Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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** Business .........................A7 Diversions .....................C7 Local & State ...............B1-7 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints ....................A6 SUNDAYSunshine 70 / 61SATURDAYT-storms 72 / 52TODAYMostly sunny 75 / 67 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 ENTERTAINER INSIDEARTS DOWNTOWN55th Bay Annual, ArtWalk celebrate area artists Friday, April 6, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com NATION & WORLD A5BATTLE ON THE BORDERNational Guard awaits guidance a er Trumps call to ght illegal immigration and drug smuggling LOCAL & STATE | B161ST ANNUAL PANCAKE DAYSBottomless apjacks and sausage breakfast aids PC Kiwanis SPORTS | C11A BOYS WEIGHT LIFTINGCounty athletes in minority at state championships at Arnold High School By John KennedyGateHouse Capital BureauTALLAHASSEE „ Dozens of family members of Florida prison inmates crowded a hearing Tuesday to protest a proposed Department of Cor-rections rule that would cut visitation times in half across the short-staffed system.DOC said it is dropping initial plans to enact every-other-weekend visiting beginning Saturday. The agency, instead, will go through a state rule-making process that would allow for another public hearing before the new scheduling goes into effect.But DOC isnt looking to abandon the new policy, and Tuesdays hearing drew out-rage and warnings from those attending.Theyre not taking into account the impact this has on our humanity,Ž said Kyle Williford, 30, of Orlando, who was released last month after serving three years at Hardee Correctional Institution following a burglary conviction.Violence is deterred by visitation,Ž he added. This is bad for the inmates, and the correctional officers.ŽThe schedule change was unveiled after the Florida Times-Union began reporting on concerns surrounding prison visitations„ obtaining records that revealed thousands of strip searches, mostly of inmate wives, mothers, girlfriends and female family members seek-ing to enter lockups.Florida has the nations third largest prison system, with 97,000 inmates scattered across almost 150 institutions statewide, including 50 major prisons.DOC has said it is looking to blunt a rise in contraband material „ drugs, cellphones and material that could be used as weapons. The agency also has been dealing with a shortage of correctional officers, particularly at pris-ons across North Florida.But while the amount of contraband seized at prisons has been rising during the past five years, the amount directly tied to visitors has remained steady at about 2.5 percent.DOC officials, though, said that 2.5 percent mostly is contraband seized at visi-tor entry points and does not include what might be suc-cessfully smuggled into cells and dormitories.Still, many who spoke at Tuesdays hearings said that inmate families are being sin-gled out for punishment and that contraband concerns are just an excuse.We are not to blame for the increase in contraband,Ž said Judy Thompson of Jack-sonville, whose son has been at Florida State Prison in Rai-ford for 18 years.Its important to be able to visit, to be able to look into someones eyes, to talk with them. For many people, thats all they have,Ž she added.Thompson is a leader with Forgotten Majority, Inc., one of the inmate advocacy orga-nizations pushing for DOC to drop the rule change, which would reduce weekly visita-tion to twice monthly.DOC could slice prison visitationSee PRISON, A5 By John Henderson522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.comSOUTHPORT „ Para-medics and law enforcement might never have to jointly respond to a call of an active shooter in a mall, or an offi-cer being shot while serving a warrant „ or it could happen in the next five minutes.So on Thursday, first responders practiced drills for these hostile scenarios and others „ just in case.Bay County for the first time held drills for tactical emergency casualty careŽ at the countys fire training facility next to the Emer-gency Operations Center. The countys firefighter training building served as the struc-ture for the training exercises.EMS personnel from the First responders take tactical trainingMike Smith places a tourniquet on Devin Rogers during a tactical emergency casualty drill at the Bay County Emergency Operations Center on Thursday. Part of the training included an actor with a fake “ rearm, which the “ rst responders were supposed to check for before moving the victims to a safe location. They did not check, and the actor shot at Rogers. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Drills give practice for hostile, dangerous scenariosKevin Shipp and Nicolas Dickinson move Catherine Lay to a safe location during a tactical emergency casualty drill at the Bay County Emergency Operations Center on Thursday. EMT students at Gulf Coast State College played the role of injured people at a protest that went out of control. See TRAINING, A5By Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson@nwfdailynews.comEGLIN AFB „ Maj. Stephen Del Bagno, the Thunderbirds pilot who died in a Wednesday crash in Nevada, had been assigned to Eglin Air Force Base immediately before going to the Air Force precision flight team.Del Bagno, in his first season with the Thunder-birds, left Eglin for the flight team just a few months ago, according to Lena Lopez, public affairs officer for Eglins 33rd Fighter Wing.He had been with the wing for about two years, servingas an F-35A evaluator pilot and chief of standardization and evaluation with the 58th Fighter Squadron, Lopez said.He was a close friend, obviously, and a prominent figure here,Ž Lopez said.Flying with the Thunderbirds fulfilled one of Del Bagnos long-standing ambitions.It was a dream, something he always aspired to,Ž Lopez said. Del Bagno was killed about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday during what the Air Force called a routine aerial demonstration training flight.According to the Thunderbirds website, Del Bagno was the slot pilotŽ for the team,flying the No. 4 jet. He was a 2005 graduate of Utah Valley State University, and was commissioned as an Air Force officer in 2007. Before joining the Air Force, Thunderbirds pilot killed in crash had Eglin connectionMaj. Stephen Del Bagno was F-35 evaluator pilotSee CRASH, A5 Del Bagno

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** A2 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald READER FEEDBACK TODAY IN HISTORY HAPPY BIRTHDAY FLORIDA LOTTERY YOUNG ARTIST CATCH OF THE DAY GO AND DOWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com.PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY The county is facing an unexpected multimillion-dollar repair or replacement of a leaking water main, but officials said Wednesday that customers water bills are not expected to increase to fund it. Dean Walker: That bridge is poorly engineered and built.Ž Iris McVann Fiddler: This is Insane for a relatively new bridge!Ž Teresa Nester Hamilton: BP money.Ž Six Alabama males have been arrested after a woman was held up at gunpoint in Panama City Beach for her purse, according to official reports. Holly Holsombake: Pick If I were Queen, Id build a wall around Bay County & make Alabama pay for it.Ž Brian Mourton: Florida needs a border checkpoint. Start running warrants before they come down.Ž State officials asked a federal judge Wednesday to put on hold his order demanding that a new process be in place by April 26 for restoring felons voting rights in Florida. Suzanne LaRue: Restore them!!!!Ž Jerome Moore: Only after doing their time and pay all “ nes and then “ ve years after they do everything.Ž Stephanie Marshall: After their time yes, but once you are a civilian, you should not be judged for 5 more years. If you can pay taxes, then you can vote. If they want to withhold rights, we should withhold taxes.Ž Federal authorities have “ led a slew of new wire fraud charges and issued another arrest warrant for the former director of Panama Citys Visual Arts Center (VAC) as her trial date approaches, according to court records. Wanda Solomon: Took my pottery class money, never got to attend.Ž Amanda Fagan: The only time that place has done great was when Linda was running it! So much disappointment..Ž. Emma Koen: I totally would love to run this place! New mural, classes, events, charity events, weddings! Oh my I could go on and on!!!Ž Nobel Prize-winning scientist James D. Watson is 90. Composer-conductor Andre Previn is 89. Actor Billy Dee Williams is 81. Movie director Barry Levinson is 76. Actor John Ratzenberger is 71. Baseball Hall of Famer Bert Blyleven is 67. Actress Marilu Henner is 66. Olympic bronze medal “ gure skater Janet Lynn is 65. Rock musician Warren Haynes is 58. Actor-producer Jason Hervey is 46. Actress Candace Cameron Bure is 42. Actress Eliza Coupe is 37. Folk singer-musician Kenneth Pattengale (Milk Carton Kids) is 36. Actor Bret Harrison is 36. Actor Charlie McDermott is 28. To submit birthdays, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with birthdayŽ in the subject line, or drop off a current photo and “ ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. The deadline is noon three business days prior to the birthday. Birthday announcements must include the persons “ rst and last name, city and age. The photo is a mug shot and must be a clear photo. These Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 14-16-20-22-30 Lotto: 01-05-11-12-25-48; estimated jackpot, $5 million Lotto XTRA: 05 Mega Millions: Estimated jackpot, $45 million Pick 2 Evening: 1-2 Pick 2 Midday: 0-9 Pick 3 Evening: 0-0-7 Pick 3 Midday: 5-7-7 Pick 4 Evening: 2-5-4-3 Pick 4 Midday: 4-7-6-7 Pick 5 Evening: 1-5-4-5-4 Pick 5 Midday: 1-3-2-2-7 Powerball: 08-24-42-54-64; Powerball: 24; Power Play: 4; estimated jackpot, $60 million Emilena Cozad Grade 2 Breakfast Point Academy Today is Friday, April 6 the 96th day of 2018. There are 269 days left in the year. Highlight in History: On April 6, 1968 41 people were killed by two consecutive natural gas explosions at a sporting goods store in downtown Richmond, Indiana. On this date: In 1830 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized by Joseph Smith in Fayette, New York. In 1862 the Civil War Battle of Shiloh began in Tennessee as Confederate forces launched a surprise attack against Union troops, who beat back the Confederates the next day. In 1896 the “ rst modern Olympic games formally opened in Athens, Greece. In 1909 American explorers Robert E. Peary and Matthew A. Henson and four Inuits became the “ rst men to reach the North Pole. In 1917 the United States entered World War I as the House joined the Senate in approving a declaration of war against Germany that was then signed by President Woodrow Wilson. In 1943 Le Petit PrinceŽ Antoine de Saint-Exupery was “ rst published by Reynal & Hitchcock of New York. In 1954 Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., responding to CBS newsman Edward R. Murrows broadside against him on See It Now,Ž said in remarks “ lmed for the program that Murrow had, in the past, engaged in propaganda for communist causes.Ž In 1965 the United States launched Intelsat I, also known as the Early BirdŽ communications satellite, into geosynchronous orbit. In 1971 Russian-born composer Igor Stravinsky, 88, died in New York City. In 1988 Tirza Porat, a 15-year-old Israeli girl, was killed in a West Bank melee. (Although Arabs were initially blamed, the army concluded Tirza had been accidentally shot by a Jewish settler.)1 IDENTITYŽ ART EXHBIT: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Amelia Center Main Gallery (Room 112) at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Exhibit features ceramic sculpture and wares by Keith Smith and Wesley Harvey.2 STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free; suitable for all ages. Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily. Details: LoveTheRep.com3 SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free; bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details: CityOfLynnHaven.com4 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEEŽ: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts 5 BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. $5 per person at the door. Details: 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com6 61ST KIWANIS ANNUAL PANCAKES DAY: 6-9 a.m. for the Kiwanis Club of Panama City, held at Forest Park United Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St. Panama City. Alice Emerson emailed this one to us and said, Spring has sprung, and were here to enjoy its beauty!Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Scott Fitzgerald shared this photo with the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, Its been a good week. Catch and release, so he is still out there waiting for you.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 A3

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** A4 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald NATION & WORLDJERUSALEM SAN FRANCISCOAppeals court limits scope of law barring pot prosecutionsA U.S. appeals court says a law that bans the Justice Department from prosecuting some medical marijuana users and dispensaries does not apply to pot operations on federal land.The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday rejected an appeal by two men charged in federal court with growing marijuana in North-ern California on property controlled by the Bureau of Land Management. A three-judge panel of the court said Thursday, however, that lawmakers did not prevent the federal government from enforcing its marijuana law on federal land even when no state laws may have been violated. MOJAVE, CALIF. Virgin Galactic conducts 1st powered ” ight of new shipVirgin Galactic has conducted the first powered test flight of its new space tourism rocket.Virgin Galactic tweets that the spaceship named Unity was carried aloft by its mother ship and released over Californias Mojave Desert early Thursday.The company says the spacecraft achieved supersonic speed before the pilots shut down the engine and it glided back to Mojave Air & Space Port.This was Virgin Galactics first powered flight since the 2014 crash of its original space-ship that killed one of its two pilots.Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson tweets that Space feels tantalisingly close now.ŽATLANTAPolice: Missing CDC worker drowned; no sign of foul playAn employee for the Centers for Disease Control and Preven-tion who was reported missing more than seven weeks ago was found drowned in a river not far from his house, with no sign of foul play, authorities said Thursday.Timothy Cunninghams body was found Tuesday partially submerged in water and mud on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River in northwest Atlanta, fire-rescue department spokesman Sgt. Cortez Stafford said at a news conference. Stafford said that rescue crews had to use boats and special equip-ment to reach Cunninghams body because it was located in difficult terrain in a remote area not easily accessible.ŽBERLINGerman court orders Catalan ex-leaders release on bailA German court ruled Thursday that former Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont can be released on bail pending a decision on his extradition to Spain, finding that the most serious accusation against him isnt punishable under German law.The state court in the northern town of Schleswig said it set conditions includ-ing a $92,000 payment for the 55-year-old to leave prison. It wasnt immedi-ately clear when he would be released, though it appeared unlikely before Friday morning.We will see each other tomorrow. Thank you all!Ž a message posted on his Twitter feed read.NEW DELHIBollywood star gets 5 years for poaching deerBollywood superstar Salman Khan was convicted Thursday of poaching rare deer in a wildlife preserve two decades ago and sentenced to five years in prison, with the judge describing him as a habitual offender.ŽThe heavily muscled actor contended he did not shoot the two blackbuck deer in the western India preserve in 1998. He was acquitted in related cases.Khan was in court for the ruling in the western city of Jodhpur. Police took him to a local prison after the verdict, though he is likely to be freed on bail in the next few days. The Associated PressPalestinian mourners carry the body of 23-year-old Mojahid al-Khodari, who was killed early Thursday morning by an Israeli airstrike, during his funeral in Gaza City. A second man died Thursday from wounds sustained in a mass protest along the Israeli border. The fatalities bring to 21 the number of people killed in confrontations in the volatile area since last week. [KHALIL HAMRA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]BERLINThe undated photo provided by the German aerospace center (DLR) shows engineer Paul Zabel with fresh salad he harvested in the EDEN-ISS greenhouse at the Neumeyer-Station III on Antarctica. The project without soil but with a closed water cycle, optimized lightning and carbon dioxide levels is a test to become part of the nutrition for astronauts in future moon or Mars missions. [DLR VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]HARTFORD, CONN.Associate Justice Richard A. Robinson questions an attorney during a session at Connecticut Supreme Court in Sept. 28 Hartford, Conn. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced Thursday that he is nominating Robinson for chief justice. Malloys previous chief justice nominee was rejected the previous week by the state Senate in a mostly party-line vote. If con“ rmed, Robinson would succeed Chase Rogers, who retired in February. [ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]The Associated PressSPOKANE, Wash. „ Gary Bailey is certain China is trying to rattle Trump voters with its threat to slap tariffs on soybeans and other agri-culture staples grown in rural America. The wheat farmer in eastern Washington, a state that exports $4 billion a year in farm products, is also certain of the result.Its a strategy thats work-ing,Ž he said.If farmers are worried, so are Republican politicians, who depended on smalltown America to hand them control of Congress and know how quickly those voters could take it away. Just seven months before the 2018 midterm elections, Trumps faceoff with China over trade has exposed an unexpected political vulnerability in what was supposed to be the Republican Partys strongest region: rural America.The clash with China poses a direct threat to the economies in both red and blue states, from Californias central valley to eastern Washington through Minnesotas plains and across Missouri, Indiana and into Ohio.They are regions in which the GOPs quest to retain its House and Senate majorities this fall is tied directly to Republican voters views about their pocketbooks and Trumps job performance. The signs of fear and frustration about both are easy to find.In southwestern Minnesota, soybean farmer Bill Gordon says the volatility in the markets makes it harder for farmers like him to market their crop and lock in profitability. The state is the countrys fourth-largest exporting state, and the states top farm export market is China.A Trump voter, Gordon said right now hes disappointed, not angry with whats hap-pening. But the trade tensions could affect his vote in the open race for the regions congressional seat, where the farm vote is significant.I vote for the people who represent rural America,Ž he said. Its not a party line.ŽPresident Donald Trump says hes simply fighting against unfair business practices with a geopolitical rival. After the Trump admin-istration announced plans to impose tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports Tuesday, China lashed back within hours, matching the American tariffs with plans to tax $50 billion of U.S. products, including soybeans, corn and wheat. China had previously released plans to impose retaliatory tariffs on frozen pork, nuts and wine in response to Trumps intent to apply duties to imported alu-minum and steel.The soybean industry, per-haps more than any other, illustrates the potential harm to Republican candidates in the fall.Soy production is concentrated in the Midwest. Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Indiana and Mis-souri account for over half of all soy produced in the United States. And more than 60 percent of U.S. soy exports have been sent to mainland China in recent years.Trump won 89 percent of Americas counties that produce soy, according to an Associated Press analysis of Agriculture Department and election data. In those counties, on average, two out of three voters supported Trump in 2016.Many Republican candidates who represent rural areas Trump won in 2016 are being forced to choose between his trade policies and community interests. Vulnerable Republicans are walking a tightrope.In eastern Washington, seven-term Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers had already found herself in an unexpectedly tight race. She has urged the White House to reverse courseŽ on the Chi-nese tariffs in recent days. She did not respond publicly to this weeks dramatic developments, however.Overall, an estimated 2.1 million jobs could be affected by the trade dispute nationally, with a majority coming from counties that Trump won in 2016, according to an analysis by Mark Muro, a senior fellow at the Metro-politan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution.Were in kind of a farm crisis,Ž said Bob Worth, who grows soybeans, corn and spring wheat with his son on 2,200 acres near Lake Benton in southwestern Minnesota. He wouldnt say how he voted in 2016, but he offered kind, if measured, words for Trump.Im going to believe in the man,Ž added Worth, whos also on the board of the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association. Hes doing this for business reasons only. I dont know if he knows how much hes hurting agriculture.ŽTrade moves rattle farmers, GOPA ” ag ” ies over the Heartland Co-op grain elevator on Thursday in Dallas Center, Iowa. The trade dispute with China is threatening to rattle small-town economies and election-year politics. Just seven months before the 2018 midterm elections, Trumps faceoff with China over trade has exposed an unexpected political vulnerability in what was supposed to be the Republican Partys strongest region: rural America. [CHARLIE NEIBERGALL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] DATELINES

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** Del Bagno was a civilian flight instructor, corporate pilot, skywriter and a banner-tow pilot. Del Bagno logged more than 3,500 total flight hours in more than 30 different aircraft, with 1,400 hours as an Air Force pilot, according to the Thunderbirds website. CRASHFrom Page A1 The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 A5county and other local fire departments learned how to deal with situations in which they are respond-ing with law enforcement to hostile situations with casualties.This class is for our EMTs and paramedics to prepare to assist our law enforcement where they are going to be finding themselves in a tactical situation, like if we made entry with a SWATteam or an active shooter situ-ation,Ž said Bay County Emergency Medical Ser-vices Capt. Danny Page. With an uptick in mass shootings on the national level, Page said it was time for the county to conduct the training.There is an increased need for our staff to be prepared to respond to this type of a situation,Ž he said. So we try to make sure they are as trained as possible to not only back up the law enforcement, but to provide safety and rescue for the citizens.ŽHe said by holding the drills,the county is trying to be accredited by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians to provide the Tactical Emergency Casu-alty Care program.This is the first time that we have put on this class,Ž Page said.Page said it is common for first responders to find themselves in potentially dangerous situations when responding to calls, so the training could help in other ways.We go into houses all the time where they may or may not be quite as secure as we wish, and things have been happening,Ž he said. We get threatened a lot.ŽThe drills taught EMS personnel and other responders how to respond to and care for patients in a civilian tactical environment and decrease preventable deaths in a tactical situation. Page said he has learned the county needs to purchase specialized equipment to deal with some of these situations.If we are going to be expected to make entry, we need the technical vests,Ž he said. There is new equipment on market as far as stretchers and different products to get people out quickly. You dont need them on a regular basis, but when you need them, you need them.ŽPage said the training also is teaching EMS and paramedics to use their senses and other tools to get patients out of hostile situations.This is medical treatment and technical awareness, how to make entry with a law enforcement team, treat the patients and get them out of the threatening envi-ronment,Ž he said.Bay County EMS Capt. Joel Welch said the training is a different way of thinking about how first responders normally approach their job.It is a quick, down and dirty, what bare minimum do I absolutely have to do to keep you alive and get you out and get you to a safe area?Ž he said. Then, I can do the detailed (medi-cal treatment).ŽWelch said people have lost lives in other mass shooting incidents across the country because EMS was kept out of the scene too long, andthe idea of this training is to get EMS to the injured sooner when it is relatively safe.ŽIt is totally different than what we do with our day-to-day patients,Ž he said.Derek Wicker, an EMT for the Panama City Fire Department, said the training was helpful.The biggest thing I learned is situational awareness,Ž he said. Try not to get tunnel vision. Were focused on an injury, but also be aware of your surroundings and things that are going on. At the end of the day, we are there to help, but we also want to go home to our families.Ž TRAININGFrom Page A1Sean Salaty helps Jacob Thomas to his feet during a tactical emergency casualty drill at the Bay County Emergency Operations Center on Thursday. First responders from across the county practiced emergency responses in highly stressful situations. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Local “ rst responders in a tactical emergency casualty drill decide which mock victims should go in ambulances or helicopters because of their injuries at the Bay County Emergency Operations Center on Thursday. Maj. Stephen Del Bagno, Thunderbird 4 slot pilot, left, and Staff Sgt. Michael Meister, Thunderbird 4 dedicated crew chief, await the signal to start their F-16 Fighting Falcon during a practice show at Nellis Air Force Base on March 14. Del Bagno was killed when his aircraft crashed on the Nevada Test and Training Range during a practice aerial demonstration on Wednesday. [PHOTOS BY MASTER SGT. CHRISTOPHER BOITZ/U.S. AIR FORCE] Maj. Stephen Del Bagno, Thunderbird 4 slot pilot, performs pre” ight checks in his F-16 Fighting Falcon at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, on Jan. 26. DOC is adding video call kiosks as an addition to every-other-week-end visitation, allowing inmates to pay $2.95 for 15 minutes of time to speak with family mem-bers and friends when visits are not allowed.Corrections spokeswoman Michelle Glady said the video calls are not intended to replace personal visits.We are very aware of how important visitation is,Ž Glady said. We take it very seriously.ŽThe video calls are a poor substitute for more frequent visits, said Angel Garner.We want to be able to see with our own eyes, in person, not over a moni-tor,Ž she said.Eileen Fritz, a retired psychotherapist, also said DOC was relying on a faulty assumptionŽ that inmate visitors were the source for rising levels of contraband.The department is just shifting the blame and consequences to the visitors,Ž Fritz said. PRISONFrom Page A1 By Anita SnowThe Associated PressPHOENIX „ National Guard contingents in U.S. states bordering Mexico awaited guidance Thursday on the what duties theyll be assigned to help fight illegal immigration and drug smuggling along the border, and a Pentagon official said it has not yet been determined whether the troops will be armed.The deployment is in very early planning stages,Ž the National Guard in Texas said in a statement.In Washington, Marine Lt. Gen. Kenneth F. McK-enzie told reporters at the Pentagon that it has not yet been determined how many, if any, of the troops participating in the border security operation will be armed. With troops in all states, the National Guard has been called on by past presidents and governors to help secure U.S. borders, and the Texas contingent said it had firsthand knowledge of the mission and operating areaŽ that will allow it to move seamlessly into the new role.The Republican gover-nors of the border states of Arizona and New Mexico also welcomed deployment of the guard along the southwest border as a matter of public safety, but it was unclear how Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown would respond to Trumps call.Trump ordered the deployment because we are at a crisis pointŽ with illegal immigration, Secre-tary Kirstjen Nielsen of the Department of Homeland Security said.Wed like to stop it before the numbers get even bigger,Ž she said.Though no specifics were provided, Nielsen said guard members would provide support to border officials, help look at the technology, the surveillance, in some cases well ask for some fleet mechan-icsŽ and free up agents trained in law enforcement for other duties.Troops await border orders

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** A6 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com SQUALL LINE ANOTHER VIEW Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTSFifty ye ars ago this week, an assassins bullet silenced the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But it did not kill his dream „ even though that dream remains unfulfilled. Kings moral suasion was instrumental in securing passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which dismantled the legal barriers to racial equality. His powerful rhetoric, grounded in a Christian ethic and the philosophies of nonviolence and civil disobedience, opened the nations eyes to the fact that America had failed to live up to its founding ideals for an entire segment of its citizens. However, even though Jim Crow had been vanquished, there were other challenges to confront. By the time of his death, King was focusing on economic justice „ he had organized the Poor Peoples Campaign in late 1967, and was in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, to support a sanitation workers strike. By many measures, African-Americans have far more opportunities and greater freedom in where they can live, work and go to school than they did a half-century ago. Thats a testament to Kings success and the nations maturation. But King left behind a lot of unfinished business, and the obstacles to success have proved far more resilient than those that opposed integration. Had he lived, King would be appalled by statistics that illustrate growing income inequality between the races. A study by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco found that black men and women earn persistently lower wages compared with their white counterparts, a gap that has grown since 1979. According to the Urban Institute, white family wealth is seven times greater than black family wealth. That disparity is as high or higher than it was in 1963. King would be alarmed by racial disparities in the criminal justice system, such as the effects mandatory minimum sentences and the War on Drugs have had on incarcerating black males. The fatal police shooting of Stephon Clark, an unarmed 22-year old African-American who was standing in back yard of his grandmothers house March 18 in Sacramento, once again has raised concerns about unequal use of deadly force against blacks by law enforcement. Kings clarion call for people to be judged by the content of their character, and not the color of their skinŽ is increasingly disregarded. Society is becoming more tribalistic, with Americans identifying themselves, and judging others, by race as well as class and politics. The night before he was killed, King gave the last of his famous orations in which he seemingly foresaw his death, even as he expressed optimism that the fight for equality ultimately would succeed. Americans must recapture that spirit that allowed King to embrace conflict while pursuing solutions. The dream still can be redeemed. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Daytona Beach News-Journal, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.Dont allow dream to dieSoft drinkswill cost you more in Philadelphia, Seattle, Boulder, Colorado, and a bunch of California cities because politicians in those places voted to tax it. The social engineers claim soft drinktaxes will reduce obesity,Ž lower diabetes rates,Ž reduce medical costs,Ž etc. But the politicians main goal is to bring in money. Philadelphia city council members applauded wildly when their tax passed. But store owner Melvin Robinson says, Its a bad tax.Ž Robinson, who runs Brunos Pizza, says the soft drinktax punishes his business. His customers quickly agreed. One I interviewed for my new YouTube/ Facebook/Twitter video angrily said, Who should pay $3 for a drink that they used to get for 99 cents?Ž Now, instead of buyinga soft drinkat Brunos, she buys from a store in the next town. Thats easy to do because Brunos is located right on an outer edge of Philadelphia. Customers just cross the street to save money. Do the politicians ever think about that? The tax is for what we feel is a good reason,Ž Philadelphia City Councilman William Greenlee told me. I thought he would talk about saving people from obesity. That still would be obnoxious and intrusive, but Greenlee gave another, simpler reason. We need the money. Nothing else that we could come up with could raise that kind of funding.Ž But the tax hasnt brought in as much money as they expected. Soft drinksales are down by more than 50 percent. That happens when people can escape taxes by crossing a street. Or by buying other, even less healthy things. Taxes often have unintended side effects. Although soft drnksales are down in Philadelphia, liquor sales are up. That surprised Greenlee. I dont know about that,Ž he laughed, cause we have a liquor tax, too!Ž Another problem:Soft drinktaxes are regressive. They hurt poor people most. Even Bernie Sanders campaigned against Phillyssoft drinktax, shouting, You dont have to fund child care on the backs of the poorest people in this city!Ž I didnt know Bernie opposed it!Ž Greenlee replied. But remember, were raising enough money to put 2,700 kids in pre-K.Ž That was the citys justification for the new tax. Activists said thousands of kids would attend high qualityŽ preschool. I doubt that the schools are high quality.Ž Government work rarely is. It is expensive, certainly „ Philly spends more than $6,000 per child; Catholic schools charge less than $5,000. Greenlee laughed at that, too, replying, Priests and nuns dont work for that much money.Ž Politicians love taxes on unhealthy things, and so do the media. Both applauded when Denmark taxed fatty food a few years ago. Today ShowŽ host Matt Lauer was thrilled. Buy food that has a certain level of fat, they charge you extra! Do we like that?Ž His panel did. They clapped gleefully. But Danes behaved a lot like Melvin Robinsons customers do. They crossed a border to avoid paying more. Denmark quickly repealed its fat tax. But Philadelphia isnt repealing its taxes. People there already pay 44 different ones, including a nearly 4 percent city income tax. I said to Greenlee, How can the city government not have enough money? They should be rolling in it!Ž But theres a lot to do!Ž he replied. Politicians do love spending other peoples money. John Stossel is host of StosselŽ on the Fox Business Network and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Beware the poisonous taxes John Stossel So repairing pipes inside the Hathaway Bay is too difficult to access, but repairing pipes under the bay is simpler? Where were the Bored of DirectorsŽ when all the criminal activity was going on at VAC! I was NOT expecting the inappropriate substitute to be in her 60s. Sheesh! Wow, new housing developments are popping like dandelions in this county! Just once, could the solution to a problem perceived by government employees demand a solution that does not result in hiring more government employees? Guns shows have not been cancelled. They are now concealed. The new development on Back Beach will greatly increase congestion, and look who is building it! Sad. Saw some guys on a golf cart driving through Lynn Haven on Easter. With beer cans. Stay classy, Bay County! A Cracker Barrel, a new ice cream place AND a Paula Deen restaurant at Pier Park. I predict Bay Countys diabetes problem growing. Instead of vetting staff, the white house should just hire temps. Job wont last anyway. All of these Easter egg hunts when we should be scavenging for Marco Rubios spine. The Postal Regulatory Commission has consistently found that Amazons contracts with the USPS are profitable,Ž the company told Fortune last year. Berlin wall worked because they machinegunned all who tried to cross. Are we prepared to do the same at our wall? News reports say Obama is reportedly feeling relievedŽ that he isnt saddled with the burdenŽ of being commander in chief anymore. Me too. Trump demands that Mexico protect its northern border into the U.S., aka no Mexicans. I want Trump protecting his northern border into Canada. Cell Phones should have automatic shutoffs when car is started. Accidents will decline! Be the reason someone smiles today. Does Trump know what DACA is? Hes said people are coming in to take advantage of DACA but in order to be DACA the immigrants had to be here in 2007. ???? Pray that GOD is allowed back in our SCHOOLS! Beautiful Blue sky and someone BURNING TRASH polluting it and our AIR WE BREATHE! Stop Burning!FIRST AMENDMENTCongress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 A7 BUSINESSCOMPANY CLOSE CHG 3M $218.67 +1.11 Am. Express $94.20 +0.97 Apple $172.80 +1.19 Boeing $336.40 +8.96 Caterpillar $148.13 +2.95 Chevron $117.29 +2.81 Cisco $41.82 +0.62 Coca-Cola $44.40 +0.16 DowDuPont $65.44 +1.75 Exxon $76.02 +1.15 Gen. Electric $13.43 +0.15 Goldman Sachs $255.81 +3.19 Home Depot $179.13 +1.69 Intel $50.38 +0.39 IBM $154.03 -0.09 J&J $130.71 +0.30 JP Morgan $111.88 +1.45 McDonalds $163.95 +2.22 Merck $54.53 -0.01 Microsoft $92.38 +0.05 Nike $69.59 +1.17 P“ zer $35.73 -0.40 Proc. & Gamble $78.80 -0.25 Travelers $139.29 +0.66 United Tech. $125.76 -0.01 Verizon $48.24 +0.31 Walmart $87.81 +0.59 Walt Disney $102.11 +1.16 United Health $229.07 +0.28 Visa $121.19 +1.38THE DOW 30U.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.27 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 18.20 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.82 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.71FOREIGN EXCHANGE A board above the ” oor of the New York Stock Exchange shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average. After plunging 501 points at the open, the Dow “ nished with a gain of 230 points, or about 1 percent. [RICHARD DREW/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Stock market turning back into its old, volatile self again a er long calmBy Stan ChoeThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Like a good thriller, you cant be sure where the stock market is headed these days until the very end.The market has become so volatile that big swings are happening not only day to day but hour to hour as investors react to a mix of hard news, fear and speculation.Take Wednesday, for example. What seemed like a terrible day for stocks ended up being quite a good one after the Dow Jones industrial average swung from a 500 point loss to a 230 point gain. The opposite has occurred in recent weeks, too, with early rallies turning into routs after stocks plunged in the last hour or so of trading.The turnaround from last years procession of gradual, effortless gains has been dizzying. Traders pin much of the blame on Washington, D.C., where the Trump administra-tion has stirred up worries about a possible trade war and the Federal Reserve has embarked on a course of interest rate increases. But they also see the rise in market volatility since February as the pendulum swinging back to normal, and perhaps overshooting it, following an unusually calm 2017.On those days where we saw the headlines of the Dow down 600 points, 700 points, 800 points, and the velocity of it where people hadnt finished processing the initial headline that were already down 100 points, that felt a lot like the crisis daysŽ of 2008 when the financial system seemed to be collapsing, said Justin Wiggs, senior equities trader at Stifel.But overall, there still hasnt been that sense of panic. Maybe thats because given the gains of the broader market, people are almost playing with house money,Ž he said.There may not be panic, but there certainly has been a sense of whiplash.For all of last year, the S&P 500 had eight days where it finished with a gain or loss of 1 percent, a traditional marker for a bigŽ move in stocks. Already this year its had 26. At that pace, the index would end the year with about 100 such days. Over the last 50 years, the index has typically had only half that number of days with big moves.The intraday trading movements have been even wilder. On Wednes-day, the S&P 500 was down 1.6 percent min-utes after trading started, as investors worried about tit-for-tat tariffs announced by the United States and China. But the index was breakeven by midday and then ended with a 1.2 percent gain. Such daily swings from high to low have been commonplace since volatility returned to the market and wider than historic norms.Since early February, the S&P 500 has moved 1.7 percentage points from its low to its high on the typi-cal day. Thats more than triple last years median of just 0.5 percentage points. Over the prior 30 years, the median has been 1 percentage point. That means half the days over that span had a swing of less than 1 percentage point, and half had a bigger move.The choppiness has been particularly acute in the last hours of trading when, according to an old market adage, the action is driven by the smart money,Ž such as big institutional investors. The early-morning hours, meanwhile, are supposedly dominated by mom-and-pop investors trading on their gut instincts and reactions to the news that occurred overnight.The worst half-hour of the trading day has been from 3 p.m. Eastern time to 3:30 p.m., when the market is approaching its 4 p.m. close. Since the stock market started its run of volatility on Feb. 2, the S&P 500 has lost an average of 0.15 percent during that half hour. Thats twice as big as the next-largest drop, from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.Which way will it go?MARKET WATCHDow 24,505.22 240.92 Nasdaq 7,076.55 34.45 S&P 2,662.84 18.15 Russell 1,542.93 11.26 NYSE 12,571.95 105.50COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,324.30 11.50 Silver 16.320 .111 Platinum 909.80 2.30 Copper 3.0695 .0625 Oil 63.54 0.17BRIEFCASEWASHINGTONUS mortgage rates fall; 30-year at 4.40 percentLong-term U.S. mortgage rates fell this week, benefiting potential homebuyers with the spring buying season underway.Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages dipped to 4.40 percent from 4.44 percent last week. The benchmark stood at an average 4.10 percent a year ago. Opioid addiction costs $2.6B a year for careA new report shows large employers spent $2.6 billion to treat opioid addiction and overdoses in 2016, an eightfold increase since 2004. More than half went to treat employees children.The analysis released Thurs-day by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation finds such spending cost companies and workers about $26 per enrollee in 2016.Employers have been limiting insurance coverage of opioids because of concerns about addiction. The Associated Press COMPANY CLOSE CHG AT&T $36.14 +0.26 DARDEN RESTS $86.67 -0.17 GEN DYNAMICS $221.22 +2.68 HANGER INC $16.02 +0.01 HANCOCK HLDG $52.65 +0.35 HOME BANCS $23.20 +0.19 ITT CORP $50.58 +1.26 THE ST JOE $18.90 +0.10 KBR INC $16.39 +0.00 L-3 COMMS $213.07 +2.32 OCEANEERING $19.18 +0.58 REGIONS $18.84 +0.08 SALLIE MAE $11.52 +0.16 SOUTHERN $45.01 +0.22 SUNTRUST $68.54 +0.39 WESTROCK $64.45 +0.59 ING-RAND $85.87 +0.83 ENGILITY $24.73 +0.56 Source: Matt Wegner Financial Advisor The Edward Jones Co. Panama City, 769-1278STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCALLAWAYZaxbys to mark “ rst anniversary with week of specialsIts been one year since Ken Clark opened a Zaxbys loca-tion at 217 N. Tyndall Parkway, and to celebrate, the restaurant will have five days of freebies next week.Thank you, Callaway, for an amazing year!Ž Clark said in a news release. We hope you enjoy the anniversary celebration, and we look forward to serving you for years to come.ŽMascot LZ will be available from noon to 2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m. daily for pictures, and the following specials will run April 9-13: Monday, Buy one boneless wings meal, get a second free; Tuesday, Free cookie with any meal purchase; Wednesday, 99-cent Zax Kidz Meal with adult meal purchase (limit 2 per adult meal purchase) News Herald staff reportIN BRIEFSpecial to The News HeraldYour future employee is a young lady who recently graduated from Chautauqua Learn and Serve. She is kind, personable, well-groomed, conscientious and reliable.She would like to work as a store clerk or greeter or perhaps cleaning. She has volunteered extensively, works well with others and can begin working immedi-ately. Also, she is eligible for OJT, a program that provides an incentive for employers who hire The Arc of the Bay clients.She would like to work part-time for you „ will you give her a chance?For information about this client or any of the other ser-vices offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Crystal at 850-532-0884, Paul at 850-635-1044 or Kathie at 850-896-5798.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTEric Thompson, an Arc of the Bay client, is shown at the Panama City Rescue Mission with his supervisor, Kim Erck. They work together at the missions Lynn Haven Bargain Center. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] The Associated PressNEW YORK „ Maribel Perez Wadsworth has been named publisher of USA Today, becoming the second woman to hold the post. Wadsworth is taking up the role immediately following the retirement of John Zidich, USA Today said Thursday.Wadsworth, 45, is also president of the USA Today Network, which has 109 local media properties. She will remain in that role, where the company said she has driven "investments in emerging technologies to create groundbreaking storytell-ing, such as the launch of the first weekly news program in virtual reality." "Maribel's passion for cre-ating great experiences for our audiences as well as her commitment to constant innovation make her the ideal leader for USA Today," said Robert Dickey, president and CEO of Gannett Co., which owns USA Today.A Cuban-American born in Miami, Wadsworth joined the corporate team of Gannett Co. in 2009, leading digital strategy for the company's local newsrooms. In 2015, she became Gannett's first chief strategy officer."I could not be more excited to work with this incredibly talented team," Wadsworth said.Wadsworth first joined Gannett as an agricultural beat reporter for the Rockford Register Star, where she was the Illinois newspaper's only Spanish-speaking reporter, according to a story in USA Today. She covered the city's migrant worker community and Spanish-speaking entrepreneurs."I remember thinking that is part of why I need to be doing what I'm doing, because I can help to bring out some of those important stories that maybe are going uncovered otherwise," Wad-sworth said.Wadsworth named publisher of USA Today Wadsworth

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** A8 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY EVENT | B3ARTS ALIVEAnnual fundraiser again taking stock in local students AREA BRIEFS | B2PCB ELECTIONSCollen Swab ends candidacy for Ward 3 seat STATE CONSTITUTION | B7REVISION COMMISSION PLAN12 more proposals could land on Florida ballot By Mike CazalasThe News HeraldLYNN HAVEN „ With an additional victim and four new charges, bonds neared $100,000 Thursday for a man that Bay County deputies said was fraudulently accepting money for contracting work he was not licensed to perform and which he did not complete.Deputies said they also believe, based on the number of promissory notes and other paperwork found in a raid of the mans home, that others had dealings with John R. Tolbert, 47, of 4527 Northshore Road. They asked that anyone who has arranged for work to be done by Tolbert contact Investigator Jarod Cutchin at 747-4700.With Thursdays charges, Tolbert now is facing two counts of forgery, two counts of contracting without a license and one charge each of grand theft, ongoing scheme to defraud, witness tampering, grand theft, possession of methampetamine with intent to distribute, possession of LSD, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, pos-session of marijuana resin and possession of drug para-phernalia. He is being held on bonds totaling $98,000.Tolbert was accepting money for work under one business, Panama Roofing, that belonged to his deceased father and no longer is active, according to a sheriffs office arrest complaint. Other promissory notes and paper-work show that he was doing the same under the name of a business he used to work for, AKC Contracting, but which had not employed him since last fall.According to arrest complaints, Tolbert came under investigation after a woman reported she paid Tolbert a total of $7,860 in October and November to repair her roof and install four windows in her home and he never com-pleted the work. She said she paid him half down in October after finding him in the Yellow Pages and he fixed the roof, but said he needed the rest of the money to take care of the windows. While the estimates were written on AKC Contracting letterhead, he asked that checks be made out to Tolbert and Panama Roofing and Construction Inc., a company his father, now deceased, had owned. The address listed for that company happens to be Tol-berts home, the complaint stated.The woman wrote the second check, and it was the last time she saw Tolbert.Fraud suspects bonds near $100KSheri s deputies believe others might have been victimized by unlicensed contractor John Tolbert Tolbert Sibley Davis By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comSPRINGFIELD „ Unlike other political campaigns, Thursdays forum for the candidates in the Springfield City Commission Ward 3 election was polite and devoid of mudslinging.Incumbent Jack Kennington and challenger Beth McLean „ who occupied the Ward 3 seat almost a decade ago „ are the only candidates running and answered ques-tions from a panel and the forum audience at the Spring-field Community Center. The two often had similar answers when it came to the impor-tance of cleaning up the city, bringing in businesses and residents and not allowing medical marijuana dispen-saries in the area.The city was pretty much bankrupt a few years back,Ž said Kennington, who has been in Springfield since 2006 and is the director of plant operations for Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center. We have come back from that to replace all our police equipment, given our officers and fire depart-ment a nice raise, which will continue. ... We have even got new services like K9 services. Our infrastructure is our main thing weve been working on for the past two and a half years.ŽWhen its finished in three or four years, the infrastruc-ture plan „ with help from state grants „ should lower city sewer costs paid to the county, get roads back in conditionŽ and ensure water lines arent constantly splitting and breaking,Ž Kennington said. He also said local taxes dont need to be raised because the city operates within its budget.McLean „ who moved to Springfield about 30 years ago from Millville „ said Spring eld candidates discuss infrastructure, cleaning up cityIncumbent Jack Kennington and Beth McLean speak to the audience at Spring“ eld Community Center during the Ward 3 City Commission candidates forum on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See FRAUD, B4 See FORUM, B4 News Herald staff reportCALLAWAY „ Emergency crews from Springfield, Calla-way and Bay County responded late Thursday morning to a house fire at 515 N. Gay Ave.An initial caller reported flames were coming through the homes windows about 11 a.m. First responders said the home was about two-thirds involved when they arrived, and it ultimately was a total loss.No one was at the home at the time, and no injuries were reported. There were four dogs in the house, three of which escaped. The fourth died from smoke inhalation.Officials said the fire appeared to have originated in the living room area but that the cause remains under investigation.Fire destroys Callaway house; dog dies, 3 escapeFire“ ghters work to put out a large house “ re Thursday morning in Callaway. Emergency personnel said the family was not home at the time, but four dogs were inside, one of which died of smoke inhalation. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] A “ re“ ghter moves a hose into a smoking house on Gay Avenue on Thursday morning. Fire“ ghters with Spring“ eld, Callaway and Bay County responded to the “ re about 11 a.m. The home was a total loss. Of“ cials said no one was injured, but one family dog died. By Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ A hot heap of buttered flapjacks and sausage can go along way toward the Kiwanis Club of Panama Citys chari-table efforts throughout the community.The organizations 61st annual Pancake Days bring in thousands each year, and you can still attend today and Saturday.One-hundred percent of the funds go back to providing grants and stay in Bay County,Ž said Sharon Owens, a Kiwanis Club board member. I think when people know that, they are more apt to participate and help.ŽThe organization sees about 10,000 to 12,000 pancakes disappear annually during the event. In their place by week-ends end is about $15,000 of the organizations $25,000 annual proceeds and about 2,000 happily fed people.Club members, Bay County students and other volunteers help stack and flip the pancakes, and diners get a bottomless plate for $5. Its a great breakfast for a great price,Ž said the clubs Keith Forehand. It helps the community, and thats what Bottomless pancake breakfast aids PC KiwanisFill up for $5 today and SaturdaySee PANCAKES, B4

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** B2 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 76/64 75/66 79/59 74/67 74/68 76/66 82/65 82/65 83/57 77/60 81/64 81/65 80/62 75/68 75/68 75/67 82/61 75/6772/5270/6178/5671/50Showers and a heavier thunderstorm Sunny to partly cloudy Cloudy, a shower and t-storm around A couple of showers possible7554737267Winds: SW 10-20 mph Winds: ESE 6-12 mph Winds: SW 8-16 mph Winds: N 8-16 mph Winds: SSE 8-16 mphBlountstown 8.16 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 6.78 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.00 ft. 42 ft. Century 8.24 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 14.37 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 10:19a 2:50a 7:24p 2:16p Destin 2:19p 12:56a ----West Pass 9:52a 2:23a 6:57p 1:49p Panama City 1:36p 12:34a ----Port St. Joe 2:30p 12:56a ----Okaloosa Island 12:52p 12:02a ----Milton 4:32p 3:17a ----East Bay 3:36p 2:47a ----Pensacola 2:52p 1:30a ----Fishing Bend 3:33p 2:21a ----The Narrows 4:29p 4:21a ----Carrabelle 8:54a 12:37a 5:59p 12:03pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018LastNewFirstFull Apr 8Apr 15Apr 22Apr 29Sunrise today ........... 6:26 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 7:04 p.m. Moonrise today ...... 12:05 a.m. Moonset today ....... 10:50 a.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 83/68/s 80/67/sh Daytona Beach 80/65/pc 84/64/s Ft. Lauderdale 82/74/s 86/73/pc Gainesville 86/60/s 78/59/pc Jacksonville 80/62/s 79/53/c Jupiter 82/69/s 87/69/t Key Largo 81/73/s 83/74/s Key West 83/75/s 84/75/s Lake City 84/61/s 76/54/pc Lakeland 87/64/s 84/64/t Melbourne 83/66/pc 88/67/pc Miami 83/73/pc 86/71/sh Naples 85/69/s 84/69/pc Ocala 85/60/s 81/59/pc Okeechobee 83/63/s 87/65/s Orlando 86/65/s 86/65/t Palm Beach 82/72/pc 86/70/pc Tampa 85/69/s 81/67/pc Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 88/63/c 86/62/s Berlin 53/38/pc 65/46/s Bermuda 67/65/pc 71/68/pc Hong Kong 79/61/c 74/63/c Jerusalem 76/55/s 77/54/s Kabul 78/50/s 77/52/c London 60/50/pc 58/49/sh Madrid 66/48/t 57/44/r Mexico City 77/53/pc 79/54/pc Montreal 40/27/sn 37/22/pc Nassau 83/71/pc 85/73/pc Paris 66/50/s 65/52/t Rome 68/48/s 66/50/s Tokyo 70/62/pc 69/48/pc Toronto 43/21/sn 37/21/pc Vancouver 57/46/c 55/44/sh Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 75/52/pc 82/59/pc Anchorage 40/32/s 45/31/s Atlanta 73/58/pc 62/40/r Baltimore 66/36/pc 40/29/sn Birmingham 75/51/pc 55/35/r Boston 47/37/sn 44/31/sn Charlotte 73/56/pc 62/34/r Chicago 36/19/pc 37/20/s Cincinnati 54/26/pc 44/23/sn Cleveland 49/24/c 35/26/pc Dallas 82/41/t 56/42/pc Denver 39/21/c 61/38/c Detroit 45/21/c 39/23/pc Honolulu 80/73/sh 80/71/sh Houston 83/65/t 66/54/c Indianapolis 47/24/pc 42/23/pc Kansas City 37/15/sn 40/27/s Las Vegas 89/66/pc 89/60/c Los Angeles 71/58/pc 70/55/c Memphis 60/35/r 50/34/pc Milwaukee 34/18/pc 35/21/s Minneapolis 23/10/pc 30/14/s Nashville 61/34/t 50/31/r New Orleans 79/67/sh 70/53/r New York City 56/36/c 45/32/sn Oklahoma City 56/25/r 48/32/pc Philadelphia 62/37/c 42/31/sn Phoenix 92/69/pc 94/72/c Pittsburgh 50/24/sh 36/22/sn St. Louis 46/23/sn 41/28/pc Salt Lake City 60/51/sh 64/46/r San Antonio 87/52/c 63/52/c San Diego 67/60/pc 69/60/pc San Francisco 64/59/r 64/52/sh Seattle 64/50/r 56/46/r Topeka 38/15/sn 43/28/s Tucson 89/60/pc 91/64/c Wash., DC 69/37/c 40/33/snSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 68 Today: Wind from the southeast at 8-16 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Wind south at 8-16 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Partly cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the west-southwest at 10-20 knots. Seas 3-5 feet. Visibility less than a mile at times in afternoon showers and thunderstorms.Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Winds south-southeast 7-14 mph. Partly cloudy tonight. Winds south 8-16 mph.High/low ......................... 71/49 Last year's High/low ...... 79/70 Normal high/low ............. 75/55 Record high ............. 87 (1988) Record low ............... 34 (1987)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.16" Normal month to date ...... 0.76" Year to date ................... 10.95" Normal year to date ....... 16.44" Average humidity .............. 53%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 72/52 Last year's High/low ...... 78/68 Normal high/low ............. 72/58 Record high ............. 89 (1940) Record low ............... 36 (2000)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... 0.01" Month to date .................. 0.22" Normal month to date ...... 0.96" Year to date .................... 17.73" Normal year to date ........ 17.41" Average humidity .............. 42%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachPANAMA CITY BEACHSwab drops out of PCB Ward 3 raceThe Panama City Beach Ward 3 race was nar-rowed to three candidates Thursday as Colleen Swab announced she is dropping out and endorsing candi-date Burnie Thompson.Thompson, Skip Stoltz and Geoff McConnell still are battling for the Ward 3 seat.I would like to thank all my supporters, my friends, my volunteers, my family, and „ most of all „ my dad for standing behind me on my campaign for Panama City Beach Ward 3. I have learned so much from this experience,Ž she said in a statement.At the end of the day I love Panama City Beach so much that Im going to ask my voters to please support Burnie Thompson. Due to recent health con-cerns, I believe I will step aside and ask for everyone to vote for Burnie Thomp-son. I believe Burnie Thompson can do the job and will do the job well.ŽNothing will change on the ballot, said Bay County Supervisor of Elections Mark Andersen.Early voting begins April 9-13, and April 17 is election day.PANAMA CITY BEACHAdditional charges “ led in golf cart, motorcycle DUI crashThe Florida Highway Patrol has released addi-tional details in an alleged DUI crash early Saturday between a golf cart and a motorcycle driven by a Panama City police officer.Robin Smith, 47, the driver of the motorcycle, had been charged with DUI with property damage, DUI with personal injury and failure to use due care.FHP reported Wednes-day that Anthony Lagrand, 19, of Columbus, Georgia, also has been charged with permitting an unauthorized minor to drive and letting a disabled vehicle obstruct traffic related to the golf cart.According to the FHP report, Shavia Hightower, 15, was in the drivers seat of the golf cart, while Anthony and Laryia Lagrand, 17, pushed it along Joan Avenue just south of North Lagoon Drive.Smiths motorcycle reportedly struck the back of the golf cart from behind, causing it to tip and pinning Hightower beneath, causing serious injuries. She was transported to Bay Medi-cal Center. A sheriffs deputy who had spotted the disabled cart and was coming up behind it and the motorcycle with emergency lights acti-vated witnessed the crash and the dashcam video was turned over to the FHP.Smith, an officer with the Panama City Police Department who lives in Panama City Beach, was arraigned Wednesday and released on his own recognizance. His next court appearance is set for June 12.LYNN HAVENFHP: Man with expired license rear-ends bus; 2 students injuredA Wewahitchka man was charged with driving on an expired license after officials said he drove his truck into the back of a school bus, leaving two students with minor injuries.The Florida Highway Patrol reported William Brown, 42, drove his Dodge Ram into the back of a stopped bus being driven by Gina Bell. The bus was stopped along State 390 near Grants Mill Road to let off students.FHP reported 20 students were on board, two of whom were trans-ported to Gulf Coast Medical Center with minor injuries.Bell was charged with driving on an expired license and taken to the Bay County Jail.LYNN HAVENLynn Haven farmers market returns SaturdayAs the weather warms up, the City of Lynn Haven is getting this years farmers market started.The first farmers market is Saturday at the Lynn Haven Sports Complex, 2201 Recreation Drive, and will be held there on the first Saturday of every month through Nov. 3. Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Various arts and crafts, food, jewelry, etc. will be available for pur-chase,Ž Tiah Romano, marketing and communications specialist for Lynn Haven, wrote in an email. We are expecting about 10-15 vendors for the first Market and expect it to grow from there. We are still accept-ing vendor forms as we speak! We have received vendor applications from surrounding areas such as Rosemary Beach and Tallahassee.ŽVendor forms can be found at cityoflynnhaven.com.DEFUNIAK SPRINGSMan pleads no contest to sexual battery on childA man has pleaded no contest to one count of sexual battery while in position of custodial authority and one count of lewd or lascivious molestation of a victim between 12 and 16 years old.According to a press release from the State Attorneys Office, Juan Pineda Avila, 34, of DeFuniak Springs was arrested after the child victim disclosed contin-ued sexual abuse, which resulted in the sexual battery charge. A second child victim later dis-closed that Avila also had molested him.During interviews with Walton County Sheriffs Office investigators, Avila admitted to the allegations, the release said.Walton County Circuit Judge Kelvin Wells has scheduled sentencing for June 16. Avila faces up to 45 years in prison.Avila will be designated as a sexual predator and will be required to register as such for the rest of his life. Avila also will face possible deportation when he is released from prison.CAMPBELLTONWalton, Jackson tickets win $70,000 each in same Fantasy 5Two Panhandle shop-pers are the lucky holders of lottery tickets worth almost $70,000.Two of the three win-ning Fantasy Five tickets drawn Tuesday night „ worth $69,234.78 each „ were purchased at Pan-handle stores. The three winning locations were Fortune Liquors, 5878 U.S. 231 in Campbellton in Jackson County; Tom Thumb #14, 1463 State 83 in DeFuniak Springs in Walton County; and Racetrac #201, 8890 W. Irlo Bronson Memorial Highway in Kissimmee.The winning numbers were 7-11-15-26-31.BONIFAYHolmes deputies investigating school bus threatThe Holmes County Sheriffs Office is inves-tigating a report of a student threatening to bring a gun onto a school bus.HCSO was told Wednesday afternoon of the alleged threat on Bus 58. The caller said a stu-dent overheard a Holmes County High School stu-dent say he was going to bring a gun on the bus.Investigators interviewed witnesses and the student who report-edly made the threat, and said they have received conflicting stories. The student has been tem-porarily suspended from school while investigators retrieve video from the bus and identify other potential witnesses.We are working in conjunction with the Holmes District School Board and hope to have more answers (soon),Ž Holmes County Sheriff John Tate said Wednesday. We take every threat toward our schools and students seriously and do everything we can to keep the students and employees safe.ŽPANAMA CITYPack Walk, adoption event postponed until April 14The Bay County Animal Control Pack Walk set for Saturday has been postponed until April 14 because of expected severe weather, county officials said Thursday.The walk now will be 9-11 a.m. April 14 at H.G. Harders Park, 8110 John Pitts Road. Dog lovers are invited to meet and walk dogs up for adoption, or bring their own leashed pooches for a group walk.About 20 dogs from the county shelter will be at the event and can be adopted for $25. For more information about adopting a pet from Bay County Animal Control, visit www.baycountyfl.gov.The weather also has led to the postponement of the inaugural Tacos & Tequila Fest, which also had been set for Saturday in front of The Grand Marlin, 5323 N. Lagoon Drive in Panama City Beach. That event, rescheduled for 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 12, will feature 14 Grand Lagoon restaurants com-peting for top taco and margarita.Rain, 15 mph wind and potentially severe thun-derstorms are forecast throughout the day Sat-urday, with a brief break Sunday and a strong return Monday. News Herald staff reportsAREA BRIEFS

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** By Genevieve Smith850-522-5118 @PCNHGenevieve gsmith@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ The Bay Education Foundation once again is hosting Arts Alive, an annual fundraiser in support of local students and education, at the Edgewater Beach Resort at 6 p.m. Saturday.Its oureighth year doing it and its a show of the best talents in Bay District Schools,Ž said Janet Kessler, the founda-tions executive director. We have auditions usu-ally midto late January and we have professional judges from out of town. Then the judges pick the top acts that are going to perform.ŽThis years event will have a silent auction, champagne reception, steak and lobster dinner, pre-show performance and a floor show. All of the per-formers will be students or employees of Bay District Schools. Proceeds from the event will flow back into the community through Bay Education Foundation programs. The event will raise money to fund class-room grants for the visual and performing arts, and it will benefit Take Stock in Children, a program that provides scholarships and matches students with mentors from the community.To be eligible for Take Stock in Children, students must qualify for free or reduced lunches, have good attendance, and maintain a 2.5 GPA or above. The program has 105 students in middle school or high school, 65 students enrolled in college, 78 college graduates and will induct 20 to 25 new students in May.Our goal is to break the cycle of poverty one student at a time,Ž said Kessler. Mentors in the program are people selected from the com-munity who can go to the schools twice a month for a half-hour lunch period with their students and just be a friend, a role model and advocate.ŽSaturdays Arts Alive event is sold out, but you still can support the cause by donating to the founda-tion or applying to become a mentor for the Take Stock in Children Program, which is in the midst of recruiting.If you or someone you know is interested in applying, visit BayEducationFoundation.org and follow the mentor link for more details.Arts Alive again taking stock in local students The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES LOCAL & STATE Stephen Todd SteveŽ McAllister passed away on Feb. 2, 2018, at Shands University of Florida Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, due to complications from diabetes. Stephen was born in Panama City, Florida, to Tommy and Dee McAllister on March 21, 1967. Steve was well known as the best window tinter in Bay County and he was extremely passionate about his job. He was very loved by his extended family, but more importantly by his son, Cameron Miles McAllister. He adored and loved his son with all of his heart. He was preceded in death by his maternal grandmother, Margret Ree Brown; uncle, Stewart Morgan Brown; and his precious mother, Alicia Dee Palmer, whom he loved dearly. He is survived by his father, George Thomas McAllister; son, Cameron Miles McAllister; brother, George McAllister; aunts and uncles, Larry and Diane Marshall, Brad and Elaine Wiese, Nancy Brown; cousins, Scott Norton, Ronnie Dunwiddie, Stephanie Hobbs, Tony Marshall, Jennifer Wiese, Colby Brown and Kelly Moore; and his stepfather, Ray Palmer. He is also survived by his step-siblings, Tim Palmer, Kim Roland, Dovana Smith, and Matt Palmer. He had a special family in Jacksonville, who loved him like a brother at Car Charisma. Norman Ferguson will be an honorary pallbearer. A special ser vice will be held at the home of Stephanie and Michael Hobbs with Cody Boyett officiating at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 7; 1919 Tyndall Drive in Panama City.STEPHEN TODD STEVE MCALLISTER Graveside services for Cordelia W. Bealor, whodied April 2, 2018, will begin at 3 p.m. today, April 6, 2018, in Lynn Haven Cemetery. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrangements.CORDELIA W. BEALORA memorial service for Annie Frances Connell, 84, of Panama City, Florida, who died April 4, 2018, will be held at a later date. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrangements. ANNIE FRANCES CONNELLFuneral services for Anita Bonsignore James, 71, of Metairie, Louisiana, and formerly of Panama City, Florida, who died March 26, 2018, will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 7, 2018, at Garden of Memories Funeral Home in Metairie.ANITA BONSIGNORE JAMESStaff Sgt. (Ret.) F L Kelley, 76, of Gainesville, Florida, passed away Wednesday, March 28, 2018. He was married to Betty Johnson Kelly for 50 years. Celebration of life services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 7, 2018, at St. John Missionary Baptist Church. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens with full military honors by the United States Air Force Honor Guard. Public visitation will be from 1-8 p.m. Friday, April 6, 2018, at the funeral home.Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome.comF L KELLEYVisitation for George MickeyŽ Payton, 74, of Panama City, Florida, who died March 31, 2018, will be from 1-8 p.m. today, April 6, 2018, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 7, 2018, at New Beginnings Assembly of God. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery with military honors by the Fort Rucker Army Honor Guard.GEORGE MICKEY PAYTONRetired Master Sgt. Zeinford Scott of Lynn Haven, Florida, passed away on Wednesday, March 28, 2018. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 7, 2018, at New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, 1401 Iowa Ave., Lynn Haven. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery with full military honors by the United States Air Force Honor Guard. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. Friday, April 6, 2018, at the Battle Memorial Funeral Home Chapel.Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome.comZEINFORD SCOTTMahlani Brielle Williams was born March 3, 2018, and passed this earthly life on March 29, 2018. She is the daughter of Troy D. Williams, Jr. and Sharon B. Greene. Memorial services will be held at 4 p.m. EDT Friday, April 6, 2018, at New Life Christian Center, 508 Sixth St., Port St. Joe, FL 32456.Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome. comMAHLANI BRIELLE WILLIAMS Arts Alive, an annual fundraiser for the Bay Education Foundation, features performances by Bay District Schools students. Four Bay County student princessesŽ audition for the 2018 Arts Alive with Arts Alive Queen Sharon Sossaman. This years event is Saturday. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] WHATS HAPPENINGToday IDENTITYŽ ART EXHBIT : 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Amelia Center Main Gallery (Room 112) at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Exhibit features ceramic sculpture and wares by Keith Smith and Wesley Harvey. STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free; suitable for all ages. Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. For details, LoveTheRep.com SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free; bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. For details, CityOfLynnHaven.com  THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEEŽ: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. For details and tickets, GulfCoast. edu/arts BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. Enjoy good music on the best dance ” oor in the area. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com 61ST KIWANIS ANNUAL PANCAKES DAY: 6-9 a.m. for the Kiwanis Club of Panama City, held at Forest Park United Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St. Panama City.Saturday61ST KIWANIS ANNUAL PANCAKES DAY: 6-10 a.m. for the Kiwanis Club of Panama City, held at Forest Park United Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St. Panama City. 8TH ANNUAL FURRY FRIEND 5K RUN/WALK : 8 a.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Proceeds go to The Humane Society of Bay County. To register, active. com ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master crafts people. SPRING FEVER MARKET : 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. Artists, crafters, and small business vendors. Family-friendly event; free. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and g rowers. For details, WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the “ rst Saturday of each month through November at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. For details, 850-2652121 or communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com TACOS & TEQUILA FEST: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of The Grand Marlin in Panama City Beach with taco and margarita vendors; hosted by the Grand Lagoon Coalition. Admission $25, $20 for military and “ rst responders. 11TH ANNUAL SEAFOOD BOIL BENEFIT : noon to 9 p.m at Shades Bar and Grill, 10952 E. County 30A, Panama City Beach. Featuring live music from Jacob Mohr, Funk, and Anne Cline, a bouncy house for children, and other activities. Boil will bene“ t the Alaqua Animal Refuge. PEARLS LAUNCH PARTY: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. EDT at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. Art show opening featuring paintings, photographs, birdhouses, models and more „ all with shotguns houses as their motif. Free; open to the public. For details, 855-272-5224 8TH ANNUAL ARTS ALIVE: 6-9:30 p.m. at Edgewater Beach Resort in Panama City Beach. Talent showcase supports “ ne arts in Bay District Schools and the Bay Education Foundations Take Stock in Children Program.  THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEEŽ: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. For details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/ arts TRIBUTE TO PATSY CLINE: 7:30 p.m. at the Palms Conference Center, 9104 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring Margo Anderson with the Encore Band and special guest Mike Purvis as Willie Nelson. Limited seating for 300, intimate concert atmosphere. General admission $25; tickets at BrownPaperTickets.com. For details, 850-814-6001Submit an eventEmail pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Whats HappeningŽ in the subject line. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: Due by 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: Due by 5 p.m. Tuesday before

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** B4 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News HeraldThe Kiwanis Club of Panama Citys 61st annual Pancake Days continue from 6-9 a.m. today and 7-10 a.m. Saturday at Forest Park United Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St., Panama City. All-you-can-eat pancakes are $5. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] we do.ŽHe said the proceeds will go to various organizations the club works with throughout the year, such as the Boys and Girls Club and Special Olympics.Pancake service started Thursday. Forehand said things went quite well „ good news, as business typically grows each day with the largest crowds on Saturday.All kinds of people show up to grab the breakfast, Owens said.(We see) families on the weekends, mainly, but people that want to help out and get a great breakfast by giving back,Ž she said. We have companies that purchase for their employees as a treat, retirees, all kinds of great folks from Panama City and surrounding areas.ŽOwens has been with the organization for more than nine years and said of all the groups she has been a part of, the Kiwanis Club truly believes in serving others and bettering the world by helping one child and com-munity at a time.We welcome anyone that would like to join us and have fun and network in the process,Ž she said. We are always looking for new members to join Kiwanis and the fun of giving back and volunteering.ŽThe 61st annual Pancake Days fundraising project will continue from 6-9 a.m. today and 7-10 a.m. Saturday at Forest Park United Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St, Panama City.For more information about the Kiwanis Club or to attend a meeting, call Owens at 850-872-4130. PANCAKESFrom Page B1The arrest complaints said Tolbert repeatedly made excuses for why he was not available before agreeing on a date to do the work. When that date arrived, he did not, and the womans calls to him went unanswered. The com-plaint said the victim later found out he had blocked her phone number.The woman called AKC Contracting and found out Tolbert no longer worked there and they could not get in touch with him either. The owner of that company told deputies Tolbert no longer was working there when he accepted the checks, but had used their paperwork to provide an estimate.Investigators served a search warrant on Tolberts home Monday and found numerous bills and promissory notes,Ž including bills that appear to have been sent to various people, leading them to believe there might be more victims, the com-plaints said.Deputies found more than paperwork, however. They reported finding a tin box with two bags of methamphetamine, two bags of blotter paperŽ that tested positive for LSD, a rubber container with marijuana resin, needles, a scale and MSM, which is used to cutŽ methamphetamine before distribution. After Tolbert was taken to jail, deputies said, the owner of AKC Contract-ing contacted them saying Tolbert had called him from jail, warning him to change his story to depu-ties. Investigators found a recording of that call at the jail and added the witness tampering charge.On Wednesday, deputies were contacted by a representative of King-dom Agenda International Ministry, 1104 N. East Ave., who said the church contracted with Tolbert seven months ago to put in a new flag pole with a concrete base for $800. The man said Tolbert installed a flag poll and started a concrete base, but disappeared and never finished it and eventually quit taking their calls.With Tolberts arrest, deputies also arrested two of his roommates on drug charges based on drugs found in the house. Christy Reed Sibley, 45, was charged with posses-sion of meth with intent to distribute, possession of LSD, possession of marijuana residue, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Michael Evans Davis, 41, was charged with traffick-ing in methamphetamine (51.3 grams), and posses-sion of paraphernalia. FRAUDFrom Page B1cleaning up Spring-field and enforcing code regulations is important to bring in business and residents. She also said citizens should be given notice when new housing or projects go up in their neighborhood, taxes shouldnt be raised and the contracting company handling trash services is working fine.I would like to see more code enforcement. There is a lot of red tape and legal rights. You cant just go throw anybody out,Ž McLean said. We did have a small homeless problem. We do have some abandoned homes that do need to be torn down. Im all for (the contracting trash service company) working with the city on that. I know its going to raise prop-erty values and we need it cleaned up so we can get more families to move in here and build.ŽThe two candidates said while they would legally get medical marijuanaif a severely ill friend needed it, they did not want dispensaries in Springfield since it draws too much of a crowd we dont want here.Ž The Springfield commission voted last year to ban dispensaries in the city.Several friends of Ken-nington and McLean came out to hear them discuss community issues and had good things to say about the candidates. Gene Bran-dow, who lives in Panama City and has known Ken-nington for many years, said the incumbent is kind, helpful, very supportive of his com-munitys concerns.ŽHes a great friend and hard worker,Ž Brandow said. If the hospital calls him anytime, hes right there.ŽCarmiah Bryant is friends with both candi-dates „ she has known McLean for 35 years and Kennington for 10 „ and said either one would be good for Springfield. She described McLean as a people personŽ who will help you any way she can.ŽShe wants whats best for the community and people. We met at the ball field with the kids playing,Ž said Bryant, who has lived in Springfield for 38 years. Kennington is a very outgoing people person also. He also wants whats best for the community.Ž Thursdays forum was held by the League of Women Voters of Bay County, who hosted a similar forum for Panama City Beach candidates on Tuesday and will host one for Callaway candidates this coming Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Calla-way Arts and Conference Center. Elections are April 17. FORUMFrom Page B1PANAMA CITYBay sheriffs of“ ce warns of tax scamsThe Bay County Sheriffs Office issued a scam alert Thursday to remind residents about IRS scams that are common this time of year.Most recently, the BCSO has received complaints of phone calls made to intended victims warning of serious emergency and time sensitive notificationsŽ from tax filings. The scammer prom-ises four serious allegations are attached toŽ the victims name and if the victim fails to return the call within 24 hours legal action will be broughtŽ against them. The phone numbers the victim is instructed to call are 716-381-5345 and 716-381-5345.Sheriff Tommy Ford advises anyone receiving these calls to hang up. Never give out personal information over the phone or send money to anyone using gift cards. News Herald staff reportsAREA BRIEF

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 B5

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** B6 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald The Associated PressGAINESVILLE „ Police and Gainesvilles mayor are looking to change a local immigration policy after realizing that a domestic abuse call could have led the victim to face deportation.Mayor Lauren Poe said the citys policy adopted to comply with federal immi-gration authorities goes too far, and wants to amend it.The policy currently requires police officers to write down the names of foreign nationals they come into contact with and turn that information over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Poe said that if those reports include victims names, it could have a chilling effect on crime reporting.This is not who we are,Ž Poe said in a Facebook post earlier this week. This type of approach is contrary to our community policing model and has a significant chilling effect on our vic-tims ability and willingness to report crimes, including domestic violence and battery.ŽThe domestic abuse case involved a Guatemalan man accused of hitting his partner, an 18-yearold Guatemalan woman. If police were to forward the arrest report, it would include notations that the victim and other witnesses in the house were suspected to be in the country illegally.Gainesville police spokesman Ben Tobias said the department has not reported the suspect, victim or witnesses to ICE, despite earlier telling reporters that it would forward information to the agency. However, that doesnt mean the suspect wont be reported to ICE. Tobias said it would be left to officials in Alachua County.While ICE is notified when foreign-born suspects are booked into a county jail in Gainesville, Alachua County was labeled non-cooperativeŽ last year for not holding immigrants longer to give time for the federal agency to take custody.Police, mayor want immigration rule changed to guard victims

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 B7By Lloyd DunkelbergerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ When voters go to the polls in November, they could face a dozen ballot measures from the Florida Constitu-tion Revision Commission, under a plan advanced Wednesday.The plan, which received preliminary approval from the commissions Style and Drafting Committee, groups 24 proposed changes to the state Constitution into 12 ballot measures for the Nov. 6 general election.The proposed ballot measures, if approved by the full commission, would be added to five proposed constitutional amendments already on the 2018 ballot. The preliminary groupings combine:€A ban (Proposal 65) on workplace vaping or electronic cigarettes with a ban (P91) on offshore drill-ing for gas and oil in state waters.€ Three public-school issues, including an eight-year term limit (P43) for school board members and a requirement (P10) that students be educated in civic literacy.Ž€ Three judicial or crimi-nal justice issues, including a measure focused on vic-tims rights (P96) and a proposal (P41) that would increase the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75. € Two higher-education measures and a proposal (P49) to provide survivor benefits to families of police officers, other first responders and Floridabased military members who are killed in the line of duty.€ Four government structureŽ measures, including a proposed requirement (P13) that con-stitutional officers such as sheriffs be elected officials in charter counties and a proposal (P103) for the annual legislative session to begin in January in even-numbered years.€ Three clean upŽ mea-sures, including eliminating a defunct reference in the Constitution to a high-speed rail system (P12) and the repeal (P3) of language aimed at preventing aliens ineligible for citizenshipŽ from owning land. The land-owning provision, which was aimed at Asian immigrants in the 1920s, never was enforced.The 37-member Constitution Revision Commission meets every 20 years and has the unique power to place proposed constitutional amendments directly on the ballot. Each of the issues considered by the Style and Drafting Committee received an initial approval from the full commission but ultimately will need the backing of 22 commis-sion members to go on the ballot.Commissioner Brecht Heuchan, chairman of the committee, said two mea-sures were left as separate proposals because they might be amended. One (P39) is an ethics measure, which includes a six-year lobbying ban for former public officials, while the other (P93) would allow the creation of innova-tionŽ school districts.Four other measures were left as stand-alone proposals because they initially were endorsed by the commission in votes that fell short of the 22 that will be necessary for any constitutional change to be placed on the ballot. Those measures include a proposed ban (P67) on greyhound racing and a requirement (P29) that employers use a federal verification system to determine the immigration eligibility of workers.Carey Theil, a lobbyist for Grey2K USA Worldwide, an animal-welfare advocacy group, said his organization supports the racing ban as a separate ballot proposal, while expressing confidence the final vote by the commis-sion will exceed the 18 votes that proposal originally received.Were comfortable being by ourselves,Ž Theil said. We do not believe we are at 18. We believe we are in excess of 22 votes today.ŽJack Cory, a lobbyist for the Florida Greyhound Association, which opposes the racing ban, said his group also supports leaving the measure as a separate ballot item. Cory said the proposal does not belong in the ConstitutionŽ and that it should be a decision made by the full commission.The Style and Drafting Committee also approved the orderingŽ of the dozen ballot measures, beginning with the measure dealing with victims rights and judicial retirement ages and ending with the proposed greyhound-racing ban.Heuchan said he looked back over the voting history of ballot proposals since 1998 and could not find any correlation between the ballot position and the fate of the measures, although he acknowledged it was an informal survey. He said other factors seemed to affect the amendments more, including the visibil-ity of the issues with voters and whether advocacy groups were campaigning for or against the proposals.With the prospect of the commission advancing a dozen additional ballot measures, Heuchan said decision fatigueŽ by voters is a factor that the commission will have to consider before its final decisions.This whole notion of fatigue is real. Its a real thing,Ž Heuchan said.The five proposed constitutional changes already on the November ballot include a measure to expand the homestead-exemption property tax break, a measure to restore voting rights to former felons and a measure to give voters the final authority in deciding whether to allow casino-style gambling.The next major task facing the Style and Draft-ing Committee will be approving the ballot-title and summary language for each of the dozen mea-sures. The titles are limited to 15 words, and summaries cannot exceed 75 words. Courts have held both must not mislead voters.Ballot measures endorsed by the committee are scheduled to move to the full commission beginning April 16. The full commission can amend the measures with support from at least 22 of the 37 members.The commission faces a May 10 deadline for finish-ing its work.12 more proposals could land on ballotOne of the Constitution Revision Commissions potential proposals on the November ballot is P67, a ban on greyhound racing. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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** B8 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald

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** ON THE DIAMOND | C3PERISCOPEKeep tabs on how local baseball and so ball stars are doing in the college and professional ranks The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 C1 SPORTSBy Pat McCannThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY BEACH „ County athletes would appear to have viable opportunities to mount the podium in only two weight divisions when the Class 1A boys weightlift-ing championships begins this morning at Arnold High School.Competition in the lower weight divisions is expected to begin about 10:30 a.m., followed by the heavier divisions in the early afternoon.Admission is $12 at the gate and parking is $10. Both prices are established by the sponsoring Florida High School Athletics Association.The Class 2A championships will be held at Arnold on Saturday.Mosleys Nick OBrien and Bays Justin Pippin are seeded Nos. 4 and 6 respectively at 219 pounds off their region qualifying results.John ONeil of Father Lopez is the top seed at 605 combined pounds for the bench press and clean and jerk. OBrien totaled 590 and Pippin 585 in qualifying. Also at 219, Joseph Claiborne of 1A BOYS WEIGHTLIFTINGCounty athletes in minority See STATE, C2 By Brent MaycockTopeka Capital-Journal Sergio Garcia grasped and grasped for an answer before finally settling on a conclusion.Unfortunately, the ball just didnt want to stop,Ž he said.It was a huge dose of misfortune indeed for the reigning Masters champion during Thursdays first round at Augusta National Golf Club, and perhaps fittingly he was fishing for a response. Sitting at 2-over for his round going into No. 15, Garcia put five „ yes, five „ balls into the water in front of the green.Garcia walked off the green with an 8-over 13 on the par-5 hole, effec-tively sabotaging his first round since win-ning his first green jacket a year ago. Garcia fin-ished at 9-over 81 „ the worst first-round score by a defending cham-pion in Masters history. The next highest was 78, made by Gene Sarazen in 1936, Seve Ballesteros in 1981 and Larry Mize in 1988.Garcias 13 matched the highest score posted on any hole at Augusta National during Mas-ters play, equaling the 13 Tom Weiskopf recorded on No. 12 in 1980 and the 13 Tommy Nakajima took on No. 13 in 1978. It also surpassed the previous high score on No. 15 by two shots, with Jumbo Ozaki (1987), Ben Crenshaw (1997) and Ignacio Garrido (1998) all taking 11s on the hole.I dont know what happened, I dont know,Ž Garcia said. Its one of those things, I dont know. Its the first time in my career where Ive made a 13 in Garcias repeat bid sinks with 13 on No. 15Sergio Garcia reacts to his tee shot on No. 4, where he made his “ rst bogey of the day. [ANDREW DAVIS TUCKER/THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE]The list The “ eld will be cut to the low 50 and ties and those within 10 strokes of the lead after the completion of todays second round. Here are the biggest surprises to miss the cut: 1. Jack Nicklaus, 1967: Going for a third consecutive green jacket, Nicklaus shot 72-79 and missed the cut. He wouldnt miss another cut at Augusta until 1994, but he did withdraw because of back issues in 1983. 2. Seve Ballesteros, 1981 and 1984: The “ ery Spaniard did not make the weekend after either of his victories. In 1981, he shot 78-76. In 1984, he posted 73-74 to miss by a shot. 3. Nick Faldo, 1997: The three-time winner stumbled to 75-81 as Tiger Woods romped to a 12-shot victory. 4. Fred Couples, 2008: The 1992 champion needed to make a 10-foot putt on the 18th hole to make his 24th consecutive cut at Augusta National. He missed, and he shares the record for consecutive cuts made with Gary Player. 5. Phil Mickelson, 2014: The three-time champion shot 76-73 and missed his “ rst cut at Augusta National since 1997. COLLEGE BASEBALL C2PANHANDLE CONFERENCEChipola holds o Gulf Coast as Carrion belts two homers By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Bay came into Thursday nights District 1-5A contest against South Walton having lost two of the last three games, giving up 27 combined runs in those two defeats. Fortunately for the Tornadoes, they still know how to get it done in the games that matter the most.The Tornadoes (10-5) rallied back from an early two-run deficit to take a 4-3 victory over the Seahawks and move to 3-0 in District 1-5A competi-tion. South Walton dropped to 10-8 overall and 2-3 in league play. The teams will face off again tonight in Santa Rosa Beach. With two wins over second-place Rutherford already in hand, Bay could lose that game and one of its Bay stays perfect in district with 4-3 winBays Dawson Erbacher went 6 2/3 innings on the mound to get the win for the Tornadoes Thursday night against South Walton. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Defending champ puts 5 balls into water on par-5 hole See BAY, C2 See MASTERS, C2

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** C2 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Pat McCannThe News HeraldMARIANNA „ Phillip Sand-erson pitched into the seventh inning and Julio Carrion backed him with two home runs as Chipola defeated Gulf Coast 7-3 on Thursday in Pan-handle Conference baseball.The outcome opened a four-game lead for the Indians over the second-place Commodores. Chipola is 11-3 (31-9) and Gulf Coast dropped to 7-7 (22-15).Gulf Coast remained in sole possession of second as North-west Florida drilled Tallahassee 10-2 on Thursday to leave both teams 6-8 and tied for third. Idle Pensacola is 6-10.Chipola and Gulf Coast were scheduled to meet 2 p.m. Saturday at Bill Frazier Field for a doubleheader to conclude their four-game series. Because of expected rain, however, that twinbill has been moved up to 1 p.m. today.Sanderson improved to 7-1 while allowing three hits in six-plus innings. He left with a 7-2 lead and two outs in the seventh. Cory Heffron greeted reliever Chase Forester with an RBI single, but that was as close as Gulf Coast could get.Thomas Leone and Christian Collazo finished for Chipola to complete a four-hitter, all singles.Jake Rice took the loss for Gulf Coast. He allowed an RBI single by Alex Webb and Carrions three-run homer in the third inning.The Indians made it 6-0 in the fourth, Francisco Urbaez and Morgan McCullough driv-ing in runs. Charlie Greenich relieved for the Commodores with one out in the fourth and turned in his best performance of the season.Greenich surrendered Carrions second homer, a solo shot, with one out in the fifth inning. From that point he held Chipola hitless until Jonathon Nieves and Edmond Americaan singled in the eighth inning. Greenich struck out seven while yield-ing a single run.Josh Nowak and Heffron had the RBIs for Gulf Coast. Jacquez Koonce had two hits and reached base four times for the Commodores. Ben Rowdon had a single and walked twice and Stevie Mof-fatt had the other base hit. Gulf Coast 000 020 100 „ 3 4 2 Chipola 004 210 00x „ 7 8 3Rice (L), Greenich (4) and Nowak; Sanderson, Forester (7), Leone (7), Collazo (8) and Webb.Chipola holds o Gulf CoastGraceville is a threat while seeded No. 8 with a quali-fying total of 580.The top six finishers in each weight division medal and mount a podium during a brief ceremony in the Arnold gymnasium.Other county contenders are Arnolds Caleb Cortez and Dylan Gandy, seeded No. 7 and No. 8 at 154 pounds. Both qualified at 480 pounds, which is 5 pounds behind No. 6 seed Alonzo Hill of Sneads.Lifters from Blountstown, Altha and Vernon are among the area athletes with the best chance of succeeding today. Blountstowns Keith Grantham is the top seed at 154 pounds, Dameion Stephens of Vernon is No. 2 at 199 pounds and Jackson Goins of Altha and Antonio Rodriguez of Vernon are No. 4 and No. 5 at 129 pounds.Another contender is Garrison Hutchinson of Altha, who is seeded seventh at 169 pounds. Ties in all weight divisions are broken by the lifter with the lowest body weight prevailing. 1A area state boys weightlifting quali“ ers, by weight division. Includes seeding, region lifts and No. 1 seed in each division.119 „ 1. Santiago Morales, Labelle, 210235-445. 13. Keegan Calhoun, Wewahitchka 175-140-315, 20. Riley Miller, Blountstown 140-165-305.129 „ 1. Alex Smith, Anclote 240-215-455, 4. Jackson Goins, Altha 220-195-415, 5. Antonio Rodriguez, Vernon 225-190-415, 14. Jonathan Harvey, Wewahitchka 205-180-385.139 „ 1. Marcus Dialo, Baker County 265-240-505, 16. Charlie Nichols, Graceville 210-205-415, 19. Kameron Merrit, Arnold 220-185-405.154 „ 1. Keith Grantham, Blountstown 280245-525, 6. Alonzo Hill, Sneads, 255-230-485, 7. Caleb Cortez, Arnold 240-240-480, 8. Dylan Gandy, Arnold 255-225-480, 19. Jacob Curcie, Port St. Joe 225-235-460.169 „ 1. Dalton Simon, Baker County 370285-655, 7. Garrison Hutchinson, Altha 275275-550, 18. Michael Wyrick, Blountstown 290-225-515.183 „ 1. Robert Yoakham, Citrus 365-275640. No area lifters quali“ ed.199 „ 1. Laetres Bell, Madison County 385-300-685, 13. Demetreous Walston, Vernon 275-285-560, 18. Hunter Kruger, Arnold 255-285-540.219 „1. John ONeil, Father Lopez 340-265605, 4. Nick OBrien, Mosley 300-290-590, 6. Justin Pippin, Bay 325-260-585, 8. Joseph Claiborne, Graceville 325-255-580, 11. Garrett Lovelace, Altha 295-275-570, 16. Tyrick Davis, Vernon 290-265-555.238 „ 1. Cameron Brown, Madison County 425-285-700, 16. Khajleik Pelt-Long, Sneads 305-265-570, 18. Cody Bar“ eld, Blountstown 310-255-565.Hwt „ 1. Jakob Alvarez, Bradford County 465-300-765, 10. Julian Severson, Graceville 380-270-650, 15. Kendrick Sims, Wewahitchka 370-270-640, 17. Alvin Dempsey, Port St. Joe 330-305-635, 18. Johnathan Lombardo, Marianna 350-275-625, 19. Jarrett Dutton, Arnold 340-280-620, 20. Vince Weaver, North Bay Haven 355-265-620. STATEFrom Page C1competition. I felt like I hit a lot of good shots, but unfortu-nately the ball just didnt want to stop.ŽComing off a bogey on No. 14 that dropped him back to 2 over for the day, Garcia had 206 yards out after a solid drive, setting up a 6-iron approach to the front-right pin location.Playing partner Doc Redman had already flirted with the water, but his ball stopped on the bank. Garcias approach landed in the wrong spot, drawing back into the pond.You could carry it two more feet and its probably good,Ž Garcia said. And if it carries a foot less, it probably doesnt go off the green and stays on the fringe like Docs ball did. Unfortunately, I landed it on the perfect spot for it to come back.ŽThat was only the start of the adventure. Garcia took a drop and his wedge hit pin high before spinning back into the pond. Another drop, another pin-high wedge, another spin to the water. Rinse and repeat.I kept hitting good shots with the sand wedge and unfortunately, I dont know why the ball just wouldnt stop,Ž he said.Garcia had already had a somewhat adventurous round to that point. After making a birdie on No. 2 to start the day in the red, he followed with bogeys on Nos. 4 and 5, then took a double bogey on No. 7 to fall to 3 over.He righted the ship a bit with a birdie on No. 8 and then got back to 1 over with a birdie on No. 12 before his collapse on the 15th.I was fighting hard and was doing quite well and had a good possibility to get back to even on 13 and keep my round going after not having a great start,Ž he said. Unfor-tunately we didnt hit the right club there and didnt give myself a good putt. The putt lipped out and then I bogeyed the next one, and then the rest is history.Ž MASTERSFrom Page C1final two against Walton and still clinch the top seed in the district tournament."Its a big win," Bay coach Andrew Starr said. "Any time you get a district win, its big. Were pretty close to where we want to be. We knew coming into the game it would be a close game. (The Seahawks) can swing it and hit it definitely. Im just proud of the guys for the way they fought and didnt give up. They tried to put together a complete game."Dawson Erbacher was solid on the mound for the Tornadoes, starting and going 6 ‡ innings to get the victory while Zach Miller recorded the final out in the top of the seventh inning to get the save. Taylor Collier started and went 3 ‡ innings for South Walton, giving up two earned runs on five hits and two walks with three strikeouts. Kai Wilk took the loss for allowing one unearned run in 2 ‡ innings on two hits and three walks with a strikeout.Erbacher overcame a pair of Bay errors to exit the game in the seventh with the lead after allowing three unearned runs on six hits, two walks, and six strikeouts."I thought Dawson pitched well," Starr said. "He mixed in three pitches for strikes. We still kicked it around a little bit and I was upset about that. I think, minus a couple of errors, it probably shouldve been a 4-1 or 4-2 ballgame."An error on Beckett Hamilton on a ground ball to shortstop by Aidan Keenan allowed the first South Walton run to score in the top of the second inning, with an RBI double by Wilk making it 2-0 moments later. Hamilton made amends with an RBI single in the bottom of the second inning to score Charlie Owens.The Tornadoes plated two runs in the fourth to take the lead, with Childree leading off the inning with a solo home run over the left field wall. Bay later loaded the bases with two outs and a passed ball allowed Elijah Covey to come home from third base and give the Tornadoes a 3-2 advantage. The Seahawks answered quickly in the top of the fifth with the aid of another Bay error, as a dropped pop up by Covey was followed by an RBI double from Michael Sharp to tie the game up.Bay went in front for good in the sixth inning, with Chil-dree leading off with a single, stealing second base, moving to third on a pair of walks, and scoring on another passed ball. The Tornadoes had a chance to blow the game open with the bases loaded and one out, but Wilk struck out Erbacher and got Amilcar Torres to fly out to right field to end the threat.The Seahawks went down quietly in the top of the seventh, however, with Drake Roberts popping out, Cole Varner striking out, and Miller coming on to strike out Sharp to end the game. Sharp had been a thorn in Erbachers side, finishing 3 for 4 with two doubles, and an RBI to lead South Walton. Childree led the Tornadoes offensively, going 2 for 3 with a home run, an RBI, and two runs. Covey was 2 for 2 with a walk and a run. Hamil-ton was 1 for 2 with an RBI. South Walton 020 010 0 „ 3 6 0 Bay 010 201 X „ 4 7 2 Taylor Collier, Wilk (L) 4 and Roberts. Erbacher (W), Miller (SV) 7. LOB: Bay 8, South Walton 7. E: Hamilton, Covey. HR: Childree. 2B: Sharp 2, Vogler, Wilk. DP: South Walton 8-3. RBI: Bay 2 (Childree, Hamilton), South Walton 2 (Sharp, Wilk).SOFTBALLBozeman 15, PSJ 1 (5)PORT ST. JOE „ The Bucks improved to 14-2 overall and 7-1 in District 4-1A competition with the win. Abby Jo Batton went five innings in the circle and struck out nine batters while allowing two hits and an unearned run to get the win.Batton also went 1 for 3 with an RBI and two runs at the plate. Courtney Boobyer led the Bozeman offense with three hits and three RBI with a run scored, while Hannah Tiller was 1 for 3 with a home run, two RBI, and two runs. Brooke Stanford was 3 for 4 with two runs and an RBI, with Meredith Sanders finishing 2 for 3 with a double, an RBI, and two runs. Malena Bearden was 2 for 3 with three runs. Chance Goolsby was 1 for 4 with a double, two RBI, and a run.Bozeman next hosts Wewa-hitchka on Monday. Port St. Joe hosts Vernon on Monday. Late prepSOFTBALLBozeman 9, Rutherford 0SAND HILLS „ Abby Jo Batton tossed a four-hit shut-out Wednesday with eight strikeouts for Bozeman, 14-2.Batton also was 3 for 3 with a run and two runs batted in. Courtney Boobyer was 2 for 2 with three RBIs and two runs, Hannah Tiller had a single, double and two runs, Brianna Harper was 1 for 4 with an RBI and two runs, Chance Goolsby had a triple and two runs and Brooke Stanford was 1-4 with an RBI and run. BASEBALLBozeman 8, Franklin County 3EASTPONT „ Sage McWa-ters pitched into the seventh inning and struck out 11 for Bozeman, which won its 10th straight game and improved to 15-2, 7-0 in the district. Taylor Gay recorded the final two outs.Cade Parker had two doubles, a triple and five RBIs to lead the Bucks. Tyler Vance was 2 for 4 and Charlie Red had an RBI single. BAYFrom Page C1Jordan Spieth hits a shot on the 17th hole during the “ rst round at the Masters golf tournament Thursday in Augusta, Ga. [DAVID J. PHILLIP/AP] Tiger Woods hits from a bunker on the second hole during the “ rst round at the Masters golf tournament Thursday in Augusta, Ga. [DAVID GOLDMAN/AP] Bays Armani Larry rounds “ rst base after a single in the “ rst inning Thursday night. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Associated PressINDIANAPOLIS „ Bojan Bogdanovic had 28 points, Victor Oladipo scored 14 of his 21 points in the second half and the playoff-bound Indiana Pacers beat the Golden State Warriors 126106 on Thursday night.The Pacers have won six of seven, including twice against the short-handed defending NBA champions. Its their first season sweep over the Warriors since 2011-12.Kevin Durant had 27 points, five rebounds and seven assists, but Golden States three-game winning streak ended. Klay Thompson had 16 points before being shut out in the second half. The Warriors were swept by an Eastern Conference team for the first time since Charlotte did it in 2013-14. Neither game was all that close in the end.After rallying from a dou-ble-digit deficit and pulling away for an 11-point victory last week, the Pacers led for the final 33:46 and by double digits the entire second half Thursday.Sure, they took advantage of a lineup missing Stephen Curry, but Indiana was impressive.The Pacers took an 18-11 lead in the first quarter and started pulling away after Lance Stephenson erased a 30-28 deficit with a 3-pointer with 9:46 left in the second quarter. Bogda-novics layup gave Indiana a 52-42 lead with 4:25 left, and after building a 62-51 half-time lead, Indiana extended the margin to 22 during the third.Golden State started the fourth on a 10-0 run, cutting the deficit to 10, but Indiana answered with seven straight to make it 104-87.Pacers sweep season series vs Warriors

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 C3The News HeraldThe following is a list of area athletes playing college baseball and their statistics as of April 4, unless noted.Position playersBrady Bell (Mosley, Gulf Coast), Nicholls State, Jr., 6-0, 175, IF „ .333 avg., 81 AB, 12 R, 27 H, 7 2B, 10 RBI, 6 BB. Jonathan Bennett (Gulf Coast), Maine, Sr., 5-10, 190, C „ .269 avg., 93 AB, 10 R, 25 H, 2 2B, 14 RBI, 18 BB, 2 SB. Garrett Breland (Mosley), Huntingdon College, So., 6-1, 190, IF/OF „ .265 avg., 83 AB, 9 R, 22 H, 7 2B, 1 3B, 15 RBI, 1BB, 2 SB. JJ Bleday (Mosley), Vanderbilt, So., 6-3, 205, OF „ .372 avg., 78 AB, 14 R, 29 H, 3 2B, 3 HR, 8 RBI, 13 BB, 1 SB. Sam Clement (Bay), Marion Military Institute, Fr., 6-2, 220, IF/C „ .368 avg., 38 AB, 8 R, 14 H, 1 2B, 10 RBI, 5 BB, 1 SB. Tristan Cooper (Holmes County), Coastal Alabama-Monroeville, Fr., 5-11, 155, IF „ .392 avg., 79 AB, 28 R, 31 H, 5 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR, 11 RBI, 7 BB, 7 SB. Silas Drummond (Holmes County), Enterprise State, Fr., IF/RHP „ .371 avg., 105 AB, 25 R, 39 H, 1 2B, 14 RBI, 7 BB, 8 SB; 9 G, 2-1, 8.79 ERA, 14.1 IP, 18 H, 14 R, 14 ER, 9 BB, 13 K. JT Duncan (Bay), Gulf Coast, So., 6-0, 170, IF/OF „ .294 avg., 34 AB, 7 R, 10 H, 2 2B, 5 RBI, 2 BB, 1 SB. Lucas Dunn (Arnold), Louisville, Fr., 6-0, 195, INF/RHP „ .259 avg., 27 AB, 6 R, 7 H, 2 2B, 1 HR, 3 RBI, 3 BB. Logan Gildea (Rutherford), Huntingdon College, Jr., 5-11, 210, DH „ .227 avg., 22 AB, 2 R, 5 H, 2 2B, 3 RBI, 3 BB. Cody Gwin (Marianna), Chipola, Fr., 5-10, 194, C „ Gwin hasnt played this season. Kendall Herron (Rutherford), Valdosta State, Sr., 5-11, 170, OF „ .277 avg., 112 AB, 22 R, 31 H, 3 2B, 2 3B, 1 HR, 12 RBI, 14 BB, 20 SB. Jacquez Koonce (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, So., 5-9, 175, OF „ .414, 140 AB, 38 R, 58 H, 10 2B, 3 HR, 28 RBI, 18 BB, 12 SB. Ryan Leno (Rutherford), Wallace-Dothan, Fr., OF „ .395 avg., 86 AB, 18 R, 34 H, 4 2B, 1 3B, 11 RBI, 8 BB, 3 SB. Bowen McGuf“ n (Mosley, Gulf Coast), Auburn, Sr., 6-1, 193, OF „ .091 avg., 11 AB, 1 H, 1 RBI, 2 BB. Jacky Miles (Holmes County, Chipola), Florida A&M, Sr., 6-0, 205, C „ .330 avg., 97 AB, 15 R, 32 H, 2 2B, 1 HR, 20 RBI, 18 BB. Jonathan Palmer (Wewahitchka), Lurleen B. Wallace, Fr., 5-9, 180, OF „ .125 avg., 16 AB, 1 R, 2 H, 1 2B, 1 RBI, 1 BB. Kodi Russ (Holmes County), Florida A&M, Sr., 5-8, 180, IF „ .160 avg., 25 AB, 3 R, 4 H, 1 2B, 1 RBI, 3 BB. Ty Russ (Holmes County, Chipola), Florida A&M, Sr., 5-8, 175, OF „ .278 avg., 36 AB, 12 R, 10 H, 11 RBI, 3 BB. Shelby Savell (Chipley), Enterprise State, So., C/ RHP „ .258 avg., 66 AB, 6 R, 17 H, 1 2B, 8 RBI, 7 BB; 4 G, 0-1, 4.91 ERA, 7.1 IP, 7 H, 5 R, 4 ER, 2 BB, 7 K. Tyreke Sumner (Blountstown), Coastal Alabama-Monroeville, Fr., 6-1, 155, OF „ .197 avg., 61 AB, 6 R, 12 H, 2 2B, 1 3B, 4 RBI, 3 BB, 4 SB. RJ Yeager (Mosley), Mercer, Fr., 6-3, 185, IF „ .357 avg., 115 AB, 32 R, 41 H, 10 2B, 3 HR, 30 RBI, 14 BB, 3 SB.PitchersNicky Agosto (Mosley), Wallace-Dothan, Fr., RHP „ 13 G, 1 GS, 1-1, 1 SV, 3.86 ERA, 21 IP, 18 H, 12 R, 9 ER, 11 BB, 19 K. Alec Aleywine (Bozeman), Gulf Coast, So., 6-2, 250, LHP „ 10 G, 10 GS, 6-3, 5.11 ERA, 49.1 IP, 51 H, 32 R, 28 ER, 21 BB, 58 K; .369 avg., 122 AB, 26 R, 45 H, 7 2B, 2 3B, 7 HR, 42 RBI, 9 BB, 1 SB. Christopher Casey (Rutherford), Huntingdon College, Fr., 6-2, 165, RHP „ Casey hasnt pitched yet this season. Daniel Floyd (Chipley), Wallace-Dothan, So., RHP „ 11 G, 5 GS, 5-1, 1 SV, 1.93 ERA, 42 IP, 30 H, 9 R, 9 ER, 9 BB, 36 K. Peyton Gray (Gulf Coast), Florida Gulf Coast, Sr., 6-3, 231, RHP „ 9 G, 3 GS, 2-1, 1 SV, 5.73 ERA, 22 IP, 23 H, 15 R, 14 ER, 10 BB, 33 K. Tanner Harden (Wewahitchka), Lurleen B. Wallace, So., 5-10, 190, RHP „ 6 G, 1 GS, 1-1, 9.72 ERA, 8.1 IP, 13 H, 12 R, 9 ER, 2 BB, 11 K. Ethan Hess (Arnold), Huntingdon College, Fr., 6-2, 210, RHP/C „ 13 G, 1 GS, 2-2, 3.58 ERA, 32.2 IP, 36 H, 15 R, 13 ER, 25 BB, 29 K. Trever Kilcrease (Arnold), Gulf Coast, So., 6-0, 175, RHP „ 11 G, 11 GS, 7-2, 2.82 ERA, 73.1 IP, 74 H, 32 R, 23 ER, 14 BB, 77 K. Peyton Millirons (Mosley), Wallace-Dothan, Fr., RHP „ 10 G, 3 GS, 5-0, 1 SV, 1.52 ERA, 29.2 IP, 21 H, 5 R, 5 ER, 9 BB, 37 K. Colby Mullins (Blountstown), Andrew College, So., 6-2, 215, RHP „ 11 G, 5 GS, 5-1, 1 SV, 4.18 ERA, 28 IP, 23 H, 18 R, 13 ER, 23 BB, 27 K. Jacob Munn (Rutherford), Huntingdon College, So., 5-10, 225, RHP „ 1 G, 9.00 ERA, 2 H, 1 R, 1 ER, 1 BB, 1 K. Jordan Murray (Mosley), Florida Tech, Fr., 6-0, 180, RHP „ 9 G, 2-0, 0.90 ERA, 20 IP, 20 H, 7 R, 2 ER, 4 BB, 14 K. Marquez Oates (Bay), Marion Military Institute, Fr., 6-2, 210, RHP „ 5 G, 5 GS, 3-1, 1.82 ERA, 24.2 IP, 25 H, 8 R, 5 ER, 7 BB, 32 K. Dallas Oliver (Chipley), Florida A&M, Sr., 6-0, 195, RHP/OF „ 7 G, 7 GS, 2-4, 5.88 ERA, 33.2 IP, 41 H, 28 R, 22 ER, 16 BB, 27 K; .322 avg., 115 AB, 30 R, 37 H, 7 2B, 1 HR, 25 RBI, 12 BB, 6 SB. Jared Padgett (Graceville), Chipola., So., 6-4, 195, LHP „ 9 G, 5.23 ERA, 10.1 IP, 9 H, 7 R, 6 ER, 12 BB, 7 K. Grant Rowell (Chipley), Coastal Alabama-Monroeville, Fr., 6-3, 175, RHP/IF „ 4 G, 1-0, 1.59 ERA, 11.1 IP, 8 H, 4 R, 2 ER, 5 BB, 8 K; .269 avg., 67 AB, 11 R, 18 H, 4 2B, 2 HR, 12 RBI, 5 BB, 3 SB. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area athletes now playing college baseball is asked to call Dustin Kent at 747-5065 or e-mail dkent@pcnh.com.COLLEGE BASEBALL PERISCOPE By Steve ReedThe Associated PressCHARLOTTE, N.C. „ The Atlantic Coast Conference is making Charlotte, North Carolina the long-term home for its football championship game, keeping it in the Queen City through 2030.Charlotte remains at the center of our footprint,Ž Commissioner John Swofford said Thursday at a news conference, during which he cited the fact that eight of the leagues schools are within 300 miles of the city as among the reasons the conference wanted to keep the game here.Solid attendance figures were also a major consid-eration in the decision for the 10-year contract extension that allows the Charlotte Sports Foun-dation to continue hosting the game.The conference championship has been played at Bank of America Stadium, home of the NFLs Carolina Panthers, seven of the past eight seasons „ and four of those were sellouts. That includes last years championship game when 74,372 fans watched No. 1 Clemson defeat No. 7 Miami 38-3.Charlotte has been an outstanding partner for the ACC and has shown continued commitment to help the growth of this game,Ž Swofford said. ... This game has truly found a home in Charlotte.ŽThe contract extension comes in the midst of uncertainty over the future of the Panthers ownership „ as well as the future of the stadium.Panthers owner Jerry Richardson announced in December he was selling the team amid reports of sexual and racial remarks made in the workplace. The NFL is continuing to investigate the matter while Richardson evaluates bids to buy the team he brought to the Carolinas as an expansion franchise in 1993.A new owner could be announced as soon as next month at the NFL owners meetings in Atlanta.The Panthers are only tethered to Bank of Amer-ica Stadium through the 2019 season, so the new ownership group could decide to build a new stadium or even relocate the team „ although the latter would seem to be a longshot considering the strong NFL fan base in Charlotte.That is addressed in the arrangement in terms of the opportunity to discuss and potentially play in that new stadium,Ž Swofford said. We would probably need to sit down with the new ownership and see what that might entail. But we would fully expect to be able to successfully do that.ŽSwofford said negotia-tions to keep the game in Charlotte began before Richardson announced he was selling the franchise. Once the news broke of Richardsons decision both sides agreed there was no reason to slow down the contract talks. I would expect to have the same kind of relation-ship with whoever owns the team in the future as we have now,Ž Swofford said.ACC football championship staying in Charlotte through 30Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford announces a 10-year contract extension with the Charlotte Sports Foundation to continue hosting the ACC Football Championship game Thursday in Charlotte during a news conference in Charlotte, N.C. [CHUCK BURTON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] The Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Craig Smith scored twice and Ryan Johansen had the go-ahead goal late in the third period to help the Nashville Predators beat the Washington Capitals 4-3 Thursday night to clinch first place in the Central Division and the top seed in the Western Conference.Even though itll be Pekka Rinne in net for the Predators when they open the playoffs next week, backup Juuse Saros stopped 28 of the 31 shots and cap-tain Roman Josi scored on the power play to give them their first division title in 19 seasons of existence.Nashville has a franchise-record 52 victories and will open the playoffs against the second wild card in the West as it tries to return to the Stanley Cup Final.Evgeny Kuznetsov scored twice and Alex Ovechkin added his NHL-leading 47th goal of the season for the Metropolitan-champion Capitals, who have nothing left to play for and could still face any of a handful of teams in the first round. Philipp Grubauer made 25 saves and strengthened his case to be Washingtons Game 1 playoff starter over 2016 Vezina Trophy winner Braden Holtby.A year after making a surprising run to the Cup Final as the eighth seed in the West, the Predators spent this regular season building to give them-selves the best opportunity to make another playoff run. More games in Music City is one way they hope to do that after going 9-2 at home in the playoffs in 2017.We think home ice trumps everything else,Ž general manager David Poile said. That to me is the biggest thing that can separate anybody.ŽWrapping up home ice wasnt easy.An early power play allowed the Predators to take a 1-0 lead on Smiths first goal of the game. Nashville survived an interference call on Josi in the first, but the leagues most penalized team struggled to keep up in the second. A tripping call on Johan-sen paved the way for Ovechkins 17th power-play goal of the season, and slashing on P.K. Subban led to Kuznetsovs first of the game to put Washington up 2-1.The Capitals took the first nine shots of the second period and had 16 to the Predators two before Smith cleaned up a loose puck in front for his career-high 25th goal.Predators beat Capitals to clinch top seed in WestWashington Capitals right wing Tom Wilson, top right, vies for the puck against Nashville Predators goaltender Juuse Saros (74) during the second period Thursday in Washington. [NICK WASS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** C4 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News HeraldAMERICAN LEAGUENATIONAL LEAGUEEAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Boston 6 1 .857 „ „ 6-1 W-6 1-0 5-1 New York 4 3 .571 2 „ 4-3 L-1 2-1 2-2 Toronto 4 3 .571 2 „ 4-3 L-1 4-3 0-0 Baltimore 2 5 .286 4 2 2-5 W-1 1-2 1-3 Tampa Bay 1 6 .143 5 3 1-6 L-6 1-3 0-3 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Minnesota 4 2 .667 „ „ 4-2 W-2 1-0 3-2 Chicago 3 3 .500 1 3-3 L-1 0-1 3-2 Cleveland 2 4 .333 2 1 2-4 L-2 0-0 2-4 Detroit 2 4 .333 2 1 2-4 W-1 1-4 1-0 Kansas City 1 3 .250 2 1 1-3 W-1 0-2 1-1 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Houston 6 1 .857 „ „ 6-1 W-5 3-0 3-1 Los Angeles 5 2 .714 1 „ 5-2 W-2 2-1 3-1 Seattle 3 3 .500 2 3-3 L-2 2-1 1-2 Oakland 3 5 .375 3 1 3-5 L-1 3-5 0-0 Texas 3 5 .375 3 1 3-5 W-1 1-3 2-2 EAST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY New York 5 1 .833 „ „ 5-1 W-3 4-1 1-0 Atlanta 4 2 .667 1 „ 4-2 W-2 4-2 0-0 Washington 4 3 .571 1 „ 4-3 L-3 0-1 4-2 Philadelphia 2 4 .333 3 1 2-4 W-1 1-0 1-4 Miami 2 5 .286 3 2 2-5 L-3 2-4 0-1 CENTRAL DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Pittsburgh 5 1 .833 „ „ 5-1 W-1 2-1 3-0 Milwaukee 4 3 .571 1 „ 4-3 L-2 1-3 3-0 Chicago 3 3 .500 2 3-3 W-1 0-0 3-3 St. Louis 3 4 .429 2 1 3-4 L-1 0-1 3-3 Cincinnati 1 4 .200 3 2 1-4 L-1 1-3 0-1 WEST DIVISION TEAM W L PCT. GB WCGB L10 STR HOME AWAY Arizona 6 1 .857 „ „ 6-1 W-4 5-1 1-0 Colorado 4 3 .571 2 „ 4-3 W-2 0-0 4-3 San Francisco 3 3 .500 2 3-3 W-1 1-1 2-2 Los Angeles 2 5 .286 4 2 2-5 L-3 2-2 0-3 San Diego 1 6 .143 5 3 1-6 L-2 1-6 0-0 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLMETS 8, NATIONALS 2 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Conforto cf 4 2 1 2 1 2 .250 Cabrera 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .292 Cespedes lf 4 2 1 1 1 3 .273 Bruce rf 4 2 2 4 0 0 .250 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .190 Gonzalez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .294 Plawecki c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .250 Reyes ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 deGrom p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .333 a-Nimmo ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .375 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Robles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --T OTALS 34 8 8 7 4 10 W ASHINGTON AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Eaton lf 1 2 1 0 1 0 .455 Goodwin lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .417 Rendon 3b 3 0 3 1 1 0 .290 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .286 Zimmerman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Kendrick 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .348 T urner ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .231 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Montero c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 S everino c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 S trasburg p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Difo ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 T aylor cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .143 T OTALS 32 2 6 1 3 11 NEW YORK 010 120 400 „ 8 8 1 W ASHINGTON 101 000 000 „ 2 6 0 a-doubled for deGrom in the 7th. bgrounded out for Robles in the 9th. c-”ied out for Doolittle in the 9th. E„Bruce (1). LOB„New York 4, Washington 6. 2B„Bruce (2), Nimmo (1), Eaton (3), Rendon 2 (2). HR„Cespedes (3), off S trasburg Conforto (1), off Strasburg Bruce (1), off Kintzler. RBIs„Conforto 2 (2), Cespedes (7), Bruce 4 (5), Rendon (4). Gonzalez) Washington 1 (Kendrick, Rendon, Zimmerman). NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom, W, 2-0 6 4 2 1 3 5 86 1.54 Blevins .2 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Gsellman .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Robles 1 1 0 0 0 3 21 0.00 Lugo 1 1 0 0 0 0 24 0.00 W ASHINGTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strsburg, L, 1-1 6 5 4 4 2 6 92 3.65 Kintzler 1 2 4 4 2 1 29 18.00 Madson 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 6.00 HBP„Strasburg (Cabrera). T „2:57. A„42,477 (41,313).RED SOX 3, RAYS 2, 12 INN. T AMPA BAY AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Duffy 3b 6 1 1 2 0 2 .259 Kiermaier cf 5 0 0 0 1 2 .071 Gomez rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .091 Cron dh 5 0 1 0 0 2 .190 Ramos c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .130 Miller 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Hechavarria ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Robertson 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .250 b-Span ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .222 W endle 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Refsnyder lf 0 0 0 0 2 0 .000 a-M.Smith ph-lf 1 1 0 0 1 0 .273 T OTALS 40 2 6 2 6 11 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 5 1 2 0 1 1 .346 Benintendi lf 4 1 1 0 2 0 .174 Ramirez 1b 6 0 2 2 0 2 .310 Martinez dh 5 0 2 0 0 1 .240 1-Swihart pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Bogaerts ss 4 0 1 1 1 1 .344 Devers 3b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .280 Nunez 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Bradley Jr. cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .136 V azquez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 T OTALS 41 3 10 3 6 9 T AMPA BAY 000 000 020 000 „ 2 6 0 BOSTON 000 000 002 001 „ 3 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-walked for Refsnyder in the 8th. b-singled f or Robertson in the 10th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 11th. LOB„Tampa Bay 9, Boston 11. 2B„ Robertson (1), Bogaerts (6), Bradley Jr. (2). 3B„Martinez (1). HR„Duffy (1), off C.Smith. RBIs„Duffy 2 (4), Ramirez 2 (6), Bogaerts (3). SB„Betts (2). S„M.Smith, GIDP„Ramos, Martinez. DP„Tampa Bay 2 (Ramos, Robertson), (Hechavarria, Miller) Boston 1 (Devers, Nunez, Ramirez). T AMPA BAY IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chirinos 5 3 0 0 0 4 54 0.00 Roe 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.70 Romo 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 3.86 A lvarado, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 2.25 Colome, BS, 1-2 1 4 2 2 2 0 29 9.00 Kittredge, L, 0-2 2.1 2 1 1 2 1 35 3.18 Y arbrough 0 1 0 0 1 0 9 2.25 BOSTON IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price 7 3 0 0 3 5 91 0.00 C.Smith 1 1 2 2 1 1 30 13.50 V elazquez 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 1.35 Kimbrel 1 1 0 0 2 2 23 0.00 Poyner, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 0 3 30 1.93 Inherited runners-scored„Yarbrough 2-1. PB„Ramos 2 (2). T „3:55. A„36,134 (37,731).PHILLIES 5, MARLINS 0 MIAMI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Brinson cf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .200 Dietrich lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Castro 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .313 Bour 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .192 Anderson 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .321 Maybin rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .320 Rojas ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Holaday c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111 b-Lee ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Smith p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 J.Garcia p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 c-Telis ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 TOTALS 31 0 4 0 0 12 PHILADELPHIA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hernandez 2b 2 1 1 0 3 0 .304 Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .136 Kingery rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Hoskins lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .400 Herrera cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .250 Franco 3b 4 1 3 4 0 0 .267 Alfaro c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .111 Pivetta p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „a-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .056 L.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Neris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .053 TOTALS 30 5 6 5 9 9 MIAMI 000 000 000 „ 0 4 1 PHILADELPHIA 201 000 20X „ 5 6 1 a-”ied out for Morgan in the 7th. b-reached on error for Holaday in the 8th. c-grounded out for J.Garcia in the 8th. E„Castro (1), Hernandez (2). LOB„Miami 4, Philadelphia 10. 2B„Anderson (2). 3B„Franco (1). HR„Franco (1), off J.Garcia. RBIs„Herrera (1), Franco 4 (5). SB„ Hernandez 2 (2), Kingery (1), Herrera (1). CS„Hernandez (1). GIDP„Telis. DP„Philadelphia 1 (Hernandez, Santana). MIAMI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith, L, 0-1 3 2 3 3 6 4 77 4.32 J.Garcia 4 4 2 2 2 2 73 1.80 Guerrero 1 0 0 0 1 3 27 8.31 PHILADELPHIA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, W, 1-0 5.2 4 0 0 0 9 97 2.79 Morgan, H, 3 1.1 0 0 0 0 1 10 5.40 L.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.25 Neris 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 10.12 Inherited runners-scored„Morgan 1-0. Umpires„Home, Paul Nauert First, Scott Barry Second, Carlos Torres Third, Kerwin Danley. T„3:03. A„44,488 (43,647).ROCKIES 3, PADRES 1 COLORADO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Blackmon cf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .345 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .320 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .240 Desmond lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .348 Story ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .154 Iannetta c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .389 Parra rf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .190 Valaika 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „c-Gonzalez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 McMahon 1b 1 0 0 1 1 0 .000 TOTALS 31 3 4 3 7 11 SAN DIEGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Margot cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .125 Pirela lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Hosmer 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Renfroe rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .286 Villanueva 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .231 Galvis ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Asuaje 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .280 Hedges c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Lucchesi p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Headley ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Maton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „b-Spangenberg ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „Lyles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 „TOTALS 31 1 6 1 0 8 COLORADO 000 000 003 „ 3 4 0 SAN DIEGO 000 000 001 „ 1 6 3 a-struck out for Lucchesi in the 5th. b-”ied out for Stammen in the 8th. c-struck out for Ottavino in the 9th. E„Villanueva (1), Asuaje (1), Hedges (1). LOB„Colorado 9, San Diego 3. HR„Margot (1), off Davis. RBIs„LeMahieu 2 (4), McMahon (1), Margot (2). SB„Blackmon (1). CS„Blackmon (1), Galvis (2). S„Parra COLORADO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 6 4 0 0 0 4 84 7.56 Ottavino, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Davis, S, 4-4 1 1 1 1 0 2 17 2.70 SAN DIEGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lucchesi 5 1 0 0 3 7 84 2.79 Maton 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Stammen 2 1 0 0 1 1 22 0.00 Hand, L, 0-2 .2 1 3 0 3 2 31 4.50 Lyles .1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Anderson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Ottavino 1-0, Lyles 2-0. T„2:58. A„20,509 (42,445).RANGERS 6, ATHLETICS 3 TEXAS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Choo dh 5 1 1 2 0 1 .296 Gallo 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Beltre 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .241 Mazara rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .357 Odor 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .167 Rua lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .100 Robinson cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .267 Centeno c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .250 TOTALS 35 6 10 4 2 4 OAKLAND AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Semien ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Pinder lf-cf 4 1 2 0 1 1 .308 Lowrie 2b 4 0 3 1 1 0 .313 Davis dh 3 0 0 1 0 2 .222 Olson 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Chapman 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .400 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Piscotty rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .222 Smolinski cf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 a-Joyce ph-lf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .217 TOTALS 35 3 12 3 2 5 TEXAS 040 000 002 „ 6 10 0 OAKLAND 002 001 000 „ 3 12 1 a-out on sacri“ce ”y for Smolinski in the 6th. E„Mengden (1). LOB„Texas 5, Oakland 10. 2B„Andrus (3), Beltre (3), Lowrie (3). HR„Choo (2), off Hatcher. RBIs„Choo 2 (3), Odor (4), Robinson (2), Lowrie (5), Davis (5), Joyce (1). CS„Andrus (1), Robinson (1). SF„Davis, Joyce. S„Rua. DP„Texas 1 (Odor, Andrus, Gallo). TEXAS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez, W, 1-0 5.1 10 3 3 0 1 76 5.06 Jepsen, H, 1 .2 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.50 Bush, H, 1 .1 1 0 0 1 1 12 2.70 Diekman, H, 1 .2 0 0 0 0 1 13 6.75 Martin, H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.15 Kela, S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 0.00 OAKLAND IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mngdn, L, 0-2 5.1 5 4 3 1 2 82 6.55 Coulombe 1.2 1 0 0 1 2 25 0.00 Pagan .2 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.38 Buchter .1 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Hatcher 1 2 2 2 0 0 16 10.80 Inherited runners-scored„Jepsen 2-1, Diekman 2-0, Coulombe 2-0, Buchter 1-0. HBP„Perez (Davis). T„3:10. A„10,132 (46,765).TWINS 4, MARINERS 2 SEATTLE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Gordon cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .400 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 1 1 .375 Cano 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .435 Haniger rf 5 0 0 1 0 1 .350 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .143 Vogelbach dh 3 0 2 1 1 0 .333 Healy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Suzuki lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 Freitas c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .200 b-Marjama ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 TOTALS 36 2 8 2 4 7 MINNESOTA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .308 Mauer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .333 Sano 3b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .280 Grossman dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Buxton cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .217 Kepler rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .286 LaMarre lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .600 a-Rosario ph-lf 2 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Adrianza ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .111 Garver c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .143 TOTALS 33 4 8 4 2 11 SEATTLE 200 000 000 „ 2 8 1 MINNESOTA 000 002 11X „ 4 8 2 a-struck out for LaMarre in the 6th. b-struck out for Freitas in the 8th. E„Haniger (1), Sano (1), Adrianza (1). LOB„Seattle 11, Minnesota 7. HR„Sano (3), off Paxton Garver (1), off Altavilla Rosario (1), off Vincent. RBIs„Haniger (6), Vogelbach (2), Sano 2 (7), Garver (1), Rosario (1). SB„Gordon (3), Segura (1). GIDP„Healy. DP„Minnesota 1 (Adrianza, Dozier, Mauer). SEATTLE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton 5 4 2 2 1 7 98 7.45 Altavilla, L, 0-1 1.1 3 1 1 0 3 23 3.00 Rzepczynski 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 Vincent 1.2 1 1 1 0 1 17 6.00 MINNESOTA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson 4.1 7 2 1 1 3 80 0.87 Rogers 1.2 0 0 0 1 0 21 0.00 Pressly .1 1 0 0 1 1 18 0.00 Duke, W, 1-0 .2 0 0 0 0 0 6 7.71 Reed, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 Rodney, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 3.38 Paxton pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Rzepczynski pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored„Rzepczynski 1-0, Vincent 2-0, Rogers 1-0, Duke 2-0. WP„ Paxton. PB„Freitas (1). T„3:09. A„39,214 (39,504).TIGERS 9, WHITE SOX 7, 10 INN.DETROIT AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Martin cf 6 1 2 2 0 1 .217 Candelario 3b 6 0 1 1 0 1 .185 Cabrera 1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Goodrum 1b 5 2 2 2 0 1 .286 Castellanos rf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .385 Martinez dh 4 0 3 2 1 0 .333 1-J.Jones pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 McCann c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Mahtook lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Iglesias ss 4 2 1 0 1 1 .100 Machado 2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .280 TOTALS 45 9 17 9 2 6 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Moncada 2b 6 0 0 0 0 4 .154 A.Garcia rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .333 Abreu 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .320 Davidson dh 3 4 2 1 2 0 .318 Sanchez 3b 5 0 3 3 0 1 .400 L.Garcia lf 5 0 2 2 0 1 .333 Anderson ss 3 1 1 0 2 2 .304 Narvaez c 4 0 1 0 1 1 .250 2-Saladino pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Engel cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .211 a-Delmonico ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .077 TOTALS 39 7 11 7 5 12 DETROIT 010 110 013 2 „ 9 17 0 CHICAGO 211 020 100 0 „ 7 11 1 a-hit by pitch for Engel in the 10th. 1-ran for Martinez in the 9th. 2-ran for Narvaez in the 10th. E„Abreu (1). LOB„Detroit 9, Chicago 9. 2B„Martinez (2), Machado 2 (5), A.Garcia (2), Davidson (1), L.Garcia (1), Narvaez (1). 3B„Sanchez 2 (2). HR„Goodrum (1), off Soria. RBIs„Martin 2 (2), Candelario (1), Martinez 2 (5), Mahtook (1), Machado (5), Goodrum 2 (3), Davidson (8), Sanchez 3 (7), L.Garcia 2 (2), Engel (2). SB„Goodrum (1), Anderson (4). CS„Martin (1). SF„Mahtook, Engel. Runners moved up„Castellanos 2, Machado, Narvaez. GIDP„Iglesias, Goodrum. DP„Chicago 2 (Sanchez, Abreu), (Bummer, Sanchez, Abreu). DETROIT IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimmermann 4.1 9 6 6 1 3 75 8.71 Saupold .1 1 0 0 1 0 12 0.00 Norris 3.1 1 1 1 2 6 50 2.70 Jimenez, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Greene, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 3 19 6.75 CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 5 8 3 3 1 1 91 5.73 Farquhar, H, 1 1.1 0 0 0 0 3 23 3.86 Avilan, H, 2 .2 0 0 0 0 2 11 4.50 N.Jones 1 3 1 1 0 0 24 2.70 Soria, BS, .1 1 4 3 3 0 0 29 9.00 Infante, L, 0-1 .1 1 2 2 1 0 13 37.80 Bummer .2 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Inherited runners-scored„Saupold 1-1, Norris 2-0, Bummer .2. HBP„Greene (Delmonico). Umpires„Home, Marvin Hudson First, James Hoye Second, Jeff Kellogg Third, Chris Segal. T„4:03. A„33,318 (40,615).PIRATES 5, REDS 2 CINCINNATI AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Hamilton cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .063 Suarez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Duvall lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .176 Gennett 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .429 Winker rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .182 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Gosselin ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500 Peraza ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .063 Barnhart c 1 0 0 0 3 0 .333 Bailey p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Quackenbush p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ervin rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 TOTALS 31 2 5 1 5 7 PITTSBURGH AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Harrison 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .333 Polanco rf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .286 Marte cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .227 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .375 Dickerson lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .238 Freese 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .333 Cervelli c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Mercer ss 2 1 1 0 2 0 .200 Brault p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Santana p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Moran ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Rivero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 33 5 9 4 4 4 CINCINNATI 010 000 010 „ 2 5 1 PITTSBURGH 001 040 00X „ 5 9 0 a-grounded out for Santana in the 6th. blined out for Kontos in the 8th. c-singled for Brice in the 9th. E„Peraza (1). LOB„Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 9. 2B„Dickerson (1), Cervelli (2), Mercer (1). 3B„Dickerson (1). HR„Duvall (2), off Kontos Polanco (2), off Bailey. RBIs„ Duvall (6), Polanco 3 (9), Dickerson (2). SF„Polanco. DP„Pittsburgh 1 (Harrison, Bell). CINCINNATI IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bailey, L, 0-2 4.2 7 5 4 3 2 84 4.22 Quackenbush .2 1 0 0 0 0 8 18.00 Garrett 1.2 1 0 0 0 2 23 0.00 Brice 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 3.00 PITTSBURGH IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Brault, W, 2-0 5 3 1 1 4 4 80 1.12 Santana 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 6.75 Feliz 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 12.00 Kontos 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 2.25 Rivero, S, 3-3 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 9.82 Inherited runners-scored„Quackenbush 1-0, Garrett 1-0. WP„Brault 2. T„2:47. A„9,227 (38,362).ORIOLES 5, YANKEES 2 BALTIMORE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Mancini lf 5 0 3 2 0 1 .240 Gentry lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Machado ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .300 Jones cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Davis 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .080 Beckham 3b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .185 Rasmus dh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .111 Santander rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .143 Sisco c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .231 TOTALS 36 5 10 5 1 13 NEW YORK AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Gardner cf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .172 Judge rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .280 Stanton lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .185 Gregorius ss 1 1 1 0 2 0 .391 Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Walker 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .250 Austin dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Wade 2b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .176 Andujar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Drury ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 TOTALS 29 2 4 2 6 8 BALTIMORE 000 000 500 „ 5 10 0 NEW YORK 000 001 100 „ 2 4 0 a-struck out for Andujar in the 9th. LOB„Baltimore 5, New York 8. 2B„Jones (1), Santander (2), Gregorius (5), Wade (2). HR„Jones (3), off Tanaka Judge (2), off Cashner. RBIs„Mancini 2 (4), Jones 2 (7), Santander (1), Judge (4), Walker (2). SB„ Santander (1). CS„Gregorius (1). DP„Baltimore 1 (Schoop, Machado, Davis). BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner, W, 1-1 6 2 1 1 3 5 100 4.09 Givens .2 2 1 1 1 0 26 6.75 ODay, H, 2 1.1 0 0 0 1 1 28 0.00 Brach, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.91 NEW YORK IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tanaka, L, 1-1 6.1 6 3 3 0 7 93 2.92 Green .2 3 2 2 0 2 20 4.50 Warren 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.86 Betances 1 0 0 0 1 3 18 6.75 Inherited runners-scored„ODay 2-0, Green 1-1. HBP„ODay 2 (Gregorius,Sanchez). T„3:15. A„33,653 (54,251).DIAMONDBACKS 3, CARDINALS 1 ARIZONA AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Peralta lf 3 0 2 2 1 0 .346 Marte ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .207 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .091 Pollock cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Descalso 3b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .250 Avila c 5 0 0 0 0 4 .125 Owings 2b 3 2 3 0 1 0 .429 Dyson rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Ray p 1 0 0 1 0 0 .000 Hirano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Cha“n p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bradley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 34 3 9 3 5 9 ST. LOUIS AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Fowler rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .133 Pham cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Carpenter 2b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .182 Ozuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Martinez 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .333 Molina c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .259 DeJong ss 4 0 0 0 0 4 .385 Munoz 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .125 Wainwright p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bowman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Bader ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Sherriff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Leone p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Garcia ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lyons p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --TOTALS 29 1 2 1 5 13 ARIZONA 020 100 000 „ 3 9 1 ST. LOUIS 000 100 000 „ 1 2 1 a-walked for Bowman in the 5th. b-popped out for Leone in the 7th. c-struck out for Hirano in the 8th. E„Goldschmidt (1), DeJong (1). LOB„ Arizona 12, St. Louis 6. 2B„Peralta (1), Pollock (5), Owings (2), Molina (1). 3B„ Descalso (1). RBIs„Peralta 2 (4), Ray (1), Molina (6). SF„Ray. S„Ray. GIDP„Pham. DP„Arizona 1 (Marte, Owings, Goldschmidt). ARIZONA IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray, W, 2-0 6 2 1 1 5 9 98 5.73 Hirano, H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.08 Cha“n, H, 1 .2 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.38 Bradley, H, 4 .1 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.59 Bxberger, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 ST. LOUIS IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wnwrght, L, 0-1 3.2 4 3 3 4 3 89 7.36 Bowman 1.1 1 0 0 1 1 31 6.75 Sherriff .2 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.38 Leone 1.1 2 0 0 0 2 18 4.91 Lyons 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 6.00 Hicks 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Inherited runners-scored„Bradley 1-0, Bowman 2-0, Leone 1-0. HBP„Lyons (Peralta). WP„Hicks. T„3:32. A„46,512 (45,538).CUBS 8, BREWERS 0 CHICAGO AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Happ lf 6 1 1 0 0 4 .136 Zobrist rf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .375 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Butler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bryant 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .346 Rizzo 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .107 Contreras c 4 1 3 0 1 0 .280 Almora cf 5 2 1 1 0 1 .176 Russell ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .304 Baez 2b 1 2 1 2 3 0 .158 Lester p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 b-Schwarber ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Heyward rf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .278 TOTALS 42 8 13 7 4 9 MILWAUKEE AB R H BI BB SO AVG. Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .310 Santana rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Braun lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Shaw 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .310 Sogard 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Aguilar 1b-3b 4 0 3 0 0 1 .500 Perez 2b-3b-p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Arcia ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Bandy c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Suter p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Villar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pina 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 TOTALS 30 0 4 0 1 11 CHICAGO 032 000 012 „ 8 13 0 MILWAUKEE 000 000 000 „ 0 4 3 a-grounded out for Suter in the 5th. bgrounded out for Lester in the 7th. c-”ied out for Jennings in the 8th. d-lined out for Cishek in the 9th. E„Cain (1), Perez 2 (2). LOB„Chicago 12, Milwaukee 5. 2B„Contreras (2), Russell (3), Braun (1), Aguilar (1). 3B„Almora (1). HR„Heyward (1), off Knebel. RBIs„Bryant (5), Almora (1), Russell (1), Baez 2 (3), Heyward 2 (4). SB„Happ (1), Braun (1). CS„Braun (1). CHICAGO IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester, W, 1-0 6 3 0 0 1 6 89 2.89 Edwards 1 1 0 0 0 3 16 3.00 Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Butler 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.12 MILWAUKEE IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perez .1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Suter, L, 1-1 5 8 5 4 3 5 96 6.30 Barnes 2 1 0 0 1 2 32 0.00 Jennings 1 3 1 1 0 1 16 1.93 Knebel .2 1 2 2 0 1 21 10.12 HBP„Lester (Bandy), Knebel (Baez). PB„ Bandy (1). T„2:52. A„24,310 (41,900).BOX SCORES ROUNDUP/MATCHUPSPhillies 5, Marlins 0: Gabe Kapler got booed twice, Nick Pivetta received a standing ovation and the Philadelphia Phillies won their home opener. Rockies 3, Padres 1: Ryan McMahon drew a bases-loaded walk off All-Star closer Brad Hand to break a scoreless tie in the ninth inning and The Rockies took three of four. Mets 8, Nationals 2: In his “rst regular-season game since August, Michael Conforto came off the disabled list to hit a tiebreaking, tworun homer off Stephen Strasburg. Tigers 9, White Sox 7, 10 inn.: Niko Goodrum hit a two-run homer after replacing the injured Miguel Cabrera. Red Sox 3, Rays 2, 12 inn.: Hanley Ramirez blooped a bases-loaded ”y ball over the drawn-in out“eld in right to break a 12th-inning tie and the Red Sox, who rallied from a tworun de“cit in the ninth, earned their sixth straight victory. Rangers 6, Athletics 3: Martin Perez pitched into the sixth inning of his “rst start of the season. Twins 4, Mariners 2: Mitch Garver hit the go-ahead home run in the sev enth in the Twins home opener. Orioles 5, Yankees 2: Adam Jones hit a go-ahead home run, Andrew Cashner pitched six strong innings and the Baltimore Orioles snapped a “ve-game losing streak. Pirates 5, Reds 2: Gregory Polanco hit a two-run home run during a four-run “fth inning to lift Pittsburgh over Cincinnati. Diamondbacks 3, Cardinals 1: Robbie Ray worked around “ve walks over six innings and the Arizona bullpen closed out a two-hitter. Cubs 8, Brewers 0: Jon Lester pitched six shutout innings to lead Chicago over Milwaukee.TODAYS PITCHING COMPARISONNATIONAL LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Atlanta McCarthy (R) 1-0 3.38 1-0 0-0 5.0 12.60 Colorado Marquez (R) 4:10p 0-0 0.00 1-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 Cincinnati Castillo (R) 0-1 10.80 0-1 0-1 11.0 2.45 Pittsburgh Williams (R) 7:05p 1-0 0.00 1-0 1-0 16.1 3.31 Chicago Hendricks (R) 0-0 1.50 0-1 1-1 28.0 4.18 Milwaukee Woodruff (R) 8:10p 0-0 5.40 0-0 0-0 5.0 7.20 Los Angeles Maeda (R) 1-0 0.00 1-0 0-0 3.0 12.00 San Francisco Holland (L) 10:15p 0-1 5.40 0-1 0-0 0.0 0.00AMERICAN LEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA Kansas City Duffy (L) 0-1 11.25 0-1 0-3 15.2 4.60 Cleveland Carrasco (R) 4:10p 1-0 7.94 1-0 2-1 18.0 4.50 Baltimore Gausman (R) 0-1 13.50 0-1 1-2 22.1 9.27 New York Sabathia (L) 7:05p 0-0 1.80 0-1 0-0 17.0 7.41 Toronto Estrada (R) 0-0 3.86 1-0 1-0 9.2 6.52 Texas Moore (L) 8:05p 0-1 9.00 0-1 0-0 0.0 0.00 Oakland Gossett (R) 0-1 9.00 0-1 0-1 6.2 2.70 Los Angeles Bridwell (R) 10:07p 0-0 0.00 0-0 0-0 6.0 19.50INTERLEAGUE 2018 TEAM 2017 VS OPP PITCHERS TIME W-L ERA REC W-L IP ERA San Diego Perdomo (R) 0-1 11.25 0-1 0-0 0.0 0.00 Houston McCullers Jr. (R) 8:10p 1-0 3.38 1-0 0-0 0.0 0.00 KEY: TEAM REC-Teams Record in games started by todays pitcher. VS OPP-Pitchers record versus this opponent. WEDNESDAYS GAMES American League Kansas City at Detroit, ppd. N.Y. Yankees 7, Tampa Bay 2 Houston 3, Baltimore 2 L.A. Angels 3, Cleveland 2, 13 innings Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 3 Oakland 6, Texas 2 National League Atlanta 7, Washington 1 N.Y. Mets 4, Philadelphia 2 Arizona 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 0 Colorado 5, San Diego 2 Interleague Minnesota 7, Pittsburgh 3 San Francisco 10, Seattle 1 SATURDAYS GAMES American League Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Boston, 1:05 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:10 p.m. Toronto at Texas, 8:05 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 9:07 p.m. National League N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. Atlanta at Colorado, 8:10 p.m. Interleague San Diego at Houston, 7:10 p.m.BASEBALL CALENDARAPRIL 17-18: Cleveland vs. Minnesota at San Juan, Puerto Rico. MAY 16-17: Owners meetings, New York. JUNE 4: Amateur draft starts. JUNE 15: International amateur signing period closes. JULY 2: International amateur signing period opens. JULY 6: Last day to sign for amateur draft picks subject to deadline. JULY 17: All-Star Game, Washington. JULY 29: Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y. JULY 31: Last day to trade a player without securing waivers. OCT. .2: Wild-card games. DEC. 10-13: Winter meetings, Las Vegas. TOP TEN A MERICAN LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Correa Hou 6 19 7 9 .474 Cano Sea 6 23 6 10 .435 Altuve Hou 7 29 7 12 .414 MChapman Oak 8 30 5 12 .400 Cuthbert KC 4 10 1 4 .400 DGordon Sea 6 25 4 10 .400 YSanchez ChW 6 20 3 8 .400 Castellanos Det 6 26 8 10 .385 Smoak Tor 7 26 5 10 .385 Simmons LAA 7 29 5 11 .379 Home Runs Dozier, Minnesota, 4; Davidson, Chicago, 4; Sano, Minnesota, 3; Anderson, Chicago, 3; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 3; Stanton, New York, 3; 20 tied at 2. NATIONAL LEAGUE Player G AB R H Pct. Eaton Was 6 22 10 10 .455 RFlaherty Atl 6 23 6 10 .435 Gennett Cin 5 21 1 9 .429 Owings Ari 7 21 7 9 .429 Tucker Atl 6 21 4 9 .429 FFreeman Atl 6 19 9 8 .421 Hoskins Phi 6 20 3 8 .400 DeJong StL 7 26 5 10 .385 Yelich Mil 6 26 6 10 .385 Panik SF 6 21 4 8 .381 Home Runs Harper, Washington, 4; Blackmon, Colorado, 4; Cespedes, New York, 3; Villanueva, San Diego, 3; Panik, San Francisco, 3; Molina, St. Louis, 3; DeJong, St. Louis, 3; 10 tied at 2.

PAGE 21

** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 C5 SCOREBOARD Baseball North Bay Haven at Bozeman 6:30 p.m. Bay at South Walton 6:30 p.m. Tennis Rutherford at West Florida 3:30 p.m. Mosley at North Bay Haven 3:30 p.m. Softball North Bay Haven at Pensacola Catholic 6 p.m. Boys weightlifting State 1A meet, Arnold 10 a.m.AREA EVENTSToday AUTO RACING Noon FS1 [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, OReilly Auto Parts 500, practice, at Fort Worth, Texas 1 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, X“ nity Series, My Bariatric Solutions 300, practice, at Fort Worth, Texas 3 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, X“ nity Series, My Bariatric Solutions 300, “ nal practice, at Fort Worth, Texas 4:30 p.m. FS1 [„] NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, OReilly Auto Parts 500, qualifying, at Fort Worth, Texas 7 p.m. NBCSN [„] IndyCar, Desert Diamond West Valley Casino Phoenix Grand Prix, qualifying, at Avondale, Ariz. COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 [„] 2018 College Basketball Awards, at Los Angeles DRAG RACING 6 p.m. FS1 [„] NHRA, Denso Spark Plugs Four-Wide Nationals, qualifying, at Las Vegas GOLF 2 p.m. ESPN [„] The Masters, second round, at Augusta, Ga. 10:35 p.m. CBS [„] The Masters, highlights, second round, at Augusta, Ga. MLB 3 p.m. MLB [„] Regional coverage, Kansas City at Cleveland OR Atlanta at Colorado 6 p.m. MLB [„] Regional coverage, Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees OR Cincinnati at Pittsburgh NBA 6 p.m. NBA [„] Cleveland at Philadelphia 9:30 p.m. NBA [„] Minnesota at L.A. Lakers NHL 9 p.m. NBCSN [„] Dallas at Anaheim SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FS2 [„] Bundesliga, Hannover vs. Werder Bremen RUGBY 5 p.m. NBCSN [„] English Premiership, Sale vs. Wasps (same-day tape)ON AIRBOSTONCeltics Irving needs knee surgery, out for playoffsThe Boston Celtics have spent most of the season adjusting on the fly. Now they will have to go through the playoffs without Kyrie Irving.The star point guard will need surgery on his left knee and is done for season. On Thursday, the team put his recovery time at four to five months.Irving hasnt played since March 11.In the upcoming sur-gery, two screws will be removed. This is Irvings first season in Boston after he demanded to be traded from Cleveland. And the player he was dealt for, Isaiah Thomas, is out for the season following hip surgery. Masters patrons hurt when bus overturnsA charter bus headed to the Masters golf tournament overturned on a Georgia interstate Thursday, injuring 15 people and snarling traf-fic as scores of fans made the pilgrimage to one of the sports premier events. The bus driver was charged with driv-ing under the influence.The bus carrying 18 passengers crashed about 8:45 a.m. Thursday, just as fans were driving in for the tournaments first round. Sgt. Chris Wright of the Georgia State Patrol said the driver ran off the right side, then overcor-rected and caused the bus to overturn in the median. Some passengers suffered broken bones and head injuries, Wright said, but none were life-threatening.The bus driver, 61-year-old Steven F. Hoppenbrouwer of Gwinnett County, Georgia, was charged with DUI and failure to maintain lane.TOKYOWomen “ rst responders ordered out of sumo ringThe head of Japans sumo association has apologized over an inci-dent in which women first responders were asked to get out of the ring as they attempted to revive an official who collapsed.In sumos tradition, the ring is considered sacred and women are prohibited from entering.That posed a problem Wednesday when Ryozo Tatami, the 67-yearold mayor of Maizuru in northern Kyoto, col-lapsed during a ring-top speech. Two women, apparently medical experts, rushed in and started performing first aid as several male sumo officials surrounding the mayor looked on.When two more women rose to the ring trying to join the first aid effort, announcements demanded the women get out of the ring.Ladies, please get off the ring,Ž a sumo ref-eree said, determinedly. Only gentlemen go up.ŽFootage posted on social media triggered outrage, with many criti-cizing sumo officials and saying they were choosing tradition over life. The Associated PressIN BRIEF EBRO SCHEDULE SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:50 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:50 a.m., Keeneland 12:05 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30, Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 12:05 p.m., Aqueduct 11:50 a.m., Keene1and 12:05 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:50 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 12:05 p.m., Keeneland 12:05 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Aqueduct 11:50 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 12:05 p.m., Keeneland 12:05 p.m., Santa Anita 2 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 12:05 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:50 a.m., Keeneland 12:05 p.m., Santa Anita 1:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION… 234-3943. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINEMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLToday National LeagueFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINEChicago -138 at Milwaukee +128 at Colorado -151 Atlanta +141 at Pittsburgh -110 Cincinnati +100 Los Angeles -141 at San Fran. +131American Leagueat Cleveland -212 Kansas City +192 at New York -167 Baltimore +157 Toronto -115 at Texas +105 at Los Angeles -142 Oakland +132Interleagueat Houston -248 San Diego +228NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONTodayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG at Boston 10 201 Chicago Charlotte 5 211 at Orlando at Detroit Off Off Dallas at Washington Off Off Atlanta at Philadelphia 3 223 Cleveland at Toronto 8 208 Indiana Miami 9 209 at New York at Memphis Off Off Sacramento New Orleans 10 220 at Phoenix at L.A. Lakers Off Off MinnesotaNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE St. Louis -152 at Chicago +142 at Pittsburgh Off Ottawa Off at Tampa Bay -350 Buffalo +320 at Anaheim Off Dallas Off Updated odds available at Pregame.com PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times CentralEASTERN CONFERENCEATLANTIC DIVISION W L PCT. GB x-Toronto 56 22 .718 „ x-Boston 53 25 .679 3 x-Philadelphia 48 30 .615 8 New York 27 51 .346 29 Brooklyn 26 53 .329 30 SOUTHEAST DIVISION W L PCT GB x-Miami 43 36 .544 „ x-Washington 42 37 .532 1 Charlotte 34 45 .430 9 Orlando 24 54 .308 18 Atlanta 22 57 .278 21 CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT GB x-Cleveland 49 30 .620 „ x-Indiana 47 32 .595 2 x-Milwaukee 42 37 .532 7 Detroit 37 41 .474 11 Chicago 27 51 .346 21WESTERN CONFERENCESOUTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB z-Houston 64 15 .810 „ San Antonio 45 34 .570 19 New Orleans 44 34 .564 19 Dallas 24 55 .304 40 Memphis 21 57 .269 42 NORTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB x-Portland 48 31 .608 „ Utah 45 33 .577 2 Oklahoma City 45 34 .570 3 Minnesota 44 34 .564 3 Denver 43 35 .551 4 PACIFIC DIVISION W L PCT GB y-Golden State 57 22 .722 „ L.A. Clippers 42 36 .538 14 L.A. Lakers 34 44 .436 22 Sacramento 25 54 .316 32 Phoenix 20 59 .253 37x-clinched playoff berth; y-won division; z-clinched conferenceWednesdays GamesOrlando 105, Dallas 100 Philadelphia 115, Detroit 108 Miami 115, Atlanta 86 New Orleans 123, Memphis 95 Toronto 96, Boston 78 L.A. Lakers 122, San Antonio 112, OTThursdays GamesIndiana 126, Golden State 106 Brooklyn 119, Milwaukee 111 Houston 96, Portland 94 Cleveland 119, Washington 115 L.A. Clippers at Utah, late Minnesota at Denver, lateTodays GamesAtlanta at Washington, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 6 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Miami at New York, 6:30 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.Saturdays GamesDenver at L.A. Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Milwaukee at New York, 6:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Chicago, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 8 p.m.Sundays GamesAtlanta at Boston, 12 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 12 p.m. Indiana at Charlotte, 12 p.m. Detroit at Memphis, 2:30 p.m. Orlando at Toronto, 5 p.m. Utah at L.A. Lakers, 5 p.m. Golden State at Phoenix, 8 p.m.PACERS 126, WARRIORS 106GOLDEN STATE (106) Durant 8-23 9-9 27, Green 3-3 2-2 9, McGee 3-4 0-0 6, Cook 5-12 0-0 12, Thompson 6-16 0-0 16, Bell 2-3 0-0 4, Looney 3-5 0-0 6, West 1-2 2-2 4, Pachulia 1-1 3-4 5, Jones 3-4 1-1 7, Livingston 2-6 2-2 6, N.Young 0-4 4-4 4. Totals 37-83 23-24 106. INDIANA (126) Bogdanovic 11-13 0-0 28, T.Young 7-11 2-4 16, Turner 3-9 2-2 8, Collison 6-8 2-2 15, Oladipo 9-17 0-0 21, Robinson III 1-2 0-0 2, Leaf 0-0 0-0 0, Booker 2-5 0-0 4, Sabonis 4-11 4-5 13, J.Young 2-3 0-0 5, Joseph 2-8 0-0 5, Stephenson 3-6 1-2 9. Totals 50-93 11-15 126.GOLDEN STATE 26 25 26 29 „ 106 INDIANA 27 35 35 29 „ 1263-Point Goals„Golden State 9-29 (Thompson 4-9, Cook 2-5, Durant 2-10, Green 1-1, N.Young 0-4), Indiana 15-29 (Bogdanovic 6-7, Oladipo 3-5, Stephenson 2-2, Collison 1-1, J.Young 1-1, Sabonis 1-2, Joseph 1-3, Robinson III 0-1, Booker 0-1, T.Young 0-2, Turner 0-4). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Golden State 39 (Thompson 7), Indiana 47 (Sabonis 9). Assists„ Golden State 29 (Durant 7), Indiana 32 (Oladipo 7). Total Fouls„Golden State 14, Indiana 24. Technicals„Golden State coach Steve Kerr, Oladipo. A„17,923 (18,500).NETS 119, BUCKS 111BROOKLYN (119) Harris 6-8 2-2 17, Hollis-Jefferson 3-6 8-8 14, Allen 2-6 0-0 4, Russell 9-16 0-1 22, Crabbe 8-14 4-5 25, Acy 3-6 0-0 9, Mozgov 2-2 2-2 6, Dinwiddie 3-7 1-1 9, LeVert 5-10 1-2 13, Stauskas 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-75 18-21 119. MILWAUKEE (111) Middleton 9-14 11-11 31, Antetokounmpo 7-21 5-5 19, Henson 6-8 0-4 12, Bledsoe 6-13 4-4 18, Snell 0-2 0-0 0, Parker 6-21 1-2 13, Zeller 4-5 0-0 8, Terry 0-2 0-0 0, Muhammad 1-4 3-4 5, Brown 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 41-93 24-30 111.BROOKLYN 30 22 31 36 „ 119 MILWAUKEE 24 21 36 30 „ 1113-Point Goals„Brooklyn 19-39 (Crabbe 5-10, Russell 4-10, Acy 3-5, Harris 3-5, LeVert 2-3, Dinwiddie 2-5, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1), Milwaukee 5-20 (Middleton 2-3, Bledsoe 2-6, Brown 1-2, Snell 0-1, Terry 0-1, Antetokounmpo 0-3, Parker 0-4). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Brooklyn 41 (Hollis-Jefferson 11), Milwaukee 41 (Antetokounmpo, Parker 10). Assists„Brooklyn 30 (Dinwiddie, Harris 6), Milwaukee 21 (Antetokounmpo 7). Total Fouls„Brooklyn 21, Milwaukee 19. A„18,378 (18,717).ROCKETS 96, TRAIL BLAZERS 94PORTLAND (94) Turner 4-6 0-0 10, Aminu 2-4 0-0 4, Nurkic 7-12 0-3 14, Napier 2-9 3-3 8, McCollum 7-25 0-0 16, Layman 2-3 0-0 4, Swanigan 3-4 4-5 10, Leonard 1-1 0-0 2, Papagiannis 1-1 0-0 2, Collins 0-4 1-2 1, Connaughton 4-6 1-1 9, Baldwin IV 6-10 0-0 14. Totals 39-85 9-14 94. HOUSTON (96) Ariza 4-8 0-0 10, Tucker 1-5 0-0 3, Capela 4-6 3-4 11, Paul 11-19 2-2 27, Harden 7-13 7-10 24, Black 1-2 0-2 2, Mbah a Moute 2-5 3-6 9, Green 2-9 0-0 6, Johnson 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 34-73 15-24 96.PORTLAND 17 27 27 23 „ 94 HOUSTON 36 30 18 12 „ 963-Point Goals„Portland 7-22 (Turner 2-2, Baldwin IV 2-3, McCollum 2-9, Napier 1-5, Connaughton 0-1, Layman 0-1, Collins 0-1), Houston 13-37 (Harden 3-6, Paul 3-8, Mbah a Moute 2-4, Ariza 2-5, Green 2-7, Tucker 1-4, Johnson 0-3). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„ Portland 47 (Nurkic 11), Houston 38 (Capela 10). Assists„Portland 16 (McCollum 4), Houston 16 (Harden 7). Total Fouls„Portland 20, Houston 16. A„18,055 (18,055).CAVALIERS 119, WIZARDS 111WASHINGTON (115) Porter Jr. 8-13 2-2 18, Morris 7-12 1-1 15, Gortat 5-9 0-0 10, Wall 10-20 6-6 28, Beal 7-15 1-1 19, Satoransky 2-4 0-0 5, Oubre Jr. 2-9 2-4 6, Scott 5-9 0-0 12, Mahinmi 1-3 0-0 2, Meeks 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 47-94 12-14 115. CLEVELAND (119) James 12-20 7-10 33, Green 8-10 3-3 21, Love 5-10 2-2 16, Osman 2-3 2-2 8, Hood 3-6 5-7 11, Nance Jr. 1-5 1-2 3, Thompson 0-0 0-0 0, Clarkson 5-12 0-0 10, JR Smith 2-4 0-0 4, Korver 4-7 2-2 13. Totals 42-77 22-28 119.WASHINGTON 26 28 36 25 „ 115 CLEVELAND 39 20 23 37 „ 1193-Point Goals„Washington 9-21 (Beal 4-6, Scott 2-2, Wall 2-5, Satoransky 1-1, Morris 0-2, Oubre Jr. 0-2, Porter Jr. 0-3), Cleveland 13-27 (Love 4-6, Korver 3-5, Green 2-3, Osman 2-3, James 2-7, Hood 0-1, Clarkson 0-2). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Washington 41 (Beal 9), Cleveland 35 (Nance Jr. 10). Assists„ Washington 34 (Wall 14), Cleveland 26 (James 14). Total Fouls„Washington 23, Cleveland 14. A„20,562 (20,562). PRO HOCKEY NHLEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Tampa Bay 80 53 23 4 110 287 228 x-Boston 80 49 19 12 110 263 208 x-Toronto 81 48 26 7 103 273 230 Florida 80 42 30 8 92 240 241 Detroit 81 30 39 12 72 214 251 Montreal 81 29 39 13 71 207 260 Ottawa 80 28 41 11 67 219 282 Buffalo 80 25 43 12 62 191 269Metropolitan Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA y-Washington 81 48 26 7 103 254 236 x-Pittsburgh 81 46 29 6 98 268 250 Columbus 81 45 29 7 97 240 226 New Jersey 81 44 28 9 97 245 239 Philadelphia 81 41 26 14 96 246 243 Carolina 81 35 35 11 81 225 254 N.Y. Islanders 81 34 37 10 78 260 293 N.Y. Rangers 81 34 38 9 77 231 263WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Nashville 81 52 18 11 115 263 209 x-Winnipeg 81 51 20 10 112 273 217 x-Minnesota 80 44 26 10 98 243 224 Colorado 80 42 29 9 93 250 231 St. Louis 80 43 31 6 92 220 216 Dallas 80 41 31 8 90 228 218 Chicago 80 33 37 10 76 227 248Paci“ c Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA y-Vegas 80 51 22 7 109 268 217 x-San Jose 80 44 26 10 98 245 221 x-Anaheim 80 42 25 13 97 227 213 x-Los Angeles 80 44 28 8 96 232 195 Calgary 81 36 35 10 82 211 247 Edmonton 80 34 40 6 74 227 258 Vancouver 80 30 40 10 70 212 258 Arizona 80 29 40 11 69 205 249 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division. 2 points for a win, 1 for OT loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffsWednesdays GamesOttawa 4, Buffalo 2 Chicago 4, St. Louis 3 Anaheim 3, Minnesota 1Thursdays GamesPittsburgh 5, Columbus 4, OT Nashville 4, Washington 3 Philadelphia 4, Carolina 3 New Jersey 2, Toronto 1 N.Y. Islanders 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Montreal 4, Detroit 3 Florida 3, Boston 2 Winnipeg 2, Calgary 1 Vegas at Edmonton, late Arizona at Vancouver, late Minnesota at Los Angeles, late Colorado at San Jose, lateTodays GamesOttawa at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Anaheim, 9 p.m.Saturdays GamesN.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Detroit, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 6 p.m. Chicago at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Boston, 6 p.m. Montreal at Toronto, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Florida, 6 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Colorado, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m. Vegas at Calgary, 9 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.Sundays GameFlorida at Boston, 6:30 p.m.ISLANDERS 2, RANGERS 1N.Y. RANGERS 1 0 0 „ 1 N.Y. ISLANDERS 0 2 0 „ 2 First Period„1, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 25 (Zuccarello, Skjei), 4:25 (pp). Penalties„Hickey, NYI, (hooking), 2:53. Second Period„2, N.Y. Islanders, Hickey 5 (Barzal), 4:55. 3, N.Y. Islanders, Beauvillier 21 (Ladd, Nelson), 7:27. Penalties„OGara, NYR, (holding), 2:04; Lee, NYI, (slashing), 14:21. Third Period„None. Penalties„Prince, NYI, major (high sticking), 4:19; Spooner, NYR, (slashing), 7:09. Shots on Goal„N.Y. Rangers 8-13-14„35. N.Y. Islanders 8-5-9„22. Power -play opportunities„N.Y. Rangers 1 of 4; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 2. Goalies„N.Y. Rangers, Pavelec 4-8-1 (22 shots-20 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 19-26-6 (35-34). A„14,152 (15,795). T„2:17. Referees„TJ Luxmore, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen„ Scott Cherrey, Scott Driscoll.DEVILS 2, MAPLE LEAFS 1TORONTO 1 0 0 „ 1 NEW JERSEY 0 2 0 „ 2 First Period„1, Toronto, Nylander 20 (Marleau, Matthews), 6:56 (pp). Penalties„Hischier, NJ, (tripping), 6:44; Noesen, NJ, (tripping), 9:33. Second Period„2, New Jersey, Zacha 8 (Maroon), 7:55. 3, New Jersey, Wood 18 (Maroon), 17:02. Penalties„Nylander, TOR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 3:52. Third Period„None. Penalties„Marner, TOR, (tripping), 19:29. Shots on Goal„Toronto 9-11-12„32. New Jersey 14-14-11„39. Power -play opportunities„Toronto 1 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 2. Goalies„Toronto, Andersen 37-21-5 (39 shots-37 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 26-10-3 (32-31). A„16,514 (16,514). T„2:29. Referees„Gord Dwyer, Brad Meier. Linesmen„ Matt MacPherson, Kory Nagy.FLYERS 4, HURRICANES 3CAROLINA 2 0 1 „ 3 PHILADELPHIA 1 1 2 „ 4 First Period„1, Carolina, Dahlbeck 1 (Ryan, Skinner), 13:45. 2, Philadelphia, Raf” 12, 14:38. 3, Carolina, Aho 29 (Teravainen, Zykov), 14:52. Penalties„Konecny, PHI, (holding), 11:53; McGinn, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 11:53. Second Period„4, Philadelphia, Provorov 16 (Gostisbehere, Couturier), 14:56. Penalties„ Manning, PHI, (slashing), 9:57; Skinner, CAR, (interference), 9:57; Voracek, PHI, (high sticking), 11:48. Third Period„5, Philadelphia, Giroux 31 (Gostisbehere, Couturier), 10:18. 6, Carolina, Staal 18 (McKeown, Williams), 13:41. 7, Philadelphia, Voracek 20 (Patrick, Gudas), 14:15. Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„Carolina 7-6-9„22. Philadelphia 15-13-6„34. Power -play opportunities„Carolina 0 of 1; Philadelphia 0 of 0. Goalies„Carolina, Darling 13-21-7 (34 shots-30 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 22-11-7 (22-19). A„20,001 (19,543). T„2:28. Referees„Steve Kozari, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen„Shandor Alphonso, Derek Nansen.PENGUINS 5, BLUE JACKETS 4, OTPITTSBURGH 2 0 2 1 „ 5 COLUMBUS 2 1 1 0 „ 4 First Period„1, Columbus, Werenski 16 (Dubois, Panarin), 5:11. 2, Pittsburgh, Kessel 32 (Schultz, Crosby), 10:26 (pp). 3, Columbus, Calvert 9 (Johnson), 12:39. 4, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 28 (Schultz), 15:35. Penalties„Hornqvist, PIT, (boarding), 8:09; Jones, CBJ, (tripping), 9:50. Second Period„5, Columbus, Jenner 13 (Vanek, Milano), 6:35 (pp). Penalties„Oleksiak, PIT, (high sticking), 4:59; Rust, PIT, (tripping), 9:01; Jenner, CBJ, (hooking), 18:16. Third Period„6, Pittsburgh, Letang 9 (Hornqvist, Malkin), 2:58 (pp). 7, Columbus, Atkinson 24 (Dubois, Panarin), 8:25. 8, Pittsburgh, Sheary 18 (Kessel), 12:16. Penalties„Atkinson, CBJ, (high sticking), 1:36. Overtime„9, Pittsburgh, Kessel 33, 1:06. Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„Pittsburgh 18-10-14-1„43. Columbus 10-11-8-1„30. Power -play opportunities„Pittsburgh 2 of 3; Columbus 1 of 3. Goalies„Pittsburgh, M.Murray 27-16-3 (30 shots-26 saves). Columbus, Bob rovsky 37-22-6 (43-38). A„19,157 (18,500). T„2:38. Referees„Marc Joannette, Tim Peel. Linesmen„ Ryan Daisy, Brian Murphy.PREDATORS4, CAPITALS 3NASHVILLE 1 1 2 „ 4 WASHINGTON 0 2 1 „ 3 First Period„1, Nashville, Smith 24 (Johansen, Subban), 4:17 (pp). Penalties„Backstrom, WSH, (slashing), 3:51; Josi, NSH, (interference), 7:03. Second Period„2, Washington, Ovechkin 47 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 4:29 (pp). 3, Washington, Kuznetsov 26 (Backstrom, Oshie), 6:47 (pp). 4, Nashville, Smith 25 (Josi, Turris), 14:03. Penalties„Johansen, NSH, (tripping), 3:43; Subban, NSH, (slashing), 6:31. Third Period„5, Washington, Kuznetsov 27, 1:07. 6, Nashville, Josi 14 (Turris, Ellis), 8:19 (pp). 7, Nashville, Johansen 15 (Arvidsson, Ellis), 14:33. Penalties„Turris, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:25; Niskanen, WSH, (tripping), 6:22; Bonino, NSH, (tripping), 19:59. Shots on Goal„Nashville 8-7-14„29. Washington 6-17-9„32. Power -play opportunities„Nashville 2 of 2; Washington 2 of 5. Goalies„Nashville, Saros 11-5-7 (32 shots-29 saves). Washington, Grubauer 15-10-3 (29-25). A„18,506 (18,277). T„2:37. Referees„Jake Brenk, Wes McCauley. Linesmen„Steve Barton, Steve Miller.CANADIENS 4, RED WINGS 3MONTREAL 1 2 1 „ 4 DETROIT 1 1 1 „ 3 First Period„1, Montreal, Deslauriers 9 (Juulsen, Alzner), 5:46. 2, Detroit, Larkin 15 (Ouellet, Frk), 18:50. Penalties„de la Rose, MTL, (tripping), 6:12; DeKeyser, DET, (tripping), 8:35; Lehkonen, MTL, (hooking), 15:40. Second Period„3, Detroit, Bertuzzi 7 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 2:13. 4, Montreal, Gallagher 31 (Drouin), 11:39. 5, Montreal, Deslauriers 10, 14:39. Penalties„Reilly, MTL, (cross checking), 5:10. Third Period„6, Montreal, Lehkonen 12 (Shaw), 2:23. 7, Detroit, Helm 13 (Wit kowski, Larkin), 3:09. Penalties„None. Shots on Goal„Montreal 8-14-6„28. Detroit 8-11-7„26. Power -play opportunities„Montreal 0 of 1; Detroit 0 of 3. Goalies„Montreal, Niemi 7-9-4 (26 shots-23 saves). Detroit, Coreau 0-5-0 (28-24). A„19,515 (20,000). T„2:26. Referees„Pierre Lambert, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen„Devin Berg, Travis Gawryletz.PANTHERS 3, BRUINS 2BOSTON 1 1 0 „ 2 FLORIDA 2 0 1 „ 3 First Period„1, Florida, Barkov 27 (Ekblad, Dadonov), 7:42. 2, Florida, Vatrano 6 (Bjugstad), 9:34. 3, Boston, Donato 5 (Marchand, Krug), 15:19 (pp). Penalties„Matheson, FLA, (holding), 15:05. Second Period„4, Boston, Heinen 15 (DeBrusk, Krejci), 2:11. Penalties„McQuaid, BOS, (interference), 13:45. Third Period„5, Florida, McCann 9 (Sceviour, Matheson), 14:23. Penalties„McAvoy, BOS, (hooking), 4:18. Shots on Goal„Boston 6-8-14„28. Florida 11-14-10„35. Power -play opportunities„Boston 1 of 1; Florida 0 of 2. Goalies„Boston, Rask 34-12-5 (35 shots-32 saves). Florida, Luongo 17-11-2 (28-26). A„14,860 (19,250). T„2:36. Referees„Jon Mclsaac, Dan ORourke. Linesmen„Michel Cormier, Tim Nowak.JETS 2, FLAMES 1CALGARY 0 1 0 „ 1 WINNIPEG 1 1 0 „ 2 First Period„1, Winnipeg, Wheeler 23 (Byfuglien, Connor), 19:13. Penalties„Ehlers, WPG, (delay of game), 8:47; Glass, CGY, (interference), 12:17. Second Period„2, Winnipeg, Stastny 16 (Ehlers, Chiarot), 12:59. 3, Calgary, Foo 1 (Backlund, Stone), 15:14. Penalties„Kulak, CGY, (high sticking), 16:11. Third Period„None. Penalties„Jan kowski, CGY, (high sticking), 1:42; Morrissey, WPG, (slashing), 17:30; Jan kowski, CGY, (roughing), 18:52; Lowry, WPG, (roughing), 18:52; Hamilton, CGY, (tripping), 18:52. Shots on Goal„Calgary 15-10-7„32. Winnipeg 8-9-9„26. Power -play opportunities„Calgary 0 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies„Calgary, Gillies 2-5-1 (26 shots-24 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 43-11-9 (32-31). A„15,321 (15,294). T„2:22. Referees„Kelly Sutherland, Ian Walsh. Linesmen„David Brisebois, Brian Mach. COLLEGE HOCKEY NCAA DIVISION I TOURNAMENTFROZEN FOUR At Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, Minn. National Semi“ nals ThursdayMinnesota-Duluth 2, Ohio State 1 Notre Dame (27-9-2) vs. Michigan (22-14-3), lateNational Championship SaturdayMinnesota-Duluth (24-16-3) vs. Notre DameMichigan winner, 6:30 p.m. GOLF THE MASTERSThursdays leaders at Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. Purse: TBA ($11 million in 2017). Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 (36-36) (a-denotes amateur)First RoundJordan Spieth 34-32„66 Tony Finau 33-35„68 Matt Kuchar 37-31„68 Henrik Stenson 34-35„69 Adam Hadwin 35-34„69 Charley Hoffman 35-34„69 Patrick Reed 35-34„69 Haotong Li 35-34„69 Rory McIlroy 35-34„69 Rafa Cabrera Bello 37-32„69 Bernd Wiesberger 37-33„70 Zach Johnson 36-34„70 Marc Leishman 33-37„70 Rickie Fowler 37-33„70 Phil Mickelson 36-34„70 Satoshi Kodaira 35-36„71 Vijay Singh 35-36„71 Cameron Smith 37-34„71 Xander Schauffele 35-36„71 Louis Oosthuizen 38-33„71 Francesco Molinari 37-35„72 Kyle Stanley 36-36„72 Tommy Fleetwood 36-36„72 a-Doug Ghim 39-33„72 Fred Couples 37-35„72 Charl Schwartzel 35-37„72 Kevin Kisner 37-35„72 Justin Rose 38-34„72 Ted Potter, Jr. 39-34„73 Brian Harman 39-34„73 Daniel Berger 38-35„73 Pat Perez 38-35„73 Jason Dufner 37-36„73 Hideki Matsuyama 36-37„73 Branden Grace 38-35„73 Tiger Woods 37-36„73 Bubba Watson 37-36„73 Jimmy Walker 37-36„73 Russell Henley 40-33„73 Thomas Pieters 37-36„73 Dustin Johnson 38-35„73 Wesley Bryan 36-38„74 Austin Cook 37-37„74 Ryan Moore 38-36„74 Jose Maria Olazabal 36-38„74 Bryson DeChambeau 38-36„74 Paul Casey 38-36„74 Martin Kaymer 38-36„74 Justin Thomas 37-37„74 Sandy Lyle 36-38„74 Ian Poulter 38-36„74 Bernhard Langer 37-37„74 Tyrrell Hatton 36-38„74 Alex Noren 39-35„74 Matthew Fitzpatrick 38-37„75 Danny Willett 41-34„75 Jason Day 40-35„75 Si Woo Kim 38-37„75 Patrick Cantlay 40-35„75 Jon Rahm 36-39„75 Adam Scott 37-38„75 Brendan Steele 38-38„76 Mike Weir 40-36„76 Patton Kizzire 38-38„76 a-Doc Redman 37-39„76 Billy Horschel 39-37„76 Chez Reavie 37-39„76 Angel Cabrera 40-36„76 a-Joaquin Niemann 40-36„76 Larry Mize 39-37„76 Yuta Ikeda 38-38„76 Webb Simpson 37-39„76 Jhonattan Vegas 39-38„77 Kevin Chappell 39-38„77 Dylan Frittelli 38-39„77 Shubhankar Sharma 38-39„77 Yusaku Miyazato 36-41„77 Mark OMeara 40-38„78 Trevor Immelman 37-41„78 Ross Fisher 39-39„78 Gary Woodland 42-36„78 Ian Woosnam 38-41„79 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 40-39„79 a-Yuxin Lin 39-40„79 a-Matt Parziale 40-41„81 Sergio Garcia 38-43„81 a-Harry Ellis 41-45„86 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueOAKLAND ATHLETICS „ Claimed OF Trayce Thompson off waivers from the New York Yankees. Transferred RHP Paul Blackburn to the 60-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS „ Reinstated LHP Martin Prez from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Jose Leclerc to Round Rock (PCL). Signed a two-year extension of their player development contract with Frisco (Texas) through the 2020 season.National LeagueLOS ANGELES DODGERS „ Claimed RHP Alec Asher from Baltimore and optioned him to Oklahoma City (PCL). NEW YORK METS „ Activated OF Michael Conforto from the 10-day DL. Optioned INF Phillip Evans to Las Vegas (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES „ Claimed RHP Jesus Liranzo off waivers from the Los Angeles Dodgers and optioned him to Altoona (EL).American AssociationCLEBURNE RAILROADERS „ Signed RHPs Conner Camacho and Scott Plaza. LINCOLN SALTDOGS „ Acquired RHPs Michael Tamburino, Michael Wagner and future considerations from Sussex County (Can-Am) for the reversionary rights to RHP Tyler Alexander. TEXAS AIRHOGS „ Traded INF Jordan Caillouet to Ottawa (Can-Am) for a player to be named.Atlantic LeagueLONG ISLAND DUCKS „ Signed OF Travis Snider.Can-Am LeagueNEW JERSEY JACKALS „ Signed RHP Alberto Rodriguez.Frontier LeagueEVANSVILLE OTTERS „ Signed LHP Sean Adler. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS „ Released INF Tyler Urps. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS „ Signed RHP Kurt Heyer. TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS „ Signed RHP Alhanon Miller.

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** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV APRIL 6 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Today Food. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Maury The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Jerry Springer Jerry Springer Tone&LiftPaid Program WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Ed Helms; Michael Symon; Tinashe. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew Pool PartyŽ (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The ClassŽ Diagnosis Murder The Big Valley EarthquakeŽ Gunsmoke CleavusŽ WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning (N) Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Forensic FilesJerry Springer (N) The Real The Wendy Williams Show (N) Paternity CourtCouples CourtJudge FaithJudge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVReal EstatePaid ProgramJudge Mathis (N) The Peoples Court The Peoples Court CityLine WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkaliciousDaniel TigerDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg & CatSesame StreetSplash A&E 34 43 118 265 Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Live PD Live PD -03.17.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Grace vs. Abrams AMC 30 62 131 254 MedicareLifeLock ‰‰‰ Backdraft (91) Kurt Russell. Chicago firefighters work overtime to stop a mad arsonist. ‰‰‚ Rambo III (88) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Bad Dog! FoodiesŽ Animal Cops Phoenix Animal Cops Phoenix Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain VetThe Vet Life My Cat From Hell BET 53 46 124 329 Hates ChrisHates ChrisHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneTyler Perrys Meet the BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, Br ownsFresh Prince COM 64 53 107 249 ScrubsScrubs 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Deadly Seas The Bering SeaŽ Deadliest Catch The captains ask each other questions. Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansE! News: Daily Pop (N) The Kardashians ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) Get Up (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) Get UpNFL Live (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 LifeLockBISSELLPerricone MDPioneer Wo.Giada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada in ItalyGiada Enter.Pioneer Wo. Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 Last-StandingLast-StandingLast-Standing700/InteractiveThe 700 Club (N) Siren PilotŽ ‰ Mr. Deeds (02) Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder. FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstSkip and Shannon: Undisputed (N) (L) Beyond the Wheel 2018NASCAR Racing FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) Unfinished Business ‰‰ Little Man (06) Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetMike & MollyMike & Molly HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family 6146Ž Actress Pascale Hutton. Home & Family 6145Ž Louis van Amstel; Danika Yarosh. HGTV 32 38 112 229 I Want That: ConsumerFlea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Fixer UpperHouse HuntersHouse Hunt ers HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancients Behaving Badly Ancients Behaving Badly Ancients Behaving Badly Ancients Behaving Badly Ancient Aliens Possible evidence of alien visitors. LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesI SurvivedI SurvivedI Survived PARMT 28 48 241 241 Try Total GymNEW SHARK ‰‰‰ Our Idiot Brother (11) Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks. ‰‰‚ Hot Tub Time Machine (10) John Cusack, Rob Corddry. Two/Half Men SUN 49 422 656 Florida Sport.Reel TimeReel AnimalsShip Shape TVFishing FlatsSport FishingSportsmanFlorida Insider Fishing Report Sport FishingInto the Blue SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:00) The Diabolical (15) (7:58) ‰ Cabin Fever: Patient Zero (14) Sean Astin.(:01) ‰‰ Immortals (11) Henry Cavill, Stephen Dorff, Isabel Lucas. (:29) Shooter TBS 31 15 139 247 MarriedKingKingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 Im Much ‰‰‰‚ Foreign Correspondent (40) Joel McCrea.(:45) ‰‰‰‚ The Front Page (31) Adolphe Menjou. ‰‰‰‰ Libeled Lady (36) Jean Harlow. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say YesSay YesNate & Jeremiah by Design Nate & Jeremiah by Design Hoarding: Buried Alive Hoarding: Buried Alive Hoarding: Buried Alive TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Hulkus PocusŽ Charmed Vaya Con LeosŽ Supernatural Supernatural Devil May CareŽ Supernatural Im No AngelŽ Supernatural Slumber PartyŽ USA 62 55 105 242 ChrisleyChrisleyLaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarBeyond TodayMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV APRIL 6 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) HarryPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramBig DealPaid ProgramToday Rossen Reports. (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) The 60sJoint HealthRehab?Paid ProgramSkin CarePaid ProgramSkin SecretsTone&LiftSkin CareBISSELL PetSlim Cycle WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenNuWaveReal EstateContureReal EstateLuminess AirPaid ProgramOpen HouseInsuranceTri-StatesGood Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Mannix Light and ShadowŽ Cannon77 Sunset StripGomer PyleGomer PylePetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. Hillbillies WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Modern Family (:22) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Morning: Satur day MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesUnexplainedBella Luce Jewelry SaleSilver Jewelry Sale Timeless sterling silver add-ons. (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Imp. JokersImp. JokersSteve A Straight Talk panel. (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramTry YogaPaid ProgramPaid ProgramDr. Ho Reliev. WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 SoundbreakingSoundbreakingSoundbreakingThe This Old House HourMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob BuilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindBarry WhiteMakeup!Marie OsmondCookSmartCredit?NEW SHARKFlipping Vegas AMC 30 62 131 254 (:14) The Terror The LadderŽ(:15) McMafia Episode 105Ž(:31) The Walking DeadThree StoogesThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:05) TankedTanked Saved by the SpellŽ Tanked The Purr-fect TankŽ Animal CribsTanked The Pirate QueenŽ Tanked Hang Ten BarbequeŽ BET 53 46 124 329 (12:46) Martin (:19) Martin (1:53) Martin (:27) MartinJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithHouse/PayneHouse/Payne COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkWorkaholicsLifeLockNEW SHARKHair LoveMyPillowScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush AbandonmentŽ Shipwreck MenShipwreck MenOutdoorsMartin Chall.Deadliest CatchThe Fish GuyzOut Da Bayou E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CityS ex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:30) NFL Live2018 Masters Tournament Second Round. (N Same-day Tape) 30 for 30E:60 FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QuePaid ProgramBISSELLOrganicCindys SkinGuys Big BiteB runch at Bob. FREE 59 65 180 311 Sexy HairAge SpotsThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramPaid ProgramDr. DrewPiYo Workout!Try Yoga!Yoga Retreat!grown-ishgrown-ish FS1 24 27 150 219 UndisputedUFC Weigh-InNASCAR Race HubDrag RacingDrag RacingDrag RacingNASCAR Race NASCAR FX 45 51 136 248 (11:23) ‰‰‰‚ The Martian (15) Matt Damon.(:23) ‰‰‰‚ Gravity (13) Sandra Bullock, George Clooney. BISSELLTry Total GymShark IONHow I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucySummer Love (16) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeCredit?New Larry K.Yoga Retreat!Cindys SkinMakeup!PiYo Workout!Fixer Upper HIST 35 42 120 269 (:06) Ancient Aliens (:04) Ancient Aliens CoinCoinCoinCoinCoinAge SpotsSwamp People The PhantomŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:03) ‰‰‚ Heaven Is for Real (14) Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly. Cindys SkinGrow HairShark IONGrilling!Celeb BeautyAge SpotsShark IONHair Love PARMT 28 48 241 241 (12:00) ‰‰‚ Crank (06) CopsCopsKnifeTone&LiftAge SpotsPiYo Workout!Airfryer OvenPoopCredit? SUN 49 422 656 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramSex PillsFoot PainProstatePaid ProgramProstateSex PillsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramFacing WavesReel Animals SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‚ The Adjustment Bureau (11) Matt Damon, Emily Blunt. ‰ Cabin Fever: Patient Zero (14) Sean Astin, Currie Graham. LifeLockLifeLockCredit?LifeLock TBS 31 15 139 247 American ‰‰‚ Race to Witch Mountain (09) Dwayne Johnson. New GirlMarriedMarriedMarriedMarriedMarriedMarried TCM 25 70 132 256 Night of the Strangler (72) Micky Dolenz. (:45) ‰‰‰ The Strangler (64) Victor Buono, David McLean. Summer of 63 ‰‰‰‚ Things to Come (36) Raymond Massey. TLC 37 40 183 280 Trading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading Spaces TNT 29 54 138 245 Castle Dressed to KillŽ Arrow Time of DeathŽ Arrow The PromiseŽ Law & OrderLaw & Order Hands FreeŽ Law & Order Evil BreedsŽ USA 62 55 105 242 NCIS: Los AngelesWhite Collar Borrowed TimeŽ Dateline A Texas TwistŽ Dateline FranticŽ Suits Bad ManŽ BalanceMyPillow WGN-A 13 239 307 EngagementHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetPerson of Interest C.O.D.Ž Paid ProgramCredit?HydroShot!Age SpotsPhilips!LifeLock FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV APRIL 6 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) The Doctors Harry Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Paid ProgramOmegaMaury The Robert Irvine Show The GoldbergsThe GoldbergsAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show Dr. Phil (N) NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza Destinys ChildŽ The RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainThe Wild, Wild WestHawaii Five-0M*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Divorce CourtDivorce CourtAndy GriffithAndy GriffithDateline IndiscretionŽ DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury Crime Watch DailySteve A Straight Talk panel. (N) ThisMinuteThisMinuteJudge Judy Judge Judy (N) Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkaliciousNature CatWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadArthur (EI) PBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -06.24.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Live PD -12.15.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 Rambo III (88) ‰‰‚ Rambo: First Blood Part II (85) Sylvester Stallone. ‰‰‚ Escape Plan (13) Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‰‰‚ The Outsiders (83) ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Lone Star Law Gator vs. DogŽ North Woods Law Tanked Tanked The Tank of AtlantisŽ BET 53 46 124 329 Fresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh Prince (:33) ‰‰‚ ATL (06) Tip Harris, Lauren London. Four Atlanta teens face challenges. ‰‰‰ Coach Carter (05) Samuel L. Jackson. COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:05) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office (Part 1 of 2)(:15) The Office The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Bering Sea Gold Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe Kardashians ‰‰ Along Came Polly (04) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. E! News Actress Kristen Bell. ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) 2018 Masters Tournament Second Round. Sergio Garcia serves as defending champion. From Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. (N) SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NFL Live (N) NBA: The Jump (N) (L) SportsNationIntentional Talk (N) (L) NFL LiveSportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterSportsCenter FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 ‰‰‰ The Incredible Hulk (08) Edward Norton, Liv Tyler, Tim Roth.(:35) ‰‚ Zookeeper (11) Kevin James, Rosario Dawson. (:40) ‰‰‚ Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (94) FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RacingNASCAR Race Hub WeekendNASCAR RacingRace HubNASCAR RacingDrag Racing FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰‚ The Equalizer (14) Denzel Washington. A former commando champions the helpless. ‰‰‰ The Amazing Spider-Man (12) Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans. HALL 23 59 185 312 A Very Merry Mix-Up (13) Alicia Witt, Mark Wiebe. A Royal Christmas (14) Lacey Chabert, Stephen Hagan. A December Bride (16) Jessica Lowndes, Daniel Lissing. HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream Hom eDream Home HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 I SurvivedI SurvivedGreys Anatomy Idle HandsŽ Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy Greys Anatomy PARMT 28 48 241 241 Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half Men ‰‰‚ The Expendables 2 (12) Jet Li SUN 49 422 656 MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox. Rays PreviewFlorida Insider Fishing Report ACC AccessInside HEATPregameBasketball SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:29) ‰‰‚ Shooter (07) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pea, Danny Glover.(:25) ‰‰‰ The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (13) Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman, Richard Armitage. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy ‰‰‚ Shrek the Third (07) TCM 25 70 132 256 (:15) ‰‰‰‰ The Philadelphia Story (40) Cary Grant.(:15) ‰‰‰‰ His Girl Friday (40) Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell. ‰‰‰‚ Woman of the Year (42) Katharine Hepburn. TLC 37 40 183 280 My 600-Lb. Life Skin Tight Shantel & HopeŽ Island MediumIsland MediumLong Island Medium Trading Spaces Trading Spaces TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones The Bod in the PodŽ Bones The But in the JokeŽ Bones NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night Blue Bloods BackstabbersŽBlue Bloods Blue Bloods M*A*S*HM*A*S*H FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV APRIL 6 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Taken All About EveŽ (N) Dateline NBC A Texas love triangle ends in murder. (N) NewsTonight Show-J. FallonLate Night With Seth MeyersLast Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Dynasty (N) Jane The Virgin (N) Page Six TVSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKingKing of the HillCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Once Upon a Time (N) Marvels Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (:01) 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleWKRP Cinci.Hogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 MacGyver (N) Hawaii Five-0 (N) Blue Bloods (N) Modern FamilyMastersHlightsLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James Corden MNT (18.2) 227 13 American Ninja WarriorAmerican Ninja Warrior2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsAnger MgtAnger MgtThe GameThe GameCorrupt CrimesKiller WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 MasterChef (N) The Resident The ElopementŽ Two/Half MenTMZ (N) Crime Watch DailyPawn StarsPawn StarsTwo/Half MenHow I Met WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashMeToo, NowSoundbreakingSoundbreakingSoundbreakingAmanpour-PBSWorld NewsWashMeToo, Now A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -04.06.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) (L) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:00) ‰‰‚ The Outsiders ‰‰‰ Batman (89) Jack Nicholson. The Caped Crusader vows to rid Gotham City of the Joker. The Walking Dead (12:14) Talking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Tanked: Unfiltered (N) Tanked (N)(:05) Tanked (:05) Tanked (:05) Tanked (12:05) Tanked BET 53 46 124 329 (5:30) ‰‰‰ Coach Carter (05) Samuel L. Jackson. The Quad TheColorPurpleŽ Black CardBETMancaveThe Rundown (:40) Martin (12:13) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 The Office ‰‰‚ Waynes World (92) Mike Myers, Dana Carvey. The Comedy Central Roast RoseanneŽ This Is NotSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth Park DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Parkers Trail (N) Gold Rush (N) Bering Sea Gold (N) Gold RushBering Sea GoldGold Rush Game OverŽ E! 63 57 114 236 ‰‰ Monster-in-Law (05) Jennifer Lopez, Jane Fonda, Michael Vartan. ‰‰ Enough (02) Jennifer Lopez, Billy Campbell, Juliette Lewis. E! News Actress Kristen Bell. Sex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 2018 Masters Tournament Second Round. (N Same-day Tape) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Basketball Awards (N) (L) Kickboxing GLORY 52. (Taped) World Rugby Sevens Series Teams: TBA. From Hong Kong. NFL Live FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Dr iveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (7:50) ‰‰ Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (95) Jim Carrey. The 700 ClubSiren PilotŽ Siren Ben finds device emitting strange sound. FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC TonightUFC Weigh-InUFC CountdownMLB Whiparound (N) (L) TMZ SportsSkip and Shannon: Undisputed FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰‰‚ The Martian (15) Matt Damon. A stranded astronaut tries to survive on Mars. Trust J. Paul Getty sends his fixer to Rome. (:23) ‰‰‰‚ The Martian (15) Matt Damon. HALL 23 59 185 312 Switched for Christmas (17) Candace Cameron Bure. The MiddleThe MiddleGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHunters IntlHouse HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHouse HuntersHu nters Intl HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient AliensAncient Aliens (:03) Ancient Aliens (:03) Ancient Aliens (:03) Ancient Aliens (12:03) Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 ‰‰‚ Heaven Is for Real (14) Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly.(:02) ‰‰‚ Heaven Is for Real (14) Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly.(:01) ‰‰‚ Heaven Is for Real (14) Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly. PARMT 28 48 241 241 (5:30) The Expendables 2 (12) Bellator MMA Live Benson Henderson vs. Roger Huerta. (N)(:15) Bellator Kickboxing Bellator Kickboxing 9: Budapest. (N) ‰‰‚ Crank (06) Amy Smart SUN 49 422 656 (6:30) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at New York Knicks. (N) PostgameInside HEATInside HEATInside HEATAfter Midnight with the HEAT From April 6, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturama (:32) FuturamaFuturama (:31) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 (6:00) ‰‰‚ Shrek the Third ‰‰‰‚ Shrek (01) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. ELEAGUEThe Last O.G. ‰‰ American Wedding (03) Jason Biggs. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰‚ Freaks (32)(:15) ‰‰‰ Ruggles of Red Gap (35) Charles Laughton. ‰‚ Way Out West (30) William Haines. ‰‰‚ The Phantom of Paris (31) TLC 37 40 183 280 Trading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading SpacesTrading Spaces TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰‚ Star Wars: The Force Awakens (15) Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher. ‰‚ Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (12) Nicolas Cage. Castle Deep CoverŽ USA 62 55 105 242 Modern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Fam ilyNCIS: Los Angeles WGN-A 13 239 307 M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HShoot the Messenger (N) EngagementEngagement C6 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS

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** The News Herald | Friday, April 6, 2018 C7ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Situations are not stressful in their own right. It is our assessment and interpretation that drives the stress levels we experience. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ The bigger picture will not be served if you change the rules for every individual request. Stick to the rules and the structures today. If you make an exception for one person, then youll have to make it for all people. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Sacri“ ce is always the necessary trade for things of value -no sacri“ ce, no value. Instant grati“ cation isnt free. It will be paid for eventually. Oddly enough, those who get used to sacri“ ce begin to actually enjoy it. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Human beings behave irrationally. This is the rule, not the exception. A lot of time and energy get wasted complaining about irrational things other humans do. Conserve your energy by expecting surprising problems. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Youll come up with a plan. They wont all like it. Some, in fact, would rally against it if they knew what it was. So, its a good thing they dont. Keep it like that for a while. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ If you set out on the journey ill-prepared and unsure, youll be beginning the way most beginners do. This is the magic (and fun!) of being a beginner -inadequate means and imperfect odds of success. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ When you “ nd yourself arguing with the basic tenants of society -the way people dress, talk or drive -its a sign that youre due for some me time,Ž resting, breathing and stretching in more than just physical ways. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ There are those who know exactly what they want, and they are very likely to get it. Though what happens after that may be that they want something else. After all, states of satisfaction can only last so long. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ Youll hear from an old friend. You might be surprised by different peoples trajectories, and they might be surprised about yours. Surprise can be life af“ rming. There is always more to know. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ Would y ou?Ž is a very different question from will you?Ž And while youll gather some interesting information from the would you?Ž question, all that matters in the end is the will you?Ž question. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ One behavior will not suit all outcomes. For instance, what you do to create trust is different from what you do to elicit desire. Decide on what you want to accomplish and work backward. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ When people are doing a certain thing to “ t in with the environment and you dont feel compelled to do the same thing, consider the very fun, adventurous possibility that you might be better suited to a different environment.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@ TriviaGuy.com 1. Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Kauai, Niihau and Kaala are names of? Types of koalas, Hawaiian islands, Kahla brands, Japanese curses 2. The first U.S. transcontinental air mail service linked New York to ...? Los Angeles, Seattle, Sacramento, San Francisco 3. What was the retail price of the original Barbie doll in its 1959 debut? $.99, $1.98, $3, $3.98 4. Not counting Alaska, what state has the northern most point? Washington, Maine, Oregon, Minnesota 5. Where is the Custer Battlefield National Monument located? South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming 6. Ronald Reagan was which number U.S. president? 36, 38, 40, 42 ANSWERS: 1. Hawaiian islands, 2. San Francisco, 3. $3, 4. Minnesota, 5. Montana, 6. 40TRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) IGLOO THANK TRIPLE CANVAS Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The preparation put into stabbing Dracula in his heart was „ PAINSTAKING Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. GYANT CANTE TIRRYA COYCUP 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app Ž  Ans. here: SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBYFathers habit of returning food proves hard to swallowDEAR ABBY: I am in my 30s and moved out of my parents home 10 years ago. Last week I decided to visit them, and we went out to eat. Dad has a habit of sending his food back to the kitchen „ My steak isnt cooked enough,Ž or My food is cold. Could you warm it up?Ž He even does this at restaurants that arent fancy. Dad has done this my whole life and hes in his 60s. Its embarrassing for me and Mom, and it frustrates the cooks and waitstaff. Is there a polite way of telling him to stop this behavior? He takes any criticism personally. „ EMBARRASSED IN THE NORTHEASTDEAR EMBARRASSED: You are certainly free to tell your father that this habit embarrasses you, but after all these years, you and your mother are not going to change him. Restaurants are in the hospitality business. If your father isnt satisfied with his food, he has a right to ask that it be served to his liking, and most restaurants will gladly comply. We are not responsible for the actions of other people, and because of that, you should not feel embarrassed about something over which you have no control. DEAR ABBY: People in nursing homes or at home „ ill, incapacitated or retired „ still need social contacts. In our busy society, these folks are often forgotten, and it is hurtful. We will all get there someday and will fully understand how important an occasional phone call or greeting card can be. Please ask your readers to make a note on their calendar as a reminder.Ž If they do, someone will be very grateful for the kind gesture „ most likely the recipient „ but it may also be their family members. Kindness goes a long way. „ REMEMBERING IN NEW HAMPSHIREDEAR REMEMBERING: You have a caring soul. Your message is an important one, which is why I am sharing it with my readers. I know most of you are busy people, but a simple gesture can make a world of difference to those who may be isolated. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.

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** C8 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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CLASSIFIEDS The News Herald | Thursday, April 6, 2018 C C 9 9 19986 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 18-285-CP In RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE BETSEY Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of George Betsey, deceased, File No.: 18-285-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. 4th St., Panama City, Florida, 3401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court. WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE NOTICE OF THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 30, 2018. Personal Representative: Sammy Betsy 118 Detroit Ave Panama City, FL 32401 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Hosam K. Zawahry FL Bar No.: 0163503 227 Harrison Ave. Panama City, FL 32401 (850)784-6300 March 30, April 6, 2018 19980 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 10001313CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWMBS, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-8TI, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-7, PLAINTIFF, VS. RICHARD M. RIGBY, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 20, 2015, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Bay County, Florida, on June 25, 2018, at 11:00 AM, at online at www .bay .real foreclose.com for the following described property: Lot 3, THE OAKS II, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 19, Pages 26 and 27, inclusive, of the Public Records of Bay County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Date: March 27, 2018 BILL KINSAUL Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Tromberg Law Group, P.A. 1515 South Federal Highway, Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33432 File # 14-001914 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850747-5717 or at AD A Request@jud14.flcourts.or g P .O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 30, April 6, 2018 20004 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 032015CA 001341XXXXXX PROF-2013-M4 LEGAL TITLE TRUST II, BY U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS LEGAL TITLE TRUSTEE, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES BRADFORD A/K/A JAMES LEE BRADFORD; ET AL, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 12, 2018, and entered in Case No. 032015CA001341XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein PROF-2013M4 LEGAL TITLE TRUST II, BY U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS LEGAL TITLE TRUSTEE is Plaintiff and JAMES BRADFORD A/K/A JAMES LEE BRADFORD; BANK OF AMERICA N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO FIA CARD SERVICES N.A.; SUNTRUST BANK; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash online via the Internet at www .bay .realfore close.com 11:00 a.m., on April 25, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 13, BLOCK 93, FIRST ADDITION TO COVE TERRACE (BUNKER’S COVE) SUDDUTH REALTY COMPANY’S TWELFTH ADDITION TO PANAMA CITY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 51, PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Panama City, Florida, on March 27, 2018. BILL KINSAUL As Clerk, Circuit Court By:Ladyne Swearingen As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegal group.com File No.: 1491-155572 March 30, April 6, 2018 20080 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.; 17001094CP, IN RE: ESTATE OF SHARON M MEYERS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of SHARON M MEYERS, deceased, whose date of death was October 22, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida, 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, must file their claims with this COURT WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is: April 6, 2018. Personal representative TAMMY MARACICK DALEY, 8532 108 Street N., Seminole, FL, 33772, Attorney for Personal Representative: ERIC RAY GARMON, FL. Bar No. 126724, The Garmon Law Firm, PLLC., 810 Grace Avenue, Panama City, FL, 32401-2520 Phone: (850)684.4000, Fax: (850)250.3047, eric@garmonlawpc.co m Pub: April 6, 13, 2018 20012 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY Probate Division Case No.: 2018-276-CP IN RE: Estate of BEVERLY MASHBURN SMITH a/k/a BEVERLY M. SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of BEVERLY MASHBURN SMITH a/k/a BEVERLY M. SMITH deceased, File Number 2018-276-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. 4th Street, Panama City, FL 32401. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is Friday,March 30, 2018 Co-Personal Representative: EDWARD ANDERSON 7904 Woodstone Drive Hixson, TN 37343 Co-Personal Representative: DONNA STRONG 2816 Jack Nicklaus Way Shalimar, FL 32579 C. JASON WHITE Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives FL Bar No. 0357080 516 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: 850.784.0809 Fax: 850.784.0806 Email: jason@jelksand white.com March 30, April 6, 2018 20100 STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPROVE INDIVIDUAL PROJECT WITHIN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT AREA The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to approve an individual project of the Florida Department of Transportation, District 3 and the St. Joe Company, 133 WaterSound Parkway, WaterSound Florida 32413, File Number 0354652-002EA, on a site within the Ecosystem Management Area established through the binding St. Joe Ecosystem Management Agreement for Bay County/West Bay Sector Plan (EMA) entered into by The St. Joe Company and the Department on May 29, 2015, under the authority of Section 403.0752, F.S., for certain regulatory approvals for an environmental resource permit including stormwater activities within a 42,889 acre tract of land in Bay County. The individual project approval is for a project known as State Road 388. The project site is located between State Road 79 and the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Bay County at latitude 3019’16.3” / longitude -8548’00.4”. The Department has determined that the applicant has provided reasonable assurance that the project complies with the terms of the EMA. The application for this individual project approval, as well as the binding Ecosystem Management Agreement for Bay County/ West Bay Sector Plan, is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department’s Northwest District offices, 160 Government Center, Pensacola, Florida 325015794. The Department’s proposed agency action shall become final unless a timely petition for administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes before the deadline for filing a petition. The procedures for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below. Mediation is not available. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. Any challenge to the proposed agency action on the individual project shall be limited to whether or not the individual project complies with the terms of the EMA. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s proposed action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a timely and sufficient petition for administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interest will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsections 28-106.111(2) and 62-110.106(3)(a), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of this notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of this notice. Under section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person’s right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. Pub: April 6, 2018 20082NOTICE OF SALEPursuant to FL ST. 713.78, Mack’s Towing will sell at public auction by sealed bid the following: SALE DATE: 04/21/18 1998 Honda 1HGCG5651WA106924 SALE DATE: 05/08/18 2001 Chevy 1Y1SK52821Z415963 2002 Saturn 1G8JU84F22Y565287 2002 Mercury 4M2ZU66E02UJ13793 Location: 7726 Panama City Beach Pkwy (Bay County) PCB, FL 32407 Time: 9:00 A.M. Pub: April 6, 2018 20088 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Heavenly Scent located at 1519 East 11th Street, B5, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32401 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 4th day of April, 2018. Blacks Are Kings Eternally Reigning Co., Inc. Pub: April 6, 2018 Apple IPad Lost3/29/18 Magnolia Beach Rd area. Has been reported to apple.REWARD FOR RETURN(850)638 7383 *If no answer leave message AMAZING DEALOne Sony and one Samsung 46” HDTV $250 eachor $400 for B OTH Call: 850-832-7224 Ruger EC9s 9mm 7+1 Compact unfired $225.00 Call (850)381-9563 Unfired Beretta PistolBrand New Beretta (Full Size) PX Storm For sale. 40 Calber. $475.00. 850-647-1630 FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com TITLEIST PLAYERS 4 CART STAND GOLF BAGNEW NEVER USED Navy Blue / White Letters / Red Accents $170.00 850-867-3763 Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring18 and older Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple PositionsPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Callaway 938 & 944 South Comet Ave. April 6th & 7th 7:00am until 12 NoonGarage SaleToo many items to list! Panama City Beach 658 16th Street Friday & Saturday April 6th & April 7th 8:00am until 4:00pmESTATE SALECollectibles, dolls and many items. Panama City Plantation Park off Transmitter Rd. 4/7/2018 8am to 11amCommunity Yard SaleKids toys and clothes, adult clothes, household items Parker 1435 Parkway Dr. (Bus. 98 to right on Ethlyn, right on Stratford, stay right at stop sign, enter Donalson Estates, left on Parkway Dr.) Friday April 13th 8am-2pm Saturday April 14th 8am-12pmThe Estate of Helen GustavsonParker estate items include sofas. table and chair set, dining table set, full bed, king bed, dressers washer, dryer, refrigerator, microwaves, stove, dishes, linens, chainsaw, misc. tools, kitchen items, and more. St. Andrew 3115 West 21st Ct April 7th & 8th 8:00am until 1:00pmMOVING SALEHousehold, furniture,Plus Clothing, Decor, Dishes ,Small appliances, jewelry.,DVD’s, Video Games, Man Stuff, Lady Stuff. Everything Must Go!. Sat & Sun 8 am -1 pm. Youngstown4708 pinedale Rd Take 77 to 388 East 5.5 miles. Left on Spring Hill follow the signs April 6th & 7th 7am to 1pmNeighborhood Yard SaleFurniture, baby items, LOTS OF STUFF!!! Lynn Haven2601 S. Hwy 77 Lynn Haven 32444 Parking lot of The Salvation Army Saturday April 7 7:30 am -1:00 pmWomen’s HomeLeague Yard SaleEverything from Clothes, Furniture, Crafts “What Knots” etc. Text FL91495 to 56654 Lynn Haven 333 Bell Circle Saturday, April 7th 8:00am until 1:00pmHUGE GARAGE SALEChina, lamps, furniture, sporting goods, fish & tackle. Electronics, musical instruments and much more! Old Airport AreaLisenby and Airport Road Friday & Saturday April 6th & 7th Starting at 8:00amANNUAL RUMMAGE SALEEverything OLD and NEW (No clothes) Panama City 255 Orinda Street (Off Highway 22, Turn at Kingsbury Body Shop) Saturday, April 7th 7:00am until 1:00pmMULTI-FAMILY YARD SALEPriced to sell. Come out and see! If rain, will cancel. Panama City6422 John Pitts Rd. North of Star Ave. April 6th 9am-2pmRummage Sale!Ladies’plus size clothing, framed art, mens’lg shirts, and home decor! NICE NICE ITEMS! Text FL91785 to 56654 Panama City Beach 207 Emerald Coast Club Blvd. April 7th & 8th 8 am until 2 pmPalm Cove HOA Community Yard SaleOver 300 units. Wide variety of items.Text FL83512 to 56654 One Day Only Sale by LawFri & Sat (6 & 7 April) Warned by Port St. Joe Code Enforcement Officer that PSJ residents could only have one yard sale for one day per quarter by city ordinance. Received two certified letters stating that if I had a sale for two consecutive days, I would be taken to court and fined five hundred dollars and put in jail for six weeks for a violation. Have brought down and .putting out much more stuff including many antiques and furniture such as a .century old washstand, Ralph .Lauren king sleigh bed, Oscar de la Renta Chippendale chairs, Victorian couch/chair/settee, desks, mahogany corner cabinet, vanities, Murphy beds, Ethan Allen dining room, numerous tables and chairs, end and coffee tables, historical military items, lots of smaller stuff and much more – four .garages and a yard full. 8 to 5 EST. Friday will be a preview only day with the sale to be held on Saturday, 8-5. 1405 Constitution Dr. (Hwy 98), Port St. Joe. Rain or Shine. Cove Corner of 3rd Street and N. Macarthur Avenue (1 Block off East of Cove Blvd between 3rd and 4th Street) April 7th, 2018 8:00am until 12:00pmESTATE/YARD SALEESTATE SALE—EVERYHTING MUST GO. NEW KIRBY VACUUM AND SINGER SEWING MACHINE. VINTAGE JEWELRY AND OTHER TREASURES. ART, FRAMES, ANTIQUE DESK, NEW ORLEANS POTTERY, CHINA, KITCHENWARE, AND MANY OTHER ITEMS. NO EARLY BIRDS. WEATHER PERMITTING. CASH ONLY!! Forest Park 310 Windy Lane (Behind Publix 23rd Street) Saturday, April 7th Starting at 7:00am Men’s Columbia, Women’s Loft, Express, American Eagle clothing, Designer purses wallets, prom dresses from Dream Gowns, Huge Beanie Baby collection, new bedrm suite, house decor etc Beach West EndPalmetto Trace Subdivision Pier Park Area April 6th & 7th 8:00am to 12:00pmCommunity Yard/ Garage SaleNeighborhood Sale All Items -Lots of Goodies Text FL91701 to 56654 Callaway5610 Boat Race Road &Tyndall Parkway Sat. 8am-12pmGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERANShare MinistryThrift Shop Clothing Sale!!! Drop in gas stove, sofa/couch, household items, dining room table, electric stove, remote control bed,lift chair, over the stove microwave & washing machine, & Dryer!! Free Books!!! Callaway 7122 East 10th Street Friday, April 6th Saturday, April 7th 8:00am until 1:00pmYARD SALELots of stuff, too much to list, priced to sell, you don’t want to miss this one! Take Hwy 22 to Star Ave looks for signs to East 10th street. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 1 1 0 0 Thursday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald 9527 Front Beach Road Panama City BeachEOE M/F/D/VREOPENING MARCH 19th STEAK PIT € MEAT CUTTER PORTION CUTTING EXPERIENCERATE OF PAY DEPENDS ON EXPERIENCE€ BUS & SET-UP (MUST BE 16 YRS OLD)€ SERVERSEXPERIENCEDNF-1186307NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE ARE YOU A RESTAURANT IN THE PANAMA CITY PANAMA CITY BEACH AREA THAT IS NEEDING EMPLOYEES FOR THE UPCOMING SEASON? THE PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD IS OFFERING ABSOLUTELY FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT ADS FOR APRIL 2018. NO STRINGS ATTACHED, NO C OMMITMENTS, ALL FREE! TO CELEBRATE OUR FINE COMMUNITY AND BUSINESSES WITHIN! FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING GETTING YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT ADS. PLEASE CONTACT BELOW! BE SURE TO ASK FOR THE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD PROMOTION! NEWS HERALD CLASSIFIEDS DEPARTMENT CALL: (850) 747-5020 NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! NOW HIRING POSITIONS! ALL YOUR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION HERE FREE FOR MONTH OF APRIL! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! NF-1186301YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! YOUR FREE NOW HIRING RESTAURANT AD HERE! APRIL CLASSIFIED PROMOS STARTING APRIL 1ST APRIL 30THSERVICE DIRECTORY SPECIAL: 10 LINES, 30 DAYS FOR $75.00 MERCH SPECIAL: 7 LINES / 7 DAYS / $7 HOME SALES / RENTALS 30 DAYS / $99.00 AUTO SAVER SPECIAL 15 DAYS $15 GARAGE SALE SPECIAL: FOUR (4) DAYS $20.00 / 8 LINES / ADDITIONAL LINES $0.30/ea CALL TODAY TO PLACE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT NF-1178719SCOTT INSIDE SALES 8507475022 MIKE INSIDE SALES 8507475013 Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen. Countertop Installers & FinishersWANTED: granite/stone countertop installers and finishers/polishers. Experience preferred. Will train motivated people. Hours of work are M-F, with each work day starting at 7am. Benefits available: 401K, health insurance, life insurance, and more! Family-oriented team. Pay based on experience, and is renegotiable after a brief period. Clean background helpful. Come grow with us! Apply through this ad anytime. Apply on-site M-F, 10am-4pm: 635 Briggs Ln, Southport, FL 32409. Dental HygienistOur fast-paced Panama City Beach dental office is looking for a part-time Registered Dental Hygienist to join our team. We are looking for someone who enjoys providing high-quality dental hygiene care while building and maintaining positive, professional relationships with our patients. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. Strong multi-tasking and organizational skills. Proficient computer/dental software skills. Outstanding positive attitude and demeanor. Professionalism in all aspects of job. Competitive salary and bonuses Email resumes to: P arkwayDentalAssociates@gmail.com Diesel MechanicLooking for experienced Diesel Mechanic. Pay based upon knowledge and abilities. Need a minimum of 1yr experience in diesel repair and or trailer repair. Knowledge in welding a plus.Job Type: Full timeRequired experience 1 year Mail resumes to: P.O Box 346 Lynn Haven, FL 32444 Elite HousekeeperHiring Elite Housekeeper, full-time, Destin, M-F. We are seeking a domestic assistant to help the House and Kitchen Manager. Must be able to perform heavy cleaning with a great attitude. Some produce prep included. Are you helpful and willing? Pet friendly? This is a happy work environment, please only individuals with high energy apply! Possible salary with benefits for the right candidate. Send resume to: asterling2017@yahoo.com Highway InspectorKennedy Engineering & Associates Group LLC is a full service engineering consulting firm licensed to do business in FL, GA, SC, AL and TN and offers services in planning, design, environmental, construction management and construction engineering and inspection. We are seeking a Highway Inspector with the following responsibilities and qualifications: Responsibilities: Daily inspection of roadway and bridge construction projects Interpretation of construction plans, specification and shop drawings Daily and weekly reports of contractors work operations to comply with contract documents Basic standard mathematical calculations Qualifications CTQP Concrete Field Inspector Level I CTQP Asphalt Paving Level I CTQP Earthwork Level I CTQP Final Estimates Level I CTQP Advanced MOT IMSA Traffic Signal Inspector FL Stormwater, Erosion and Sedimentation Control Training MINIMUM of 2 Years Roadway Inspection Required Please send resumes to lkennedy@keagroup.com for further information. Land Surveyor-Party ChiefSeeking qualified field personnel with experience related to land surveying. Applicants should have a minimum of three years field experience in the areas of boundary control, topographic surveying and construction staking. Experience in the operation of Trimble Robotic Total Stations and GPS equipment is a plus.Job Type: Full timeMail resumes to: P.O BOX 346 Lynn Haven, FL 32444 LOGISTICS SPECIALIS T • 3 Plus Years Exp. in Logistics Support  DOD Knowledge / Aviation Part System A Plus  Aircraft Mechanic Exp. A Plus QUALITY ASSURANCE PROFESSIONAL  A&P License / 5 Years Exp. as Aircraft QA Insp.  DOD Knowledge / DASH-8 Aircraft Exp. A Plus  FAA IA highly preferred, but not required  Quality Exp. (ISO or AS) preferred A&P AIRCRAFT MECHANIC  A&P License / 5 Years Exp.  Exp. w/ OEM Wiring/Component/IPC Manuals  DOD Knowledge / DASH-8 Aircraft Exp. A Plus  Must be able to obtain a class 3 flight physical All Candidates Must be able to pass a background check. Full & Part-time positions available for qualified candidates. *Candidates must possess intermediate level computer skills in MS Office applications (Word, Excel & Outlook a must). Please email resumes to russell.thompson@atsainc.com Experienced• Managers •Asst Managers •Sales PersonelHeatwave & Purple Haze Now Hiring FT/PT -year round. Great pay. Great work environment. Apply at 10015 Front Beach Rd. Or fax to 850-234-9911 Housekeeping, Maintenance, Security & Front DeskCasa Blanca Resort850-234-5245 EOE / DFWP HVAC Service TechPd vacation & holidays. Med Ins, Retirement. DFWP. EOE. Tarpon Dock Air Conditioning (850) 785-9568 Hy’s ToggeryNow Accepting Applications for Sales Associates Full and Part TimeNo phone calls or emails. Apply in person only, at Hy’s Toggery Pier Park next door to Tootsie’s. Web ID#: 34374388 Maint/RepairSignal Hill GolfGrounds MaintenancePositions available. Year round employment (Golf Benefits) Apply in person only 9615 Thomas Dr. Now Hiring Experienced Cleaners.We offer Exceptional pay. Must be able to provide your own transportation and your own cleaning supplies. If you are looking for a great place to work please give us a call @ 850-248-7857 or Call Whitney at 850-527-1719 Office Administrator AssistantWe are seeking a self-motivated, task oriented Administrative Assistant with a positive, friendly attitude. Job type: F ull time Required experience: 1 year Mail resumes to: P .O Box 346 L ynn Haven, FL 32444 Plumbing ServicepersonRequirements: 5 years of verifiable service plumbing work. Current drivers license w/clean record. Drug test required prior to employment. Salary D.O.E. Applications available Whitehead Plumbing 1601 F rankford A ve. Monday -Friday Rupert’s CleanersNow hiring customer service representatives. No experience necessary. Willing to train. Able to work Monday -Friday. Apply in person Mon-Fri 8am-1pm 2320 Jenks Ave Taking ApplicationsEntry Level Tack Welders/Helpers. Will Train. Industrial/ Construction Experience a Plus. Apply in Person. No Phone Calls. 1725 Buchanan Street, Southport, FL. Callaway Village Square229 N. Tyndall Parkway General Retail Space 975 sq. feet Available Immediately Contact (850) 814 2998 Text FL91485 to 56654 Lynn Haven WarehouseFor lease, 3010 SqFt. w/Office, Three 12’ Bay Doors. Avail. April 10. Call (850) 596 0649 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Forest Park3/2 All brick house. Garage, 2 Sheds, Fenced back yard.$1,525call (850)596 0649 POOL HOMENice 3BD/2BA with large den & office (or 5BD) Screen back porch, party deck. 10x12 storage shed. $1500.00 monthly Call Joe at 850-276-2030 After 12:00 RV Lot RentalsRv sites available, shady spots, Bonifay. Full hook up incl Wifi & Cable Tv 30amp $570 50amp $620 per month. Call 850 258 3110 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL75823 to 56654 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794Text FL81660 to 56654 Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices refferences available call today for your free estimate ( 850)819-9987 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 COLE’S PAINTINGPressure Washing. Insured850-774-1291 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY All Home Repairs & RemodelingWood rot, roofs repairs, drywall, painting, vinyl, windows, doors, fencing. Lic & Ins. Sam (850)348-0207 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Int/ext painting, Clean-ups/sod, pressure washing, rock/flower beds, lawns.Save 20% Call Roy 850-303-8526 FREEAppliance removal Discount Small Hauling. 850-257-1180 BJs Lawn & Tree Service! Offering 25% off tree removal! Licensed & Insured. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 WHITE’S CONCRETESpring Special Lic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 / 896-6864 Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569Text FL91517 to 56654 Exp CNA Will care for Elderly in your home! meals,light housekeeping! Non-smoker. 36 yr exp. Ref. 850 348-5866 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Come Clean Under PressueDarryl’s Pressure washing & Window Cleaning Condo & Home Cleaning Commercial Residential 850-778-0178 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Kipple & Son Concrete and Pool RepairPool Replaser & all types of concrete work, drive ways, patio, pool deck & blockwork. Free Estimate Call: 850-866-4618 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section!

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Thursday, April 6, 2018 C C 1 1 1 1 3102 Preserve Rookery Blvd. Fabulous 4bd/5ba executive home in the gated Preserve community. $659,900Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 Cove 3br/2ba Lg Brick HomeAll electric, remod. & hardwood floors. Landsc. Spacious backyard workshop. (850) 832-4590. Lake Front LotsAvailable within 2 blocks of the beach. One lot is 42x115 that would completment the larger lot next to it that is currently for sale also. Purchase the 2 lots & make a wonderful home site. Contact Hope Abbott 850-596-7653 395 Wahoo Rd. Dock your yacht behind your house in this 3bd/2ba.Bay Point Canal Home! $379,000Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 FOR SALE BY OWNERBeautiful Panama City Beach Condo 1 br / 1.5 ba Ground floor with private boat slip. Completely furnished. Must see! $159,000 or best offer Call: 334-703-0401 Pirate’s Cove at 204 Cain Road Lake Powell 1bd/1ba Condo approx. 800 sq.ft. furnished, pools, private boat ramp, covered parking. $150K Call (850) 832-2782 or (850) 819-6929 t xt FL87402 to 56654 100+/-Acre Equestrian Ranch One of a kind. 10,000 sq foot facility Retiree Liquidating Possible Trade. 850-865-0838 https://vimeo.com/ 202665676 640 Acres in Bay County!Perfect farm or timberland! Justt off Highway 77 Lagoon Realty 850 624 1074 Approxiametly 64 acres with highway frontage, Located in Calhoun County Florida on Highway 73. A portion of described property is under Assignable Conservation Reserve Program. Great hunting!$4500 per acre FIRM Serious inquiries only please (850)832-6137 (850)832-6136 gdrpcbch@gmail.com Jackson County Florida377 Acres, $2,985.oo per Acre 145 Acres Cultivated/Irrigated 6,000 SQ FT Open Packing Shed 2,400 SQ FT Cooler with Loading Ramps Multiple Wells Call Kane 850-509-8817 3bd/2baBank Repo Like new, Double wide Set up in quiet mobile home park. 200 ft. from swimming pool. $28,957. In the heart of Panama City. 850 960-8452 NF-1179098 D O D G E C H R Y S L E R DODGE CHRYSLER J E E P R A M H Y U N D A I JEEP RAM HYUNDAI MITSUBISHI LINCOLN M M NOW HIRING!Come join the largest and busiest dealership in Bay County! We are looking to hire sales consultants for our New & Used Departments. Join our team and be able to sell from the largest selection of vehicles in the area. No experience necessary.We are offering a full training program!€ $500/week plus commission! € Amazing benets and paid vacation!Please apply in person: 636 W. 15th Street Panama City, FL 32401Ask for Greg Chavers. NF-1116606 2015 Harley Davidson 883 SportsterBlack in color, Security, ABS, Less than 10miles. $7495 (msrp $9725) Contact: 850-218-1967 Harley Ultraglide, 2009, Maroon in color with 40,350 miles 10,999.00 cali David Meadows at Bay Cars and get ready for Bike week 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars WANTED: LOOKING TO BUY JON BOATApprox 12-14” feet long. With electric motor and trailer. All in good condition. Contact: 850-238-0446 GOLF CART2011 CLUB CAR PRECEDENT STREET LEGAL 48V ELECTRIC FLIP/ FLOP SEAT 12” ALUMINUM WHEELS ADULT DRIVEN LOCAL CART LIKE NEW $3900 770-634-5351 2007 37ft Double Tree Mobile Suites 5th WheelRV for sale $20,000 firm. Call: 850-814-2726 Ram 1500, 2014, Laramie 30k miles of extras!!! Priced to sail Only 34,998 Please call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2017, Hemi V8, 4x4, low miles, Clean CarFax! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500 longhorn, 2018, 6.7 Cummins 4x4 with only 1,200 miles!!! Not a scratch inside or out! This truck is practically new! Don’t miss out, call today for details! 850-557~7093 ask for Bryan @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra, 2008, Crew, Great work truck! Only $12,988! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars TRUCK HEADQUARTERS!! EVERY MAKE & MODEL FROM GAS TO DIESEL! If I don’t have it, I will get it! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chrysler Town & Country, 2013, low miles, $14,988 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Grand Caravan, 2014, only 56k miles, SAVE BIG! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Ford Transit Van, 2017, 15 passenger van, white, automatic, all pwr, Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars 1973 Corvette51k orig. miles, auto, PS, PB, Tilt/Tele, Flowmaster exh EXCELLENT CONDITION $19,995 Contact: 850-218-1967 Dodge Dakota, 2006, 4dr, V6, only $9998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Durango GT, 2017, low miles, nav, lthr, backup cam, only $30,988 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Ford F250, 2008, 6.4L Diesel, Crew cab, lifted, long bed, LOADED! Must see! $20,988 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Ford F350, 2008, Diesel, 4x4, lthr, touchscreen radio, pwr seats, long bed, lift, and a toolbox! Runs like new! Call Bryan Penello 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars GMC Sierra LT, 2014, with 45,000 miles! V8 with tow package and ready to go to work! Financing available, call Bryan today for more info and financing details at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Need a Car, Truck, SUV??? Ease Financing Available!! Ovar 300 new and used to choos.froml Can Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Laramie, 2013, 15k miles, Hemi, htd/cld seats, nav, Bluetooth & more! $31,998 Call Scott 850-358-6223 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500 Rebel, 2017, 4x4, 5.7L, only 15k miles, Must see! Only $41,988 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2013, Laramie with 15,000 miles. Packed with features and very clean! Call Bryan for details and financing options at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, 4x4, Big Horn, LOADED with leather, nav and more! Low miles! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Compass, 2017, low miles, 1 owner, clean CarFax, like new! Only $14,988! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Patriot, 2010, only 46k miles, manual, runs & drives like new! Payments as low as $199/mth! WAC Call Bryan 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Jeep Patriot, 2017, low miles, 1 owner, Clean CarFax! Only $13,988! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Sport, 2016, low miles, 1 owner, Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2016, Rubicon, hard top, lthr, 1 owner, 25k miles, Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2018, with only 575 miles on itWhite Hard top, someone has taken the depreciation, so take advantage of this great opportunity at owning a new vehicle for the low low price of 35895.00 calf David Meadows at Bay Cars for this great deal 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Kia Sportage, 2017, only 17k miles, under warranty! Easy financing! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mitsubishi Outlander, 2014, LOADED with everything! Super clean! Only 60k miles! Only $16,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Toyota 4Runners-6 in stock! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars 2004 Chevy Silverado LTLT options, fully loaded 2WD. White exterior, leather interior; ARE cover; one owner; looks and runs good. $5000 OBO. 850-272-5305 We have 2 Ford Mustang Convertibles 2017 White one with 585 miles on it for a great price of $31,888.00 and a Black Mustang 2016 with 34719 miles on it for 23,888.00 Call David Meadows at Bay Cars for either of these vehicles 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars 2007 Hyundai Tucson$4,500 OBO, 151k miles, Very clean, 4WD, auto, cold A/C, trailer hitch, 850-890-4846 Blacked Out Toyota 4 Runner 2016 with 32,933 miles this is a great looking SUV come out and test drive it today. It’s listed at 35,064.00 come see David Meadows at Bay Dodge fur a great deal on this vehicle won’t last long Chevrolet Equinox, 2015, gray, 59k miles, Only $14,600! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Tahoe LT, 2015 Loaded with lots of extra’s! Only 30k miles Priced at $46,998 call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars GMC Yukon, 2016, Denali, white, LOADED! Only 27k miles! Super clean! Save big! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Jeep Cherokee Sport, 2017, low miles, Must see! $21,988 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Jeep Compass, 2014, silver, 64k miles, great on gas, plenty of storage! Financing available w/ payments as low as $199/mth (WAC) Call Bryan 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2018, Sterling Edition, 25th anniversary, This is the celebration year for the Grand Cherokee! Help me help you celebrate with this beautiful vehicle! Call Garcia 305-600-8331 @ Bay Cars Dodge Dart, 2014, very clean! Only $12,998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Honda Accord EXL, 2013, coupe, manual V6, only 14k miles, Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Azera Limited, 2015, full size Sedan, ln the wrapper! 30k miles, Priced to sell at 23,998 Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Genesis, 2010, Very clean for the miles and financing is available! Call Bryan 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, 2016 only 8k milesUl Under Warrantyl! Priced at 17,998 Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata Limited, 2011, 35MPG! Very comfortable! $9888 Call Bryan 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata, 2011, with only 62,000 miles! Payments as low as 189/m with approved credit! Great on gas and very clean! Call Bryan today at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Lexus LS460, 2011, Beautiful candy apple red! 45k miles, LOADED! Won’t last at $25,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Town Car, 2005, Signature, Runs great! Must see! $6998 Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz SLK250, 2013, hard top convertible, only 21k miles, Priced to sell at $24,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Porsche Boxster S, 2010, Red convertible hardtop with 71,351 miles on it for the low price 26,900.00 call David Meadows at Bay Dodge and let me help you get into this vehicle today. 706-393-1549 Chrysler 200, 2013, very clean! Only 54k miles! $12,898 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2015, RT Plus, 35k miles, auto, nav, lthr, blind spot monitor, sunroof, $26,988 Call Scott 850-358-6223 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2017, 5.7L V8, manual, Must see! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Fiat 124, 2017, two door Spider White with only 3,307 miles, so take advantage of someone else taking the depreciation. Save thousands on this nice convertible priced at 25,490.00 and come see me at Bay Dodge and ask for David Meadows 706-393-1549 Cadillac STS, 2008, with 63,000 miles, Luxurious and sporty. Call Bryan for details or pictures at 850-557-7093 @Bay Cars Chevrolet Cruze, 2016, Premier pkge, white, auto, only 21k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Chrysler 300C, 2017, white, clean, auto, V6, 29k miles, MUST SEE! $23,998 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger Scat Pack, 2016, 392 Hemi with only 12,000 miles!! Red suede interior with track apps, super track pack, sport mode and much more!! Payments as low as $4S0/Month W.A.C. call Bryan for more information at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars 2014 Porche Cayman2-Door Coupe, 37k miles. Black on Black, loaded. Call for details 850 527 1756 BMW X3, 2009, black, Won’t last long! $11,998 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars C5 Corvette, 2004, under 75,000 miles!!! Runs and drives with no mechanical issues. Only asking $16,9981 Call Bryan for details and pictures at 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Cadillac ATS, 2014, Luxury RWD sedan, 36k miles, mocha steel metallic, 1 owner, LOADED! CLEAN! $23998 Call/Text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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CLASSIFIEDSC C 1 1 2 2 Thursday, April 6, 2018 | The News Herald BILL CRAMER CHEVROLET BUICK GMC 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, Fl 850-250-5489 • 877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.comPlus tax, title, license, dealer adds, $95 electronic filing fee, and $595 dealer prep fee on all vehicles. Pricing good throug h 4/30/18. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8:30am 7:00pm Saturday: 8:30am 6pm Sunday: 1:00pm 5pmFive Decades.... Three Generations.... One Tradition. Our Pre-Owned Business Is Great, & We Need YOUR Vehicle To Supplement Our Inventory! 15 MINUTE NO OBLIGATION APPRAISALWE’RE BUYING THEM ALL! ALL YEARS! ALL MODELS! YOU NAME IT, WE’LL BUY IT! WE WILL NOT BE OUTBID!WE NEED TO BUY YOUR VEHICLE! 2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT #17302320 ......................... $4,995 2004 KIA SORENTO #18703410 .......................... $5,991 2002 NISSAN FRONTIER #17875310 ......................... $5,993 2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER #18103610 ......................... $6,993 2013 CHEVY SPARK #18101310 .......................... $7,992 2010 NISSAN ALTIMA #18702010 .......................... $7,995 2011 KIA SPORTAGE #18501010 ......................... $8,995 2009 CADILLAC STS #18600300 ......................... $9,990 2013 KIA OPTIMA #18211810 ........................... $9,991 2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER #18708010 .......................... $9,991 2015 CHEVY SONIC #18222810 .......................... $9,991 2015 KIA FORTE #18207210 .......................... $9,991 2013 FORD FOCUS #18807400 ......................... $9,992 2015 FORD FIESTA #18808900 ......................... $9,992 2006 CHEVY EXPRESS #18701310 ........................ $10,991 2007 CHEVY SILVERADO #18214410 ........................ $10,991 2014 FORD FOCUS #18219520 ........................ $10,991 2013 HONDA INSIGHT #18413800 ........................ $10,991 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX #18247310 ........................ $10,991 2011 CHEVY IMPALA #17114710 ........................ $10,993 2014 CHEVY IMPALA LTD. #18101310 ....................... $10,994 2014 KIA SOUL #18501110 ......................... $11,595 2014 KIA OPTIMA #18600400 ........................ $11,900 2016 JEEP PATRIOT #18705300 ....................... $12,993 2017 JEEP PATRIOT #18702600 ....................... $12,995 2006 NISSAN PATHFINDER #18246210 ........................ $13,991 2010 CADILLAC SRX #17297210 ........................ $13,991 2016 TOYOTA COROLLA #18254010 ........................ $13,991 2016 TOYOTA COROLLA #18809000 ........................ $13,991 2016 CHEVY CRUZE #18702100 ....................... $13,992 2017 KIA OPTIMA #18414300 ........................ $14,991 2016 NISSAN ALTIMA #17124410 ....................... $15,995 2013 HONDA ACCORD #18212910 ........................ $15,991 2017 JEEP COMPASS #17488500 ....................... $15,994 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 #18228910 ........................ $15,995 2015 TOYOTA CAMRY #18210710 ....................... $16,993 2017 JEEP RENEGADE #17788300 ....................... $16,995 2013 FORD ESCAPE #18510100 ......................... $17,991 2004 CHEVY CORVETTE #17276512 ........................ $17,994 2010 FORD F-150 #18239710 ........................ $17,994 2014 CHEVY SILVERADO #18205910 ....................... $18,694 2014 CHRYSLER 300 #18253010 ........................ $18,991 2015 TOYOTA CAMRY #18203910 ........................ $18,991 2014 BUICK LACROSSE #17315010 ....................... $18,992 2016 CHEVY MALIBU #17137510 ....................... $18,993 2014 CHEVY EXPRESS 3500 #18808600 ....................... $19,993 2017 RAM PROMASTER 1500 #18701800 ....................... $19,995 2017 CHEVY EQUINOX #18702300 ....................... $19,995 2012 CHEVY SUBURBAN #17298510 ....................... $20,991 2014 CHEVY IMPALA #17257910 ...................... $20,993 2014 CHRY. TOWN & CNTRY. #18227010 ...................... $20,993 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18222310 ........................ $21,991 2013 CHEVY TRAVERSE #18249510 ........................ $21,991 2015 GMC ACADIA #18246810 ........................ $21,991 2014 CADILLAC SRX #18221320 ....................... $21,992 2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18702710 ....................... $22,991 2014 FORD F-150 #17278420 ....................... $22,994 2014 RAM 1500 #18227920 ....................... $22,994 2018 MINI COOPER #17601800 ...................... $23,990 2012 FORD F-150 #18211710 ........................ $23,991 2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 #18240520 ...................... $23,992 2014 BUICK ENCLAVE #18806100 ....................... $24,493 2012 RAM 1500 #18245710 ....................... $24,992 2015 TOYOTA AVALON #18248810 ....................... $25,991 2014 CADILLAC SRX #18415600 ...................... $25,992 2013 CHEVY TAHOE #18220210 ...................... $25,993 2015 CHEVY CAMARO #18232310 ...................... $25,995 2017 CHEVY MALIBU #17129110 ....................... $26,993 2015 CHEVY CAMARO #18412000 ........................ $27,991 2013 TOYOTA TUNDRA #17590900 ....................... $27,994 2014 FORD F-150 #17218012 ....................... $27,994 2017 FORD F-150 #18801500 ....................... $27,994 2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 #18250010 ....................... $28,991 2015 CADILLAC SRX #18410500 ....................... $28,991 2017 RAM PROMASTER 1500 #18410900 ....................... $28,991 2007 HUMMER H2 #18409710 ....................... $29,991 2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 #18240710 ....................... $29,991 2015 DODGE DURANGO #18248410 ....................... $29,991 2016 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 #18242620 ...................... $29,994 2014 GMC SIERRA 1500 #17491910 ...................... $29,995 2013 CHEVY SUBURBAN #17296910 ...................... $29,995 2014 RAM 1500 #18215610 ....................... $30,991 2017 GMC ACADIA #18237112 ........................ $30,991 2015 CADILLAC XTS #17136510 ...................... $30,993 2016 CADILLAC SRX #18410400 ........................ $31,991 2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 #18505400 ....................... $31,994 2018 CHEVY COLORADO #18708400 ....................... $32,991 2016 CADILLAC SRX #18409800 ....................... $33,991 2014 JEEP WRANGLER UNL. #18228020 ....................... $34,591 2015 JEEP WRANGLER #18410300 ....................... $34,991 2015 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18505110 ........................ $34,992 2017 GMC ACADIA #17124210 ........................ $37,991 2016 TOYOTA TUNDRA #18510800 ........................ $37,991 2014 TOYOTA SEQUOIA #18410200 ....................... $39,991 2016 MERCEDES GL350 #17591000 ...................... $39,995 2014 GMC SIERRA 1500 #18247410 ....................... $47,992 2015 CADILLAC ESCALADE #18233910 ....................... $47,994 2017 FORD F-150 #18223810 ....................... $52,991 2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 #18411200 ........................ $52,991 2015 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 #18417600 ....................... $52,991 2015 GMC YUKON XL #17244810 ...................... $52,993 2016 CADILLAC ESCALADE #18231710 ...................... $58,994 2017 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 #18228310 ....................... $62,491 STOP!TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE INCREDIBLE SAVINGS DUE TO THE HUGE SUCCESS OF OUR BUY CAR EVENT! NF-1152063

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ARTS DOWNTOWN:55th Bay Annual, ArtWalk celebrate area artists | 6-7 E N T E R T A I N E R ENTERTAINER ISSUE NO. 163 €F riday, April 6, 2018Artists Touch: David Sussman | 4 Dining: Wa e Queen | 10-11 Beach Insider:Tacos & Tequila| 19-21 Putnam County Spelling Bee | 26FREE

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E2 Friday, April 6, 2018 | INSIDE Share your photosSend us your pictures of people who made the scene around town and well share them with readers. Email photos to tsimmons@ pcnh.com and jwaddy@ pcnh.com. SEEN ON SCENEArt Downtown ...............4 55th Bay Annual/ArtWalk 6-7 Dining: Waffle Queen ..... .............................10-11 Liquid Dream Fishing Team .................................14 Community Spotlight ..18 Beach Insider: Tacos & Tequila ..................19-21 Nightlife .................... 22 Lifes A Beach ..............23 Putnam County Spelling Bee .................................26 Jam Session ................29 Movietown:Ready Player One ..........................30 GO & DO: Calendar 32-38 ABOUT US Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com 'Unity II' by Heather Clements was named Best of Show at the 2017 Bay Annual competition and exhibit. The 55th Bay Annual opens April 10 See the article on pages E6-7 for details. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]ABOUT THE COVERFAR LEFT: Participants trade in eggs for prizes at the Adult Egg Hunt at Patches Pub. LEFT: Prizes range from beer koozies to Jell-O shots and free draft beer during the Adult Egg Hunt at Patches Pub. LEFT: Participants scale fences in search of Easter eggs during the Adult Egg Hunt on April 1 at Patches Pub & Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive, in Panama City Beach. [PHOTOS BY ERYN DION/THE NEWS HERALD]

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E4 Friday, April 6, 2018 | Exhibition will run through May 26By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A third-generation photographer with a long and interesting career will be the focus of an extended exhibition opening Friday at The Light Room. The Art of David Sussman PhotographyŽ will be on display through May 26 at the studio/gallery located at 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City. David is a local commercial photographer who just moved back to the area from south Florida,Ž said owner and photographer Bonnie Tate-Woodby. This show highlights some of the projects hes worked on over the years. There are industrial, aerial, nature, macro, portraits and some of his personal creative images.Ž Sussman is a media artist with more than over 40 years of experience in both film and digital photography, according to Tate-Woodby. He started his career at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a photographer, where he led the transition from film to digital in a full-service photo lab. During his 30-year tenure at JHU/APL, Sussman taught seminars at Winona International School of Professional Photographers in the field of Special Film Effects. His photography has been featured on covers of national and international magazines including PhotoMethods, Technical Photography, Harbor Style, The Professional Photographer and others. On his website, DWSussman.com, the photographer saidexcelling in the areas of industrial and commercial photography, which much of his work covers, requires vision and knowledge of lighting: The vision requires seeing in the minds eye what could be, rather than what everyone else sees. Its the knowledge of using light and modifying it by the master photographer that captures that mental image.Ž Also known for his special effects work, Sussman said the essential component is to use composition, lighting and software to tell a story in a single image that elicits an emotional response. Composite imagery has no known boundaries other than knowledge,Ž hesaid. The most challenging effect is making a multiple image composite look natural as if shot on a single sheet of film.Ž Sussman has received numerous professional photography awards including Kodaks Industrial Challenge Award, Epcots Professional Photographers showcase and Professional Photographers of America Showcase. Today he is recognized as a master in the Digital Media Field,Ž TateWoodby said. An opening reception for The Art of David Sussman PhotographyŽ will befrom 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, April 6. An exhibit talk/tour is planned for 2 p.m. April 28. This will be a great opportunity to learn where, how and when he chooses his subjects, and technical aspects of his equipment and methods,Ž TateWoodby said. Mr. Sussman photographs, processes, prints, stretches and frames all of his own work.Ž Widely known throughout Florida and the U.S., Sussmans work has drawna number of private collectors as well as commercial clients including Bayfront Health, Landsberg Bennett Wealth Management,Wyvern Hotel, real estate and title companies, builders and resort developers, and a large land management company in Southwest Florida. Local clients include Berg Pipe, NAVSEA, AAA Trucking, Panama City Shipyard and Hornbeck, to name but a few. Architecture photography is the art of capturing buildings that accurately portray all or part of a structure aesthetically,Ž Sussman explained. This is one of the most challenging assignments due to observing and capturing ambient light, shadows, color balance and even how to add your own light without it being noticed.Ž The Light Room and the Sussman exhibit will be open after-hours on Thursday, April 12, as part of the Historic Downtown ArtWalk, from 4-8 p.m.See the article on pages E6-7 for more information on the event.Sussmans photos capture range of subjects THE ARTISTS TOUCHWhat: An exhibit of large format printing, “ lm and digital photography showcasing nature, industrial, aerial, portraits and other work. Where: The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave., Panama City When: Opening reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m., Friday, April 6; exhibit talk/tour at 2 p.m. April 28; show will hang through May 26 Details: Call 850-8180475, email bonnie@ thelightroompc.com; or visit TheLightRoomPC.comDAVID SUSSMAN PHOTOGRAPHYThe Light Room in Panama City will host an exhibit by Florida-based photographer David Sussman from April 6 to May 26. [DAVID SUSSMAN/CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS]

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E6 Friday, April 6, 2018 | 55th Bay Annual opens, evening ArtWalk plannedBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Downtown will celebrate the visual arts and area artists this week, with the opening of the 55th Bay Annual, an Artwalk, and other related activities. These events not only enrich the lives of locals, but also encourage tourism and a healthy local economy,Ž said artist Heather Clements, a director at CityArts Cooperative and the Best of Show winner at the Bay Annual for the past two years. Its an exciting time for Panama City, with a greater number and variety of cultural events blooming right now because of so many passionate and dedicated people.Ž The opening reception of the 55th Bay Annualwill be from 6-9 p.m. Saturday, April 7, at thePanama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St. The awards ceremony will take place at 7:30 p.m., and the exhibition will open to the public on Tuesday, April 10, running through May 4. Bay Annual is a competition and exhibit that has stood the test of time, stood the test of many trials,Ž said Kim Griffin White, executive director at the Center for the Arts. Weve had great work arrive, and this years event will prove to be excellent.Ž Awards include a Best of Show winner, whoreceives $500 and a solo exhibit in 2019; five Merit Award winners receive$100 each; and honorable mentions that receive a ribbon.Clements, who received the Best of Show awards in 2016 and 2017, will have her solo exhibit in the Main Gallery in May. The Bay Annual is a wonderful community event Im always thrilled to be a part of because its an exciting culmination of the best works by local artists,Ž Clements said. Im genuinely blown away every year, as our artists work keeps improving, and new talent is showcased every year, as well.Ž Winning Best of Show has beenan honor, Clements said.The timing of her wins couldnt have been better, she added, as she had beendoubting the value and purpose of her art, as artists inevitably do. After dedicating my entire life to art and creating literally thousands of drawings and paintings, it is so appreciated to receive some recognition for all that hard work,Ž she said. Honestly, the first time I won Best of Show I had been so impressed by the exhibit I doubted I would win anything at all. After they announced my name, I had to make sure I wasnt hearing things!Ž Different judges are used each year. This years judges are Sarah Thomas Stage, painter and program manager fortheFlorida Division of Cultural Affairs, and Linda Hall, a Tallahasseebased artist whomaintains a studio in the historic Smoky Downtown celebrates area artists THE ARTISTS TOUCHArtist Heather Clements poses beside her painting Unity II, which received the Best of Show award in the 54th Bay Annual. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] See ART, 7Indian Lagoon by Pam Hutton received a Merit Award in 2017. Free Improvisation by Carl Webb received an Honorable Mention in the 2017 competition.

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E7Hollow section of town and teaches part-time in the Department of Art and International programs at Florida State University. Having out-of-town judges is an important factor in Bay Annual,Ž White said. DOWNTOWN ARTWALK The Downtown ArtWalk will take place from 4-8 p.m. Thursday, April 12. Thirteen local art galleries have joined with shops and restaurants where pop-up galleries will appear tooffer anexciting visual art experience.Each location will serve upunique art exhibits accompanied by live music, complimentary hors doeuvres, beverages, door prizes and more. We will all be open 4-8 p.m. with refreshments, all free,Ž White said. Each art spot will have a door prize with a value of at least $50.Ž To be elegible for one of the 13 door prizes, patrons must have their passportsŽ stamped by at least seven of the participating art spaces during the event, andleave the passport with the last venuevisited. Passports will be collected on Friday, April 13, and a drawing of eligible passports will determine the winners. Winners will be notified how to collect their prizes. The passports and prizes are meant toencourage patrons to stroll historic downtown Panama Cityfrom gallery to gallery anddiscover the rich and varied offeringsŽ of the downtown art district. Local artists will be on hand to talk about about their work and creative processes. AnArtWalk map will be available at each of theparticipating venues,providing aself-guided tour of art around downtown. The event is free and open to the public. Original art and gifts will be priced to sell, with some locations offering special pricing on other items for the ArtWalk event. Downtown ArtWalk galleriesinclude: The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive; Paul Brent Gallery, 413 W. Fifth St.; Fringe Gallery/ CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave.; Gallery 721 Art and Artifacts, 445 Harrison Ave.; Matthew L. Jankowski Archive, 505 E. Seventh St.; Randy Johnson Art Gallery, 535 Harrison Ave.; The Light Room, 306 Harrison Ave.; Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St.; and The UnReal ARTists Gallery, 839 Oak Ave. During the Art Walk, I think people will be amazed by the diversity of talent this area has to offer in both visual arts and music,Ž Clements said. It will be an evening to please the senses, and feel connected to the artistic community. CityArts/Fringe Gallery will have live music by John Andrulevich, snacks, new artwork for sale, and well even open the doors to our figure drawing class „ with a clothed model for the occasion „so visitors can see artists at work.Ž Other participating venues includepop-up galleries at Black and White Tavern, 448 Harrison Ave.; Blasted Screen Print and Boutique, 424 Harrison Ave.; The Funky Mermaid, 474 Harrison Ave.; and Moseys Downtown, 425 Grace Ave., which plans to stay open later than 8 p.m. Well have The Art of David Sussman photography exhibit, along with blues music from Melissa Califano, and wine and desserts,Ž said Bonnie Tate-Woodby, owner of The Light Room.Im excited about this ArtWalk because its a very organized team-up of 13 locations and dozens of creative people. Its an invitation for the community to enjoy lots of art in one night and discover how downtown is growing.Ž ARTFrom Page 6 THE ARTISTS TOUCHConfetti by Al Morris won a Merit Award in 2017. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Yellow Orchids by Dedee Higby received an Honorable Mention in 2017. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] Primary Colors by Pam Hutton received an Honorable Mention in 2017. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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E8 Friday, April 6, 2018 |

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E10 Friday, April 6, 2018 | Build your own protein wa esBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Sarah K. Yohn of SKY Fitness and Nutrition openedWaffle Queen Cafe on Feb. 14 inside Fitness Junky, so others could fall in love with her protein waffles, too. Im a one-woman show,Ž said Yohn, aka Waffle Queen, a competitive body builder. Im thankful Im located in a gym, because I probably wouldnt get my workouts in.Ž Shelast competed two years ago and plans to return to the spotlight this year at MaxFit Classic in Fort Walton Beach, where she won first in 2016. On the wall by the coffee bar „ builtby her husband, Bo,a Navy veteran in the Reserve „are family photos of her parents, along with her mothers waffle maker. We always grew up baking together. She loved to host parties. She wanted to open up a bakery one day. This is a tribute to her, something she never got to do,Ž Yohn said. She and my father both passed away from cancer. I decided I wanted to help people from the foundation, help them get healthy before everbecoming sick „ my why.Ž Her mother, Geneva, passed away in 2011, and her father, David,in 2013. In 2014, she began to unlock her fitness potential. Yohnearned credentials from the National Academy of Sports Medicine as aCertified Personal Trainer, Fitness Nutrition Specialist, and Performance Enhancement Specialist. I always had waffles daily and if I go low-carb I can fill it with goodies on top. I would look forward to it each day,Ž said Yohn, who usually has a waffle postmorning workout. Waffle Queen Cafe customers start bypicking a protein „ flavored protein powders (all gluten-free) that are mixed with water and one egg for the base. You cant use egg white or its a flatter waffle,Ž Yohn explained. Waffles range from one carb to seven carbs for just the waffle itself.Ž The menus eight protein powder flavors range from Chocolate Cupcake Frosting to Peanut Butter and White Chocolate Mint.Thewaffle that started it all is the best-selling Snickerdoodle, a one-carb waffle made withSnickerdoodle PEScience protein powder (one of two brands she uses). The Snickerdoodle waffle, alsoher all-time fave,packs 24 grams of protein and 5 grams of fat (from the egg) without any fillings or toppings. After deciding on the protein, Step 2 (optional) is to pick from a choice of 10fillings, from agave syrup to chocolate chips, pecans and unsweetened coconut. People love pecans and mini chocolate chips,Ž Yohn said. I have a lot of regulars.Ž Finally, pick a topping, if desired. You dont have to limit on toppings, because its so low-calorie,Ž Yohn said. Waffles start at $5 and include Walden Farms sugar-free pancake syrup and little Reddi-wip. Go nuts over Wa e Queen Cafe FOOD & DRINKWhat: Build your own protein waf” es and shakes; pick up SKY Meals Where: 7924 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach; inside Fitness Junky in the Beach Shopping Center by the Hathaway Bridge; open to the public Hours: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to noon Saturday Details or preordering: Facebook. com/waf” equeencafe; SkyFitnessNutrition.com; sarahyohn@ me.com; 602-332-8589Wa e Queen CafeWaf” e Queens Snickerdoodle waf” e starts with PEScience protein powder mixed with water and an egg. This one also is “ lled with pecans and topped with blueberries, raspberries and prepared peanut butter powder, then drizzled with the Walden Farms sugar-free syrup and topped with Reddi-wip. [JAN WADDY/ THE NEWS HERALD] Waf” e Queen Sarah Katherine Yohn of SKY Fitness and Nutrition has paired her passion for “ tness with her cravings for waf” es. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See WAFFLE, 11

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E11 FOOD & DRINKAdditional fillings and toppings are 50 cents each. I went for the Snickerdoodlefilled with pecansand topped with blueberries, raspberries and prepared powdered peanut butter„ along with the Reddi-wip and syrup. Yohn plugged it into her MyFitnessPal smartphone app and it came to a total of 13 carbs, 13 fat, 30 grams of protein, and 5 grams fiber. I try to do a balance of carbs, fat and protein; its a macro breakdown for body builders,Ž Yohn said. I dont like to look at food as good or bad. I like Flexible Dieting. Eat food and enjoy it while making it really good. Food is fuel. A lot of girls in the fitness industry and in general, fear carbs and food.Ž Even though I dont track my macronutrients,the Snickerdoodle wafflefelt healthful and guilt-free „and was surprisingly good and filling. The waffle also was much thicker and more spongy than I had expected. Every Wednesday, Yohn also creates a Waffle of the Week, alternating between sweet and savory creations. It allows me to still be creative,Ž she said. I make about 25 Waffles of the Week in a day.Ž She also offers Loyalty Cards: If you buy 10 waffles, get the Waffle of the Week for free. If you dont like savory, save it for the following week,Ž Yohn said. She and her husband always have to try the Waffle of the Week when creating them, too, of course. When I did the biscuits and gravy waffle, I had three or four of them,Ž she said. Other savory creations have included the Artisan Pizza, a pizza dough base that she rolled out and seasoned with sage and Italian seasoning. Ithrow it in the waffle iron and then add sauce and meat,Ž she said. Some guys had two or three at a time.Ž On March 29, she was making the Nutty Monkey Waffle of the Week, but already was preparing for this weeks debut of the Philly Cheesesteak Waffle topped with flank steak, sauteed onions and peppers, and Provolone cheese. For the base I am thinking about using the Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits „thefat will crisp up nicely „ and an all-purpose protein powder,Ž Yohn said. In addition to waffles, the menu includes Build Your Own Protein ShakeŽ with protein powder mixed with almond or cows milk, starting at $4, with 50 cents for each addition „ from blueberries to chia seeds. She also is currently doing meal prep with a choice of three different Sky Meals,which can be preordered online (along with waffles) at skyfitnessnutrition.com. The Fajita Bowl sold out in an hour,Ž Yohn said. Other choices include the Teriyaki Chicken Bowl and Turkey Chili and Jalapeno Cornbread, which also has been a Waffle of the Week. This week, she debuted the Spring-Givingmeal with green beans, sweet potatoes (plus cinnamon and sugar), and ground turkey with fresh rosemary and thyme topped with cranberry. WAFFLEFrom Page 10The Philly Cheesesteak, which debuted April 4, is the Waf” e of the Week. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Sarah Yohn prepares waf” es and SKY Meals at the cafe. The entrance to Waf” e Queen is inside Fitness Junky in Panama City Beach.

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E12 Friday, April 6, 2018 |

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E14 Friday, April 6, 2018 | The kick-off tournament of the Emerald Coast Redfish Circuit was upon us. We expected to experience the same short tides, two highs and two lows, and about the same weather, 15to 20-mph winds out of the North, as two weeks previous at the Florida Pro Redfish Series, where we finished 19th. Leading up to the tournament, Jake and I had prefished two days in five different areas to be prepared and not weigh in with just 2 pounds. The first day of prefish, wewent to one spot, caught a 7.01-pound red fan casting and left. The second day of prefishing, we caught a 6.5-pound red at the island and a 7.2pound red in St. Andrew Bay. Wefound roughly 10 schools of reds with more than half yielding upper slot reds. We pinpointed what baits, jig head size, and speed to work to catch the bigger reds. Whats great about the Emerald Coast Redfish Circuit, besides low entry cost andthree calcuttas to buy into, is that it has more of a good time, relaxed environment.We bought into most spots and big trout calcuttas. We thought about buying into the big red, but knew seven teams were making runs for the bigger reds. We were going to head toward the island to fish one of the schools we had found. When we came out of Callaway Bayou, it was capping 2to 3-foot waves. We changed our minds quickly. Instead, we went to find the school we had found the weekend before in East Bay that produced a 7-pound red. We arrived at the point, power poled down, and began to fan cast, since it was overcast and windy, with no visibility. Third cast hung a 2-pound trout at 19 inches. Next cast caught a 17-inch trout, and the next, a 16-inch red. Then more and more trout. The wind and waves were beating us down being in the open, so we moved to a cove we knew out of the weather, planning to come back later when it warmed up. We got to the cove, dropped the trolling motor and began tobeat the banks slowly, looking for big trout and reds. Again, it was trout after trout after trout, and nothing bigger then 16 inches. Just as we were about ready to move, I hooked up „ but this time there was no head shake and it nosed down. I hung a 21-inch red weighing in at 3 pounds. We knew that wouldnt place or win calcuttas. It was a no-cull tournament, so we released it and moved on. We went to another cove that had done well for us on standard tides, but was sometimes hard to access on short tides. We managed to get back in there and immediately spotted an upper slot red with the little bit of sun that appears every so often a minute at a time. We cast, jigged, waited, and nothing. The sun was behind clouds again, so we couldnt see where the fish went. When the sun appeared again, the red was gone. No idea where. We worked through the cove, fan casting and trying to sight cast when allowed. We saw a handful of middle to lower slot reds and nothing would eat. It was now 11 a.m., with weigh in at 3 p.m. We had a 2-pound trout in the live well and werent finding the schools of upper slots we were hoping for. We went back to the first point as the sun became a constant andwater rippled from the wind. While we worked around the point, I noticed blue tails moving about 75 feet in front of us. I couldnt tell how big, just that they moved away from us. I told Jake to be ready. We were going to try to cut an angle and get within distance so we could cast ahead of them. As we angled, the blue tails got closer. I said,ŽNow,Ž andwe both threw ahead, both jigged once, and both hooked up. We hung a 4-pound red and a 3.75-pound red. Normally, we wouldnt keep either unless it was a cull tournament. We werent seeing much and Jakes 3.75pound red had 10 spots. We knew that red was a candidate to place in the calcuttas and win us something. After pulling two out of that school, everything spooked and we couldnt find another red in that area.We ran to a flat that washit-or-miss for us in the past. We drifted the flat, throwing soft plastics, and caught a 20-inch red. We saw big trout but they refused to eat, and spooked off. We followed that flat around a bend and found calm, smooth, clear, shallow water. Once we were in the smooth water, we found the school of upper slot reds we had been looking for. We couldnt breathe hard without spooking a fish. There were probably 10 in that school of upper slots, and we could never get in casting distance due to how spooky they were with the clear, smooth, shallow water. We finished eighth out of 25 teams; 14 teams weighed in, and only 8 teams had two fish. The conditions were hard and the big fish became scarce, few and far between. Winning weight was right at 12 pounds, followed by 11, then9 and below. We took second in both calcuttas, missing first in spots by one spot and trout by half a pound. All in all, for a first tournament, and considering the conditions, it was a good tournament, and we did take home some money for the calcuttas.LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAMA good tourney, despite conditions A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony WatsonJake and AJ Watson are shown at the Emerald Coast Red“ sh Circuit tournament weigh-in. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E18 Friday, April 6, 2018 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: John Clancy Occupation: Master carpenter and handyman Where you grew up: Born Californian, but Southern raised. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Juan Taco/tacos, of course! Favorite hang-out: St. Andrews State Park What you do for fun: My wife and I renovate houses, golf and “ sh. Name: Michael J. Russ Occupation: Bestselling author/speaker Where you grew up: Military brat, grew up living around the world. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Capt. Jacks Buffett/ crab legs Favorite hang-out: Diegos What you do for fun: Golf at Holiday Golf Club, play the drums, drink red wine. Name: Timothy J Ramsden, MD Age: 54 Occupation: Medical doctor Where you grew up: Plano, Ill. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Finns Island Style Grub/Finntastic Wrap with chicken without the tortilla Favorite hang-out: My favorite place to hang out it is under the Gulf of Mexico. What you do for fun: I enjoy scuba diving for fun and dinner!

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T a c o s & Tacos & T e q u i l a F e s t Tequila FestSoak up inaugural esta at Grand Lagoon | 20-21 B E A C H I N S I D E R BEACH INSIDER ISSUE NO. 163 € Friday, April 6, 2018

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corn. I chose to do 500 of each.Ž The Grand Marlin, whichwill have a tent out front for the competition, also will be serving a modified brunch menu beginning at 10 a.m. Were trying to create an awareness of the East End, a combined effort for businesses. We want to spread the wealth. You have the Grand Marlin, Dockside Seafood, Capt. Andersons and Off the Hook right there,Ž Jochum said. We are organic over here at the Grand Lagoon, the gateway to the Gulf, with working marinas. All the coalition members, 72 members, are mom and pop businesses on a working waterfront with commercial fishing, recreational fishing, the only exit to the Gulf from here. If you want to come to the Gulf in Panama City, you come to the Grand Lagoon.Ž For Tacos & Tequila Finns Island Style Grub plans to stay withan original recipe for that has continued to attract locals and tourists. We are doing our original fish tacos. It is our top seller at Finns since day one,Ž said owner Justin Buxton.The margarita is going to be something else though. Mango aa with ginger lime jalapeo Kombucha. It is delicious.Ž While sampling tacos and sipping on margaritas, expect to hear everything from reggae to tropical rock and jazz playing in the background. Kevin Jacobs and Shawn Perry will be playing a variety of music. Theyre two local favorites,Ž Busuttil said. Whats cool is the stage we got is going to be a huge boat from Legendary Marine; theyll play on the back of the boat.Ž Tacos & Tequila shirts also will be for sale at the event. Guests must be 21 and older to attend. Ticketsare$25 per person and$20 for active and retired military and first responders.Tickets are available at GrandLagoon.org and participating Grand Lagoon businesses: Dat Cajun Place Cafe, 8501 Thomas Drive; Patches Pub & Grill, 4723 Thomas Drive;The Grand Marlin of Panama City Beach, 5323 N. Lagoon Drive; Busters Beer & Bait, 5900 Thomas Drive; Diegos Burrito Factory Thomas Drive, 6209 Sunset Drive; Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive; Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive; Spinnaker Beach Club, 8795 Thomas Drive; C-Level Bar & Grill, 5508 Thomas Drive; Sisters of the Sea & Dive Bar, 3901 Thomas Drive; Finns Island Style Grub, 7210 Thomas Drive. Tickets also will be available at the event, if it is not sold out. Any proceeds from the event will benefit the Grand Lagoon Coalition, but a raffle of gift cards from numerous Grand Lagoon businesses will be divided among three local charities: Warrior Beach Retreat, the Toys for Kids Foundation and Food4Kidz. | Friday, April 6, 2018 E21Inaugural esta postponed to Mothers Day WeekendBy Jan Waddy747-5072 | 747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACHTacos & Tequila pairs perfectly at the beach „ especially when soaked up in the sun, which is why the Grand Lagoon Coalition has decided to move the inaugural festival from April 7 to May 12. Its still going to be wonderful, and the weather will be nicer,Ž said Paul BusterŽ Busuttil, event committee chairman. We sold 500 tickets, and the tickets are still valid for May 12. Well refund money at Eventbrite or they can go to thevenue where they bought the ticket.Ž Because of weather concerns, the Grand Lagoon Coalition decided Wednesday night to findthe new date „ keepingthe time, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and location in front of the Grand Marlin the same.All 14participating Grand Lagoonbusinesses also are expected to stay the same. Right now, weve talked to most of them and they are all on board,Ž said Busuttil, owner of Busters Beer & Bait „ one of thecompetitors. Grand Lagoon bars and restaurants are competing for the Best Fish Taco and the Best Margarita in the Grand Lagoon „ and the people get to decide the winners. Fish tacosis probably the most popular item on any menu here, and whats more natural than fish tacos and margaritas on the water?Ž asked Executive Chef Konrad Jochum, consultant to Schooners and Spinnaker. Once you get your ticket, sample one or 100 margaritas; itstotally up to you. Each table has two boxes. Eat and drink as much as you want, then throw in your ticket. Whichever box has the most tickets, wins. Two or three judges will be judging the best decoratedbooth.Ž After the success of the Grand Lagoons third annual Bloody Mary & Music Festival at Schooners in October, Tacos & Tequila seemed like another winning combination. Basically it was something I saw in another city and wanted to bring it here,Ž said Busuttil,inspired by asimilar event in Destin. Our Bloody Mary Fest blew away Destins Bloody Mary Fest. Weve already pre-sold 500 tickets and are capping it at 800, because its the first time to make sure we have enough fish.Ž But instead ofthe Big Tomato trophy, the winners of Tacos & Tequila have a chance for the fish taco trophy (complete with a plastic fish) andthe margarita glass trophy. Jochum is ordering 600 pounds of Mahi Mahi from the Gulf of Mexico for Tacos & Tequila to be delivered to participating businesses May 11. The Mahi Mahi will be cooked fresh on large grills in the Grand Marlin parking lot during the competition. Everybody uses the same fish and everybody uses the same tequila and goes to work,Ž Jochum said. Each vendor gets 60 pounds of Mahi to use for the tacos. Eachvendor makes 1,000 tacos and 1,000 5-ounce margaritas.Ž The featured tequila is Dolce Vida, an organic craft tequila created by the original makers of Deep Eddy Vodka. Everybody uses the same tequila andthe same Triple Sec. Its up to you to create a recipe; you cant add any more alcohol. ... The tacos will be small 1-ounce tacos with 4-inch taco shells,Ž said Busuttil, who added businesses had a choice of flour or Tacos & Tequila:Grand Lagoon concocts a winning combo BEACH INSIDERWhat: Grand Lagoon area businesses competing for best “ sh taco and margarita; live music; gift card raf” e; hosted by Grand Lagoon Coalition When: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 12 (rescheduled from April 7) Where: In front of The Grand Marlin of Panama City Beach, 5323 N. Lagoon Drive Admission: $25; $20 for military and “ rst responders; tickets available in advance at participating Grand Lagoon businesses: Dat Cajun Place Cafe, Patches Pub & Grill, The Grand Marlin of Panama City Beach, Busters Beer & Bait, Diegos Burrito Factory Thomas Drive, Sheraton Bay Point Resort, Schooners, Spinnaker Beach Club, C-Level Bar & Grill, Sisters of the Sea & Dive Bar, Finns Island Style Grub, or at the door if not sold out; tickets are limited; ages 21 and up Details or tickets: GrandLagoon.org Refunds: Tickets already purchased are valid on the new date. If you need a refund, please visit Eventbrite or the venue where the ticket was purchased.TACOS & TEQUILA FESTGrand Lagoons Tacos & Tequila has been rescheduled from Saturday, April 7, to Saturday, May 12, in hopes of sunshine. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Grand Lagoon businesses will compete for the Best Margarita in the Grand Lagoon. Finns Island Style Grub will stay with their crowd-pleasing recipe. Finns Island Style Grubs “ sh tacos feature Mahi Mahi, cabbage, pico, cheese, cilantro, valentina and white sauce. Fish tacos are a mainstay of menus along the Northwest Florida coast. E20 Friday, April 6, 2018 |

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHDustin Savage and Caleb Hutton dig in the sand. [PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] Jernya Adams plays with her nephew, Jahmir Atwater, 2. Tionni Atwater, 6 months, shows off her beach fashion. Noella William, 6, digs in the sand with a paddle. Tony Ogburn and Chinda Nhep take a walk along the water.

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E26 Friday, April 6, 2018 | GO & DO : LIVE THEATERBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The children at this years 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling BeeŽ are sure to tickle the funny bone „ while using humerusŽ correctly in a sentence. We live in a world now where we dont talk anymore, and heres a show about the importance of words,Ž said Hank Rion, director and assistant professor of Theatre at Gulf Coast State College. The cast, theyre underdogs. They find protection in words from bullies and from daily life. This spelling bee makes them feel important, and itsin using the power of words. It really kind of struck a nerve with me.Ž The GCSC Visual and Performing Arts Divisionwillopen the Tony and Drama Desk awardwinning musical comedy, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,Ž on Friday.Based on the book by Rachel Sheinkin andmusical score by William Finn, the story focuses on an eclectic group of awkward midpubescent students as they vie for the spelling championship of a lifetime. While candidly disclosing hilarious and touching stories from their home lives, the tweens spell their way through a series of (potentially nonexistent) words, hoping never to hear the soul-crushing dingŽ of the bell that signals a spelling mistake. The production is a fast-paced crowd pleaser with audience participation „ volunteer spellers are taken from each nights audience „ making it an instant theater favorite. GCSC student Tyler Kent, 26, plays a 12-year-old contestant. Though one of the oldest spellers, he doesnt always know what hes doing. Some of the stuff that he says comes off as mean, but its kind of just because he doesnt know how to interact with the other kids,Ž Kent explains. He doesnt have many friends. One of the benefits of going to the Bee is that he always gets to make new friends when he goes there.Ž Kent played a different character in the show when he was a student at Mosley High School in 2010. He has enjoyed exploring a completely different character in this production. Kent added thateach performance haschallenged the actorsto keep from breaking character and laughing at the improvised on-stage antics. It happens,Ž Kent said. One of the actors portrays Jesus, and he does something differentevery night, to the point that it makes us cry laughing. Its a constant battle to have fun and try not to break.Ž The cast consists of nine current GCSC students including Ben Whitmer, Amy Tinch, Haythem Smith, Charis Walker, Savannah C. Wambo, Danyelle Kirchoff, Christian Paris, Christian Becerra and Kent. The production is directed and choreographed by Rion,with musical direction by Carissa Hosea, associate professor of Music. The music is so diverse,Ž Hosea said. It has lots of different styles in it. Its fun, its refreshing, the lyrics are hysterical,and I think any age is going to enjoy the show.Ž Rehearsals started in midJanuary, Hosea said, and every actor is on the stage almost 100-percent of the show. Its a great opportunity for me to do a show like this (that has) only nine people,Ž said Rion, who directed musicalsfor 25 years before joining the GCSC faculty in 2017. Its a treat to work that closely with nine people. You know, usually musicals are on a bigger scale. What I loved about this is its more of a play with music, so its been really fun „and a great cast. My gosh, theyre good.Ž Performances will bein the Amelia Center Theatre on the main GCSC campus, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday,April 6 and 7, 13 and 14; and 2:30 p.m. forSunday matinee performances, April 8 and 15. General admission tickets are $20;$10 for high school students, military and senior adults; or free for GCSC and FSU PC students, faculty and staffwith a valid ID. For details and advanced tickets, visit GulfCoast.edu/arts.Laughter stings at Spelling BeeGCSC presents perennially popular comedyThe contestants in The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee are played by, from left: Tyler Kent, Savannah Wambo, Ben Whitmer, Charis Sellick, Amy Tinch and Haythem Smith. [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEEWhat: Award-winning musical comedy about awkward midpubescent students vying for the spelling championship When: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 6-7, 13-14; and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 8 and 15 Where: Amelia Center Theatre at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City Admission: $20; $10 for high school students, military and senior adults; free for GCSC and FSU PC students, faculty and staff with valid ID Details and Advance Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts For a video, see NewsHerald.com.

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E29 JAM SESSIONBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A third-generation Panama City native, singer-songwriter Ashley Feller tries to spread the positive energy with her original songs. Feller,the performing guest at the News Herald Jam Session on March 30, can be found strumming her acoustic guitar and singing stories with humor embedded in them at venues across the area. I really enjoy Melony, John Prine, Linda Ronstadt „ their style, as far as humor goes or attempt at humor at least,Ž is a major influence on her songs, Feller said. AndI enjoy bluegrass, so thats played a part in how my music tends to sound.Ž Born at Tyndall Air Force Base, Feller learned music by listening and watching as her grandmother played organ. I would stand beside her and she would tell me these are the notes in this chord, this is how chords are made, this is what chords will go within this set of songs. She just led me on the way,Ž she said. Fellers fatherplayed flute in several local bands. He returned to college as an older adult, and sometimes couldnt make it to evening performances because of work or classes. Thats when Feller stepped in, having learned the flute from him. Whenever he couldnt make the gig, sometimes I would go and fill in for him, and that was a very valuable learning experience,Ž she said. Feller picked up the guitar for the first time in high school, taking classes from Ted Shumate and Don Underwood. Bay High was a (performing arts) magnet at one time, and there were many guitar classes you could take. That was a great experience, learning how to play guitar from such gifted people,Ž she said. Feller has held other jobs while playing and performing on the side. In recent months, she has become a full-time performer, playing at Ms. Newbys, Mariners Daughter, Elmores Landing and other venues. She has played as a member of the Sweater Puppets, and still plays with the Fourth Street Band, known for its renditions of songs by 1970s erasinger-songwriters. Her originals come from life, but with her own humorous twists: Theres a little bit of truth in all of them, but its an exaggerated truth for the purposes of being entertaining.Ž Her latest CD, Old Blue: Rage Against the Van,Ž was in part inspired by her touring van, which is featured on the album cover. Old Blue is parked and for sale. Its nothing to look at,Ž shelaughed. I drove it for about 15 years. It went on many adventures and Ive had many experiences with that van.Ž Shes recording a new album at the Gulf Coast State College studio led by producer Dave Schwartz. On April 2, she was scheduled to record a new single there, Im Sorry I Drunk-Dialed You,Ž which she sang during her Jam Session. (Schwartz) has really got great visions about the potential of what we can do here in Panama City,Ž Feller said. We really do have lots of awesome songwriters here. Many of our recording sessions are helped by the students.Ž For instance, Schwartz had the idea to incorporate a choir of voices in the style of We Are the WorldŽ in one of the songs on her CD, which she wrotefor her father. A few days before the session, Feller texted and messaged friends and peers who she thought might be interested in participating. I cant ever explain how blessed I felt when I saw those 11 friends show up, and sing a song they had never heard before, and just do a bang-up job at it,Ž she said. Feller hopes to ride that wave of positivity and see it grow. I think if I continue the road Im on, things are going to be great,Ž she said. Ive had so much wonderful support from the community. Weve really got wonderful people here who will continuously show up and watch you play, and tell their friends about you, and buy your CDs and give them to their friends. ... Its a continual cycle of positivity, so I think I need to stay with it.ŽFellers humor shows in original songsAshley Feller performs original songs at the News Herald Jam Session on March 30. [KRISTY SMITH/THE NEWS HERALD]RIGHT: Her latest album is Old Blue Rage Against the Van. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] NEXT JAM SESSIONWho: Paracosm When: 3 p.m. Friday, April 13 Where: Live streaming at Facebook.com/ PanamaCityNewsHerald

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Each week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com Matt: Ready Player One abandons mission Has there ever been another filmmaker who helped influence and create American pop culture more than Steven Spielberg? In Ready Player One,Ž he dives deep into that self-created nerd well, throwing familiar references at us faster than Sonic the Hedgehog driving the Millennium Falcon. Its difficult not getting geekygiddy seeing King Kong swipe at Marty McFlys DeLorean, or a Xenomorph burst from the chest of Mortal Kombats Goro. Unfortunately, all goodwill is lost under noisy CGI, rampant deus ex machinas, and ham-fisted morality. In 2045, humanity spends most of its time within a VR world called the Oasis. When the games pop-culture fanatic creator dies, he leaves behind a mission within the game that gives the winner complete ownership. Visually and conceptually, its highly imaginative. Even the nostalgia seems to serve a purpose, leaving us with tons of fun Hey! Its that thing!Ž moments (i.e., The ShiningŽ sequence is a blast). The story and filmmaking, however, are shockingly inept. Were constantly being forced to suspend our disbelief, and not in the expected fantasy/sci-fi elements, but in simple character choices. Throw in some sporadic and unnecessary narration, underwhelming acting performances, and heaps of underwritten characters, and you remember that Spielberg didnt just make JawsŽ ƒ he also made Hook.Ž Worst of all is the films overarching message. At first, it seemed to be smart and meta takedown of corporate bastardization of nostalgia. But then it takes a turn, forcing a sudden push for realityŽ over geekdom with a hearty, You dang kids need to stop your vidja gamesand snapbooksand go outside, dagnabbit!Ž Heres hoping Spielberg goes back to creating timeless art instead of simply referencing it. Rating: out of Cole: Characters fail in Ready Player One Steven Spielbergs Ready Player OneŽ takes us to a wonderfully realized dystopia where citizens find escape in a virtual reality universe. When its creator dies, he turns his inheritance into a game within that world where an unlikely hero emerges. However, for all that Ready Player OneŽdoes well „ and make no mistake, Spielberg really delivers on a technical level and there are sequences that are truly marvelous „ it really only wants to have its cake and eat it, too, just as so many other failed popcorn flicks of recent years. Full of hollow nostalgia, false mea culpa, stupid deus ex machina, and always choosing momentary bliss over story and character coherence, Ready Player OneŽ is alas the giant, stinking, culminating turd that Hollywood has been building toward as its been gorging itself over the years. All of the worst storytelling tendencies that studios havepracticed over the last several years are here laid bare in what might only be tolerably taken in as a parody of the modern blockbuster. Among the most heinous sins of the current-era Hollywood system is when something impactful happens to a character and then its immediately followed by something completely incongruous by the impacted character. This vacant character psychology is unforgivable, obviously, but also increasingly prevalent. Other common and depraved sins include celebrating that which it derides and forcing characters into decisions they wouldnt make. Ready Player OneŽ doubles down on all these nonsensical story mechanics and more, and in the end, it isnt just distasteful; its insulting right down to its cold, cynical, disrespectful core. Rating: out of E30 Friday, April 6, 2018 | MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUB Spielberg returns with Ready Player OneReady Player OneDirector: Steven Spielberg Starring: Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Ben Mendelsohn, T.J. Miller, Simon Pegg, Mark Rylance, Lena Waithe Rated: PG-13 (sequences of sci-“ action violence, bloody images, some suggestive material, partial nudity and language) Tye Sheridan stars in Ready Player One. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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E32 Friday, April 6, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARHAVE AN EVENT?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh. com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion. Friday, April 6 IDENTITY ART EXHIBIT: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Amelia Center Main Gallery (Room 112) at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. The exhibit features ceramic sculpture and wares by Keith Smith and Wesley Harvey. STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts Saturday, April 7 LICENSE-FREE FRESHWATER FISHING: Residents and visitors are invited to partake in license-free “ shing in state freshwater “ sheries on Saturday and Sunday as part of the Keep Florida Fishing initiative. FURRY FRIENDS 5K: 8-10 a.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. Registration at 7 a.m.; $30, free for children 10 and younger. Pet-friendly run/walk helps to support The Humane Societys ongoing mission of “ nding homes for animals. Run or walk, pets are encouraged. All proceeds go directly to the shelter. SPRING FEVER MARKET: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. Artists, crafters and small business vendors under one roof. Family friendly event is free and open to the public. BAY COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL PACK WALK: 9-11 a.m. at H.G. Harders Park, 7900 John Pitts Road, Panama City. Members of the public will have the opportunity to walk a dog along about a half mile of the parks wooded trail. Dogs will be available for adoption for a fee of $25. For more information on adopting from Bay County Animal Control, visit BayCountyFL.gov GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@ cityo” ynnhaven.com 11TH ANNUAL SEAFOOD BOIL BENEFIT: Noon to 9 p.m at Shades Bar and Grill, 10952 E. County 30A, Panama City Beach. Featuring live music from Jacob Mohr, Funk, and Anne Cline, a bouncy house for kids, and other activities. Broil will bene“ t the Alaqua Animal Refuge. PEARLS LAUNCH PARTY: 5-7 p.m. EDT at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. Art Show Opening featuring paintings, photographs, birdhouses, models, and more, all with shotguns houses as their motif. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, 855-272-5224 ST. JUDE DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION: 5-8 p.m. at St. John Catholic Church, 1008 Fortune Ave., Panama City. Dinner is free; donations accepted to help St. Jude continue serving the homeless and elderly of Bay County. 8TH ANNUAL ARTS ALIVE: 6-9:30 p.m. at Edgewater Beach Resort in Panama City Beach. Talent showcase supports “ ne arts in Bay District Schools and the Bay Education Foundations Take Stock in Children Program. TRIBUTE TO PATSY CLINE: 7:30 p.m. at the Palms Conference Center, 9104 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring Margo Anderson with the Encore Band and special guest Mike Purvis as Willie Nelson. Limited seating for 300, intimate concert atmosphere. General admission, $25; tickets now at BrownPaperTickets.com. Details, 850-814-6001 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m.at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts Sunday, April 8 LICENSE-FREE FRESHWATER FISHING: Residents and visitors are invited See CALENDAR, 33Edgewater Beach Resort will host the 8th annual Arts Alive on Saturday, a talent showcase supporting “ ne arts in Bay District Schools. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E33to partake in license-free “ shing in state freshwater “ sheries as part of the Keep Florida Fishing initiative. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 2:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts HILLSIDE PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION: 3 p.m. EDT at Holy Family Senior Center, Seventh St. and Avenue L, Apalachicola. Enjoy an exhibit of rare photographs of former Holy Family School and the African-American hill community. Last year, Save Our Shotguns donated more than 40 enlarged archival photographs to this display of historic images. This exhibit will remain up at Holy Family for the duration of April. Admission is free and open to the public. Details at SaveOurShotguns.org/events/pearls Monday, April 9 ADVENTURES IN ALYS: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. One of a kind storytelling experience with audience participation. Details at LoveTheRep.com STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre on Central Square. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. Details at LoveTheRep.com THE ENCHANTED GALAPAGOS ISLANDS AND DARWINS FINCHES: 7 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida, 308 Airport Road, Panama City; presented by Norman Capra. Program sponsored by Bay County Audubon Society. Free and open to all; visitors welcome. Refreshments provided. Tuesday, April 10 55th BAY ANNUAL ART COMPETITION: April 10-May 4 at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Admission: Free to the public during regular gallery hours. Details at CenterForTheArtsPC.com PLEIN AIR PAINT-A-SHOTGUN WORKSHOP: Tuesday through Wednesday at Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. Led by Kate Knapp, a representational artist and student of the Impressionist Cape School of Art with Henry Hensche in Provincetown, Ma. This workshop is open to artists of any experience and any medium. Sign-up at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. Artists should bring their own supplies. View Knapps work at KateKnappArtist.com. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns. org/events/pearls BOOKS ON THE BAY WILL GLOVER: 6 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Host Tony Simmons will speak with author and News Herald Managing Editor Will Glover about his new novel series and his approach to storytelling. Books will be available for purchase. PILOT CLUB FUN-RAISER: 6-8 p.m. at Dirty Dicks Crab House, 9800 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Pilot Club will receive $7.50 from each ticket to bene“ t charities for brain-related disorders. Tickets are $15. Wednesday, April 11 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV HOUR: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Reps improv troupe plays games, makes up scenes and songs on the spot. Audience members can workshop on Wednesday and perform with them on Thursday. Details at LoveTheRep.com PAUL BRENT HOW HE CREATES WATERCOLORS: 6-7 p.m. at Sheraton Bay Point, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. The artist will demonstrate his techniques. Admission is free. Details, Beach Art Group 850-541-3867 Thursday, April 12 AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV HOUR: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Reps improv troupe plays games, makes up scenes and songs on the spot. Audience members can workshop on Wednesday CALENDARFrom Page 32 GO & DO : CALENDARSee GO, 34

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E34 Friday, April 6, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARand perform with them on Thursday. Details at LoveTheRep.com DOWNTOWN ARTWALK: 4-8 p.m. in 13 galleries, pop-up galleries and shops in downtown Panama City. Enjoy exhibits, live music, complimentary hors doeuvres, door prizes and more. Meet local artists and “ nd art and gifts priced to sell. Free and open to the public. Participating locations include: Black And White Tavern, Paul Brent Gallery, Blasted Screen Print & Boutique, Randy Johnson Art Gallery, Gallery 721, The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, Fringe Gallery/CityArts Cooperative, The Funky Mermaid, Matthew L. Jankowski Archive, The Light Room, Moseys Downtown, The UnReal ARTists Gallery, Panama City Center for the Arts. MEET AND GREET ARTIST KATE KNAPP: 5-6:30 p.m. EDT at Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. Knapp is a representational artist and student of the Impressionist Cape School of Art with Henry Hensche in Provincetown, Ma. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns.org/ events/pearls MARKETFEST: 6-9 p.m. at Laketown Wharf Resort, Panama City Beach. A trendy and unique indoor/ outdoor shopping experience featuring more than 100 merchants, artists, food trucks and live entertainment. A portion of proceeds go to local non-pro“ ts. Details, 850-896-0594 KONKRETE SOUL CONCERT: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Free concert, open to the public. Family-friendly performance of oldies, jazz, and contemporary hits. Sponsored by the Friends of the Bay County Public Libraries. BLASTED CONCERT: 8 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring In Sonistus Lux and Barkers of the Wrong Tree. Details at Facebook.com/ BlastedScreenPrint Friday, April 13 MARKETFEST: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Laketown Wharf Resort, Panama City Beach. A trendy and unique indoor/outdoor shopping experience featuring more than 100 merchants, artists, food trucks and live entertainment. A portion of proceeds go to local non-pro“ ts. Details, 850-896-0594 5TH ANNUAL BAY COASTAL LIVING FAIR: 3-7 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Lifestyle and home decor market featuring vendors showcasing shabby chic, vintage, repurposed furniture, garden decor, jewelry, boutique clothing, hand-crafted items, art and photography; food trucks, live music by The Wabi Sabis; DIY and paint workshops. Admission free; donations accepted for Anchorage Childrens Home. Details, baycoastallivingfair.com STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com WINE TASTING: 5-7 p.m. at Somethins Cookin, 93 E. 11th St., with complimentary wine and hors doeuvres. Details, 850-769-8979 IDENTITY ART EXHBIT CLOSING RECEPTION: 5-7 p.m. in the Amelia Center Main Gallery (Room 112) at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 West U.S. 98, Panama City. Closing reception for exhibition featuring ceramic sculpture and wares by Keith Smith and Wesley Harvey. SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com FRIDAY THE 13TH PUB CRAWL: 6:30-11:30 p.m. in Historic downtown Panama City. With acoustic Horror Music and drink specials at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave. Details at Facebook.com/ BlastedScreenPrint RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEINS CINDERELLA: 7:30 p.m. at Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets start at $45. Details and tickets, MarinaCivicCenter.com THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts Saturday, April 14 5th ANNUAL COACH POST 10K/5K/AND 1-MILE FUN RUN: 6 a.m. at St. Andrews State Park, 4607 State Park Lane, Panama City Beach. Family friendly race at St. Andrews State Park over a ” at and fast course GOFrom Page 33 See GO, 35

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E35 GO & DO : CALENDARsurrounded by sugary white beaches. All levels are welcome on this USA Track & Field certi“ ed course. After-race party with catered food, awards ceremony and prize drawings. 4TH ANNUAL 30A CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT: Held at Rosemary Beach. Fundraiser for Emerald Coast Autism Center. To become a sponsor, email info@ rosemarybeachfoundation. org, to register a team, visit Cornhole30A.com ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 5TH ANNUAL BAY COASTAL LIVING FAIR: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Lifestyle and home decor market featuring vendors showcasing shabby chic, vintage, repurposed furniture, garden decor, jewelry, boutique clothing, hand-crafted items, art and photography; food trucks, live music by The Wabi Sabis; DIY and paint workshops. Admission free; donations accepted for Anchorage Childrens Home. Details, baycoastallivingfair.com WEST INDIES MARKET: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Emerald Coast Events Venue, 17760 Panama City Beach Parkway. Paintings, sculptures, baked goods, jewelry, handmade furniture, and more. Details, hilltopproductionevents. com SAVE OUR SHOTGUNS A SYMPOSIUM: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EDT at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. This day-long event features presentations by various legal and humanities professionals, and provides an opportunity for the public to learn about historic preservation, restoration, affordable housing and community culture. Topics include land trust, zoning and other heirs property concerns. Participants are invited to spend the day at the Center or stop in for a speaker of interest who will be announced ahead of time. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns.org/ events/pearls MARKETFEST: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Laketown Wharf Resort, Panama City Beach. A trendy and unique indoor/outdoor shopping experience featuring more than 100 merchants, artists, food trucks and live entertainment. A portion of proceeds go to local non-pro“ ts. Details, 850-896-0594 FUN FEST: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Boulevard. The 4th annual Fun Fest to bene“ t local charities. For more information or to buy tickets, visit FunFestPCB.com PCB BEER FESTIVAL: 1-4 p.m. at Fishale Taphouse & Grill, 7715 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Rain or shine. All proceeds will bene“ t Toys for Kids. JAZZ IN THE STREETS: 6-10 p.m on Florida Avenue in Lynn Haven. Details, CityOfLynnHaven.com STREET PARTY BETWEEN 2 SHOTGUNS: 6:30-9 p.m. EDT on Avenue L between Eight and Ninth streets. A popular celebration of community life featuring live music and barbecue dinners for sale. Bring chairs and spend a night paying tribute to the legacy of shotgun houses under the stars. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns. org/events/pearls THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts Sunday, April 15 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 'BLESS US ALL' AN INTERFAITH SERVICE: 9-10:30 a.m. EDT at St. Paul AME Church, 81 Ave. L, Apalachicola. Ministers of several local churches will lead a special outdoor church service open to the public. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, WEST INDIES MARKET: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Emerald Coast Events Venue, 17760 PCB Parkway, Panama City Beach. Paintings, sculptures, baked goods, jewelry, handmade furniture, and more. Details: GOFrom Page 34 See GO, 36

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E36 Friday, April 6, 2018 | hilltopproductionevents. com, SaveOurShotguns. org/events/pearls MARKETFEST: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Laketown Wharf Resort, Panama City Beach. A trendy and unique indoor/outdoor shopping experience featuring more than 100 merchants, artists, food trucks and live entertainment. A portion of proceeds go to local non-pro“ ts. Details, 850-896-0594 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 2:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Details and tickets, GulfCoast.edu/arts CONCERT AND WINE TASTING: 5 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring Calliope Pettis. Details at Facebook.com/ BlastedScreenPrint JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT: 7 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Spring Tour in support of album "Nashville Sound." Details and tickets, MarinaCivicCenter.com. Monday, April 16 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com Tuesday, April 17 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com TRUMPET QUARTET: 6:30 p.m. at The Place, 429 Harrison Ave., Panama City. The Brian Taylor Quartet plays as part of the Gulf Jazz Societys monthly jazz series. Tickets are $10 for GJS members, $12 for nonmembers. For reservations, call Larry at 784-2106 or Bob at 258-4022 Wednesday, April 18 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com 20TH ANNUAL SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL: Wednesday through Sunday with top smooth jazz acts featured in lunch and dinner cruises, on stage at Aaron Bessant Park, and at after-parties in Panama City Beach; presented by ResortQuest and WSBZ-FM The Seabreeze Smooth Jazz 106.3. For a lineup of performers, schedule and to buy tickets, visit SeabreezeJazzFestival. com. Thursday, April 19 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP WITH CHARLIE SAWYER: 9-11 a.m. EDT at Holy Family Center, Seveth Street at Avenue L, Apalachicola. Learn How to See and Capture Better PhotographsŽ with Apalachicola photographer Charlie Sawyer; share his techniques for seeing potential photographs in the environment and the technical knowledge necessary to capture images in ways that show their best light. Bring any digital camera with fully-charged batteries, plus an optional tripod and additional lenses. Rain date: Friday, April 20. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns. org/events/pearls 20TH ANNUAL SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL: Through Sunday with top smooth jazz acts featured in lunch and dinner cruises, on stage at Aaron Bessant Park, and at after-parties in Panama City Beach; presented by ResortQuest and WSBZ-FM The Seabreeze Smooth Jazz 106.3. For a lineup of performers, schedule and to buy tickets, visit SeabreezeJazzFestival.com. THERESA CAPUTO LIVE! THE EXPERIENCE: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. TLCs Long Island Medium.Ž Tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com, 850-763-4696 or at the Marina Civic Center box of“ ce. BLASTED CONCERTS: 8 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring Meraki/ Toska. Details at Facebook. com/BlastedScreenPrint Friday, April 20 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at GOFrom Page 35 GO & DO : CALENDARSee GO, 37A comedic take on the Sherlock Holmes classic, Baskerville opens April 20 at the Martin Theatre in Panama City. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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| Friday, April 6, 2018 E37 GO & DO : CALENDARSchooners.com 55th BAY ANNUAL ART EXHIBIT: Through May 4 at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Admission: Free to the public during regular gallery hours. Details at CenterForTheArtsPC.com 20TH ANNUAL SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL: Friday show is sold out. For details, visit SeabreezeJazzFestival.com. PEARLS POETRY: 6 p.m. EDT at Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. PEARLS invites anyone who is inspired to write poetry related to PEARLS to read their work. Preregister by contacting PEARLS at info@saveourshotguns. org. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns.org/ events/pearls SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com BASKERVILLE: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Comedic genius Ken Ludwig transforms Sir Arthur Conan Doyles classic Hound of the Baskervilles into a murderously funny adventure with Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and 3 actors that play 12 different parts. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com Saturday, April 21 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 COMCAST CARES DAY COASTAL CLEAN UP: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park, 4607 State Park Lane, Panama City Beach. Meet at the Jetties Pavilion. T-shirts, breakfast, drinks, gloves and trash bags will be provided. 20TH ANNUAL SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL: Saturday show is sold out. For details, visit SeabreezeJazzFestival.com. EARTH DAY BAY COUNTY CELEBRATION: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at McKenzie Park in downtown Panama City. Hosted by Friends of St. Andrew Bay. Free admission. Details, EarthDayBayCounty.com FREE STOVE TOP/SALT BLOCK DEMO: 10:30 a.m. with Bill Holland at Somethins Cookin, 93 E. 11th St., Panama City. For reservations, call 850-769-8979. TRANSLATING OUR FAMILY HISTORY: 1 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Sponsored by the Bay County Genealogical Society. Fred Borg will discuss reading and translating in another language. Free and open to the public. LA CARAVANA DE GARDEL SCREENING AND Q&A: 6 p.m. in the Holley Center, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City. Following the “ lm and Q&A will be a Tango Concert. Doors open at 5 p.m. for social hour. Admission is $15. Tickets are available at the Marina Civic Center box of“ ce, marinaciviccenter. com, and by phone at 850-763-4696. BASKERVILLE: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Comedic genius Ken Ludwig transforms Sir Arthur Conan Doyles classic Hound of the Baskervilles into a murderously funny adventure with Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and 3 actors that play 12 different parts. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com BLAIR ST CLAIR: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. From VH1s RuPauls Drag Race Season 10. Showtimesmidnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details, SplashBarFlorida. com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, April 22 12th ANNUAL CAJUN FESTIVAL: April 16-22 at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. Experience Cajun music, food and fun on the sandy beach, with treats like duck gumbo and bananas foster bread pudding, plus gator specials all week. Details at Schooners.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. GOFrom Page 36 See GO, 38

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E38 Friday, April 6, 2018 | Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 20TH ANNUAL SEABREEZE JAZZ FESTIVAL: Sunday show is sold out. Details, visit SeabreezeJazzFestival.com. BASKERVILLE: 2 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com WALKING HISTORY TOUR: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. EDT convening at Holy Family Senior Center, Seventh Street at Avenue L, Apalachicola. Join an insightful and enjoyable walking tour of the hill neighborhood which occupies the historic northeast corner of the city of Apalachicola and is considered the hub of the African-American community. Learn about some of its standing houses, as well as their bygone stories, with Pam Richardson of Save our Shotguns Apalachicola Inc. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns.org/events/ pearls Thursday, April 26 SANDJAM: 4 p.m. gates open at the M.B. Miller Pier in Panama City Beach; music begins at 5:15 p.m. Today: Fitz and the Tantrums, and Capital Cities. Tickets: 3-day general admission $129; VIP $359. Details and tickets: SandJamFest.com PARROT HEAD RENDEZVOUS 2018 LICENSE TO CHILL: 6-11 p.m. at Sharkys Beach Front Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. The Panama City Parrot Head Club hosts members from all over the country. Trop Rock music starts at 6 p.m. Thursday evening, and continues daily until Sunday afternoon at 5. Current members of a Parrot Head Club may purchase a 4-day pass for $80; general public can purchase day passes for $20. Details at PanamaCityPHC.org BASKERVILLE: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Comedic genius Ken Ludwig transforms Sir Arthur Conan Doyles classic Hound of the Baskervilles into a murderously funny adventure with Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and 3 actors that play 12 different parts. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com Friday, April 27 55th BAY ANNUAL ART EXHIBIT: Through May 4 at Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Admission: Free to the public during regular gallery hours. Details at CenterForTheArtsPC.com SANDJAM: 1 p.m. gates open at the M.B. Miller Pier in Panama City Beach; music begins at 2 p.m. Today: Sublime with Rome, and St. Lucia. Tickets: 3-day general admission $129; VIP $359. Details and tickets: SandJamFest.com SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com PARROT HEAD RENDEZVOUS 2018 LICENSE TO CHILL: 6-11 p.m. at Sharkys Beach Front Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details at PanamaCityPHC.org A CHORUS LINE: 7:30 p.m. at Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets start at $45. Details and ticket, MarinaCivicCenter.com BASKERVILLE: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Comedic genius Ken Ludwig transforms Sir Arthur Conan Doyles classic Hound of the Baskervilles into a murderously funny adventure with Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and three actors who play 12 different parts. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com CLARENCE BUCARO IN CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Repertory Theatre in Seaside. Admission: $25. Tickets and details at LoveTheRep.com ART AND MUSIC SHOW: 8 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring a meet-theartist reception at 8 p.m. for an exhibition of work by Tessa Burch. At 9 p.m., live music with The Burl. Details at Facebook.com/ BlastedScreenPrint Saturday, April 28 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as “ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 YOUTH FISHING RODEO: 9 a.m. to noon at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. Children ages 16 and younger may join the Parks and Recreation Department and Optimist Club of the Beaches to promote safe “ shing practices. Fishing rods and reels from the Fish Florida Foundation will be given to participants (quantitites limited). Lunch provided. Free and open to the public. For details, 850-233-5045 SANDJAM: 1 p.m. gates open at the M.B. Miller Pier in Panama City Beach; music begins at 2 p.m. Today: Incubus, and Kaleo. Tickets: 3-day general admission $129; VIP $359. Details and tickets: SandJamFest.com PEARLS CLOSING PARTY: 5-7 p.m. EDT at Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., Apalachicola. Mingle with local and professional artists as Save our Shotguns closes out its month-long PEARLS celebration of Apalachicolas rich legacy of shotgun houses. Artworks will be auctioned off and the public will have a chance to go home with a painting, drawing, photograph or sculpture in mixed medias such as glass, woodwork and mixed repurposed media to commemorate the event. Admission is free and open to the public. Details, SaveOurShotguns.org/ events/pearls PARROT HEAD RENDEZVOUS 2018 LICENSE TO CHILL: 6-11 p.m. at Sharkys Beach Front Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details at PanamaCityPHC.org BLASTED CONCERT: 7 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Featuring Blind Tiger, Dying Whale, and Burn This Down. Details at Facebook.com/ BlastedScreenPrint BASKERVILLE: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets and details at MartinTheatre.com ATLANTA INVASION: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Special Guest Alissah Brooks (TEN Atlanta) and Destiny Brooks (Blakes on the Park). Showtimes Midnight and 2 a.m. Ages 18 and up. Details: SplashBarFlorida.com or 850-236-3450 Sunday, April 29 PARROT HEAD RENDEZVOUS 2018 LICENSE TO CHILL: at Sharkys Beach Front Restaurant & Tiki Bar, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details at PanamaCityPHC.org GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 CELTIC WOMAN HOMECOMING: 7 p.m. at Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets start at $60. Details and ticket, MarinaCivicCenter.com Friday, May 4 SPRING CONCERT SERIES: 6-8 p.m. at Shef“ eld Park, Lynn Haven. Free admission. Bring lawn chairs or blankets to the new amphitheater. Food vendors will be on site. Details at CityOfLynnHaven.com Saturday, May 5 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 CITY OF LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2201 Recreation Drive, Lynn Haven. Along with vendors, enjoy family activities and games. Details at 850-265-2121 or email communications@cityo” ynnhaven.com PANAMA CITY LIONS CLUB BLINDFOLDED REGATTA: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Andrew Bay Yacht Club, 218 Bunkers Cove Road, Panama City. Entry fee for two-person teams, $50. Raf” e tickets for sale; tent spaces available for commercial displays; food and drinks offered. Free to the public to watch the heats. GOFrom Page 37 GO & DO : CALENDARThe Panama City Lions Clubs annual Blindfolded Regatta will be May 5 at St. Andrew Bay Yacht Club. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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