first of 10 children, on Sept. 22, 1928, to John and Myrtle Penny of Southport, Florida. William would not have an easyŽ life, but his entire life was dedicated to the Lord he loved and the family he cherished. A man of great humbleness and compassion, he made numerous sacrifices over his lifetime to bring blessings to his beloved family and friends. Well known for his ability to fix just about anything with a motor or engine, he was often found in his shop maintaining/repairing the vehicles and boat motors of family and friends. Countless nieces and nephews knew to take any vehicle they were considering for purchase to Uncle William for the once overŽ before buying. William began his career as a gifted mechanic and driver with the Panama City Transit System (city buses) as a teenager. During the summer, William and another driver would take two of the buses to Miami on loanŽ to that city for the busy tourist season. He served as a driver and mechanic maintaining the two buses. After doing this for some time, the owner of the buses decided an actual drivers license might come in handy for young William. William proudly served in the U.S. Army from 1955 to 1957. He loved sharing fascinating stories of his time spent beyond the Arctic Circle and in Yuma, Arizona, while testing tanks and other heavy equipment/artillery in extreme temperatures. After an honorable discharge, he worked at the Navy Coastal Systems Station on Panama City Beach until 1960. He then transferred to the Marine Corps Logistics Base in Albany, Georgia. After their retirements in 1987, he and his wife, Fern, returned to Southport to re-establish their home on Cavanaugh Point on Fanning Bayou where his wife was born. They had grown up fishing, swimming, and boating with their families and friends on the little bayou that separated their birthplaces. Williams strong faith and servants heart led him to serve two congregations as a devoted deacon. First, at Southside Baptist Church of Albany, Georgia, for 12 years and, after retirement and returning home, at First Baptist Church of Southport until the summer of 2001. Hiland Park Baptist became their church home on July 8, 2001, where William continued his service in the choir and on the Building and Grounds Committee. Williams strong work ethic and willingness to serve provided farreaching support for the churches he loved. Visitation, cleaning/ maintaining buildings and grounds, driving the church bus for various outings and activities; wherever there was a need, William could be found. Fern and he comprised a dynamic duoŽ of service for the furthering of their Fathers Kingdom. This gentle soul was preceded in death by his first wife, Agnes Bush, of Alford, Florida, who he lovingly cared for as leukemia took her from him and his little daughter; his parents; his brother, Donald Penny; and sister, Doris Tatum. Waiting here, cherishing the memory of this treasured life, is his beloved wife of 63 years, Fern Cavanaugh Penny; his three children, Brenda Humphries (Willard), Dory Sitte (Dave), and Andy Penny (Leitha). His adored grandchildren Shannen Fields (Jimmy), Melanie Cothren (Mike), Cory Proctor (Jamie), Will Sitte (Allison), Kala Glass (Scott), and Brent Penny (Leah). Great-grandchildren Jay and Mallory Fields; Mills and Marlee Cothren; Devin, Drew, and Luke Guy; Adelyn Proctor, Asher Penny, and Kolton Glass. He is also survived by his brothers, Johnny Penny (Laura), Jack Penny (Bobbi), and Glen Penny (Sheila); along with his sisters, Edna Tatum, Ruthie Miller (Billy), Linda Davis (Clark), Ann Walsingham (Nolan); and Sharon Penny Calhoun (widow of his brother, Donald); and numerous nephews, nieces, and extended family. The family would like to express its sincere gratitude to Lance, Janet, Helen, and Lisa of Tender Touch Home Health Care. Sincere appreciation also goes to Bonnie Barrett who became a loving friend while providing professional in-home support for both William and Fern. All services will be held at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home with visitation from 5-7 p.m. Friday, May 18; followed by services at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 19, with Dr. Steven Kyle officiating. Interment will be held at Old Southport Cemetery. The family requests that, in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Hiland Park Baptist Church Building Fund or Youth/ Choir Department.Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.comJAMES WILLIAM PENNY Graveside funeral services for Steven Kendall SteveŽ Pugh, 53, of Youngstown, Florida, who died May 10, 2018, will begin at 3 p.m. today, May 18, 2018, at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Southerland Family Funeral Home is handling arrangements.STEVEN KENDALL STEVE PUGHMargaret Serva, 95, of Panama City, Florida, passed away Wednesday, May 16, 2018, at her home surrounded by her family. Margaret was born in Englewood, Missouri, and lived in Panama City since the late 1950s. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, she worked with the National Weather Service in Miami, and was one of the first women to fly into the eye of a hurricane. Margaret finished her career in Civil Service as a computer operator at the Navy Lab in Panama City Beach after 25 years of service. She enjoyed traveling, golf, boating and fishing, and was a member of St. Andrew Baptist Church. Margaret was preceded in death by a daughter, Donna Lue Busch; her parents, Carroll and Wilkie Dell Sapp; and four brothers, Coburn, Hickman, Roger and Donnie Sapp. Survivors include her husband of 39 years, Senior Master Sgt. Emil Serva, USAF, ret., of Panama City; two children, Sandra Ruppel (Jeff) of Lynn Haven and Bill Martin Busch (Cora) of Southport; two sisters, Lue Dell Nichols of Texas and Ruth Crane of Missouri; her grandchildren, Casey Ruppel (Amanda), Aaron Ruppel, Shelby Bierman (Sean), Beau Ruppel (Kristy) and Justin Busch (Shelly); and her greatgrandchildren, Gage Ruppel, Ezra Ruppel, Reid Bierman, Jake Busch and Nolin Busch; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, May 21, 2018, at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplain Conrad Meadows officiating. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 5-7 p.m. Sunday. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Emerald Coast Hospice, 421 Oak Ave., Panama City, FL 32401.Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.comMARGARET ALICE (SAPP) SERVA Visitation for John Dallas Sword, 72, of Callaway, Florida, who died May 16, 2018, will be from 6-8 p.m. today, May 18, 2018, at Bayside Church in Panama City, Florida. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 19, 2018, at Bayside Church. Interment will follow at Callaway Cemetery. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.JOHN DALLAS SWORDMother Jerrie L. Waddell, 91, of Lynn Haven, Florida, departed her earthly home on May 10, 2018, to walk the streets of gold in her heavenly home. On March 27, 2007, for her 80th birthday, the mayor of Lynn Haven, Florida, dedicated her birthday as an official Jerrie L. Waddell Day.Ž This honor is annotated in the Lynn Haven, Florida, City Records. Public visitation will be held from 1-8 p.m. Friday, May 18, 2018, at the funeral home. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 19, 2018, at Greater Friendship Missionary Baptist Church with Elder James E. Russ officiating. Interment will follow at Springfield A.M.E. Church Cemetery in Marianna, Florida.Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome.comJERRIE L. WADDELL

PAGE 14

** B4 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Heraldin FloribamasŽ first season and now are back filming Season 2. Mem-orable Hall quotes from Season 1 include, This fight definitely brought us closer,Ž and, Stop talking (expletive deleted) about my friends plastic surgery!Ž Another cast member described as a friendŽ in police reports, Nilsa Anderson, was there for the incident and later when deputies pulled over the van they were in as it left the area of the bar.Halls court date is June 15.According to a Bay County Sheriffs Office incident report, two versions of what happened at Newbys about 1 a.m. Wednesday have emerged: Halls version, which is backed up by Anderson, and the version given by the victim, a witness and the head of security at Newbys who saw it unfold. Deputies went with the latter ver-sion and detained Hall while issuing her a notice to appear, which is similar to an arrest except instead of being taken to jail, the defendant is allowed to sign paperwork promis-ing to show up for court.Everyone agreed Hall and the victim were at Newbys when the alter-cation erupted and that Hall then left. A sheriffs deputy pulled over the van she was riding in as it left the area, and Hall agreed to give her version of events. Hall said she was at the bar when another woman stated Aimee, who is part of the TV show Flora Bama, was making PCB ratchet, Ž the deputys report stated. Aimee said the two continued to argue when she (Aimee) threw a cup of water on the female, then left.Ž Anderson backed up Halls version of events.But the victim had a different story to tell when the deputy returned to Newbys.(She) appeared to have been crying and stated her nose hurt,Ž the deputy wrote. (She) stated she told Aimee she was making PCB ratchet. The two argued for a short time where Aimee began to walk away,Ž the report continued. Within seconds Aimee turned and punched her in the face.ŽThe woman said the punch was from left field and she was not expecting it.Ž A friend confirmed the victims version of events.Ultimately, the deputy spoke to a Newbys secu-rity person, who stated he did not know what started the argument, but observed the female, whom he identified as Aimee, reach around (a man) and strike (the victim) in the face.ŽAs a final note, the deputy added, It should be noted that all involved parties (except for the security) appeared to be under the influence of alcohol.Ž FLORIBAMAFrom Page B1for his service and was promoted to colonel „ the highest Army rank before general „ about two years ago.Army spokesman Dave Lakin was in Afghanistan with Walker and said he is respected by his peers.He is very well thought of,Ž Lakin said.Bay County Commis-sioner Guy Tunnell, who has known Walker for many years, had similar compliments.It always warms my heart to see a local person succeed at this level, and Britt is no exception,Ž Tunnell said. I am so proud of his service and dedication to his commu-nity and his country, and Bay County is lucky to call him one of our own.ŽIn addition to his research and financial duties, Walker is a parachutist who has jumped out of airplanes at mul-tiple air shows.Thats probably one of the highlights of my career,Ž he said.Walker currently lives in northern Virginia, which is totally differentŽ than Panama City „ busier and more quickly paced than the sleepy beach town he grew up in. He said he misses home, which he tries to visit once a year or every other year.He said he will try to visit Panama City for his 30-year high school reunion and still remem-bers going hunting with his dad when he was young. Walker fondly remembers his past while recognizing the role the Army plays in who he is today.The Army is a team,Ž he said. When I joined, I didnt know Id join a team for life. Theres a camaraderie when youre in uniform.Ž COLONELFrom Page B1Deputy Charles Scott, who was killed with his own weapon by a suspect in 1917 over the illegal sale of liquor „ and Springfield Police Chief Barry Roberts read the names of Florida officers killed this year. Seven officers have died on the job in Bay County since 1917.This [job] is more than a calling. Its a privilege,Ž Lynn Haven Police Chief Matthew Reimer said. We get to stand guard in that gap between good and evil. We get to stand up for the weak. We get to seek out the truth and we get the honor to wear this badge. ... This badge stands for justice.ŽFirst Baptist Church Senior Pastor Craig Conner gave an invocation in tribute to officers sacrifices, and BCSO Sgt. Larry Grainger and Renee Byrd respectively sang Policemans PrayerŽ and Amazing Grace.ŽBay native and state Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis, the guest speaker, also praised law enforcement during the ceremony. Patronis recently has supported legislation that expands benefits for first respond-ers who cant work because of post-traumatic stress disorder related to their jobs.Its heartbreaking to see those that grieve from the loss from a sacrifice, and we grieve with them,Ž Patronis said. But in grief, what we see is a true image of a hero that will be engraved in each and every one of us as we reflect on the sacrifice that was made. ... Theyre the ones that always run toward danger as I and others have been able to run away from it. I can never say thank you enough.ŽPanama City Police Chief Scott Ervin said all the officers at Thursdays ceremony are brave and do extraordinary thingsŽ while saving countless livesŽ and enduring harsh conditions and criticisms.ŽThey bring justice to the weak and victimized and solace to those who are broken, assistance to those in need and peace to tragic situations,Ž Ervin said. FALLENFrom Page B1Police of“ cers listen to speakers during the Bay County Law Enforcement Memorial Service on Thursday. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] bipartisan 27-member Florida delegation met Thursday with representatives of the states tourism industry, its substantial military presence, environmental interests and the Ameri-can Petroleum Institute.The meeting, arranged by the delegations lead-ership „ Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings and Republican Rep. Vern Buchanan „ at the urging of the rest of the delegation, came amid continuing mixed signals from the Trump administration regarding the future of oil exploration in the Gulf.At least twice since the beginning of this year, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has indicated drilling would not be allowed off the coast of Florida. However, the area remains in a Trump administration proposal that would open federal waters along parts of Americas coast to oil and gas exploration.Gaetz said after Thurs-days hearing that he has talked with President Donald Trump about the proposed expansion of oil and gas exploration, and is optimistic Trump understands the states concerns.The president is proFlorida,Ž Gaetz said, adding Trump has indi-cated an understanding of the existential threat to FloridaŽ posed by expanded gas and oil exploration.Thursdays meeting also came just days after the Department of Defense released a report indicating an expansion of oil and gas exploration would interfere with mil-itary testing and training unless the Defense and Interior departments could develop rules to accommodate both enterprises.The Gulf Test Range, covering almost 120,000 square miles in the east-ern Gulf of Mexico, is used by several military units, including Eglin Air Force Bases 96th Test Wing and 33rd Fighter Wing and the Air Force Special Operations Com-mand at Hurlburt Field. The range accommodates high-altitude supersonic air combat training, airto-air missile testing, drone targeting, hypersonic weapons testing and space launches.Gaetz said he was skep-tical of comments offered Thursday by Erik Milito, an American Petroleum Institute director, about the potential for coexistence of military and oil operations.According to Gaetz, Milito touted their (the oil and gas industry) fre-quent cooperation with the militaryŽ and suggested that there were ways oil and gas compa-nies could cooperate with the military for joint use of the test range.I found the stipulations (for coexistence) unpersuasive,Ž Gaetz said. For one, he said, military testing is experimental and needs unobstructed space to ensure safety in the event that something goes awry. And expanded oil and gas exploration would put more vessels in the Gulf, possibly in harms way.Milito wasnt available for comment, but an American Petroleum Institute spokeswoman said the institutes posi-tion was outlined in a news release addressing the Department of Defense report.Offshore oil and natural gas exploration and development already suc-cessfully co-exists with U.S. military operations in the Gulf of Mexico,Ž Milito said in the news release. This new report on the Eastern Gulf of Mexico confirms that continued collaboration between the Department of Defense and Interior will enable the successful coexistence of continued military training and expanded American oil production.ŽBrig. Gen Evan Dertien, commander of the 96th Test Wing at Eglin Air Force Base, offered the militarys perspective at Thursdays meeting. He was not available for comment after the meeting, but according to Gaetz, Dertien talked about the uniqueness of the Gulf Test Range and its value to the military.The Florida delega-tion also heard Thursday from Ken Lawson, presi-dent of Visit Florida, the states official tourism marketing organization. Lawson talked about the devastation of the states tourism industry following the 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig off Louisiana.For years, visitation to Floridas Panhandle suf-fered not just from the physical harm that the oil caused to the beaches, water and wildlife, but also from the perception by the rest of the country and the world,Ž Lawson said, according to a copy of his prepared remarks. Today, our North Florida beaches are more beautiful than ever, and the tourism industry there is booming. But the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will always serve as a stark reminder of what happens when we do not make our beaches, our waters and our environ-ment our top priorities.ŽDespite the unanimity in Floridas House del-egation, Gaetz is worried that other states along the Gulf Coast wont neces-sarily fall into line on the issue.The oil and gas indus-try has substantial swayŽ over those states and their congressional rep-resentation, he said. HEARINGFrom Page B1

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** TodayJEEP BEACH JAM: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach; Vendor Village, Obstacle Course and JBJ Vendor Raf” e open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Vendor Village with music and contests at 10 a.m. Jeep Wash is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Scavenger Hunt awards from 2-4 p.m., Raf” e Mini Drawing 4-5 p.m.; free concert from 7 p.m. until on main stage at Vendor Village. After-show party at Ms. Newbys. For details, jeepbeachjam. com PARADE OF HOMES: noon to 6 p.m. at 16 homes in Bay County. 39th annual event sponsored by the Bay Building Industries Association. Homes showcase the latest and greatest in home building features. For details, www.BayBIA.org SPRING FLORAL SHOW: noon to 4 p.m. at The Artist Cove studio.gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, featuring the ” oral art of most of the studio and gallery artists. Free. For details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. For details, CityOfLynnHaven. com BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. Enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com END DAYSŽ: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Sixteen-year-old Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father hasnt changed out of his pajamas since 9/11, her new neighbor, a 16-year-old Elvis impersonator, has fallen for her hard and the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is that Stephen Hawking will save them all. Show is followed by a wine and hors doeuvre reception. For details and tickets, 850-265-3226 DIGITAL GRAFFITI: Threenight event at Alys Beach off County 30A. Projection art festival. For details and tickets, DigitalGraf“ ti. comSaturdayVFW POST 2185 75th ANNIVERSARY: noon to 6 p.m. at 2136 Sherman Ave. Free; open to the community. HUD STRONG FAMILIES EVENT: 1-3 p.m. at Panama City Housing Authority, 804 E. 15th St. For all residents of PCHA housing. PANCARE mobile clinic, dental clinic and HIV screenings; barbers; representatives from Gulf Power and Haney Technical Center; and games, food and activities for the kids. Free. LION TAMER DIVE TOURNAMENT: at Captain Andersons Marina, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. $25 entry free for tournament. For details, www.CaptAndersonsMarina.com or 850-234-3435 BAY YOUTH SUMMER WORK FOUNDATION YARD SALE: 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Willie Pollard Insurance, 1317 N. Tyndall Parkway, Panama City. For details, 866-1077 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. For details, 850-774-5367 JEEP BEACH JAM: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach with raf” es at 9 a.m., music and contests at 10 a.m., Jeep Wash from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendor Village and Obstacle Course open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Raf” e Mini Drawing 2:30-3:30 p.m. Pre-Parade Party from 4-5:30 p.m. at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant, 15201 Front Beach Road, with Jeep Parade staging 5-6 p.m. and Jeep Beach Crawl and Parade 6-8 p.m. Bon Voyage Block Party, Show and Shine awards and music at 8 p.m. until at Pier Park Drive. For details, jeepbeachjam.com 2ND ANNUAL SALTY DOG DAY: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in St. Andrews, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City, during the St. Andrews Farmers Market. Proceeds will bene“ t Lucky Puppy Rescue and Operation Spay Bay. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers. For details, WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 5TH ANNUAL RIDE TO REMEMBER POKER RUN: Registration from 9-10 a.m. at Gulf Coast State Colleges Military Park, followed by “ rst of two wreath-laying ceremonies at 10 a.m.; kickstands up at 10:30 a.m. Participants will travel to a few local businesses throughout Panama City and Panama City Beach, with second wreath-laying ceremony at Pier Park Veterans Memorial at 2 p.m. Festivities will conclude at L.E. Tommy Thomas American Legion Post 375, where guests will be treated to food, entertainment, drawings and prizes. Event honors active duty military and veterans, with all proceeds supporting GCSCs military, veteran and dependent students as part of the GCSC Foundations Thanks a Million campaign. For details, Suzanne Remedies, 850913-3291 or sremedies@ gulfcoast.edu The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 B5Holmes County sheriffs deputies reported the arrest of three juveniles for stealing and torching this van. [HOLMES COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE] By Mike Cazalas747-5094 | @PCNHMikeCaz mmcazalas@pcnh.comHOLMES COUNTY„ Three juveniles are facing multiple charges following a string of burglaries and vandalism that culminated Wednesday with the theft and torching of a Holmes School District van.Ethan Riley Lewis, 17; Dillon Travis Leavins, 16; and Cameron Lassiter, 17, are charged in connection to the most recent series of incidents, which began Sunday after deputies responded to a report of criminal mischief at Union Hill Baptist Church. Two doors had been damaged in what appeared to be an attempted burglary.The following day, deputies responded to Bethlehem School, where a school van had been burglarized, stolen and returned over the weekend, according to surveillance footage. School officials recovered a small amount of marijuana from the van and noted the vehicle had logged 90 miles more than what had been recorded at end of day Friday.On Wednesday, the sheriffs office again responded to the theft of the van, this time gaining an admission from two of the boys that they had taken the van from school property and drove down several dirt roads until stopping at a residence, where they went inside and took an unknown amount of paint, which they poured into the van before setting it on fire.The teens were arrested and charged with arson, grand theft, multiple counts of burglary, and criminal mischief, authori-ties reported. They have been transported to a juve-nile detention facility but are expected to face the charges as adults.Two of the juveniles also were previously arrested and transported to a juve-nile detention facility in Panama City after being charged in connection with the April 27 burglary of Bethlehem School. The third juvenile also will be charged in connection with that same burglary, officials said.3 teens charged after school district van burned WHATS HAPPENINGSubmit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before

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** B6 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Annie Blanks315-4450 | @DestinLogAnnie ablanks@nwfdailynews.comCRESTVIEW „ An Okaloosa County school bus driver has been arrested after authorities said he dropped off an 8-year-old disabled student a mile from her house and told her to walk home. Anthony Wayne Campbell, 44, was booked into the Okaloosa County Jail on May 11 and released the following day on $3,000 bond. He faces one felony child neglect charge stemming from the Feb. 2 incident.According to his Okaloosa County Sheriffs Office arrest report, the Walker Elementary School students mother filed a complaint Feb. 5 alleging that she had made arrangements for the child to be dropped off from the bus at her home Feb. 2.The mother said she normally took the child to and from her home, but made arrangements that day with the school district to have the child dropped off from the bus.About 4 p.m. that afternoon she saw the child walking toward her house. She asked the child where the school bus was, and the child told her the driver made her get off at the church.ŽThe woman said the church was one mile from her home, and it was almost dark when the child made it home.The high temperature in Crestview on Feb. 2 was 59 degrees, with the low hovering near freezing at 34 degrees, according to the AccuWeather website.After the mother filed a complaintFeb. 5, Campbell was placed on administrative leave as the sheriffs office con-ducted an investigation.A School Board member became aware of the situation and emailed me at 8:37 a.m. (Feb. 5),Ž Superintendent Mary Beth Jackson wrote in an email to the Daily News on Feb. 6, shortly after news broke of the mothers complaint. I called the principal and transportation director after reading the School Board members email. The parent was in the principals office within a few minutes and I spoke to her as well.ŽDeputies obtained video footage from the school bus „ Okaloosa County School Bus 04-12 „ which was driven by Campbell.In the video, the Walker Elementary School stu-dent boarded Campbells bus and gave him a bus pass that had instructions she was to be dropped off at her home in Crestview. Campbell said he didnt know where that address was.According to the report, he then told her, OK, all I do is, you know where the church is, I drop two boys off there. They walk down that road, I never go down that road because thats a long way down there.ŽHe then asked the victim if her mother was going to meet her at the church, and she said no.Campbell then told her, Youll have to walk,Ž according to the report.The bus driver then abandoned the child one mile from her home, the arrest report said. The street the child had to walk down was a very narrow clay road with several sharp curves which makes it very dan-gerous for pedestrian traffic, especially a small handicapped child.ŽThe report said there is a bus stop on the childs road right beside her house.Investigators said Campbell didnt speak with anyone from the school after getting the bus pass that instructed him to drop off the victim at her home, and did not attempt to notify the victims parents that he was dropping her off at another location, despite having the ability to do so with his cellphone.This video shows an egregious lack of care and utter disregard for the victims safety by Campbell,Ž the report said. Campbell consciously made the decision that he was going to leave the victim at a location he chose and told her she would have to walk home, despite the instructions on the bus pass to take her home.ŽAuthorities deter-mined Campbells actions exposed the child to a substantial risk of serious physical injury and/or death.Officials plan to recommend at the May 29 School Board meeting that Campbell be suspended without pay pending the criminal charges, accord-ing to school district staff.School bus driver charged for leaving disabled girl to walk home Campbell By Mike SchneiderThe Associated PressORLANDO „ A Florida prosecutor who got into a legal fight with the gover-nor for her blanket refusal to seek the death penalty now says her office no longer will request monetary bail bonds for defendants accused of low-level crimes.Instead, prosecutors in the Orlando-area jurisdiction of State Attorney Aramis Ayala will recom-mend releasing defendants on their own recognizance for crimes involving possession of small amounts of marijuana, driving with-out a license, panhandling, disorderly conduct or loitering. By primarily relying on money, our bail system has created a poverty penalty that unjustifiably discriminates against those without resources to pay,Ž Ayala said in a statement Wednesday announcing the change. Our focus must be on public policy, not on wealth.ŽAyala said the system has discriminated against defendants who end up jailed until trial solely because they cant afford to pay bail. Federal appel-late courts and the U.S. Justice Department under President Barack Obama have come to similar con-clusions, saying that jailing people just because they cant afford to pay a fine or fee, without considering an alternative, is an unconstitutional denial of equal protection and due process rights.The new policy, which starts June 1, wont be applied to defendants charged with domestic violence, stalking, firearms and dangerous felonies, Ayala said. Also, extra scrutiny will be given to defendants with a history of failing to appear in court, past violations of release or a previous conviction involving a violent crime.Local criminal defense attorneys applauded the change.People who cant afford bail often make a guilty plea in order to get out of jail, even if theyre not guilty,Ž said Warren Lindsey, an Orlando-area criminal defense attorney. If youre in jail for any length of time, you lose your job. You lose your apartment. You lose your house.ŽAyalas decision squares with a national trend toward giving defendants nonmonetary bond, said Marty McDonnell, a Talla-hassee attorney who chairs the Florida Bars criminal section.In most jurisdictions in Florida where sheriffs budgets are pinched, its not in their best interests to hold people who dont need to be held,Ž McDon-nell said.Ayalas decision shouldnt be considered controversial, but prosecutors tend to campaign with tough-on-crime promises, said Andrew Metcalf, president of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys.I would not consider this to be a maverick posi-tion for a state attorney to take, but do recognize it might not be politically popular,Ž Metcalf said. It is the right thing to do.ŽAyalas declaration last year that she no longer would seek the death pen-alty triggered a fight with Gov. Rick Scott, who took away more than two dozen cases from her office.The Florida Supreme Court ruled last August that Scott had the authority to reassign the first-degree murder cases because Ayala had enacted a blan-ket policy. Ayala agreed to seek the death penalty in some cases, and appointed a panel to guide decisions on capital punishment.Prosecutor no longer will request bail for small crimesState Attorney Aramis Ayala answers questions during a news conference in Orlando in 2017. Ayala now says her of“ ce no longer will request monetary bail bonds for defendants accused of low-level crimes. [AP FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 B7ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Preferences dont automatically make a thing superior or inferior. A better “ t doesnt mean a thing is objectively a better item; its just a better item for the person it “ ts. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Stories have big power, but only if they are believed. If they are told well, they often are believed whether or not they are true. Thats why its important to ask, Who stands to gain from this?Ž about every story you hear. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ This is the kind of day when just do itŽ applies best. If youre reasonably sure the action will bene“ t all (or at least that it will harm none) go ahead. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Would you rather learn from experience or gain from experience? Its a trick question. To learn (SET ITAL)is(END ITAL) to gain. And when you apply the learning, youll “ nd its worth more than gold. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Because you expect more of yourself than most people do, it sometimes feels like youre failing on a larger scale. But youre much further along than you would be had you not taken on such a big challenge. Cut yourself some slack. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ In theory, you can work on your inner life through meditation, reading, sel” ess service and education. Would it surprise you if enjoyment, pleasure and self-interest also lead to mental improvement? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ The helium of emotion is so weightless youre not even aware youre carrying it around with you. And yet, when you encounter those who need your compassion, you have plenty to give. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ There have been times in your life when you were unhappy but couldnt pinpoint the source. Today will bring the opposite experience. Where is this happiness coming from? Dont ask. Just go with it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ The company you keep will not only affect the outcome of your projects today, it will also change you at your core. Happy, supportive people will remind you to smile and accept yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ A change of venue can make a big difference to your productivity. Maybe you cant cut out distractions, but being around a different set of them will work, too. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ You want to be welcoming and open, but then again, theres something to be said for making people work for it. Your attention is worth working for, after all, and they will today. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ Youre not driven by other peoples opinions. Its your own story that drives you. You want that narrative to be great, and its greatness doesnt depend on the completion, only on your own ability to rise.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Which of these is particularly fond of beer and other forms of alcohol? Elephant, Raccoon, Parakeet, Gorilla 2. Whose quotes included, Funeral by funeral, science makes progress.Ž? Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Paul Samuelson, Charles Darwin 3. Whats the only planet in our solar system that rotates clockwise? Earth, Pluto, Mars, Venus 4. From Shakespeare, who was Romeo in love with before Juliet? Rosaline, Ophelia, Decius, Regan 5. What toothpaste had children saying, Look Ma, no cavitiesŽ? Pepsodent, Trident, Aquafresh, Crest 6. Which of these is another word for dandruff? Spruce, Scurf, Spald, Scruff ANSWERS: 1. Elephant, 2. Paul Samuelson (American economist), 3. Venus, 4. Rosaline, 5. Crest, 6. ScurfTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) QUESTHAIRYAGENDASYRUPY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The mint where the Washington 25-cent coins were produced was the „ HEADQUARTERS Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. AZGUE CLEET DASIRU RAYPAL 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app Ž  Answer here: SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBYTrampoline next door poses risk for sun-loving neighborDEAR ABBY: I have really nice neighbors, and we are always pleasant to each other. We put up a large above-ground pool in our backyard, and they put up a trampoline. I would like to enjoy our pool (how to put this delicately?) without tan lines. I do not want to offend them or expose myself to their teenage son when hes jumping on their trampoline. Is there a tactful way to ask them to move the trampoline since there is no other way to stay discreet in my own backyard? „ NO TAN LINESDEAR NO TAN LINES: Have you not heard about tan throughŽ fabrics? They were invented years ago to help women achieve a summertime glowŽ without the risk of being reported for indecent exposure. You can find more information about this type of swimwear online by searching no tan line swimsuit.Ž One caveat: Dermatologists recommend avoiding the sun to prevent skin cancers. When using these garments, make sure to use sunscreen underneath the swimsuit so you will achieve an all-over tan instead of a nasty all-over sunburn.DEAR ABBY: I recently discovered my wife was having an emotional affairŽ with an also-married coworker. She swears it wasnt physical, but their texts contain professions of love for each other and claims of I cant wait to see you again.Ž As I read them, my heart was pounding out of my chest, and I wasnt sure if I would survive the day. My wife blames it on my emotional shortcomings. I agree that we have had issues. But I love her very much, and I dont want to see our marriage fail. No one forced her to have an affair. But she refuses to accept that. How can I get her to acknowledge that what she did has threatened our marriage and gutted me? „ HURTING IN OKLAHOMADEAR HURTING: Unless you and your wife are willing to deal with the issues that led to her having the emotional affair, she may continue to seek fulfillment elsewhere. Stop arguing and agree to go as a couple to a licensed marriage and family therapist. You both have work to do repairing your relationship, and doing so may take time and mediation. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.

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** B8 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 C1 SPORTS BASEBALL | C4MLB ROUNDUPScores, stats, standings and leaders from Thursdays games SPORTS TICKER C3PREAKNESS NEW SHOOTERSHalf of the eight-horse eld has yet to experience the sensation of battling Justify By Pat McCannThe News HeraldSAND HILLS „ Bay County sports fans went to a spring football jamboree on Thursday night at Bozeman and a soccer game broke out.Well, actually two of them, as the first two halves ended innil-nil ties after 20 minutes. If anything, it underscored that nobody actually "wins" a half of foot-ball anyway.But in this case, teams strained to try and reach the end zone and host Boze-man did so twice in the final two quarters while blanking North Bay Haven 14-0. Bozeman 0, Rutherford 0The Rams had two viable scoring opportunities thwarted by turnovers, and a holding penalty killed the Bucks lone venture across midfield.Rutherford marched the opening possession from its 35 to first-and-goal at Bozemans 9 as the Rams continually gained yardage with pitches and sweeps around the left side following linemen Tye Davis and Austin Sheppard. Rutherford reached third-and-goal from the 8 when a fumble in the backfield was recovered by Bozemans Brandon Vinta back at the 20.That scuttled a 16-play drive where running back James Caldwell twice con-verted fourth-down runs and Chris Dickersons 16-yard gain on a sweep was the big play.Bozeman was held without a first down in the first quarter and Rutherford again threatened. This time the Rams used a 51-yard con-nection between quarterback Reggie Tubbs and receiver Donovan Smith to move into scoring position.Tubbs scrambled for a first down to the Bucks 11, but on first down Caleb Ward not only stymied a bubble screen but came up with an interception. Bozeman responded when Dante Robinson lofted a half-back pass to Tyler Bates for Jamboree almost pointlessBay limps into jamboree from o -theeld injuries By Pat McCannThe News HeraldWhile Josh Wright at Arnold and Jeremy Brown at Mosley were talking about the need to get physi-cal leading up to tonights three-school spring football jamboree, Mike Watkins at Bay was left to ponder the odds that one of his play-ers might get hurt departing the bus prior to the opening snap.The three schools meet at Mike Gavlak Stadium start-ing at 6 p.m. for three halves of football, each program getting the equivalent of a full game of competition. BayWatkins said he wanted the Tornadoes to do more hitting this spring than in the past, but what transpired off the field has supplied limitations heading toward the culmina-tion of spring drills."Weve had the injury bug for the first time in a long time," Watkins said. "We wanted to be a little more physical. Have a little more contact."Then a starting receiver broke an ankle playing AAU basketball. Another receiver rolled an ankle during open gym at school.A lineman turned an ankle on a trampoline. Yet another receiver injured his thumb and was forced to wear a brace. Then a right tackle tweaked a meniscus.Watkins said that the areas of concern transition each spring depending on the makeup of the team. He was decisive, however, on the Tornadoes current Large schools collide at Gavlak North Bay Havens Ray Tynan gets free on a scramble as teammate Trey Eggert gets a block on Thursday night in a spring football jamboree at Bozeman. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Bozeman only team to score as Rutherford and North Bay Haven held scorelessFirst half: Arnold vs. Mosley 6 p.m. Second half: Bay vs. Mosley Third half: Arnold vs. Bay Admission: $6 Format: 12-minute quarters. All phases of special teams live except for kickoffs, will ball placed on 30-yard line. Rutherfords Montell Bouie registers one of his two sacks on the night by bringing down Bozeman quarterback Blake Embrick. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] By Howard FendrichThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Alex Killorn scored the tiebreaker with about 8 minutes left, Andrei Vasi-levskiy made 36 saves, and the Tampa Bay Lightning weathered the equiva-lent of more than a period without a shot on goal to edge the Washington Capitals 4-2 on Thursday night, evening the Eastern Conference final at two games apiece.Killorn was left pretty much alone during a defensive breakdown by Washington and scored 6 seconds after a Tampa Bay power play expired, put-ting in a pass from Ondrej Palat.Steven Stamkos and Brayden Point scored Tampa Bays first two goals, and Anthony Cire-lli added an empty-netter with a second left.Washingtons goals came from Evgeny Kuznetsov „ off an assist by Alex Ovechkin „ and defenseman Dmitry Orlov.Lightning top Caps to even East nal See GAVLAK, C2 See JAMBOREE, C2See LIGHTNING, C2

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** C2 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News HeraldThe Lightning host Game 5 on Saturday night, with Game 6 back in Washing-ton on Monday.The road team has won every game in the series so far.The Capitals, who elimi-nated the two-time reigning Stanley Cup champion Pitts-burgh Penguins in the second round, fell to 3-5 overall at home during these playoffs „ and even got booed late in the first period, which ended with the Lightning ahead 2-1.The Lightning won Game 4 despite going nearly 21 full minutes of game time „ the last 10:41 of the first period, followed by the initial 10:11 of the second „ without putting a single official shot on net. And they won even though the Capitals finally got back center Nicklas Backstrom, who was third on the team in points this season behind Ovechkin and Kuznetsov. Backstrom had missed four games in a row with an injured right hand.One key: Vasilevskiy played just like the Vezina Trophy finalist he is. He was spectacular at times, includ-ing stops against Chandler Stephenson on a breakaway and Backstrom from the doorstep in the second period. Early in the third, Vasilevskiy used his left glove to swat away a try from Brett Connolly.After one flubbed chance, Ovechkin threw his head back and looked up, the very pic-ture of disappointment.Capitals goalie Braden Holtby didnt need to make nearly as many saves, given the shot discrepancy: Wash-ington ended up with 38 to Tampa Bays 20.Orlov put the hosts ahead about 4 minutes after the opening faceoff with a shot from the left circle, but the Lightning needed all of 70 seconds to draw even.Washington defenseman Michal Kempnys backhand clear attempt went awry, sliding right onto the tape of Tyler Johnsons stick. From there, it was as easy as 1-2-3 for Tampa Bay: Johnson passed to rookie Yanni Gourde, who moved it to Point, whose immediate shot from close range gave Holtby no chance.The Lightning went up 2-1 lead less than 3 minutes later, with Stamkos put-ting the teams lone shot of a power play in off the left post. That capped a slick sequence of passes, from Nikita Kucherov to J.T. Miller, back to Kucherov, back to Miller, to Point, who found Stamkos.The Lightning have produced 11 power-play goals over their last nine games, with at least one in each. And its been Stamkos lead-ing the way: He has scored on a power play in each game of this series.The game was barely 8 minutes old, and the Light-ning had only accumulated five shots. But Tampa Bay already had scored twice and silenced a boisterous, red-clad crowd that went from supportive chants of Lets go, Caps!Ž before the game even began to a nervous hush to „ somewhat unbelievably, given that Washington began the day two wins from playing for the Stanley Cup „ a smat-tering of groans and jeers in the closing seconds of the opening period. priorities. "Id say number one, find-ing leadership," Watkins said. "Two, finding playmak-ers. Three, offensive line. "This year we have 10 or 12 on the offensive line and one has played a varsity snap. So there is inexperience at that position. Some have played elsewhere on varsity, but were mixing kids in."Otherwise Bay should be getting more indoctrinated each season with Watkins spread offensive philosophy, his terminology and how he wants tempo and execution to meld and evolve."Otherwise its pretty basic. Youve got new faces and might be trying to install some new wrinkles," Watkins said. "We're trying to find out if we need to use personnel a little different." MosleyPerhaps its because hes a former offensive lineman. Or maybe its because Mosleys style always has trended toward smashmouth on offense.It just seems that the offen-sive line is Browns focus almost every spring. Except maybe for tonight, because the Dolphins staff will gets its first view of which running backs are going to replace the combined 3,000 yards rush-ing of departing John Miller and Darien Ganzy."Theyll all get carries. They all bring something different to the table," Brown said of a group that includes but is not limited to Don McKay, Alex Noble and Jacarri Greene. "It will be interesting to get them in a game-type environment and see if they make the right reads „ and their ball security."Im excited to see how it looks against somebody who hasnt practiced against our stuff for three or four weeks. Kids on defense get used to certain formations and know whats coming."The jamboree also will help starting quarterback Michael Maddox get rid of some rust from having been injured the second half of last season. Backup Liam Byrd, a rising sophomore, will be held out with a sprained shoulder, and starting receiver Josh Lingenfelter also will get some reps behind center."For us, the philosophy the first three weeks is to see whos going to get physical, and who needs another year in the weight room or another year on JV," Brown said. "The kids that have been in the program, we know what they can do. A handful of kids on offense and defense; can they step up and help us? Its always a matter of identifying kids and building your depth."ArnoldWright said that the Mar-lins aim this fall is to be a run-first offense with the ability to pass and get the ball in space.With that in mind, John Darwin has been promoted to the role of offensive coordi-nator as Arnold perhaps adds a new attitude to a new look.Considering that offensive linemen have spent more time working on blocking sleds and in the chutes it conjures visions of Vince Lombardi atop one of the sleds."Thats kind of where were at," Wright said. "Weve been a cerebral front, but want to be more physical. We have some returning players, but want to see if they adapted to what were trying to get done in the spring."Not that defense isnt a concern, where three standout players have graduated."Some of those guys are unproven, too," Wright said. "We have a few kids with some playing experience, but a lot have not been in a big ballgame."The goal at Arnold remains to overcome the mediocrity of fourand five-win seasons and become a perennial contender. The Marlins will open with a three-year starter at quarter-back in Cade Ledman and have some returning skill players."We all need to get on the same page under Coach Darwin," Wright said. "Hes done his homework; his approach has been good. We want to show some execution and take care of the football."In addition to Ledman, Wright said that backup Jake Bingham also could get some work at quarterback. GAVLAKFrom Page C137 yards to Rutherfords 39. Quarterback Blake Embrick then scrambled away from trouble and tossed a short pass that Jordan Rosalis advanced near the 30, but Bozeman was called for holding deep in the backfield and the opportunity was lost. North Bay Haven 0, Rutherford 0North Bay Haven not only fielded the most size in offensive linemen Joshua Stuckey, Vincent Weaver and Trey Eggert, the Buccaneers were able to establish the best tempo of the three schools which all ran versions of the spread offense.Much of the reason for that might have been that NBH quarterback Ray Tynan has been in the pro-gram for four years and established himself as the starter last season.Tynan completed 5 of 11 passes for 78 yards and also flashed some credible scrambling ability to extend plays and turn some losses into successful scrambles.Like Rutherford in the opening half, however, the Bucs couldnt convert in the red zone.Tynan scrambled for 11 yards, then passed to Michael Panariello for 22 on the Bucs opening possession. They reached the Rutherford 21 before consecutive sacks ended the drive, Rutherfords Cam-eron Knapp making the key stop on fourth down.A 37-yard pass from Tynan to Zane Hamilton and 12-yard burst by Cam Gant got NBH to first-and-goal at the 7 in the second quarter. That series ended with an interception by Jaylen Bouie in the end zone."I kicked myself in the backside for not kicking a field goal down there," North Bay Haven coach Andy Siegal said. "I was trying to get us in the end zone and kind of forgot about field goals."But this wasnt about winning as much as exe-cuting and trying to plug in guys and try and establish some depth."Rutherford was held to 19 total yards in the half until Tynan was stopped on a scramble near mid-field with 8.4 seconds left. Caldwell then broke loose on a sprint into the sec-ondary that ended with him knocked out of bounds at the NBH 7."I thought we had time to kick a field goal," Ruth-erford coach Loren Tillman said after the half was ruled over on Caldwells run. "I dont care, I want to win no matter what. "I thought we moved the football, especially in the first half (against Boze-man) but shot ourselves in the foot." Bozeman 14, North Bay Haven 0Two factors dominated the first quarter of the final half. The most noticeable was a nuisance rain that started before the teams lined up.After seemingly halting late in the first quarter, it returned to limit both offenses. North Bay Haven also was without Tynan for the second half, as he tweaked an ankle on his final play against Rutherford.Bozeman finally ended the scoring drought when Embrick, who earlier had a 21-yard run into NBH terri-tory, scored on a zone read from 8 yards.Running back Jaidon Dorsey got loose on a 25-yard scoring run for the Bucks. Tommy Benjamin kicked both extra points.Bozemans Jason Griffin was getting his baptism as a high school football head coach."Im very pleased. Our kids played hard, played physical and went toe to toe with two (Class) 4A schools," Griffin said. "I thought it was a pretty good start here at Bozeman."Siegal was experienc-ing his first competition at North Bay Haven after an extensive prep, collegiate and even professional foot-ball resume."Were a young football team and I thought showed passion and a lot of heart," Siegal said. "All three teams played pretty good football tonight. I thought we came out and played physical football." JAMBOREEFrom Page C1Rutherfords Bryson Short saves a touchdown by bringing down North Bay Havens Zane Hamilton after a 37-yard pass reception. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Bozemans Brian Zerr is confronted by a quartet of Rutherford defenders during a “ rst-half run on Thursday night. [PATTI BLAKE/ THE NEWS HERALD] LIGHTNINGFrom Page C1 By Schuyler DixonThe Associated PressDALLAS „ Marc Leishman enjoyed the old home of the AT&T Byron Nelson as much as anyone, considering he made the last nine trips there and had one of the best scoring averages in tournament history.The Australian might take a liking to the new place as well.Leishman shot a 10-under 61 on the links-style Trinity Forest course to take the first-round lead Thursday and was eight shots clear of hometown star Jordan Spieth in the event that returned to Dallas after 35 years at the TPC Four Seasons in suburban Irving.Considering the criticisms of Trinity Forest from others „ mentioned vaguely by players who did show up „ Leishman wouldnt have needed much to join that chorus after a history of high finishes in Irving despite a couple of recent missed cuts.Instead, Leishman opened with an eagle, started the back nine with three straight birdies and reached 9 under with another eagle at the 14th.The 34-year-old, a threetime PGA Tour winner, had chances to go lower but settled for a 10-foot birdie putt at the par-3 17th for the lowest round of his PGA Tour career. He was a stroke shy of the Nelson record.Probably would have been the harshest critic, I think,Ž Leishman said with a smile. I played very well over there. When I got here and saw instantly, you know, was happy that were here and its just a cool spot.ŽJ.J. Spaun and Texan Jimmy Walker were three shots back at 64. Spaun had six birdies in a span of seven holes for a 30 on his second nine „ the front nine on the undulating layout with no trees or water hazards a few miles south of downtown Dallas.Walker had a chance to get to 8 under when his shot from the edge of a fairway bunker on 18 rolled within a foot of the cup before settling 14 feet away. He missed the birdie putt.Sam Saunders, Aaron Wise and Keith Mitchell shot match-ing 65s playing in the first group off the first tee. They were part of an eight-way tie four shots behind Leishman. Defending champion Billy Horschel shot 68.Spieth, one of just two world top-10 players in the Nelson field at No. 3, didnt have many chances and missed on some of the few that he did, start-ing with a short birdie putt for a disappointing par 5 on the opening hole.It was another frustrating round for the 24-year-old Spieth, a Trinity Forest member who was hoping the venue change would help him top his best Nelson finish. That was a tie for 16th when he was a 16-year-old amateur playing for a private high school in Dallas.Leishman shoots 61 in debut of new course

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 C3 SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFCLEVELANDNFL picks Browns for new season of Hard KnocksReady or not, the Cleveland Browns are getting their close-up.Coming off a historic, dismal 0-16 season, the Browns have been chosen to appear on HBOs popular Hard KnocksŽ series, which gives NFL fans a behind-the-scenes look at training camp.The Browns have turned down previous opportunities to be on the award-winning series. But with renewed optimism around Cleve-land following the recent draft, and the selection of quarterback Baker Mayfield, the team is granting HBO unlimited access to its upcoming camp.Cleveland is the 13th franchise to participate in Hard Knocks,Ž which began in 2001 with the Baltimore Ravens. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were featured last summer. Although theyve won only one game the past two seasons under coach Hue Jackson, the Browns see the show as a possi-bility to highlight some of their younger players and put a positive spin on their rebuild.MANCHESTER, ENGLANDGuardiola signs new deal to stay with Man CityFresh from winning the Premier League, Pep Guardiola has signed a new Manchester City contract through 2021 to make the strongest long-term commitment of his managerial career.Completing five years at the Abu Dhabi-owned club would represent Guardiolas longest tenure in a coaching job.Starting out in topflight management in 2008, Guardiola spent four years transform-ing Barcelona into a side that won three Spanish league titles and the Champions League twice among 13 honors.After taking a sabbatical, Guardiola took charge of Bayern Munich and won the Bundesliga in each of his three years. Leaving Germany before getting burnt out, the coach moved to Man-chester in 2016. LOUISVILLE, KY.Basketball escort queen arrested for forged checksPolice have arrested the self-proclaimed escort queenŽ at the center of a sex scandal involving the University of Louisvilles basketball team.News outlets report Katina Powell was arrested Thursday, moments after the court told her to vacate her Louisville home, for allegedly cashing stolen and forged checksAn arrest report says Powell is accused of stealing checks total-ing $2,900 and trying to cash them last month at a liquor store.Louisville Metro Police spokesman Dwight Mitchell tells The Cou-rier-Journal that Powell will be charged with criminal possession of a forged instrument and theft by deception. The Associated Press Kentucky Derby hopeful Bravazo runs during a morning workout May 1 at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas brings back Bravazo, who “ nished sixth in the Derby, along with Sporting Chance, to take on Derby winner Justify on Saturday in the Preakness. [CHARLIE RIEDEL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By David GinsburgThe Associated PressBALTIMORE „ Half the participants in the eight-horse Preakness field have yet to experience the sensation of chasing Justify to the finish line.Perhaps one of the new shoot-ers in Saturdays race can find a way to leave the Kentucky Derby winner in his wake.Quip, Sporting Chance, Dia-mond King and Tenfold skipped the Derby to focus on earning a chunk of the $1.5 million Preak-ness purse.History just might be on their side.A new shooter „ a horse which runs in one of the two remaining Triple Crown races after passing up the Derby „ has won the Preakness four times since 2000. Just last year, Cloud Computing paid $13.40 in an upset over Derby winner Always Dreaming. Then again...Derby runners have done well over the course of time,Ž insisted W. Elliott Walden, president and CEO of racing operations for WinStar Farm, which owns Justify and Quip. Now is it because theyre the better horses? Quite possibly thats the case. Theyre just the best horses of the crop and thats why they run in the Kentucky Derby.ŽThe finest of the newcomers this year appears to be Quip, who has three wins and a second-place showing in five career races.Hes a really good horse. Hes fast,Ž Justify trainer Bob Baffert said of Quip.Trained by Rodolphe Brisset and ridden by last years Breed-ers Cup Classic winner Florent Geroux, Quip captured the Tampa Derby in March before finishing second in the Arkan-sas Derby.While unbeaten Justify comes in with just two weeks rest „ the quickest turnaround of his career „ Quip enters the Preak-ness coming off an extended break.Quip is a horse that has shown quality at the highest level,Ž Walden said. We feel like he could have run in the Kentucky Derby, but we wanted to give him a chance to catch up to himself. Hes a slight-made horse we felt like would do better with the five weeks rest.ŽQuip had a pair of wins last year before staggering to a seventh-place showing in the Grade 2 Kentucky Jockey Club at Churchill Downs in November.In retrospect, that might have been a turning point.Hes changed a lot,Ž Brisset said. After the Kentucky Jockey Club, we gave him a couple of weeks off and you could see the maturation. You still have to be a little careful when hes around too many horses, but hes way more professional.Ž Well, Quip „the third choice at 12-1 „ will have only seven other horses to contend with on Saturday. Two of them will be saddled by Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas.Lukas brings back Bravazo, who finished sixth in the Derby, along with Sporting Chance.Unlike the rest of the first-time Triple Crown participants, Sporting Chance is no fresher than the Derby horses. Sporting Chance (30-1) also ran at Churchill Downs on May 5, taking fourth in the Pat Day Mile.Asked to assess the chances of both his entrants Saturday, Lukas shrugged his shoulders and saluted Justifys impressive performance at the Derby.I dont have a lot of confi-dence if he runs that same race. Lets be honest, at 82 you get more realistic,Ž Lukas said. If hes the best horse, so be it. Well throw the bouquets his way and salute him as a sec-ond-leg winner and go on to the Belmont. But well try to get the best piece of this we can.ŽTenfold (20-1) began racing this year. Sired by 2007 Preak-ness winner Curlin, the dark brown colt won his first two races before fading to third in the Arkansas Derby last month.We have a fresh horse; hes put on weight since the Arkan-sas Derby and hes trained really well at Churchill Downs,Ž assis-tant trainer Scott Blasi said. The timing is good for us for this race.ŽIf the track is soggy, that would be even better. Curlin earned 2007 Horse of the Year honors after slogging to victory in the muddy Breeders Cup Classic.With all this wet weather, him being a Curlin, he steps up with the sloppy track and moves forward,Ž Blasi said.Trained by John Servis, Diamond King (30-1) won the Federico Tesio Stakes at nearby Laurel Park in April. While Dia-mond King probably doesnt have the speed and stamina of Justify, he does trainer who won the Kentucky Derby and jockey Javier Castellano, who guided Cloud Computing to victory at last years Preakness.Weve got a top jockey and the horse is doing really well,Ž co-owner Chuck Zacney said.Half the horses in Preakness eld get rst shot at JustifyNew bloodKentucky Derby winner Justify, left, with exercise rider Humberto Gomez aboard, is escorted to the track for a workout Thursday at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. The Preakness Stakes horse race is scheduled to take place Saturday. [PATRICK SEMANSKY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Ralph D. RussoThe Associated PressThe NCAA is open-ing a door for states with legalized sports gambling to host NCAA champion-ship events and officials in Nevada are already set to get in the game as soon as they can.The governing body for college sports on Thursday announced a temporaryŽ lifting of a ban that prevented events like college basketballs NCAA Tournament from being hosted in states that accept wagers on single games. The move comes three days after the Supreme Court over-turned a federal law that barred most states from allowing gambling on professional and college sporting events.On Monday we contacted the Mountain West Conference, our NCAA colleagues, we also spoke with our local and regional leaders. Its our intent to present competitive bids for national events, and we want to be aggressive in that space,Ž UNLV athletic director Desiree Reed-Francois said. We know that Las Vegas as a community, we have a proven track record of success in host-ing large scale events.ŽNCAA President Mark Emmert said the board of governors will consider permanently revising its policy at future meetings. But the NCAA said it will not change its rules that prohibit gambling on sports by athletes and all athletic department employees, including coaches.Emmert also is calling for federal regulations of sports gambling, joining the NFL, NBA and other leagues.Our highest priorities in any conversation about sports wagering are maintaining the integrity of competition and student-athlete well-being,Ž Emmert said in a statement.Emmert has said in the past he hoped lawmakers would make exceptions for college sports if sports gambling is allowed.There might be a carve-out to eliminate college athletics from sports gambling similar to what we did with daily fantasy sports,Ž Emmert said during a college sports forum in December in New York. That would require state-by-state lobbying unless the fed-eral government steps in to regulate.Lead1, an association of athletic directors for the 130 schools that play major college football, is pushing for regulation, too.Eighty percent of our athletic directors have indicated that they oppose college sports betting,Ž said former U.S. Rep. Tom McMillen, who is the president of Lead1. Our athletic directors are concerned not only about the vulnerability of young student-athletes to inducements of point shaving, but the increased compliance costs to keep their programs clean.ŽNCAA says door open for states that allow betting

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** C4 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald AMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 28 12 .700 „ „ 8-2 W-2 18-7 10-5 Boston 30 14 .682 „ „ 5-5 W-2 13-6 17-8 Toronto 22 22 .500 8 3 4-6 L-1 11-12 11-10 Tampa Bay 19 22 .463 9 5 4-6 W-3 8-10 11-12 Baltimore 13 30 .302 16 12 5-5 L-2 10-13 3-17 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Cleveland 21 21 .500 „ „ 4-6 W-1 13-9 8-12 Minnesota 18 21 .462 1 5 6-4 L-1 8-9 10-12 Detroit 19 23 .452 2 5 5-5 L-1 12-10 7-13 Kansas City 13 30 .302 8 12 3-7 L-5 6-16 7-14 Chicago 11 29 .275 9 12 2-8 W-1 4-15 7-14 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 28 17 .622 „ „ 7-3 W-2 12-10 16-7 Los Angeles 25 18 .581 2 „ 5-5 L-2 11-14 14-4 Seattle 24 18 .571 2 5-5 L-1 9-9 15-9 Oakland 22 22 .500 5 3 4-6 W-1 11-9 11-13 Texas 17 28 .378 11 9 4-6 L-1 7-16 10-12 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Atlanta 26 16 .619 „ „ 7-3 W-1 9-8 17-8 Philadelphia 25 16 .610 „ 8-2 W-3 16-6 9-10 Washington 24 18 .571 2 1 7-2 W-4 10-10 14-8 New York 20 19 .513 4 3 3-7 L-1 8-11 12-8 Miami 16 27 .372 10 9 3-7 L-1 10-15 6-12 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Pittsburgh 26 17 .605 „ „ 8-2 W-3 15-6 11-11 Milwaukee 26 18 .591 „ 6-4 W-1 10-9 16-9 St. Louis 23 18 .561 2 1 4-6 L-1 12-8 11-10 Chicago 22 18 .550 2 2 6-4 L-1 13-8 9-10 Cincinnati 15 29 .341 11 11 7-3 W-1 6-15 9-14 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Arizona 25 18 .581 „ „ 3-7 L-1 14-12 11-6 Colorado 23 20 .535 2 2 5-5 L-1 7-11 16-9 San Francisco 22 22 .500 3 4 3-7 L-1 12-8 10-14 Los Angeles 17 26 .395 8 8 2-8 W-1 8-13 9-13 San Diego 17 28 .378 9 9 4-6 L-1 11-18 6-10 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLDODGERS 7, MARLINS 0LOS ANGELES AB R H BI BB SO AVG. T aylor ss 4 2 2 0 1 1 .246 Barnes c 3 2 0 0 2 0 .209 T urner 3b 4 1 3 5 0 1 .462 Muncy 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Kemp lf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .318 Pederson lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Hernandez cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Bellinger 1b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .265 Forsythe 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .145 Puig rf 3 2 2 1 2 1 .214 Maeda p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .133 J ansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --T OTALS 36 7 10 7 7 7 MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Prado 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .167 S huck rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Castro 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Maybin lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238 A nderson rf-3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .268 Dietrich lf-2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .248 Rojas ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Brinson cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .168 Holaday c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .163 S mith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Rivera ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .171 T azawa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cloyd p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Realmuto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .313 T OTALS 31 0 4 0 0 11 LOS ANGELES 004 300 000„7 10 0 MIAMI 000 000 000„0 4 0 a-singled for Smith in the 3rd. b-struck out f or Cloyd in the 9th. LOB„Los Angeles 10, Miami 4. 2B„Turner 2 (2), Kemp 2 (9), Dietrich (7). HR„Puig (3), off Tazawa. RBIs„Turner 5 (5), Kemp (18), Puig (10). S„Maeda. Runners left in scoring position„Los A ngeles 4 (Hernandez 3, Bellinger); Miami 2 (Anderson, Brinson). RISP„Los Angeles 4 f or 8; Miami 0 for 4. LOS ANGELES IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maeda, W, 3-3 8 2 0 0 0 8 96 3.89 J ansen 1 2 0 0 0 3 24 3.57 MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S mith, L, 2-5 3 2 4 4 4 4 77 4.22 T azawa 1 4 3 3 1 2 32 9.00 Cloyd 5 4 0 0 2 1 83 10.80 PB„Holaday (1). Umpires„Home, Jansen Visconti; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Greg Gibson. T „3:06. A„13,820 (36,742).RED SOX 6, ORIOLES 2BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mancini lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .264 J ones cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Machado ss 4 1 1 2 0 1 .339 S choop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .169 T rumbo dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .288 V alencia 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .280 Rickard rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .308 S usac c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .333 T OTALS 31 2 5 2 0 8 BOSTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Betts rf 4 2 3 0 1 0 .364 Benintendi lf 2 0 0 1 1 1 .269 Ramirez 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Martinez dh 3 1 1 2 0 1 .344 a-Swihart ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Bogaerts ss 4 1 2 3 0 1 .313 Devers 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .241 Holt 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .308 Leon c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .196 Bradley Jr. cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .167 T OTALS 32 6 10 6 4 7 BALTIMORE 000 000 002„2 5 0 BOSTON 200 040 00X„6 10 0 a-grounded out for Martinez in the 7th. LOB„Baltimore 2, Boston 7. 2B„Susac (1). HR„Machado (14), off Price; Martinez (13), off Gausman; Bogaerts (6), off Gausman. RBIs„Machado 2 (40), Benintendi (23), Martinez 2 (38), Bogaerts 3 (24). SB„ Betts 3 (11), Ramirez (4), Bradley Jr. (4). S F„Benintendi. Runners left in scoring position„Boston 3 (Ramirez 2, Holt). RISP„Baltimore 1 for 3; Boston 4 for 8. GIDP„Martinez. DP„Baltimore 1 (Machado, Schoop, Davis). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman, L, 3-3 4.2 8 6 6 2 6 101 3.88 Hart 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 1.93 Castro 1.1 0 0 0 2 1 25 3.38 A raujo 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 6.55 BOSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price, W, 4-4 9 5 2 2 0 8 95 4.38 Inherited runners-scored„Castro 1-0. WP„Gausman. Umpires„Home, Tony Randazzo; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Nic Lentz. T „2:44. A„36,615 (37,731).PIRATES 5, PADRES 4 S AN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. J ankowski rf 4 1 1 1 1 3 .360 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 3 0 0 .269 Cordero lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Pirela 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Lopez c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 S pangenberg 3b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .200 a-Villanueva ph-3b-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Galvis ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .239 A suaje 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Margot cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .195 Lauer p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .286 S tammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Szczur ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cimber p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 S trahm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Y ates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Reyes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 T OTALS 34 4 9 4 2 12 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moroff 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .216 Polanco rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .228 Cervelli c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .296 Bell 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .269 Dickerson lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .316 Freese 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .254 Rodriguez cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .189 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .229 Kuhl p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Brault p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Osuna ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 32 5 9 4 3 6 SAN DIEGO 002 020 000„4 9 1 PITTSBURGH 000 310 10X„5 9 0 a-struck out for Spangenberg in the 6th. b-popped out for Stammen in the 6th. c-grounded out for Feliz in the 8th. d-struck out for Yates in the 9th. E„Villanueva (7). LOB„San Diego 6, Pittsburgh 8. 2B„Hosmer (14), Cordero (4), Galvis (5), Lauer (1), Polanco (12), Dickerson (13), Rodriguez (3), Brault (1). RBIs„Jankowski (2), Hosmer 3 (19), Bell (26), Dickerson (28), Freese (10), Rodriguez (10). CS„Pirela (2). SF„Freese. S„Lauer, Kuhl. Runners left in scoring position„San Diego 3 (Pirela 2, Szczur); Pittsburgh 5 (Moroff 2, Freese, Rodriguez, Kuhl). RISP„San Diego 2 for 8; Pittsburgh 3 for 12. Runners moved up„Cervelli. DP„Pittsburgh 1 (Cervelli, Mercer). SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lauer 4.2 6 4 4 3 3 88 8.14 Stammen .1 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.11 Cimber 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.92 Strahm, L, 0-1 .2 2 1 0 0 0 18 4.76 Yates 1.1 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.64 PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kuhl 4.1 6 4 4 2 5 85 4.53 Brault 2.1 3 0 0 0 3 32 4.42 Santana, W, 2-0 .1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.95 Feliz, H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.84 Vazquez, S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 2.41 Inherited runners-scored„Stammen 2-0, Yates 2-0, Brault 1-0, Santana 1-0. WP„Lauer. Umpires„Home, Will Little; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Tom Woodring. T„2:56. A„11,404 (38,362).ATHLETICS 10, BLUE JAYS 5OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Semien ss 5 1 1 0 1 1 .274 Joyce lf 6 1 2 1 0 3 .214 Lowrie 2b 4 2 1 1 2 1 .324 Davis dh 4 3 4 2 0 0 .233 Olson 1b 4 1 1 3 1 2 .239 Chapman 3b 4 2 3 2 1 1 .244 Piscotty rf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .239 Fowler cf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .158 Lucroy c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Totals 41 10 14 10 6 13 TORONTO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Granderson rf 2 1 0 1 3 0 .270 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .233 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .255 Solarte 2b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .244 Pillar cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .308 Martin c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .163 Morales dh 4 0 0 1 0 0 .146 Smith Jr. lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .400 Urena ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .333 TOTALS 33 5 7 5 7 3 OAKLAND 003 042 001„10 14 1 TORONTO 010 030 010„5 7 0 E„Olson (3). LOB„Oakland 11, Toronto 9. 2B„Lowrie (10), Chapman (5), Smoak (11), Pillar (18). HR„Davis (13), off Sanchez; Olson (7), off Oh; Chapman (8), off Axford. RBIs„Joyce (8), Lowrie (37), Davis 2 (38), Olson 3 (19), Chapman 2 (21), Fowler (2), Granderson (14), Smoak (26), Solarte (26), Pillar (19), Morales (11). SB„Fowler (1). SF„Pillar. Runners left in scoring position„Oakland 6 (Joyce 2, Chapman 2, Piscotty, Fowler); Toronto 6 (Donaldson 2, Solarte, Martin, Smith Jr., Urena). RISP„Oakland 4 for 11; Toronto 3 for 12. Runners moved up„Semien, Piscotty, Martin, Smith Jr., Morales, Smoak. GIDP„Morales. DP„Oakland 1 (Olson, Semien, Casilla). OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Triggs 2.1 1 1 1 2 1 42 5.23 Casilla 2 3 3 3 2 1 41 3.60 Petit, W, 1-0 2.2 1 0 0 1 1 29 3.62 Dull .2 1 1 1 1 0 25 6.30 Trivino 1.1 1 0 0 1 0 19 0.59 TORONTO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez, L, 2-4 4 5 4 4 4 8 97 4.47 Oh .2 4 3 3 1 0 30 2.79 Loup .1 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.57 Axford 1 2 2 2 0 2 28 2.08 Tepera 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.05 Clippard 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 1.17 Petricka 1 2 1 0 0 0 15 7.11 Sanchez pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored„Petit 2-2, Trivino 2-1, Oh 1-1, Loup 2-0. HBP„Axford (Davis). WP„Casilla, Axford. PB„Martin (1). Umpires„Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Shane Livensparger; Third, Brian Gorman. T„3:34. A„22,893 (53,506).PHILLIES 6, CARDINALS 2PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .271 Altherr rf 5 0 1 2 0 2 .193 Herrera cf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .361 Hoskins lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Santana 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .195 Franco 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Kingery ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Rios p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alfaro c 4 2 2 0 0 1 .250 Velasquez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Florimon ss 2 2 1 2 0 0 .289 TOTALS 38 6 11 6 2 8 ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Pham cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .302 Martinez 1b 4 0 3 0 1 1 .304 DeJong ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Ozuna lf 5 1 0 1 0 1 .242 Fowler rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .154 Gyorko 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .295 Carpenter 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .164 c-Bader ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pena c 4 0 3 0 0 0 .258 Weaver p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 a-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Tuivailala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wong 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .190 TOTALS 35 2 10 2 3 5 PHILADELPHIA 000 010 032„6 11 0 ST. LOUIS 000 000 020„2 10 0 a-”ied out for Weaver in the 7th. b-grounded out for Dominguez in the 8th. c-”ied out for Carpenter in the 8th. LOB„Philadelphia 7, St. Louis 11. 2B„ Herrera (9), Carpenter (9). HR„Santana (8), off Weaver; Florimon (1), off Brebbia. RBIs„Altherr 2 (21), Herrera (25), Santana (28), Florimon 2 (4), Ozuna (21), Gyorko (9). SB„Hernandez (8). S„Weaver. Runners left in scoring position„ Philadelphia 4 (Hoskins, Kingery, Williams 2); St. Louis 4 (Ozuna 2, Garcia, Bader). RISP„Philadelphia 3 for 9; St. Louis 2 for 11. GIDP„Santana. DP„Philadelphia 1 (Franco, Santana); St. Louis 1 (Martinez, DeJong). PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vlasquz, W, 4-4 6.1 5 0 0 2 5 96 4.37 Dominguez, H, 3 .2 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Rios 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 3.94 Garcia .2 2 1 1 0 0 18 3.24 Morgan, H, 7 .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.38 Ramos 1 3 0 0 0 0 21 1.02 ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver, L, 3-3 7 4 1 1 1 6 97 4.37 Hicks 0 3 3 3 0 0 12 2.29 Tuivailala 1 1 0 0 1 1 12 2.70 Brebbia 1 3 2 2 0 1 18 4.09 Hicks pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Rios pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored„Dominguez 2-0, Garcia 1-1, Morgan 2-0, Tuivailala 2-1. HBP„ Garcia (DeJong). Umpires„Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T„3:33. A„41,039 (45,538).WHITE SOX 4, RANGERS 2TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. DeShields cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .253 Choo dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .247 Profar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Mazara rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .278 Gallo lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .195 Kiner-Falefa 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .261 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .189 Chirinos c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .198 1-Rua pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .183 Guzman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .202 TOTALS 32 2 6 2 3 9 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .270 Sanchez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .286 Abreu 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .288 Delmonico lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .226 Engel cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Davidson dh 3 0 0 1 1 0 .244 Castillo c 4 0 1 2 0 0 .250 Garcia cf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Anderson ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Thompson rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .119 TOTALS 31 4 8 3 3 5 TEXAS 001 000 010„2 6 2 CHICAGO 000 000 04X„4 8 1 1-ran for Chirinos in the 9th. E„Fister (2), Leclerc (2), Abreu (4). LOB„ Texas 8, Chicago 6. 2B„Moncada (9). 3B„ Mazara (1). RBIs„Choo (17), Mazara (27), Davidson (25), Castillo 2 (12). SB„Garcia (7), Thompson (2). S„DeShields. Runners left in scoring position„Texas 6 (DeShields 2, Choo, Gallo, Chirinos, Guzman); Chicago 4 (Sanchez 2, Garcia, Thompson). RISP„Texas 1 for 8; Chicago 1 for 7. Runners moved up„Odor, Guzman. LIDP„ Sanchez. GIDP„Castillo. DP„Texas 2 (Kiner-Falefa, Odor, Guzman), (DeShields, Guzman). TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 7 6 0 0 0 4 97 3.43 Leclerc, L, 1-1 BS, 2-2 .2 1 4 0 3 1 30 2.45 Jepsen .1 1 0 0 0 0 6 5.51 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 7.1 3 1 1 3 8 98 4.88 Avilan, W, 1-0 .2 2 1 1 0 0 17 5.25 Jones, S, 2-4 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 3.63 Inherited runners-scored„Jepsen 3-2. HBP„Jones (Kiner-Falefa). WP„Shields. PB„Chirinos (2). Umpires„Home, Paul Nauert; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Angel Hernandez. T„2:54. A„17,666 (40,615).STATISTICAL LEADERSAMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Betts, Boston, .353; Martinez, Boston, .344; Simmons, Los Angeles, .342; Machado, Baltimore, .342; Brantley, Cleveland, .338; Lowrie, Oakland, .325; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .322; Castellanos, Detroit, .316; Gordon, Seattle, .315; Lindor, Cleveland, .314. RUNS: Betts, Boston, 44; Lindor, Cleveland, 36; Trout, Los Angeles, 34; Judge, New York, 33; Springer, Houston, 33; Gardner, New York, 32; Semien, Oakland, 31; Gregorius, New York, 30; 3 tied at 29. RBI: Machado, Baltimore, 38; KDavis, Oakland, 36; Lowrie, Oakland, 36; Martinez, Boston, 36; Judge, New York, 35; Upton, Los Angeles, 34; Haniger, Seattle, 32; Gregorius, New York, 31; 3 tied at 30. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 56; Lindor, Cleveland, 55; Lowrie, Oakland, 55; Machado, Baltimore, 55; Martinez, Boston, 55; Segura, Seattle, 54; Betts, Boston, 53; Gordon, Seattle, 53; Simmons, Los Angeles, 52; Semien, Oakland, 51. HOME RUNS: Betts, Boston, 13; Gallo, Texas, 13; Machado, Baltimore, 13; Ramirez, Cleveland, 13; KDavis, Oakland, 12; Lindor, Cleveland, 12; Martinez, Boston, 12; Trout, Los Angeles, 12; 3 tied at 11. ERA: Verlander, Houston, 1.05; Cole, Houston, 1.75; Morton, Houston, 2.03; Severino, New York, 2.14; Sale, Boston, 2.29; Kluber, Cleveland, 2.34; Manaea, Oakland, 2.35; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.59; Clevinger, Cleveland, 2.70; Colon, Texas, 2.82. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 93; Sale, Boston, 87; Verlander, Houston, 84; Paxton, Seattle, 71; Severino, New York, 70; Bauer, Cleveland, 67; Happ, Toronto, 66; Morton, Houston, 62; Kluber, Cleveland, 61; McCullers, Houston, 58. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Herrera, Philadelphia, .357; Markakis, Atlanta, .333; Gennett, Cincinnati, .327; Freeman, Atlanta, .325; Cabrera, New York, .320; Kemp, Los Angeles, .318; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .318; Arenado, Colorado, .317; Pham, St. Louis, .312; Posey, San Francisco, .310. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 40; Blackmon, Colorado, 31; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 31; Freeman, Atlanta, 30; Harper, Washington, 30; Markakis, Atlanta, 30; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 30; Pham, St. Louis, 30; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 29; 6 tied at 27. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 36; Pollock, Arizona, 33; Freeman, Atlanta, 32; Story, Colorado, 32; Albies, Atlanta, 31; Harper, Washington, 30; Markakis, Atlanta, 30; Suarez, Cincinnati, 30; Franco, Philadelphia, 29; Cespedes, New York, 28. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 56; Albies, Atlanta, 52; Gennett, Cincinnati, 52; Freeman, Atlanta, 51; Herrera, Philadelphia, 51; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 49; Cabrera, New York, 48; Castro, Miami, 48; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 47; Peraza, Cincinnati, 47. HOME RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 13; Harper, Washington, 13; Blackmon, Colorado, 11; Pollock, Arizona, 11; Adams, Washington, 10; Baez, Chicago, 10; Shaw, Milwaukee, 10; Story, Colorado, 10; Villanueva, San Diego, 10; 2 tied at 9. ERA: Martinez, St. Louis, 1.62; Scherzer, Washington, 1.69; deGrom, New York, 1.83; Nola, Philadelphia, 1.99; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.36; Newcomb, Atlanta, 2.51; Corbin, Arizona, 2.53; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 2.59; Mikolas, St. Louis, 2.63; Lester, Chicago, 2.66. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 91; Corbin, Arizona, 75; Strasburg, Washington, 68; Syndergaard, New York, 61; Gray, Colorado, 59; Greinke, Arizona, 58; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 57; Smith, Miami, 57; deGrom, New York, 56; Gonzalez, Washington, 55.THIS DATE IN BASEBALLMay 18 1912: Detroit players went on strike to protest Ty Cobbs suspension. To avoid a forfeit and “ne, manager Hugh Jennings recruited college players and others; they lost to the Philadelphia As 24-2. Joe Travers gave up all 24 runs on 26 hits. 1929: The Brooklyn Dodgers outslugged the Philadelphia Phillies for a 20-16 victory in the “rst game of a doubleheader. Brooklyns Babe Herman and Johnny Frederick each had “ve hits. Frederick scored “ve times to give him a major league record eight runs in two games. The Phillies won the second game 8-6. The teams combined for a record 50 runs in a doubleheader.BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSDodgers 7, Marlins 0: Justin Turner drove in “ve runs in his third game back from the disabled list to back Kenta Maedas eight shutout innings. Red Sox 6, Orioles 2: Xander Bogaerts and J.D. Martinez homered to back a complete game effort by David Price. Pirates 5, Padres 4: Gregory Polanco led off the seventh inning with a double and scored the go-ahead run on an error for Pittsburghs eighth win in nine games. Athletics 10, Blue Jays 5: Khris Davis went 4 for 4 and scored three times as Oakland won for the second time in its past 13 games north of the border. Phillies 6, Cardinals 2: Vince Velasquez pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning, Carlos Santana and Pedro Florimon each hit home runs, and Philadelphia won for the seventh time in eight games. White Sox 4, Rangers 2: Welington Castillo hit a tiebreaking two-run single in Chicagos four-run eighth. Yoan Moncada sparked the winning rally with a ground-rule double after Jose Leclerc (1-1) retired the “rst two batters of the inning. Moncada advanced on a passed ball and scored when Leclerc committed a throwing error on Yolmer Sanchezs tapper back to the mound. Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, ppd. LATE Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels Detroit at Seattle Colorado at San FranciscoTODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Los Angeles Stripling (R) 0-1 2.20 0-3 0-1 1.2 21.60 Washington Scherzer (R) 7:05p 7-1 1.69 8-1 1-0 7.0 0.00 San Diego Ross (R) 2-3 3.59 5-3 0-0 0.0 0.00 Pittsburgh Nova (R) 7:05p 2-3 5.01 5-4 0-1 11.0 4.09 Arizona Godley (R) 4-2 4.08 5-3 0-1 11.2 2.31 New York deGrom (R) 7:10p 3-0 1.83 4-4 0-0 0.0 0.00 Chicago Hendricks (R) 3-3 3.20 3-5 1-0 12.0 1.50 Cincinnati Bailey (R) 7:10p 1-5 5.59 1-8 0-0 8.2 6.23 Miami Straily (R) 1-0 5.54 3-0 2-1 25.0 4.32 Atlanta Newcomb (L) 7:35p 4-1 2.51 5-3 0-1 11.0 4.91 Philadelphia Arrieta (R) 3-1 2.59 3-4 1-2 21.0 3.86 St. Louis Wacha (R) 8:15p 4-1 3.09 6-2 1-0 10.0 3.60 Colorado Freeland (L) 3-4 3.42 4-4 2-2 22.1 3.22 San Fran Holland (L) 10:15p 2-4 4.79 3-5 0-1 4.0 13.50AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Oakland Anderson (L) 0-2 8.16 1-2 0-0 0.0 0.00 Toronto Estrada (R) 7:07p 2-3 5.32 5-3 0-1 10.2 5.06 Baltimore Cobb (R) 0-5 7.06 0-6 3-1 29.1 3.38 Boston Pomeranz (L) 7:10p 1-1 5.47 3-2 2-1 23.0 1.96 Texas TBD 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Chicago Fulmer (R) 8:10p 2-3 6.53 3-4 0-0 0.0 0.00 Cleveland Clevinger (R) 3-0 2.70 4-4 1-0 7.0 0.00 Houston Morton (R) 8:10p 5-0 2.03 5-3 0-1 5.1 6.75 New York Sabathia (L) 2-0 2.23 4-3 2-0 12.2 2.13 Kansas City Junis (R) 8:15p 4-3 3.53 5-3 0-1 5.2 9.53 Tampa Bay Snell (L) 4-3 3.12 4-5 0-0 0.0 0.00 Los Angeles Tropeano (R) 10:07p 1-2 3.64 2-3 0-0 0.0 0.00 Detroit Fulmer (R) 1-3 4.37 3-5 0-0 0.0 0.00 Seattle Hernandez (R) 10:10p 5-3 5.66 6-3 0-1 2.0 18.00INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Milwaukee Suter (L) 2-3 5.14 2-5 0-0 4.0 6.75 Minnesota Gibson (R) 8:10p 1-1 3.43 5-3 0-0 0.0 0.00 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. VS OPP-Pitchers record versus this opponent. WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League Cleveland 6, Detroit 0 Tampa Bay 5, Kansas City 3 Texas 5, Seattle 1 Boston 6, Oakland 4 Houston 2, L.A. Angels 0 National League Milwaukee 8, Arizona 2 Cincinnati 6, San Francisco 3 Miami 6, L.A. Dodgers 5 Atlanta 4, Chicago Cubs 1 Interleague Washington 3, N.Y. Yankees 3, 5 innings, susp. N.Y. Yankees at Washington, ppd. Philadelphia 4, Baltimore 1 Pittsburgh 3, Chicago White Sox 2 St. Louis 7, Minnesota 5 Toronto 12, N.Y. Mets 1 SATURDAYS GAMES American League Oakland at Toronto, 1:07 p.m. Cleveland at Houston, 4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Texas at Chicago White Sox, 7:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, 7:15 p.m. Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 9:07 p.m. Detroit at Seattle, 9:10 p.m. National League Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m., 1st game Philadelphia at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Arizona at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m., 2nd game Miami at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Interleague Milwaukee at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.BASEBALL CALENDARJUNE 4: Amateur draft starts. JUNE 15: International amateur signing period closes. JULY 2: International amateur signing period opens. JULY 6: Last day to sign for amateur draft picks subject to deadline. JULY 17: All-Star Game, Washington. JULY 29: Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. JULY 31: Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. OCT. 2-3: Wild-card games. DEC. 10-13: Winter meetings, Las Vegas. TOP TEN A MERICAN LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Betts, Bos 39 150 44 53 .353 JMartinez, Bos 41 160 28 55 .344 Simmons, LAA 41 152 26 52 .342 MMachado, Bal 42 161 25 55 .342 Brantley, Cle 32 130 19 44 .338 Lowrie, Oak 42 169 17 55 .325 MDuffy, TB 30 121 9 39 .322 Castellanos, Det 39 152 21 48 .316 DGordon, Sea 41 168 24 53 .315 Lindor, Cle 42 175 36 55 .314 NATIONAL LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. OHerrera 39 143 23 51 .357 Markakis, Atl 42 168 30 56 .333 Gennett, Cin 42 159 21 52 .327 FFreeman, Atl 42 157 30 51 .325 Cabrera, NYM 38 150 23 48 .320 Kemp, LAD 41 129 13 41 .318 Dickerson, Pit 38 148 21 47 .318 Arenado, Col 38 139 22 44 .317 Pham, StL 36 125 30 39 .312 Posey, SF 35 129 17 40 .310 Through May 16

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** The News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 C5 SCOREBOARD Chipola wins state title LAKELAND „ Chipola shut out Hillsborough 5-0 on Thursday in the if necessaryŽ game to win the FSCAA state baseball tournament.The Indians, 42-16, went 5-1 in the state tour-nament to advance to the national tournament on May 26 in Grand Junction, Colo.Chipola opened at state with an 11-8 win over Miami Dade, then defeated Santa Fe 4-1, State College of Florida Manatee-Sarasota 10-3 and Santa Fe 9-8 before suffering its first defeat, 8-3, against Hillsbor-ough on Wednesday.That necessitated the return matchup on Thursday.Tallahassee, the other Panhandle Con-ference representative, was eliminated in three games. The Eagles lost to State College of Flor-ida Manatee-Sarasota 6-2, downed Central Florida 12-4 and were eliminated by Santa Fe 6-3. Lady Indians fall to Eastern Arizona in 8ST. GEORGE, UTAH „ The Chipola softball team took its first loss of the NJCAA Division I Softball Championship tournament on Thursday afternoon, falling to No. 7 seed Eastern Arizona 4-3 in eight innings.The No. 2 seed Lady Indians (49-3) led 3-1 after six innings, but Eastern Arizona (54-10) extended the game with a pair of runs in the bottom of the seventh thanks to an RBI single by Lena Kotrys and an RBI sacrifice fly by Cza-rina Lorta.Vesi Liiliis solo home run to left field in the bottom of the eighth inning gave the Gila Mon-sters the walk-off win. They advanced to todays semifinal round game against Temple (Tex.). Chipola fell into the losers bracket to face South Georgia State/Howard (Tex.) late Thursday night.Pania Monk started in the circle for Eastern Arizona and went all eight innings to get the win, giving up three earned runs on six hits and three walks with seven strikeouts. Krys-tal Goodman started for Chipola and allowed two earned runs on four hits and four walks with two strikeouts in six innings. Morgan Goree took the loss for surrendering two earned runs on two hits in an inning of work.Candela Figueroa led the Lady Indians offen-sively, going 3 for 4 with a double, a run, and an RBI, while Lauren Finch was 1 for 3 with an RBI. Barbara Woll and Amy Woodham each had a hit and scored a run. The Lady Indians won their tournament opener Wednesday 15-0 over Central Alabama in five innings. IN BRIEFFootball Spring jamboree (Arnold, Bay, Mosley) at Arnold 6 p.m.AREA EVENTS Today AUTO RACING Noon FS1 [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, All-Star Open & Race, “ nal practice, at Concord, N.C. 1:30 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, All-Star Open, pit road speed practice, at Concord, N.C. 3:30 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, North Carolina Education Lottery 200, qualifying, at Concord, N.C. 5 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, All-Star Open & Race, qualifying, at Concord, N.C. 7:30 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, North Carolina Education Lottery 200, at Concord, N.C. COLLEGE SOFTBALL 11 a.m. ESPN2 [„] NCAA Tournament, Lexington, Ky. Regional, Notre Dame vs. Michigan ESPNU [„] NCAA Tournament, Athens, Ga. Regional, Northwestern vs. California 1:30 p.m. ESPNU [„] NCAA Tournament, Fayetteville, Ark. Regional, Wichita St. vs. Oklahoma St. SEC [„] NCAA Tournament, Athens, Ga. Regional, Harvard vs. Georgia, SEC Network 4 p.m. ESPNU [„] NCAA Tournament, Gainesville, Fla. Regional, South Florida vs. Ohio St. SEC [„] NCAA Tournament, Fayetteville, Ark. Regional, DePaul vs. Arkansas, SEC Network 6 p.m. ESPN [„] NCAA Tournament, Tempe, Ariz., Regional, Mississippi vs. Long Beach St. ESPN2 [„] NCAA Tournament, Norman, Okla. Regional, Boston U. vs. Oklahoma 8 p.m. ESPN [„] NCAA Tournament, Seattle Regional, Texas vs. Minnesota ESPN2 [„] NCAA Tournament, Tucson, Ariz. Regional, North Dakota St. vs. Mississippi St. 10 p.m. ESPN2 [„] NCAA Tournament, Los Angeles Regional, Sacramento St. vs. UCLA 10:30 p.m. ESPNU [„] NCAA Tournament, Seattle Regional, Boise St. vs. Washington GOLF 9:30 a.m. GOLF [„] LPGA Tour, Kingsmill Championship, second round, at Williamsburg, Va. 11:30 a.m. GOLF [„] Champions Tour, Regions Tradition, second round, at Birmingham, Ala. 3 p.m. GOLF [„] PGA Tour, AT&T Byron Nelson, second round, at Dallas 6 p.m. GOLF [„] Web.com Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, second round, at Greenville, S.C. (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 2 p.m. NBCSN [„] Black-Eyed Susan Stakes, at Baltimore MLB 6 p.m. MLB [„] Regional coverage, L.A. Dodgers at Washington OR Arizona at N.Y. Mets NBA 2 p.m. ESPN2 [„] NBA Draft Combine, at Chicago NHL 7 p.m. NBCSN [„] NHL Stanley Cup playoffs, Western Conference “ nals, Game 4, Winnipeg at VegasON THE AIR EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbed simulcast: Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Pimlico 12:10 p.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m., Churchill 4 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Pimlico 12:10 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Ebro live racing 6:30 p.m. Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Ebro live racing 1:30 p.m. Thoroughbred simulcast:Pimlico 9:30 a.m., Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 11:50 a.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 7 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m, Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Churchill a.m. 11:45 a.m., Parx 11:55 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m., Belmont 12:30 p.m., Santa Anita 1:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM … (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. LOCATION … Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION …234-3943. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLToday National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINEat Washington -210 Los Angeles +190 at Pittsburgh -125 San Diego +115 at New York -157 Arizona +147 Chicago -180 at Cincinnati +165 at Atlanta -213 Miami +193 at St. Louis -114 Philadelphia +104 at San Francisco -105 Colorado -105American LeagueAt Toronto -130 Oakland +120 at Boston -180 Baltimore +165 at Houston -165 Cleveland +155 at Chicago Off Texas Off New York -174 at Kansas City +162 at Los Angeles -130 Tampa Bay +120 at Seattle -150 Detroit +140Interleagueat Minnesota -135 Milwaukee +125NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PlayoffsSaturdayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOGat Cleveland 6 205 BostonSundayat Golden State 7 226 HoustonNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Stanley Cup PlayoffsTodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINEat Vegas -121 Winnipeg +111 Updated odds available at Pregame.com HORSE RACING THE PREAKNESS ODDS CHARTThe “ eld for Saturdays 143rd Preakness Stakes:PP Horse Jockey Odds 1. Quip Florent Geroux 12-1 2. Lone Sailor Irad Ortiz Jr. 15-1 3. Sporting Chance Luis Contreras 30-1 4. Diamond King Javier Castellano 30-1 5. Good Magic Jose Ortiz 3-1 6. Tenfold Ricardo Santana Jr. 20-1 7. Justify Mike Smith 1-2 8. Bravazo LuisSaez 20-1 Trainers: 1. Rodolphe Brisset. 2. Thomas Amoss. 3. D. Wayne Lukas. 4. John Servis. 5. Chad Brown. 6. Steve Asmussen. 7. Bob Baffert. 8. D.Wayne Lukas. Weights: 126 each. Distance: 1 3-16 miles. Purse: $1 ,500,000. First place: $900,000. Second place: $300,000. Third place: $165,000. Fourth place: $90,000. Post time: 5:48 p.m. CDT. PRO BASKETBALL NBAPLAYOFFSAll times CentralCONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE BOSTON 2, CLEVELAND 0May 13: Boston 108, Cleveland 83 May 15: Boston 107, Cleveland 94 Saturday : Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. Monday : Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 23: Cleveland at Boston, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: Boston at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 27: Cleveland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCE GOLDEN STATE 1, HOUSTON 1May 14: Golden State 119, Houston 106 Wednesday: Houston 127, Golden State 105 Sunday : Houston at Golden State, 8 p.m. Tuesday : Houston at Golden State, 9 p.m. Thursday, May 24: Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m. x-Saturday, May 26: Houston at Golden State, 8 p.m. x-Monday, May 28: Golden State at Houston, 8 p.m.INDIVIDUAL PLAYOFF STATISTICSThrough May 16: SCORING G FG FT PTS. AVG. James, CLE 13 161 92 434 33.4 Davis, NOR 9 106 53 271 30.1 Durant, GOL 12 129 72 355 29.6 Harden, HOU 12 113 86 353 29.4 Westbrook, OKC 6 64 33 176 29.3 Wall, WSH 6 56 40 156 26.0 Antetokounmpo, MIL 7 69 38 180 25.7 McCollum, POR 4 40 10 101 25.2 Middleton, MIL 7 67 14 173 24.7 George, OKC 6 49 31 148 24.7 Mitchell, UTA 11 102 39 268 24.4 Holiday, NOR 9 88 21 213 23.7 Aldridge, SAN 5 37 41 118 23.6 Beal, WSH 6 49 20 139 23.2 Oladipo, IND 7 53 30 159 22.7 DeRozan, TOR 10 87 43 227 22.7 Paul, HOU 12 97 37 257 21.4 Embiid, PHL 8 60 43 171 21.4 Thompson, GOL 12 96 20 248 20.7 Dragic, MIA 5 35 15 93 18.6 FG PERCENTAGE FG FGA PCT. Gobert, UTA 55 84 .655 Capela, HOU 72 111 .649 Scott, WSH 26 41 .634 Favors, UTA 42 68 .618 Turner, IND 33 54 .611 Young, IND 36 60 .600 Middleton, MIL 67 112 .598 Adams, OKC 27 46 .587 Sabonis, IND 36 62 .581 Horford, BOS 91 158 .576 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT AVG. Davis, NOR 9 24 97 121 13.4 Towns, MIN 5 15 52 67 13.4 Embiid, PHL 8 23 78 101 12.6 Westbrook, OKC 6 11 61 72 12.0 Capela, HOU 12 45 93 138 11.5 Green, GOL 12 27 103 130 10.8 Gobert, UTA 11 43 75 118 10.7 Valanciunas, TOR 10 30 75 105 10.5 Love, CLE 13 29 105 134 10.3 Antetokounmpo, MIL 7 8 59 67 9.6 ASSISTS G AST AVG. Rondo, NOR 9 110 12.2 Wall, WSH 6 69 11.5 James, CLE 13 120 9.2 Green, GOL 12 105 8.8 Lowry, TOR 10 85 8.5 Simmons, PHL 10 77 7.7 Westbrook, OKC 6 45 7.5 Harden, HOU 12 84 7.0 Holiday, NOR 9 57 6.3 Antetokounmpo, MIL 7 44 6.3 PRO HOCKEY NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFSAll times CentralCONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE WASHINGTON 2, TAMPA BAY 2May 11: Washington 4, Tampa Bay 2 May 13: Washington 6, Tampa Bay 2 May 15: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Thursday: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Saturday: Washington at Tampa Bay, 6:15 p.m. Monday, May 21: Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 23: Washington at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.LIGHTNING 4, CAPITALS 2TAMPA BAY 2 0 2 „ 4 WASHINGTON 1 1 0 „ 2 First Period„1, Washington, Orlov 2 (Niskanen, Oshie), 4:28. 2, Tampa Bay, Point 7 (Gourde, Johnson), 5:38. 3, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 7 (Miller, Point), 8:32 (pp). Penalties„Eller, WSH, (holding), 7:27; Gourde, TB, (interference), 11:20; Hedman, TB, (slashing), 14:31; Kucherov, TB, (hooking), 17:56. Second Period„4, Washington, Kuznetsov 10 (Ovechkin, Wilson), 5:18. Penalties„Hedman, TB, (tripping), 7:08. Third Period„5, Tampa Bay, Killorn 5 (Palat, Sergachev), 11:57. 6, Tampa Bay, Cirelli 2, 19:58. Penalties„Eller, WSH, (hooking), 9:51. Shots on Goal„Tampa Bay 7-6-7„20. Washington 15-14-9„38. Power -play opportunities„Tampa Bay 1 of 2; Washington 0 of 4. Goalies„Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 10-4 (38 shots-36 saves). Washington, Holtby 10-5 (19-16). A„18,605 (18,277). T„2:34. Referees„Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen„Michel Cormier, Brian Murphy.WESTERN CONFERENCE VEGAS 2, WINNIPEG 1May 12: Winnipeg 4, Vegas 2 May 14: Vegas 3, Winnipeg 1 Wednesday: Vegas 4, Winnipeg 2 Today: Winnipeg at Vegas, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 20: Vegas at Winnipeg, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 22: Winnipeg at Vegas, 8 p.m. x-Thursday, May 24: Vegas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.INDIVIDUAL PLAYOFF STATISTICSThrough May 16:SCORING LEADERS GP G A PTS Jake Guentzel, PIT 12 10 11 21 Sidney Crosby, PIT 12 9 12 21 Mark Scheifele, WPG 15 14 6 20 Evgeny Kuznetsov, WSH 15 9 11 20 David Pastrnak, BOS 12 6 14 20 Blake Wheeler, WPG 15 3 17 20 Alex Ovechkin, WSH 15 10 9 19 Jonathan Marchessault, VGK 13 8 9 17 Brad Marchand, BOS 12 4 13 17 Filip Forsberg, NSH 13 7 9 16 Nikita Kucherov, TB 13 7 9 16 Patrice Bergeron, BOS 11 6 10 16 Paul Stastny, WPG 15 6 9 15 Steven Stamkos, TB 13 6 9 15 Dustin Byfuglien, WPG 15 5 10 15GOALS AGAINST AVERAGEAt least 10 games played Name Team GPI MINS GA AVG Marc-Andre Fleury VGK 13 845 24 1.70 Braden Holtby WSH 14 852 31 2.18 Martin Jones SJ 10 584 22 2.26 Connor Hellebuyck WPG 15 898 35 2.34 Matt Murray PIT 12 715 29 2.43 Andrei Vasilevskiy TB 13 760 34 2.68 Tuukka Rask BOS 12 686 33 2.88 Pekka Rinne NSH 13 684 35 3.07GOALTENDERS SAVES PERCENTAGEName Team GP MIN GA SA SPCT Marc-Andre Fleury VGK 13 845 24 436 0.945 Martin Jones SJ 10 584 22 304 0.928 Connor Hellebuyck WPG 15 898 35 450 0.922 Braden Holtby WSH 14 852 31 390 0.921 Andrei Vasilevskiy TB 13 760 34 401 0.915 Matt Murray PIT 12 715 29 314 0.908 Pekka Rinne NSH 13 684 35 363 0.904 Tuukka Rask BOS 12 686 33 339 0.903 GOALTENDERS SHUTOUT RECORDName Team GPI MINS SO Marc-Andre Fleury VGK 13 845 4 Connor Hellebuyck WPG 15 898 2 Martin Jones SJ 10 584 2 Matt Murray PIT 12 715 2 Pekka Rinne NSH 13 684 2 AHL CALDER CUP PLAYOFFSAll times Eastern CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE LEHIGH VALLEY VS. TORONTOSaturday: Lehigh Valley at Toronto, 4 p.m. Sunday : Lehigh Valley at Toronto, 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 23: Toronto at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. Friday, May 25: Toronto at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. x-Saturday, May 26: Toronto at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m. x-Monday, May 28: Lehigh Valley at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 30: Lehigh Valley at Toronto, 7 p.m.WESTERN CONFERENCE ROCKFORD VS. TEXASToday: Rockford at Texas, 7 p.m. Sunday : Rockford at Texas, 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 22: Texas at Rockford, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24: Texas at Rockford, 7 p.m. x-Friday, May 25: Texas at Rockford, 7 p.m. x-Monday, May 28: Rockford at Texas, 7 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 29: Rockford at Texas, 7 p.m. GOLF PGA TOURAT&T BYRON NELSONThursday at Trinity Forest GC, Dallas; Purse: $7.7 million; Yardage: 7,380; Par: 71 (36-35) FIRST ROUND Marc Leishman 32-29„61 -10 J.J. Spaun 30-34„64 -7 Jimmy Walker 31-33„64 -7 Sam Saunders 32-33„65 -6 Aaron Wise 33-32„65 -6 Keith Mitchell 32-33„65 -6 Abraham Ancer 34-31„65 -6 Jonathan Byrd 32-33„65 -6 Ethan Tracy 31-34„65 -6 Peter Uihlein 31-34„65 -6 Tyler Duncan 31-34„65 -6 Rory Sabbatini 34-32„66 -5 Ryan Armour 33-33„66 -5 Branden Grace 32-34„66 -5 Kevin Na 31-35„66 -5 Seamus Power 35-31„66 -5 Ryan Blaum 33-33„66 -5 Eric Axley 32-34„66 -5 Robert Garrigus 33-33„66 -5 Tom Lovelady 33-33„66 -5 T.J. Vogel 33-33„66 -5 Nicholas Lindheim 33-33„66 -5 Brandt Snedeker 32-35„67 -4 Sangmoon Bae 34-33„67 -4 Billy Hurley III 31-36„67 -4 Talor Gooch 32-35„67 -4 Tim Herron 33-34„67 -4 Kelly Kraft 33-34„67 -4 Zac Blair 35-32„67 -4 Johnson Wagner 31-36„67 -4 Dominic Bozzelli 32-35„67 -4 C.T. Pan 33-34„67 -4 Adam Scott 32-35„67 -4 Brian Gay 34-33„67 -4 Graeme McDowell 33-34„67 -4 Bill Haas 32-35„67 -4 Troy Merritt 33-34„67 -4 Matt Jones 34-33„67 -4 Patrick Rodgers 34-33„67 -4 Cameron Percy 33-34„67 -4 Kevin Tway 32-35„67 -4 Nate Lashley 32-35„67 -4 Joel Dahmen 34-33„67 -4 Vaughn Taylor 35-33„68 -3 James Hahn 35-33„68 -3 Billy Horschel 34-34„68 -3 Ryan Palmer 34-34„68 -3 Ben Crane 35-33„68 -3 Andrew Putnam 34-34„68 -3 Maverick McNealy 32-36„68 -3 Sung Kang 33-35„68 -3 Anirban Lahiri 35-33„68 -3 Mark Wilson 32-36„68 -3 Carl Pettersson 34-34„68 -3 Shawn Stefani 33-35„68 -3 J.T. Poston 34-34„68 -3 J.B. Holmes 35-34„69 -2 Cameron Beckman 35-34„69 -2 Charles Howell III 34-35„69 -2 Robert Streb 34-35„69 -2 Geoff Ogilvy 33-36„69 -2 Joaquin Niemann 35-34„69 -2 Corey Conners 33-36„69 -2 Zecheng Dou 36-33„69 -2 Harris English 34-35„69 -2 Brendon de Jonge 32-37„69 -2 Nick Taylor 33-36„69 -2 Martin Piller 34-35„69 -2 Padraig Harrington 33-36„69 -2 Fabin Gmez 35-34„69 -2 Jordan Spieth 35-34„69 -2 Russell Knox 35-34„69 -2 Peter Malnati 34-35„69 -2 Brian Davis 35-34„69 -2 J.J. Henry 34-35„69 -2 Matt Atkins 31-38„69 -2 Bronson Burgoon 36-33„69 -2 Xinjun Zhang 34-35„69 -2 Alex Cejka 35-35„70 -1 Steve Marino 34-36„70 -1 Steve Wheatcroft 33-37„70 -1 Ken Duke 34-36„70 -1 Beau Hossler 36-34„70 -1 Hudson Swafford 34-36„70 -1 Grayson Murray 34-36„70 -1 George McNeill 36-34„70 -1 Martin Flores 34-36„70 -1 Richy Werenski 35-35„70 -1 Tommy Gainey 35-35„70 -1 Derek Fathauer 34-36„70 -1 Adam Schenk 34-36„70 -1 Sam Ryder 34-36„70 -1 Ben Silverman 33-37„70 -1 Rick Lamb 34-36„70 -1 Robert Allenby 34-36„70 -1 Hunter Mahan 36-34„70 -1 Rod Pampling 35-35„70 -1 Scott Piercy 34-36„70 -1 Charlie Beljan 35-35„70 -1 John Huh 36-34„70 -1 John Rollins 36-34„70 -1 Conrad Shindler 33-37„70 -1 Roberto Daz 32-38„70 -1 Martin Laird 36-35„71 E David Hearn 35-36„71 E David Lingmerth 35-36„71 E Satoshi Kodaira 35-36„71 E Cody Gribble 36-35„71 E Stuart Appleby 33-38„71 E Kris Blanks 35-36„71 E Andrew Yun 35-36„71 E Noah Goodwin 35-36„71 E Michael Thompson 34-37„71 E Parker McLachlin 34-37„71 E Ernie Els 35-36„71 E Aaron Baddeley 35-36„71 E Brian Stuard 36-35„71 E Brett Stegmaier 36-35„71 E Denny McCarthy 38-33„71 E Hideki Matsuyama 37-35„72 +1 Matt Kuchar 35-37„72 +1 Sergio Garcia 37-35„72 +1 Chad Campbell 33-39„72 +1 ngel Cabrera 36-36„72 +1 John Senden 34-38„72 +1 Will Zalatoris 37-35„72 +1 Tom Whitney 33-39„72 +1 David Berganio, Jr. 35-37„72 +1 Michael Kim 35-37„72 +1 Matt Every 37-35„72 +1 John Merrick 36-36„72 +1 Blayne Barber 35-37„72 +1 Omar Uresti 35-37„72 +1 Lanto Grif“ n 41-31„72 +1 Stephan Jaeger 38-34„72 +1 Jonathan Randolph 36-36„72 +1 Oliver Goss 37-35„72 +1 Cameron Tringale 37-36„73 +2 Dicky Pride 32-41„73 +2 Troy Matteson 38-35„73 +2 Steven Ihm 36-37„73 +2 Rob Oppenheim 37-36„73 +2 Ricky Barnes 40-33„73 +2 Ben Martin 36-37„73 +2 Daniel Chopra 35-39„74 +3 Kyle Thompson 37-37„74 +3 Steven Bowditch 35-40„75 +4 Brendon Todd 36-39„75 +4 Tyrone Van Aswegen 39-37„76 +5 Daniel Summerhays 41-35„76 +5 Ryan Baca 35-41„76 +5 Brian Norman 39-37„76 +5 Smylie Kaufman 39-38„77 +6 D.J. Trahan 41-37„78 +7 Greg Chalmers 42-36„78 +7 David Duval 38-42„80 +9 AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPPOINTS LEADERS Through May 121. Kyle Busch, 503 2. Joey Logano, 491 3. Kevin Harvick, 484 4. Brad Keselowski, 396 5. Kurt Busch, 393 6. Clint Bowyer, 386 7. Denny Hamlin, 380 8. Martin Truex Jr., 376 9. Ryan Blaney, 365 10. Kyle Larson, 356 11. Aric Almirola, 342 12. Jimmie Johnson, 286 13. Erik Jones, 285 14. Alex Bowman, 271 15. Chase Elliott, 266 16. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 265 17. Austin Dillon, 241 18. Paul Menard, 240 19. William Byron, 229 20. Ryan Newman, 225NASCAR XFINITY POINTS LEADERS Through May 5 1. Elliott Sadler, 401 2. Justin Allgaier, 368 3. Tyler Reddick, 363 4. Christopher Bell, 349 5. Daniel Hemric, 343 6. Cole Custer, 323 7. Brandon Jones, 304 8. Ryan Truex, 285 9. Spencer Gallagher, 277 10. Matt Tifft, 270 11. Ryan Reed, 252 12. Austin Cindric, 219 13. Ross Chastain, 208 14. Michael Annett, 196 15. Ryan Sieg, 184 16. John Hunter Nemechek, 174 17. Alex Labbe, 166 18. Jeremy Clements, 158 19. Kaz Grala, 156 20. Garrett Smithley, 156NASCAR CAMPING WORLD TRUCK POINTS LEADERS Through May 11 1. Johnny Sauter, 275 2. Noah Gragson, 240 3. Grant En“ nger, 214 4. Brett Mof“ tt, 213 5. Ben Rhodes, 213 6. Matt Crafton, 205 7. Stewart Friesen, 178 8. Justin Haley, 173 9. Dalton Sargeant, 168 10. Myatt Snider, 167 11. Cody Coughlin, 149 12. Austin Hill, 131 13. Justin Fontaine, 120 14. Austin Wayne Self, 116 15. Wendell Chavous, 111 16. Jordan Anderson, 107 17. Joe Nemechek, 104 18. Spencer Davis, 94 19. Jesse Little, 78 20. Robby Lyons, 78INDYCAR POINTS LEADERS Through May 12 1. Josef Newgarden, 178 2. Alexander Rossi, 176 3. Sebastien Bourdais, 152 4. Scott Dixon, 147 5. James Hinchcliffe, 144 6. Graham Rahal, 142 7. Will Power, 135 8. Robert Wickens, 133 9. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 125 10. Marco Andretti, 105 11. Tony Kanaan, 95 12. Simon Pagenaud, 90 13. Takuma Sato, 90 14. Ed Jones, 87 15. Zach Veach, 84 16. Spencer Pigot, 76 17. Gabby Chaves, 68 18. Charlie Kimball, 60 19. Matheus Leist, 60 20. Max Chilton, 58FORMULA ONE POINTS LEADERS Through May 13 1. Lewis Hamilton, 95 2. Sebastian Vettel, 78 3. Valtteri Bottas, 58 4. Kimi Raikkonen, 48 5. Daniel Ricciardo, 47 6. Max Verstappen, 33 7. Fernando Alonso, 32 8. Nico Hulkenberg, 22 9. Kevin Magnussen, 19 10. Carlos Sainz, 19 11. Sergio Perez, 17 12. Pierre Gasly, 12 13. Charles Leclerc, 9 14. Stoffel Vandoorne, 8 15. Lance Stroll, 4 16. Marcus Ericsson, 2 17. Esteban Ocon, 1 18. Brendon Hartley, 1NHRA LEADERS Through May 6 Top Fuel1. Steve Torrence, 581. 2. Tony Schumacher, 461. 3. Doug Kalitta, 458. 4. Clay Millican, 448. 5. Leah Pritchett, 435. 6. Antron Brown, 390. 7. Brittany Force, 375. 8. Terry McMillen, 336. 9. Richie Crampton, 280. 10. Mike Salinas, 275. Funny Car 1. Courtney Force, 546. 2. Jack Beckman, 538. 3. Matt Hagan, 487. 4. Tommy Johnson Jr., 436. 5. J.R. Todd, 428. 6. Robert Hight, 421. 7. Ron Capps, 404. 8. Cruz Pedregon, 357. 9. Shawn Langdon, 301. 10. Tim Wilkerson, 293. Pro Stock 1. Vincent Nobile, 534. 2. Bo Butner, 486. 3. Greg Anderson, 463. 4. Chris McGaha, 460. 5. Drew Skillman, 444. 6. Tanner Gray, 439. 7. Erica Enders, 438. 8. Deric Kramer, 414. 9. Jason Line, 368. 10. Alex Laughlin, 349. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Eddie Krawiec, 286. 2. Andrew Hines, 261. 3. Scotty Pollacheck, 246. 4. Jerry Savoie, 203. 5. Angelle Sampey, 177. 6. Hector Arana, 159. 7. LE Tonglet, 154. 8. Hector Arana Jr, 153. 9. Cory Reed, 142. 10. Steve Johnson, 121. TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBALTIMORE ORIOLES „ Optioned C Caleb Joseph to Norfolk (IL). Recalled C Andrew Susac from Norfolk. HOUSTON ASTROS „ Optioned OF Jake Marisnick to Fresno (PCL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS „ Optioned RHP Jaime Barria to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Eduardo Paredes from Salt Lake. OAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Placed C Bruce Maxwell on the restricted list. Recalled C Josh Phegley from Nashville (PCL). SEATTLE MARINERS „ Optioned RHP Christian Bergman to Tacoma (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Ryan Cook from Tacoma.National LeagueATLANTA BRAVES „ Placed RHP Mike Soroka on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Monday. Recalled LHP Max Fried from Gwinnett (IL). Sent SS Dansby Swanson to Rome (SAL) for a rehab assignment. CHICAGO CUBS „ Placed OF Jason Heyward on the 10-day DL. Optioned INF David Bote to Iowa (PCL). Recalled LHP Randy Rosario from Iowa. MIAMI MARLINS „ Sent RHP Brett G raves to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Optioned RHP Mark Leiter Jr. to Lehigh Valley (IL). Sent RHP Victor Arano to Lehigh Valley for a rehab assignment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS „ Placed C Carson Kelly on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Wednesday. Selected the contract of C Steven Baron from Memphis (PCL). Transferred RHP Adam Wainwright to the 60-day DL.Can-Am LeagueOTTAWA CHAMPIONS „ Released C Adam Martin. QUEBEC CAPITALES „ Released OF Isaac Ballou. ROCKLAND BOULDERS „ Signed INF JC Rodriguez. SUSSEX COUNTY MINERS „ Signed LHP Mark McCoy.Frontier LeagueLAKE ERIE CRUSHERS „ Sold the contract of RHP Dalton Geekie to the Chicago Cubs. RIVER CITY RASCALS „ Released RHP Lucas Williams. SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS „ Signed LHP Darrell Thompson.BASKETBALLNational Basketball AssociationMILWAUKEE BUCKS „ Named Mike Budenholzer coach.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueDENVER BRONCOS „ Signed QB Nick Stevens. GREEN BAY PACKERS „ Signed CB Josh Jackson and LB Oren Burks. OAKLAND RAIDERS „ Waived C Alex Of“ cer. Signed G Cameron Hunt. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS „ Signed LB Shaquem Grif“ n, CB Tre Flowers, LB Dadi Nicolas and WR Keenan Reynolds. Waived DE Marcell Frazier and DE Noble Nwachukwu. TENNESSEE TITANS „ Calimed OL John Theus off waivers from the New Orleans Saints. Waived DL Antwaun Woods.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueLOS ANGELES KINGS „ Signed D Oscar Fantenberg to a one-year contract extension.SOCCERNational Womens Soccer LeagueWASHINGTON SPIRIT „ Placed F Cali Farquharson on the 45-day DL. Signed F Mallory Eubanks.COLLEGESATLANTIC SUN CONFERENCE „ Added Liberty to the conference beginning with the 2018-19 academic year. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN „ Named Jeff Barber athletic director. DAVIS & ELKINS „ Named J.D. Lamm director of golf and mens and womens golf coach, effective Aug. 1. POST (CONN.) „ Named Stephanie Demake womens soccer coach. WASHINGTON STATE „ Announced graduate QB Gardner Minshew is transferring from East Carolina.

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** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MAY 18 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Broadcasting from Windsor, England. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Maury The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Jerry Springer Jerry Springer MyPillowProstate WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Countdown to the royal wedding. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The KidnappingŽ Diagnosis Murder The Big ValleyGunsmoke TatumŽ WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Sir Keith Mills. (N) Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Forensic FilesJerry Springer (N) The Real Ziggy MarleyŽ (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) Paternity CourtCouples CourtJudge FaithJudge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVAdvanced DPaid ProgramJudge Mathis (N) The Peoples Court The Peoples Court (N) CityLine WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplash A&E 34 43 118 265 Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Live PD Live PD -08.12.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 PiYo Workout!LifeLockThree Stooges (:25) ‰‰‰‚ Airplane! (80) Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty.(:25) ‰‰‰ Blazing Saddles (74) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder.Lone Ranger ANPL 46 69 184 282 Too Cute! Fluff and FeathersŽ Animal Cops Houston Animal Cops Houston Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain VetLife at Vet U My Cat From Hell BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceHouse/Payne House/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Scrubs Scrubs (:34) Scrubs (:07) Scrubs70s Show70s Show70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Big Giant Swords BattleBots (Part 1 of 2) BattleBots (Part 2 of 2) BattleBots BattleBots BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News: Daily Pop (N) Total Bellas ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) Get Up (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Outside LinesNFL Live (N) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Get UpCollege Softball Notre Dame vs Michigan. Regional. (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 LifeLockNew BissellCindys SkinPioneer Wo.ContessaContessaContessaContessaContessaContessaPioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny 700/InteractiveThe 700 Club Reba Reba Reba Reba Reba The Middle FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things First1992 All-Star RaceNASCAR RacingNASCARNASCAR RacingNASCARNASCAR FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‚ After Earth (13) ‰‰‰ Interstellar (14) Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway. Space explorers set out to find a new home for humanity. How I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family 6176Ž Actress Fiona Gubelmann. Home & Family 6175Ž Actress Kate Walsh. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Fixer UpperHouse HuntersHouse H unters HIST 35 42 120 269 God Code An expert finds a code in the Bible. UFO Conspiracy: Hunt for the Truth Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesI SurvivedI SurvivedI Survived PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Meat SaunaŽ Bar Rescue Two/Half MenTwo/Half Men (:12) Two and a Half Men Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenRoseanne Roseanne SUN 49 422 656 Florida Sport.Reel TimeReel AnimalsShip Shape TVFishing FlatsSport FishingSportsmanFlorida Insider Fishing Report Sport FishingInto the Blue SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:30) Neverknock (17) Jodelle Ferland. ‰‰‚ Dark Skies (13) Keri Russell, Josh Hamilton. ‰‰ Knowing (09) Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne, Chandler Canterbury. TBS 31 15 139 247 MarriedKingKingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 Secret (:45) ‰‚ The Gay Diplomat (31) ‰‰‚ Action in Arabia (44) Victory Quiz ‰‰‚ Ice Station Zebra (68) Rock Hudson, Ernest Borgnine. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say YesSay YesSay Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Trial by MagicŽ Charmed Lost and BoundŽ Supernatural Supernatural (Part 1 of 2) Supernatural (Part 2 of 2) Supernatural USA 62 55 105 242 Chicago P.D. Called in DeadŽ Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307Creflo DollarBeyond TodayMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MAY 18 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) Harry (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramToday Today at the Royal WeddingŽ Coverage of the nuptials. (N) (L) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) CMA AwardsCue VaporMarie OsmondPaid ProgramTraegerL King ReportTraegerPaid ProgramTai ChengTraeger ShowGet Energy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenCookSmartCook FastLuminess AirCookSmartOmegaThe Royal Wedding: A Special Edition of Good Morning America Coverage of the nuptials. (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Mannix Rage to KillŽ Cannon Kellys SongŽ 77 Sunset StripGomer PyleGomer PylePetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. Hillbillies WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS News Presents: The Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Coverage of the nuptials. (N) (L) MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesUnexplainedPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid P rogramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Imp. JokersImp. JokersSteve (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramNever FearPaid ProgramPaid ProgramDr. Ho WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 (12:30) American MastersRoyal Wedding WatchThe Royal Wedding: Prince Harry & Meghan Markle Coverage of the royal wedding. (N) (L) A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindShark IONDrs. Co-hostNew BissellCindys SkinDr. Ho Reliev.Makeup!Flipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 (:13) The Terror Hope comes in strange forms.(:33) Fear the Walking Dead (:39) Into the BadlandsThree StoogesThree StoogesThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:03) TankedTanked SHAQ-SIZED!Ž TankedTankedTreehouse MastersTreehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinHates ChrisHates ChrisHates ChrisJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithHouse/PayneHouse/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkWorkaholicsPain SolvedShark IONTry Total GymMyPillowScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:01) Bering Sea GoldSons of WinterSons of Winter StrandedŽ OutdoorsMartin Chall.Argo: Inside StoryThe Fish GuyzOut Da Bayou E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityThe Real Princess DiariesE! Live From the Royal Wedding Prince Harry marries Meghan Markle. (N) (L) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:00) First TakeNFL LiveNBA: The JumpNFL LiveBassmasters FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QuePaid ProgramNew BissellShark IONCindys SkinGuys Big BiteBrunch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Dr. DrewAge SpotsThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramPaid ProgramThe Royal Wedding: A Special Edition of Good Morning America Coverage of the nuptials. (N) FS1 24 27 150 219 (12:00) UFC ReloadedTMZ SportsDrag Racing1992 All-Star RaceNASCAR RacingNASCAR FX 45 51 136 248 (11:02) ‰‰‰‚ The Wolf of Wall Street (13) Jonah Hill (:02) Fargo AporiaŽ Suze OrmanNew BissellTry Total GymShark IONHow I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyA Royal Winter (17) Merritt Patterson. HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomePaid ProgramPiYo Workout!Tai ChengMyPillowPaid ProgramPiYo Workout!Property Broth ers: Buying HIST 35 42 120 269 (:06) The Tesla Files (:06) Ancient AliensCoinCoinCoinCoinCoinDr. Ho Reliev.Swamp People Outer LimitsŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 Harry & Meghan: Royal Rebels (:03) Biography Kate Middleton. Cindys SkinAgeless BodyHair LoveNinja Intelli-Cindys SkinAge SpotsNinja Intelli-Dr. Ho Reliev. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Ninja Warrior American Ninja WarriorTattoo Night.Sex PillsKnifeFish OilOmegaCindys SkinNew BissellPoopPiYo! SUN 49 422 656 After Midnight With the Rays From May 18, 2018. CleanseBladderProstateFoot PainCredit?Suburban upr.Facing WavesReel Animals SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‚ Dark Skies (13) Keri Russell, Josh Hamilton. Neverknock (17) Jodelle Ferland, Dominique Provost-Chalkley. LifeLockLifeLockTraeger ShowLifeLock TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰ Failure to Launch (06) Matthew McConaughey. ‰‰‚ Just Like Heaven (05) Reese Witherspoon. MarriedMarriedMarriedMarried TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‚ Dudes (87) Jon Cryer, Catherine Mary Stewart. ‰‰ Border Radio (87) Chris D., John Doe. Children Learn ‰‰ Riffraff (35) Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Una Merkel. TLC 37 40 183 280 When Harry Met MeghanPrince Harry: Wild No MoreMeghan Markle: A Royal LoveTLCs Royal Wedding LIVE Coverage of the royal wedding. (N) (L) TNT 29 54 138 245 CastleCastle Nanny McDeadŽ Castle MontrealŽ Law & Order RemandŽ Law & Order AtonementŽ Law & Order SlaveŽ USA 62 55 105 242 NCIS: Los AngelesNCIS: Los AngelesDatelineDateline The Last DanceŽ CromartiesChrisleyPhilips KitchenMyPillow WGN-A 13 239 307 How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetPerson of Interest Root PathŽ Drs. Co-hostYoga Retreat!Paid ProgramHair LovePhilips KitchenCaught on FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MAY 18 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) The Doctors (N) Harry (N) Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramJoint HealthMaury The Robert Irvine Show (N) The GoldbergsThe GoldbergsAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show (N) Dr. Phil (N) NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BonanzaThe RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainThe Wild, Wild WestHawaii Five-0M*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Divorce CourtDivorce CourtAndy GriffithAndy GriffithDateline DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury (N) Crime Watch DailySteve (N) ThisMinuteThisMinuteJudge Judy (N) Judge Judy (N) Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -02.24.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Live PD -05.12.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:25) ‰‰ The Lone Ranger (13) Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, William Fichtner.(3:55) ‰‰‰ Open Range (03) Robert Duvall. Cattle herdsmen battle a ruthless rancher in 1882. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Lone Star Law North Woods Law Tanked Tanked BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, Browns (:40) ‰‰‚ ATL (06) Tip Harris, Lauren London. Four Atlanta teens face challenges. This Christmas COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office (Part 2 of 2)(:15) The Office The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots BattleBots BattleBots BattleBots BattleBots BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 Total Bellas Power StruggleŽ Total Bellas Wine About ItŽ Total BellasTotal BellasTotal Bellas Bella-ManiaŽ E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:30) NFL Live (N) (L) NBA: The Jump (N) (L) SportsNationQuestionableAround/HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (L) College Softball ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Softball Bases Loaded (N) NBA Draft Combine 2018 Participants include Grayson Allen (Duke) and Tyus Battle (Syracuse). From Chicago. (N) (L) College Softball FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle ‰‰ Valentines Day (10) Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Jessica Biel.(:40) ‰‰ A Walk to Remember (02) Shane West, Peter Coyote. The Notebook FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCARNASCARNASCARs Toughest RaceCamerasNASCAR RacingNASCAR Racing FX 45 51 136 248 How I Met ‰‚ R.I.P.D. (13) Jeff Bridges, Ryan Reynolds. ‰‰‰ World War Z (13) Brad Pitt, Mireille Enos, James Badge Dale. The Wolf of Wall Street (13) HALL 23 59 185 312 Summer Villa (16) Victor Webster, Hilarie Burton. A Novel Romance (11) Steve Guttenberg, Shannon Elizabeth. Very, Very Valentine (18) Danica McKellar, Cameron Mathison. HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse Hunt ersHouse HuntersHouse Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 I SurvivedI SurvivedI Survived ‰‰ 90 Minutes in Heaven (15) Hayden Christensen, Kate Bosworth, Dwight Yoakam. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Roseanne Roseanne RoseanneRoseanneMom (:36) Mom (:12) Mom (4:48) Mom (:24) Mom ‰‚ The Waterboy (98) SUN 49 422 656 MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels. True Fishing Florida Insider Fishing Report ACC AccessPower of Lightning Live! Postgame SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰ Men in Black II (02) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. ‰‰‰ Men in Black (97) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. ‰‰‚ Jurassic Park III (01) Sam Neill, William H. Macy. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy Bobs BurgersBobs Burgers TCM 25 70 132 256 (:15) ‰‰‰ Confessions of a Nazi Spy (39) Francis Lederer(:15) ‰‰‰ Nazi Agent (42) Conrad Veidt. Hitler Lives (:15) ‰‰‰ Mata Hari (31) Greta Garbo, Ramon Novarro. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the Dress When Harry Met Meghan TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Bones Bones NCIS: New Orleans BaitfishŽ NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods Leap of FaithŽ Blue Bloods ParenthoodŽ Blue Bloods M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MAY 18 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Blindspot In MemoryŽ Dateline NBC Relatives keep dying in the same home. (N) NewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Harry and MeghanLife Sentence (N) Page Six TVSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKingKing of the HillCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Once Upon a TimeMarvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (:01) 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (N)(:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss: CelebrityHawaii Five-0Blue Bloods Out of the BlueŽ Modern FamilyLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenModern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 American Ninja WarriorAmerican Ninja Warrior2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsAnger MgtAnger MgtThe GameThe GameCorrupt CrimesKiller WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 MasterChef Three chefs cook; a winner is revealed. Two/Half MenTMZ (N) Crime Watch DailyPawn StarsPawn StarsTwo/Half MenHow I Met WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashIn Principle (N) American Masters Hedy LamarrŽ (N) Royal Wedding WatchAmanpour-PBSFace to FacePBS NewsHourAmer. Masters A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -01.13.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 ‰‰‰ Independence Day (96) Will Smith. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. (:05) Fear the Walking Dead (:11) Into the Badlands (12:13) Talking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Tanked: Unfiltered (N) Tanked (N)(:02) Tanked Gangster TankŽ(:04) Tanked (:05) Tanked Tank of JerichoŽ(12:05) Tanked BET 53 46 124 329 (6:30) ‰‰‚ This Christmas (07) Delroy Lindo, Idris Elba. MartinMartinMartinMartinIn Contempt BannedŽ(12:01) MartinMartin COM 64 53 107 249 The Office ‰‰‰ Dumb & Dumber (94) Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Lauren Holly. TaskmasterTaskmasterSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth Park DISC 36 39 182 278 BattleBots (N)(:01) Bering Sea Gold (N)(:01) Deadliest Catch: Decked (:01) Bering Sea Gold (:01) Deadliest Catch: Decked (12:01) BattleBots E! 63 57 114 236 ‰‚ Bride Wars (09) Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway. ‰‰‰ Enchanted (07) Amy Adams, Patrick Dempsey. E! NewsThe Real Princess Diaries ESPN 9 23 140 206 College SoftballCollege Softball Texas vs Minnesota. Regional. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College SoftballCollege Softball North Dakota State vs Mississippi State. (N) College Softball Sacramento State vs UCLA. Regional. (N) (L) First Take FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 (6:45) ‰‰‚ The Notebook (04) Ryan Gosling, Rachel McAdams, James Garner. The 700 Club ‰‰ The Wedding Planner (01) Jennifer Lopez. FS1 24 27 150 219 RaceDayNASCAR RacingDrag RacingMLB Whiparound (N) (L) UFC Weigh-InUFC Reloaded FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‰‰‚ The Wolf of Wall Street (13) Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, Margot Robbie. Trust (:02) ‰‰‰‚ The Wolf of Wall Street (13) Leonardo DiCaprio. HALL 23 59 185 312 Sun, Sand & Romance (17) Tricia Helfer, Paul Campbell. The MiddleThe MiddleGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHu nters Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient AliensAncient Aliens (N)(:03) The Tesla Files (N)(:05) Ancient Aliens (:03) Ancient Aliens (12:03) Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Harry & Meghan: A Royal Romance: Special Edition (18) Harry & Meghan: Royal Rebels (:02) Biography Kate Middleton.(:01) Harry & Meghan: A Royal Romance: Special Edition (18) PARMT 28 48 241 241 (6:00) ‰‚ The Waterboy (98) ‰‰ Happy Gilmore (96) Adam Sandler, Christopher McDonald. ‰‰‰ Tropic Thunder (08) Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Robert Downey Jr.Ninja Warrior SUN 49 422 656 Ins. LightningIns. LightningInside RaysRays PregameMLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles Angels. (N) (L) PostgameInside Rays SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‚ The Lost World: Jurassic Park (97) Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Pete Postlethwaite. FuturamaFuturamaFuturama (:32) FuturamaFuturama (:31) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 Bobs Burgers ‰‰‚ San Andreas (15) Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario. ELEAGUE ‰‰‚ Wanderlust (12) Paul Rudd, Jennifer Aniston. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‚ School for Scoundrels (60) Ian Carmichael. ‰‰‚ The Belles of St. Trinians (54) Alastair Sim. ‰‰‚ Laughter in Paradise (51) Alastair Sim, Fay Compton. TLC 37 40 183 280 Prince Harry: Wild No More (N) Meghan Markle: A Royal LoveSecrets of the Royal WeddingMeghan Markle: A Royal LoveSecrets of the Royal WeddingPrince Harry: Wil d No More TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰ The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (13) Jennifer Lawrence.(:45) ‰‰‰ The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 (14) Jennifer Lawrence. Animal Kingdom BetrayalŽ USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyNCIS: Los Angeles WGN-A 13 239 307 M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HEngagementEngagementEngagementHow I Met C6 Friday, May 18, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 C C 7 7 20439 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 18000163CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR THE CIM TRUST 2016-FRE1, MORTGAGE-BACKED NOTES, SERIES 2016-FRE1, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY SCOTT; MARIA L. SCOTT; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN#100308000020877038 ); UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONY SCOTT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARIA L. SCOTT;, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, et.al. Defendant(s) NOT ICE OF ACTION TO: ANTHONY SCOTT (Current Residence Unknown) (Last Known Address(es)) 5621 HOWARD ROAD PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 4128 JACKSON COMMUNITY ROAD VERNON, FL 32462 ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, INCLUDING, IF A NAMED DEFENDANT IS DECEASED, THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING, BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT, AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS (Last Known Address) 5621 HOWARD ROAD PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: SEE EXHIBIT ACommencing at the Northwest Corner of Section 19, Township 4 South, Range 13 West: Thence South along the West line of said Section 19 a distance of 3333.26 feet to the South R/W line of Ivy Road; thence S89 56’00” E along said R/W line 99.11 feet: thence S0 33’10”W, 145.20 feet: thence S89 56’00”E, 170 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence continue S89 56’00”E, 80.00 feet: thence S0 33’10”W, 145.20 feet: thence N89 056’00”W, 80.00 feet: thence N0 33’10”E, 145.20 feet to the Point of Beginning. Also known as Lot 3, Block “A”, Bay Front Unit Two. A/K/A: 5621 HOWARD ROAD, PANAMA CITY, FL 32404. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, POPKIN & ROSALER, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442., Attorney for Plaintiff, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the (Please publish in News Herald) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P. O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850) 747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711 OR EMAIL AD AREQUEST@JUD14 .FLCOURTS.ORG. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 26th day of April, 2018. BILL KINSAUL As Clerk of the Court By Debbie Roberson Deputy Clerk Pub: May 11, 18, 2018 20360 Case #40089 FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. CHRISTOPHER W. PIPPIN, Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CHRISTOPHER W. PIPPIN, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P.O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before June 24, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: April 24, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By:-s-Crystal Blanchard, Division Representative April 27, May 4, 11, 18, 2018 20481 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAYCOUNTY, FLORIDA GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 17000678CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., VS. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALLOTHERS WHO MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTIN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT AKINS, SR.; ROBERT AKINS, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTAKINS, JR.; DOLORES BAKICH; DONALD L. CARRICO„ Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: DONALD L. CARRICO LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 204 MISSOURI AVE LYNN HAVEN, FL32444 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT: 4704 W. DIANA AVE., GLENDALE, AZ 85302; 237 N 10TH AVE., BURWELL, NE 68823-4162; 7122 W COMET AVE., PEORIA, AZ 85345-6728; 2039 N 66TH DR., PHOENIX, AZ 08035-3411; 1814 MAINE AVE., LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444-4112 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 15 LYNN HAVEN AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOKS, PAGES 9 AND 10 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAYCOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a: 204 MISSOURI AVE LYNN HAVEN, FL32444 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on FRENKELLAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is One East Broward Blvd., Suite 1430, Ft. Lauderdale, FL,33301 (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice of Action) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at BAYCounty, Florida, this day of May 1, 2018. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT BY: Debbie Roberson DEPUTYCLERK Pub: May 18, 25, 2018 20511 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 17001293CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, V. CARA A. CHRISTIE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARA A. CHRISTIE; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2;Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 27, 2018, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Bay County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Bay County, Florida, described as: LOT 20, BLOCK E, PINE FOREST ESTATES PHASE 3, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT’ BOOK 14, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS ON FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 602 SPARROW ST, LYNN HAVEN, FL 32444 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, online at www .bay .realfore close.com on June 14, 2018 beginning at 11:00 AM. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 27 day of April, 2018. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court Ladyne Swearingen Deputy Clerk Pub: May 18, 25, 2018 20506 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017CA001090 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-18, Plaintiff, vs. MARCUS SALE; TARI SALE, et al. Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 18, 2018 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on June 5, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.(CT), at www .bay .realfore close.com. BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF TEN ACRE ROAD (60’R/W) AND THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COCOA AVENUE (60’R/W); THENCE S 0001’ 09”E ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COCOA AVENUE FOR 240 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BEARING AND RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 80 FEET; THENCE S 8913’ 52”E FOR 135 FEET; THENCE N 0001’ 09”W FOR 80 FEET; THENCE N 8913’ 52”W FOR 135 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING Property Address: 2524 COCOA AVENUE, PANAMA CITY, FL 32405 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated April 26, 2018 BILL KINSAUL, CLERK BAY COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850-747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: AD ARequest@j ud14.flcourts.org Pub May 11, 18, 2018 20513 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 17 001059CA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE E. CHRISTENSEN; et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 26, 2018, by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in Bay County, Florida, described as: TRACT 2: The North 1/2 of the following described parcel: Lots 27, 28, 29, and 30, all in Block 46, according to the Plat of Callaway, recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 1, Public Records of Bay County, Florida; together with the South 1/2 of that portion of the platted 10 foot alley lying North of and immediately adjacent to Lots 27, 28, 29, and 30 of said Block 46, and that portion of the platted 60 foot street lying South of and immediately adjacent to Lots 27, 28, 29, and 30, Block 46, said Plat of Callaway. online to the highest and best bidder for cash on June 27, 2018 beginning at 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL TIME, at www .bay .realfore close.c om, subject to all ad valorem taxes andassessments for the real property described above. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED on April 30, 2018 BILL KINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32401 BY: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk Pub: May 18, 25, 2018 20527 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2017-CA-000290 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR NEW RESIDNETIAL PASS-THROUGH TRUST V, Plaintiff VS. TASCHA JODYNE NASH; UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 1 N/K/A RYAN TAYLOR, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 23, 2018 and entered in 2017-CA-000290 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for BAY County,Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR NEW RESIDNETIAL PASS-THROUGH TRUST V is the Plaintiff and TASCHA JODYNE NASH; UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 1 N/K/A RYAN TAYLOR are the Defendant(s).Bill Kinsaul as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at www.bay.realfore close.c om, at 11:00 AM, on July 24, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 19, BLOCK D OF LANNIE ROWE LAKE ESTATES UNIT EIGHT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE(S) 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 237 CHARLENE DR PANAMA CITY, FL 32404 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this -23rd day of April, 2018. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court By: Jennifer Estrada As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Robertson,Anschutz& Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L., Boca Raton,FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 IMPORTANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@jud14.flc ourts.org 17-120284-TaM Pub: May 18, 25, 2018 20535 Notice of Default and Intent to Foreclose F oreclosure HOA 77252-LE18-HOA. Notice of Default and Intent to Foreclose regarding timeshare interest(s) owned by the Obligor(s) on Schedule “1” at Legends Edge Condominium, located in Bay County, Florida, as described pursuant the Declaration referred to below of said county, as amended. Legends Edge Condominium Association, Inc., a Florida not-for-profit corporation did cause a Claim of Lien to be recorded in public records of said county. Obligor is liable for payment in full of amounts as shown in the lien plus costs; and is presently in default of obligation to pay. Trustee is conducting a non-judicial foreclosure pursuant to Florida Statute 721.855. The Obligor must pay all sums no later than 30 days from the first date of publication by contacting Trustee or the Trustee will proceed with the sale of the timeshare interest at such date, time and location as Trustee will include in the Notice of Sale. The Trustee is: First American Title Insurance Company, a Nebraska corporation, 400 International Parkway, Suite 380, Lake Mary, FL, 32746, (702) 304-7509. Each obligor, notice address, and timeshare interest description are as listed on Schedule “1” Legal Description: Unit Week (See Schedule “1” Legal Description Variables), in Unit (See Schedule “1” Legal Description Variables), in LEGENDS EDGE CONDOMINIUM, according to the Declaration of Condominium thereof, as recorded in Official Record Book 1919, at Page 323, in the Public Records of Bay County, Florida, and anyamendments thereof. SCHEDULE ‘1’ : Contract No., Obligors, Obligor Notice Address, Legal Description Variables; LE*2607*50*X, JOHN F. BALDWIN, 17708 WORLEY DRIVE, PFLUGERVILLE, TX 78660UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 50, Unit: 2607, Frequency: Odd Year Biennial ; LE*2607*50*X, HJARDIST M. BALDWIN, 17708 WORLEY DRIVE, PFLUGERVILLE, TX 78660UNITED STATES, Unit Week: 50, Unit: 2607, Frequency: Odd Year Biennial Pub: May 18, 25, 2018 20533 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE WHITESLLC DBAGULF COUNTY WRECKER SERV gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on 05/30/2018, 08:00 am at 6120 hwy 22 panama city, FL 32404, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. WHITESLLC DBAGULF COUNTY WRECKER SERV reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 1G1PE5SBXE7134162 2014 CHEVROLET 1GCDG15Z2SF170161 1995 CHEVROLET 1GAHG39U261241463 2006 CHEVROLET 2G1WF52EXY9160198 2000 CHEVROLET 1C3BH48K6GN227516 1986 CHRYSLER 2D4GP44LX5R225001 2005 DODGE 1FAFP54N5WA190766 1998 FORD 1FALP52U1RA207161 1994 FORD 1FTEX27L0VNC42570 1997 FORD 1FMPU16505LA86990 2005 FORD F10GN675447 1976 FORD 1GTEC14W11Z157003 2001 GENERAL MOTORS CORP 1GTEC14W8TZ525325 1996 GENERAL MOTORS CORP 1GKFK66847J248054 2007 GENERAL MOTORS CORP 2HGES26714H578210 2004 HONDA 1HGEG8654SL016286 1995 HONDA 5FNRL18693B130121 2003 HONDA JALC4B14847012732 2004 ISUZU SAJDA01C6YFL67499 2000 JAGUAR 1J4GX48S43C582091 2003 JEEP 1C4PJMAK3CW176688 2012 JEEP 1J4FT48S9YL145041 2000 JEEP JM1BK12F761438723 2006 MAZDA JM1BJ225X20549041 2002 MAZDA 3N1CB51D45L537134 2005 NISSAN JS1VS55A082103430 2008 SUZUKI JT3GP10V7Y0045299 2000 TOYOTA JT3GN87R8Y0145404 2000 TOYOTA JYAVM01E21A029222 2001 YAMAHA Pub: May 18, 2018 20543 NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE WITH MINOR CHILDREN CASE NO.: 18-170DR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY IN RE: The Marriage of MATTIEU ‘KALEB THOMAS HARPER, Husband, and KASSANDRA ANN HARPER, Wife. TO: MATTIEU KALEB THOMAS HARPER 7238 Miller Road Panama City, FL 32404 (last known address) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage with minor children has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: Kassandra Ann Harper c/o Julia G. Duke, Attorney for W ife, whose address is: 1021 Grace A venue, P anama City FL 32401 on or before June 25, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at Juvenile Justice Courthouse, 533 East 11th Street, Panama City, FL 32401 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. I f you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your address. Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed or e-mailed to the address(es) on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Date: May 4, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Greg Gladden Deputy Clerk Pub: May 18, 25, June 1, 8, 2018 20541 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS AGENCY OF RECORD Destination Panama City is seeking proposals from qualified individuals or firms to conduct professional services and act as Marketing & Public Relations Agency of Record. Proposals may be submitted in person at the Destination Panama City, 1000 Beck Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401. Submittals must be notated that they are for the Marketing & Public Relations RFQ along with the firm’s name and address. Please review all documents pertaining to this request before submitting requested information. Submittals will be accepted until 3:00 p.m., CDT, on Wednesday, August 24, 2018. Specifications may be obtained at the Destination Panama City offices located at 1000 Beck Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401, or they may be obtained on our website at https://destinationpanamacity.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/M arketing-PR-RFQ-2018. pdf Destination Panama City reserves the right to reject any one or all proposals, or any part of any proposal, to waive any informality in any proposal, and to award a contract deemed to be in the best interest of the Destination Panama City. DESTINATION PANAMA CITY JENNIFER M. VIGIL PRESIDENT & CEO Pub: May 18, 2018 20594 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 18-246 DR Division: PERLA M. GREEN Petitioner and LESTER S. YOUNG, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: LESTER S. YOUNG 3026 Southmall Circle APT A Montgomery, Alabama 36116 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on PERLA M. GREEN, whose address is 1914 Frankford Ave, Apt.. 1533 Panama City Florida 32407 on or before June 11, 2018, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 533 E. 11th Street, Panama City, FL 32401, before service on Petitioner or imme-diately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following, real or personal property should be divided; (insert “none” Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: May 8, 2018 Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court Greggory Gladden Deputy Clerk February 6, 2018 Pub May 11, 18, 25, June 1, 2018 20549 PUBLIC NOTICE THE LYNN HAVEN PLANNING COMMISSION WILL HOLD A REGULAR MEETING ON JUNE 5, 2018, AT 5:30 P.M. IN “THE CHAMBERS” MEETING ROOM, 108 EAST 9TH STREET AGENDA REGULAR MEETING : 1. Call to Order 2. Minutes of March 6, 2018, Regular Meeting 3. Development Order Application (DO 18-02), Tyndall Federal Credit Union Drive Thru, Highway 77 4.Annexation (ANNEX-18-01) Robert W. Mowat, 4629 and 4617 Highway 389 and 1536 Highway 390 5. Small Scale Future Land Use Map Amendment (SSA-18-05), Robert W. Mowat, 4629 and 4617 Highway 389 and 1536 Highway 390, Bay County Residential to City of Lynn Haven Low Density Residential 6. City Planner’s Report Materials related to the above applications may be inspected by the public at the Planning Department, 825 Ohio Ave, during regular business hours. Comments may be made orally at the meeting or in writing at any time on or before the meeting date. The Planning Commission will receive public input and comments on the proposed agenda items and may make a recommendation to the City Commission. The agenda items above may be forwarded by the Planning Commission to the City Commission at the City Commission meeting on June 12, 2018 at 4 p.m. or on June 26, 2018 at 6 p.m. in The Chambers at 108 East 9th Street, Lynn Haven, Florida. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, they will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based (Florida Statute 286.0105). ***In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and 286.26, Florida Statutes, persons with disabilities needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Planning Dept. no later than two days prior to the proceeding at telephone number 850-265-2961 for assistance. If hearing impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service numbers(800) 955-8771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (VOICE), for assistance. Pub: May 18, 2018 20652 NOTICE OF ACTION IN REM AND ARREST 20604 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that Panama Mini Warehouses Pursuant to FS 83.806 will sell the contents of the following storage units #74 Marlon Adams. The contents are misc. personal property including household property. Each unit will be available at management’s discretion for sale or disposal on May 31, 2018 at 10:00 AM. Those listed can make payment with cash to recover said contents up until the time mentioned above and all property must be moved from premises that day. Panama Mini Warehouses 1603 W. 15 Street Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 784-0083 Pub May 11, 18, 2018 20632 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to FL Chapter 71178, towing and storage, the following vehicles will be auctioned off to the highest bidder at 7AM, at dates listed below. Location: Bay Auto Recovery, 1206 Bob Little Road, Panama City, FL 32404. We reserve the right to reject any and all bids. JUNE 10, 2018 WDBSK75FX31703 5038 2003 MERCEDES 2DR 1FINF2112XEA81752 1999 FORD F-250 1G-TEK19T13E236845 2003 GMC PK KL5JD56Z07K527858 2007 SUZUKI 41)R 3KPFK4A71HE141301 2017 KIA FORTE L7222031 1967 CADILLAC 4DR JUNE 22, 2018 KNDJN2A28G7409639 2016 KIA SOUL Pub May 18, 2018 20648 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Coastal Towing and Roadside Service INC, Gives notice of lien and intent to sell these vehicles on May 28th 2018 @9:00 am ET at 4610 County Rd 386 Port St Joe, FL 32456 pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Coastal Towing and Roadside Service Inc. reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 2007 TOYT 5TBRV54197S451209 2001 MITS JA4LS21H41P053942 2001 DODGE 3B7HC13YX1M577506 Pub May 18, 2018

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 8 8 Friday, May 18, 2018| The News Herald Building Construction SuperintendentGAC is hiring a experienced superintendent salary is negotiable. Employee must have field knowledge and the ability to oversee a job from start to finish. GAC offers health and life insurance, and performance bonus. Please contact 850-785-4675 or jobs@gaccontractors.com for further information. Multi-Media Sales Executive Open Territory: PC BeachThe News Herald is seeking a Multi-Media Sales Executive (MMSE) in its Panama City location. This position will focus on tactical and rapid account development by prospecting for new business in an effort to grow print and digital advertising revenue in the local retail business category. Primary responsibilities include: relationship building, conducting needs assessments by active listening and clarifying needs, develop marketing plans to meet the customer’s needs, generate and present proposals to provide long-term solutions for the customer. Minimum qualifications include: HS diploma or GED. Minimum 1-2 years experience in B2B sales. Must have a Florida driver’s license, current auto insurance and must pass drug screening. Send cover letter and resume to jsmith@pcnh.com mmccabe@pcnh.com Navy Gateway Inns and Suitesis looking for several detail-oriented, dependable team players with excellent customer service skills to perform a full range of related duties. Positions are daytime hours, to include weekends and Holidays.Housekeepers $10.77/hr Laundry Worker $9.65/hr Custodial Worker $10.77/hrApplicants must pass a background check and hold a current Driver’s license. Applications are available on-line at www .navymwrpanamacity .com/jobs or apply in person at the NSA-PC Visitors Center, Thomas Drive. For additional information call (850) 235 5737 Now hiring for: Massage Therapists Estheticians Nail Techs Brazilian WaxersP/T or F/T Email your resume to: indigoearthspa@gmail.com or apply in person: 443 Grace Ave, Panama City, FL Call (850)303-3669 Press OperatorThe News Herald in Panama City, Florida, home of the “World’s Most Beautiful Beaches” is looking for a press operator preferably with at least 2 years of experience using Web Press, must have great work history, be self-motivated, disciplined & be a team player. Ability to use a computer is required. We will train the right person in this rapidly advancing, high tech field. The position is full time & includes night and weekend work. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including 401(k), paid vacation and sick leave, medical, dental, vision & life insurance. Send your resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later time. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Web ID#:34351513 WANTED: granite/stone countertop installers and finishers/polishers. Experience preferred. Will train motivated people. Hours of work are M-F, with each work day starting at 7am. Benefits available: 401K, health insurance, life insurance, and more! Family-oriented team. Pay based on experience, and is renegotiable after a brief period. Clean background helpful. Come grow with us! Apply through this ad anytime. Apply on-site M-F, 10am-4pm: 635 Briggs Ln, Southport, FL 32409. Text FL92490 to 56654 Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen OF VESSELS DONALD WELDON V. M/V “UPGRADED”, ET AL. CASE NO. 5:18-CV-00102RH-GRJ IN THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA, PANAMA CITY DIVISION In accordance with Supplemental Rule (C)(4) for Certain Admiralty and Maritime Action of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and Local Admiralty Rule C(4), notice is hereby given of the arrest of the M/V “UPGRADED”, O/N 1140255, and the M/V “HIGH LIFE”, O/N 1240067, on April 27, 2018, in accordance with a Warrant of Arrest issued on April 26, 2018. Pursuant to Supplemental Rule (C)(6), and Local Admiralty Rule C(6), any person having a claim against the vessel and/or property shall file a claim with the Court not later than ten (10) days after process has been effected, or as otherwise provided in Supplemental Rule (C)(6), and shall serve an answer within twenty (20) days from the date of filing their claim, on Plaintiff’s counsel: Craig D. Olmstead (FL Bar No. 501352), Olmstead, Harrell & Garner, LLC, 234 Office Park Drive, Gulf Shores, AL 36542, (251) 943-4000 Pub May 18, 25, 2018 20656 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the District Three Headquarters until 2:00 P.M. on June14, 2018 for Proposal ID E3R40 Landscaping in Holmes County Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www fdot.gov/contracts/d3 or by calling (850) 330-1364. Pub:May 18, 25, 2018 20654 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that Quality Storage Solutions, Pursuant to F.S. 83806 will offer for sale and will sell at a public or private Auction on May 24, 2018 at 1:30 pm at 17614 Ashley Drive. Miscellaneous property located in Storage Unit 17 Occupied by Elizabeth Gibbons. We also reserve the right to cancel the sale without notice. Pub: May 17, 18, 2018 20658 INVITATION FOR BIDS STREET SWEEPING The City of Panama City will accept sealed bids for Street Sweeping Services of City streets, at the Purchasing office until 2:30 p.m., CDT, on Monday, June 4, 2018, until 2:30 p.m. Specifications may be obtained at the Purchasing Office, 519 East 7th Street, Panama City, Florida, telephone (850) 872-3070, or our website www .pcgov .org. Submit bids in person at the Purchasing Department or via U.S. mail or courier service. Bids must be plainly marked, “BID NO. PC 18-030 ~ SWEET SWEEPING SERVICES ~ JUNE 4, 2018” All bids must be received by 2:30 p.m., CDT, on Monday, June 4, 2018, at which time all bids will be opened and read aloud. Please review all documents pertaining to this request before submitting requested information. The City reserves the right to reject any one or all bids, or any part of any bid, to waive any informality in any bid, and to award a contract deemed to be in the best interest of the City. CITY OF PANAMA CITY BECKY BARNES PURCHASING AGENT Pub May 18, 2018 LOST DOGApril 30th, lost jack russel terrior, white with light brown. No collar, backside shaved. If found, will reward. 850-960-5127 Samsung Electric Dryer 3 years old, great condition $150 Call (850)654-3802 Aluminum WelderMiracle Strip Welding has an opening for a full time Aluminum Welder / Fitter. Paid holidays, vacation and sick leave. Must pass welding test. Apply at 7117 McElvey Road in Panama City Beach. B-Dubs in Pier Park is hiring cooks, servers, and cashiers. It’s the closest you can get to being paid for eating wings and watching sports! Apply Today. Bookkeeper Asst.PT needed year round Average 3-4 hrs a wk. Must be able to work Sat & Sun. Computer exp req. Retirees are encouraged to apply. Send resume to: Coconut Creek Mini-Golf & Gran Maze. Attn: Bookkeeper. 9807 Front Beach Rd., PCB, FL 32407 No Phone Calls. Exp Receptionist Office AssistantFor busy medical practice. Fax resume to: 850-763-1477 Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple Positions Small Engine MechanicPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Legal SecretaryInteresting, friendly, fast paced work environment, experience necessary, competitive salary with bonus incentives, health ins. & vacation included. Send resume to: P.O. Box 860 or email to cneese@bryanthigby com Leon’s DonutsNear Tyndall AFB is now hiring. Will train. Bakery/kitchen exp desired. 11 pm until 7 am shift. $11/hr. Call 850-832-1457. Stock Clerk/ Sales ClerkPT/ FT. All shifts. Apply between 9am-12 7 days per week. Shell Port North West Floridas Largest Seashell Outlet 9949 Thomas Dr. PCB. Retirees welcome. FOR RENT! Callaway, Tyndall Parkway now available, newly remodeled. 1br/1ba apartments, furnished or unfurnished. New appliances, free WI-FI, starting at $695/mo + Electric & Deposit. (Includes W/S) No Pets or Smoking. Call: 419-910-0364 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 1Br/1Ba Condo off N. Lagoon, w/s/g, & cable svc incl. No smok. $950/mo +dep. 850-708-2438. Panama City 1 bedroom Garage Apartment: 1 br 1ba, $500/mo + $500 dep. Garage Included. Call 785-7341 or 814-3211 Bayou George 3bd/2ba, 16x80. Clean, quiet, lrg yrd, no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL91926 to 56654 395 Wahoo Rd. Dock your yacht behind your house in this 3bd/2ba.Bay Point Canal Home! $379,000Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 Panama City 3bd/2ba, SS appl, fireplace, tool stor room, XL garage, sec sys. REDUCED $184,900 850-832-7332 Callaway 5802 Ivy Road ( Tyndall Pkwy, East to Ivy Road. Turn left at light. House on right.) Saturday, May 19th 8:00am to 2:00pmMoving SaleFurniture, household items, lots of golf equipment & much, much more. Inside & outside. Lynn Haven 602 Carolina Avenue Hwy 77 toward Southport, turn left on to 6th Street. Corner 6th/Carolina Saturday, May 19th Sunday, May 20th 8:00am to 3:00pmDecluttering SaleDining furniture. Household items, queen comforter. Many miscellaneous items. Panama City3016 Kings Harbour Road Friday, May 18th Saturday, May 19th 7:30am to 3:00pmLIVING ESTATE TAG SALERain or Shine! All inside! No Early Sales!!! Includes four bronze canons, furniture, loads of smalls, artworks, lots of collectibles, many tools, collection of cross cut handsaws, figureines, clocks, and much much more! Please do not block neighbors driveway or in their lawns! Panama City 3314 Avon Road Saturday, May 19th 7:00am to 1:00pmAll Must Go! Make Offer PricingFurniture, toys, games, movies, books, household decor, Coca-Cola, scooter, Christmas, kitchen items, RV. PCB West End 105 Villa Court Saturday, May 19th 8:00am to 2:00pmMOVING SALEDishes, cowboy boots, household items. Lynn Haven 2309 Minnesota Ave Friday, Saturday, Sunday May 18th, 19th, & 20th 8:00am to 4:00pmYARD SALEFurniture, tools, fishing equipment, TVs, and clothes. For more information call: 850-867-5907 Lynn Haven 315 New York Avenue. ( Left on E. 4th Street. off Hwy 77 after Po Folks. Estate Sale is in Cottage BEHIND main house.) May 18th & 19thEstate of Glorida Clarke HawkinsFurniture including dining table, settee, Pottery Barn craft desk and table, Singer Sewing machine in cabinet, misc tables, chairs and shelves, rugs, kitchen items, craft items, sterling silver flatware, costume jewelry, and more. Parking on E. 4th St. Only. Do not park in front of main house or in driveway Callaway5610 Boat Race Road &Tyndall Parkway Sat. 8am-12pmGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERANShare MinistryThrift Shop Clothing Sale!!! Drop in gas stove, sofa/couch, household items, dining room table w/chairs, electric stove, remote control bed, gas dryer. Free Books!!! Lynn Haven 1512 East 10th Court Saturday, May 19th 8:00am to 12:00pmEVERYTHING MUST GO!TWO FAMILY SALE: Washer, dryer, chest freezer, brand new never out of the box generator, furniture, kitchen items, electronics, yard equipment, tools, camping gear, and much more! NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE!! BEST PRICES 8AM-10AM Bay Youth Summer Work FoundationYard Sale Saturday, May 19th From 6:30am -2:00pm Willie Pollard Insurance 1317 N. Tyndall Parkway Funds from sale will go to funding jobs for the Summer. Beach Thomas Drive 6506 S. Lagoon Drive. ( Turn North on Raven St., then left on S. Lagoon) Saturday, May 19th Starting at 8:00amMoving SaleGeneral household items and miscellaneous Beach West End West Shore Place, Inlet Beach West Shore Place ad jacent to 30 Avenue Shopping Center on 98 in Inlet Beach May 19,2018 8:00 AM to 2:00 PMCommunity Yard SaleMiscellaneous Items For Sale -Stop And Shop With Us.! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section! $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY A. Pearce Tree & Stump Service“We go out on a limb for you!” Lic. & Ins. 850-596-5067 ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794Text FL91927 to 56654 Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices. Licensed and insured call for your F ree estimate ( 850)819-9987 Let us do your Lawn or Palms! Retired Military family call or text James or Kay at 850-768-4589 or 850-703-1706. Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 COLE’S PAINTINGPressure Washing. Insured850-774-1291 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Kevin WilliamsAll Areas of Home Repair and Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Decks, Additions No Job too Small! 30 Years Experience! Call (843)270-9251 Quality Work Guaranteed Free Estimates FREEAppliance removal Discount Small Hauling. 850-257-1180 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 CNA AvailableI will take care of your loved ones in their home. For more info call 850-688-5244. Private Home Health Care24 Years of Experience. Referrences Available. Call: (850) 630-5451 !!Bob’s Home Repairs!!Roof, soffit, facia, door & window replacement or repair.and light remodeling Dial850-257-6366 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting, Clean-Ups/Sod, Epoxy floors, Rock/Flower Beds, Gutter & Roof Cleaning, Drainage systems. Lot Clearing, Haul-Offs. Weeding, Tree Trimming, Pressure Washing, driveways. Save 10%-20% 850-303-8526 ACLASSIC TOUCH An Honest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 18yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 774-3977 txt FL88189 to56654 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Kipple & Son Concrete and Pool RepairPool Replaser & all types of concrete work, drive ways, patio, pool deck & blockwork. We accept most major credit cards. Free Estimate Call: 850-866-4618 WHITE’S CONCRETESpring Special Lic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 / 896-6864 Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569Text FL91517 to 56654 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 864-0320

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, May 18, 2018 C C 9 9 4001 Riverside Dr. Beautiful custom built 3br/2ba. 3126sqft. $399,900. MLS #668301 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL92794 to 56654 3br/2ba Lynn Haven Brick Home216 Missouri Avenue (Do not disturb Tenants) Available June 1st Two car garage, living room, dining room, screen porch, large corner lot. Close to Bay and City Park. new appliances. Small Pets ok (w/Deposit) 1500sqft, $1500/mo + SecurityCall Barbara Hidman Broker / Owner (850)527-5085 Lake Front LotsAvailable within 2 blocks of the beach. One lot is 42x115 that would completment the larger lot next to it that is currently for sale also. Purchase the 2 lots & make a wonderful home site. Contact Hope Abbott 850-596-7653 FOR SALE BY OWNERBeautiful Panama City Beach Condo 1 br / 1.5 ba Ground floor with private boat slip. Completely furnished. Must see! $159,000 or best offer Call: 334-703-0401 100’ open water on Deerpoint Lake, 2.5ac beautiful, natural homesite, 4300 Edwards Rd. Lagoon Realty 850-624-1074, MLS#6692008. 640ac in Bay County best acreage price, just off Hwy 77, perfect farm, hunting or timberbland. Call 850-258-9677 ******************** 100’ open water on Deerpoint Lake, 2.5ac beautiful, natural homesite, 4300 Edwards Rd. Lagoon Realty 850-624-1074, MLS#6692008. Waterfront for Sale1/2 Acre lot, Big Oak Trees, Deep Water on Bear Creek. Just East of Cherokee Landing Bridge on Ard Dr. $49,500 850-832-9119 2bd/2baExcellent condition setup in nice mobile home community $11,875 (850)769-1088 3bd/2ba Like new, Double wide Set up in quiet mobile home park. 200 ft. from swimming pool. $28,957. In the heart of Panama City 850 960-8452 NF-1116606 636 W. 15th Street • Panama City, FL 32401 850.348.1038 I’m back in business at Bay Dodge! Call me. Victor Torres NF-1179098 D O D G E C H R Y S L E R DODGE CHRYSLER J E E P R A M H Y U N D A I JEEP RAM HYUNDAI M I T S U B I S H I L I N C O L N MITSUBISHI LINCOLN TRUCK HEADQUARTERS!! EVERY MAKE & MODEL FROM GAS TO DIESEL! If I don’t have it, I will get it! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Our business special of the week: 2017 Ford Transit w/18,736 miles w/ a low price of $26,649! Come see me, David Meadows @ Bay Cars or call 706 393-1549 Blue 2012 Harley Davidson Street Glide $14,500 GARAGE KEPT, 14,800 miiles, air shocks, double cruiser seat. call Jim (850)832-4468 FOR SALE MOTORCYCLESTwo Harley Davidson Heritage Softtails. 1997 (1340CC) with 10,000 original miles, $6,500 2003 (1450CC) Anniversary Edition with 21,006 miles, $8,000. Both are beautiful bikes and garage kept. 850-874-2949 2010 G3 Suncatcher Pontoon Boat21’, 90 Yamaha Tilt/trim 2014 Trailer, low hours, Very clean, fresh tune up. $8,100. Call (863)224-0405 Boat Slips AvailableStarting at $10 a foot. Marina is adjacent to Marina Landing Condominium and west end of Hathaway Bridge. Call 850-763-3921 for more information. Deep Water Slip305 Wilson Avenue Protected massalina Bayou for Rent. Water is furnished, electric is available. $180.00 monthly 205-388-136 2016 Ram 3500 Laramie Diesel Dually 4x4 with A LOT of adds! 30,000 miles on this 6.7L Cummins means it hasn’t even been broke in yet! Sunroof, sliding/adj. 5th wheel hitch, top of the line hard bed cover & so much more! Call Bryan for the best deal on this barley used Diesel 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2016 Toyota Tundra 4x4 (white) 49,000 miles TRD Edition. Looks & drives like new! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2018 Ram 2500 Longhorn 4x4 (Silver) Leather, Navigation, Back up camera & other great amenities. 1,500 miles & priced to sell! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2006-2016 pre-owned trucks! We have brands & models w/low miles 4x2 or 4x4s Se Habla Espanol! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2014-2016 Toyota Tundra models to choose from. 4x2 & 4x4 w/low miles. (Espanol) Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars Ford F-250 1997 Super Duty Hauler1997 F-250 HD, 7.5L Gas, Tow Package, XL Ext Cab w/ 8 foot Bed, Pendaliner w/ Vinyl Cover, Goodyear Pro-Grade Tires, 96,300 mi, Champagne Brown, VG Condition, $3995, Call Kevin @ 774-3551 Need a Car, Truck, SUV??? Ease Financing Available!! Ovar 300 new and used to choos.froml Can Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, Laramie 30k miles of extras!!! Priced to sail Only 34,998 Please call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra, 2008, Crew, Great work truck! Only $12,988! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Truck and Trailer for hauling heavy equipment with hydraulic ramps in very good condition Call Larry (850)258-5806 2017 Mitsubishi Outlander Like new only 600 Miles. Clean car fax! Save Thousands! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars BY OWNER05 Subaru Outback New Tires, LTR, PWR roof $5,250 Call (850)819-1740 Chevrolet Tahoe LT, 2015 Loaded with lots of extra’s! Only 30k miles Priced at $46,998 call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars GMC Yukon, 2016, Denali, white, LOADED! Only 27k miles! Super clean! Save big! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Jeep Cherokee Sport, 2017, low miles, Must see! $21,988 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2018, with only 575 miles on itWhite Hard top, someone has taken the depreciation, so take advantage of this great opportunity at owning a new vehicle for the low low price of 35895.00 calf David Meadows at Bay Cars for this great deal 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Lexus LS460, 2011, Beautiful candy apple red! 45k miles, LOADED! Won’t last at $25,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota 4Runners-5 in stock! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars 2006 Chevy Silverado 4x2 w/125,000 Miles! Some dings but nothing serious, it’s a used truck. Runs & drives like a top! Call Bryan at 850 557-7093 for pictures and details @ Bay Cars. Financing available! 2010 Ford F-150 XLT V8 Very Clean & one owner $17998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2014 Chevy Silverado 1500 Reg. Cab 72,000 miles w/clean car fax Only $17,998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2010 Chev. Tahoe 109 miles (white w/tan leather) Looks great & runs excellent! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2012 Dodge Durango Crew w/75,000 miles. Pwr seat, touch screen radio, 3rd row seating for the whole family!! Payments as low as $299 monthly W.A.C call Bryan: 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2012 Dodge Durango Crew w/75,000 miles. Power seat, touch screen radio, 3rd row seating with more room for the whole family! Payments as low as $299 monthly W.A.C. Call Bryan today at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2013 Ford Escape Eco Boost 4x4 Clean car fax w/low miles $15,998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2016 Acura RDX, Silver, Automatic w/one owner Like new! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars 2016 Dodge Journey (black) w/only 27,000 miles! Seats 7, gets great gas mileage and payments as low as $199 monthly W.A.C. call Bryan: 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2016 Jeep Wrangler 4dr, Auto, Soft top, white w/ only 28,000 miles. Get ready for Jeep Beach Jam! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars 2017 Jeep Cherokee. Clean Car fax w/8,000 miles $21,998 Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars BY OWNER10 Dodge Ram Reg Cab, 3.7 Litre V6, Alloys, Cold Air, 241k miles $4,950 05 Subaru Outback New Tires, LTR, PWR roof $5,250 07 Kia Sorento LX 4x4, New Tires, Perfect Condition $5,550 Call (850)819-1740 Honda Accord EXL, 2013, coupe, manual V6, only 14k miles, Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Kia Sportage, 2017, only 17k miles, under warranty! Easy financing! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz SLK250, 2013, hard top convertible, only 21k miles, Priced to sell at $24,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Want a new car and not the new car price? We have a vehicle that the previous owner took the depreciation so take advantage of this 2017 Chevy Camaro Red LT w/only 1257 miles for the low price of $31,888. Come see me, David Meadows @ Bay Cars or call 706 393-1549 We have a great looking 2017 Audi Q3 Premium (Black) w/only 22,761 miles for $31,249! Come see me, David Meadows @ Bay Cars or call 706 393-1549 2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited (red 4dr) Hard top w/ 80,000 miles! Only asking $17,987! call Bryan: 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars for more details and pictures 2011 Volvo XC90Loaded with leather and 3 rows, like new condition, senior owned, purchased new! Volvo must sell $8500/offer. Please call at (850)-814-2178 2016 Chev. Cruze Clean car fax w/very low miles Only $16,998! Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2017 Dodge Journey. Clean car fax, one owner Only $19998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2017 Fiat 124 Spider 4cl Turbo w/only 9,000 miles! Clean car fax & one owner $20,998 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2017 Ford Focus only 6,000 miles! One owner w/clean car fax Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2017 Hyundai Elantra Like new, one owner & clean car fax. 15,000 miles $16,998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2018 Dodge Charger w/25,000 miles (black) 4dr sports vehicle still under factory warranty. Must go soon! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Cruze, 2016, Premier pkge, white, auto, only 21k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Tahoe LT, 2015 Loaded with lots of extra’s! Only 30k miles Priced at $46,998 call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chrysler Pacifica Touring L, 2017, V6, LOADED! Only 14k miles! $28,988 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2016, Scat Pack 392 Hemi with only 12,000 miles!! Red suede interior with track apps, super track pack, sport mode and much more! I Payments as low as $450/Month W.A.C. call Bryan for more information at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2017, 5.7L V8, manual, Must see! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata, 2011, with only 62,000 miles! Payments as low as 189/m with approved credit! Great on gas and very clean! Call Bryan today at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2016 Dodge Challenger Scat Pack 392 Hemi w/only 12,000 Miles! Red suede interior w/track apps, super track pack, sport mode and much more! Payments as low as $450 monthly W.A.C. call Bryan: 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2017 Chev. Camaro w/only 1257 miles (red) like new but with a used car price w/factory warranty still left Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2017 Chrysler 300S premium alloy edition w/ all the bells and whistles! White leather interior w/black accents & immaculate condition! 20,000 miles & looking for a new home! Call Bryan at 850 557-7093 for pictures and details @ Bay Cars. Financing available! 2012 Nissan Altima 2.5SFrost white, 4door, low mileage, overall excellent condition, well kept. $13,000 OBO Call (850)819-0415 2014 Chev. Equinox Very clean w/leather int. Low miles for only $16,998! Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2014 Dodge Charger R/T 5.7 Hemi Very clean w/low miles $19998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars 2015 Chev. Malibu LT w/41,000 miles. Excellent condition, great gas mileage and priced to sell! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2015 Ford Edge Sport very well kept w/low miles and a breath taking color (Electric Spice Yellow! Call Derrick 936 414-4583 @ Bay Cars 1996 Mazda Miataruns but needs engine work $700 Call (850)227-5920 If no answer please leave a message 2006 Chev. HHR only 38,000 miles! (Gray) Very clean sm. Suv. Must go! Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars 2006 Toyota Prius4door $4500 OBO tinted windows, backup camera, leather seats, good tires, A/C, and very good condition. This car gets 45 miles to the gallon. Call (941)713-1089 2012 Ford Mustang (Red) only 13,000 miles Excellent Condition V8 Shelby Edition! Must see Call Victor 850 348-1038 @ Bay Cars If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 1 1 0 0 Friday, May 18, 2018| The News Herald BILL CRAMER CHEVROLET BUICK GMC 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, Fl 850-250-5489 • 877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.comPlus tax, title, license, dealer adds, $95 electronic filing fee, and $595 dealer prep fee on all vehicles. Pricing good throug h 5/31/18. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8:30am 7:00pm Saturday: 8:30am 6pm Sunday: 1:00pm 5pmFive Decades.... Three Generations.... One Tradition. Our Pre-Owned Business Is Great, & We Need YOUR Vehicle To Supplement Our Inventory! 15 MINUTE NO OBLIGATION APPRAISALWE’RE BUYING THEM ALL! ALL YEARS! ALL MODELS! YOU NAME IT, WE’LL BUY IT! WE WILL NOT BE OUTBID!WE NEED TO BUY YOUR VEHICLE! 2011 TOYOTA SCION #17310110 ........................... $6,9912006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER #18103610............................... $6,9952014 NISSAN VERSA NOTE #18222510................................ $7,9932011 DODGE NITRO #18414600................................ $8,7932011 BUICK REGAL #18110310................................ $9,5912013 KIA OPTIMA #18211810............................... $9,9932012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE #18420100............................... $9,9932013 HONDA INSIGHT #18413800............................... $9,9932016 NISSAN VERSA NOTE #18419800............................... $9,9932016 NISSAN VERSA NOTE #18412600............................... $9,9932011 CHEVY IMPALA #17114710............................... $9,9952005 FORD F-150 #18242631............................. $10,9912011 DODGE G. CARAVAN #18253210............................. $10,9912014 CHEVY IMPALA #17150510............................ $10,9952014 KIA OPTIMA #18600400............................. $11,9002011 CADILLAC CTS #18522310............................... $11,9912017 KIA RIO #18413500............................. $11,9932016 NISSAN SENTRA #18414400............................ $12,9932016 NISSAN SENTRA #18418800............................ $12,9932015 CHEVY EQUINOX #18419600............................ $12,9942012 JEEP LIBERTY #18251911............................. $13,5912017 JEEP PATRIOT #18423800............................. $13,9912013 CHEVY MALIBU #17315020.............................. $14,9912017 JEEP COMPASS #18423500............................ $14,9922015 NISSAN ALTIMA #18248710............................ $14,9932015 CHEVY EQUINOX #18416600............................ $14,9932017 CHEVY CRUZE #18725800............................. $15,9912016 VW TIGUAN #17124220............................ $15,9922017 CHEVY TRAX #18416500............................ $15,9922010 LEXUS RX350 #18520900............................ $15,9932017 KIA SPORTAGE #18417800............................. $16,9912016 CHEVY MALIBU #18418900............................ $16,9932017 KIA OPTIMA #18411700............................ $16,9932017 NISSAN ALTIMA #18413900............................ $16,9932014 MINI COOPER S #18412400............................... $17,9912015 CHEVY EQUINOX #18259910............................. $17,9932014 HYUNDAI SANTA FE #18414800............................. $17,9932014 CHRYSLER 300 #18253010............................. $17,9942013 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18222310............................. $17,9952014 GMC ACADIA #17322310............................. $18,9912016 HONDA ACCORD #18244310............................. $18,9912017 CHEVY IMPALA #18411800............................ $18,9932010 FORD F-150 #18239710............................ $18,9951999 PONTIAC FORMULA #17129310............................. $19,9912015 VW GOLF #18520500............................ $19,9922014 GRAND CHEROKEE #18415400............................ $19,9932012 CHEVY SUBURBAN #17298510............................ $19,9932016 NISSAN FRONTIER #18417000........................... $20,9932016 NISSAN PATHFINDER #18417200........................... $20,9932015 KIA OPTIMA #17136520.............................. $21,9912014 CHEVY EQUINOX #18423300............................ $21,9922015 CADILLAC SRX #18214010............................ $21,9922013 CHEVY SILVERADO #18217210............................ $21,9922014 DODGE CHALLENGER #18419710............................ $21,9922013 F-150 #18510120............................ $21,9922012 CHEVY CAMARO #18255510............................ $21,9932015 CHEVY TRAVERSE #18415300............................ $21,9942014 CADILLAC SRX #18221320............................ $21,9952011 CHEVY SILVERADO #18240520............................ $22,4942017 NISSAN FRONTIER #18424800............................ $22,9912013 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18702710........................... $22,9932017 FORD MUSTANG #18412800........................... $22,9932013 CADILLAC SRX # 18419400 ..................... $22,9942012 FORD F-150 #18211710........................... $23,5932013 CHEVY SILVERADO #18416100........................... $23,9942005 CHEVY CORVETTE #18511500........................... $23,9942008 CHEVY CORVETTE #18413700........................... $23,9942015 BUICK ENCLAVE #18725300............................. $24,9912014 NISSAN FRONTIER #18525400............................. $24,9912014 CHEVY SILVERADO #18261410............................. $24,9912017 CHEVY TRAVERSE #18726400............................. $24,9912013 CHEVY TAHOE #18220210........................... $24,9952016 CHEVY EXPRESS #18520700........................... $25,9922015 CADILLAC SRX #17290410............................ $26,9912012 CHEVY TAHOE #18267110............................ $26,9912017 RAM PROMASTER #18411100........................... $26,9922007 HUMMER H2 #18409710........................... $26,9932015 DODGE CHARGER #18413600........................... $26,9932017 RAM PROMASTER #18410900........................... $26,9932015 CHEVY CAMARO #18413000........................... $26,9942016 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER #18417300........................... $26,9942013 FORD F-150 #18268510............................. $27,9912014 CHEVY SILV. 3500HD #18263910............................. $27,9912015 BUICK ENCLAVE #18424500............................ $27,9922014 FORD EXPEDITION #18415100............................ $27,9932014 CHEVY TAHOE #18415200............................ $27,9942014 CHEVY SILVERADO #18526000............................ $28,9912014 GMC SIERRA #18415700............................ $28,9912015 DODGE DURANGO #18248410........................... $28,9932016 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18265610............................ $29,9912017 BUICK ENCLAVE #18725900............................ $29,9912012 GMC YUKON #18256010............................ $29,9912017 TOYOTA TACOMA #18250710........................... $29,9932014 RAM 1500 #18215610........................... $30,9932014 JEEP WRANGLER UNL. #18223820............................. $31,9912016 CADILLAC SRX #18426200............................. $31,9912014 CHEVY SILVERADO #18223410............................ $31,9922015 TOYOTA 4RUNNER #18600500............................ $32,9912018 CHEVY COLORADO #18416800........................... $32,9932018 CHEVY COLORADO #18416900........................... $32,9932014 JEEP WRANGLER #18228020........................... $34,5932015 CADILLAC SRX #18260810............................ $34,9912017 TOYOTA 4RUNNER #18417400........................... $36,9942016 TOYOTA TUNDRA #18510800............................ $37,9942014 CHEVY SILV. 2500 HD #18414900............................ $38,9912014 GMC SIERRA #18247410............................. $47,9922014 GMC SIERRA 3500 HD #18414900........................... $49,9932016 CADILLAC ESCALADE #18414900............................ $55,991 STOP!TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE INCREDIBLE SAVINGS DUE TO THE HUGE SUCCESS OF OUR BUY CAR EVENT! NF-1182849

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Dining: Funky Mermaid | 10-11Meet the Mixologist: Oasis | 13Beach Insider: Lion Tamer | 19-21End Days at Kaleidoscope | 28 S A L T Y SALTY D O G D A Y DOG DAY S t A n d r e w s c e l e b r a t e s St. Andrews celebrates f o u r l e g g e d f r i e n d s | 6 four-legged friends | 6 E N T E R T A I N E R ENTERTAINER I S S U E N O 1 6 9 € F R E E € ISSUE NO. 169 € FREE € F R I D A Y M A Y 1 8 2 0 1 8 FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018

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E2 Friday, May 18, 2018 | Salty Dog Day returns to St. Andrews on Saturday, May 19. [PHOTO COURTESY OF BRAD STEPHENS]ABOUT THE COVERPANAMA CITY „ The Panama City Center for the Arts hosted the opening of a monthlong exhibition of work by artist Heather Clements during a receptionMay 11. We Are NatureŽ features work from the past few years, during which time Clements twice won Best in Show at the Bay Annual competition, held by the Center for the Arts. For details, visit CenterForTheArtsPC.com.We Are Nature opening reception INSIDE SEEN ON SCENE Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com Heather Clements poses with some of her work during the opening reception May 11. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] The Public Eye, which hosts the annual projection art festival Public Eye Soar, projected Clements work onto the walls of the Center for the Arts. INSIDE Share your photosSend us your pictures of places youve enjoyed in the area, events youve attended, parties youve crashed „ and well share them with the rest of the world. You can email photos to tsimmons@pcnh.com or post them to our Facebook page at Facebook.com/PanamaCityBeachGuide. Let us know about the fun youre having „ dont keep all the good times to yourself! SEEN ON SCENEUndercurrents ............4Salty Dog Day ............6GO & DO: 5 Best Bets ..7Jam Session: Bay High School .......................9Funky Mermaid Lounge .............................10-11Meet the Mixologist ....13Liquid Dream Fishing Team .........................15Gulf Jazz Society .......18Beach Insider: Lion Tamer...................19-21Nightlife ...................22Lifes A Beach ...........23Movietown: Clueless ..27End Days ................28Readers Theatre .......29GO & DO: Calendar 31-38 ABOUT US

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E4 Friday, May 18, 2018 | UNDERCURRENTS The thing about writing „ whether as a hobbyist or professional „ is that, like most forms of creative art or craftwork, it can be a lonely pursuit. All that time spent staring into the middle distance. Hunched over a keyboard or notebook. Pacing. Talking to imaginary friends. Trying on hats. (Or maybe that last ones just me.) And the coffee. So. Much. Coffee. Anyway, I was pleased recently to co-host a spring socialŽ for area writers at CityArts Cooperative alongside my partners in The Syndicate Studio „ Mark Boss, Brady Calhoun and Jayson Kretzer. We worried that no one would show up, lone wolves being best at a distance, after all. But the numbersquickly outgrew the lounge area and we had to circle up the folding chairs in the spacious dance studio. Over the course of the afternoon, about 30 writers showed up. They talked about their work and their interests, picked each others brains about approaches and styles, drank the aforementioned coffee, and just generally got along. There were older folks who were brand new to the craft, and younger folks who were old hands, and vice versa. Good questions got good answers, and I think everyone left having learned something new and madenew connections. I was also pleased to learn that groupings of writers continue all over the place. Here are a few you might be want to check out, if youre interested in writing and are looking for critiques or encouragement.Chapter One meets at Starbucks Lynn Haven to work on their manuscripts and trade information about writing and the publishing industry. Contact Rob on their Facebook page for details, Facebook.com/ groups/595308133908893/The Panama City Writers Guild meets at6:30 p.m.on the first and third Tuesday of each month at the St. Andrews Civic Center,2629 W. 10th St., Panama City (across from Oaks by the Bay Park). Visitors and new members are always welcome. For details, visit PanamaCityWriters.org.Florida Writers AssociationPanama City Chaptermeets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of the month at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. We cant always secure the library meeting room on the third Wednesday, so we will sometimes meet on an alternate Wednesday, or will collect up at our satellite campus, Po Folks on 15th Street,Ž said Panama City writer Kurt Cox. One does not have to be a member of FWA to attend. Some chapters have craft lectures scheduled every meeting, but we have evolved into solely a critique group.ŽWriters Aglow is a group of Christian writers with daytime and nighttime meetings. Get details at WritersAglow.com. In gathering this information, I was saddened to learn that one of the longrunning local groups had disbanded, Panhandle Writers Guild. However, a new, as-yetunnamed writers group is now meeting from 9:30-11 a.m. on the first and third Wednesday of the month at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Its described as a gathering for people who like words, like writing words, or like thinking and talking about writing words.Ž The group is still forming and is not advertising its presence (yet), but one can contact Floriopolis for more information. In addition, Education Encore at Gulf Coast State College offers writing classes each spring and fall. Visit GulfCoast. edu for details. The fall program starts Sept. 21. And I will be teaching a four-week course on Writing the Fantastic this summer at CityArts, focusing on worldbuilding, characters, plots and themes. Details will be posted atTheSyndicateStudio. com in the coming weeks. In the meantime, keep writing. Chase those stories down and pin them to the page. Then share them with others. Even lone wolves need a pack sometimes. Peace.Lone-wolf writers in search of a pack Tony SimmonsAuthor and retired educator Craig Bush, left, addresses a gathering of area writers hosted by The Syndicate Studio at CityArts Cooperative recently. [TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] About 30 area writers shared their love of the craft in a roundtable discussion. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E6 Friday, May 18, 2018 | By Tony Simmons@PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Every dog has its day, so they say. In St. Andrews, where the motto encourages one to Keep St. Andrews Salty,Ž merchants and residents have set aside this Saturday to celebrate salty dogs. Salty Dog DayŽ is adog-friendly eventbenefiting The Lucky Puppy Rescue and Operation Spay Bay. The weekly St. Andrews Waterfront Farmers Market will include dog merchandise vendors, groomers, veterinarians, a shot clinic, a microchip booth, a photo booth, treat stations, a dog play area, demonstrations, food, music, shopping and entertainment. Adult dogs and puppies available for adoption will also be at the market. The market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday, year-round in theSmiths Yacht Basin next to The Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 1201 Beck Ave. Stop by the Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., and order a custom charm from event sponsor Maharajas Fine Jewelry with your pups name on it;10 percentof sales will benefitLucky PuppyandOperation Spay Bay. ThePublishing Co. Museum also offersfree guided tours of Historic St. Andrews every Wednesday and Friday at 1:30 p.m. Call 850-872-7208 for details, or toschedule another time. ThroughMay 31, the Publishing Co. Museum will host an exhibit, Why We Call Florida Home,Ž sponsored by theFlorida Humanities Council. For the past few weeks, residents have been voting on thesaltiest dog in St. AndrewsŽ via the website, HistoricStAndrews.com, to act asMayor for a Day on Saturday. Each vote was $1, and all funds raised will go to the two agencies. The dog with the most votes will be declared Mayor of St. Andrews.Panama City Commissioner Mike Nichols will make a formal proclamation during the festivities and introduce thehonorable hound, which willbe featured on the promotional materialsfor next years election andSalty Dog Day T-shirt. Los Antojitos Mexican Restaurant, 1236 Beck Ave., will host a silent auction and raffle for the event from 3-5 p.m., along with live musical entertainment. The artists and volunteers at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., have been preparing for Salty Dog Day bycutting out and paintingphoto props to be used around St. Andrews for the day. In addition,a doggie wading pool will be in the galleryscourtyard for pups to cool off. Many of the area merchants will also participate in a pup crawl,Ž with free doggie treats, toys and water bowls for visiting dogs. The Farmers Market will have flyers listing the participating merchants, so humans know where to take their dogs.DONATIONSSome dogs in the community just dont have what they need,Ž said Brad Stephens of Sunjammers, 1129 Beck Ave., which is acting as a drop-off location for the food and wish-list drives associated with Salty Dog Day. TheDog Food Drive will benefit The Lucky Puppy Rescue, the Bay County Humane Society and Operation Spay Bay. In addition to Sunjammers,donations may be dropped offat the following St. Andrews sites through Saturday:The Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, The Trendy Side,Estate Treasures, Little Village, Alices on Bayview, Native Spirit Museum & Gallery, and Los Antojitos (which will give a free queso dip in exchange forevery 15-poundbag of dog food donated there). The agencies also have a wish list of needs that include:puppy and adult food (Purina One, Pro Plan, 4Health);baby food (meat andcereal); dog toys; large beach towels; towels; bleach; Clorox wipes; pee pads; paper towels; OxiClean-type powder laundry detergent; liquid laundry detergent; evaporated milk; and cat litter.'SALTY DOG DAY' What: Dog-friendly activities, vendors, adoptions and more; fundraiser for Lucky Puppy and Operation Spay Bay Where: Throughout the historic St. Andrews business area When: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 19 Admission: Free Details: HistoricStAndrews. com[CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] GO & DOSalty dogs have their day

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E7 GO & DO : 5 BEST BETS FOR THIS WEEKEND1 In theaters this weekend is Deadpool 2Ž rated R, a superhero dark comedy in which the foul-mouthed mutant mercenary (Ryan Reynolds) brings together a team of fellow mutant rogues to protect a young boy of supernatural abilities from the brutal, timetraveling mutant, Cable (Josh Brolin); Book ClubŽ a comedy about four lifelong friends have their lives forever changed after reading 50 Shades of GreyŽ in their monthly book club; and the family friendly comedic film Show DogsŽ rated PG-13, about Max, a macho, solitary Rottweiler police dog (voiced by rapper Ludacris) who is ordered to go undercover as a primped show dog in a prestigious dog show, along with his human partner (Will Arnett), to avert a disaster from happening.2 The second leg of horse racings Triple Crown takes place Saturday. Justify will try to win the Preakness after winning the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago. The race is at 6:20 p.m. ET and airs on NBC.3 Friday is National Bike to Work Day, a time when people are encouraged to ditch their automobiles and commute with their bikes if possible. You can ride an old-timey bike, a fancy new version with shocks … whatever, just bike! Its good for your health and for the environment.4 Saturday is Armed Forces Day, a day to honor those serving our country in the military. Check the newspaper for events in your town, or check out the official site, http://afd.defense.gov/ for more information.5 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional injuryrelated death for children ages one to 14. On Saturday, National Learn to Swim Day, parents and guardians should teach children about water safety as well as the importance and benefits of learning to swim. Learn more at teachmetoswim. com/national-learn-toswim-day „ More Content NowRapper Ludacris provides the voice of Max in Show Dogs.Ž [GLOBAL ROAD] Ryan Reynolds stars as Deadpool in Deadpool 2.Ž [TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX]

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E8 Friday, May 18, 2018 |

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E9By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The rising sound of brass lifted the roof at The News Herald on May 11, when the Bay High School jazz ensemble „ Bay Blast „ performed for the weekly Jam Session. The band of high school students is a self-starter, explained BHS band director Nick Efstathiou (or, as the students call him, Mr. EŽ). He puts them in charge of day-to-day operations, like setting up chairs or copying sheet music, and encourages them to find ways to lead. I always tell the kids its their band program,Ž he said. I want to create as much ownership as I can for the kids.Ž Efstathiou said that not every music student will become a professional musician or a music teacher or band director. In fact, most of them will not. I want a child that will contribute to society after they graduate,Ž he said. I want them to be the best that they can be at that. ... Were not creating a bunch of little band directors.Ž One of his current students, senior Charlotte Keen, is one of the leaders in Bay Blast. She found herself taking on more behind-the-scenes responsibility as she got into the high school band, so she ran for office.She comes from a family of musicians and started playing at age 11, but she doesnt plan to major in music when she moves to attend the University of Miami this autumn. I picked up the flute in sixth grade, when I got into middle school,Ž she said. My entire family was into band, so I joined and picked up the flute because I was good at it.Ž Keen said she plans to study biomedical engineering with a focus on cell and tissue engineering while in college. Shell also be in the marching band. Efstathious story is quite different; he wasnt really interested in band when he first joined the middle school program at Surfside under director Gary Nichols. His best friend was going to take band, and he found out that a girl he had a crush on was joining the band. So I said OK, Ill do band,Ž he said. He stuck with it through high school, and earned a tuba scholarship to Troy University. He planned to major in engineering, but that track wasnt available at the time. Instead, he majored inmusic education „ which he said has been a good choice so far. He plans to keep teaching music until he grows up. Efstathiou band students tend to enter detail-oriented professions because they learn from the start to pay attention to details. They cant just get close to playing the right note; for a piece to work, the player must hit themark every time. There is no option. You have to play that chord,Žhe said. In a math class, you can pass with a B or C average, but in music if we only do 92 percent of the stuff right, its not going to sound very good.Ž JAM SESSIONBay Blast rocks the houseThe Bay High School jazz ensemble performs Friday at the Panama City News Herald. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] The Bay High School jazz ensemble performs Friday at the Panama City News Herald. NEXT JAM SESSIONWho: Qwerty When: 3 p.m. Friday, May 18 Where: Live streaming on the News Herald's Facebook page and live in the newsroom

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E10 Friday, May 18, 2018 | FOOD & DRINKJoin regulars for lunch, hear live music at nightBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ In the spirit of revitalization, downtown business owners Joe and Jessica Kelley have given their Funky Mermaid Lounge the freedom to organically developin the back of their Gift Basket Designs shop. Were trying to do something a little different to bring people downtown,Ž said Joe, a Panama City native whose wife moved to the area from Tennessee nearly 20 years ago. We have a lot of little different things going on. Next month, were going to have beer yoga. Wehave Makeup & Mimosas on Tuesdays, wine tastings on Thursdays. Theres always something.Ž Beer yogaŽ is scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, when the tables and chairs will be swapped for yoga mats „ no need to put your beer down, though. Drink beer while doing yoga and doing poses, and maybe well experiment with some healthy foods,Ž Joe said. Try this with us.Ž The Kelleys purchased Gift Basket Designs in January 2017, relocating it from Mulberry Avenue to 474 Harrison Ave. in May 2017. We wanted to get foot traffic. We really just had a gift basket store and had an idea to do wine tastings with cheese and crackers,Žsaid Joe, who explained the need to add hand sinks led to adding a little bar in the back for ladies to have wine while they wait on their basket. Nowwere trying to do lunch Monday through Friday; and Wednesday, Friday andSaturday nights, we have live music.Ž The basket shop opens at 11 a.m. Monday through Saturday and stays open till closing, but the lounge has continued to grow,expanding itswine and craft beer selection. Funky Mermaidstarted growing its roots in October and already has a table of regulars „ though the exact table depends on whats available. I eat here every day,Ž said Nat Brannon, who Funky Mermaid Lounge adds to downtown airFUNKY MERMAID LOUNGEWhat: Pizza, sandwiches, salads, wine, craft beer, live music Where: 474 Harrison Ave., Panama City (inside Gift Basket Designs) Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. for lunch Monday through Friday, plus 5-9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and 5-11 p.m. or later Friday and Saturday (Sunday available for special parties) Details, delivery or call ahead: 850-215-4434, Facebook.com/ funkymermaidlounge/, info@ funkymermaidlounge.com or thefunkymermaidlounge. com The Turkey Bravo Sriracha, bursting with avocado, is served with a side of tuna dip and pita chips at the Funky Mermaid Lounge on May 15 during lunch. [PHOTOS BY JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Roasted red pepper hummus is served with pita chips and fresh fruit. See FUNKY, 11

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E11owns Lone Wolf Investigations & Security Services „ a couple of doors down from Funky Mermaid. Nats mother, June Brannon, joined her sonand his employee Brad Hall at a table just after 11 a.m. Tuesday. Weve been here every day since they opened,Žsaid June, who likes that its nice and peaceful. I get the tuna dip and I dont have to carry nothing home. The Grilled Cheese is good, too, and the Roast Beef (on Ciabatta served with Au Jus). ... The tuna dip is just the right amount in a little bowl.Ž The Funky Mermaid serves lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. The menu is the process of letting people taste all different things. Wedo pizzas and sandwiches for delivery, especially the local downtown area.Peopleworking get busy and stuck in their offices; were trying to have healthier alternatives,Ž said Joe, who added there is no delivery charge. Appetizers include tuna dip with tortilla chips or hummus (roasted red pepper or garlic) with pita, Charcuterie Board of meat, cheese, fruit and nuts for two to four people, and the Caprese Salad and the Mermaid „ a fresh fruit salad with seasonal fruit over a spring mix drizzled with blueberry goat cheese and honey balsamic vinaigrette. Spring Mix is used for all salads and sandwiches. It sounds a little weird, but the Key West is great,Ž said Brad, who admitted the flavoris as good as itis messy. While Brad decided to branch out with the Turkey Bravo Sriracha to go with his tuna dip stand-by, Nat went for his usual order of roasted red pepper hummus and fruit. The Mediterranean Wrap also has been popular. Weve been selling a lot since we introduced it,Ž said Nicole Rainone,working behind the bar. The Mediterranean Chicken Wrap features chicken, avocado, feta, roasted red pepper, artichoke hearts. I ordered Joes favorite, the Turkey Bravo Sriracha, which also was messy, but worth it. The sandwich featuredtoasted white bread with the perfect ratio of mesquite turkey stacked high, alongwith tomato, ample avocado, spring mix, provolone and a sriracha mayonnaise „ with just a little kick. On the side, I opted for the hummus, though I might go for the fruit or tuna dip next time. While ahalf would have sufficed, I ate the whole thing (because it was so good and freshand Ifigured it wouldnt save „ or at least thats how I rationalized it). While Brad also enjoyed his turkey sandwich as well, he will be back for the Key West. This is good, but Id get the Key West. Im telling you; its a 10,Ž he said, but added, Im working my way down the menu.Ž Though I was unsure of the sound of the Key West Sandwich on Artisan with turkey, cole slaw, avocado and Russian dressing, the overwhelming reactions have piqued my curiosity. That is good. I had it on Saturday,Ž Nicole said.Its a messy sandwich, but its delicious. Its a mayonnaise-based cole slaw with a sweet taste with avocado ... Its just good.Ž The Mediterranean, Key West and Veggie Burger are cook Todd Nortons creations, who has let the menu evolve along with Funky Mermaid. Toddbrings 30 years of restaurantexperience from NewHampshire, having relocated to Panama City in October 2017. I make a Western Apricot Sauce for the Veggie Burgers, and I make those myself, dont buy them,Ž Todd said. I put everything in there, throw in artichoke hearts if I have them, throw in spinach, sundried tomatoes, mushrooms, with sesame oil and Japanese breadcrumbs; its a hit. The Key West seems to be the most popular sandwich by far. I had seen something similar when I was in the Keys and I gave it a Northern flare.Ž He added coleslaw, exchanged spicy mayo for Russian dressing and added avocado„ Im putting them on almost everything, and people are loving it,Ž Todd added. Cheese and pepperoni pizza is available by the slice or get a whole pizza with additional toppings such asground beef, Italian sausage, Canadian Bacon, bacon, roasted red peppers, bell peppers, onions, jalapenos, or black olives. A dessert pizza features chocolate chips. Food serviceresumesat 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, where customers also can mingle with musiciansWednesday, Friday and Saturday nights. A bench serves at the corner stage in the intimate setting, which also includes two hanging TVs. Everyone once in a while, we pull a musician from out of town whos traveling through, and we try to support Music Matters,Ž Joe said. Most of the musicians love the soundwith theacoustic tiles, and Charles Segrest plays on the piano. Thatis aninvolved thing „sing along.Ž Segrest is a fellow member of the Krewe of St. Andrews. Musiciansalso have included Dave Lloyd, KC Phelps, Temple Woodrum, Chuck Foster, Jess and Jesse, and Tyler James Arnold; andThunder debuted Wednesday. FUNKYFrom Page 10The Turkey Bravo Sriracha is served with hummus and tortilla chips. The Funky Mermaid Lounge began when owners Joe and Jessica Kelley created a bar in the back of Gift Basket Designs so customers could enjoy a glass of wine while waiting for their baskets. The full menu now includes wine by the glass or bottle, craft beers by the bottle or six-pack (including Floridian Funky Buddha), pizza, appetizers and sandwiches. The Funky Mermaid Lounge is a quiet spot for lunch, while the corner bench serves as the stage area for live music Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evenings.

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E12 Friday, May 18, 2018 |

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E13 MEET THE MIXOLOGISTBy Kristy Lynne Smith 747-5087 | @PCNHKristyLynne | ksmith@pcnh.comName, Age: Nelson ChristopherChrisŽ Degan, 47Years bartending: 17 yearsBar location: Oasis Liquors, 1103 W. 15th St., Panama CityFavorite Drink to make: An Absolute Stress. I like to see the smile on their face when they drink it. I make a pretty good one!ŽWhats the most sold drink in the bar? My Washington Apple shots. And Budweiser Light. I also get a lot of requests for my signature drink, the Pornographic Dirty Martini. I mean, come on... were a dive bar.ŽWhen someone says surprise me,Ž whats your go-to drink? I always go to a Sex on the Beach.ŽWhich cocktail do you dread making? Margaritas... no. A Bloody Mary. White Russians too. You shouldnt order a Bloody Mary at night. Its ridiculous. Its made for hangovers in the morning.ŽWhat is the strangest drink a customer has ever ordered? Someone actually ordered a mat shot. Thats where you empty the excess liquor from the mats (where drinks are prepared)into a shot. He blew chunks within five minutes. I high-fived him 22 times after.ŽWhen do you know when a customer has had too much? When they are annoying other customers of mine. When theyre stumbling and fumbling. Thats our code word here at the O that we made up. We also look for slurred speech as well.Its time to call them an Uber, taxi, or phone a friend. I cut people off pretty militantly. When they start running my other customers off, I get pretty annoyed and I dont tolerate it. Ill also try to sober them up by putting them in the corner with a Coke, not water. A sugar drink is what they need. Water will actually make them a little more loopy. People dont realize that. A sugary Coke will sober you up better than water or coffee.ŽWhat do you think makes this bar special? The diverse clientele we have. And most importantly David and Beth Newby. They are by far the best bosses I could imagine working for. They are human. They never contrive themselves as being perfect. If we are at a big luncheon with all the bar folks and big wigs, they will not hesitate to come sit with the staff. They avoid the big wigs. Thats a great quality. They consider themselves just like the people that work for them. You know its not fake either.ŽAre there any new products you are interested in working with or are currently working with? Captain Morgan Watermelon. Its going to be really good with ginger ale.ŽWhat activities do you enjoy outside the bar? Play basketball and shoot pool.ŽWhat is your personal drink of choice? Crown and Coke.ŽDRINK SPECIALS? Happy Hour is from 4-7 p.m. every day with $1.75 drafts and well drinks.Chris makes you feel at home at OasisChris is a familiar face at the OŽ and always makes you feel right at home. [KRISTY LYNNE SMITH/ NEWS HERALD] Pornographic Dirty Martini€ Smirnoff Vodka € Olive Juice € Two Olives HOW DOES IT TASTE? To be honest, this was my “ rst dirty martini. Ive had all the fruity and sweet ones before, so I wasnt expecting something so savory. Its a really delicious sipping drink. Its a proper martini and Chris makes an extra effort to make it just right.Ž „ KRISTY LYNNE SMITH[KRISTY LYNNE SMITH/NEWS HERALD]

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E14 Friday, May 18, 2018 |

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E15 We had come upon the time to faceour nemesis tournament of fishing. If you remember the article about last years tournament, we caught trout, permit, flounder and saw about 100 reds, but never caught one. Navarre is the only tournament fishing location we have never weighed-in at, and our goal was to not goose-egg again. We spent the last week studying Google Earth, Bing maps, tides, wind, moon phase, and any tips posted about catching reds in Navarre. After all the studying, we pickedthree spots that looked good for how we fish and the tides, riggedthree different baits and sizes each, and made sure the boat and equipment were ready. We arrived, paid registration dues, and bought into the spots and big trout Calcutta. Not really knowing the area and having trouble catching reds here, we knew we could catch trout. Take off was at 5:40a.m., and we headed for spot number one.There was already another tournament angler pulled up there starting to fish, so we kept on movingfor spot number 2. As we were coming up, I heard Jake Wright counting to six „ the number of boats around spot number 2. I was now thinking we were up the creek and all the homework was for nothing. En route to spot number 3,wesaw an open flat that looked enticing and pulled up. We were advised to throw a spoon and a Slayer SSB to be successful in the Navarre Sound, so Jake threw the spoon and I threw the SSB. We saw water busting, and little shrimp and minnows jumping. Once we saw that, Jake switched to a Gulp Shrimp and I switched to my go-to swimbait. Jake hooked up first cast with Gulp! and reeled in a 15-inch red. Not the right size, but it got the Redfish Skunk out of the boat and gave us a little bit of confidence. I hooked up and caught a 14-inch red. Again, it was a red, but not the right one. Jake threw again and caught a 19-inch red „ getting bigger, but there were only2 spots and this was a no-cull tournament. We released and kept moving, only to keep catching dinks and rats. We came to the end of the flats and into docks. It was 9 a.m., and we figured, what the heck lets fish the docks. We maneuvered in and out of docks.Jakeskipped under and I threw down the middle and the sides. I started catching red after red, but nothing over 3 pounds and nothing with a lot of spots. We came around a dock thathad a broken dock next to it with the middle section missing. Inside that middle section was a school ofeight upper and over slot reds. I threw at them, then got distracted by Jake throwing on a different school by the dock we just came around. I felt a thump, set the hook, and the drag took off; it had weight and was heading for pilings.I set the power pole, clicked the drag twice andI ran around the boat, horsing the red to keep him out of the pilings. I landed the red; he was 27 incheson the nose and weighed 6.5 pounds. He went in the live well, and we knew at that point we were in great shape anddecided togo for weight instead of Calcuttas. It was 11:30 a.m. We continued working docks, heading back toward the landing and weigh-in. We kept catching 3to 4-pound reds. We were looking for another 5or 6-pound red to weigh-in, but werent seeing or catching any big ones. The windpicked up and the trolling motor was dying, so we knew we must decide soon or end up weighing in one fish. Jake hooked up and landed a 4.7-pound red withfour spots. We made the decision to keep him and head back to the landing. We had been told by the locals any red over 6 pounds was a stud for Navarre, and 12 pounds usually wins it. The first team weighed in with 11.48 pounds, which we knew was more than us „ and its not a good sign whenthe first team to weigh has big weight. Usually, the smaller weighs are the first to be done and head home. The next team weighed and only had one red, then another team weighed in with onlyone red, then another team weighed in withtwo reds at 10.14 pounds. We knew now we would be placing top 3, depending on one other sound team that usually catches around 11 pounds. They weighed in at 9.56 pounds, and then we weighed in at 11.18 pounds. The remainder of the teams goose-egged, and we finished second place. We went in just trying to catchtwo reds to weigh andneverexpected to win anything. It was bittersweet and showed us, regardless of any plans or what people say, do what youre confident with and have fun.LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAMEmerald Coast Red sh Circuit Tournament 2 A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony WatsonJake Wright and A.J. Watson come in second place during the Emerald Coast Red“ sh Circuit in Navarre with a weigh-in of 11.18 pounds. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E16 Friday, May 18, 2018 |

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E17

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E18 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DO: LIVE MUSICNews Herald Staff ReportsPANAMA CITY „ The Gary and Jill Wofsey Quartet will pay tribute to legendary jazz saxophonist, composer and arranger Gerry Mulligan on Tuesday at The Place Downtown, as part of Gulf Jazz Societys monthly event. The swinging group of top jazz musicianswill feature noted flutist and guitarist Dr. Jill Wofsey; trumpeter and fugelhornist Gary Wofsey; acclaimed bassist Steve Gilmore; and popular local drummer Charles Pagano. Mulliganslandmark recording of Birth of the CoolŽ in the 1980s is considered the seminal album in the history of modern jazz. The recording marked the beginning of a new direction in jazz, departing from the straight bebop style. Jill Wofsey, a professional flutist, bassist, teacher and clinician, received a Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Northern Colorado and degrees from the University of Minnesota and Eastman School of Music. A Yamaha Performing Artist, she was voted into the 67th annual Downbeat Readers Poll and has served as chair of the National Flute Association Jazz Committee. Brass player Gary Wofsey has traveled with the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra and later settled in New York and formed a 13-piece jazz orchestra featuring some of the best jazz musicians in New York City. Wofsey is best known for his unique ability to play trumpet and flugelhorn simultaneously. Bassist Steve Gilmore, a three-time Grammy award winner, is regarded as one of the best jazz bassists in the world. He was Tony Bennetts bassist for five years, and he has toured internationally and recorded with many of the most recognized jazz icons. Charles Paganos percussion work has a wide reputation in the Florida Panhandle region for his musicianship and his ability to blend, creatively, with first rate jazz ensembles. The PlaceDowntown, 429 Harrison Ave. in Panama City, offers a full bar and a menu that includes hamburgers, a variety of sandwiches, salads, seafood, prime rib and steaks. Seating is limited. Call for reservations. Reservations can be made by contacting Larry or Amy at 850-784-2106, or Bob at 850-258-4022. Tickets are $12 or $10 for Gulf Jazz Societymembers. Individual memberships are $20 annually, $30 for family memberships, $10 for students. The Gulf Jazz Societyis an organization of jazz enthusiasts from all walks of life,Ž said Larry Fletcher, volunteer executive director, in a posting at the website, GulfJazzSociety. org. The Societys membership includes musicians, teachers, business and professional persons, students, and persons simply interested in Americas original music. The common bond is the love of jazz music and the desire to build a larger jazz audience in the community.Ž Founded in 1997, the Gulf Jazz Societyserves as an advocate of jazz music inPanama City and the Panhandle region of Florida. As part of its annual program, the GJS awards scholarships and introduces jazz to local schools. Recently, the Society awarded three $500 scholarships and granted Bay County public schools a curriculum guide titled Jazz For Young People,Ž as well as instructional materials for the use of classroom teachers. The GJS is a nonprofit organization and a member of the American Federation of Jazz Societies. The Gulf Jazz Society board of directors meets monthly in the fellowship room of the historic St. Andrews Church at 10th and Chestnut in Panama City. Any person interested in jazz and the program of the GJS is welcome to attend; call 850-2351659 for meeting details.All that jazz: Wofsey Quartet tribute to Gerry MulliganThe Gary and Jill Wofsey Quartet will pay tribute to jazz legend Gerry Mulligan on Tuesday at The Place Downtown, as part of Gulf Jazz Societys monthly event. The swinging quartet features trumpeter and fugelhornist Gary Wofsey, pictured, his wife, noted ” utist and guitarist Dr. Jill Wofsey, acclaimed bassist Steve Gilmore, and popular local drummer Charles Pagano. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Jill Wofsey Gerry Mulligan

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LION TAMERDive Tournament, Family Fun Day | 20-21 BEACH INSIDERISSUE NO. 169 € Friday, May 18, 2018

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done it one other time,Ž said Galbreath, who added past demos also have been performed by local executive chefs Chris Infinger and Konrad Jochum. In May 2017, Infinger described lionfish as a good substitute for any fish „ grouper, snapper „ a very good fish to introduce people who have never had fish. Its not greasy or fishy,Žhe said. Theyre eating everything we like to eat, so thats why they need to go away. If you like crab, grouper, snapper, thats what theyre eating, and so thats what they kind of taste like. This is a good way to introduce them to people who normally wouldnt order them. They are edible; the meat is good.Ž Lionfish can consume 2 pounds of prey, per acre, per day and are known to consume 56 species of fish and invertebrates.Lionfish are easy to spear, Galbreath said, because they are not afraid of humans. They are removed from boats, reefs and the natural bottom of the Gulf. Last year, we caught a total of 929 fish, and the most caught was by Bob Stapleton, 127. He also got the longest at 17.25 inches,Ž Galbreath said. Ron Bronhem caught the heaviest at 2.57 pounds, and the smallest was caught by Doug Wiggin at .03 pounds „ teeny tiny.Ž Once caught, divers must be careful not to poke themselves with the spine. If you do get stuck, soak the area in warm water. Its a protein-based venom, so use warm water, not ice, to reduce swelling,Ž Robinson advised in 2017 after getting stuck in his hand and thigh spear fishing off the Empire Mica. It was like a bad bee sting. My hands didnt swell, but everyones body reacts differently. If warm water is not helping, seek medical attention. You want to make sure no part of the spine is left behind.Ž The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will return with a marine touch tank for kids, andalso will have Lionfish Removal & Awareness Day Exhibits and safe handling demonstrations. The boys from Covenant Christian School are setting up lionfish traps and we will have a DJ,Ž said Chelsea Ray, marketing director for Capt. Andersons Marina, who added the music would be island style; definitelyfamily-friendly. Half Hitch will have a kayak booth promoting kayak fishing.Ž The free fun day includes a kids fishing clinic, as well asexhibits on the History of Diving and theHistory of Fishing in Bay County. The annual Lionfish Art Contest by Patronis Elementary also returns with winners announced at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, and local arts and crafts vendors will be set up. A new vendor this year is CCA„ Coastal Conservation Association of Florida,Ž said Ray, who added othervendors include Gulf World, WonderWorks, Beach Art Group, Scentsy, LuLaRoe, and the Sno Factory will be selling sno-cones.Ž In addition to lionfish, Smokin Butts and Brothers BBQ will have barbecue for sale during Sundays festival. The free kids dockside catch and release fishing (with all gear and bait provided) is from 1-5 p.m. Sunday. The fishing clinic will be hosted by Busters Beer & Bait and local Boy Scouts. About 20 to 30 kids can fish for several minutes at a time, and another station will teach them how to tie different knots. We will have kids from strollers on up; they always have something to do. We have close to 1,000 who come out all day,Ž Pam Anderson, operations manager at Capt. Andersons Marina, said in 2017. Older kids can do the fishing clinic, and other kids have things to do „ a cupcake walk and fishing over the wall with treats.Ž | Friday, May 18, 2018 E21 E20 Friday, May 18, 2018 | BEACH INSIDERWhat: Seventh annual event hosted by Capt. Andersons Marina and Divers Den When: Divers can spear“ sh all day Saturday and Sunday, May 19-20, with 4 p.m. weigh-in Sunday; Family Fun Day is 1-6 p.m. Sunday, May 20 Where: Parking lot at Capt. Andersons Marina, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach Admission: Free; $25 entry fee for divers Details: 850-234-8717, DiversDenPCB.com or CaptAndersonsMarina.comLion Tamer Dive Tournament & Family Fun Day 7th annual tournament culminates with Family Fun DayBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „Divers head back into the water armed with spears Saturday on a two-day hunt for lionfish, and all ages are invited to sample the big catch Sunday on the Grand Lagoon. The seventh annual Lion Tamer Dive Tournament, hosted by Divers Den and Capt. Andersons Marina, culminates with the Family Fun Day from 1-6 p.m. Sunday in the marina parking lot, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive „ a free event to help spread awareness about the invasive species of predatory reef fish. A safety meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Friday at Divers Den, 3120 Thomas Drive, in advance of the tournament, but divers can enter the tournament till 1 p.m. Sunday. Prizes will be awarded after the lionfish weigh-in at 4 p.m. Sunday for the most lionfish, smallest lionfish, longest lionfish, heaviest lionfish and a new category this year „ venom vase. This is an attempt for divers to give us fish,Ž said Stacie Galbreath of Divers Den, who explained Tarpon Dock Seafood Market is paying divers for their catch. Every fish a diver gives us gets their name thrown in a raffle for extra prizes. Its getting hard to get divers to give them up.Ž Brian Robinson, manager, instructor and boat captain at Divers Den, added divers aregetting$5 to $5.50 a pound for the lionfish. Lionfish has found new demand by locals and restaurants forthe speciessweet, white meat and locals desire tohelp eradicate the fish fromlocal waters, where they were first noticed in 2010. The lionfish survive on Floridas native species, threatening Floridas saltwater fish and habitat. Theyre on some restaurant menus and they sell quite a bit at Tarpon Dock,Ž Galbreath added. While more divers hunting lionfish is positive news, Divers Den wanted to be sure to have enough lionfish for Sundays lionfish filet demonstration and sampling. The dive shop divers have actually been bringing in fish over the last month, up to 400 pounds,so we have enough to prepare and Capt. Andersons fish market has been keeping up with them,Ž said Galbreath, who added the market has been freezing them till this weekend. Watch tournament divers bring in their catches and Justin Buxton, owner of Finns Island Style Grub, will be preparing the lionfish two ways: grilled and ceviche „ Galbreaths favorite way to eat it. He does an excellent ceviche; hes Lion Tamer: Catch action at Capt. Andersons MarinaThe seventh annual Lion Tamer Dive Tournament & Family Fun Day returns this weekend with free activities in the parking lot at Capt. Andersons Marina from 1-6 p.m. Sunday. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Prizes will be awarded in several categories, from the heaviest lion“ sh to the smallest. A raf” e also has been added as an incentive for divers to turn in lion“ sh for the sampling. A kids zone will feature activities and games for children. Tournament divers will spear lion“ sh for two days before the weigh-in at 4 p.m. Sunday.

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHMyles Gill, 3, shows off his sandy hairdo. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Lily Beaby, 8, searches for shells. Left: A young girl ” oats in the water. Above left: Nicky Reeves plays in the water with her daughter, Amirah Newman, 4. Above right: A couple enjoys the view.

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E27 MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEditors Note: CluelessŽ is playing at The Grande 16 Pier Park, 500 S. Pier Park Drive, in Panama City Beach at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, May 20, and Wednesday, May 23. For more information, call 850-233-4835 or visit thegrandtheatre.com. Each week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com Matt: Clueless might get better with age Ready for a shock? Pinnacle teen-comedy CluelessŽ is over 20 years old. Before Alicia Silverstone was a retiredactress-turned-naturist; before Stacey Dash was just another Fox News pundit; and when Paul Rudd was young, funny and good-looking ƒ as opposed to now, when hes middle-aged, funny and good-looking. They were part of a cultural phenom that was so thoroughly 90s we wondered if its greatness could hold over time. Well, either my nostalgia is strengthening, or the film is actually getting better with age. CluelessŽ is as funny as ever, lovingly laughing at its characters with a timeless sense of teenage naivete. The story of posh highschooler Cher (a neverbetter Silverstone) and her gang of hilariously un-self-aware cohorts is a segmented film. Befriending and making-over a lower-class classmate. Falling for the James-Deanesque new kid. Playing matchmaker to some lonely teachers. Learning how to drive. Dealing with your mopey, know-it-all college stepbrother. Its a collage of teenage moments; nonetheless, theres a beautiful cohesion throughout. The colorful dialogue of obnoxious colloquialisms and the beyond-perfect casting ground the film at every boad, saggy pantsd turn. Sure, CluelessŽ is a chick flick,Ž but to write it off because of that would be to ignore how smart and subtly subversive the movie is. Based on the Jane Austen book Emma,Ž the story parallels are not only fun and unexpectedly exact, they give the plight of these decidedly unsympathetic characters a rare gravitas. Neither praising adolescents or standing at a distance to laugh at them, it instead simply accepts them, warts and designer clothes and giant cellphones and all. That uncynical love makes this colorful and lively gutbusting comedy every bit as successful as it was in 1995. Rating: out of 5 stars Cole: Clueless popularity lost on newcomer Following a popular highschooler in Beverly Hills as she navigates the social scene, CluelessŽ has gone on to become something of a cult hit since its 1995 release and is now scheduled for theatrical re-release. Its easy to see why, too. The crackling script and heightened atmosphere along with the alternately playful and snarky characterizations are the kind of things that would sear into many an adolescents mind and develop a commensurate following. Alas, however; I never watched CluelessŽ as an adolescent in the 90s and thus never had that base of affection for the film. So watching it now in preparation for this review I was struck by how uneven it is both dramatically and comedically. There wasnt a single moment in the movie where I bought into the film as a brilliant classic, and neither was there a point where I thought it was going particularly poorly. Its quality constantly vacillates but only within a small range. Its funny or interesting probably 60 percentof the time, but never interesting or funny enough; and then it treads into less interesting places and offers up really lame and dated jokes for another 40 percentof the time, but theyre never disastrous. Theyre just bad enough to break any positive momentum. If you loved CluelessŽ when it came out, youre almost certain to still love it and you should certainly go buy a ticket. So many nostalgia-driven movie choices dont hold up, but this will. If, on the other hand, you dont already have a shared memory with Clueless,Ž it seems unlikely that you will join the fan club at this point. Rating: out of starsClueless brings back 90s Clueless,Ž released in 1995, is playing at the Grand Theatre in Pier Park on Sunday and Wednesday, May 20 and 23. [CONTRIBUTED IMAGE] CluelessDirector: Amy Heckerling Starring: Alicia Silverstone, Stacey Dash, Brittany Murphy, Paul Rudd, Donald Faison, Breckin Meyer, Jeremy Sisto, Dan Hedaya, Wallace Shawn Rated: PG-13 (sex related dialogue and some teen use of alcohol and drugs)

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E28 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DOFather, daughter duo bring relationship to stageBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „The characters of End DaysŽ might appear extreme, but theyre dealing with extreme circumstances, after all. A teenage Goth girl with a new friend who dresses like Elvis is dealing with her father, who hasnt left their home since surviving the World Trade Center disaster on 9/11. She hasregular conversations withStephen Hawking, while her newly evangelical mom talks to Jesus. It feels like the end of the world is approaching „ but then, isnt it always? End DaysŽ opens at Kaleidoscope Theatre in Lynn Haven on Friday for a three-weekend run, ending the community theaters 47th season. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, May 18,19, 25,26, and June 1 and 2; with 2 p.m. matinees Sunday, May 20 and 27, and June 3. A wine and hors doeuvres reception will take place after the opening performance on Friday. For tickets and details,visit KT-online.org. The play, written by Deborah Zoe Laufer,is codirected by Doug Gilliland and Jason Blanks. It features Cassidy Cobb as Rachel Stein, Eric Cobb as Arthur Stein, Cameron Ryals as Stephen Hawking, Nathan Simmons as Jesus, Dylan Van Slyke as Nelson Steinberg, and Kathy Tinder as Sylvia Stein. Originally considered for production several years ago, the play only recently received approval from the theaters board. It was considered too edgy,Ž Gilliland said. Its not even offensive, even a little bit. The topic is religion, but were not saying one thing or another about that. Were not commenting on religion, its just a part of who we are.Ž Cassidy Cobb, 17, a student at Arnold High School, is acting opposite her father,Eric Cobb, who teaches at Arnold. Theysaid the chance to share the stage playing father and child was unique. Its a lot of fun,Ž Cassidy Cobb said. Heused to do a lot of (acting) but then he quit, so I got to drag him back. Its been a blast to get to share the experience with him.Ž Shes a huge theater person. She walks around the house singing show tunes,Ž Eric Cobb said ofCassidy.I did theater years ago, and to be pulled back into it is fun. To be pulled back into it with her is beautiful, and of course memories that will last a lifetime.Ž Cassidy Cobb said Racheladopted the Gothic style and cynical outlook after 9/11:It really shook up both of her parents to the point where neither of them are really present in her life any more,Ž she said. So she kind of retreated into herself, and she dresses in this sort of dark, intimidating way to keep people away from her.Ž Rachel begins to be drawn from heremotional exile by the attention of Nelson, the next-door neighbor who impersonates Elvis. Nelson is just a really positive being,Ž saidVan Slyke, a theater major at Gulf Coast State College, discussing his character. The play is beautifully written, and it does set up for a really great play, especially when you have such great directors and a great cast and crew like ours, so its very exciting.Ž Eric Cobb said Arthur Stein is having a tough time with depression and survivors guilt. All 65 people in his office died, except him. Hes finally coming out of it, and its this weird kid next door that pulls the whole family out of it,Ž Eric Cobb said. He manages to connect with everybody and bring them all out of where they are.ŽEnd Days examines religion, science, familyEND DAYSWhat: A family dramedy about the end of the world Where: Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven When: 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. on Sunday, through June 3 Tickets: Adults $18 (reserved) or $20 at the door; military/ seniors $17 (reserved) or $19 at the door; students $10 (reserved) or $12 at the door Details and Reservations: KTonline.org or 850-265-3226 The cast of End Days,Ž opening Friday at Kaleidoscope Theatre in Lynn Haven, includes, from left: Cassidy Cobb, Cameron Ryals, Eric Cobb, Dylan Van Slyk, Nathan Simmons and Kathy Tinder. [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] Sylvia Stein (Kathy Tinder) seeks advice from Jesus (Nathan Simmons) in End Days.Ž

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E29Dramatic reading a rst for CityArtsBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Something new is on the schedule for CityArts Cooperative, a dramatic presentation performed by a new theatrical group. The St. Andrews Readers Theatre Troupe willperform selections from Edgar Lee Masters classic Spoon River AnthologyŽ in a dramatic reading format. The performance will be at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 19, at CityArts, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. People in general have no idea what a readers theater is,Ž said troupe member Marilyn Agee, a retired educator. So weve adopted it as part of our mission to educate the public about readers theater.Ž Unlike a play in which costumes and sets help to tell the story and actors perform from memorized lines, a readers theater focuses only on the words and delivery. The troupe reads from the play, often in a very basic costume (or simple black clothing) and without sets or props, so that the audience can zero-in on the authors words. Think of it in terms of an audio book, but read live. Im a former theater addict, but as time has progressed I knew I couldnt do a play and be gone from home every night for six weeksŽ for rehearsals and performances, Agee said. But I thought a readers theater could work with the retired lifestyle.Ž The event is open to the public and admission is free.The performance is hosted by Bay Arts Alliance board president Jayson Kretzer and The Syndicate Studio. While its the first readers theater weve had, Im not sure it is so much of an expansion of what we do, but more a realization of our inclusiveness to all forms of art,Ž said Kretzer, a director at CityArts Cooperative. It has always been a bit of a challenge for the public to understand what CityArts is. For us, it is a space to create. Whether that means creating in your studio, teaching a class, or building a creative event depends on the director. There are a dozen directors here, and we all have different tastes and interests, so while you can get art or dancing classes one night, the next you might find a book signing or performance like well haveSaturday.Ž St. Andrews Readers Theater Troupe wasformed by residents of Landmark Condominiums on Beach Drive, whom Agee described as all transplants.Ž After a Christmas program at condo, some of the group started talking about finding places to perform and ways to pull off a show. Now, the troupeof actors invite the audience to use their imagination to join them in the world the readers create using just theirvocal performance of theprinted word. Our job this summer is to create our next piece,Ž Agee said. Its all a matter of adapting plays or readings. Weve discussed doing Mark Twain, O Henry, and poetry Americana. Im sure theyll all be part of our repertoire. Were taking a longterm view.Ž In Spoon River Anthology,Ž the American poet,Masters, created a series of compelling freeverse monologues of a time gone by in which former citizens of a mythical Midwestern town speak touchingly about their lives. Their voices describe disappointment and dashed dreams, but also love and hope „ themes that are sometimes anguished, sometimes humorous, but are universal and still resonatetoday. GO & DONew troupe brings Spoon River to lifeSPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGYWhat: The St. Andrews Readers Theatre Troupe will perform a dramatic reading of selections from the classic play When: 4:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 Where: CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City Admission: Free and open to the public Details: TheSyndicateStudio. com/events The St. Andrews Readers Theatre Troupe will perform selections from Spoon River AnthologyŽ in a dramatic reading format on Saturday at CityArts Cooperative. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E31HAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, May 18 JEEP BEACH JAM: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach; Vendor Village, Obstacle Course and JBJ Vendor Raf” e open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Vendor Village with music and contests at 10 a.m. Jeep Wash is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Scavenger Hunt awards from 2-4 p.m., Raf” e Mini Drawing 4-5 p.m.; free concert 7 p.m. till on main stage at Vendor Village. After-show party at Ms. Newbys. Details, jeepbeachjam.com WHY WE CALL FLORIDA HOME EXHIBIT: Regular hours through May 31 at the Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City; presented by the Florida Humanities Council. Free admission. HEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATURE: Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com JAY HALL SHEER JOY, PURE HAPPINESS: Exhibit on display through May 26 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: May 18 through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com THE BOY THAT NEVER SLEEPS ART BY GARRET DECHELLIS: Exhibit on display through May 31 in the Youth Department at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Featuring oil paintings used to illustrate the the book of the same title by Victoria and Garret DeChellis. Details, Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 850-522-2118 SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Noon to 4 p.m. at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, featuring the ” oral art of most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 EMERALD COAST THEATRE FESTIVAL: 6 p.m. Brandon Styles „ Celebrity Singing Impressions & Magic Show; 7 p.m. Gardyloo by The Tiny Warriors; 8 p.m. Winston Churchill -Through the Storm by House of Monkeys. Performances at Emerald Coast Theatre Co., 560 Grand Blvd., Miramar Beach. Performances are open to the public. For details and tickets, visit NWFTheatreFestival.com SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com DIGITAL GRAFFITI: Three-night event at Alys Beach off County 30A. Projection art festival. Details and tickets, DigitalGraf“ ti.com END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Sixteenyear-old Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father hasnt changed out of his pajamas since 9/11, her new neighbor, a 16-year-old Elvis impersonator, has fallen for her hard and the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is that Stephen Hawking will save them all. Tonights show is followed by a wine and hors doeuvres reception. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 Saturday, May 19 LION TAMER DIVE TOURNAMENT: at Captain Andersons Marina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. $25 entry free for tournament. Details, CaptAndersonsMarina. com or 850-234-3435 JEEP BEACH JAM: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jeep check-in and registration at Vendor Village at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach with raf” es at 9 a.m., music and contests at 10 a.m., Jeep Wash from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vendor Village and Obstacle Course open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Raf” e Mini Drawing 2:30-3:30 p.m. Pre GO & DO : CALENDARJeep Beach Jam continues with free concert Friday at Frank Brown Park and Jeep Beach Crawl & Parade from Sharkys to Pier Park on Saturday. Details, JeepBeachJam.com [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 32

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E32 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARParade Party from 4-5:30 p.m. at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant, 15201 Front Beach Road, with Jeep Parade staging 5-6 p.m. and Jeep Beach Crawl and Parade 6-8 p.m. Bon Voyage Block Party, Show and Shine awards and music at 8 p.m. till at Pier Park Drive. Details, jeepbeachjam.com 25TH ANNUAL KIDFEST: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. indoor and outdoors at the Central Panhandle Fairgrounds with nearly 100 childrens activities and stage entertainment beginning at 10:30 a.m.; presented by Early Education and Care Head Start Program. Admission is free; food, beverages and merchandise will be available for sale during the festival. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smiths Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. 2ND ANNUAL SALTY DOG DAY: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Historic St. Andrews, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City, during the St. Andrews Farmers Market. Proceeds from the event will bene“ t Lucky Puppy Rescue and Operation Spay Bay. EMERALD COAST THEATRE FESTIVAL: 9 a.m. Favorite Fables by ECTC Homeschool Creative Dramatics; 10 a.m. The 10 Best/Worst Things About Middle School by ECTC Jr. Thespian Troupe; 11 a.m. A Tale Dark and Grimm The Whole story of Hansel and Gretel by ECTC Creative Dramatics; noon Aerialists in Wonderland by the Aerial Teen Performance Co., Aerial Dance Panama City; 1 p.m. Teenaging is Hard by Those Meddling Kids; 2 p.m. Poems for People Who Hate Poetry by The Live Bard; 3 p.m. Winston Churchill: Through the Storm by House of Monkeys; 4:30 p.m. Jessies Messy Mind by Messy Mind Productions; 6:15 p.m. Mirrors by View from The Stage Inc. of Crestview; 7:15 p.m., Gardyloo by The Tiny Warriors; 8:30 p.m. Musical Theatre Mad Libs by Gulf Coast State College of Panama City. Performances at Emerald Coast Theatre Co., 560 Grand Blvd., Miramar Beach. Performances are open to the public. For details and tickets, CALENDARFrom Page 31Dshaun McCloud, left, slams into Zack Bungay, while playing Loco Bubble Soccer at KidFest in April 2015. KidFest returns to the fairgrounds on Saturday. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 33

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARvisit NWFTheatreFestival.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 5TH ANNUAL RIDE TO REMEMBER POKER RUN: Registration from 9-10 a.m. at Gulf Coast State Colleges Military Park, followed by “ rst of two wreathlaying ceremonies at 10 a.m.; kickstands up at 10:30 a.m. Participants will travel to a few local businesses throughout Panama City and Panama City Beach, with second wreathlaying ceremony at Pier Park Veterans Memorial at 2 p.m. Festivities will conclude at L.E. Tommy Thomas American Legion Post 375, where guests will be treated to food, entertainment, drawings and prizes. Event honors active duty military and veterans, with all proceeds supporting GCSCs military, veteran and dependent students as part of the GCSC Foundations Thanks a Million campaign. Details, Suzanne Remedies, Director of Military and Veteran Affairs at 850-913-3291 or sremedies@ gulfcoast.edu BAY COUNTY STAMP CLUB SHOW: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 3007 W. 14th St., Panama City. Browse collections of classic and modern stamps and supplies. Customer collections welcome. Free admission and parking. Details, Walter Baldwin at 850-784-1214 or walt.baldwin5002@gmail. com MYSTIC FESTIVAL: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Capstone House, 1713 Beck Ave., Panama City. Entry, $5 per person. Enjoy snacks, coffee, drinks, and lunch for sale. Find a favorite reader, psychic or medium. Buy crystals, jewelry, essential oils, windchimes, books, incense, dowsers, mojo bags, etc. MILITARY APPRECIATION BLOCK PARTY: 11 a.m. until along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. Merchants and vendors will be set up in the street. The Bay High School ROTC color guard will present the ” ag at noon; the national anthem will be performed by the North Bay Haven High School Choir. Bay Winds Orchestra will perform from 2-3 p.m. Sound Arcade will perform on the stage at Fifth Street from 3-7 p.m., with DJ T3 taking over the after-party. SPRING FLORAL SHOW: Noon to 4 p.m. at The Artist Cove, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City, featuring the ” oral art of most of the studio and gallery artists. Free admission. Details, TheArtistCovestudio.com or 850-215-2080 READERS THEATRE SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY: 4 p.m. at CityArts cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. The St. Andrews Readers Theatre Troupe will perform selections from Edgar Lee Masters Spoon River Anthology.Ž Free admission. Open to the public. Light refreshments will be served following the performance. Presented by The Syndicate. Details, TheSyndicateStudio.com/events THE HIP ABDUCTION LIVE: 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. at Spinnaker Beach Club, 8795 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Tickets: $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Details, SpinnakerBeachClub.com END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 DIGITAL GRAFFITI: Three-night event at Alys Beach off County 30A. Projection art festival. Details and tickets, DigitalGraf“ ti.com PANGINA HEALS: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From RuPauls Drag Race Thailand. Her “ rst U.S. tour. Also featuring Envy DuVall, Cinnamon Ashley and China Moon. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida.com or 236-3450 Sunday, May 20 JEEP BEACH JAM: 8:30 a.m. Worship on the Water at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach, followed by Of“ cial Blessing of the Jeeps. Details, jeepbeachjam. com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 EMERALD COAST THEATRE FESTIVAL: 1 p.m. Teenaging is Hard by Those Meddling Kids; 2 p.m. An Iliad by 9 Muses Theatre of Panama City; 3:45 p.m. Jessies Messy Mind by Messy Mind Productions; 5:30 p.m. Mirrors by View from The Stage Inc. of Crestview; 6:30 p.m. Musical Theatre Mad Libs by Gulf Coast State College of Panama City; 7:45 p.m. The Heir Apparot by PB&J. Performances at Emerald Coast Theatre Co., 560 Grand Blvd., Miramar Beach. Performances are open to the public. For details and tickets, visit NWFTheatreFestival.com END DAYS: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 LION TAMER DIVE TOURNAMENT & FAMILY FUN DAY: 1-6 p.m. (4 p.m. weigh-in) at Captain Andersons Marina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. Details, CaptAndersonsMarina.com or 850-234-3435 DIGITAL GRAFFITI: Three-night event at Alys Beach off County 30A. Projection art festival. Details and tickets, DigitalGraf“ ti.com Monday, May 21 NAVAL STORES AND TURPENTINING: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. The Historical Society of Bay County will host Bill Register, who will present a program on the origins of Naval Stores in the United States, its history in Northwest Florida and an exhibit of tools and equipment used. Open and free to the public. Register is a 6th-generation Floridian, whose family that has worked in the turpentine industry since the mid to late 1800s. Tuesday, May 22 BLASTED CONCERT: 7-10 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City, featuring touring bands Dingbat Superminx and Pleasures, and local band The Jerry CALENDARFrom Page 32Replicas of Columbus ships, Nina (pictured) and the Pinta, return to dock at the Panama City Marina on May 25 until they depart early May 30. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 34

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E34 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARRiddle. Details, Facebook. com/BlastedScreenPrint Wednesday, May 23 VOLUNTEER DOCENT TRAINING: 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at The Panama City Publishing Co. on Beck Avenue. FILM FAN CLUB ALIEN: 5:30 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Watch cult classic “ lms at the library. Film Rated R. Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. Details, NWRLS.com Thursday, May 24 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26, at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 Friday, May 25 WHY WE CALL FLORIDA HOME EXHIBIT: Regular hours at the Panama City Publishing Co. Museum, 1134 Beck Ave., Panama City. Presented by the Florida Humanities Council. Free admission. Runs through May 31. HEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATURE: Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com JAY HALL SHEER JOY, PURE HAPPINESS: Exhibit on display through May 26 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com THE BOY THAT NEVER SLEEPS ART BY GARRET DECHELLIS: Exhibit on display through May 31 in the Youth Department at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Featuring oil paintings used to illustrate the the book of the same title by Victoria and Garret DeChellis. Details, Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 850-522-2118 SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com JESS AND JESSE HOUSE CONCERT: 6-9 p.m. at Wild Root in Lynn Haven. Limited VIP seating, $20; general admission, $10. END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Sixteen-year-old Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father hasnt changed out of his pajamas since 9/11, her new neighbor, a 16-year-old Elvis impersonator, has fallen for her hard and the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is that Stephen Hawking will save them all. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 COLUMBUS SHIP REPLICAS DOCK IN PANAMA CITY: The Pinta and the Nina, replicas of Columbus Ships, will dock at the Panama City Marina, 1 Harrison Ave., until they depart early Wednesday morning, May 30. $8.50 for adults, $7.50 for seniors, $6.50 for students. Saturday, May 26 SHADDAI ANNUAL BREAM FISHING TOURNAMENT AND FISH FRY: 7 a.m. kick off; 3 p.m. weigh in at the Howards Creek Upper Landing. Fish plates with all the “ xins $10 starting at 2 p.m. at the Upper Landing Pavilion. Details, Bob at 402-981-9419, JE at 850-763-8514, Leon at 850-258-5032 or Bill at 850-832-0958 PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, CALENDARFrom Page 33 See CALENDAR, 35

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E35 GO & DO : CALENDAR850-265-3226 IMPERMANENCE BY CHARLES SAYLOR WITH THE DRAG: 8-11 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City.balances the rigor of hospital work through painting and illustration. Saylor, an artist and doctor, will display his most recent artwork, a series of acrylic paintings that depict aging statues of antiquity, in an attempt to illustrate the fading of all things into the realm of the forgotten. Free admission. Music begins at 9 p.m. FREE SIDESHOW CIRCUS PERFORMANCE: 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. outdoors at Ripleys Believe It or Not!, 9907 Front Beach Road, in Panama City Beach for free live performance by Captain Darron & Trashique from the Tinderbox Circus Sideshow. Details, 850-230-6113 PHARRAH DYNAMICS & CHAMPAGNE MUNROE: 8 p.m. till 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From B Bobs Mobile, Ala. Also featuring Envy DuVall, China Moon, Roxxie Wilde and DJ Vishus V. Showtimes at midnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, May 27 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND PICNIC DINNER PARTY: Noon to 9 p.m. at the Havana Beach Bar & Grill, Pearl Hotel, 63 Main St., Rosemary Beach. All day Happy Hour for select food and drinks. END DAYS: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 CALENDARFrom Page 34Ripleys Believe It or Not! in Panama City Beach will host free sideshow performances by Captain Darron & Trashique on May 26 in the parking lot. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 36

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E36 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARSINFONIA GOES POPS: 7-9 p.m. at Alys Beach amphitheatre, off County 30A. Food and beverages for sale. Free admission, open to the public. Details, Alysbeach.com/event GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with The Rowdies on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. PHARRAH DYNAMICS & CHAMPAGNE MUNROE: 8 p.m. till 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From B Bobs Mobile, Ala. Also featuring Envy DuVall, China Moon, Roxxie Wilde and DJ Vishus V. Showtimes at midnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Monday, May 28 ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE: 10 a.m. at Kent Forest Lawn Cemetery, 2403 Harrison Ave., Panama City; hosted by the Bay County Veterans Council and the Bay County Board of County Commissioners. Ceremony is a tribute to the men and women who have served our nation and have given their lives to protect our freedoms. Bill Gobat, Lt. Col., USMC (Ret.) will serve as the Master of Ceremonies and the guest speaker will Cmdr. Jay Sego, commanding of“ cer, Naval Support Activity-Panama City. MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION: 11 a.m. at Shades Bar and Grill in Inlet Beach with bouncy houses, BBQ, plus regular menu and full bar. Public is welcome to bring family and spend the day. Active and retired military personnel will receive 15 percent off. Shades also is selling smoked brisket and sides for people to pre-order and pick up to take to their own party. Details, Shades at 850-231-9410 or info@shades30a.com ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Garden Club, 810 Garden Club Drive. All military services will be honored inside the cool Club House, followed by a short program at the Memorial Wall. Refreshments will be served in the Club House. The public is invited to attend this patriotic ceremony. Tuesday, May 29 SUMMER REELS THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE: 7 p.m. at Alys Beach amphitheatre, off County 30A. Food and beverages for sale. Free admission, open to the public. Bring blankets and low-back chairs. Details, Alysbeach.com/event Wednesday, May 30 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES THE CURRYS: 7-9 p.m. at at Alys Beach amphitheatre, off County 30A. Food and beverages for sale. Free admission, open to the public. Bring blankets and low-back chairs. Details, Alysbeach.com/event Thursday, May 31 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26, at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 Friday, June 1 HEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATURE: Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com ART TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: 7 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Artist Heather Clements will discuss her work and career, and sign copies of her new book. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC. com END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Sixteenyear-old Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father hasnt changed out of his pajamas since 9/11, her new neighbor, a 16-year-old Elvis impersonator, has fallen for her hard and the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is that Stephen Hawking will save them all. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 ROOTS AND BOOTS: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civics Center, 8 Harrison Ave. Panama City. 7th Annual Faith & Hope Concert featuring Aaron Tippin, Sammy Kershaw, and Collin Raye. Proceeds bene“ t St. Johns Catholic School. Details: 850-763-4696 or info@marinaciviccenter.com Saturday, June 2 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. PANAMA CITY BEACH ARTISTS, MUSICIANS AND FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Shoppes at Edgewater, Panama City Beach. Browse the works of artists, crafters, growers and more. Enjoy live music. Details, 850-774-5367 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 21st SHELL SHOW: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Presented by Gulf Coast Shell Club. Admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children 12 and under. CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com END DAYS: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 Sunday, June 3 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. CALENDARFrom Page 35Jim Hearon juggles with his son, James, in July 2013 during the Summer Concert Series at Aaron Bessant Park. The series returns June 7 through Aug. 9. [HEATHER HOWARD/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] See CALENDAR, 37

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| Friday, May 18, 2018 E37 GO & DO : CALENDARDetails at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 21ST ANNUAL PANAMA CITY BEACH SHELL SHOW: 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Presented by Gulf Coast Shell Club. Admission is $2 for adults and $1 for children 12 and under. END DAYS: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 Monday, June 4 GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Jeff on Sax on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Thursday, June 7 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26, at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: 7 p.m. each Thursday through Aug. 9 at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Free admission. Family friendly. Bring lawn chairs and blankets; coolers, food and pets are welcome. Friday, June 8 HEATHER CLEMENTS WE ARE NATURE: Exhibit on display through July 12 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Free admission, open to the public. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com WORLD OCEANS DAY: 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. at various locations in Panama City Beach. Join the fun starting with a beach clean up at the M.B. Miller County Pier from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. At the same time, there will also be activities and shows at Gulf World. After that, head to Divers Den for an underwater dive from 1-4 p.m., and “ nish off the day at Sharkys for the after party from 5-7 p.m. OH MY MICK HUBERT, VOICE OF THE GATORS: 5:30 p.m. at the Lyndell Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Mick will talk about his 29-year career as sports radio announcer for the Florida Gators. Pre-registration required. Call Mike Varner 850-527-7184. All proceeds will go to the Panhandle Gator Club scholarship fund. Saturday, June 9 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 HERMIT CRAB FESTIVAL: at Kinsaul Park in Lynn Haven. Details, CityOfLynnHaven.com FAMILY SCAVENGER HUNT: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City. More than 30 businesses and public areas will be involved. Free to participate. Get your map and prize details at Bou Cou Dancewear, Vinny & Bays, The Little Mustard Seed, and Main Street Antiques. Details, DowntownPanamaCity.com/ ScavengerHunt LORRIE MORGAN IN CONCERT: 7 p.m. at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 S. Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Hits include Five Minutes,Ž Except For Monday,Ž Something In Red,Ž Watch Me,Ž What Part Of No,Ž A Picture of Me Without YouŽ and Something in Red.Ž Sunday, June 10 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 Monday, June 11 GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Nite“ re on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, June 12 NANCY SPRINGER AUTHOR VISIT: 6-7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. The award winning author of The Books of Isle fantasy series, the Enola Holmes mystery series, and a plethora of other novels will discuss her latest release, The Oddling Prince.Ž Free admission. Books will be available for purchase. Wednesday, June 13 PCB SENIOR CENTER OPEN HOUSE: 11:30 a.m. at the Oat“ eld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama Citgy Beach. Meet and greet members, board and staff. Free cookout; may bring potluck dish and beverage to share. Recognition awards; raf” e drawing for a 50CC motor scooter donated by California Cycles ($10 per ticket to bene“ t the Senior Center); raf” e tickets may be purchased in advance at the Senior Center. Free and open to the public. Donations to food drive appreciated. Details, 850233-5065 or PCBSC.com Thursday, June 14 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26 at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: 7 p.m. each Thursday through Aug. 9 at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Free admission. Family friendly. Bring lawn chairs and blankets; coolers, food and pets are welcome. CALENDARFrom Page 36 See CALENDAR, 38

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E38 Friday, May 18, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARFriday, June 15 NELE ZIRNITE ANOTHER SKY: Exhibit on display through June 22 at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Featuring the work of the Lithuanian artist. Free admission during regular hours. Details, CenterForTheArtsPC.com 6th ANNUAL PATCHAPALOOZA: 4-10 p.m. at Patches Pub and Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach with Gary Nichols playing from 4-7 p.m. followed by Two Beards & a Ponytail. Locals music festival bene“ ts Veterans Task Force helping local veterans; Patches will have food and drink specials all weekend. Details, 850-2338879 or patchespub.com INKED ART OPENING: 6-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. On display through June, featuring artwork by tattoo artists from A Sailors Grave Tattoo Parlor and Time Piece Tattoos: Darren Anderson, Lance McIntosh, Katelynn Rhea, Sean Flood, Derek Nail and Joshua Gonzalez. Additional artists include Shaun Topper (Captured Tattoo in California), Mowgli Olenason (Coven Tattoo in Colorado), Cynthia Rudzis (Maryland), and Tea Cake (London). Free admission, open to the public. Light refreshments provided by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. Enter drawings to win giveaways such as literary-themed temporary tattoos by Litographs. Details at NWRLS.com Saturday, June 16 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 6th ANNUAL PATCHAPALOOZA: 1-10 p.m. at Patches Pub and Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach with Ben Walker at 1 p.m., Tyler Arnold at 2 p.m., Chuck Foster at 3 p.m., Derrick Dorsey at 4 p.m., Sarah Moranville and 5 p.m. and David Auen from 6-10 p.m. Locals music festival bene“ ts Veterans Task Force helping local veterans; Patches will have food and drink specials all weekend. Details, 850-2338879 or patchespub.com BAY DAY COMEDY JAM: 7 p.m. at Dave & Busters, 15701 LC Hilton Drive, Pier Park, Panama City Beach. Featuring the hottest comedians from BET Comic View, Carolines on Broadway, HBO Comedy and more. General admission $20; VIP $30. Details, 678-886-9416 MAYHEM MILLER: 8 p.m. till 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From VH1s RuPauls Drag Race Season 10. Also featuring China Moon, Envy DuVall and Roxxie Wilde. Showtimes at midnight and 2 a.m. Free meet and Greet. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, June 17 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 PANAMA JACK SUMMER SLAM: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Sharkys Beachfront Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. The largest professional beach volleyball tournament in the Panhandle. Athletes from all over the Southeast will battle for thousands of dollars in prize money. Free admission. Details, 321-277-1599 Monday, June 18 GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Reasonable Doubt on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Tuesday, June 19 TEEN PROGRAM SONGWRITING WITH ANTHONY PEEBLES: 4 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Program geared for Middle and High School students. Free admission. Details at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 850-522-2118 Thursday, June 21 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26 at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: 7 p.m. each Thursday through Aug. 9 at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Free admission. Family friendly. Bring lawn chairs and blankets; coolers, food and pets are welcome. Saturday, June 23 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 PRINCESS AND THE POET: Doors open for silent auction and art show at 5 p.m.; curtain rises at 6 p.m. at the Gulf Coast State College Amelia Center Theater, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. The Pyramid Players of Panama City present an original family friendly musical fairy tale based upon an African folk tale. Free admission, donations accepted. Details, 850-872-8105 Sunday, June 24 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 Monday, June 25 GROOVIN ON THE GREEN: 7-9 p.m. with Tony Vegas on the Village Green in Carillon Beach; concert series sponsored by the Carillon Beach Institute. Thursday, June 28 PAINT PARTY: 5-7 p.m. each Thursday through July 26 at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Artist Helen Ballance leads a step by step process to create a coastal painting. Cost: $35 each, includes all materials and 16x20-inch canvas. Details, 850-236-6065 SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: 7 p.m. each Thursday through Aug. 9 at Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach. Free admission. Family friendly. Bring lawn chairs and blankets; coolers, food and pets are welcome. Saturday, June 30 HISTORIC ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews Marina, 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City. Find produce, seafood, plants, herbs, honey, spices and seasonings, and artisan wares such as handmaid linens, candles, housewares and jewelry. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 BEGINNER MOUNTAIN DULCIMER WORKSHOP: 2-4 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Taught by professional dulcimer player, Jessica Comeau. Spare dulcimers will be available but you are encouraged to bring your own. Workshop is free. Details: 850-522-2120 or www.nwrls.com Sunday, July 1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 LIGHT UP THE BAY FIREWORKS: After sunset at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Details, 850-236-6065 Tuesday, July 3 DOGLOVE WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT: On display July 3-30 at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Artist Krista Oneisom presents an exhibit of mans best friend in watercolor paintings. In addition, 3D clay portraits of pups made by Draketurnerlabs of Cleveland, Ohio, which will be in the lobby display case. CALENDARFrom Page 37

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