Citation

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

Full Text

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** LOCAL & STATE | B1SPRING BREAK WAS UNMANAGEABLEEmergency personnel see relief a er new PCB laws Sunday, March 25, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald$1.50 www.newsherald.com Lifestyle ......................... D1-6 Local & State ................ B1-16 Obituaries ......................... B3 Sports ........................... C1-7 TV grid ............................. C8 Viewpoints ...................... E1-3 TUESDAYMostly cloudy 74 / 61MONDAYLow clouds 71 / 58TODAYPartly sunny 76 / 59 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050When opioids returned, they didnt arrive quietly.They roared back, fueled by both the pills doctors prescribed to numb pain and the cheap supply of heroin and related drugs on the streets. They hooked people, young and old, poor and wealthy.It hurt the workforce. It created a rise of babies born addicted. It filled ambulances with over-dosevictims. It created new challenges for law enforcement and emergency medical personnel. It tore families apart. But it also fueled a movement of help, in churches, doctors' offices, jails and even courtrooms. People all over the county reached out with the message that it was possible to recover from the disease of addiction.These are some of the stories of our com-munity. Find them all on Pages A2-4.To hearmore, visit our series of video and podcast interviews at newsherald.com.OPIOIDS IN BAY COUNTY: SPECIAL REPORTTENTACLES OF ADDICTIONPILLS, ADDICTION, SUPPORT, PRAYER, LOSS, GRIEF, HELPThe opioid epidemics reach is pervasive throughout Bay County. But so is help. Nicole Bass NICU nurse Patrick Walsh Bay County inmate, recovering addict Chris Jackson Victim of addiction Rick McClung Pastor, former addict Brittany Cureton Recovery specialist, former addict Jay Radtke Bay County medical examiner Timothy Ford Army veteran Christopher Sammons Bay County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputy

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** A2 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldRob Jackson vividly remembers sitting in a church pew in 2010, listening to a sermon on how everyone deals with some bad times in life.I remember thinking, Oh my God, in our life we are so blessed,Ž he recalled. Please dont let anything happen to us.ŽSix years later, his 21-year-old son Christopher, a state diving champion and U.S. Naval Academy student, was dead of an overdose.For Jackson and Christophers mother, Cheri Boyle, piecing together how this happened has been a pains-taking process.They know it started in high school, when he was 17 and hit the board during a dive, injuring his shoulder.They suspect after that pain medicine prescription ran out, he turned to classmates, swiping from their parents medicine cabinets, for more.They suspect hed been using for two years, through a semester in the Naval Acad-emy, before he hit the board again in practice, re-injured his shoulder, and got more pain pills.They know that by the time he came to them that Decem-ber and told them everything, it might have been too late.We didnt know about it,Ž Boyle said. We were ignorant at the time it was happening because it was beyond our comprehension that this kid of ours, that any-thing like this could happen.ŽThree treatment programs, numerous aftercare programs, a job and classes at a local college couldnt pull Christopher out of his addiction. He was just six weeks away from completing a year-long program in North Carolina, Jackson said, when it happened.Powerless to stop it, Jack-son felt completely aloneŽ as he watched his son and his family struggle. In many ways, he and Boyle still do.Were losing a generation of kids that have a lot to con-tribute to society,Ž Boyle said. My son was one of them.Ž John Henderson and Eryn DionBeyond our comprehensionEverything about Brittany Curetons office is tidy. Her shelves are stacked neatly with books. Her bulletin board is adorned with photographs. Her hair and makeup are perfect.At times, the people sitting on the other side of her desk „ clients at Bethel Vil-lages recovery program „ dont believe she could everrelate to what they are going through.And on those occasions, she reaches fora worn black binder she keeps on the floor by her f eet and reminds them she knows exactlywhat it's like to sit in that chair.Because she sat there, too, three years ago, and in that binder are her worksheets.Y'all cant tell me I dont know,Ž she said. Because I know.ŽShe knows what its like to be just out of high school,in love andpartying too much. To experiment with pain medica-tion, lose control and end up hooked on heroin.She knows what its like to go to work hiding an addiction.She knows what it's like to overdose andend up in the hospital. She knows what it's like to be arrested and pray the officer doesnt find your drugs.She knows what it's like to try „ go back to school, try medication, try a prayer group „ only to fail.She knows what it's like to lose everything „ to be evicted, have your car break down on the side of U.S. 98, sign into detox and sign guardianship of your kid over to your parents.But most importantly, she tells them, she knows what it's like to trust in God, start over and get your life back. What its like to have a job that you love and help people through. What it's like to be the parent your child needs. And what its like to be happy. Katie LandeckShe knows the road to recoveryBrittany Cureton looks over notes she took when she was working to overcome her opioid addiction in 2015. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Rob Jackson and Cheri Boyle hold a photo of their son Chris Jackson. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Dr. Jay Radtke cant save the patients that come to him.He cant stitch up their wounds, or write them a prescription. He cant get them oxygen, or give them CPR.When patients come to Dr. Radtke, its too late. Theyre dead. As the Medical Examiner for the 14th Judicial Circuit, Radtke has seen his trade shape and shift through the opioid epi-demic. He remembers pill mills in Fort Lauderdale and watch-ing people go from one clinic to the next one, then the next one, collecting their pain medication.Overdoses, which fall under the medical examiner's juris-diction as an "accidental death," were high then. When the pill mills were shut down, people moved on to illicit drugs, heroin mostly, and the deaths dropped off. Now, as word spreads about heroin cut with the powerful, deadly opioid fentanyl, Radtke sees people moving back to pills, something they can get from a doctor, or can buy from someone with a prescription. Something they can trust. Until they can't, and they end up on Radtke's autopsy table.More pills again means more suspicion. Cases that might have been considered "natural" are now suspected overdoses, and that means more cases for Radtke's office. Fifty-six overdosevictims, not all from opioids, came across his table last year. Opioid deathsare among the hardest to prove, requiringmore detailed and more expensive toxicology panels. More medi-cal detective work. Talking to family, friends, even first responders. Digging into their history, finding lower back sur-geries, neck surgeries, chronic pain, and, almost always, he said,a clinician prescribing an alarming amount of opioids. Radtke takes exception to the prescription rates. He points to studies showing overthe-counter painkillers with similar, long-term pain relief. People can be taking fewer drugs, he says, but they get Oxycontin or fentanyl patches anyway.And Radtke will keep per-forming their autopsies. Eryn DionRoad of addiction dead-ends with Dr. RadtkeMedical Examiner Jay Radtke sees more cases now that more deaths are suspected as overdoses. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Tim Ford served in the Army for 23 years, including in Afghanistan. He isnt an opioid addict but ended up affected by the national crisis anyway.Fordhas chronic pain, a result of several fused vertebrae in his neck, surgeries that were necessary after lugging heavy equipment during military training, along with post-traumatic stress disorder.But when Ford, who retired as a major, asked the VA doctor for painkillers in 2015, the doctor said no. The VA denied the request because, once over a 10-year-period,Ford, 57, tested positive for THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Ford, who served from 1983 to 2006, said he only used marijuana before and after his service.But because of the test, Ford went roughly 24 months without pain pills.I just had to deal with it,Ž he said.The VA, he said, "got scared and over-conservative" when prescribing pain pills. Over half of all veterans returning from the Middle East are reporting chronic pain, and in 2011 the National Institute of Health reported veterans being seen by the VA were twice as likely as civilians to overdose on opi-ates. The report triggered new rules,making it safer but much harder for VA doctors to prescribe opiates and caus-ing them to wean patients off their doses.The rulesleft people like Ford, who spoke about his struggles at a 2016 town hall, in pain as he struggled to navigate the red tape.Fordeventually wasprescribed pain medication through a private doctor after having to push some more for treatment. He now takes several sets of pills a day. It eases the pain to where its bearable,Ž he said.Even so, he still doesn't feel like the government is doing enough for the thousands like him, struggling with both chronic pain and medi-cation. The government, he suggested, should consider prescribing non-addictive medical marijuana. „ Collin BreauxPain relief gone in a pu of smokeVeteran Timothy Ford stands for a photo in his Panama City Beach home. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] In nearly every conversation Kim Bodine has with companies about recruiting, at some point the conversation turns to talk about drug tests.People will mention its hard to recruit when you drug screen,Ž the executive direc-tor of CareerSource Gulf Coast said. Some have stopped screening.Ž She heard stories of the drug testing eliminating 50 percent of the candidates for some retail positions as the opioid epidemic has become more and more prominent.And its not just opioids people are testing positive for, but a lot of marijuana, she said. While many people have relaxed their attitudes as some states legalize, she said,employers have not.And its not, shes quick to say, just a Bay County issue. Nationwide, employers are having a more difficult time finding employees who can pass a drug test, especially for low-skill jobs like waiting and retail, which account for a large portion of the local economy. A nationwide survey of 501 business by the National Safety Council found that 70 percent of employers have had been impacted by opioid use, including missed work, failed drug screening, using at work, impaired performance and even overdosing on the job. Panama City Beach seems par-ticularly hard hit, Bodine said, because of the high number of service jobs.In fact, she said, in many ways the local job market is better than most. The work-force is hungry and trainable.But still, Ive heard employ-ers say ƒ if you come to work and you're stoned and your eyes are red, we are sending you home. If you are drooling, we are sending you home. If you are drinking we are send-ing you home,Ž she said.These are things that you hope no one would ever have to say to their employees,Ž she said. But Ive heard employers say it.Ž Katie LandeckFailed drug tests cull workforceKim Bodine looks over unemployment numbers in this News Herald “ le photo. [FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 A3For an hour and a half, he clutched his obituary as he worked outon the prison lawns. It read something like this: Patrick Walsh, 49, died after spending 32 years getting high „ on opioids, cocaine, marijuana, methamphet-amines and pain pills.He is survived by three children, two of whom stoppedspeaking to him when court dates, missed holidays and disappointments became unbearable. He is also survived by two grandchildren, one of whom he never got a chance to hold.Each exercise ripped and crumpled the paper until it was in pieces. At the end, Dr. James Fatz, the director of the jails Life-line program, told the inmates to look at their obituaries. Thats over. Its torn up,Ž Dr. James Fatz told them. Its a new beginning from right now.ŽFour times nowWalsh has been to jail because of addic-tion-fueled crimes. But this is the first time he's asked for or received treatment, enrolling in the jail'sLifeline and Mission Based Resilience programs.And as he wrote to his eldest last week, he's differ-ent now.Because at this point, there are only three things he wants in the world: to hold his 1-year-old grandson in his arms for the first time; toeat dinner with his two youngest, look at them and tell them they"wont everŽ have to worry about his drug use or going to prison again; and tell all three hes sorry „ sorry about the missed birthdays,the embarrassment, the days he was too drunk or high to play. He's sorryfor everything.But its hard to fit that in a letter andprove its more than words. So in his last letter, heoffered them the only proof he had and tucked a copy of his Mission Based Resiliencegraduation certificate into the envelope „ between the pages of apologies „ and hoped it would be enough. Katie LandeckPages of apologiesPatrick Walsh is an inmate at the Bay County Jail and a recovering addict. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Nicole Bass talks about caring for newborns who are addicted to drugs, at the Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center NICU. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] An inconsolable cry, high pitched and drawn out, echoes through the Gulf Coast Neonatal Inten-siveCare Unit.The baby in the corner room has woken.The cries dont stop as nurse Nicole Bass walks into the room. They dont stop when she starts softly talkingto the child orwhen she bends down to scoop the infant out of the swing she napped in after reject-ing her cradle. Even when Bass offers a pacifier, the infant still looks miserable.The only thing that seems to help is when Bass holds the child tight to her body.This baby was born addicted to opioids. Like theother babiesin the ward with neonatal abstinence syndrome, the nurses have been trying to manage her withdrawal symptoms, keeping the fevers and tremors at bay. Every day, medications are adjusted, depending on the infants symptoms and how hard they cry.Its terrible and its kind of helpless,Ž Bass said. Theres not a whole lot you can do other than hold them.ŽIn her four years in NICU, shes held a lot of addicted babies. There are always two or three in the ward, and when awake, they are always inconsolable. The problem, she said, seems to have gotten worse.There have been babies shes held for her entire 12-hour shift, children whose parents never seem to visit. Over and over again, shes fallen in love with them.But in the end, they go home with their parents, whether they visited or not. And while she worries about all NICU babies, she cant help but worry a little more about the addicted ones. Will their parents get better? What will the out-come be? Will this baby go through life with the same addiction her parents did?So when they cry, she holds them, right up against her heart. Katie LandeckAddicted babies cries break nurses heartBay County Emergency Medical Services Capt. Danny Page isnt sure why hes seeing more cases of people overdosing on opioids in the last couple of years.The 16-year veteran just knows its happening at an alarming rate and that every day, the calls come in."We need you to respond urgent. Patient is unrespon-sive, possible overdose.ŽSometimes it's two calls. Sometimes it's 20. Either way, each time, the ambu-lance crews turn on its sirens and races to the scene because every second counts.If there is any reason to expect drug use, the crews administer naloxone, a drug that can reverse the effects of an overdose if delivered in time. But, Page said, not everyone survives the overdose calls. Sometimes, they're too late or the victim took too large of a dose, the victim's respiratory system gives up and the heart soon follows.Thats what they typically die from if its left unchecked,ŽPage said. Their heart stops.ŽThe overdoses have come in spurts in different parts of town in all different age groups, but mainly the 20to 30-year old crowd, Page said. He said the overdoses have resulted from legal pre-scription medicines „ often not in the name of the person who took them „ as well as illegal drugs.We see a mix „ not just pills,Ž he said. We see lots of completely illegal drugs that people smoke, inject as well, as well as the (prescription) pills that people are taking.ŽSome people even chew up patches with drugs like morphine.Those (patches) are mostly seen with a chronic problem like cancer who have legitimate medical problems,Ž he said. They're not meant for getting high, but that's what it's come to down to as the epi-demic continues.Ive seen it getting increasingly worse,ŽPage said. John HendersonThe lungs give up and the heart followsBay County Emergency Medical Services Capt. Danny Page says more people seem to be overdosing. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Quick-witted deputy reverses death rattleWhen the Bay County Commission announced in December it planned to sue the pharmaceutical compa-nies for the havoc the opioid epidemic has caused, Commissioner Tommy Hamm seemed particularly moved.I imagine everybody up here knows somebody that has had an addiction problem with pain pills,Ž Hamm said. I know I certainly have, so I would think we need to address it.ŽSix years ago, Hamm lost a friend to an oxycontin overdose.Hed gotten to where he was crushing them up and injecting them and shooting up with it and overdosed,Ž Hamm said. He left behind a wife and children. It is so rampant that virtually everybody out there knows of somebody who has had issues with it."If you take them like pre-scribed, some people have a chance of being addicted just by following the doctor's orders. Then you have other people that take them and dont have those issues, but it is definitely something that we have to deal with as a society.ŽIt leaves no stone unturned, he said.In his position, Hamm sees both the personal devastation and also thecost totaxpayers, who end up paying to ban-dage the problem through jails and law enforcement while the pharmaceutical companiesseem tolack any accountability for the increased number of addicts or the abuse of their products. Bay County has the second high rate of opi-oids prescriptions per capita in the state.Hamm said he wants to know why.Maybe there are more doctors that are more loose with the prescriptions here,Ž he said. Maybe we have people that are better at doctor shopping. I dont know what would make us rank up there at the top like that.ŽWhatever the reason, he thinks the pharmaceutical companies should have to pay for the damage they caused and he, along with the rest of the commission,hopes a judge will agree. John HendersonEverybody knows somebody His neighbors screams reverberated as Deputy Chris Sammons pulled into his driveway. Help! My sons dead! Hes dead. Hes dead.ŽWith a speed that only comes from years of police work, Sammons was out of his car and running to his neighbors house. On the kitchen floor, his friends adult son was turning purple, barely breathing.With a quick order to call 911, Sammons sprinted to his patrol car to grab medical gear. The man's pulse was gone when Sammons returned.He was making, well, we call it the death rattle,Ž Sammons said. Its a gurgling sound.ŽSammons started round after round of CPR, as the body in front of him turned a deeper purple. Somewhere around the fourth or fifthround, his neighbor confessed, I think he might be using drugs again.ŽSammons didnt have time to be shocked, but he was. He had known the man in front of him for five years and the mans father for 12. He knew the son had a past, but in all their talks over the fence, never had he suspected he was using.But there they were, on the floor. For the second time in the 10 months since all Bay County deputies had started carrying Narcan, Sammons reached for the nasal spray capable of reversing an over-dose. One shot up each nostril, and then back to CPR. By the time, Sammons heard the sirens, the pulse had returned. Andwhen EMS arrived, the man was awake, bewildered and trying to fight.Without the Narcan, the medics told Sammons, his neighbor would be dead. The roxicodonethe manhad ille-gally taken to try to beat back depression was actually a far more potent dose of com-pressed fentanyl.Sammons doesnt think about what happened much, but his neighbors, who truly thought they lost their child, he said, have thanked him like 60 times.Ž Katie LandeckBay County Sheriffs Deputy Christopher Sammons has saved several people using Narcan, a nasal spray that alleviates some of the symptoms of an opioid overdose. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD] Like most people, Commissioner Tommy Hamm has friends who have been impacted by the opioid epidemic. [PATTI BLAKE/ NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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** A4 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY Dara KamThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Two days after instructing federal prosecutors to seek the death penalty in drug-related cases, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Ses-sions came to Tallahassee on Thursday to promote President Donald Trumps plan to combat the deadly opioid epidemic.Sessions, addressing dozens of law enforcement officials, defended Trumps controver-sial death-penalty position, which has sparked pushback from Democrats and others who accuse the president of targeting minorities in a newly resurrected war on drugs.We will not hesitate to pursue maximum sentences allowed by law, and if appropriate, the death penalty. Our message should be clear: Busi-ness as usual is over,Ž Sessions, a former U.S. senator from Alabama, said during Thurs-days 30-minute speech inside the federal courthouse. Plain and simple, drug traffickers show no respect for human dignity. They put their greed ahead of the safety and even the lives of others, knowing people will be dying as a result of their products.ŽThe presidents Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse,Ž released Monday, addresses issues such as over-prescription, illegal drug supplies, and access to recovery and support services, such as medication-assisted treatment. Sessions announced Thursday that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is sending 250 task force offi-cers, and dozens of analysts, to places in the nation where the opioid crisis is at its worst.ŽThe task forces will focus on drug traffickers and medical professionals who are fueling the opioid crisis,Ž Sessions said.Drug trafficking leads directly to addiction. Addiction leads to death around our country. Its also an inherently violent and deadly business,Ž he said.The presidents plan also includes a national campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of prescription and street drugs, as well as support for research to develop a vaccine to prevent opioid addiction.The same day Trump announced his proposal, Gov, Rick Scott signed into law a sweeping measure aimed at keeping patients from getting hooked on powerful prescription drugs and then turning to even deadlier street drugs like heroin and fentanyl. The $65 million package, nearly half of which comes from federal funds, includes a controversial provision that places limits on prescriptions that doctors can write for treatment of acute pain.Doctors in many cases would be limited to writing prescrip-tions for three-day supplies, though they could prescribe up to seven-day supplies of con-trolled substances if medically necessary.Ž Cancer patients, people who are terminally ill, palliative care patients and those who suffer from major trauma would be exempt from the limits. Neither Scott nor Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, who has led efforts to combat opioid addiction, were present for Sessions speech, the second recent opioidfocused talk the U.S. attorney general has delivered in Florida.Speaking in Tampa last month, Session created headlines when he said patients in pain need to take aspirin sometimesŽ rather than addic-tive opioids.Sessions Tallahassee appearance came on the same day Kellyanne Conway, a Trump administration official who oversees the White Houses efforts to combat the opioid crisis, advised a group of college students to eat the ice cream, have the French fry, dont buy the street drug,Ž according to a report in The Hill.In Tallahassee, Sessions „ who recently created a task force to look into bringing lawsuits against opioid manufacturers and distributors „ avoided the mention of aspirin, but he reiterated that doctors are over-prescribing pain medications.Sessions also said he has assigned a dozen federal pros-ecutors to opioid hot-spotsŽ „ including the Middle District of Florida „ to focus on investigating and prosecuting opioid-related health care fraud.Sessions: No more business as usual in opioid ghtA court appearance isn't usu-ally an occasion for balloons.But drug court isn't the usual session. Here, there's less bustle back and forth of defense attorneys or inmates being shepherded in and out. There's less clinking chains of handcuffs and more babies babbling into the microphone as their parent speaks to the judge, more candid conversations about ankle monitors, more jokes.Every Tuesday, the group meets to go over their progress before the judge. Far from the blink and you miss itŽ pace of other dockets, here, the sessions are more leisurely. They share news of jobs at the Cracker Barrel, about being clean and sober for the first time they can remember, about how they're taking it easy after surgery and staying conscious of their limits, about being busy, staying busy and being productive.And when one of them suc-ceeds, they share that, too.A round of applause erupts as one of the participant receives her graduation certificate from the program. Her family cheers her on from the audience as she speaks to Judge DeDee Costello, something that would have cer-tainly found them in contempt of court in any other hearing, or at least earned them a stern warning from the bailiff. It's been a long road„ her case goes back to 2014, extended by sev-eral probation violations„ but a steady showing in drug court over the last year has made her an example to the others, Costello says, that there's a light at the end of the tunnel.ŽGraduation isn't the end,Ž Costello tells her, an encouragement and a warning. It's just the beginning.ŽWith her certificate and a ceremonial brick in hand, the new graduate takes one last look around the courtroom, offering parting words to those still on their journey. Good luck, y'all.Ž Eryn DionBalloons in courtroomSitting in the interns chair, Dr. Mark Stavros is in his element flashing a chart in front of a patient, talk-ingabout dopamine levels, the prefrontal cortex, the comfort zoneŽ and treatment options.Its a speech hegives often: to addicts, with-drawing and miserable; to families trying to under-stand the disease; to mental health professionals; to law enforcement.Really, to anyone who asks. Addiction is something Stavros has more experience with than most. His father is one of the dinosaurs of addic-tionŽ medicine. But as if to prove addiction can impact any family,his sister died of aheroin overdose in the '90s. He didnt even know she had been using.He wasworking the ER „ where hedreaded addictscoming in looking to score „ when he got the call.He never planned to go into addiction medicine, but in 2009, he got another call asking if he would reconsider and said yes.Imet patients at rock bottom, who had lost a lot of their lives and needed help,Žthe owner ofGulf Coast Addiction Medicinesaid. Suddenly, I could start seeing an impact in patients' lives.Ž He threw himself into it. Learning the cycle of the disease, how patients might have had control once, but the drugs altered the brain and that controlwas lost. About how an addicts dopamine levels are below comfortable levels unless they're using, creating a need to get high. About how 80 percent of addicts will relapse in their first yearif they go off medications designed to treat addiction, like methadone, suboxone and vivitrol. About the right way to take and prescribe medicine to reduce the chance of abuse, and how success rates are better when medication is combined with therapy.It became a fixable prob-lem to him.Yes, he says, its a chronic disease. Relapse will happen, but every day he sees peoplechange. Katie LandeckAddiction, death and recovery: Hes seen it allJudge DeDee Costello, seen in this “ le photo, presided over Drug Court last week. [FILE PHOTO] The strum of a guitar stopswomen chattingat the front of the room and causesa man, who hadn't made eye contact with anyone since he sat down, to look up.Theres revival, and its spreading like a wildfire in my heart, Hallelujah.ŽStanding in back by the glazed doughnuts is Pastor Rick McClung, taking a quick inventory of the hundred or so people packed into the room. He greeted most people „ some healthy with years of recovery under their belt, some court-ordered and nervous „ as they came in the door.This ministry, Most Excel-lent Way, is a path forward for people struggling with addiction, an invitation to faith and recovery McClung extended when he started at First Baptist Church over 15 years ago with the intent to reach out to addicts.I got a sweet salvation and its beautiful. Ive got a heart overflowing cause Ive been restored.Ž Its never an easy thingŽ for McClung to stand at the front of the room and speak. He doesnt want to beput on a pedestal. He doesnt want people to think he has all the answers. He wants to be a conduitŽ for Gods love to help the people in the room love themselves.Thirty-twoyears ago, he was an addict. An alcoholic in a dark place. Hereminds the crowd of thatnearly every week, some-times with a joke, sometimes as a serious reminder of the pain.Andevery week, he repeats a prayer to himself „ "Let the words in my mouth and the meditation in my heart be acceptable to you God, and let me say everything you want me to say and nothing you dont" „ and prepares to head to the front of the roomto take the stage when the music ends.There ain't nothing gonna steal my joy. No, there ain't nothing gonna steal my joy.Ž Katie LandeckThe hope of a sweet salvationAddiction medicine is Dr. Mark Stavros of Gulf Coast Addiction Medicines passion. He has partnered with Bay County Jail to offer vivitrol treatments to inmated. [PATTI BLAKE/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] Most Excellent Way Pastor Rick McClung stands for a photo. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 A5By Juan A. LozanoThe Associated PressHOUSTON „ Largescale projects long considered essential to easing Houstons flood-ing woes went to the top of the areas to-do list after Hurricane Harvey inundated large swaths of the nations fourth-largest city.Seven months later, local officials are still looking for funding to undertake plans that include a new reservoir, deeper and wider bayous and a coastal barrier system „ all of which have fallen victim to a lack of money or political will in the past.Yet local leaders insist this time will be different, saying theyre committed to making the projects a reality, even as they wait to find out how much money they might get from the state and federal governments and whether local taxpayers will be willing to help out.Theres been a whole lot of talk over the years, but now its time to get it done in the post-Harvey era,Ž Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said at a recent community meeting. One thing thats giving Turner and others hope is that billions of federal dollars have been allocated to pay for flood-mitigation projects. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has promised $1 billion for areas affected by Harvey, though Houston will be competing with other Texas communities for that funding. Congress in February provided $15 billion to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood-control projects nationwide, some of which could go to the Houston area.Houston, which was founded on the banks of the Buffalo Bayou around the mid-1800s and rises barely above sea level, has long been susceptible to flooding. But recent growth has made the problem worse. The area has more pavement, which generates more stormwater runoff, and has lost wetlands that could soak up that runoff.Big projects Houstonarea officials are eying include building a third reservoir for the area, at a cost of about $500 million. They also want to complete the excavation and widening of six local bayous, a $1.3 bil-lion project, part of which has proceeded in fits and starts for more than 20 years due to inconsistent funding. And they want to undertake a project known as the coastal spine, which was first proposed after Hurri-cane Ike in 2008. That $6 billion to $10 billion proj-ect „ also called the Ike DikeŽ „ proposes barriers to protect the area from storm surge coming into Galveston Bay.This will be very different than the last several decades when things were thought of but never actually executed,Ž said Marvin Odum, Houstons Hurricane Harvey recovery czar.Whichever projects are ultimately funded, they will likely take years to build.Turner and other Houston-area officials have asked Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to use the states $11 billion rainy day fund to help front the cost of building the reservoir and other projects, with the state being repaid once federal dol-lars are awarded. But that message has fallen on deaf ears,Ž said Stephen Costello, Houstons chief resilience officer.However, Ciara Matthews, a spokeswoman for Abbotts office, said Saturday that through the governors work with Congress, a record amount of funding is now available to Houston to rebuild and restore the reservoirs and bayous, as well as building the coastal spine.He has also made available a billion dollars in hazard mitigation funding for the city and county right now,Ž Mat-thews said, referring to the money from FEMA for areas affected by Harvey.Harris County Judge Ed Emmett, the top elected official in the county where Houston is located, said hes not reassured by promises from state offi-cials. He also noted that theyve pushed to cut property taxes, which Harris County uses to pay for its flood-control efforts.When somebody at the state level tells you that theyre going to lower the property tax, what theyre telling you is, We are not going to build many flood-control projects,Ž Emmett said.Officials are also asking Harris County residents to approve a $1 billion to $2 billion bond proposal to help pay for some proj-ects. That will be on the ballot sometime this year.Texas A&M University at Galveston marine sciences professor Sam Brody cautioned that Houston and the rest of Texas cant engineer their way out of flooding issues by only relying on large-scale projects. Efforts such as buying out homes in flood prone areas and being mindful of future development must play a role in making the area more flood resilient, he said.Houston remains the only major U.S. city with-out zoning, but it does have rules about building in the flood plain. The City Council is set to vote in the coming week on stricter rules. Harris County approved new restrictions late last year. Both Houston and Harris County are also pursuing a home buyout strategy.There is no one silver bullet that is going to fix this problem,Ž Brody said. Its a... multi-strategy issue that people need to recognize,Ž he said.After Harvey, ood-control projects fate unclearConstruction workers help excavate and widen Brays Bayou on Thursday as part of a nearly $500 million ” ood control project in Houston. [DAVID J. PHILLIP/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A6 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Ken ThomasThe Associated PressPALM BEACH, Fla. „ President Donald Trump has issued an order supporting his push to ban most transgender troops from serving in the U.S. military except under limited circumstances.Ž But the decision is expected to be the subject of an ongoing legal fight in the months ahead.The White House announced the decision late Friday, shortly after the president arrived at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, completing a process that followed Trumps surprise announcement on Twit-ter last year that he would reverse an Obama admin-istration plan to allow transgender individuals to serve openly.In a memo to the presi-dent, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis pointed to substantial risksŽ with allowing military person-nel who seek to undertake a treatment to change their gender or who ques-tion their gender identity.Mattis also said exempting those in the military from wellestablished mental health, physical health and sex-based standardsŽ applying to all service members could hurt military effectiveness and lethality.Ž But the policy includes narrow exemptions allowing some transgender members to serve.The Pentagon has not released data on the number of transgender people serving, but a Rand Corp. study previously estimated between 1,320 and 6,630, out of 1.3 million active-duty troops.Several legal challenges have blocked Trumps efforts to enact a ban, and four federal courts have already ruled against the ban. The Pentagon responded by allowing those serving to stay in the military, and began allowing transgender individuals to enlist beginning Jan. 1.Civil rights advocates said they would continue the legal fight, which could eventually reach the Supreme Court.Before the policy was announced on Friday, Maj. David Eastburn, a Pentagon spokesman, said it would have no immediate practical effect on the military because the Pentagon is obliged to continue to recruit and retain transgender people in accordance with cur-rent law. How the policy worksMattis wrote in the 48-page memo that U.S. troops who require or have already had gender reassignment surgery should be disqualified from military service.Service members with a history or diagnosis of gender dysphoria,Ž or those with discomfort with their biological sex, would also be banned „ but with some exceptions.Current transgender service members who have not yet undergone reassignment surgery are allowed to remain in the military, as long as they have been medically stable for 36 consecutive months in their biologi-cal sex before joining the military and are able to deploy across the globe.It also allows currently serving service members to remain if they were diagnosed with gender dysphoria since the Obama administrations policy took effect and prior to the start of the new Trump policy. Those service members are allowed to serve in their preferred gender and receive medical treatment for gender dysphoria.AP Explains: Trumps policy on transgender troopsPresident Donald Trump issued an order supporting his push to ban most transgender troops from serving in the U.S. military except under limited circumstances.Ž [MANUEL BALCE CENETA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 A7Filipino boy scouts use the light of their cellphones as they observe Earth Hour on Saturday in suburban Pasay city southeast of Manila, Philippines. The annual event urges people all over the world to switch off the lights in their homes and workplaces for at least an hour. [BULLIT MARQUEZ/AP] Earth Hour marked in darkness

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** A8 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 A9

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** A10 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Sveinung SleireBloombergPolitical power in Norway is dominated by women. They hold the office of the prime minister, the finance minister, the foreign minister and the speaker of parliament.Its not a female conspiracy,Ž says Prime Minister Erna Solberg.Even by Scandinavian chart-topping standards for gender equality, Norway stands out when it comes to the political landscape (theyre not quite as good in corporate Norway). So what gender issues do these politicians worry about?The challenge in the Scandinavian countries is not to end up with a large group of young men who have no purpose in life, no hope for a job,Ž Solberg said in an interview in Oslo.Its a demographic that needs careful political attention to avoid a dan-gerous backlash, the prime minister said. At the University of Oslo, about 57 percent of all PhD students last year were women. The risk of men falling behind also makes them more vul-nerable to losing their jobs to automation.Thats what we see in the angry white men who not only dont like Muslims and immigrants, but abso-lutely not women either, at least if they cant keep the woman to themselves,Ž Solberg said.Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Soreide says, the problem Erna is pointing to is a massive problem, glob-ally. A lot of very vulnerable countries have enormous youth unemployment, and most of them are men.ŽTone Troen, Norways newly minted speaker of parliament, says shes confident the next genera-tion will do better. But its important that boys and girls make non-traditional choices when it comes to education,Ž she said.Men do wield some power in Norway. They hold most of the executive positions in listed compa-nies, run the central bank and the countrys $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund (the worlds biggest). And while Norway is beaten only by Denmark when it comes to equal pay, men still get about 7 percent more than women, on average.Like the rest of the world, Norway was shaken by the #MeToo movement, which revealed a series of misconduct cases in both politics and business, including in Solbergs own Conservative Party. The deputy leader of the big-gest opposition party even resigned amid allegations of misconduct.The threshold for whats acceptable has been moved,Ž Eriksen Soreide said. Thats probably one of the most important wins.Ž But reaching total equality will take a terribly long time,Ž she said. Solberg quipped we might need to wait until 2072.ŽBefore becoming foreign minister, Eriksen Soreide was defense minister, fol-lowing in the footsteps of a long line of women leading that department. She used to get asked by young girls whether men were even allowed to run the defense ministry in Norway.As women take power, male anger a concern in NorwayErna Solberg, Norways prime minister, center; Ine Eriksen, Norways foreign minister, right; and Tone Troen, Norways speaker of parliament, pose following an interview Wednesday in Oslo, Norway. [KYRRE LIEN/BLOOMBERG]

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** A12 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldA er escaping from N. Korea, life moves quickly in the SouthBy Anna FifieldThe Washington PostSEOUL „ Last August, they were making a terrifying escape from North Korea, fleeing over rivers and on buses and in rickety taxis through China, Viet-nam, Laos and Thailand.The fisherman and his wife hadnt been doing too badly in North Korea, by the low standards of the North Korean countryside. But they wanted to get a good education for their children, a teenage boy who loved art and computers, and an 8-year-old girl who liked whatever her brother liked.This month, just a few weeks after emerging from the South Korean governments resettlement program for North Korean refugees, the kids were pre-paring to enter new schools. Schools with books and electricity and teachers who didnt need to be bribed into giving lessons.I have so much to do!Ž the housewife exclaimed a few days before school started, rushing around their small apartment and rifling through a drawer for newly begotten documents.South Koreans use a phrase literally meaning skirt windŽ to describe the whoosh of an education-mad mother zipping around. Even though shed been in fast-paced capital-ist South Korea for only a few weeks, the housewife had already become fully assimilated to these skirt windŽ southern ways. It was a whole new world for them.I first met the family on the banks of the Mekong River last August, just 12 days after they had escaped from North Korea. The fish-erman had been earning decent money, smuggling goods back and forth between China and North Korea, while moonlighting from his official job.But they were disillusioned. They had hoped that Kim Jong Un, only 27 years old when he inher-ited the leadership of North Korea in 2011, would usher in a new era of freedom and prosperity.Instead, while they toiled, the state remained largely the same. They found ways to feed themselves, but the bad schools deeply troubled them. The teachers didnt show up and the school had almost no supplies. How were their kids going to lead a better life than theirs? So the family fled.After I last saw them, in the cells of a provincial police station in northern Thailand, they were transferred to an immi-gration detention center in Bangkok. There, they were processed relatively quickly „ just a few weeks in that jail „ and then they started the last leg of their journey.Since then, theyve been through a lot of firsts: first passports, first airport, first plane.Upon landing at the space-age Incheon Airport outside of Seoul, they were taken to a debriefing center run by South Koreas intel-ligence agency to root out North Korean spies or ethnic Koreans from China trying to get the resettlement money offered to refugees. Its the same pro-cess that the 30,000-plus North Koreans whod made the journey before them had been through.They were held there for questioning for 70 days. What did you do in North Korea? Why did you come to South Korea? Can the Kim Jong Un regime survive? What do ordinary people think of him?When they werent being questioned, they gorged on South Korean television. They had more than 70 channels „ unimaginable after a TV in North Korea that received only state propaganda.The boy loved watching action movies and playing computer games. The girl said she loved watching animations „ but the word she used for animation was an old-fashioned one that hasnt been used in South Korea for decades. Its little things like this that high-light the cultural divide that opened up in the 70 years since one country was split in two.Then they moved to Hanawon, the resettlement center operated by South Koreas Ministry of Unification to help people from the North adjust to the high-tech, fast-paced South.They learned about the Internet and mobile phones, how to open a bank account and how to use a debit card. They learned about job opportunities, about South Korean laws and about a foreign concept called gender equality.They watched in amaze-ment as, in January, the man who had helped get them from China to Thailand, Ji Seong-ho, was lauded by President Donald Trump during his State of Union address in January. In February, their reedu-cation was complete. They were installed in a small, two-bedroom apartment on the tired fringes of Seoul. Time to embark on their new lives as South Koreans.When I visited them the first time in their new apartment, just a few days after their release from Hanawon, they were clearly struggling. They wrestled with the electronic lock on the front door, and their apartment was bare except for a small television sitting on an old plank of wood.They say that North Korea is a socialist country and South Korea is a capi-talist country. But it doesnt feel capitalist here,Ž the fisherman said. They asked The Washington Post to continue withholding their names to avoid endangering the family members they left behind. The Unification Ministry provides $7,000 to a family of four to help them get settled, then $4,300 for the next three quarters. They also get a housing subsidy of $2,000 for the first year.Their emergence into daily South Korean life came with more firsts: first driving lessons for the fisherman, first electric washing machine for the housewife. She didnt need to scrub their clothes by hand any more. And first day of school for the kids.During a second visit, just days before school started, the family was more settled. Theyd brought an abandoned wardrobe theyd found on the street into their home, and had a computer for their kids.Now, unlike in North Korea, the teenager can get on the Internet. He likes looking for music and movies and games, but admits that he also looks at satellite images of their home town. I miss my grandparents and my friends,Ž he said. The fisherman had spec-tacles, the housewife had a Christian cross around her neck. The teenager was looking much more like a teenager. He was wearing jeans „ verboten in North Korea because they are the preferred pants of the American imperialists „ and a hoodie. And the girl was torn between playing with a jar of slime and cell-phone games, so she tried to do both at the same time.They still had telltale North Korean accents, but those would soon be gone, for the kids at least. They were settling in.People are very kind here. When you go to a government office in North Korea, they say: What do you want? Here, they say: How can I help you?  the fisherman said. And I wont get into trouble for saying anything. For example, if I complained about the president, I dont have to worry about getting arrested.Ž[Trump accepts invitation to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un]But this next phase also came with more worries. Mainly, money worries.They were discovering how expensive life in the South would be. Theyd spent almost $1,000 getting their son ready for school: books and uniforms and a bag and shoes. He was excited „ as much as a teen-age boy trying to play it cool could be „ about attending his new school and learning new things. Hed already gone to look around and saw that the school was so much bigger and more modern than the one he attended in North Korea.Im a little bit worried about settling into this new school system,Ž he said. But were slowly getting used to things.ŽHis sister was too busy playing with the cellphone to answer a reporters ques-tion about whether she was looking forward to her new school. Huh?Ž she said, and returned her eyes to the screen.Family adjusts to Seouls paceA family of North Korean defectors hugs in a hotel room after escaping from the country. [PAULA BRONSTEIN/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST]

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** A14 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Paul WisemanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Presi-dent Ronald Reagan once likened trade wars to the pie fights in old Hollywood comedies. One pie in the face leads to another. And then another.Pretty soon, Reagan said in a 1986 radio address, everything and everybody just gets messier and messier. The difference here is that its not funny. Its tragic. Protectionism becomes destructionism. It costs jobs.ŽSuddenly, the worlds financial markets are gripped by fear that an escalating trade rift between the United States and China „ the two mightiest econ-omies „ could smear the world with a lot of splattered cream and broken crust. If it doesnt prove tragic, as Reagan warned, it may still inflict far-reaching pain.The Dow Jones industrial average lost a combined nearly 1,150 points Thursday and Friday after President Donald Trump set his administration on a path to restrict Chinese investment in the United States and impose tariffs on up to $60 billion of Chinese products.We should be very worried,Ž said Bryan Riley, director of the conservative National Taxpayer Unions Free Trade Initiative. Its very possible this could escalate into something that neither country intends.ŽThe trade sanctions that Trump unveiled Thursday are meant to punish Beijing for pilfering technology from American companies or for forcing them to hand over technol-ogy in exchange for access to Chinas market. The announcement followed a seven-month investigation by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative into the tactics China has deployed to try to overtake American technological supremacy.China has not been playing by the rules,Ž said Stephen Ezell, director of global innovation policy at the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation think tank.Unbowed, China imme-diately threatened to retaliate if the United States followed through on its actions.On Friday, Beijing unveiled a broad list of U.S. products „ from apples and wine to pork to steel pipe „ that could face retaliatory Chinese tariffs in a separate trade spat with Washington. That dispute is over taxes that Trump imposed this month on imported steel and aluminum.We dont want a trade war, but we are not afraid of it,Ž said Hua Chunying, a spokeswoman for Chinas Foreign Ministry.The stakes are even higher in the standoff over Beijings technology policies than in the old-school dispute over metals. An industrial nations ability to harness technology is increasingly vital to healthy economic expansion.If China dominates the industries of the future, it will be very difficult for the United States to have an economic future,Ž Peter Navarro, a key White House trade adviser, told reporters.Trade tensions are rising at a delicate time. The world economy has finally emerged from the shadow of the Great Recession. Major regions are growing in tandem for the first time in a decade. International economic growth is expected to reach a seven-year high of 3.9 percent this year. Last year, global trade expanded 4.2 percent, the most since 2011.Some trade experts fear that a conflict over technology will erupt into an escalating war of sanctions between the worlds two biggest economies „ Rea-gans destructive pie fight. The U.S.-China tensions remind economists and trade analysts of the Rea-gan-era skirmishes between the United States and Japan, which at the time appeared to pose a grave threat to U.S. economic dominance.This is Back to the Future „ that old 80s film,Ž said Rod Hunter, a former White House trade adviser. Indeed, Trumps top trade negotiator, Robert Lighthizer, is a veteran of the trade battles with Tokyo, having served in the Reagan administration.To target China, Trump and Lighthizer dusted off a Cold War weapon from the Reagan years: Section 301 of the U.S. Trade Act of 1974, which lets the president unilaterally impose tariffs. The provision was meant for a world in which much of global commerce wasnt covered by trade agreements. But with the arrival in 1995 of the World Trade Organization, Section 301 fell largely into disuse.In some ways, a hard-nosed approach succeeded against Japan three decades ago. Under U.S. pressure, Tokyo agreed to voluntary export restraintsŽ to limit auto shipments to the United States. But to bypass the limits, Japanese automakers simply built plants in the American South.Likewise, the Reagan administration in 1985 strong-armed Japan, Ger-many, France and Britain to raise their currencies values to help U.S. manufacturers squeezed by a strong dollar, which makes U.S. goods costlier overseas.But the United States wielded unusual leverage with Japan. The two coun-tries are close political allies; Japan depends on U.S. mili-tary protection. China, by contrast, is a geopolitical rival, far less likely to bend to U.S. pressure.Its true that China has benefited enormously from access to the Ameri-can market and has much to lose: Last year, it exported $375 billion more in goods to the United States than it bought in return „ a record trade gap that irritates Trump.But a full-blown trade war would test Trumps fortitude for commercial combat and would certainly hurt many Americans, including some of Trumps supporters. Most directly, U.S. tariffs would raise costs for consumers and businesses.Trade groups are already lobbying the Trump admin-istration to seek diplomatic solutions to the disputes. Chinas all-powerful leaders face no such public pressure.We live in a society where stakeholders in Con-gress are going to put a lot of pressure on the administra-tion,Ž said Wendy Cutler, a former U.S. trade official who is vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute. In China, they dont.ŽStill, the 301 sanctions might be enough to prod the Chinese to return to the negotiating table to consider softening their aggressive technology policies.If this gets the two countries back to the table to talk about this, then that is a good outcome,Ž said Erin Ennis, senior vice president at the USChina Business Council. If the idea is to inflict suf-ficient pain so that China feels it has no choice but to change its policies, then Im skeptical.ŽWhy Trump risks trade warA woman wearing a uniform with the logo of an American produce company helps a customer shop for apples a supermarket Friday in Beijing. China announced a $3 billion list of U.S. goods including pork, apples and steel pipe on Friday that it said may be hit with higher tariffs in a spiraling trade dispute with President Donald Trump that companies and investors worry could depress global commerce. [MARK SCHIEFELBEIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 A15By Howard FrankGatehouse Media PennsylvaniaKUTZTOWN, Pa. „ Its early in the morning when Amos Antoine, 20, mounts a barbers chair. Amos is a big man, but he doesnt say anything „ hes non-verbal. He must come for his haircut before the public shows up; extraneous stimuli get him upset. Amos has autism spectrum disorder.His brother Frankel, a 2010 East Stroudsburg High School North graduate and 2015 Kutztown University grad, is a licensed barber on a mis-sion: Fading Autism. He gives haircuts to cli-ents with autism spectrum disorder for free.Its hard to communicate with him or understand what hes trying to communicate,Ž Frankel said of his brother. They are very sensitive to light and noise, so he cant be in any social setting. As a parent, you have to keep that in mind.ŽBefore Frankel first started his endeavor, Amos haircuts took place in the homes kitchen.Their parents had to give Amos a haircut, and it wasnt great, Frankel said. So when he got his job at City Cuts Barber Shop in Kutztown, he set aside early Saturday mornings before the shop opened to give haircuts to autistic clients.In the morning time, you can control things,Ž Frankel said. You can control outbursts. I might be playing YouTube music if thats what they like. You try to reduce the things you cant control. Its more calming that way. Its also relieving for the parent because theres no one there to judge. Its the pri-vacy aspect thats relieving for the parents.ŽFading Autisms mission statement is to provide convenient, quality and free haircuts for individu-als diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.Penn. barber on mission to fade autismFrankel Antoine, right, shows off his brother Amos new haircut. Amos is autistic, and Frankel started an organization to provide free haircuts to autistic clients. [PHOTO PROVIDED] Frankel Antoine gives free haircuts to people with autism spectrum disorderThe Mister Rogers forever stamp went on sale Friday. [U.S. POSTAL SERVICE] Keith Srakocic The Associated PressPITTSBURGH (AP) „ It was a beautiful day to honor Mister Rogers with a postage stamp.The U.S. Postal Ser-vice on Friday released a stamp featuring Fred Rogers, the gentle TV host who entertained and educated generations of preschoolers on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."The stamp pictures Rogers in his trademark cardigan along with King Friday, a puppet character from the show's Neighborhood of Make-Believe sketch.A dedication ceremony was held at the Pittsburgh studio where Rogers filmed his beloved PBS show, which aired between 1968 and 2001. Rogers died in 2003 at age 74.Among those attend-ing were Rogers' widow, Joanne, and David Newell, who played Mr. McFeely, the deliveryman on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."Joanne Rogers said that when she first saw the stamp, it was "love at first sight.""I thought it was so beautiful. I think it is so festive," she said.Postmaster General Megan Brennan said at the unveiling that Mister Rogers "made the ups and downs of life easier to understand for the youngest members of our society.""He shaped genera-tions with his kindness and compassion," she said.Noting the stamp has the words "Forever USA," Brennan said "these words of the Postal Service are our way of saying Mr. Rogers represents the best of America and will do so always."Paul Siefken, president and CEO of the Fred Rogers Company, said he couldn't think of "a better tribute to Fred and his legacy." He noted that Rogers loved sending letters, especially to young children who wrote to him about his show."Fred Rogers left an indelible mark on generations of young audiences through his groundbreaking series, and his timeless wisdom and important messages of inclusion and neighborliness remain just as relevant today as they were 50 years ago," Siefken said. Mr. Rogers stamp unveiled

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** A16 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald

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** LOCAL & STATE PANAMA CITY BEACH | B4UNDERSEA EGGSDivers compete to collect most eggs, trash FRIDAYS NUMBERSFLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Friday. Pick 2 (a ernoon): 4-8 Pick 2 (evening): 4-7 Pick 3 (a ernoon): 1-9-8 Pick 3 (evening): 6-5-3 Pick 4 (a ernoon): 4-68-0 Pick 4 (evening): 9-59-7 Pick 5 (a ernoon): 1-60-0-7 Pick 5 (evening): 1-7-65-3 Fantasy 5: 7-8-10-32-36 Lucky Money: 14-26-2744-14 Mega Millions: 4-8-2353-59-17-x3 By John Henderson522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.comBAY COUNTY „ Bay Countys and Panama Citys opioid lawsuit against phar-maceutical companies is now part of a massive national legal case before a judge in Ohio.Judge Dan Aaron Polster of the Northern District of Ohio has been assigned the task of resolving more than 400 federal lawsuits brought by cities, counties and Native American tribes against central figures in the national opioid tragedy, including makers of the pre-scription painkillers, companies that distribute them and pharmacy chains that sell them. According to a March 6 story in the New York Times, Polster isurging of lawyers to efficiently settle the case in a way that will provide mean-ingful solutions to the crisis rather than focusing on a trial and finger-pointing."Opioid cases in Bay, P.C. tied in to suitSee SUIT, B12By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ An intoxicated driver condemned to six decades in prison for running a stop sign and killing four visiting Ohio softball players is asking for a new trial on grounds of juror misconduct,Ž court records stated.Cody Austin Shirah, 22, filed the motion March 2 for a new trial. He was convicted a week earlier on four counts of DUI manslaughter for a September 2016 crash at the intersection of John Pitts Road and Pinetree Road that killed four Ohio softball players visiting Bay County for a tournament. Shirah was sentenced to 60 years in prison almost immediately after the juror gave its guilty verdict, but he has since requested a new trial with a different judge, court records stated.Circuit Judge Michael Overstreet has yet to weigh in on the motion for a new trial but has declined to recuse himself from further involve-ment in the case.Defense Attorney Caren Bennetts motion for a new trial has been held confi-dential in the court files, but the prosecutions response to one point of the motion states there was no juror misconduct.ŽJuror #57 did put the State and Defense on notice that he knew (Shirah) and one of his girlfriends, but that he could still be fair and impartial,Ž prosecutor Larry Basford wrote in response. If the defense had concerns, they should have inquired during the jury selection process, but they did not.ŽDuring jury selection, one juror indicated he might have met Shirah at some point in Shirah seeks new trial, new judgeMotion alleges juror misconduct, says one juror knew defendantSee SHIRAH, B12By Christian DavenportThe Washington PostWASHINGTON „ It's a good time to be a defense contractor.Weeks after the White House released its budget request, which provided a massive increase in defense spending, Congress took over and added even more money for ships, aircraft and missile defense in what amounts to a spending spree on major weapons systems.As part of the $1.3 trillion omnibus bill adopted Thurs-day evening, defense spending would jump to $700 billion, the largest increase in 15 years. President Donald Trump still must sign off on the overall budget, and he has said he is considering a veto in part over the lack of funding to build a wall on the nation's southern border.Should Pentagon spending survive the process, the huge increases are an effort to shore up the military, and its hardware, after more than a decade of war. But some budget analysts fear the infusion of cash could galvanize the Pentagon to invest in new programs that ultimately it won't be able to sustain if the high rate of spending doesn't remain constant."The problem is, you can start ramping up, but if you don't have a long-term budget deal to maintain this level of funding, a lot of this could get wasted. You end up U.S. budget bill good news for defense contractorsSee BUDGET, B12 By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Driving in an area of Panama City Beach infamously known as the triangle,Ž Bay County EMT Capt. Joel Welch pointed out the window to a parking lot across from the super clubs where medics would station and wait for an emergency during Spring Breaks of the past.It never took long, he said.Welch recalled the days before the 2015 adoption of EMTs: Spring Break became unmanageableEmergency personnel see relief a er new PCB lawsClub La Vela and Spinnaker Beach Club are photographed from a helicopter piloted by Bay County Sheriffs Of“ ce Air Unit Sgt. Ken Smiley on March 17. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Bay County EMS and “ re crews respond to the collision, which involved a scooter and an SUV One woman was seriously injured. BCSO EMT Capt. Joel Welch responds to a head-on collision in Panama City Beach on Saturday. See LAWS, B13

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** B2 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 81/62 79/62 81/58 76/62 76/63 79/58 81/56 82/57 79/51 57/43 81/58 81/58 81/58 76/63 77/62 78/62 79/58 76/5971/5874/6174/6275/62Low clouds Pleasant with variable cloudiness Mostly sunny and beautiful A t-storm in spots in the afternoon7666757259Winds: E 8-16 mph Winds: SE 10-20 mph Winds: SSE 8-16 mph Winds: SSE 8-16 mph Winds: WSW 8-16 mphBlountstown 8.62 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 9.10 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.20 ft. 42 ft. Century 8.39 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 15.08 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Sat.Apalachicola 2:30p 6:09a 10:00p 5:25p Destin 5:33p 3:59a ----West Pass 2:03p 5:42a 9:33p 4:58p Panama City 4:32p 3:37a ----Port St. Joe 3:26p 3:47a ----Okaloosa Island 4:06p 3:05a ----Milton 7:46p 6:20a ----East Bay 6:50p 5:50a ----Pensacola 6:06p 4:33a ----Fishing Bend 6:47p 5:24a ----The Narrows 7:43p 7:24a ----Carrabelle 1:05p 3:56a 8:35p 3:12pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018FullLastNewFirst Mar 31Apr 8Apr 15Apr 22Sunrise today ........... 6:40 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 6:57 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 1:06 p.m. Moonset today ......... 2:17 a.m. Today Mon. Today Mon.Clearwater 76/63/pc 80/66/pc Daytona Beach 82/64/pc 73/62/c Ft. Lauderdale 82/65/s 83/69/pc Gainesville 81/58/pc 69/58/c Jacksonville 79/56/pc 64/57/c Jupiter 84/63/s 81/69/pc Key Largo 78/68/s 79/71/s Key West 80/69/s 80/71/s Lake City 79/57/pc 65/58/c Lakeland 83/60/pc 81/62/pc Melbourne 86/63/pc 79/66/pc Miami 83/66/s 84/71/s Naples 81/64/s 83/68/s Ocala 80/59/pc 73/58/c Okeechobee 84/57/pc 82/64/pc Orlando 84/64/pc 79/64/pc Palm Beach 82/65/s 81/71/c Tampa 78/64/pc 82/66/pc Today Mon. Today Mon.Baghdad 82/59/pc 85/61/s Berlin 51/36/c 48/32/c Bermuda 64/59/pc 63/58/r Hong Kong 77/68/s 78/67/c Jerusalem 66/50/s 78/56/pc Kabul 75/46/s 78/49/pc London 55/37/pc 54/44/pc Madrid 55/37/sh 58/38/pc Mexico City 83/54/pc 83/56/pc Montreal 39/20/pc 41/21/s Nassau 83/69/s 84/68/pc Paris 58/42/c 54/40/pc Rome 60/41/pc 59/41/sh Tokyo 62/50/s 66/53/pc Toronto 37/27/s 45/31/s Vancouver 48/39/c 48/41/r Today Mon. Today Mon.Albuquerque 69/41/s 62/39/pc Anchorage 36/23/c 36/24/c Atlanta 58/41/sh 50/44/c Baltimore 46/29/pc 50/28/s Birmingham 76/49/c 57/48/c Boston 37/30/sf 39/30/s Charlotte 49/35/sh 55/39/pc Chicago 43/30/s 50/45/c Cincinnati 46/33/pc 52/45/pc Cleveland 41/30/s 53/38/s Dallas 85/67/t 84/66/c Denver 65/35/pc 53/25/sh Detroit 40/31/s 52/41/s Honolulu 81/67/pc 81/70/pc Houston 84/68/c 85/68/pc Indianapolis 42/30/pc 50/45/c Kansas City 51/41/c 60/42/t Las Vegas 65/47/pc 63/49/pc Los Angeles 64/47/pc 68/51/s Memphis 60/50/c 68/58/c Milwaukee 40/32/s 45/41/pc Minneapolis 46/31/pc 42/33/r Nashville 56/46/c 61/50/c New Orleans 83/63/pc 82/65/pc New York City 45/31/sf 48/33/s Oklahoma City 68/59/t 78/55/t Philadelphia 44/31/pc 48/32/s Phoenix 76/53/s 72/51/s Pittsburgh 41/27/s 50/33/s St. Louis 51/38/pc 56/54/t Salt Lake City 47/33/sh 48/32/sn San Antonio 84/67/c 86/69/pc San Diego 63/53/pc 66/51/pc San Francisco 58/45/pc 62/49/s Seattle 51/40/c 51/45/sh Topeka 53/44/c 65/42/t Tucson 77/48/s 71/42/pc Wash., DC 48/33/pc 52/34/sMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday Gulf Temperature: 64 Today: Wind from the west-southwest at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Wind south at 4-8 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Partly cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the east at 8-16 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility generally unrestricted.Nice today with times of clouds and sun. Winds west-southwest 8-16 mph. Turning cloudy tonight. Winds light and variable.High/low ......................... 71/49 Last year's High/low ...... 77/59 Normal high/low ............. 73/53 Record high ............. 84 (1995) Record low ............... 31 (1983)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date ................... 1.90" Normal month to date ...... 4.42" Year to date ..................... 9.92" Normal year to date ....... 14.42" Average humidity .............. 77%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 77/66 Last year's High/low ...... 76/64 Normal high/low ............. 70/55 Record high ............. 83 (1995) Record low ............... 26 (1968)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 2.63" Normal month to date ...... 4.41" Year to date .................... 17.29" Normal year to date ....... 14.78" Average humidity .............. 55%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachBy Ashraf Khalil and Calvin WoodwardThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ In a his-toric groundswell of youth activism, hundreds of thousands of teenagers and their supporters rallied across the U.S. against gun violence Sat-urday, vowing to transform fear and grief into a votethem-outŽ movement and tougher laws against weapons and ammo.They took to the streets of the nations capital and such cities as Boston, New York, Chicago, Houston, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Los Angeles and Oakland, Cali-fornia, in the kind of numbers seen during the Vietnam era, sweeping up activists long frustrated by stalemate in the gun debate and bringing in lots of new, young voices.They were called to action by a brand-new corps of lead-ers: student survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead Feb. 14.If you listen real close, you can hear the people in power shaking,Ž Parkland survivor David Hogg said to roars from the protesters packing Penn-sylvania Avenue from the stage near the Capitol many blocks back toward the White House. Were going to take this to every election, to every state and every city. Were going to make sure the best people get in our elections to run, not as politicians but as Americans.Because this,Ž he said, pointing behind him to the Capitol dome, this is not cutting it.ŽSome of the young voices were very young. Yolanda Renee King, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.s 9-year-old granddaughter, drew from the civil rights leaders most famous words in declaring from the stage: I have a dream that enough is enough. That this should be a gun-free world. Period.Ž By all appearances „ there were no official numbers „ Washingtons March for Our Lives rally rivaled the wom-ens march last year that drew far more than the predicted 300,000.The National Rifle Associa-tion went silent on Twitter as the protests unfolded, in contrast to its reaction to the nationwide school walkouts against gun violence March 14, when it tweeted a photo of an assault rifle and the message Ill control my own guns, thank you.ŽPresident Donald Trump was in Florida for the weekend and did not weigh in on Twitter either.White House spokesman Zach Parkinson said: We applaud the many courageous young Americans exercising their First Amendment rights today.Ž He pointed to Trumps efforts to ban bump stocks and his support for school-safety measures and extended background checks for gun purchases.Since the bloodshed in Florida, students have tapped into a current of gun control sentiment that has been building for years „ yet still faces a powerful foe in the NRA, its millions of support-ers and lawmakers who have resisted any encroachment on gun rights.Organizers are hoping the electricity of the crowds, their sheer numbers and the under-18 roster of speakers will create a tipping point, starting with the midterm congressional elections this fall. To that end, chants of Vote them out!Ž rang through the Washington crowd.Emma Gonzalez, one of the first students from Floridas Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to speak out after the tragedy there, implored those of voting age to vote.In her speech, she recited the names of the Parkland dead, then held the crowd in rapt, tearful silence for more than six minutes, the time it took the gunman to kill them.We will continue to fight for our dead friends,Ž Delaney Tarr, another Parkland survivor, declared from the stage. The crowd roared with approval as she laid down the students central demand: a ban on weapons of warŽ for all but warriors.Student protesters called for a ban on high-capacity magazines and assault-type weapons like the one used by the killer in Parkland, comprehensive background checks, and a higher mini-mum age to buy guns.Gun violence was fresh for some who watched the speak-ers in Washington: Ayanne Johnson of Great Mills High School in Maryland held a sign declaring, I March for Jaelynn,Ž honoring Jaelynn Willey, who died Thursday two days after being shot by a classmate at the school. The gunman also died.About 30 gun-rights supporters staged a counter-demonstration in front of FBI headquarters, standing quietly with signs such as Armed Victims Live LongerŽ and Stop Violating Civil Rights.Ž Other gun-control protests around the country were also met with small counter-demonstrations. The presidents call to arm certain teachers fell flat at the protest, and from critics as young as Zoe Tate, 11, from Gaithersburg, Maryland.I think guns are dumb. Its scary enough with the security guards we have in school,Ž she said. We dont need teachers carrying guns now. I find it amazing that I have to explain that idea to adults.ŽParkland itself was home to a rally as more than 20,000 people filled a park near the Florida school, chanting slogans such as Enough is enoughŽ and carrying signs that read Why do your guns matter more than our lives?Ž and Our ballots will stop bullets.ŽMasses of teens demand gun controlPeople take part in a rally against gun violence Saturday in New York. Tens of thousands of people poured into the nations capital and cities across America on Saturday to march for gun control and ignite political activism among the young. [CRAIG RUTTLE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Vote them out!: Hundreds of thousands of young people and supporters across the US take a stand

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES On March 21, 2018, John William Daniels Jr was called home unexpectedly. The viewing will be held from 6-8 p.m. Monday, March 26, 2018, at Westside Baptist Church for all family and friends. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at Westside Baptist Church. The burial will follow at Roberts Cemetery. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. John was born in Wewahitchka, to John William Daniels, Sr., and Naomi Daniels. He married Wanda Hysmith on July 29, 1982. He was an active member of Westside Baptist Church and worked as a Correctional Officer Sergeant for 25 years. He was preceded in death by his father, John William Daniels, Senior; brother Roger Allen Daniels; and daughter Tabitha Amanda Daniels. He is survived by his mother, Naomi Daniels; his wife Wanda Daniels; two daughters, Rebecca Daniels and Kelly Angelino; and his grandchildren Daren and Taylor Angelino.Comforter Funeral Home 601 Long Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-1818JOHN WILLIAM DANIELS JR.Robert Leslie Harvey, 71, of Southport, passed away Saturday, March 24, 2018, in his home. He was born Jan. 28, 1947, in Pelham, Georgia. He served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. He was a retired heavy equipment operator for Cemex. He was preceded in death by his parents, Emmit and Blonie Harvey; two brothers; and two sisters. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Rose Marie Harvey; three children, Robert Harvey Jr., Teresa Tootill (Shawn) and Traci Mylrea (Ben); five grandchildren, Anthony Murray, April McConnell, Robert Tootill (Kim), Bryce Mylrea and Riley Mylrea; brother, Tony Brown; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 31, 2018, in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel with Pastor Joe Sellars officiating. Interment will follow in the Southport Memorial Gardens Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. Friday at the funeral home. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272ROBERT LESLIE HARVEY Williard D. Dale, 91, of Panama City, died March 23, 2018, at Covenant Care Hospice. Funeral services will take place graveside at 10 a.m. Friday at Jefferson Memorial Gardens in Trussville, Ala. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements.WILLIARD D. DALEGeorge A. Jacobi, Colonel (USAF, Ret), 100, passed away March 19, 2018, ending his century-long journey on this magnificent planet and entering the Kingdom of God. He was born on July 30, 1917, on a farm in Rancocous, New Jersey. Georges working life began at the Philadelphia Navy Yard as a shipwright. At the advent of WWII, he entered the Aviation Cadet Program, which marked the beginning of his 31-year Air Force flying career. He flew 89 combat missions in the South Pacific and as a test pilot flew more than 60 different types of aircraft. Additionally, George held many distinguished command and staff positions around the world. He retired to Lynn Haven, Florida, where he lived for more than 40 years before moving to St Augustine. He graduated from Jackson College in Hawaii and earned a Masters degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. George is survived by his wife, Betty, and his two daughters, Karen Schauer and Colonel Barbara Jacobi (USAF, Ret). He is also survived by his two grandchildren, Laura Schauer Ives and Grant Schauer; and his three great-grandchildren, Harrison Ives, Harper Ives and Clark Schauer. George will be remembered for his love and devotion to his family, for his expansive and outgoing personality, and for his belief that anything can be accomplished if a person works hard enough. Colonel Jacobi will be interred in Arlington Cemetery.GEORGE A. JACOBI Inez R Kirtsinger, age 87, of Lynn Haven, Fla., passed away March 23, 2018, at a local hospital. Inez was a devoted and loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She was very proud of her family and loved spending time with her two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Inez was born on June 18, 1930, in West Bay, Fla., to the late Duncan and Ruby (Buchanan) Ray. She was the oldest of five children, and is survived by Doris Bass (and the late Gerald Bass) of Lynn Haven, Roy Edgar Ray (Myrtle) of Youngstown, Fla., Delma Ruth Jordan of Bonifay, Fla., and John Ray (Donna) of Lynn Haven. She attended nursing school at Florida State College in Chattahoochee, Fla., where she met the love of her life, Carl Kirtsinger. Together they raised their son, Rodney Kirtsinger, in Chattahoochee before moving to the Panama City area in 1965. Inez was the beloved wife of Carl Kirtsinger. They celebrated 68 years of marriage this year. Inez was a loving mother to Rodney Kirtsinger, of San Diego, Texas. She was a cherished grandmother to Petty Officer First Class Alan Kirtsinger (USCG) and daughter-in-law, Angela, of Mobile, Ala., as well as Cindy Smith and son-in-law, Master Sergeant Matt Smith (USAF), of Arlington, Va. She was a treasured greatgrandmother to Cole, Valerie, Eli and Owen. She will be dearly missed by all that knew and loved her. Family and friends will gather at Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home, 2403 Harrison Ave., Panama City, Fla., for visitation Monday, March 26, 2018, from 6-8 p.m. Her funeral service will be led by David Buchanan at the funeral home on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at 10 a.m., followed by a graveside burial at Evergreen Memorial Gardens, 3733 U.S. 231, Panama City. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Inezs memory to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405.Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, FL 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.comINEZ R KIRTSINGER Terry James McDade, TJ,Ž age 82, died Thursday, March 22, 2018, at his home. A funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at Eastside Baptist Church in Vernon, with Rev. Jonathan Taylor officiating. Interment will follow in the Eastside Baptist Church Cemetery. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service. Family and friends may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.TERRY JAMES 'TJ' MCDADE Richard Keith Minthorne, 44, of Panama City, died Saturday, March 10, 2018. A celebration of Richards life will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, March 30, 2018, at St. Andrews Baptist Church. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com. RICHARD KEITH MINTHORNEThese obituaries appeared in The News Herald over the past seven days: Bernice C. Barton 89, died March 15. Bonnie Gale Berndt 61, Panama City Beach, died March 16. Jorja Lovel Byers 64, Fountain, died March 15. Laurel D. Carlson 93, Panama City Beach, died March 14. Rudolf Alphonse Carlson 97, Panama City, died March 13. Barrie Howard Coffman Seacrest Beach, died March 10. Miranda Marie Corrigan, 30, Lynn Haven, died March 14. Joseph Creamer 79, Panama City, died Feb. 18. Coley Crawford 73, Southport, died March 14. Paul Crouch 72, died March 17. Homer Harold Daniels, 83, Panama City, died March 19. Taylor Alexander Davidson died March 14. Bessie Lee White Davis, 91, Panama City, died March 14. Edward Joseph Demers 63, Carriere, Miss., died March 17. Cupidene Elenburg 81, Panama City, died March 18. Stephen Folds 28, Panama City, died March 11. Joseph Cecil Fountain 79, Panama City, died March 19. Helen E. Garcia 90, Jefferson City, died March 20. Floy Agnes Gray 78, died March 15. Anthony A. Harris Austin, Texas, died March 14. Michael Laine Hum” eet, 10 months, Lynn Haven, died March 14. Charles Ted Isaac 79, Panama City Beach, died March 17. D. Dean Jones 97, Lynn Haven, died March 22. Daniel Leon Keefover 72, Panama City Beach, died Feb. 19. E. Jean Klinger 95, Panama City, died March 20. Robert Lee Mayo 94, Clarksville, died March 19. Robert Eugene McGinnis 88, Panama City Beach, died March 19. Hugh G. Overstreet 87, Panama City, died March 15. Esperanza Hope Valenzuela Pacher died March 16. Mary Frances Smith Perkins 77, Panama City, died March 11. Larry Perlstein 71, Panama City, died March 20. Noel G. Phillips Jr. died March 16 Jack Saunders Jr., 78, Panama City, died March 15. Rosemarie Schultz 79, Southport, died March 17. Jerry A. Simmons 79, Panama City, died March 15. Verna Mae Thompson, 75, Concord, N.C., died March 13. Bruce Warren 70, Lynn Haven, died March 14.NOT FORGOTTENHugh G. Overstreet, MSgt. USAF (Ret.), 87, of Panama City, diedThursday, March 15, 2018. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m.Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at Forest Lawn Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements by Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home and Cemeteries.HUGH G. OVERSTREETJack Saunders Jr., 78, of Panama City, died Thursday, March 15, 2018. Funeral services will be announced on a later date. To extend condolences, please visit www. heritagefhllc.com.JACK SAUNDERS JR.Patricia Ann Scherrer, 75, of Panama City, died Friday, March 23, 2018. Funeral services will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home. The family will receive friends beginning at 1 p.m., prior to the service. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com.PATRICIA ANN SCHERRERThe Lord called Pete home on Feb. 21, 2018, while in the gentle care of Covenant Hospice. Pete leaves behind, his wife of 45 years, Judy; his sons, Steve (Janis), Scott (Kathie), David and Jeff; his daughters, Karen (Mike) and Lisa (Jr.); two very special grandchildren who were his pride and joy, Larry and Brianna. Pete had many other grandchildren and great-grandchildren. As per Pete's wishes, his body was donated to Life Science. He was cremated and his ashes spread in a private ceremony. Anyone wishing, may make a donation to Covenant Hospice in his memory.LAWRENCE (PETE) WARTENBE

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** B4 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald Staff reportPENSACOLA „ A 50-foot commercial fish-ing vessel caught fire and sunk in Pensacola Bay on Friday afternoon, accord-ing to the U.S. Coast Guard. The fire consuming the New Horizon, moored at Joe Patti's Marina, was put out about 4:30 p.m. by the Pensacola Fire Department. As the vessel sank, it discharged an estimated 100 gallons of diesel into the water, which Coast Guard Sector Mobile helped to contain.Seatow deployed containment boom and sorbent pads around the vessel to collect oil, and a vacuum truck and skimmer began operations Saturday morning.There were no reported injuries or reports of affected wildlife. The cause of the fire is under investigation.Fishing boat catches re, sinks The New Horizon caught “ re Friday afternoon in Pensacola Bay. The vessel ultimately sank. [PENSACOLA FIRE DEPARTMENT] Photos by Joshua Boucher The News HeraldAny eggs missed by hunters Saturday at St. Andrew State Park won't go bad in the sun „ they'll become fish food.The Panama City Dive Club hid over 100 dyed, hard-boiled eggs along the "kiddie pool" jetties Saturday for the club's fourth annual Underwater Easter Egg Hunt. About 40 divers suited up and hunted for the eggs, competing to gather the most, the most of cer-tain colors, and the most trash. The club also meets regularly to clean trash from among the rocks.Here are other Easter egg hunts and activities coming up in Bay County, mostly of the more tradi-tional type: SUNDAY, MARCH 25EASTER EGG HUNT: 3:305:30 p.m. at St. Andrew Untied Methodist Church, 2001 W. 11th St., Panama City. Ages 0-3 at 3:30 p.m., 4-7 at 3:45 p.m. and all ages at 4 p.m. Followed by activities hour, a pinata and a 5 p.m. hot dog fundraising dinner. Details: St. Andrew United Methodist Church on Facebook. SATURDAY, MARCH 31EASTER EGG HUNT: 10 a.m. to noon at the Lynn Haven Sports Complex, 2201 Recreation Drive. Games provided by the FSU Recreation, Tourism and Events Program, in” atables, face painters, and concessions for sale. Have a photo taken with the Easter Bunny and Chicken. Hunts will be at 10:30 a.m. for ages 1-3; 10:45 a.m. for ages 4-7; and 11 a.m. for ages 8-10. Free admission. Details, CityOfLynnHaven.com. PCB EASTER EGG HUNT: 10 a.m. on Fields 5-9 at Frank Brown Park, Panama City Beach Parkway. Ages 10 and under. After the hunt, take pictures with the Easter Bunny. Details, 850-233-5045 or PanamaCityBeachParksAndRecreation.com. LITTLE LOCALS EGG HUNT: Starting at 10 a.m. at Schooners, 5121 Gulf Drive, Panama City Beach. The hunt schedule is divided by age: 10 a.m. for ages 0 to 2 years, with one parent allowed in the hunting ground; 10:30 a.m. for ages 3-4; 11 a.m. for ages 5-6; and 11:30 a.m. for ages 7-9. Space is limited, registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Wristbands are required for participation. Details, Schooners.com EASTER FAMILY FUN DAY: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at High Praise Panama City, 7124 E. State 22, Panama City. Family activities, food, bounce houses, face painting, snow cones and more. Details: High Praise Panama City on Facebook. SUNDAY, APRIL 1RESCUE MISSION EASTER BANQUET: 2-5 p.m. in the courtyard of the Panama City Rescue Mission, 609 Allen Ave. All are invited to dine or volunteer. Details: 850-769-0783. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, APRIL 7-8ZOOWORLD SPRING FLING: 10 a.m. each day at ZooWorld, 9008 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Ice cream social, baby animals, games, face painting, prizes and goodies. Regular admission. Details: zooworldpcb.com. Divers walk into the water for the Underwater Easter Egg Hunt at St. Andrews State Park on Saturday. Divers searched the water for dyed boiled eggs and trash to win prizes. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Four dyed eggs gathered from the jetties Saturday awaiting counting by the judges. Chris Cromer, president of the Panama City Dive Club, motions to the jetties at St. Andrews State Park before competitors start the clubs fourth annual Underwater Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday. Divers prep their gear to start combing the sands in the jetties at St. Andrews State Park on Saturday. Divers were looking for over a hundred boiled eggs. Steven Breazeale counts eggs gathered during the Underwater Easter Egg Hunt at St. Andrews State Park on Saturday. Divers hunt for undersea eggs

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B5

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** B6 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B7By Diane M. RobinsonThe Washington County News Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCARYVILLE „ An ordi-nance passed in May last year was called into question when the Caryville Town Council met in regular session March 20.The ordinance includes a requirement that all residents inside town limits connect to the towns water system. Town Clerk Suzanne Floyd said everyone had successfully connected to the water system „ except for two people who have emphatically refused to do so after receiving certified letters.One person is former coun-cil member Ransom Works. The second is current council member Henry Chambers.Chambers, who made the motion to pass the ordinance, refuses to connect to the water system, stating he will not cap off his water and pay the town for water. He has argued his well is grandfathered in.I had water in this town before the town ever incorporated,Ž Chambers said. Im not about to shut my well down to tie into the system.ŽTown Attorney Jerry Miller, however, said there wasnt a clause in the regulation for that.There is no grandfather clause in the ordinance,Ž Miller said.Then yall go ahead and do what yall gone do,Ž Cham-bers said.Miller took the opportunity to address the council concerning their roles and responsibilities.You set the model for compliance with your laws, regulations, ordinances and resolutions, by your conduct and actions,Ž Miller said. If you do not hold the highest expectations and performance of your own regulations, that is a very strong communication to your community that you're not going to stand up for law. That is not a model that can contribute to an effective, efficient and proficient municipal operation.ŽMiller went on to ask each council member to do some self-evaluation regarding their service to the community.You undertook an oath to obey the law when you took on these roles,Ž he said. At any point in time when you establish a position contrary to your own oath in comply-ing with the law, I suggest that is the time you need to look in the mirror and evaluate resignation. I represent this municipal body, and will only con-tinue to do so as long as each member sets a model and standard of compliance with law,Ž Miller concluded.However, Chambers remained defiant.I am not paying the town for no water when I have a well in my yard,Ž he said.Miller will look into what recourse the town holds in matters such as these and what can be done to make it right.In other business, a resolu-tion to bring all of the towns facilities up to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance was approved. The town will have three years to make the required improvements.A request for proposals for a grant administrator for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) was approved to run in a regional paper to allow for a broader net to be cast.The Caryville Town Coun-cil will meet again in regular session at 6 p.m. April 10.Caryville council member refuses water connectionHenry Chambers de ant despite voting in favor of mandatory connections

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** B8 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B9

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** B10 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Christine SextonThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Gov. Rick Scott signed 74 bills into law on Friday, including a taxcut package, a measure that declares the Legis-latures intent to observe daylight-saving time year-round and a bill that prevents most minors from getting married.The tax package (HB 7087), which totals about $171 million in tax and fee cuts, authorizes a three-day tax holidayŽ in early August that will allow back-to-school shoppers to buy clothes and school supplies without paying sales taxes. Also, the bill will lead to a similar seven-day holidayŽ in early June for residents to buy tax-free hurricane supplies.The bill also includes tax breaks for farmers and ranchers who suffered damage in Hurricane Irma and trims a commercial-lease tax paid by many businesses. Other parts of the package include a property-tax break for homeowners displaced by Hurricane Irma and a break for nursing homes and assisted living facili-ties that purchase electric generators.Scotts office released the list of 74 bills early Friday evening. The measures were passed during the legislative ses-sion that ended March 11. About two-dozen of the measures were what are known as localŽ bills, which involve issues in individual communities across the state.The daylight-saving time bill (HB 1013) drew widespread attention during the legislative session. It expresses the Legislatures support for keeping Florida on daylight-saving time throughout the year.While the Legislature and Scott agree on the issue, such a change would ultimately require congressional approval. To that end, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio has filed legislation to begin the process of making the change.Scott on Friday also approved a measure (SB 140) that bars people under age 18 from getting marriage licenses. The bill includes an exception, though, for 17-year-olds who have written consent from their parents or guardians. Also, the 17-year-olds could not marry people who are more than two years older than them. The Legislature passed 195 bills during this years session, and Scott has signed 154 into law. To date, he hasnt vetoed any bills.Scott, however, issued a signing letter Friday with a bill (HB 7043) that would allow the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to assume administration of a federal wetland-per-mitting program. Scotts letter said the bill gives the department authority to undertake rulemaking to explore whether the state should issueŽ per-mits now administered by the federal government.The Department of Environmental Protections rulemaking process is done with public input and scru-tiny,Ž Scott wrote. Also, the Department of Envi-ronmental Protection must demonstrate that their permitting pro-grams standards are just as stringent, if not more stringent, than what is in place currently with the federal government.Ž „ News Service Executive Editor Jim Saunders contributed to this report.Scott signs in tax cuts, signs out time changesDan LaMoore sizes hands for an 8-foot diameter silhouette clock at Electric Time Co., in Med“ eld, Mass. Florida hopes to stay permanently on daylight-saving time, but the change will require congressional approval. [AP FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B11

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** B12 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldIt is not class-action; it's multi-district litiga-tion,Ž said attorney Cliff Higby, who is one of the lawyers representing the county and city in the case. Everybody has claims that are standing on their own.ŽWith 121.2 prescriptions issues per 100 people in 2016, Bay County has the second highest per capita rate of opioid prescriptions in the state, led only by neighboring Washington County. County leaders said the high number of prescrip-tions has resulted in the county shelling out funds for incarcerating people, medical treatment, law enforcement and other associated costs.All the other cities and counties are going to have similar claims to Bay County, including excess burden on the financial resources of the county due to the nuisance and the epidemic of opiote drugs,Ž Higby said.Higby said the main argument is that opioid distribution companies have been negligent in the distribution of opioids.They are regulated by the federal controlled substance act and they have a duty to monitor the flow of opiate drugs into communities and to regions, and they have been failing in that regard," he said. SUITFrom Page B1 starting a lot of programs that you can't finish," said Todd Harrison, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "In many cases, we spent billions developing new technolo-gies and new weapons but didn't buy them, and that's an ever-present concern when you've got a build-up in defense spending like this."One of the biggest boosts in funding is for air-craft. In all, the Pentagon would get 143 additional planes, bringing the total of aircraft procurement spending to $44 billion, a 27 percent increase over the White House budget request. The big winner is Lockheed Martin, which manufactures the stealthy F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Jet.After initially criticizing the cost of the F-35 as the most expensive weapons program in the history of the Pentagon, President Trump on Thursday praised the jet as "that beautiful F-35. It's stealth, you cannot see it. Is that correct? It better be correct."Under the spending plan, the Pentagon would spend an additional $3 billion to buy 20 more of the fighter jets. There's another $740 billion for 10 more of Boeing's F-18 Super Hornets, $676 mil-lion for additional V-22 helicopters and $510 for three additional KC-46 tankers.The Pentagon "went gonzo" on aircraft pro-curement, said Steve Ellis, the vice president of Tax-payers for Common Sense, a watchdog group. "More F-35s for every service. You get a plane, you get a plane and you get a plane, too. More Super Hornets, V-22 Osprey, more drones, more everything."The spending plan would also raise spending on shipbuilding, giving the Navy an additional $3.4 billion for construction of new ships.Missile defense is another area where contractors could see their bottom lines increase. The Pentagon would spend an additional $1 billion on two of Lockheed's missile defense systems, bringing total appropriations for the Missile Defense Agency to $11.5 billion.The spending plan comes a month after the Pentagon awarded Boeing a $6.5 billion contract to "complete the accelerated delivery of a new missile field with 20 additional silos" at Fort Greely, Alaska. U.S. Rep. Kay Granger, R-Texas, the chair of the defense appropriations subcommittee, defended the spending plan, saying in a statement that huge investments in national security were overdue."Our military is trying to recover from 16 years of war," she said in a statement. "The needs are great, and this bill begins to fulfill those needs."She added that Congress must "ensure that these funds are spent strategically and with vigorous Congressional oversight."She also lauded increased funding in research and develop-ment, particularly in areas such as space, electronic warfare and hypersonics vehicles that could fly at speeds of Mach 5 or greater. Many in the Pen-tagon, including Michael Griffin, the new undersecretary of defense of research and engineering, think hypersonics, a technology also pursued by the Chinese, needs to be a top priority for the PentagonRep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, the chairman of the House Armed Ser-vices Committee also praised the budget, saying that it "sends a very strong message to allies and adversaries alike that the United States is going to stand up and defend ourselves."But Ellis warned that the spending was out of control."Really what this comes down to is: more is not a strategy, and there is no underlying rhyme or rationale for the increases, except for they had money to spend." BUDGETFrom Page B1the past, court records state.But its hard to recognize him,Ž the juror told the court. He was younger at the time. I think he may have dated my girlfriends daughter. I never knew his last name.ŽBasford specifically asked the juror if he could still be fair and impartial, and the juror said he could because it was years ago since he spoke with the previous girlfriend and only saw Shirah in pass-ing. Basford, Bennett and Shirah all then agreed the jury panel was acceptable. However, after a guilty verdict was rendered, Shirah claimed he recognized saw the juror's tattoos and then recognized him.Basford argued that the juror stated his full name during jury selection, and Shirah had ample oppor-tunity in the course of the trial to object. But they waited until the adverse outcome express any concerns.As to the allegation that (Shirah) did not rec-ognize Juror #57 until after the verdict when he saw the jurors tattoos, a review of the video of the trial shows Juror #57 wore a short sleeve shirt each day of the trial,Ž Basford wrote. The tat-toos were clearly visible each day.ŽBennett also asked that Overstreet recuse himself before the subsequent motion for a new trial. She said Overstreet was prejudiced in the sen-tencing of Shirah because Overstreet had been the judge to release him on drug-offender probation only weeks before the fatal crash. Overstreet denied the request.The crash happened about 12:30 a.m. Sept. 17, 2016 after witnesses reported being sideswiped on U.S. 231 by a black F-150 that then sped away onto Pinetree Road. The witnesses followed the truck as it approached the intersection with John Pitts Road, where it plowed into the side of a van with enough force to eject several of the vans passengers, officers reported.Two of the five softball players in the van „ Anthony Gouge, 30, of Columbus, and Eric Young, 25, of Chillicothe „ died immediately, and two more „ Anthony Gouges brother, 29-year-old William Gouge II, and Josh Martin, 33, both of Columbus „ later died at a local hospital. The vans driver, Craig A. Jackson, 31, of London, Ohio, later was released after treat-ment for critical injuries.The team had just left a game at H.G. Harders Park as part of the World Sports League World Softball Championships, and the five teammates were headed to their hotel room. SHIRAHFrom Page B1From left, engineer tech Bryan Caudill and Timothy Cutler work on the console of a rigid hull in” atable boat at SAIC, a defense contractor in Panama City Beach in 2017. [ANDREW WARDLOW/THE NEWS HERALD] Cody Shirah speaks to Defense Attorney Caren Bennett on the opening day of his DUI manslaughter trial. [ZACK MCDONALD/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B13Spring Break laws, including the ban of alcohol on the beach sand. Fights and alco-hol-related medical issues were commonplace among the record-breaking call vol-umes. And in the final few years of unfettered alcohol consumption on the beach during Spring Break, the mob mentality of the hundreds of raucous college-aged visitors took a turn toward endanger-ing patients and paramedics alike.It was just craziness „ anything went,Ž Welch said, recalling the years building up to the laws. It was a slow increase, but it seemed like three or four years before [the laws] there was a difference in the crowd. The mentality was more unruly.ŽWelch, who has been an EMT in Bay County since 1996, said some college-aged visitors would be helpful in emergencies „ helping clear the way, for example „ but the volatile situations mostly put him and his patients in danger. Getting into a crowd with your gear and everything was one thing,Ž he said. Carrying a patient out was another. It wasnt like Moses and the Red Sea.ŽHowever, as Welch drove along the Beach on Saturday, responding to scooter crashes and cardiac calls, he said the call volume and types of calls in the past two years have been much more manageable. Since the implementation of the Spring Break laws, EMS calls have decreased substan-tially, according to county records.In 2015, medical personnel responded to 3,413 calls „ some nights breaking records of crews working upward of 170 medical emergencies. In 2016, the calls decreased by about 15 percent to 2,881. In 2017, medics responded to 2,576 calls and were on track for a similar outcome in 2018, working 1,240 just after mid-March, records stated.Mark Bowen, Bay Countys chief of emergency services, said it is difficult to attribute the fluctuation of numbers to one certain thing. Weather and the economy also influence the lack of bodies at the beach, which ultimately affects the number of medical issues. What is certain, though, is that paramedics and all other emergency responders saw relief fol-lowing the Spring Break laws, Bowen said.We still have an influx of people to attend to,Ž he said. But theres no doubt that the stress and impact on our emergency management system has diminished.ŽIn the years before the alcohol ban on the beach, Bowen said he would have to have as many medics as possible in service and stationed along the beach. There was a delicate balance to not over-working staff while still being able to have enough people to respond to the massive number of calls coming from beach for fights and alcohol-related medical issues. The increased demand drew heavily on resources, which made it difficult when medi-cal emergencies occurred in other parts of the county, Bowen said.For many of them, the reason they became para-medics was to save lives,Ž he said. The more mayhem, the less they were able to do what they felt in their heart they were called to do.ŽLike many other emergency personnel in Bay County, Bowen cited a 2015 house party shooting that hospitalized seven people with gunshot wounds as the culmination of mayhem on the beach.That was huge for us,Ž Bowen said. It went as well as it could go, and were proud of how we handled that. But Spring Break got to the point it was unmanageable.ŽBowen said many nights they would need several extra trucks to run patients from the beach to hospital. EMTs still keep an eye out for large events and add more trucks and staff when required. But on the ground, medics are seeing positive changes, Bowen added.Were pleased from the medical response standpoint,Ž he said. We feel safer, and we feel like the public is safer.Ž LAWSFrom Page B1

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** B14 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Kevin BouffardThe Lakeland LedgerFROSTPROOF „ Byron and Cynthia Matteson said they dont plan to give up on their lifelong commitment to citrus, but they agreed they need another cash crop to survive the uncertainties of growing Floridas signature crop.So they are planting bamboo on 35 acres of their Frostproof farm.I felt a little bit like I was bailing out on citrus,Ž said Cynthia Matteson, a fourth-generation citrus grower. We were going to put it (the 35 acres) in citrus, but the situation is so bleak.ŽBleak because the fatal bacterial disease citrus greening, endemic in Flor-ida, has made it difficult to grow that crop at a profit.Im still a citrus man,Ž said Byron Matteson, adding they will continue raising the crop on 85 acres. It breaks my heart to see the industry like it is. It breaks my heart to see my citrus trees in this condition.ŽBefore it dies, a greening-infected citrus tree will produce fewer fruit of smaller size. The disease has led to more than a 70 percent reduction in Flor-idas annual citrus crop while almost tripling the cost of production.But the outlook for growing bamboo in Florida is as sunny as the outlook for citrus is bleak, said the couple, who own Mattco Enterprises LLC in Lake Wales.Im planting 35 acres for now, but Ill probably come back and plant a little more,Ž said Byron Matteson, 56, who has been growing citrus since he was a teenager.Mattco hopes eventu-ally to grow on 100 acres if its first foray into bamboo proves profitable, he added. The Mattesons expressed confidence it will.The thing about bamboo that is hard to resist: It takes five to 10 years to make a profit on a new citrus grove. You can do it with bamboo in three years,Ž Cynthia Matteson said.Mattco has partnered with OnlyMoso USA Corp. in Sunrise, which is promoting commercial bamboo growing in the United States. Moso is a bamboo plant variety, but contrary to the name, the company offers other varieties after discover-ing they grow much better in Floridas climate, said spokeswoman Debbi Fultz. One such variety is Asper bamboo, which Mattco is planting.OnlyMoso is the U.S. subsidiary of an Italian company, Consorzio Bambu Italia, which began promoting commercial bamboo in 2011, said founder and President Fab-rizio Pecci, who traveled to Frostproof for the Mattco kickoff. The company has helped create more than 5,000 acres of commercial bamboo in Europe, primar-ily Italy, Pecci said.OnlyMoso has helped start more than 300 acres of commercial bamboo in Florida and other Southeastern States since it began in 2014, said Chris Kaiser, director of sales and business.Consorzio Bambu promotes bamboo as both a food crop, bamboo shoots, and its better known use as a wood product. Grow-ers can begin picking the shoots by the third year after planting and bamboo wood by the fifth year, Pecci said. The shoots are growing in popularity among U.S. and European consumers because of their health benefits, including antioxidants, potassium and fiber. A mature bamboo farm will produce 60 metric tons per year of wood and 14 tons of shoots without need of those chemicals, he said.For the commercial grower, a major attraction of bamboo is its simplicity to grow, Byron Matteson and company officials agreed. All it needs is water and fertilizer two times a year,Ž Matteson said. The lifes-pan of these plants is 80 to 100 years. Effectively, this will never need to be replanted. Matteson estimated the caretaking costs of a mature bamboo farm at $5,000 per acre, mainly fertilizer and labor, he said. Sales of the wood and shoots could bring in $25,000 per acre in the cur-rent market.Wednesdays planting event at Mattco attracted a representative of one of Floridas largest citrus growers, Lykes Bros. Inc. It has more than 30,000 grove acres, according to Forbes magazine.Max Tucker, researchand-development farm manager for Lykes, said the company has been looking at bamboo for two years but has not made a decision on investing in the crop. Like most citrus growers, Lykes is looking at alternatives to citrus.For us it will be a process of assessing its technical feasibility, financial requirements and market potential,Ž Tucker said.Tucker was more encouraged on its market potential after speaking with Pecci, he said.Well see how another citrus grower does,Ž Tucker said.OnlyMoso has a carrot „ the financial kind „ for growers looking to plant new bamboo farms, said Charles Edwards, a sales representative. The cost of planting a new bamboo farm runs $18,000 per acre, Edwards said, but OnlyMoso will advance a new grower half that cost interest free for the first four years, repayable in the fifth year when the farm produces sprouts and wood.Byron Matteson found the offer hard to resist.If I hadnt expected a return (profit), I wouldnt be putting it in,Ž he said. Citrus growers to try bamboo to o set lossesFrom left, Fabrizio Pecci, president of Italian bamboo company Consorzio Bambu Italia; Roberto Seminara, shareholder; Byron and Cynthia Mattison, owners of the Lake Wales-based citrus g rower Mattco Enterpises LLC; and Chris Kaiser, director of sales and business at OnlyMoso, encircle one of the new bamoo plants on Mattcos farm on 35 acres in Frostproof. [ KEVIN BOUFFARD/THE LEDGER ]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 B15 HOLMES COUNTYFHP: Woman, 85, dies in collision with lighted police carAn 85-year-old woman has died after her vehicle was struck by a police vehi-cle with its emergency lights on, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. The officer was seriously injured.FHP reported Zachary Neitsch, 20, was driving a marked Holmes County Sheriff's Office patrol car west on Thomas Drive with his emergency lights on and siren activated. Near Hospital Drive, Mellie Marell, 85, of Boni-fay, reportedly failed to yield right of way, and Neitsch's patrol car struck the right front side of her Volkswagen Passat.Both vehicles rotated and came to rest in the grass shoulder of Thomas Drive near Hospital Drive.Both were taken to Doctors Memorial Hospital, where Marell was pronounced dead and Neitsch remains in seri-ous condition.Charges are pending investigation.FOUNTAINRed Cross responds to home “ res in Fountain, ChipleyA family of four adults and two children under 3 are being helped by the American Red Cross after a fire.The fire damaged the resi-dence in the 17100 block of Aawsaw Lane in Fountain on Friday.Volunteers responded to another fire Saturday, this one on the 4100 block of Pine Log Road in Chipley. Two adults living in the residence are being aided by the Red Cross.LYNN HAVENFood truck fundraiser to support BCSO employee after “ reThe Bay County Sheriff's Office will host a food truck fundraiser this week to help an employee after a house fire.BCSO reported Doug Dieckman, who works at the Bay County Jail, "lost his family home and several family pets to a house fire on March 18."The agency invites the public to help the family recover at the food truck fair, set for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thurs-day and Friday at BCSO's main office, 3421 State 77.The Prime Rib Guy and Temperley's food trucks will set up Thursday, with Pirate Bay and Back Porch BBQ taking over on Friday.Donations will go to the Dieckman family at the end of the day. Also Friday, BCSO will have an Easter-themed silent auction in the front lobby.Donations from the public will be accepted both days. Any business owner who wants to donate can call Peggy MacDonald or Theresa Anglin at 850-747-4700.TUCSON, ARIZ.Florida base being studied as locations for F-35 unitMilitary bases in Arizona, Florida and Missouri are being studied by the Air Force along with one in Texas already identified as the pre-ferred location for basing an Air Force Reserve squadron of 24 F-35 fighters.A notice published Wednesday in the Federal Register says Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base is the preferred alternative and that the "reasonable alternatives" being studied for environmental suitability are Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Arizona, Homestead Air Force Base in Florida and Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri.The notice says the Air Force plans to conduct eve-ning public meetings at each location in late April.If F-35s are assigned to Davis-Monthan and White-man, they would replace A-10 attack jets. They would replace F-16 fighters at Homestead or Fort Worth. Staff and wire reportsAREA & STATE BRIEFS

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** B16 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldJessica SaggioFlorida TodayMELBOURNE, Fla. (AP) „ 1 ... 2 ... 3 ... 4 ... 5 ... 6 ... 7 ... 8 ... 9 calls, counted Scott Gardiner of Melbourne, tally-ing how many spam calls he received in one day. Nine calls.I'm pretty sure it's been a phone number from every one of the 50 states, too,Ž Gar-diner said, noting he's losing patience.  ... I've asked to be put on the Do Not Call list. Yeah, that doesn't work.ŽBut Gardiner knows he isn't special. He said his wife and mother-in-law are in the same boat.Ž Then there were the dozens of people who responded to a FLORIDA TODAY Facebook post noting they, too, understood the burden. Some were report-ing upward of 20 calls a day.It's a problem most people have in the Sunshine State have encountered, and „ bad news „ it's only getting worse.So bad, in fact, that based on recent data from the pop-ular app RoboKiller, which heavily monitors spam calls, Florida is one of the worst states for calls, according to an influx of robocalls the company has flagged since the beginning of this year.Data collected by the Fed-eral Trade Commission, which monitors complaints, show Florida has always been among the worst states in sheer volume. Last year, 588,021 formal complaints were filed to the FTC, second only to California, which reported 823,692 spam or scam telemarketing calls „ and those are just the calls actually reported.We accurately define it as an epidemic,Ž said Ethan Garr, co-creator of RoboKiller, an app made to stop the calls. What drives this is basic economics. Making these phone calls is so inexpensive for scammers. It costs them less than a penny per minute.ŽGarr said Floridians get an average of 2.1 spam calls per day. He attributes that to the number of retirees here, as scammers generally go after the elderly who might not be as up to date with technology.But where are these calls coming from? Are they even legal? And better yet, how do you get rid of them?Well, they most certainly are not legal, said Keith Keogh, a lawyer out of Chicago who has been part of multiple class-action lawsuits against companies that robocall.He referenced the Tele-phone Consumer Protection Act, which designates that companies and individuals cannot bombard a person's phone with robocalls with-out their consent. If you're on the Do Not Call list, the calls aren't legal.That doesn't stop them, though.The masterminds behind these calls could be anyone: A guy sitting in his basement, a call center overseas, even ter-rorists, said Garr.Many of the calls are run by small companies or even large overseas call centers that are looking for leads. They aim to refer people to different health care companies or loan agents who then pay them for the referral, said Keogh.They key is to find out who is calling, he said, and if it's a legitimate company a person can sue if they're being harassed. Take screenshots of the call, and submit a formal complaint to make it all public record, Keogh advised. Consumers may be enti-tled to $500 per call, he said. However, settlements in class-action suits generally pay out less than that.We spend a lot of our time trying to find out who's call-ing ... and trying to go after these people,Ž said Koegh. There's really no way to get them to stop besides litigation. Their whole business model is making these calls in mass.ŽIt seems hopeless some-times, said Koegh, especially when callers are using local numbers to trick people into answering.Chris Sharpe of Titusville knows this struggle. She shared a screenshot of seven calls she received in on day, all from spam callers. Five of those calls used a local area code.But people are generally not litigious said Koegh, and most of the people he represents have tried time and time again to stop the calls to no avail.That's where apps like RoboKiller step in, said Garr. His app uses audio fingerprinting and a constantly-updated algorithm to block calls before they get to a person's phone. The app's algorithm is also able to decipher legitimate calls from spam calls, he said.But they don't just stop there. The best mechanism of defense is to connect to a real human, he said, and waste their time.If you can waste the human's time, you can start winning the battle,Ž said Garr. Time is money for them.ŽThe company uses what it calls an answerbox,Ž which interacts with the robocall and is designed to get to an actual human and stall them. Users can customize their answerboxes as well for added fun, he said. Many of the answerboxes are actually hilariousŽ he said.RoboKiller is currently only available on iPhone, but will expand to Android later this month. Subscriptions cost $2.99 per month or $24.99 per year.There are other options, though. According to CTIA, an FTC-recommended trade association representing manufacturers and providers of wireless products and ser-vices, there a number of call blocking apps available for various operating systems. Among the free options are Mr. Number (iPhone) and Blacklist (Android), which both have positive reviews. Here's the advice I give to people,Ž said Garr. If you're not going to invest in a solu-tion, don't answer calls and don't give away information.ŽRobocall epidemic worsens, Florida a prime target

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 C1 SPORTS NASCAR | C2MARTINSVILLENASCAR moves to its rst short track of the season with a two-day stop at Martinsville Speedway. Unseasonably cold weather in Virginia and possible urries hamper opening day at the paperclip-shaped track. NCAA | C3BASKETBALLCan Kansas States defense stop Loyola-Chicagos unlikely tournament run? See how they fared By Pat McCannThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ Games 3 and 4 of Panhandle Conference baseball four-game series often can turn into all hands on deck for the bullpen during Saturday afternoon doubleheaders.With that as a backdrop, the dueling shutouts served up, first by Gulf Coast via Brett Wisely in the opener and the response by Cason Greathouse and Northwest Florida in Game 2 were among the largest surprises in a twinbill matinee at Bill Frazier Field.What had to be an even more outrageous outlay was the Commodores and Raid-ers completing two 7-inning games in 3 hours, 20 minutes, and that including 30 minutes between games.The 1-0 victory and 2-0 defeat left Gulf Coast still sol-idly, if distantly, entrenched in second place behind first-place Chipola (5-1 entering Saturday) at 7-5 in the conference 19-13 overall. Third-place Northwest Florida is 4-4, 23-11.Wisely limited the Raiders to three hits and a walk in the opener, getting the final two outs of the game on strikeouts after NWFS put Thomas Bro-yles on second with just one out in the seventh.Gulf Coast split s; stay s in 2ndGulf Coast State Colleges Jeff Omohundro tags out Northwest Florida States Kyle Fitzgerald on Saturday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The News HeraldWith the 14th edition of the annual All-Star Basketball Classic less than two weeks away, the final boys and girls for the East All-Stars have been selected.The event matches the top seniors from The News Her-alds eight-county readership area comprising the East boys and girls teams against the best seniors from The Daily News in Fort Walton Beachs Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton county area. The East teams are chosen by The News Herald with assistance of the East All-Star coaches „ Bozeman coach Michael Memmen for the boys, and Bozeman coach Desmond Brown for the girls.The first four boys „ Ruth-erfords Lorenzo Ferrell, Blountstowns KK Godwin, Mosleys Stacy Burse, and Bethlehems Kobe Hendrix „ and first four girls „ Mosleys JaTayvia Holley, Port St. East All-Star Classic rosters nalizedShelton States Cierra Johnson (2) scored 47 points in Saturdays 98-64 win over Gulf Coast in the third-place game of the NJCA A Division I Womens Basketball National Championship tournament in Lubbock, Tex. [JOE MORALES/RAPID SHOTZ PHOTOGRAPHY] By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comLUBBOCK, Tex. „ It was a tough weekend for Gulf Coast at the NJCAA Division I Womens Basketball Championship tournament. On Friday, the Lady Commodores quest for a third straight national title was ended by Tallahassee, due in large part to an injury to All-American guard Shayla Bennett. On Saturday, they lost again in the third-place game, and in the process had to watch a hallowed record set by a former AllAmerican get broken.No. 1 seed Shelton State (Ala.) (36-1) cruised past No. 2 seed Gulf Coast (28-4) 98-64 behind a 47-point performance from Cierra Johnson. The 5-foot-10 sophomore guard made 16 of 24 shots from the field, 5 of 10 from the 3-point line, and 10 of 11 from the free throw line for her 47 points, which breaks the 15-year-old record set Lady Commodores legend Tashia Morehead in 2003.Johnson scored 31 points in the first half, including 16 during a decisive 27-4 Buc-caneers run over the final six minutes of the second quar-ter. Margaret Robinson added 18 points and six rebounds for the Bucs, while Nakia Kincey scored a team-high 16 points for Gulf Coast. Dominique Banks had 14 points, nine rebounds, and three blocked shots, with Alexus Dye adding 12 points and Din Dian 11. Janesha Green scored nine points.Johnsons 47 points spur Shelton St. past Gulf CoastGulf Coasts Nakia Kincey goes up for a layup during Saturdays the third-place game of the NJCAA Division I Womens Basketball National Championship in Lubbock, Tex. Kincey led Gulf Coast with 16 points. [JOE MORALES/RAPID SHOTZ PHOTOGRAPHY] See ROSTERS, C7 See GULF COAST, C7 See BASEBALL, C7

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** C2 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Doug FergusonThe Associated PressAUSTIN, Texas „ Justin Thomas won two matches Saturday to reach the semifinals of the Dell Technologies Match Play.One more and he gets to No. 1 in the world.Thomas made quick work of Si Woo Kim in the morning, and then trailed for the first time all week against Kyle Stanley „ just not for long. Thomas won three straight holes to start the back nine, made a 6-foot par putt to stay in control and closed out Stanley, 2-and-1.Dustin Johnson didnt win a match this week and will not get any world ranking points. That means Thomas only has to reach the champi-onship match Sunday to become the seventh American to reach No. 1.In his way was Bubba Watson, who is back to playing like a two-time Masters champion.It will and would be a great accomplishment,Ž Thomas said. But Im just worried about trying to beat Bubba Watson tomorrow.ŽWatson made all the key putts in a battle of Georgia southpaws when he beat Brian Harman in the morning, and then he turned a tight match into a runaway against Kiradech Aphibarnrat by winning five of six holes on the back nine for a 5-and-3 victory.That put Watson, who won last month at Riv-iera, in the semifinals for the first time since his Match Play debut in 2011.Alex Noren extended his run at Austin Country Club by winning for the ninth time in his last 10 matches. His only loss was to Johnson a year ago in the quarterfinals, and he needed only 31 holes to beat Patrick Reed and Cameron Smith of Australia.Noren and Thomas are the only semifinalists who have not lost a match this week.Kevin Kisner reached the semifinals with a big putt and a big blowout. He made a birdie on the 18th hole to beat Matt Kuchar, and then matched the shortest match of the week with an 8-and-6 victory over Ian Poulter, who was dis-appointed for more than just losing.Probably didnt see that one coming,Ž Kisner said. I thought it was going to be a difficult match. Obviously, Ians match-play record speaks for itself. I got off to a good start making a few birdies. He made a few mistakes, and I was able to capitalize on those. And things just snowballed from there.Ž Poulter was told after he beat Louis Oosthuizen in the morning that reaching the quarterfinals was enough for him to be in the top 50 at the end of the week, which would get him into the Masters. Moments later, he received a text that he needed to win his match against Kisner.I gave him no fight at all. It was rubbish,Ž said Poulter, who didnt make a birdie.The misinformation wasnt to blame, though it clearly added to an all-around bad day at the office.Next time I wont listen to other people. Ill do my bit and focus better,Ž Poulter said. I mean, I cant put that down as an excuse. It would be an excuse if I said it. So its disappointing to be given the wrong information, but that wasnt part of this afternoon.ŽThomas makes Match Play semisJustin Thomas loses control of his club as he hits his tee shot on the eighth hole during Saturdays play at the Dell Technologies Match Play in Austin, Texas. [ERIC GAY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] The Associated PressMARTINSVILLE, Va. „ Weather washed out qualifying for NASCARs first stop this season at a short track and Martin Truex Jr. will start Sunday from the pole at Martinsville Speedway.There was no qualifying session because of a wintry mix that moved through the Virginia area and halted the Truck Series race after just 23 laps Saturday. NASCAR postponed the Truck Race and set the Cup field by owners points. The Truck Race is now scheduled to resume after Sundays Cup event.Truex is the defend-ing Cup Series champion and is coming off his first victory of the season last week in California. He led both of Saturdays practice sessions, which NASCAR was lucky to get in before the weather dis-rupted its first two-day enhanced weekendŽ of the year.NASCAR is trying a new attack in certain markets in which cars are only on track for two days instead of three, it saves teams money and gives the drivers time to do fan events.NASCAR was hopeful the weather would clear and both Cup and Trucks can be com-pleted on Sunday. Next weekend is the first scheduled break for the Cup Series since the season began in early February at Daytona.Brad Keselowski is the defending race winner and Jimmie Johnson, who has opened this season in a slump, leads all active drivers with nine victories at Martinsville. When asked how he can get a 10th victory at Martins-ville, Johnson quipped: I think survive the snowstorm and see what happens with the weather.ŽChamp on pole as weather washes out Cup qualifyingMartin Truex Jr. stands in the garage during Saturdays practice for the NASCAR Cup Series race at Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va. [MATT BELL/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 C3 NCAATOURNAMENT ELITEEIGHTAlookatSaturdays RegionalFinalgames RamblinonLoyola-ChicagoguardDonteIngramcelebratesabasketagainstKansasStateduringthesecondhalfofSaturdaysregional“nalgameinAtlanta.[PHOTOSBYDAVIDGOLDMAN/ THEASSOCIATEDPRESS] Loyola-ChicagomakesrstFinalFourappearancesince1963ByPaulNewberryTheAssociatedPressATLANTA„Sister JeanandtheLoyola RamblersareheadedtotheFinalFour.ThisimprobableNCAATournamentjusttookitscraziestturnyet.BenRichardsonscored23pointsand11thseededLoyolaromped toa78-62victoryover KansasStateonSaturdaynight,cappingoffaremarkablerunthroughthebracket-bustingSouthRegional.TheRamblers(32-5) matchedthelowestseededteameverto reachtheFinalFour, joiningLSU(1986), GeorgeMason(2006) andVCU(2011).Thoseotherthreealllostinthe nationalsemifinals.Dontbetagainst Loyola,whichemerged fromaregionalthat producedastaggeringarrayofupsets.The Southbecamethefirst regionalinthetourna-menthistorytohavethetopfourseeds„includ-ingoverallNo.1Virginia„knockedoutontheopeningweekend.Intheend,itwasthe Ramblerscuttingdownthenets.Afterthreeclosecalls,thisonewasdownrighteasy.FinalFour!Final Four!Žthescarf-clad faithfulfromChicagochantedasthefinalsec-ondstickedoff.Loyolacontinuedtobeinspiredbyits98-year-oldteamchaplain,SisterJeanDolores-Schmidt, wholedaprayerinthe lockerroombeforethe game,thenwaspushed ontothecourtinher wheelchairtojointhe celebrationwhenitwasdone.Joiningthecelebra-tionwereJerryHarknessandothermembers oftheRamblers1963 nationalchampionship team,whichplayedone ofthemostsociallysig-nificantgamesincollegebasketballhistoryonitswaytothetitle.Itwasknownasthe GameofChange,Ž matchingtheRamblers andtheirmostlyblack rosteragainstanallwhiteMississippiState teamattheheightof thecivilrightsmove-ment,settingupanevenmoresignificantcontestthreeyearslater.TexasWestern,withfiveAfri-can-Americanstarters, defeatedKentuckyin thenationalchampion-shipgame.Evenwithatitle ontheirresume,this performancecameout ofnowhere.Loyolahad notmadethetournamentsince1985until theybrokethedrought bywinningtheMissouriValleyConference.Then,asifbenefitingfromsomesortof divineintervention,theRamblerswontheirfirstthreetournamentgames byatotaloffourpoints.Finally,withtheFinal Fourontheline,they turnedinathoroughlydominatingperformance.Nottheleastbitintim-idated,Loyolacameout inattackmoderight fromthestartagainst aninth-seededKansas Stateteamthatrodea stiflingdefensetotheregionalfinal.Movingtheballjustasyoudexpect fromaveteransquad withtwoseniorsand twofourth-yearjuniors inthestartinglineup, theRamblerskeptget-tingopenlooksandshot56percentintheopeninghalf,openingupa36-24lead.TheRamblersreallyturneditoninthesecondhalf.Richardsonswished a3-pointerashewasfouledbyKamauStokes,windingupflatonhis backwhileflashingahugesmilewithhisarmsraisedabovehishead.Heknockeddownthefree throwtocompletethefour-pointplay,stretch-ingtheleadto44-29.Thingswentsowell fortheRamblersthat theyactuallyincreasedtheirleadduringthefirsttelevisiontimeoutofthesecondhalf.TheofficialswentbackandreviewedareplayofDonteIngramsjumperintheopening minuteoftheperiod, rulinghewasbehind the3-pointlinewhen hereleasedtheshotto changethemarginfrom46-33to47-33.Notthatitmatteredattheend.LoyolaChicago guard Clayton Custer(13) passesin frontof KansasState forward XavierSneed (20)during the“rst halfofof Saturdays regional “nalgamein Atlanta. Loyola-ChicagoguardBenRichardson(14)celebrates athree-pointshotagainstKansasStateduringthe“rst halfofofSaturdaysregional“nalgameinAtlanta. The Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ With more defensive will than shooting skill, Michigan muscled its way back to the Final Four.Charles Matthews scored 17 points and Michigan earned its first Final Four berth since 2013 with a 58-54 victory over Florida State on Saturday night in the West Region final.Moe Wagner added 12 points as the Wolverines (32-7) earned their 13th consecutive victory by persevering through a defense-dominated second half and holding off a late charge from the Seminoles (23-12), who had already knocked off three higher-seeded opponents on their schools longest NCAA Tournament run since 1993.With tenacious defense and just enough made free throws down the stretch, Michigan hung on and advanced to San Antonio, Texas, next weekend to face the underdog heroes of Loyola-Chicago (32-5), who stunned the sport by winning the South Region.The third-seeded Wolver-ines are much less of a surprise, but the achievement is no less impressive for coach John Beileins squad, which wore its Do More, Say LessŽ shirts throughout the week.In fact, Michigan let its fans do the talking: The Wolver-ines had a distinct home-court advantage from thousands of vocal fans packed into the lower bowl of Staples Center, and they seemed to need all of those cheers to survive an off shooting night.I said were shooting 33 per-cent,Ž Beilein said. That might change in the second half, but at the same time, weve got to understand we may not make shots, (but) were still going to win the game with our defense. Weve just got to hang in there, dont give them second shots, try and take away the 3 ball, the drive. We did a great job on defense.ŽMichigan nip s Florida State 5854 to reach Final Four

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** C4 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30, Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11:35 a.m, Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION… 234-3943 ODDS PREGAME.COM LINENATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONTodayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG Cleveland 6 228 at Brooklyn at Milwaukee Off Off San Antonio at Indiana 3 207 Miami Boston 6 200 at Sacra. at Washington 10 217 New York at Toronto 8 226 L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City 3 216 Portland at Houston Off Off Atlanta Utah 3 203 at Golden StateCOLLEGE BASKETBALLTodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG Villanova 6 Texas Tech Duke 3 KansasMondayat San Francisco 3 North TexasTuesdayWestern Kentucky 1 Utah Penn State 2 Mississippi StateNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Pittsburgh -165 Philadelphia +155 at Winnipeg Off Nashville Off at Dallas -270 Vancouver +240 at Minnesota Off Boston Off at Edmonton Off Anaheim Off Updated odds available at Pregame.com COLLEGE BASKETBALL MENS BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENTAll times Central EAST REGIONAL At TD Garden, Boston Regional Semi“ nals FridayVillanova 90, West Virginia 78 Texas Tech 78, Purdue 65Regional Championship TodayVillanova (33-4) vs. Texas Tech (27-9), 1:20 p.m.SOUTH REGIONAL At Philips Arena, Atlanta Regional Semi“ nals March 22Loyola of Chicago 69, Nevada 68 Kansas State 61, Kentucky 58Regional Championship SaturdayLoyola of Chicago 78, Kansas State 62LOYOLA OF CHICAGO 78, KANSAS ST. 62LOYOLA OF CHICAGO (32-5) Krutwig 4-8 1-1 9, Richardson 7-10 3-3 23, Custer 2-8 2-2 7, Townes 4-6 5-5 13, Ingram 4-6 2-2 12, Jackson 3-3 0-0 6, Negron 0-0 0-0 0, Shanks 0-0 0-0 0, Skokna 0-0 0-0 0, Williamson 3-6 2-3 8, Satterwhite 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 27-47 15-18 78. KANSAS ST. (25-12) Sneed 6-10 0-0 16, Mawien 2-8 0-0 4, Brown 6-16 2-3 14, Stokes 4-12 4-4 13, Diarra 2-8 2-2 7, Sallah 0-1 0-0 0, Love 0-0 0-0 0, Stockard 0-0 1-2 1, McAtee 0-0 0-0 0, Wainright 1-2 0-0 2, Patrick 0-0 0-0 0, Schoen 0-0 0-0 0, McGuirl 2-9 1-1 5, Kinnamon 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 23-66 10-12 62. Halftime„Loyola of Chicago 36-24. 3-Point Goals„Loyola of Chicago 9-18 (Richardson 6-7, Ingram 2-4, Custer 1-4, Williamson 0-3), Kansas St. 6-25 (Sneed 4-6, Diarra 1-3, Stokes 1-5, Wainright 0-1, Mawien 0-1, Brown 0-4, McGuirl 0-5). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„ Loyola of Chicago 35 (Ingram 8), Kansas St. 27 (Sneed 6). Assists„Loyola of Chicago 17 (Custer 5), Kansas St. 9 (Stokes 4). Total Fouls„Loyola of Chicago 15, Kansas St. 19.MIDWEST REGIONAL At CenturyLink Center Omaha, Neb. Regional Semi“ nals FridayKansas 80, Clemson 76 Duke 69, Syracuse 65Regional Championship TodayKansas (30-7) vs. Duke (29-7), 4:05 p.m.WEST REGIONAL At STAPLES Center, Los Angeles Regional Semi“ nals March 22Michigan 99, Texas A&M 72 Florida State 75, Gonzaga 60Regional Championship SaturdayMichigan (31-7) vs. Florida State (23-11), lateFINAL FOUR At The Alamodome, San Antonio National Semi“ nals March 31Loyola of Chicago (32-5) vs. West champion East champion vs. Midwest championNational Championship April 2 Semi“ nal winnersNATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENTSemi“ nals At Madison Square Garden, New York TuesdayWestern Kentucky (27-10) vs. Utah (22-11), 7 p.m. Penn State (24-13) vs. Mississippi State (25-11), 9:30 p.m.Championship ThursdaySemi“ nal winners, 7 p.m.COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONALChampionship Series (Best-of-3; x-if necessary) MondayNorth Texas (18-17) at San Francisco (21-15), 9 p.m.WednesdaySan Francisco (21-15) at North Texas (18-17), 7:30 p.m.March 30x-San Francisco (21-15) at North Texas (18-17), 6 p.m.COLLEGEINSIDER.COM TOURNAMENT Quarter“ nals SaturdayLiberty 84, Central Michigan 71Semi“ nals WednesdayUIC (19-15) at Liberty (22-14), 6 p.m. Sam Houston State (21-14) at Northern Colorado (24-12), 8 p.m.Championship March 30Semi“ nal winners, 6 p.m.NCAA DIV. II TOURNAMENTAt Sioux Falls, S.D. Championship SaturdayFerris State 71, Northern State 69NCAA WOMENS TOURNAMENT All times Eastern ALBANY REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals Saturday At Albany, N.Y.South Carolina 79, Buffalo 63 UConn 72, Duke 59Regional Championship MondaySouth Carolina (29-6) vs. UConn (35-0), 6 p.m. SPOKANE REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals Saturday At Spokane, Wash.Notre Dame 90, Texas A&M 84 Oregon 83, Central Michigan 69Regional Championship MondayNotre Dame vs. Oregon (33-4), 8 p.m. KANSAS CITY REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals Friday At Kansas City, Mo.Mississippi State 71, N.C. State 57 UCLA 84, Texas 75Regional Championship TodayMississippi State (35-1) vs. UCLA (27-7), 6:30 p.m. LEXINGTON REGIONAL Regional Semi“ nals Friday At Lexington, Ky.Oregon State 72, Baylor 67 Louisville 86, Stanford 59Regional Championship TodayOregon State (26-7) vs. Louisville (35-2), 11 a.m.FINAL FOUR At Columbus, Ohio National Semi“ nals March 30Albany champion vs. Spokane chamion, 6 or 8:30 p.m. Kansas City champion vs. Lexington champion, 6 or 8:30 p.m.National Championship April 1Semi“ nal winners, 7 p.m.WOMENS NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT Third Round ThursdayIndiana 73, Purdue 51 Virginia Tech 81, Fordham 50 St. Johns 65, Duquesne 52 Alabama 61, Georgia Tech 59 South Dakota 85, Michigan State 83, OT TCU 81, New Mexico 72FridayWest Virginia 67, James Madison 55 UC Davis 71, Kansas State 69Quarter“ nals TodayUC Davis (28-6) at Indiana (20-14), 1 p.m. Alabama (20-13) at Virginia Tech (21-13), 1 p.m. St. Johns (19-14) at West Virginia (24-11), 3 p.m. TCU (22-12) at South Dakota (29-6), 6 p.m.WOMENS BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL Semi“ nals SaturdayYale 76, South Alabama 74, OT Central Arkansas 65, Nevada 56Championship Wednesday or ThursdayYale (18-13) vs. Central Arkansas (25-9), TBANCAA WOMENS DIV. II TOURNAMENTAt Sioux Falls, S.D. Championship FridayCentral Missouri 66, Ashland 52 AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPSTP 500 LINEUPSaturday qualifying cancelled by weather, race today, at Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville, Va. Lap length: 0.526 miles(Car number in parentheses; lineup in owner points order)1. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota. 2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota. 3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford. 4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford. 5. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford. 6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota. 7. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet. 8. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford. 9. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford. 10. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford. 11. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford. 12. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet. 13. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota. 14. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet. 15. (21) Paul Menard, Ford. 16. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet. 17. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford. 18. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet. 19. (43) Darrell Wallace Jr., Chevrolet. 20. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet. 21. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet. 22. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet. 23. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota. 24. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford. 25. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet. 26. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet. 27. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford. 28. (38) David Ragan, Ford. 29. (95) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet. 30. (51) Harrison Rhodes, Chevrolet. 31. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford. 32. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet. 33. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet. 34. (23) Gray Gaulding, Toyota. 35. (72) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet. 36. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet. 37. (96) DJ Kennington, Toyota. 38. (55) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet. PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times CentralEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division W L PCT. GBx-Toronto 54 19 .740 „ x-Boston 49 23 .681 4 Philadelphia 42 30 .583 11 New York 26 47 .356 28 Brooklyn 23 50 .315 31Southeast Division W L Pct GBWashington 40 32 .556 „ Miami 39 34 .534 1 Charlotte 32 41 .438 8 Orlando 22 51 .301 18 Atlanta 21 52 .288 19Central Division W L Pct GBIndiana 42 31 .575 1 Milwaukee 38 34 .528 5 Detroit 33 40 .452 10 Chicago 24 49 .329 19 WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division W L Pct GBy-Houston 58 14 .806 „ San Antonio 43 30 .589 15 New Orleans 43 30 .589 15 Dallas 22 50 .306 36 Memphis 19 53 .264 39Northwest Division W L Pct GBPortland 44 28 .611 „ Oklahoma City 44 30 .595 1 Minnesota 42 32 .568 3 Utah 41 32 .562 3 Denver 40 33 .548 4Paci“ c Division W L Pct GBy-Golden State 54 18 .750 „ L.A. Clippers 38 34 .528 16 L.A. Lakers 31 40 .437 22 Sacramento 24 49 .329 30 Phoenix 19 55 .257 36 x-clinched playoff berth; y-won divisionFridays GamesDenver 108, Washington 100 Indiana 109, L.A. Clippers 104 Cleveland 120, Phoenix 95 Minnesota 108, New York 104 Toronto 116, Brooklyn 112 Milwaukee 118, Chicago 105 Oklahoma City 105, Miami 99 San Antonio 124, Utah 120, OT Boston 105, Portland 100 Golden State 106, Atlanta 94Saturdays GamesPhiladelphia 120, Minnesota 108 Detroit 117, Chicago 95 Orlando 105, Phoenix 99 L.A. Lakers at Memphis, late New Orleans at Houston, late Charlotte at Dallas, lateTodays GamesCleveland at Brooklyn, 12 p.m. San Antonio at Milwaukee, 2:30 p.m. Miami at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at Sacramento, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Toronto, 5 p.m. New York at Washington, 5 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 7 p.m. Utah at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.Mondays GamesDenver at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 6 p.m. New York at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 10 p.m. PRO HOCKEY NHLEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Tampa Bay 75 51 20 4 106 272 213 x-Boston 73 46 17 10 102 243 188 Toronto 75 45 23 7 97 255 213 Florida 73 38 28 7 83 223 224 Montreal 76 27 37 12 66 192 243 Detroit 75 27 37 11 65 192 233 Ottawa 74 26 37 11 63 203 262 Buffalo 75 23 40 12 58 174 248Metropolitan Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Washington 75 44 24 7 95 236 221 Pittsburgh 75 42 27 6 90 246 229 Columbus 76 42 29 5 89 215 208 Philadelphia 75 38 25 12 88 226 223 New Jersey 75 39 28 8 86 225 225 Carolina 75 33 31 11 77 208 239 N.Y. Rangers 75 33 34 8 74 219 241 N.Y. Islanders 75 31 34 10 72 242 273WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA x-Nashville 73 48 15 10 106 238 183 Winnipeg 74 45 19 10 100 245 192 Minnesota 73 41 24 8 90 227 210 Colorado 75 41 26 8 90 239 218 St. Louis 75 42 28 5 89 209 196 Dallas 75 38 29 8 84 214 204 Chicago 76 31 36 9 71 214 234Paci“ c Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Vegas 75 47 21 7 101 250 204 San Jose 75 43 23 9 95 232 203 Los Angeles 75 41 27 7 89 219 187 Anaheim 75 38 24 13 89 212 200 Calgary 76 35 31 10 80 205 231 Edmonton 74 33 36 5 71 214 236 Vancouver 75 26 40 9 61 193 246 Arizona 75 25 39 11 61 186 241 x-clinched playoff spot; 2 points for a win, 1 for OT loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffsFridays GamesMontreal 3, Buffalo 0 New Jersey 4, Pittsburgh 3, OT Winnipeg 3, Anaheim 2, OT St. Louis 4, Vancouver 1 Boston 3, Dallas 2Saturdays GamesColorado 2, Vegas 1, SO San Jose 5, Calgary 1 Chicago 3, N.Y. Islanders 1 N.Y. Rangers 5, Buffalo 1 Toronto 4, Detroit 3 Florida 4, Arizona 2 New Jersey 2, Tampa Bay 1 Washington 6, Montreal 4 Carolina 5, Ottawa 2 St. Louis 2, Columbus 1 Nashville at Minnesota, late Los Angeles at Edmonton, lateTodays GamesPhiladelphia at Pittsburgh, 11:30 a.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Dallas, 6 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m.Mondays GamesFlorida at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Carolina, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Toronto, 6 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Colorado at Vegas, 9 p.m. Calgary at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. PRO BASEBALL SPRING TRAININGAll times CentralAMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct. Boston 19 9 .679 Houston 18 9 .667 Cleveland 18 12 .600 New York 17 12 .586 Baltimore 16 12 .571 Kansas City 16 12 .571 Chicago 15 12 .556 Minnesota 13 13 .500 Seattle 13 14 .481 Oakland 13 14 .481 Tampa Bay 13 15 .464 Toronto 13 16 .448 Detroit 11 15 .423 Los Angeles 13 18 .419 Texas 7 22 .241NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct. Milwaukee 19 9 .679 San Diego 15 9 .625 Chicago 17 11 .607 St. Louis 16 11 .593 Miami 15 11 .577 Los Angeles 15 14 .517 Arizona 13 15 .464 San Francisco 13 15 .464 Colorado 12 14 .462 Atlanta 13 16 .448 Washington 12 16 .429 Philadelphia 12 16 .429 Cincinnati 10 18 .357 Pittsburgh 10 18 .357 New York 9 18 .333(ss)-split squad games count in the standings, ties and games against non-MLB teams do not countFridays GamesBoston 5, N.Y. Yankees 0 Detroit 11, Atlanta 3 Houston (ss) 2, Minnesota 2 Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 2 Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay (ss) 1 Tampa Bay (ss) 6, Toronto 5 St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Kansas City (ss) 9, San Francisco 6 Seattle 5, Chicago White Sox 5 L.A. Dodgers 10, Kansas City (ss) 0 Colorado 8, Cincinnati 2 Oakland 4, L.A. Angels 2 Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 3 Houston (ss) 3, Washington 1 Washington (ss) 6, Miami 3 Cleveland 6, Arizona 1 San Diego 9, Texas 7Saturdays GamesBoston 6, Houston 0 Miami 4, Washington 3 St. Louis 8, N.Y. Mets 7 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 8, Atlanta 3 Philadelphia 4, Detroit 1 Pittsburgh 7, Tampa Bay 5 N.Y. Yankees (ss) 13, Toronto 6 Chicago White Sox 7, L.A. Dodgers 3 Cleveland 10, Texas 3 Milwaukee 10, Oakland 5 San Diego 6, Cincinnati 2 Arizona (ss) 15, L.A. Angels 9 Kansas City 4, Arizona (ss) 4 Minnesota 12, Baltimore 4 San Francisco vs. Sacramento, late Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Seattle, late Colorado vs. Chicago Cubs (ss), lateTodays GamesMiami (ss) vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 11:10 a.m. Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Houston vs. Miami (ss) at Jupiter, Fla., 12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 12:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Washington at West Palm Beach, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 12:07 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 2:05 p.m. Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 2:10 p.m. San Francisco vs. Oakland at Oakland, CA, 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. L.A. Angels at Anaheim, CA, 8:07 p.m.Mondays GamesPhiladelphia vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 12:05 p.m. Baltimore vs. Norfolk at Norfolk, VA, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Charlotte at Charlotte, NC, 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Houston at Houston, TX, 6:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Omaha at Papillion, NE, 6:05 p.m. St. Louis vs. Toronto at Montreal, QC, Canada, 6:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Atlanta at Atlanta, GA, 6:35 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Texas at Arlington, TX, 7:05 p.m. San Diego vs. El Paso at El Paso, TX, 7:05 p.m. Cleveland vs. Arizona at Phoenix, 8:40 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. L.A. Dodgers at Los Angeles, CA, 9:10 p.m. Oakland vs. San Francisco at San Francisco, CA, 9:15 p.m. GOLF INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF PGA TOURSWORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP DELL TECHNOLOGIES MATCH PLAYSaturday at Austin Country Club, Austin, Texas Yardage: 7,108. Par: 71 (seedings in parentheses)Fourth RoundBubba Watson (35), United States, def. Brian Harman (18), U.S., 2 and 1. Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28), Thailand, def. Charles Howell III (59), U.S., 1 up. Kyle Stanley (45), U.S., def. Sergio Garcia (7), Spain, 3 and 1. Justin Thomas (2), U.S., def. Si Woo Kim (50), South Korea, 6 and 5. Cameron Smith (46), Australia, def. Tyrrell Hatton (12), England, 2 and 1. Alex Noren (13), Sweden, def. Patrick Reed (19), U.S., 5 and 3. Ian Poulter (58), England, def. Louis Oosthuizen (25), South Africa, 2 and 1. Kevin Kisner (32), U.S., def. Matt Kuchar (16), U.S., 1 up.Quarter“ nalsBubba Watson (35), United States, def. Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28), Thailand, 5 and 3. Justin Thomas (2), U.S., def. Kyle Stanley (45), U.S., 2 and 1. Alex Noren (13), Sweden, def. Cameron Smith (46), Australia, 4 and 2. Kevin Kisner (32), U.S ., def. Ian Poulter (58), England, 8 and 6. TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBOSTON RED SOX „ Traded INF Deven Marrero to Arizona for a player to be named or cash. Optioned INF Tzu-Wei Lin and LHPs Roenis Elias and Robby Scott to Pawtucket (IL). Reassigned C Dan Butler, INF Ivan De Jesus Jr. and OFs Rusney Castillo and Aneury Tavarez to minor league camp. Signed C Christian Vazquez to a three-year contract extension. CLEVELAND INDIANS „ Released RHP Carlos Torres. DETROIT RED WINGS „ Released SS Alexi Amarista. HOUSTON ASTROS „ Optioned OF Tony Kemp and INF Tyler White to minor league camp. KANSAS CITY ROYALS „ Released OF Michael Saunders and RHP Ricky Nolasco. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Claimed DH Kennys Vargas off waivers from Cincinnati. NEW YORK YANKEES „ Optioned RHP Domingo German to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Acquired 1B Mike Ford as a Rule 5 draft return from Seattle and assigned him to Scranton/WilkesBarre. Signed C Kellin Deglan to a minor league contract. SEATTLE MARINERS „ Optioned RHP Chasen Bradford to Tacoma (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS „ Traded C Mike Ohlman to Boston for cash. Released RHP Bartolo Colon. TORONTO BLUE JAYS „ Assigned LHP Matt Dermody outright to Buffalo (IL). Released LHP Craig Breslow. Signed RHP Murphy Smith to a minor league contract.National LeagueARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS „ Designated RHP Albert Suarez for assignment. Selected the contract of RHP Fernando Salas from Reno (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS „ Optioned RHPs Jackson Stephens and Robert Stephenson to Louisville (IL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS „ Optioned RHP Junior Guerra and OFs Keon Broxton and Brett Phillips to Colorado Springs (PCL). NEW YORK METS „ Optioned RHP Zack Wheeler to minor league camp. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Released RHP Francisco Rodriguez. SCOREBOARD IN BRIEF Today AUTO RACING 1 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Series, STP 500, at Ridgeway, Va. BOWLING 1 p.m. ESPN „ PBA Tour, Roth/ Holman Doubles Championship, at Columbus, Ohio COLLEGE BASEBALL Noon ESPN2 „ LSU at Vanderbilt COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, East or Midwest Regionals, “ nal, teams TBA 3:30 p.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, East or Midwest Regionals, “ nal, teams TBA COLLEGE HOCKEY 3 p.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Tournament, Northeast Regional, “ nal, Cornell-Boston U. winner vs. MichiganNortheastern winner, at Worcester, Mass. COLLEGE SOFTBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 „ Texas A&M at Florida GOLF 9 a.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, WGCDell Technologies Match Play, semi“ nals, at Austin, Texas 1:30 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, Corales Puntacana Resort & Club Championship, “ nal round, at Punta Cana, Dominican Republic 2 p.m. NBC „ PGA Tour, WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, “ nals, at Austin, Texas 4 p.m. GOLF „ Champions Tour, Rapiscan Systems Classic, “ nal round, at Biloxi, Miss. 6 p.m. GOLF „ LPGA Tour, Kia Classic, “ nal round, at Carlsbad, Calif. MLB Noon MLB „ N.Y. Yankees vs. Tampa Bay, at Port Charlotte, Fla. 8 p.m. MLB „ L.A. Dodgers at L.A. Angels NBA Noon NBA „ Cleveland at Brooklyn 5 p.m. NBA „ New York at Washington 7:30 p.m. NBA „ Utah at Golden State NHL 11:30 a.m. NBC „ Philadelphia at Pittsburgh 6:30 p.m. NBCSN „ Boston at Minnesota RUGBY 9 a.m. NBCSN „ English Premiership, Leicester Tigers vs. Wasps RUNNING 11 a.m. NBCSN „ IAAF, Half-Marathon Championships, at Valencia, Spain (taped) SKIING 10:30 p.m. NBCSN „ Alpine skiing, U.S. Championships, at Sun Valley, Idaho (same-day tape) WINTER SPORTS 2 p.m. NBCSN „ Curling, Women's World Championship: Gold Medal match, at North Bay, Ontario WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN „ NCAA Tournament, Lexington, Ky. Regional “ nal, Oregon St.-Baylor winner vs. Stanford-Louisville winner 6:30 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA Tournament, Kansas City, Mo. Regional “ nal, NC StateMississippi St. winner vs. UCLA-Texas winnerON THE AIRThe News Herald will publish announcements of area interest concern-ing meetings or events. Announcements, which must be dated and contain contact information, can be mailed to the Sports Department, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 or emailed to sports@ pcnh.com. Events that require entry fees or registration costs that dont benefit charities or go toward the operating expenses of youth leagues or school booster clubs, or toward the purchase of trophies and awards are not eli-gible, and must run as an advertisement. Panhandle Seminole Club golfThe annual Panhandle Seminole Club Scholarship Golf Tournament will be held Thursday, April 12 at Indian Springs Golf Club in Marianna. Registration and warm-up will begin at noon CST with the shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this four-man scramble event. Cash prizes will be awarded to the first-, second-, and third-place teams. Entry is $65. Contact: Roy Baker 850-209-1326 or George Sweeney 850-482-5526. Rutherford bene“ t golfA golf tournament to benefit the Rutherford High School girls golf team will be held Saturday, May 19 at Nature Walk Golf Club beginning with 8 a.m. registration. Entry is $65 per player, $250 per team, in the select shot event. Total team hand-icap must be higher than 40 with only one player with 5 handicap or less. Contact: Coach Kerri Miller 850-767-4500, millekm@bay.k12.fl.us or Mike Nethero 850747-9130 netheromd@knology.netANNOUNCEMENTSGERMANY Takanashi claims record 54th ski jump WCup winSara Takanashi claimed her first ski jumping World Cup win of the season to finally overtake Gregor Schlierenzauer with her record 54th career win on Saturday.The four-time World Cup winner from Japan, who ceded her season title to Maren Lundby of Norway, soared 100.5 meters with her first jump and 96.5 in her second for a total of 227.1 points. She beat Daniela IraschkoStolz of Austria by 3.0 points and Lundby by 5.4.It was Takanashis fifth consecutive win in Oberstdorf.Schlierenzauer still holds the mens record of 53 World Cup wins.Iraschko-Stolz twice jumped 101.0 meters for the days longest jumps on the normal hill.With just Sundays season finale remaining, Lundby „ the Olympic champion „ leads on 1,280 points, ahead of Germanys Katharina Althaus on 892 and Takanashi on 816. The Associated Press

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 C5 SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFFLOWERY BRANCH, GA.Falcons sign CB, special teams standout BethelThe Atlanta Falcons added depth at cornerback and a three-time Pro Bowl player on special teams by signing Justin Bethel, who played his first six seasons with Arizona.The 27-year-old Bethel joins guard Brandon Fusco and tight end Logan Paulsen as Atlantas top free-agent additions. The Falcons have focused on re-signing their own players while hoping to work out an extension for quarterback Matt Ryan, who can be a free agent after the 2018 season.Bethel had a combined four interceptions the past three seasons with the Cardinals and returned three for touchdowns.Bethel has played in all 16 games in each of his six seasons.NEW ORLEANSNoble Indy edges Lone Sailor in Louisiana DerbyCo-favorite Noble Indy settled near the front and held off a late charge by Lone Sailor to win the $1 million Loui-siana Derby by a head at the Fair Grounds Race course Saturday.Noble Indy and Bravazo both went off at 5-2 in what is one of the major prep races for the Kentucky Derby, but Bravazo faded after entering the final turn in third.Trained by Todd Pletcher and with jockey John Velazquez aboard, Noble Indy earned 100 points in the Road to the Kentucky Derby, assur-ing qualification for the Triple Crown opener. Velazquez steered Noble Indy into the lead enter-ing the final turn and finished the 1 -mile race in 1:50.28. He paid $7.40, $4.80 and $3.20. Lone Sailor was a sen-timental favorite, racing one day after the jazz funeral of its owner, New Orleans Saints and Peli-cans owner Tom Benson.MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIAHamilton takes record 7th pole at Australian GPMercedes driver Lewis Hamilton set a blistering time in his final lap of qualifying to take pole position at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix on Saturday for a record seventh time, outpacing his nearest rival by a sizable 0.664 seconds.The defending Formula One champion set a time of 1 minute, 21.164 sec-onds at Albert Park circuit, breaking a tie with Ayrton Senna for most poles at the Australian GP. Its the 73rd pole of Hamiltons career. Im so happy with that lap. It was such a nice lap,Ž Hamilton said. And, you know, Im always striving for perfection and that was as close as I could get.ŽFerraris Kimi Raikkonen finished second with a lap of 1:21.828, with teammate Sebastian Vettel and Red Bulls Max Verstappen and Daniel Ricciardo rounding out the top five. Ricciardo will start the race in eighth position after a penalty for driving too fast under red-flag conditions during Fridays practice. The Associated Press By Vin A. CherwooThe Associated PressAfter retiring from the NFL a little more than a year ago, Evan Mathis decided to move closer to where he grew up in Alabama.And to get the kind of house he and his wife wanted, Mathis needed to free up some money. And that meant the avid sports card collector would have to part with his prized possession: a 1952 Mickey Mantle baseball card.Just that image of the young Mickey Mantle, over the years its been a centerpiece of the hobby,Ž Mathis told The Associated Press by phone. I guess its kind of like the Mona Lisa of the sports card world.ŽIssued as part of its first set of baseball cards by Topps, the Mantle card is the marquee piece of a card-only spring collection by Heritage Auctions. It is one of six versions of the card to have been rated a Mint 9 by PSA, one of the leading sports memorabilia authenticators, with three others having earned a Mint 10 rating.The card has been estimated by Heritage to be valued at $3.5 mil-lion. For comparison, the highest price paid for a card at auction was $3.12 million two years ago for a 1909 Honus Wagner card.Its what I consider the new face of card collecting,Ž said Chris Ivy, Heritages director of sports auctions. For decades its been the (Wagner card). For post-war (World War II) cards and the babyboomer generation and beyond, it really does come down to this 52 Topps rookie Mickey Mantle card, which has kind of moved from just sports collecting to more of Americana.ŽIvy attributes the high value of the card Mathis is selling due to its cen-tering, strong corners and print quality „ a rare combination, con-sidering quality control wasnt the top issueŽ for Topps in the 1950s. The fact that this one came out of the factory in strong condition, sur-vived for many decades in that same condition, didnt get put in spokes or thrown away by mom is pretty miraculous,Ž Ivy added.Ex-NFL lineman selling Mantle card New York Mets third baseman David Wright is the majors only captain on the eve of the season, and its unclear if he will ever play again. [DAVID GOLDMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]Once one of most revered titles in sports, Mets Wright set to be baseballs lone captain during 2018 seasonBy Jay CohenThe Associated PressMESA, Ariz. „ Anthony Rizzo is a three-time All-Star and the 2017 winner of the Roberto Clemente Award, baseballs biggest honor for sportsmanship and community involvement. Jon Lester is a three-time World Series champion, and Jason Heyward organized the most important meeting in franchise history.Plenty of leaders with the Chicago Cubs. No captain.One of the most revered titles in sports is hanging by a thread in baseball, which treats its history with hallowed tones in almost every case, but doesnt seem the slightest bit concerned about the absence of the iconic C on the front of its uniforms. New York Mets third baseman David Wright is the majors only captain on the eve of the season, and its unclear if he will ever play again.Leadership is a taken role and people want to follow you just based on how you are, how you treat them, how well you listen, how well you interact daily, how much you really are into them as opposed to yourself,Ž Cubs manager Joe Maddon said, and that becomes obvious. Leadership is taken, man. Its hard to just place that out there.Ž The 35-year-old Wright was named the fourth captain in Mets history in 2013, joining Keith Hernandez, Gary Carter and John Franco. He made the last of his seven NL All-Star teams that same year before he was hampered by a series of injuries. He hasnt appeared in a major league game since 2016.Wright declared right away that he wouldnt wear the C on the front of his jersey, so that special touch has been missing from baseball for a couple years.Im not sure if theres a ben-efit to having a title and Ive never been one to like come in here and say you have to listen to me because Im the captain,Ž Wright said. I would hope that if I have something to say that somebody would listen to me because of, you know, because of what Ive hopefully displayed in the clubhouse and be consid-ered kind of a leader in here.Ž But Wright made no attempt to hide the significance of the title to him.Ill say it again, that to this day its probably the biggest honor away from the field of my career,Ž he said.A variety of factors have contributed to the decline of captains. Many of the captains across sports spend most of their careers with a single team, but that has become a rarity in baseball. There also are no real respon-sibilities for the title.Hockey captains serve as the teams liaison to the officials. NFL captains participate in the pregame coin toss. NBA captains also have specific responsibilities, but baseball barely mentions the word in its rulebook.Theres no, like, formal meeting,Ž Washington ace Max Scherzer said. Its not like football where you go out there and shake the other teams hands and you need captains to go do that. Base-ball doesnt have that. So maybe thats why you dont see it. Theres no coin toss.ŽBut the list of baseball cap-tains still includes some of the biggest names in the history of the sport. Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Thurman Munson and Derek Jeter are on the list of 11 Yankees captains. Pee Wee Reese and Duke Snider with the Dodgers. Jimmie Foxx and Carl Yastrzemski for the Boston Red Sox. Willie Stargell, Barry Larkin and other Hall of Famers.Jeter thought he did something wrong when then-Yankees owner George Steinbrenner called to make him captain in 2003.The boss, Mr. Stein-brenner usually only called if you were in trouble during the season,Ž Jeter said. He called me, we were in Cincinnati, and said he wanted to name me the captain. It was a welcome phone call.ŽThe list of baseball captains underscores not only the spe-cial players to hold the title, but also the unique situations that led to their leadership position.Rizzo, Lester and Heyward, who got the Cubs together during a key moment in Game 7 of their World Series win in 2016, could each serve as cap-tain. But identifying one leader in Chicagos clubhouse at the possible expense of its other respected veterans likely would hurt the team more than help it. There are similar situations in several other clubhouses across the sport.Having a team captain could conceivably in some ways change the relationship between the manager and the coaches and the rest of the team,Ž Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said.So, again, its all about the people. Its not that its a good idea or a bad idea, its all about the people. Its not just the guy youre consider-ing for that position but also everybody around him, your own players, the manager, the coaching staff. You really have to think of it in those terms.ŽLeadership changeChicagos Kris Bryant, right, and Jason Heyward, second from right, celebrate in the dugout during a game last season. The Cubs are among the teams that have chosen not to have a captain. [CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]Im not sure if theres a bene t to having a title and Ive never been one to like come in here and say you have to listen to me because Im the captain. I would hope that if I have something to say that somebody would listen to me because of, you know, because of what Ive hopefully displayed in the clubhouse and be considered kind of a leader in here.ŽDavid Wright, captain of the New York Mets New York Yankees out“ elder Mickey Mantle is seen in 1954 in St. Petersburg, Fla. [HARRY HARRIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** C6 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald MLB 2018 | NATIONAL LEAGUE PREVIEWA look at prospects for all NL teams, listed in order of “ nish last year. Capsules by The Associated PressWashington Nationals2017: 97-65, “rst place, lost to Cubs in NLDS. Manager: Dave Martinez (“rst season). Projected Lineup: SS Trea Turner (.284, 11 HRs, 45 RBIs, 46 SBs in 98 games), LF Adam Eaton (.297, 2, 13 in 23 games), RF Bryce Harper (.319, 29, 87), 3B Anthony Rendon (.301, 25, 100, 41 2Bs), 2B Daniel Murphy (.322, 23, 93, 43 2Bs, expected to begin season on DL recovering from knee surgery), 1B Ryan Zimmerman (.303, 36, 108, 33 2Bs), CF Michael A. Taylor (.271, 19, 53), C Matt Wieters (.225, 10, 52). Rotation: RH Max Scherzer (16-6, 2.51 ERA, NL-high 268 Ks, 2002/ 3 IP, 3rd Cy Young Award), RH Stephen Strasburg (15-4, 2.52, 204 Ks), LH Gio Gonzalez (15-9, 2.96, 79 walks), RH Tanner Roark (13-11, 4.67), RH A.J. Cole (3-5, 3.81 in 11 appearances) or RH Jeremy Hellickson (8-11, 5.43 with Phillies and Orioles). Outlook: This might very well be the end of an era at Nationals Park, with Harper eligible to leave as a free agent after the season and GM Mike Rizzos contract set to expire, too. The team has won four NL East titles in the past six years but has zero playoff series wins to show for it. Thats why yet another manager (Baker) lost his j ob, and yet another rookie skipper has been brought in (will Martinez have more success than Matt Williams?). Miami Marlins2017: 77-85, second place. Manager: Don Mattingly (third season). Projected Lineup: RF Cameron Maybin (.228, 10 HRs, 35 RBIs, 33 SBs with Angels and Astros), CF Lewis Brinson (.106, 2, 3 in 21 games with Brewers), 2B Starlin Castro (.300, 16, 63 in 112 games with Yankees), 1B Justin Bour (.289, 25, 83, .902 OPS in 108 games), C J.T. Realmuto (.278, 17, 65), LF Derek Dietrich (.249, 13, 53), 3B Brian Anderson (.262, 0, 8 in 25 games), SS Miguel Rojas (.290, 1, 26 in 90 games). Rotation: RH Jose Urena (14-7, 3.82 ERA), RH Dan Straily (10-9, 4.26, 170 Ks), RH Odrisamer Despaigne (2-3, 4.01), RH Jacob Turner (2-3, 5.08 with Nationals), LH Justin Nicolino (2-3, 5.06). Outlook: New CEO Derek Jeter is accustomed to winning, and that is about to change. He traded away half of last years starting lineup, including the NL MVP in Stan ton, which means the Marlins are rebuilding yet again. Even with an entirely new out“eld, the offense could be decent. But Castro and Realmuto are potential trade bait and might be gone before August, and the season will almost surely end Sept. 30, leaving the Marlins out of the playoffs for the 15th year in a row. This season is really all about developing prospects acquired in those offseason trades.Atlanta Braves2017: 72-90, third place. Manager: Brian Snitker (third season). Projected Lineup: CF Ender Inciarte (.304, 11 HRs, 57 RBIs, 22 SBs, Gold Glove), 2B Ozzie Albies (.286, 6, 28, 8 SBs in 57 games), 1B Freddie Freeman (.307, 28, 71 in 117 games), C Tyler Flowers (.281, 12, 49) or Kurt Suzuki (.283, 19, 50), RF Nick Markakis (.275, 8, 76), LF Ronald Acuna (.325, 21, 82, 44 SBs with 3 minor league teams) or Lane Adams (.275, 5, 20, 10 SBs), 3B Johan Camargo (.273, 14, 65) or Charlie Culberson (.154, 0, 1 in 15 games with Dodgers), SS Dansby Swanson (.232, 6, 51). Rotation: RH Julio Teheran (11-13, 4.49 ERA), RH Mike Foltynewicz (10-13, 4.79), RH Brandon McCarthy (6-4, 3.98 in 19 games with Dodgers), LH Sean Newcomb (4-9, 4.32 in 19 games), RH Anibal Sanchez (3-7, 6.41 with Tigers), LH Scott Kazmir (10-6, 4.56 with Dodgers in 2016) or LH Luiz Gohara (1-3, 4.91 in 5 games). Outlook: The Braves likely are still at least a year away from contending in the NL East, but improved starting pitching could push them closer to .500 this year.New York Mets2017: 70-92, fourth place. Manager: Mickey Callaway (“rst season). Projected Lineup: 2B Asdrubal Cabrera (.280, 14 HRs, 59 RBIs, .351 OBP), LF Yoenis Cespedes (.292, 17, 42, .892 OPS in 81 games), RF Jay Bruce (.252, 36, 101 with Mets and Indians), 3B Todd Frazier (.213, 27, 76, .344 OBP with White Sox and Yankees), 1B Adrian Gonzalez (.242, 3, 30, .642 OPS in 71 games with Dodgers), C Travis dArnaud (.244, 16, 57, .293 OBP in 112 games), CF Brandon Nimmo (.260, 5, 21, .379 OBP, .797 OPS in 69 games), SS Amed Rosario (.248, 4, 10, 49 Ks, 3 BBs, .271 OBP, .665 OPS in 46 games). Rotation: RH Noah Syndergaard (1-2, 2.97 ERA, limited to 301/ 3 innings by lat injury), RH Jacob deGrom (15-10, 3.53, 239 Ks, 2011/ 3 IP), LH Jason Vargas (18-11, 4.16, 1792/ 3 IP in 32 starts with Royals), RH Matt Harvey (5-7, 6.70, 110 hits, 21 HRs, 67 Ks, 47 BBs in 922/ 3 IP), LH Steven Matz (2-7, 6.08 in 13 starts). Outlook: With better health in a soft division, they could certainly rejoin the wild-card hunt.Philadelphia Phillies2017: 66-96, “fth place. Manager: Gabe Kapler (“rst season). Projected Lineup: 2B Cesar Hernandez (.294, 9 HRs, 34 RBIs, 15 SBs), 1B Carlos Santana (.259, 23, 79 with Indians), RF Nick Williams (.288, 12, 55) or Aaron Altherr (.272, 19, 65), LF Rhys Hoskins (.259, 18, 48), CF Odubel Herrera (.281, 14, 56), C Jorge Alfaro (.318, 5, 14), 3B Maikel Franco (.230, 24, 76), SS J.P. Crawford (.214, 0, 6 in 23 games). Rotation: RH Aaron Nola (12-11, 3.54 ERA, 184 Ks), RH Jake Arrieta (14-10, 3.53, 163 Ks with Cubs), RH Vince Velasquez (2-7, 5.13 in 15 starts), RH Nick Pivetta (8-10, 6.02), RH Zach E”in (1-5, 6.16) or RH Ben Lively (4-7, 4.26). Outlook: The decision to sign Arrieta signals the rebuild is over. The Phillies added Santana, Neshek and Hunter to a talented young roster in hopes of being competitive. A month into spring training, they added Arrieta because management thinks its time to contend now. The lineup has the potential to be dynamic if the young hitters continue to emerge and Santana does what he did in Cleveland. The bullpen should be formidable with HunterNeshek-Neris at the back end. Chicago Cubs2017: 92-70, “rst place, lost to Dodgers in NLCS. Manager: Joe Maddon (fourth season). Projected Lineup: CF Ian Happ (.253, 24 HRs, 68 RBIs, .842 OPS) or Albert Almora Jr. (.298, 8, 46), 3B Kris Bryant (.295, 29, 73, 38 2Bs, 111 runs), 1B Anthony Rizzo (.273, 32, 109, 91 BBs), C Willson Contreras (.276, 21, 74), LF Kyle Schwarber (.211, 30, 59), SS Addison Russell (.239, 12, 43), RF Jason Heyward (.259, 11, 59), 2B Javier Baez (.273, 23, 75, .796 OPS). Rotation: LH Jon Lester (13-8, 4.33 ERA, 180 Ks), RH Kyle Hendricks (7-5, 3.03), RH Yu Darvish (10-12, 3.86, 209 Ks with Rangers and Dodgers), LH Jose Quintana (11-11, 4.15, 207 Ks with White Sox and Cubs), RH Tyler Chatwood (8-15, 4.69 with Rockies). Outlook: World Series or bust. The acquisition of Darvish, who “nalized a $126 million, six-year contract in February, gives Chicago a strong rotation, and the lineup is young, deep and dangerous. A franchise-record six players (Rizzo, Schwarber, Bryant, Happ, Baez and Contreras) belted at least 20 homers last year, including a major league-record “ve in an age 25 or younger season. Chicago also scored more than 800 runs in consecutive seasons for the “rst time since the team surpassed that mark for three straight years from 1929-31.Milwaukee Brewers2017: 86-76, second place. Manager: Craig Counsell (fourth season). Projected Lineup: CF Lorenzo Cain (.300, 15 HRs, 49 RBIs, 26 SBs, .363 OBP with Royals), RF Christian Yelich (.282, 18, 81, 16 SBs, .369 OBP, 36 2Bs with Marlins), LF Ryan Braun (.268, 17, 52), 3B Travis Shaw (.273, 31, 101), 1B Eric Thames (.247, 31, 63), C Manny Pina (.279, 9, 43), SS Orlando Arcia (.277, 15, 53, 14 SBs), 2B Jonathan Villar (.241, 11, 40, 23 SBs) or Eric Sogard (.273, 3, 18, .393 OBP). Rotation: RH Chase Anderson (12-4, 2.74 ERA), RH Zach Davies (17-9, 3.90), RH Jhoulys Chacin (13-10, 3.89 with Padres), LH Wade Miley (8-15, 5.61, 93 walks with Orioles), LH Brent Suter (3-2, 3.42). Outlook: Expectations are up after the Brewers “nished one game out of the playoffs in what was supposed to be the second full season of a rebuild. Instead of signing a high-priced starter, general manager David Stearns added Cain and Yelich as the teams key offseason acquisitions. The new out“elders are former Gold Glove winners who can help out the pitching staff by cutting down on extra-base hits at Miller Park. The rotation should be bolstered later in the season by the return of right-hander Jimmy Nelson, who is recovering from right shoulder surgery in September.St. Louis Cardinals2017: 83-79, third place. Manager: Mike Matheny (seventh season). Projected Lineup: RF Dexter Fowler (.264, 18 HRs, 64 RBIs), CF Tommy Pham (.306, 23, 73, 25 SBs), 1B Matt Carpenter (.241, 23, 69, 109 BBs, .384 OBP), LF Marcell Ozuna (.312, 37, 124 with Marlins), 3B Jedd Gyorko (.272, 20, 67), C Yadier Molina (.273, 18, 82), SS Paul DeJong (.285, 25, 65), 2B Kolten Wong (.285, 4, 42, .376 OBP). Rotation: RH Carlos Martinez (12-11, 3.64 ERA, 217 Ks), RH Michael Wacha (12-9, 4.13), RH Adam Wainwright (12-5, 5.11), RH Luke Weaver (7-2, 3.88), RH Miles Mikolas (14-8, 2.25 with Yomiuri Giants in Japan). Outlook: The Cardinals have had one losing season since the start of the century, but they are facing immense pressure from fans after “nishing behind the Cubs and Brewers in 2017. For the Cardinals to snap that postseason drought,Ž theyll need bounce-back seasons from several players „ including a healthy Wainwright on the mound and Carpenter at the plate.Pittsburgh Pirates2017: 75-87, fourth place. Manager: Clint Hurdle (seventh season). Projected Lineup: 2B Josh Harrison (.272, 16 HRs, 47 RBIs), LF Corey Dickerson (.282, 27, 62 with Rays), CF Starling Marte (.275, 7, 31, 21 SBs in 77 games), 1B Josh Bell (.255, 26, 90), RF Gregory Polanco (.251, 11, 35), 3B David Freese (.263, 10, 52) or Colin Moran (.364, 1, 3 in 7 games with Houston; .308, 18, 63 in 79 games at Triple-A Fresno), C Francisco Cervelli (.249, 5, 31), SS Jordy Mercer (.255, 14, 58). Rotation: RH Ivan Nova (11-14, 4.14 ERA, 2 CGs), RH Jameson Taillon (8-7, 4.44), RH Chad Kuhl (8-11, 4.35), RH Trevor Williams (7-9, 4.07), RH Joe Musgrove (7-8, 4.77 in 38 games, 15 starts for Houston). Outlook: General manager Neal Huntington insists the Pirates are not rebuilding, but it certainly looks that way after they ”ipped franchise cornerstones McCutchen and Cole for less expensive and less proven talent. The Pirates did nothing in free agency, though they were able to grab Dickerson, an All-Star for Tampa Bay last season.Cincinnati Reds2017: 68-94, “fth place. Manager: Bryan Price (“fth season). Projected Lineup: CF Billy Hamilton (.247, 4 HRs, 38 RBIs, .299 OBP, 59/72 SBs), 3B Eugenio Suarez (.260, 26, 82), 1B Joey Votto (.320, 36, 100), 2B Scooter Gennett (.295, 27, 97), LF Scott Schebler (.233, 30, 67), LF Adam Duvall (.249, 31, 99), SS Jose Peraza (.259, 5, 37), C Tucker Barnhart (.270, 7, 44). Rotation: RH Homer Bailey (6-9, 6.43 ERA in 18 starts), LH Brandon Finnegan (1-1, 4.15 in 4 starts), RH Luis Castillo (3-7, 3.12 in 15 starts), RH Tyler Mahle (1-2, 2.70 in 4 starts), RH Sal Romano (5-8, 4.45 in 16 starts). Outlook: The Reds launched into a major rebuild in 2015 and have lost at least 90 games for three straight seasons while “nishing last in the NL Central all three years. They locked up Suarez through 2024 with a $66 million contract during spring training „ their “rst signi“cant deal during the rebuild „ but are still at least a year away from looking for an upgrade through free agency. The everyday lineup will score enough runs to keep games competitive, but pitching is the sore point again. Los Angeles Dodgers2017: 104-58, “rst place, lost to Houston in World Series. Manager: Dave Roberts (third season). Projected Lineup: CF Chris Taylor (.288, 21 HRs, 72 RBIs, 17 SBs), SS Corey Seager (.295, 22, 77), 3B Justin Turner (.322, 21, 71, will start season on DL with broken left wrist), 1B Cody Bellinger (.267, 39, 97, 10 SBs), RF Yasiel Puig (.263, 28, 74), LF Matt Kemp (.276, 19, 64 in 115 games with Braves) or Joc Pederson (.212, 11, 35 in 102 games), C Austin Barnes (.289, 8, 38) or Yasmani Grandal (.247, 22, 58), 2B Logan Forsythe (.224, 6, 36) or Enrique Hernandez (.215, 11, 37) or Chase Utley (.236, 8, 34). Rotation: LH Clayton Kershaw (18-4, 2.31 ERA, 202 Ks), LH Alex Wood (16-3, 2.72), RH Kenta Maeda (13-6, 4.22), LH Rich Hill (12-8, 3.32), LH Hyun-Jin Ryu (5-9, 3.77). Outlook: Kemp has been a surprise in his return to the club. He was acquired from Atlanta as part of the Dodgers salary dump and “gured to be traded. However, he has been a solid performer in spring training. Kershaw anchors the rotation, and Jansen is one of the best closers in the game. A multitude of veterans will be vying for playing time as a result of the teams heavy use of platoons and matchup-driven lineups.Arizona Diamondbacks2017: 93-69, second place, wild card, lost to Dodgers in NLDS. Manager: Torey Lovullo (second season). Projected Lineup: LF David Peralta (.293, 14 HRs, 57 RBIs, 31 2Bs), CF A.J. Pollock (.266, 14, 49, 33 2Bs, 20 SBs), 1B Paul Goldschmidt (.297, 36, 120, 94 BBs, 34 2Bs, 18 SBs), 3B Jake Lamb (.248, 30, 105), RF Steven Souza Jr. (.239, 30, 78 with Rays), 2B Ketel Marte (.260, 5, 18 in 73 games), SS Nick Ahmed (.261, 6, 21 in 63 games), C Jeff Mathis (.215, 2, 11). Projected Rotation: LH Robbie Ray (15-5, 2.89 ERA, 218 Ks), RH Taijuan Walker (9-9, 3.49), RH Zack Greinke (17-7, 3.20, 215 Ks), LH Patrick Corbin (14-13, 4.03, 178 Ks), RH Zack Godley (8-9, 3.37, 165 Ks). Outlook: With all “ve starters back and nearly every position player returning, the Diamondbacks expect to be in the thick of things in the NL West after their big turnaround season under Lovullo, the NL Manager of the Year. The acquisition of Souza and signing of Dyson should help. In addition, several players who missed much or most of last season with injuries are back, including Ahmed and utility man Chris Owings. Greinkes initial start was pushed back a few days after he experienced tightness in his groin during a spring training outing, but its not expected to be serious. Colorado Rockies2017: 87-75, third place, lost to Arizona in wild-card game. Manager: Bud Black (second season). Projected Lineup: CF Charlie Blackmon (NL-leading .331, 37 HRs, 104 RBIs, 137 runs, 213 hits, 14 triples, 1.000 OPS), 2B DJ LeMahieu (.310, 8, 64), RF Carlos Gonzalez (.262, 14, 57, .377 in September), 3B Nolan Arenado (.309, 37, 130, 43 doubles, .959 OPS), LF Gerardo Parra (.309, 10, 71 in 115 games), SS Trevor Story (.239, 24, 82, 191 Ks), 1B Ian Desmond (.274, 7, 40 in 95 games), C Chris Iannetta (.254, 17, 43 with Diamondbacks). Rotation: RH Jon Gray (10-4, 3.67 ERA, 112 Ks, 1101/ 3 innings in 20 starts), LH Tyler Anderson (6-6, 4.81), RH German Marquez (11-7, 4.39), RH Chad Bettis (2-4, 5.05 in 9 starts), LH Kyle Freeland (11-11, 4.10). Outlook: The lineup bene“ts from hitter-friendly Coors Field and features plenty of “repower, especially with the return of Gonzalez on a one-year deal. Arenado is one of the best hitters and “elders in the game.San Diego Padres2017: 71-91, fourth place. Manager: Andy Green (third season). Projected Lineup: CF Manuel Margot (.263, 13 HRs, 39 RBIs), 1B Eric Hosmer (.318, 25, 94 with Royals), RF Wil Myers (.243, 30, 74, 20 SBs), LF Jose Pirela (.288, 10, 40 in 83 games) or Hunter Renfroe (.231, 26, 58 in 122 games), 3B Chase Headley (.273, 12, 61 with Yankees), 2B Carlos Asuaje (.270, 4, 21), SS Freddy Galvis (.255, 12, 61 with Phillies), C Austin Hedges (.214, 18, 55). Rotation: LH Clayton Richard (8-15, 4.79 ERA), RH Bryan Mitchell (1-1, 5.79 in 20 games, 1 start with Yankees), RH Dinelson Lamet (7-8, 4.57), RH Luis Perdomo (8-11, 4.67), RH Tyson Ross (3-3, 7.71 with Rangers). Outlook: The Padres should be more fun to watch this season with the additions of Hosmer and Galvis, but theyre still not expected to contend for another year or two. There are some other interesting players on the team as well, including Pirela, who can play left “eld or second base.San Francisco Giants2017: 64-98, “fth place. Manager: Bruce Bochy (12th season). Projected Lineup: 2B Joe Panik (.288, 10 HRs, 53 RBIs), 1B Brandon Belt (.241, 18, 51), RF Andrew McCutchen (.279, 28, 88 with Pirates), C Buster Posey (.320, 12, 67, 34 2Bs), 3B Evan Longoria (.261, 20, 86, 36 2Bs, Gold Glove with Rays), SS Brandon Crawford (.253, 14, 77, 34 2Bs, Gold Glove), LF Hunter Pence (.260, 13, 67), CF Austin Jackson (.318, 7, 35 with Indians). Rotation: LH Madison Bumgarner (4-9, 3.32 ERA in 17 starts), RH Johnny Cueto (8-8, 4.52), RH Jeff Samardzija (9-15, 4.42, NL-high 2072/ 3 IP), RH Chris Stratton (4-4, 3.68), LH Ty Blach (8-12, 4.78). Outlook: The Giants are coming off their “rst last-place “nish in a decade and their worst season overall since 1985. The talent level was upgraded signi“cantly with trades for Longoria and McCutchen. Those two former All-Stars might be on the downside of their careers „ both are in their 30s „ but they should still add some pop to a lineup that “nished last in the majors in homers, 29th in runs and 29th in on-base percentage. They should also im p rove a defense that was s p otty at best last season.NL EastNL CentralNL West Cubs manager Joe Maddon Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw Nationals right “elder Bryce Harper

PAGE 39

** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 C7Wisely fanned only three, but Jake Randa was the lone Raider to reach third base, and then on a hit and infield error in the first inning.Right-hander Christian Camacho was nearly as resilient on the mound for the visitors, but Gulf Coast pushed a run across in the bottom of the sixth inning.Jacquez Koonce led off with a double, and Gulf Coast coach Mike Kan-dler gave left-handed swinger Josh Nowak a decision in how to move Koonce to third.After a fouled bunt attempt, Nowak even-tually grounded a single into left field on a 2-2 pitch.With runners at the corners, the Raiders played their infield back and Corey Heffrons fielders choice brought in Koonce with the only run Wisely needed.Both kids pitched outstanding, we were fortunate, bottom line,Ž Kandler said. Wisely was really really good, but its like Ive been saying „ expect any-thing in this conference.It was fun to see a game like that. It worked out (for Nowak). I gave him the option to bunt or swing away and move him up and he felt like he could hit him.ŽOtherwise both teams made key outs on the basepaths to bolster already stout pitching.That theme carried over into the second game with one excep-tion. Northwest Florida bunched three of its five hits against Alec Aleywine in the first inning to produce two runs.Kaden Polcovich, son of former Commo-dore ex-Major Leaguer Kevin, opened with a single and Thomas Broyles doubled him to third.One-out later, Kyle Fitzgerald grounded on opposite-field RBI single and Leo Horacios fielders choice brought in Broyles. That was that.Greathouse was far from overpowering, but combined 12 outs on balls hit in the air with four strikeouts to frustrate Gulf Coast. The brother of former Commodore Cam Greathouse survived Malik Spratlings leadoff double in the fifth inning and left the bases loaded in the seventh.Gulf Coast managed only six hits against him, Koonce and Spratling each with two. Koonce and Wisely each had two hits for the Commo-dores in the first game.Fitzgerald had two hits for the Raiders in Game 2, the doubleheader also somewhat peculiar in that it didnt feature one relief pitcher.Gulf Coast plays the Spring Hill College junior varsity in a doubleheader starting 2 p.m. Monday in Mobile, Ala. Game 1Northwest 000 000 0 „ 0 3 0 Gulf Coast 000 001 x „ 1 7 2 Camacho (L) and Halfacre Wisely (W) and Nowak. LOB: Northwest 5, Gulf Coast 4. E: Rowdon 2. S: Cienfuegos. 2B: Fitzgerald, Heffron, Koonce. CS: Fitzgerald, Koonce, Wisely. WP: Wisely. RBIs: Gulf Coast, Heffron. Game 2Northwest 200 000 0 „ 2 5 1 Gulf Coast 000 000 0 „ 0 6 0 Greathouse (W) and Vetter Aleywine (L) and Heffron. LOB: Northwest 3, Gulf Coast 5. E: Stephens. DP: Northwest 4-6-3. S: 2B: Broyles, Fitzgerald, Spratling. SB: Fitzgerald. WP: Greathouse. BK: Aleywine. RBIs: Northwest, Fitzgerald, Horacio. BASEBALLFrom Page C1Gulf Coast State Colleges Brett Wisely pitches to Northwest Florida State on Saturday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD] Gulf Coast was playing without Bennett again but held steady in the early going thanks to a strong start from Green, who scored nine first quarter points after posting a career-high 38 on Friday, while also get-ting a spark off the bench from little-used reserves Kincey and Banks. A pair of 3-pointers by Kincey and a driving basket by Dian comprised an 8-2 Gulf Coast run to take a 32-27 lead with 6:05 left in the second quarter.Shelton State quickly took command of the game, however, with Johnson answering with a driving bucket plus a foul for a three-point play, a corner 3-pointer, and another three-point play on a transition layup to make it 40-34 Bucs. Johnson then hit a pullup jumper and Ataiya Bridges followed with a 3-pointer from the right corner and a pair of free throws to put Shelton State up 47-34 with 2:06 to half.Johnson closed the half with five straight points on a steal and basket plus a foul for a three-point play and a short jumper in the lane to put her team ahead 54-36 at the break. The Bucs continued to pour it on in the third quarter, starting the second half on a 22-6 run to blow the game open. A cutting basket for Savan-nah Reier and a bucket by Johnson opened the third, with a mid-range jumper by Reier, a basket inside by Ayanna Trigg, and a 3-pointer by Dana Echols staking the Bucs to a 69-40 advantage.Another three by Tiyah Johnson and a pair of free throws by Jordan LeNoir made it 76-42 with 2:05 left in the third and Shel-ton State began subbing out some of its starters. The Lady Commodores took advantage by reeling off 14 straight to cut the deficit to 20 with 8:44 left in the game after two 3-pointers by Kincey and another by Dian.Johnson, Robinson, and Reier re-entered the game for the Bucs and Johnson helped push the lead back out with two free throws, a 3-pointer, and a long two-point jumper to make it 85-62 with 4:28 remaining. Johnson stroked another mid-range jumper and nailed a dribble pull-up three that gave her 45 points and made it 90-64 with 2:35 to go.The Lady Commodores tried to keep Johnson from getting the record by send-ing a double team on the perimeter, but she worked her way around it and drew a foul with 2:06 on the clock. Johnson coolly sank both foul shots to get the record and was pulled from the game. Shelton State shot 53 percent from the field for the game com-pared to 36 percent for Gulf Coast and turned 16 GC turnovers into 27 points. The Lady Commodores were only able to convert 11 Bucs turnovers into four points. GULF COASTFrom Page C1Gulf Coasts Dominique Banks had 14 points, nine rebounds, and three blocked shots in Saturdays game. [JOE MORALES/RAPID SHOTZ PHOTOGRAPHY] Joes Teiyahna Hutchin-son, Holmes Countys Laura Jones, and North Bay Havens Josselin Geer „ were revealed last week.Rounding out the East boys roster is Eddie Dubose of Rutherford, Antonio Bellamy of Mosley, Matthew Isenhoff of Vernon, Werlean Pollock of Marianna, Jacobi Jones of Wewahitchka, Amari Banks of Cottondale, Noah Gustason of Bozeman, and Jamal Howard of Blountstown.For the girls, the final eight selections go to Brooklynn Quinn and ShaMario Cole of Port St. Joe, Shelby Suggs and Carly Hanson of Boze-man, Devyn Butorac and Taylor West of Ponce de Leon, Kori Jones of Mar-ianna, and Robin Tate of Poplar Springs.Dubose, a 6-foot-5 for-ward, averaged 10 points and 7.5 rebounds per game for the Rams this season, while the 6-1 Bellamy was the second-leading scorer for the Dolphins at 13.8 points per game and led them with 6.3 rebounds per contest. He also shot 52 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free throw line. Isenhoff, a 6-foot guard, was the top scorer for Vernon at 21.8 points per game while adding 4.6 rebounds, 2.3 assists, and 2.6 steals per game.A super-athletic 6-2 guard, Pollock averaged 12 points, six rebounds, and 3.5 assists per game for the Bulldogs this season. A 5-9 guard, Banks was the top performer for the Hornets at 19 points per game to go with four assists, five rebounds, and a steal per game. Gustason, a 6-3 forward, led Bozeman with 11.6 points and 8.5 rebounds per contest to go with an assist and 1.7 steals per game. A 6-2, 200-pound forward, Howard brought interior toughness to an undersized Blountstown team and finished his senior season averaging eight points, 6.2 rebounds, and 1.5 steals per game. Stats for Jacobi Jones were not made available.Kori Jones, a 5-7 guard, averaged 12 points, seven rebounds, and two steals per game for the Bulldogs this season, while the 5-9 Tate averaged 13.2 points per game for the Atomics. Quinn, a versatile 5-11 guard-forward, finished the season with averages of 9.2 points, 6.4 rebounds, 4.7 assists, and 3.6 steals, while the 5-5 Cole put in 7.4 points, two rebounds, and 2.7 steals per contest.Suggs, a 5-7 guard, led the Bucks in scoring with 16.8 points per game and added 5.9 rebounds per game as well, while the 5-10 forward Hanson averaged a double-double this season at 14.2 points and 10.4 rebounds per contest. Butorac, a 5-6 guard, averaged 11.2 points, 4.5 rebounds, an assist, and 2.1 steals per game for the Pirates, while 5-4 teammate West put in 10.4 points, 3.7 assists, and 3.1 steals per game this season.Rutherford senior guard Kara Spani, who averaged 16 points per game for the Rams,was originally slated to be on the East girls team before suffering a knee injury in her last game of the season.The All-Star Basketball Classic will take place April 7 at the Billy Har-rison Field House at Gulf Coast State College. The girls game will tip off at 11 a.m., followed by the boys game at 1 p.m. Admission to the games will be $6 for adults, $2 for children, and kids 4 and under will get in free. Passes will be accepted for high school and col-lege coaches.Bozeman coaches Michael Memmen and Desmond Brown have been chosen to helm the All-Star East teams, with Rutherford coach Rhondie Ross helping Memmen coach the boys, and North Bay Haven coach Ty Steele assisting Brown with the girls. ROSTERSFrom Page C1 The Associated PressALBANY, N.Y. „ Geno Auriemma and the UConn Huskies are in a familiar place „ the Elite Eight.Napheesa Collier had 16 points and 11 rebounds to help topseed UConn beat Duke 72-59 on Saturday and advance to the regional finals for the 13th con-secutive season.The Huskies senior duo of Gabby Williams and Kia Nurse was key on the defensive end to help UConn to the win.Were fortunate that our two seniors are two of the better defensive players in the country,Ž Auriemma said. We can count on those two every game. Gabbys going to play great every game. She plays at a cer-tain level every game. Kias one of the toughest competitors weve had at Connecticut.ŽUConn (35-0) will face defending national champion South Carolina on Monday night to try and advance to a record 11th straight Final Four.SOUTH CAROLINA 79, BUFFALO 63: Aja Wilson, the consensus “ rst pick in the next WNBA draft, had 20 points and 13 rebounds, Alexis Jennings added 20 points, and South Carolina held off the upstart Bulls 79-63 on Saturday to keep alive its quest to defend its national title. South Carolinas dominance inside against the smaller Bulls spelled the difference. The Gamecocks outrebounded Buffalo 48-21, outscored the Bulls 20-5 on second-chance points, and “ nished with a 52-30 edge in the paint. Secondseeded South Carolina (29-6), whose only losses this season have come against ranked teams, will face top-seeded and unbeaten UConn in the regional “ nal on Monday night. Dillard led Buffalo with 29 points, the only Bulls player in double “ gures. Buffalo (29-6), just the third Mid-American Conference school to reach the Sweet 16, was among the “ nal four teams to earn an at-large berth.UConn moves on to womens Elite Eight

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** C8 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS SUNDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 25 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Sunday Today W/ Willie GeistSpringfield Community ChurchMeet the Press (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramNHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins. (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 TomorrowIn Touch W/Charles StanleyKey of DavidCampmeeting: InspirationBill PurvisSeventh Day Adventist ChurchPaid ProgramPaid P rogramPaid Program WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America This Week With George ...Hlnd Pk BptstCatholicSt. Dominics Catholic ChurchFirst Baptist ChurchNuWaveConture METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeakmanBeakmanBill NyeBill NyeSaved by BellSaved by BellSaved by BellSaved by BellBrady BunchBrady BunchBrady BunchBrady Bunch WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS News Sunday Morning (N) Face the Nation (N) Bill PurvisYears of March MadnessRoad to the Final Four (N) MNT (18.2) 227 13 Into the WildAnimal AdvWild AnimalsExplorationAnimal RescueReal Life 1011st United Methodist ChurchPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Program WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Force of FaithBethel BaptistHigh PraisePaid ProgramCity Church at NorthsideFox News SundayPaid ProgramPaid ProgramXtreme OffPai d Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 PinkaliciousSplashBiz Kid$ SciGirls Local RoutesCapitol UpdateCrossroadsFace to FaceCall the Midwife Call the Midwife A&E 34 43 118 265 Hoarders Arline; CarolynŽ Hoarders Phyllis; JanetŽ Hoarders Eileen; JudyŽ Hoarders The First 48 The First 48 AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:49) M*A*S*H (:19) M*A*S*H (7:49) M*A*S*H (:19) M*A*S*H (8:49) M*A*S*H (:19) M*A*S*H (9:49) M*A*S*H (:19) M*A*S*H (10:49) ‰‰‚ Rambo: First Blood Part II (85) Richard Crenna ANPL 46 69 184 282 North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law Long ShotŽ North Woods Law North Woods Law BET 53 46 124 329 House/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsTyler Perrys Meet the Browns COM 64 53 107 249 The Office (:35) The Office (:10) The Office (:45) The Office (:20) The OfficeThe Office (:25) The OfficeThe Office The Office (:05) The Office (:35) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Operation Sportsmans Twin Turbos Race to the TopŽ Shifting Gears With Aaron Kaufman Aarons Back At It!Ž Pushes design abilities to the limits. Naked and Afraid E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex and the Cit y ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 (10) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) E:60 (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) 2018 NCAA Womens Basketball Tournament ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) 30 for 30SportsCenter (N) (L) E:60Formula One Racing Australian Grand Prix. College Baseball FOOD 38 45 110 231 Trishas Sou.Valerie HomeValerie HomeValerie HomeValerie HomeValerie HomeGiada Enter.Pioneer Wo.ContessaContessaThe Kitchen Spring FeastŽ FREE 59 65 180 311 (6:30) ‰‰ Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (05) (:10) ‰‰ What to Expect When Youre Expecting (12) Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez. (11:50) ‰‰‰ Hitch (05) FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RacingTire Sports Car ChallengeMonster Jam (N) NASCAR RaceDay (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 Mike & MollyMike & MollyHow I MetHow I Met ‰‰‚ The Equalizer (14) Denzel Washington, Marton Csokas. A former commando champions the helpless. Transformers HALL 23 59 185 312 (6:00) The Birthday Wish (17) All Yours (16) Nicolette Sheridan, Jayne Eastwood, Dan Payne. Summer Villa (16) Victor Webster, Hilarie Burton. The Sweetest Heart (18) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperProperty Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 Top Gear RVsŽ Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsPawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars LIFE 56 56 108 252 Amazing FactsJeremiahJoel OsteenCindys SkinMarried at First SightLove at First FlightThe Wrong Boyfriend (15) Francesca Eastwood, James Caan. PARMT 28 48 241 241Sexy YouTry Total GymEngine PowerXtreme OffTruck Tech Detroit MuscleBar Rescue Bar Rescue Bug BiteŽ Bar Rescue SUN 49 422 656 Yoga Retreat!Drs. Co-hostGolf AmericaGolf LifeGolf Dest.Endless GolfJimmy HanlinSwing ClinicGolf the WorldInside RaysMLB Presea son Baseball SYFY 70 52 122 244 Krypton ‰‚ Leprechaun in the Hood (00) Warwick Davis, Ice-T. ‰‰ G.I. Joe: Retaliation (13) Dwayne Johnson, Bruce Willis, Channing Tatum. ‰‰ Gamer (09) Gerard Butler. TBS 31 15 139 247 KingFriends Friends Friends Friends Brooklyn NineBrooklyn NineBrooklyn Nine ‰‰ Bad Teacher (11) Cameron Diaz, Justin Timberlake. TCM 25 70 132 256 Scarlet E. ‰‰‰ The Eagle and the Hawk (33) ‰‰‚ No Questions Asked (51) Arlene Dahl(:45) ‰‰‰‚ I Want to Live! (58) Susan Hayward, Simon Oakland. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay Yes to the Dress Say Yes to the PromŽ Say YesSister Wives Utah strengthens laws against polygamy. TNT 29 54 138 245 Law & Order HitmanŽ Law & Order Open SeasonŽ Law & Order AsteriskŽ Law & Order The WheelŽ Law & Order Mothers DayŽ ‰‰‚ Red (10) Bruce Willis. USA 62 55 105 242 In TouchJoel OsteenUnsolved: Tupac and BIGLaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 YouseffAge SpotsWalker, Texas Ranger Walker, Texas Ranger Walker, Texas Ranger Cops Cops Cops Cops SUNDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 25 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Scandal No More BloodŽ Paid ProgramPaid ProgramShepherds ChapelEarly TodayEarly TodayNewsChannel 7 Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 CopsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramTone&LiftDr. Ho Reliev.Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPage Six TVCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 CSI: Miami (:35) Blue Bloods BlowbackŽ(:35) ABC World News NowMorningMorningNews 13 This Morning (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 The Fugitive Storm CenterŽ The UntouchablesPeter GunnPeter GunnMr. LuckyNight GalleryFacts of LifeDiffrent StrokeBev. HillbilliesMy Three Sons WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS Overnight News (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramBusiness FirstMorning News MNT (18.2) 227 13 Murdoch MysteriesBella Luce Jewelry SaleSilver Jewelry Todays hottest jewelry styles! (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAgDay WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Big BangTwo/Half MenJudge JudyPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramOutdoor ShowAsk-Tech.Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Call the MidwifeDark Angel on Masterpiece Mary Ann arouses suspicions. Antiques RoadshowWild Kratts (EI) Wild Kratts (EI) Ready Jet Go!Cat in the Hat A&E 34 43 118 265 Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsCookSmartNever FearPaid ProgramNuWaveCredit?Paid ProgramParking WarsParking War s AMC 30 62 131 254 Walking Dead (:37) The Walking Dead (:39) Talking DeadComic MenComic MenThree StoogesPiYo Workout!Never FearPaid ProgramPaid Program ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:04) North Woods LawNorth Woods LawNorth Woods LawLone Star LawRescue Dog to Super DogDogs 101 Meeting unique dogs. BET 53 46 124 329 Jamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxDifferent World (:45) A Different WorldDifferent WorldShowdown of FaithJamie FoxxJamie Foxx COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkRoast Battle II WarTransformPaid ProgramPaid ProgramHair LoveScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:02) Naked and AfraidTurn & BurnTurn & Burn Memory LaneŽ Turn & BurnTurn & Burn Drag-OnŽ Turn & Burn Junk to FunkŽ E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the CitySex & the City (:02) Sex and the CityThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe Kardashians ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 30 for 3030 for 30SportsCenterGolic & Wingo (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Beat BobbyBeat BobbyGuys Grocery GamesPaid ProgramAirfryer OvenPaid ProgramPaid ProgramLarry KingMyPillowPaid ProgramPaid Prog ram FREE 59 65 180 311 Yoga Retreat!Ageless BodyPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCindys SkinPiYo Workout!Joseph PrinceRobisonJoyce MeyerJohn HageeYoung-Hungry Last-Standing FS1 24 27 150 219 (11:00) UFC 25 Greatest FightsNASCAR Racing Monster Energy Cup Series: STP 500. TMZ SportsFirst Things First FX 45 51 136 248 (11:53) Trust (:20) AtlantaPaid ProgramLifeLockCindys SkinBalanceAmazing AbsNever FearMakeup!Paid Program ‰‰‚ Unbroken (14) HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHow CloseHow CloseSexy Hair CareLarry KingMyPillowPiYo Workout!PiYo Workout!Flip or FlopListed Sister s HIST 35 42 120 269 (12:03) Kingpin (:04) Kingpin El Chapo created one unified cartel. Paid ProgramOmegaDr. Ho Reliev.Credit?Dr. Ho Reliev.Paid Program LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:03) The Secret Sex Life of a Single Mom (14) Ashley Jones. Paid ProgramHair LoveLifeLockLuminess AirPaid ProgramRobisonJoyce MeyerBalancing Act PARMT 28 48 241 241 (:03) Bar RescueBar RescueSex ToysRelieve painMedical Disc.Paid ProgramCredit?Paid ProgramPaid ProgramCredit? SUN 49 422 656 Paid ProgramBladderCredit?Foot PainProstatePaid ProgramProstateFoot PainFins & SkinsShip Shape TVCredit?Paid Program SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:56) ‰‰ Resident Evil: Apocalypse (04) Milla Jovovich. (2:58) Zodiac: Signs of the Apocalypse (14) Aaron Douglas. Twilight Zone ‰‰ The Forgotten (04) Julianne Moore. TBS 31 15 139 247 (12:00) ‰‰ Failure to Launch ‰‚ Fools Gold (08) Matthew McConaughey, Kate Hudson. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondMarriedMarriedMarriedMarried TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ The Walls of Malapaga (50) Jean Gabin, Isa Miranda. ‰‰‰ French Cancan (55) Jean Gabin, Franoise Arnoul. ‰‰‚ Double Harness (33) Ann Harding. Rafter Rom. TLC 37 40 183 280 (:06) Sister WivesMy Big Fat Fabulous LifeMy Big Fat Fabulous LifeWhat Not to WearWhat Not to Wear DesireeŽ Say Yes to the Dress TNT 29 54 138 245 (12:00) ‰‰‰ War of the Worlds (05) Jokers WildLaw & Order ChosenŽ Law & Order Under GodŽ Law & Order AbsentiaŽ Charmed USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUDatelineDatelineCSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 ElementaryElementary Alma MattersŽ ElementaryPaid ProgramCredit?Philips!Joseph PrinceLes FeldickJoyce Meyer SUNDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 25 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 NHL HockeyPGA Tour Golf WGC Dell Technologies Match Play, Finals. A champion will be decided from the single-elimination matches. (N) Little Big Shots CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Hollywood ‰‰ Tyler Perrys Madeas Witness Protection (12) Tyler Perry, Eugene Levy. EngagementEngagementThe GoldbergsThe GoldbergsSaving Hope Twinned LambsŽ WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 CookSmartOmegaNuWavePhilips!Luminess AirCookSmartRidgecrest Baptist ChurchWorld NewsNews 13 5:30Amer. Funniest Home Videos METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Facts of LifeFacts of LifeDiffrent StrokeDiffrent StrokeMamas FamilyMamas FamilyThe Love Boat EgyptŽ The Love Boat EgyptŽ Touched by an Angel WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament Regional, Final: Teams TBA. (N) (L) 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament Regional, Final: Teams TBA. (N) (L) 60 Minutes (N) MNT (18.2) 227 13 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramLaughsRaw Travel 50PlusPrimePositive PaulaExtra (N) The MomsHappi HouseFamily FeudFamily Feud WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Truck TechPaid ProgramPawn StarsPaid ProgramThe SimpsonsPaid ProgramThe SimpsonsPaid ProgramHow I MetTwo/Half MenBobs BurgersB obs Burgers WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Call the Midwife Call the Midwife Call the Midwife Call the Midwife Call the Midwife Call the Midwife A&E 34 43 118 265 The First 48 The First 48 Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:49) ‰‰‚ The Last Stand (13) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Forest Whitaker. (:19) The Walking Dead (:41) The Walking Dead (5:46) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law ManhuntŽ North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, Browns (1:57) ‰‰‚ Lottery Ticket (10) Bow Wow, Brandon T. Jackson. ‰‰‚ This Christmas (07) Delroy Lindo, Idris Elba, Loretta Devine. COM 64 53 107 249 (:10) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office (:45) The Office Drug TestingŽ(:20) The OfficeThe Office The Office Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0 DISC 36 39 182 278 Naked and Afraid Naked and AfraidNaked and Afraid Naked and Afraid Naked and Afraid Naked and Afraid E! 63 57 114 236 (12:00) ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 (10) Sarah Jessica Parker. ‰‚ Bride Wars (09) Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway. ‰‰‰ The Blind Side (09) Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw. ESPN 9 23 140 206 PBA Bowling Roth/Holman Doubles Championship. (Taped) World/PokerWorld/PokerSportsCenter (N) (L) Basketball ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:00) College Baseball LSU at Vanderbilt. (N) (L) College Hockey NCAA Tournament, Northeast Regional, Final: Teams TBA. (N) SportsCenterCollege Softball FOOD 38 45 110 231 Guys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery Games FREE 59 65 180 311 (11:50) ‰‰‰ Hitch (05) Will Smith. ‰‰ Just Go With It (11) Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Nicole Kidman. (:10) ‰‚ Grown Ups (10) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR Racing Monster Energy Cup Series: STP 500. (N) (L) Shot in the Dark 89 Blocks FX 45 51 136 248 (12:30) ‰‰ Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (09) Shia LaBeouf. ‰‰‰ Pacific Rim (13) Charlie Hunnam. Humans pilot giant robots to fight monstrous creatures. Sicario (15) HALL 23 59 185 312 (12:00) The Sweetest HeartA Ring by Spring (14) Stefanie Powers, Rachel Boston. Moonlight in Vermont (17) Lacey Chabert, Carlo Marks. Royal Matchmaker (18) HGTV 32 38 112 229 Property BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars La La LandŽ Kingpin LIFE 56 56 108 252 Seduced (16) Elisabeth Rhm, Jon Prescott, Julie Mond. His Double Life (16) Emmanuelle Vaugier, Brian Krause. His Secret Family (15) Haylie Duff, David ODonnell. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue El Moronte!!Ž Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bare RescueŽ Bar Rescue SUN 49 422 656 MLB Preseason Baseball: Yankees at Rays Inside HEATPregameNBA Basketball Miami Heat at Indiana Pacers. (N) (L) Postgame SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:00) ‰‰ Gamer (09) ‰‰ National Treasure (04) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. ‰‰ The Last Witch Hunter (15) Vin Diesel, Elijah Wood. TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰ Failure to Launch (06) Matthew McConaughey. ‰‰‚ The Intern (15) Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway, Rene Russo. ‰‰ Were the Millers (13) Jennifer Aniston. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰‰ On the Waterfront (54) Marlon Brando, Karl Malden. ‰‰‚ The Mating Game (59) Tony Randall(:45) ‰‰‰‚ Splendor in the Grass (61) Natalie Wood, Warren Beatty. TLC 37 40 183 280 Sister Wives Maddie has her baby shower. Sister Wives The Longest LaborŽ Maddie goes into labor. Sister Wives (N)(:05) Sister Wives (N) TNT 29 54 138 245 (12:00) ‰‰‚ Red (10) ‰‰‚ Red 2 (13) Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker. ‰‰ Contraband (12) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale, Ben Foster. USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Mob RulesŽ SUNDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 25 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Little Big Shots (N) Genius Junior (N) Timeless HollywoodlandŽ (N) NewsOutdoorsmanPerson of InterestPerson of Interest CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 ‰‰‚ My Girl 2 (93) Anna Chlumsky, Dan Aykroyd. Family GuyFamily GuyClevelandClevelandLake City (08) Sissy Spacek, Troy Garity, Rebecca Romijn. WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 American Idol Hopefuls perform for the judges. (N)(:01) Deception EscapologyŽ NewsLawcallHlnd Pk Bptst (:35) Branson Country USA (N) CSI: Miami METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Columbo Two women kill their two-timing lover. Touched by an AngelNight GalleryNight GalleryThe Twilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Instinct Wild GameŽ (N) NCIS: Los Angeles (N) Madam Secretary (N) Castle SetupŽ (Part 1 of 2) BonesModern FamilyForensic Files MNT (18.2) 227 13 LeverageRizzoli & Isles Post MortemŽ Haven See No EvilŽ The X-Files Redux IIŽ The X-FilesMajor Crimes Long ShotŽ WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 The SimpsonsBrooklyn NineFamily Guy (N) Last ManOpen HouseBig BangBig BangBensingerAmerican Ninja WarriorDetroit MuscleEngine Power WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Call the MidwifeCall the Midwife (N) Dark Angel on Masterpiece Mary Ann arouses suspicions. Local RoutesCrossroadsCall the Midwife A&E 34 43 118 265 Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:53) The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead The Hilltop has unexpected visitors. (N)(:03) Talking Dead (N)(:03) The Walking DeadComic MenWalking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 North Woods LawNorth Woods Law (N)(:01) Lone Star Law (N)(:02) North Woods Law (:03) Lone Star Law (12:04) Lone Star Law BET 53 46 124 329 ‰‰‚ Lakeview Terrace (08) Samuel L. Jackson, Patrick Wilson. MartinMartinMartinMartin (:31) Martin (12:02) Martin (:33) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Tosh.0Daniel Tosh: People PleaserSouth Park (:45) South Park SuccubusŽ South Park DISC 36 39 182 278 Naked and AfraidNaked and Afraid: UncensoredNaked and Afraid (N)(:01) Naked and Afraid (:01) Naked and Afraid (12:02) Naked and Afraid E! 63 57 114 236 (5:00) ‰‰‰ The Blind Side The Arrangement (N)(:01) The Royals (N)(:02) The RoyalsSex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the CitySex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 2018 NCAA Womens Basketball TournamentSportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College SoftballDraft: FeaturedDraft: FeaturedJohnsonville Cornhole Championships From Las Vegas. ESPN FC (N) College GameDay (N) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Guys Grocery GamesGuys Grocery Games (N) Beat BobbyBeat BobbyBeat BobbyBeat BobbyGuys Grocery GamesBeat BobbyBeat Bobby FREE 59 65 180 311 Grown Ups (:40) ‰‰‰ Forgetting Sarah Marshall (08) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis.(:20) ‰‰‰ Definitely, Maybe (08) Ryan Reynolds, Isla Fisher, Abigail Breslin. FS1 24 27 150 219 (6:30) 89 BlocksUFC 25 Greatest Fights UFC 25 Greatest Fights FX 45 51 136 248 (6:30) ‰‰‰‚ Sicario (15) Emily Blunt, Benicio Del Toro. Trust John Paul Getty III is kidnapped.(:26) Trust John Paul Getty III is kidnapped.(11:53) Trust HALL 23 59 185 312 (6:00) Royal Matchmaker (18) When Calls the Heart (N) Meet the Peetes (N) Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 How CloseHow CloseCaribbean LifeCaribbean LifeIsland Life (N) Island Life (N) House HuntersHouse HuntersCaribbean LifeCaribbean LifeIsland LifeIsland Life HIST 35 42 120 269 (6:00) KingpinKingpin Pablo Escobars rise in 1970s Colombia. (N)(:03) Kingpin El Chapo created one unified cartel.(12:03) Kingpin LIFE 56 56 108 252 My Husbands Secret Life (17) Kara Killmer, Brett Donahue.(:02) The Secret Sex Life of a Single Mom (14) Ashley Jones.(:01) My Husbands Secret Life (17) Kara Killmer. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar RescueBar RescueBar Rescue Weird ScienceŽ(:03) Bar RescueBar RescueBar Rescue Weird ScienceŽ SUN 49 422 656SportsmanFlorida SportFins & SkinsSport FishingMLB Preseason Baseball: Yankees at Rays After Midnight with the HEAT SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‚ Shooter (07) Mark Wahlberg, Michael Pea, Danny Glover. (9:55) Krypton PilotŽ (10:55) ‰‰ Resident Evil (02) Milla Jovovich, Eric Mabius. TBS 31 15 139 247 (5:30) ‰‰ Were the Millers Big BangBig BangBig BangBig BangFinal SpaceFinal SpaceFinal SpaceFinal Space ‰‰ Failure to Launch (06) TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ Titanic (53) Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck. ‰‰‰‚ A Night to Remember (58) Kenneth More. (:15) The Sun Down Limited (24) Mickey Daniels, Joe Cobb. TLC 37 40 183 280 Sister Wives Discussing jaw-dropping moments. (N) (Part 1 of 2) Three Wives, One Husband (N)(:06) Sister Wives Discussing jaw-dropping moments. Three Wives, One Husband TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰ London Has Fallen (16) Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart. ‰‰ London Has Fallen (16) Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart. The Alienist RequiemŽ ‰‰‰ War of the Worlds (05) USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyLaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue BloodsBlue BloodsBlue BloodsShoot the MessengerBones The Body in the BagŽ Bones

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 D1 CELEBRATE FAITH Celebrate Community is a partnership between The News Herald and local businesses to highlight the little things that make this area unique, that cause us to love it. Each Sunday in this space, well write about one of the topics important to our areas core. Email story ideas to Jan Waddy at jwaddy@pcnh.com. SUNRISEEaster Sunrise Services will be taking place throughout Bay County on April 1 „ from Eastgates Sunrise Service at 6:15 a.m. at Rick Seltzer Park in Panama City Beach to Historic St. Andrew Churchs Easter Sunrise at 6:30 a.m. overlooking the water at Oaks by the Bay Park. HOPEThe Panama City Passion Playreturns to the Marina Civic Center at 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday; presented by St. Andrew Baptist Church.Admission is free; bring one canned good for the Center of Hope. INSIDEFaith Calendar D2 Pets of the Week D2 You Can Help D3 Botanists Corner D3 Community Connections D4 Society D5 WhatsHappening D6 Sunday Crossword D6 By Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Easter is bigger than bunnies, colored eggs and springtime to those at the Panama City Rescue Mission. This holiday season will bring fun, food and fel-lowship to those who attend the missions annual Easter banquet April 1.Easter is especially important to us because it reflects upon Jesus humble life and then cruel suffering during his crucifixion, all of which was ultimately trans-formed to glory upon his resurrection,Ž said Michael Brust, shelter manager. He has witnessed some of the same renewals in those who visit the mission.We have seen a similar transformation take place in many a persons life that has come through our doors. From destitution, drug dependency and despair we have witnessed the meta-morphosis of the spirit that only God can perform,Ž he said.The mission wants to pro-vide the holiday meal to its neighbors in need, said Lisa Nixon Mabry, communica-tions manager. Many in our community dont have family or loved ones to spend the holidays with,Ž she said. We want them to feel that love and compassion they may be missing the rest of the year and open our home to them to sit down and enjoy the holiday with others.ŽThis years Easter banquet will be 2-5 p.m. April 1 in the courtyard of the mission, 609 Allen Ave.With turkey, roast beef, dressing and vegetables on the menu, people will not only feel love and compassion, but the fullness of hearty meal.Brust used Bible verse John 3:16 to state everyone is loved by God, and they A season of transformationMichael Adams, left, and Victor Case, right, eat during the 2013 Easter dinner at the Panama City Rescue Mission. Volunteers are sought to help serve thsi year, and all are invited to dine. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTOS] Elizabeth Park, a volunteer, “ lls a plate with food during a previous Easter dinner at the Panama City Rescue Mission. Volunteers still are sought for this years dinner. Easter themed centerpieces wait to be placed on tables during a previous Easter dinner at the Panama City Rescue Mission in Panama City. Carol House hands a plate of food to Nicole Leeks and 4-monthold Jiavanni Henry during the 2013 Easter dinner at the Panama City Rescue Mission. The Rev. Joe Atkins carries donated food to the kitchen while preparing for a past Easter dinner at the Panama City Rescue Mission. Rescue Mission prepares, seeks volunteers for annual banquetSee BANQUET, D2

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** D2 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald Apalachicola Bay (Eastern Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/25 H 2:25 p.m. 1.2 L 6:08 a.m. -0.1 H 10:00 p.m. 1.4 L 5:23 p.m. 1.1 3/26 H 3:05 p.m. 1.3 L 7:26 a.m. -0.1 H 11:38 p.m. 1.4 L 7:13 p.m. 1.1 3/27 H --L 8:28 a.m. -0.1 H 3:35 p.m. 1.3 L 8:22 p.m. 0.9 3/28 H 1:16 a.m. 1.4 L 9:20 a.m. -0.1 H 3:59 p.m. 1.3 L 9:14 p.m. 0.7 3/29 H 2:37 a.m. 1.4 L 10:04 a.m. 0.0 H 4:19 p.m. 1.3 L 10:00 p.m. 0.5 3/30 H 3:43 a.m. 1.4 L 10:41 a.m. 0.2 H 4:36 p.m. 1.3 L 10:42 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 4:41 a.m. 1.4 L 11:13 a.m. 0.3 H 4:51 p.m. 1.3 L 11:21 p.m. 0.2 4/1 H 5:33 a.m. 1.4 L 11:40 a.m. 0.5 H 5:06 p.m. 1.4 L 11:59 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 6:24 a.m. 1.4 L --H 5:23 p.m. 1.4 L 12:04 p.m. 0.7 4/3 H 7:15 a.m. 1.3 L 12:37 a.m. 0.0 H 5:44 p.m. 1.5 L 12:28 p.m. 0.8 4/4 H 8:09 a.m. 1.3 L 1:15 a.m. 0.0 H 6:11 p.m. 1.5 L 12:54 p.m. 0.9 4/5 H 9:09 a.m. 1.3 L 1:57 a.m. 0.0 H 6:43 p.m. 1.5 L 1:28 p.m. 1.0 4/6 H 10:18 a.m. 1.2 L 2:47 a.m. 0.0 H 7:23 p.m. 1.4 L 2:15 p.m. 1.1 4/7 H 11:33 a.m. 1.2 L 3:51 a.m. 0.1 H 8:13 p.m. 1.4 L 3:27 p.m. 1.1 4/8 H 12:42 p.m. 1.3 L 5:07 a.m. 0.1 H 9:19 p.m. 1.3 L 5:07 p.m. 1.1 4/9 H 1:35 p.m. 1.3 L 6:19 a.m. 0.2 H 10:45 p.m. 1.2 L 6:38 p.m. 1.0 4/10 H --L 7:20 a.m. 0.2 H 2:14 p.m. 1.3 L 7:44 p.m. 0.9 4/11 H 12:16 a.m. 1.2 L 8:11 a.m. 0.2 H 2:45 p.m. 1.4 L 8:34 p.m. 0.8 4/12 H 1:36 a.m. 1.3 L 8:53 a.m. 0.2 H 3:10 p.m. 1.4 L 9:16 p.m. 0.6 4/13 H 2:42 a.m. 1.3 L 9:30 a.m. 0.3 H 3:31 p.m. 1.4 L 9:52 p.m. 0.4 4/14 H 3:40 a.m. 1.4 L 10:03 a.m. 0.4 H 3:48 p.m. 1.4 L 10:26 p.m. 0.3 4/15 H 4:35 a.m. 1.4 L 10:33 a.m. 0.6 H 4:06 p.m. 1.5 L 11:00 p.m. 0.1 4/16 H 5:28 a.m. 1.4 L 11:03 a.m. 0.7 H 4:26 p.m. 1.5 L 11:35 p.m. 0.0 4/17 H 6:24 a.m. 1.5 L 11:33 a.m. 0.9 H 4:49 p.m. 1.6 L --4/18 H 7:23 a.m. 1.4 L 12:13 a.m. -0.1 H 5:17 p.m. 1.6 L 12:04 p.m. 1.0 4/19 H 8:29 a.m. 1.4 L 12:58 a.m. -0.2 H 5:51 p.m. 1.7 L 12:38 p.m. 1.1 4/20 H 9:43 a.m. 1.4 L 1:51 a.m. -0.2 H 6:31 p.m. 1.7 L 1:19 p.m. 1.2 4/21 H 11:06 a.m. 1.3 L 2:57 a.m. -0.1 H 7:21 p.m. 1.6 L 2:19 p.m. 1.2Following are hour/minute adjustments to compute tide times at other locations: Sikes cut: high tide 1:11 earlier, low tide 1:12 earlier; West Pass: high tide and low tide :27 earlier; Carrabelle: high tide 1:25 earlier, low tide 2:13 earlier. Tid e c h artsForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather Inc. 2018 Panama City at St. Andrews Pass (Central Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/25 H --L 2:42 a.m. -0.4 H 4:28 p.m. 1.4 L --3/26 H --L 3:43 a.m. -0.4 H 5:51 p.m. 1.3 L --3/27 H --L 4:33 a.m. -0.3 H 7:11 p.m. 1.3 L --3/28 H --L 5:12 a.m. -0.2 H 8:26 p.m. 1.1 L --3/29 H --L 5:37 a.m. 0.0 H 9:42 p.m. 1.0 L --3/30 H 11:37 a.m. 0.5 L 5:41 a.m. 0.3 H 11:07 p.m. 0.8 L 3:46 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 10:46 a.m. 0.7 L 5:14 a.m. 0.5 H --L 5:38 p.m. 0.3 4/1 H 1:10 a.m. 0.6 L 3:48 a.m. 0.5 H 10:39 a.m. 0.9 L 7:00 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 10:52 a.m. 1.1 L --H --L 8:10 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H 11:16 a.m. 1.2 L --H --L 9:18 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H 11:47 a.m. 1.3 L --H --L 10:28 p.m. -0.1 4/5 H --L --H 12:25 p.m. 1.3 L 11:41 p.m. -0.1 4/6 H --L --H 1:09 p.m. 1.3 L --4/7 H --L 12:52 a.m. -0.1 H 2:02 p.m. 1.2 L --4/8 H --L 1:52 a.m. -0.1 H 3:04 p.m. 1.2 L --4/9 H --L 2:40 a.m. -0.1 H 4:14 p.m. 1.2 L --4/10 H --L 3:17 a.m. 0.0 H 5:30 p.m. 1.1 L --4/11 H --L 3:45 a.m. 0.0 H 6:48 p.m. 1.0 L --4/12 H --L 4:03 a.m. 0.2 H 8:10 p.m. 0.9 L --4/13 H 11:08 a.m. 0.6 L 4:10 a.m. 0.3 H 9:40 p.m. 0.8 L 3:16 p.m. 0.5 4/14 H 10:15 a.m. 0.7 L 4:02 a.m. 0.5 H 11:33 p.m. 0.7 L 4:44 p.m. 0.4 4/15 H 9:56 a.m. 0.9 L 3:23 a.m. 0.6 H --L 5:51 p.m. 0.2 4/16 H 9:59 a.m. 1.1 L --H --L 6:54 p.m. 0.0 4/17 H 10:19 a.m. 1.3 L --H --L 8:00 p.m. -0.1 4/18 H 10:52 a.m. 1.4 L --H --L 9:15 p.m. -0.2 4/19 H 11:36 a.m. 1.5 L --H --L 10:36 p.m. -0.3 4/20 H --L --H 12:29 p.m. 1.6 L 11:57 p.m. -0.3 4/21 H --L --H 1:30 p.m. 1.6 L ---Following are hour/minute adjustments to compute tide times at other locations: Parker: high tide 1:33 later, low tide 2:12 later; Laird Bayou: high tide 1:11 later, low tide :45 later; Downtown Panama City: high tide :42 later, low tide :30 later; Lynn Haven: high tide 1:08 later, low tide :40 later; Panama City Beach: high tide :38 earlier, low tide :54 earlier. East PassDestin (Central Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/25 H --L 3:58 a.m. -0.1 H 5:34 p.m. 0.7 L --3/26 H --L 4:59 a.m. -0.1 H 6:57 p.m. 0.6 L --3/27 H --L 5:49 a.m. -0.1 H 8:17 p.m. 0.6 L --3/28 H --L 6:28 a.m. -0.1 H 9:32 p.m. 0.5 L --3/29 H --L 6:53 a.m. 0.0 H 10:48 p.m. 0.5 L --3/30 H --L 6:57 a.m. 0.1 H 12:43 p.m. 0.2 L 5:02 p.m. 0.1 3/31 H 12:13 a.m. 0.4 L 6:30 a.m. 0.2 H 11:52 a.m. 0.3 L 6:54 p.m. 0.1 4/1 H 2:16 a.m. 0.3 L 5:04 a.m. 0.2 H 11:45 a.m. 0.4 L 8:16 p.m. 0.0 4/2 H 11:58 a.m. 0.5 L --H --L 9:26 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H --L --H 12:22 p.m. 0.6 L 10:34 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H --L --H 12:53 p.m. 0.6 L 11:44 p.m. 0.0 4/5 H --L --H 1:31 p.m. 0.6 L --4/6 H --L 12:57 a.m. 0.0 H 2:15 p.m. 0.6 L --4/7 H --L 2:08 a.m. 0.0 H 3:08 p.m. 0.6 L --4/8 H --L 3:08 a.m. 0.0 H 4:10 p.m. 0.6 L --4/9 H --L 3:56 a.m. 0.0 H 5:20 p.m. 0.6 L --4/10 H --L 4:33 a.m. 0.0 H 6:36 p.m. 0.5 L --4/11 H --L 5:01 a.m. 0.0 H 7:54 p.m. 0.5 L --4/12 H --L 5:19 a.m. 0.1 H 9:16 p.m. 0.4 L --4/13 H 12:14 p.m. 0.3 L 5:26 a.m. 0.1 H 10:46 p.m. 0.4 L 4:32 p.m. 0.2 4/14 H 11:21 a.m. 0.3 L 5:18 a.m. 0.2 H --L 6:00 p.m. 0.1 4/15 H 12:39 a.m. 0.3 L 4:39 a.m. 0.2 H 11:02 a.m. 0.4 L 7:07 p.m. 0.1 4/16 H 11:05 a.m. 0.5 L --H --L 8:10 p.m. 0.0 4/17 H 11:25 a.m. 0.6 L --H --L 9:16 p.m. 0.0 4/18 H 11:58 a.m. 0.7 L --H --L 10:31 p.m. -0.1 4/19 H --L --H 12:42 p.m. 0.7 L 11:52 p.m. -0.1 4/20 H --L --H 1:35 p.m. 0.8 L --4/21 H --L 1:13 a.m. -0.1 H 2:36 p.m. 0.8 L --Port St. Joe (Eastern Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/25 H --L 2:47 a.m. -0.4 H 5:01 p.m. 1.6 L --3/26 H --L 3:48 a.m. -0.4 H 6:24 p.m. 1.4 L --3/27 H --L 4:38 a.m. -0.3 H 7:44 p.m. 1.4 L --3/28 H --L 5:17 a.m. -0.2 H 8:59 p.m. 1.2 L --3/29 H --L 5:42 a.m. 0.0 H 10:15 p.m. 1.1 L --3/30 H 12:10 p.m. 0.6 L 5:46 a.m. 0.3 H 11:40 p.m. 0.9 L 3:51 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 11:19 a.m. 0.8 L 5:19 a.m. 0.6 H --L 5:43 p.m. 0.3 4/1 H 1:43 a.m. 0.7 L 3:53 a.m. 0.6 H 11:12 a.m. 1.0 L 7:05 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 11:25 a.m. 1.2 L --H --L 8:15 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H 11:49 a.m. 1.3 L --H --L 9:23 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H --L --H 12:20 p.m. 1.4 L 10:33 p.m. -0.1 4/5 H --L --H 12:58 p.m. 1.4 L 11:46 p.m. -0.1 4/6 H --L --H 1:42 p.m. 1.4 L --4/7 H --L 12:57 a.m. -0.1 H 2:35 p.m. 1.3 L --4/8 H --L 1:57 a.m. -0.1 H 3:37 p.m. 1.3 L --4/9 H --L 2:45 a.m. -0.1 H 4:47 p.m. 1.3 L --4/10 H --L 3:22 a.m. 0.0 H 6:03 p.m. 1.2 L --4/11 H --L 3:50 a.m. 0.0 H 7:21 p.m. 1.1 L --4/12 H --L 4:08 a.m. 0.2 H 8:43 p.m. 1.0 L --4/13 H 11:41 a.m. 0.7 L 4:15 a.m. 0.3 H 10:13 p.m. 0.9 L 3:21 p.m. 0.6 4/14 H 10:48 a.m. 0.8 L 4:07 a.m. 0.6 H --L 4:49 p.m. 0.4 4/15 H 12:06 a.m. 0.8 L 3:28 a.m. 0.7 H 10:29 a.m. 1.0 L 5:56 p.m. 0.2 4/16 H 10:32 a.m. 1.2 L --H --L 6:59 p.m. 0.0 4/17 H 10:52 a.m. 1.4 L --H --L 8:05 p.m. -0.1 4/18 H 11:25 a.m. 1.6 L --H --L 9:20 p.m. -0.2 4/19 H --L --H 12:09 p.m. 1.7 L 10:41 p.m. -0.3 4/20 H --L --H 1:02 p.m. 1.8 L --4/21 H --L 12:02 a.m. -0.3 H 2:03 p.m. 1.8 L --should view the banquet as a moment to come together and rejoice in the blessing that God loves all. He said the community, homeless or not, should all gather to cel-ebrate the moment.Depending on the weather, about 150 people „ volunteers and participants „ typically show up to the event, Mabry said. The banquet is open to the public, and the mission welcomes the community.We strive to bring compassion and love to everything we do for our neighbors in need. Its always heartwarming to see the community come along side of us to help do just that,Ž she said.Just as the mission gives back to the commu-nity, they are looking for volunteers to do just that at the banquet. Mabry said volunteers are needed to serve meals, greet attendees and clean up.Volunteers will be responsible for spreading love and compassion to those who walk through our doors who need a hot meal and to see the community cares,Ž she said.To volunteer, just show up between 1 and 6 p.m., or call the mission at 850-769-0783 for more details. BANQUETFrom Page D1 Zoey is a healthy, 5-pound spayed female Papillon/Chihuahua mix. She is about 14 months old and does great with other dogs. She loves company and may do best in a home with continuous people or dog companionship. If you can be a loving com-panion to sweet Zoey, please complete the adoption application on theluckypuppy.org, email tmmattson@aol.com, or text/call 850-814-6500.LUCKY PUPPY OF THE WEEK: 'ZOEY'Zoey is available from Lucky Puppy Rescue. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Rosco is loaded with personality and loves to play fetch. He enjoys the company of other pets and has been friendly around families with children. He has done well with using his doggy door and is quickly pick-ing up basic commands and tricks. Rosco is up to date with all his vaccina-tions, microchipped and neutered. His adoption cost is $25. Meet Rosco at Bay County Animal Services, 6401 Bay Line Drive, Panama City or call 850-767-3333.BAY COUNTY PET OF THE WEEK: 'ROSCO'Rosco is available from Bay County Animal Services. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] To submit items for the Faith Calendar, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with "Faith Calendar" in the subject line. TodayPastor Appreciation: for Pastor Wilhelmina Williams at the Body of Christ Jesus Church, 106 Harbor St., Port St. Joe. Details: 850-229-2646, 850-541-4474 (Evangelist Barrington) or 850-381-1785 (Evangelist Marcel) Hope on the Beach Palm Sunday Service: 8 a.m. on the beach at Ed Walline Park at the intersection of County 393 and 30A (for inclement weather service will be held at Shunk Gulley restaurant on the second ” oor, elevators are located on the east side of the building); 10:15 a.m. at the U.S. 98 location upstairs at 3834 U.S. 98 W. (Elevator located on east side of building.) Details, 850-267-0322 or admin@hopeonthebeach. org Serving with Spirit: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Details: 850-769-7481 or www. unityofpanamacity.org 'Big Mo' Ostrander in Concert/Homecoming Celebration: 10:30 a.m. at Bayou George Assembly of God Church, 5715 U.S. 231, Panama City. Details, 850-785-3961 Annual Easter Egg Hunt: 3:30-5 p.m. at St. Andrew United Methodist Church, 2001 W. 11th St., Panama City; open to all ages with the hunts separated by age and over 1,500 eggs hidden on the property. Hunt followed by fundraising dinner hosted by the Men's Club. Details, 850-785-1564 Praise & Potluck Service: 11 a.m. at Thompson Temple First Born Church, 222 Ave. E, Port St. Joe with Pastor M. Davis followed by potluck dinner Details, 850-229-6997WednesdayIgnite Children and Youth Pre-Easter Party: 5:30 p.m. at Parker United Methodist Church. Details, Facebook. com/ParkerPastor or mypumc.orgThursday Hope on the Beach Maundy Thursday Service: 6:30 p.m. at U.S. 98 location upstairs at 3834 U.S. 98 W. Details: 850267-0322 or admin@ hopeonthebeach.org Holy (Maundy) Thursday Passover Communion service: 7 p.m. at Parker United Methodist Church. Details, Facebook.com/ ParkerPastor or mypumc. org Panama City Passion Play: 7 p.m. at Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; 15th annual production presented by St. Andrew Baptist Church. Requested admission is one canned good to bene“ t the Center of Hope. Details, panamacitypassionplay.comFridayGod's Friday: noon luncheon followed by 12:30 p.m. service at Parker United Methodist Church. Details, Facebook.com/ ParkerPastor or mypumc. org Hope of the Beach Good Friday Service: 4:30 p.m. at the Ed Walline Beach location, corner of County 393 and 30A. In inclement weather this worship service will be held at the main campus, 3834 U.S. 98 on the second ” oor. Everyone is welcome to attend as we commemorate the cruci“ xion and the death of Jesus Christ. Come and check out this new service from a blanket, beach chair or the boardwalk. Details: 850267-0322 or admin@ hopeonthebeach.org Panama City Passion Play: 7 p.m. at Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; 15th annual production presented by St. Andrew Baptist Church. Requested admission is one canned good to bene“ t the Center of Hope. Details, panamacitypassionplay.comSaturdayPanama City Passion Play:2 p.m. at Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City with sign-language for hearing impaired; 15th annual production presented by St. Andrew Baptist Church. Requested admission is one canned good to bene“ t the Center of Hope. Details, panamacitypassionplay.com Passover Seder: 6 p.m. at Temple Bnai Israel, 1910 Frankford Ave., Panama City, conducted by Temple Bnai Israels Rabbi Alana Wasserman and will be hosted by the Temple Sisterhood. The highlight of Passover is the Seder, a family-oriented tradition and ritual-packed feast. The focal points of the Seder are: The recitation of the Haggadah, a liturgy that describes in detail the story of the Exodus from Egypt, eating matzo, eating bitter herbs „ to commemorate the bitter slavery endured by the Israelites, drinking four cups of wine „ a royal drink to celebrate newfound freedom. Event is open to the community. Ticket prices: Members $35, adults $10/children, nonmembers $45 adults/$15 children. Details, www. bnaiisraelpc.org; or Mike Starkman, president, 850-522-8685 or president. templebnaiisrael@knology.net.FAITH CALENDAR

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 D3 LA TIMES CROSSWORD ANSWERS PANAMA CITY „ I have two Fringe treesŽ (Chionanthus virginicus) in my yard along Airport Road. This small decidu-ous tree is also called Old Mans Beard. It occurs naturally in wet soils and grows only to about 30 feet. The flowers appear at this time of year as large, airy, pendant clus-ters. This is an excellent tree for home gardens or yards.Another popular local tree is dogwood, which offers several varieties you might want to add to your landscaping:€ Chinese dogwood (Cornus kousa chinensis) is a very popular dogwood that has large white bracts followed in fall by hanging red fruit. Autumn leaves have red scarlet tint. Plant in full sun. Height is 20 feetand width is 15 feet.€ Stellar pink dogwood (Cornus x Rutgan P.P. #7207) has shell-pink flowers in early spring followed by a show of autumn foliage. Height and width is 25 feet.€ Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) grows to a height of 40 feetwith spreading limbs from short trunks. The flow-ers are small and yellow in a dense central cluster.Sometimes, to get a dogwood specimen, our local nurseries may have to order you one. I know Springfield Nurs-ery does that for special orders, and other nurs-eries might also.I want to mention, at this time, one of my favorite groundcovers called Cotoneaster.Ž The cranberry variety grows 3 feettall and 6 feetwide and has large beautiful red berries during the winter. Eich-holz Cotoneaster (C. dammeri Eichholz) is a low growing, widespreading groundcover featuring white flowers followed by showy carmine-red fruit in fall. It grows 10 to 12 feet high and 8 to 10 feet wide. Streibs Findling cotoneaster (C. dammeri) is a flat growing groundcover with tiny blue-green leaves. It can be used on banks, berms and to cascade over walls.We also have many vines, evergreen and deciduous, that you may see in our nurseries at this time. Select the right vine for your situ-ation; provide a sturdy support; train, prune and tie; andfertilize regularly to never let pests get a running start. Howard C. Gray is a horticulturalist and former agent with the University of Florida Extension Office.BOTANISTS CORNERFringe tree ourishes in local yards, gardens Howard GrayA fringe tree is in bloom. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Submit your agencys needs to pcnhnews@ pcnh.com with You Can HelpŽ in the subject line. Military Welcome CenterThe Military Welcome Center inside the North-west Florida Beaches International Airport is looking for volunteers to meet and greet service members arriving at and traveling through the air-port. Volunteers provide a welcoming smile and act as hosts offering military visitors a comfortable place to relax and refresh. To find out more, call vol-unteer coordinator Carol Hertz at 850-265-1270. Panama City Rescue MissionThe Panama City Rescue Mission, a faith-based nonprofit organization, has successfully transformed hundreds of lives and restored as many families over the last 45 years. To continue helping count-less homeless and hurting people in our community, the Panama City Rescue Mission depends on donations from neighbors. The Panama City Rescue Mission is located at 609 Allen Ave., Panama City. All dona-tions are tax-deductible. For more information, call 850-769-0783.Needs include: general office supplies (both cam-puses); pens; envelopes; pocket folders; label makers; tape for label maker; spiral notebooks; Bibles with footnotes; large print study Bibles (New King James Version); rain ponchos; A Strongs Concordance of the Bible; black pants (for work); AA books; hygiene items; towels and wash clothes; cleaning supplies; small table fans; large trash bags; bottled water; umbrellas; canned goods (vegetables); herbs/spices; napkins; and white button-down shirts (for work).Backpacks: While Bethel Village undergoes renovations, the womens shelter is temporarily closed.Back-packs are being made for the homeless women who would normally stay at the shelter. Needs for the backpacksinclude canned food/meats; can openers; baby wipes (to wipe off with); small blankets (for backpacks); small umbrellas; Bay Town Trolley Passes; water; sunscreen; small Bibles.Bethel Village (womens and childrens campus): Zyrtec/Claritin; Ibupro-fen; Midol; magnesium; B12; tampons; Band-Aids; paper towels; toilet paper; journals; stamps; printer paper; paper plates and plastic cups; napkins; all-purpose cleaner; dish sponges; plastic gloves for sanitation; dish soap; mouth wash without alcohol; laundry soapRestoration House (mens campus): mens jeans (all sizes); mens underwear (M-2XL); and mens socks.YOU CAN HELP

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** D4 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldCommunity Connections publishes regular meetings of clubs, groups and organizations with particular interests. Submit information to pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Community ConnectionsŽ in the subject line. Announcements are published as space allows. ALUMNI Bay High Class of 1951: 11 a.m. second Mondays at Golden Corral on 23rd Street. Details: 850-763-1031 Bay High Class of 1954: 11:30 a.m. “ rst Mondays at Rodeos. Details: Georgia, 850-722-4287 Bay High Class of 1955: 11 a.m. “ rst Mondays at O'Charley's on 23rd Street in Panama City. Details: 850-271-8711 or 850-763-4278 Bay High Class of 1957: 11:30 a.m. “ rst Mondays at PoFolks on 15th Street. Details: Laura Jenkins, 850-271-4271 Panhandle Gator Club, af“ liate of the University of Florida Alumni Association: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays at Sonnys BBQ on State 77. Details: Mike Varner at mvarnerg8r@ gmail.com or 850-527-7184 BRIDGE/CARDS/GAMES ACBL Bridge Games: noon Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays; 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at St Andrew's Episcopal Church, 1608 Baker Court, Panama City. For details, Armand, 850-276-9479 ACBL Bridge Lessons: 2 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at St Andrew's Episcopal Church, 1608 Baker Court, Panama City. Details: Armand Grassi, 850-276-9479 Card Party: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. fourth Mondays at St. Andrews Episcopal Church parish hall, 1607 Baker Court, Panama City. Join the Gulf Coast Womans Club for bridge, Mexican dominoes, shanghai, hand and foot, and other games. Lunch is served at 11:30 for $15. Details: Teri Floore, 850-763-2439 or tl” oore@ knology.net Lynn Haven Contract Bridge Club: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Lynn Haven Community Center. Details: Carrie, 850-871-5719 CIVIC/SERVICE CLUBS American Legion Auxiliary Unit 392: 6:30 p.m. second Tuesdays at 535 Oak Ave., Panama City. Womens veterans support organization serving the community and veterans. Details: 850-215-4535 American Legion Post 392: 6:30 p.m. “ rst Wednesdays at 535 Oak Ave., Panama City. Veterans organization serving the community and veterans. Details: 850-215-4535 American Legion Post 402: 6 p.m. “ rst Mondays at Emerald Coast VFW Post 10555, 17680 Ashley Ave., Panama City Beach. Eligible veterans welcome. Details: 850-249-3025 American Legion Riders Chapter 392: 7 p.m. third Tuesdays at 535 Oak Ave., Panama City. Riding association supporting veterans and the community. Details: 850-215-4535 Bay County Democratic Women's Club: Meets monthly at 135 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details: 850-532-4289 Bay County Republican Executive Committee: 6 p.m. fourth Mondays in the Board Room of Bay District Schools on Balboa Avenue. Details: 850-481-3631 Bay County Veterans Council: 1 p.m. second Thursdays in American Legion Post 356. Guest speakers scheduled at most meetings. Details: J.K. Lacey, 850-265-1863 Civil Air Patrol Tyndall … Panama Composite Squadron: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays at Forest Park Methodist Church. Details: gocivilairpatrol.com Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 17: 7 p.m. second Mondays in the American Legion building at 2230 15th St., Panama City. Details: Commander A.J. Bacon, 850-832-1783 Kiwanis Club of Panama City (Downtown): Noon Wednesdays at St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club, 218 Bunkers Cove Road, Panama City. Details: Keith Forehand, dkforehand@ gmail.com, 850-832-1048 or PanamaCityKiwanis.org Libertarian Party of Bay County: 5:30 p.m. fourth Mondays at Applebee's, 678 W. 23rd St., Panama City. Dinner at 5:30 p.m., meeting at 6:30. The public is invited. Details: Libertarian Party of Bay County on Facebook for details or email anna.jamesautocenter@knology.net Lynn Haven Rotary: 7 a.m. Wednesdays at Panama Country Club in Lynn Haven. Details: James Morris, 850-814-1874 Navy Leagues of Panama City and Bay County: 7:30 a.m. at the Egg and I, 1114 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. RSVP and Details: Rick Weston, 443-625-4190 Panama City … Bay County Council, Navy League: 7:30 a.m. fourth Thursdays at The Egg and I, 1114 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Breakfast, social and speaker program. Non-members welcome. Details: 850-640-1432 or email RickWeston@comcast.net or Region63@juno.com Panama City Lions Club: Noon Thursdays at St. Andrew Bay Yacht Club on Bunkers Cove Road. Details: Jerry Jimmerson, 850-624-3454 Pilot Club: 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at Po Folks. Details: Sue Krauss, 850-233-6247 Republican Roundtable: 5:30-8 p.m. second Tuesdays at Bone“ sh Grill, 641 W. 23rd St., Panama City. General meeting. Everyone is welcome. Rotary Club of the Emerald Coast: 5:30 p.m. Mondays at Triple J Steak and Seafood, 2218 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Details: 850-866-2485 Sons of the American Legion Squadron 392: 9 a.m. “ rst Saturdays at 535 Oak Ave., Panama City. Mens veterans support organization serving the community and veterans. Details: 850-215-4535 St. Andrews Lodge #212 F&AM: Meetings “ rst and third Thursdays at 1104 Bayview Ave., on Panama City's St. Andrews Marina. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. Details: Fred Werner, 850-625-8988 Unity Women's Group: Bring a bag lunch and join plans for fun and service to the community. Noon third Saturdays at the Unity Spiritual Center fellowship hall, 1764 Lisenby Ave. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity.org U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary: 6 p.m. third Wednesdays. Details: Bob Wells, 850814-5807, or Bob Shorter, 850-819-6319 U.S. Submarine Veterans: 2 p.m. third Saturdays in odd-numbered months at the American Legion Post 392, 535 Oak Ave., Panama City. Family luncheons at noon on third Saturday of even numbered months. U.S. submariners, those who served in support of submarine forces or immediate family members of submariners welcome. Details: John Schmitz, 256-508-8250 Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10555: 6 p.m. third Tuesdays at Emerald Coast VFW Post, 17680 Ashley Ave., Panama City Beach. Eligible combat veterans welcome. Details: 850-7037636 or 850-249-3025 VFW Auxiliary to Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10555: 6 p.m. third Tuesdays at Emerald Coast VFW Post 10555, 17680 Ashley Ave., Panama City Beach. Eligible veterans family members welcome. Details: 850-249-3025 Women of Unity: noon third Saturdays at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, facilitated by Melissa Aarrant. Bring a bag lunch and join us as we plan for fun and service to the community. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity. org DANCE, MUSIC Bay Wind Community Band: 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Jinks Middle School. Details: Quinn Jungemann, 850-265-0619 Dancing Divas of the Red Hat Tribe: 6-8 p.m. Mondays at Oakland Terrace Recreation Center; belly dancing for women ages 45 and up. Details: Rita Miller, 850-265-4609, or Gloria Taft, 850-896-1197 Blues and Lindy in the Panhandle: 7:30 p.m. Fridays at the Panama City Art Co-Op, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. No experience or partner needed. No outside shoes allowed on dance ” oor. Bring dance shoes or socks. Gulftones Mens Barbershop Harmony Chorus: 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. Messiah Lutheran Church, on W. State 390. Men of all ages welcome. Details: Bill Schwarz, 850-722-1912 or www.gulftoneschorus.com Harmony Shores Chorus: 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at First United Methodist Church, 903 E. Fourth St., Panama City. Details: 850-628-5784 or harmonyshores.com Panama City Pipes & Drums: 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays in clubhouse behind Panama City Police Department, 1209 E. 15th St. Details: www.pc-pipes.com or Terry, 850-871-0473 Square and Round Dancing: 7-9 p.m. Thursdays at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road. $6 per person. Details: 850-8712955 or 850-265-9488 Student Chamber Orchestra: 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Fine Arts at the Beach, 17226 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Free for all music students. Call ahead for a spot. Details: 850-249-7111 or FineArtsAtTheBeach. com FITNESS/HEALTH Kids Yoga: 9:30-10:30 a.m. Saturdays at at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, facilitated by Nikki Chan. Mom and dad are invited too. $5 per child, $10 per family. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity. org Mental Health America of Bay County: 11:30 a.m. fourth Tuesdays at Life Management Center's Childrens Services Building room 205, 525 E. 15th St., Panama City. Details: 850-769-5441 or mhabay@ knology.net Mindful Meditation: 11 a.m. Wednesdays at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, facilitated by Darcey Blakely. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity. org Panama City Yoga Meetup: First Saturdays with location and teacher changing each month. Details: www.meetup.com/ pcyoga/calendar Shanti Yoga: 5 p.m. Thursdays and Mondays at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, facilitated by Nikki Chan. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity.org Stroller Fitness: 9-10 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Details: Cassidy Carrow at 850-819-2842 or cassidy.carow@babybootcamp.com The Panama City Society of the Sword: 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at Holy Nativity Episcopal School. Details: Robert, 850-678-9190 or northbayfencing.weebly.com Take Off Pounds Sensibly 217: Every Monday at the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Beck Avenue and W. 14th Street. Weighins begin at 9 a.m., and the meeting starts at 10 a.m. Details: 850-769-8617. Tong Ren: 12:30 a.m. Thursdays at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, facilitated by Susan Zecchini. Details: 850-769-7481 or www.unityofpanamacity.org TOPS 709: Take off Pounds Sensibly meets 6-7 p.m. Thursdays at the Callaway Community Center, Beulah Avenue. For exact building, call 850-769-4103 or 850-769-4024. TOPS FL 563: Weigh-ins at 5 p.m., meetings at 6 p.m. Wednesdays in room 1 at Panama City Beach Senior Center. Details: 850-235-3398 Transcendental Meditation Group: 5:30 p.m. Sundays at Unity Spiritual Center 1764 Lisenby Avenue Panama City; must be a certi“ ed TM meditator to attend. Details: 850-7697481 or info.unitypcgl@ gmail.com Weekend Warriors: 8:30 a.m. Saturdays at Panama City Health Club, 1598 Balboa Ave., Panama City. A free boot camplike outdoor community workout. Bring a friend, water bottle and towel to burn some calories, make new friends and motivate each other. Every last Saturday, the group meets to run/walk the Hathaway Bridge. Must be 18 years or older. Details: PanamaCityHealthClub.com or call 850-914-2348 Zumba Fitness: 6:30 p.m. Fridays at the Lynn Haven Community Center. Details: 850-303-8342 GARDEN Gulf Beach Garden Club: 1 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays September through May at 17012 Hernando Ave., Panama City Beach. The club sponsors projects and educational programs yearround. Everyone welcome. Details: PCBGardenClub. org or 850-249-8560 Panama City Garden Club: noon third Tuesdays at 810 Garden Club Drive, Panama City. Coffee and general meeting. Details: 850-763-9563 Seagrove Garden Club: 10 a.m. second Wednesdays through May. Details: Shari Roberts, membership chairwoman, 850-267-9586 St. Andrews Community Garden: Enchanted Garden Tours at 7:45 p.m. Thursdays and Saturdays at the garden site on Beck Avenue in Historic St. Andrews. Details: Ronnie Barnes, 850-763-7359 Sweet Bay Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society: 5:30 p.m. “ rst Thursdays. Details: sweetbay.fnpschapters. org for meeting sites, or 850-234-6453 SENIORS AARP Chapter 1315: noon second Tuesdays at Oakland Terrace Park Clubhouse, 1900 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 850-265-9176 Bay County Council on Aging: Activities for seniors are 9:45-11 a.m. Monday through Friday at 1116 Frankford Ave., Panama City. Lunch served 11 a.m. to noon. Panama City Beach Senior Center: Open Monday through Friday with activities and presentations throughout the month at 423 Lyndell Lane. Details: http://pcbsc.com or 850-233-5065 SPECIAL INTEREST ACLU Greater Bay Area Chapter: 6:30 p.m. second Mondays at Sonnys BBQ, 2240 State 77, Lynn Haven, in the back meeting room. For details, 850-763-8145 A.D. Harris Improvement Society Inc.: Board meeting 5:30-6:30 p.m. third Thursdays in A. D. Harris Learning Village Cafetorium, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. Axis Writing Lab: 3-5 p.m. Mondays with appointment made. For details, 850-215-4812 Bay County Audubon Society: 7 p.m. second Mondays, September through May, at the Science and Discovery Center, 308 Airport Road, Panama City. The public is invited. A program and refreshments are provided. The society also hosts Saturday “ eld trips. For details, 850-871-1736 or BayCountyAudubon.org Bay County Chapter Military Of“ cers Association: 11 a.m. “ rst Fridays at Holiday Inn Select, 2001 State 77, Panama City. Lunch and speaker program. Non-members welcome. For details, 850-233-7697, 850-763-7600, or email John.Law@knology.net or matt4626@comcast.netBAY COUNTY COMMUNITY CONNECTIONSMaggie and Michael McKinney, aka Lucky Mud, entertain during the Lynn Haven Rotarys Derby Day in May 2017. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 D5 READER FEEDBACK TODAY IN HISTORY HAPPY BIRTHDAY YOUNG ARTIST CATCH OF THE DAYClay Hewett, of Santa Rosa Beach, shared this photo with the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, Got out yesterday with Scales & Tails Kayak Charter. Cant say enough good things about the trip. Highly recommend.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Today1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and g rowers. Details: WaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-68682  DEATH AND TAXESŽ: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 850-265-3226 or ktonline.org Monday3 ADVENTURES IN ALYS: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free; suitable for all ages. One-of-a-kind storytelling experience with audience participation. Details: LoveTheRep.com4  IDENTITYŽ „ OPENING RECEPTION: 5-7 p.m. at the Amelia Center Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Ceramic sculpture and wares exploring de“ nition, construction and allocation of identity. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts5 PANAMA CITY BOP & SHAG : 6:30-9 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City, with dinner, dance and fun (East/West Coast swing, Latin, ballroom). Admission $3.6 THE OLD DUTCH INN REVISITED: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Bay County Historical Society hosts Bobby Bolton and Robert Register offer a presentation on the history of the Old Dutch Inn and the in” uences it had on Panama City Beach, Bay County and the nation. Free; open to the public.GO AND DOWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. Ray Senechal, of Panama City Beach (Treasure Island Condos), sent us this photo and said, This photo I took from the 18th ” oor of Treasure Island last month. I just happened to see some activity way out and was very lucky to capture this picture. I used a Cannon 7D Mark II camera with a Cannon 400mm Zoom Lens and was shooting at 10 frames per second to capture the action. I have this picture on my cell phone as the background picture and so many people have asked me for a copy I decided to share with the general public.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CELEBRATE COMMUNITYKimber Grade 1 Tyndall Elementary School Movie reviewer Gene Shalit is 92. Former astronaut James Lovell is 90. Feminist activist and author Gloria Steinem is 84. Singer Anita Bryant is 78. Singer Aretha Franklin is 76. Actor Paul Michael Glaser is 75. Singer Sir Elton John is 71. To submit birthdays, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with birthdayŽ in the subject line, or drop off a current photo and “ ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. The deadline is noon three business days prior to the birthday. Birthday announcements must include the persons “ rst and last name, city and age. The photo is a mug shot and must be a clear photo. DEAR ABBY: Im hoping you can give me some guidance, as I am a huge fan and read your column regularly. I am a 32-year-old woman whose mother and grandmother told me about our proud Native American heritage all my life. Several years ago, I got a large tattoo in our tribes language as a way to honor my family. Recently, Mom did a DNA test and discovered that we are not, in fact, of Native American descent. We feel devastated and betrayed by our parents and grandparents for lying to us for generations. I havent shared this news with my husband, extended family and friends because I feel so ashamed and humiliated. I told Mom that I would like to have my tattoo covered up or removed. It upset her and made her feel incredibly guilty. Abby, your thoughts on how best to handle this situation? „ TATTED AND CONFUSEDDEAR T and C: Considering the circumstances, I see no reason for continuing to wear a tattoo that would be a constant reminder you were lied to. If your mother deliberately misled you, she has good reason to feel guilty. If she, too, was misled, then shes as much a victim as you are. DEAR ABBY: For 18 years I was in a loveless marriage. My ex-wife and I have been divorced for a year now and Im feeling emotionally available. I have met „ or shall I say re-met „ a woman I have known since second grade. Now, so many years later, we have connected. We see each other every few weeks and text each other. This has been going on for almost a year. My crush has come back, but it is different this time. I feel like Im falling in love with her. How do I take a 45-plus-year friendship out of the friendship zone? Should I tell her how I feel or not? I have tried, but the words just wouldnt come out of my mouth. „ LOST IN FRIENDSHIPDEAR LOST IN FRIENDSHIP: The words you are looking for are, I think Im falling in love with you, and I need to know if you feel the same way.Ž Say that, and the worst that can happen is your friendship of 45-plus years will remain a kindred spiritŽ friendship. The best that can happen will be you will hit the jackpot. Speak up! Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.DEAR ABBYWoman proud of her heritage is rocked by results of DNA test Jeanne PhillipsA highly trained alligator handler, according to ZooWorld Director Kayte Hogan, Jess Kiefer took the man „ later identified as 19-year-old Jonah Abraham „ down to the ground and put him in an alligator hold,Ž putting all her weight on his neck and back to keep his head down and squeezing him with her legs to keep him from squirming away. Ryan Powell: "This is awesome. Way to go Jess!" Last year, Doorways counted 336 people, which is likely a low estimate of the local population. The requirements to be counted are strict „ people must self-report, and be living on the streets, out of a car, in an emergency shelter or outside on the night being counted. Virginia Stokes: "Why is there so much hatred for the homeless. GOD gave his only begotten son to save us from hell .and he was homeless too. Why do people think that they are going to heaven when they have so much hate in there hearts for the homeless. Never know when you could lose everything you have. Then you will be homeless too. Judge Lest ye be judged.. We all stand before GOD one day." In a letter to the editor, Ronald V. Wolff said, "Mr. Haq would also have us believe that Republicans are morally and religiously bankrupt and Democrats are saints in American society. I suppose he missed all the news regarding the shenanigans taking place in the DNC to malign Trump. Neither party can claim moral superiority over the other." Richard Weber: "Heres a response to yours. Trump did not bring jobs back, not even the ones he has in China! Supporting the serial adulterer and porn star sexual dabbler, Trump p roves the fact that Republicans are morally corrupt! No matter how you try to justify Trumps actions, its all lies. You sir are attempting to do just what Cambridge Analitica, the Russians, and Faux News has been doing... misleading the weak of mind into believing their BS!" Today is Palm Sunday, March 25 the 84th day of 2018. There are 281 days left in the year. Highlight in History: On March 25, 1965 the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led 25,000 people to the Alabama state capitol in Montgomery after a “ ve-day march from Selma to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. Later that day, civil rights activist Viola Liuzzo, a white Detroit homemaker, was shot and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen. On this date: In 1634 English colonists sent by Lord Baltimore arrived in present-day Maryland. In 1776 Gen. George Washington, commander of the Continental Army, was awarded the “ rst Congressional Gold Medal by the Continental Congress. In 1865 during the Civil War, Confederate forces attacked Fort Stedman in Virginia but were forced to withdraw because of counterattacking Union troops. In 1911 146 people, mostly young female immigrants, were killed when “ re broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. in New York. In 1918 French composer Claude Debussy died in Paris at age 55. In 1924 the Second Hellenic Republic was proclaimed in Greece. In 1931 in the so-called Scottsboro BoysŽ case, nine young black men were taken off a train in Alabama, accused of raping two white women; after years of convictions, death sentences and imprisonment, the nine eventually were vindicated. In 1975 King Faisal of Saudi Arabia was shot to death by a nephew with a history of mental illness. (The nephew was beheaded in June 1975.) In 1988 in New York Citys so-called Preppie KillerŽ case, Robert Chambers Jr. pleaded guilty to “ rst-degree manslaughter in the death of 18-year-old Jennifer Levin. (Chambers received 5 to 15 years in prison; he was released in 2003 after serving the full sentence.) In 1990 87 people, most of them Honduran and Dominican immigrants, were killed when “ re raced through an illegal social club in New York City. In 2017 a man sitting at the back of a public bus on the Las Vegas Strip opened “ re for what authorities called no apparent reasonŽ as passengers got off at a stop in the heart of the tourism corridor; one man was killed. (A judge later declared the suspect un“ t to face trial.)

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** Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Is the book of 2 Samuel in the Old or New Testament or neither? Old, New, Neither 2. In Luke 22, what Mount ofŽ did Jesus go to of which His disciples also followed? Carmel, Zion, Olives, Pisgah 3. What future Israelite leader as a baby was described as exceedingly fairŽ? Solomon, David, Herod, Moses 4. From Judges 16, how many times did Delilah say Samson mocked her? 1, 3, 5, 7 5. According to Ecclesiastes 6, what already has been named? Everything, Stars, Fishes, Great Sea 6. The name Lucifer means what kind of bearerŽ in Latin? Gift, False, Light, Demonic ANSWERS: 1. Old, 2. Olives, 3. Moses, 4. 3, 5. Everything, 6. LightBy C.C. BurnikelAcross 1 Did a triathlon leg 6 Pepper spray alternative 10 At full speed 15 Slightly 19 Taste enhanced by shrimp paste 20 Otherworldly glow 21 Multi-colored spring bloomer 22 Bugs or Porky 23 Pet Airways security device? 25 Narrative from novelist Levin? 27 MIT, for one 28 Govt. investment 29 Grand Mosque locale 30 Luxury hotel chain 31 Essence 33 Pyrex sister brand 35 It precedes Flames home games 37 The Yankees during the Babe Ruth era? 40 True 43 Chicago Blackhawks broadcaster 44 Give 45 Wine glass-making component? 50 Your point being?Ž 51 Betel nut tree 53 Church reading 54 Memorable Louis 55 A/C measures 57 Agenda 59 Dress policy at some fancy restaurants 62 Enzyme ending 64 Shot at a bar 65 Big name in anti-itch cream 66 Slow-cooked dishes 69 Alley designation? 72 The Hig hwa ymanŽ poet 73 Dont sweat itŽ 75 Of course!Ž 76 __ Paese cheese 77 Like some celestial paths 78 Isnt being used 81 Dust jacket ID 85 City bus path: Abbr. 86 Expose 88 Where __ 89 Green Day drummer __ Cool 90 Seminar on Hughes poetry? 94 Amen to that!Ž 97 Inseparable 98 Utterly lost 99 Hockey contract negotiator? 100 Solo performance 103 Actor Cumming 105 Lat. and Ukr., formerly 106 SpaceX CEO Musk 107 Put a damper on 110 Memorize things, maybe 112 Part of U.S. 115 Association of gamblers? 117 Injury treatment for a top pitcher? 119 Not worth __ 120 Resort rental 121 Apple Watch assistant 122 Exposed 123 Body imperfection 124 Dover souls 125 Warmhearted 126 Plot spoilers? Down 1 Tampa NFLers 2 Apple since 1998 3 Nepal Airlines headquarters 4 First-responder letters 5 Call the shots 6 Hand, to Jorge 7 Uncle Henrys wife 8 Wading spot 9 Corn holder 10 Cap-__: from head to toe 11 Jacobs of fashion 12 Jungle crusher 13 Genesis father of twins 14 1785-90 U.S. capital 15 Ferocious Flea foe 16 Like hardcovers 17 Ancient neighbor of Lydia 18 Big bang producer 24 Come before 26 Dance in a line 29 Beauty mark 32 And so on: Abbr. 34 Language of Andorra 36 Itll be fun!Ž 37 Strikers bane 38 Habit 39 Flying start? 41 Little devils 42 Daring exploit 45 Reject with contempt 46 Forearm-related 47 Slangy rejection 48 Like critters counted at night 49 City in southern France 52 One of the Van Halens 56 2005 horror sequel 58 If __Ž: So be itŽ 60 Hamlet, for one 61 Alfalfa sprouts concern 63 USMC rank 65 West Yorkshires largest city 66 Show contempt 67 Sacher dessert 68 Receded 69 Risotto relative 70 Show with numbers 71 Shiny, in adspeak 74 January birthstone 76 Home to the Congressional Country Club 78 Variety 79 __ of My SoulŽ: Isabel Allende novel 80 Not of the cloth 82 Took a course under duress? 83 __ Mawr College 84 In order 87 Madam SecretaryŽ star 91 Almond Joy ingredient 92 Cat-__-tails 93 Close 95 Hold your horsesŽ 96 Cabinet dept. 99 Apprentice 100 Creator of tasty cups 101 John of rock 102 Ugly marketing battle 104 Computer acronym 108 Home run pace 109 Scrapes (out) 111 eBay competitor 113 Like “ ne cheese 114 Docs orders 115 Unenviable 116 Doing the job, brie” y 117 Dont __ me!Ž 118 DeservingWord for Words D6 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald TRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY Wilson CaseyHOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS WHATS HAPPENING LOS ANGELES TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD PUZZLEEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ It may be overwhelming to think about creating the life you want, but you can make it all seem much more doable by focusing on the more manageable task of eliminating what you don't want from the life you currently have. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ You're so smart and funny that you sometimes have to hold back to make sure you're not taking too much of the social spotlight. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Your life will feel a bit like a game of charades, as you're tasked with the challenge of imagining and embodying what others need to see to understand the point of a larger communication. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Boredom is a kind of stress „ a stress that can be alleviated in a number of ways. Novelty is one way. Challenge is a better way. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ The hardest thing about a conversation is often starting it. Do this and you'll earn the respect and compassion of people who are so worth the effort. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ You behave in a non-prejudiced way toward people from other social groups, not because it's politically correct or because it's what educated people do but because it's personally important to you. This is how peace spreads. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ New circles entice! Having an excuse to be there isn't half as important as having an excuse to leave. The moment when you step back from the action and identify the fundamental issues and questions at hand will be invaluable. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ It's been this way since the cave people had to hear their way through the wild to eat and avoid being eaten: Listening well is among the top skills for getting along in life. And it will be your strength today. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ Underreacting has its place and may be key to your style today. You know on a deeper level that you're bigger than the situation being thrown at you, and you're in total control of your responses. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ When you show up and do the work „ regardless of whatever temptations and distractions are around, regardless of discomfort or drama, regardless of inconvenience or interference from loved ones „ you will be rewarded. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ Though you pride yourself on being a magnetic person whom others are comfortable around, you also know that being social isn't the end goal in and of itself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ Luckily for everyone around you, you're really good at maximizing the positive and defusing the negative. Other talents include keeping the action and conversation productively focused. Today GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 'DEATH AND TAXES': 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-2653226 or kt-online.org Monday AARP TAX-AIDE PROGRAM: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Panama City Beach Library. IRS certi“ ed aides will provide free income tax preparation. Bring your 2017 tax documents, a picture ID, and a Social Security card for each person on the tax return; bring a checkbook to verify the routing and account number for a refund. The 2016 tax return will be helpful also. AARP focuses on low-to-moderate income taxpayers of all ages; you do not have to be an AARP member. No appointments; “ rst-come is “ rst-served. Details, Phil Cunningham at 850-7747953 or pwcinpc@gmail. com ADVENTURES IN ALYS: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. One of a kind storytelling experience with audience participation. Details at LoveTheRep.com STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com 'IDENTITY' OPENING RECEPTION: 5-7 p.m. at the Amelia Center Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Ceramic sculpture and wares exploring de“ nition, construction and allocation of identity. On exhibit through April 13. Details, GulfCoast. edu/arts LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF BAY COUNTY: 5:30 p.m. at Applebee's, 678 W. 23rd St., Panama City Dinner at 5:30 p.m., meeting at 6:30. The public is invited. Details, Libertarian Party of Bay County on Facebook or email anna.jamesautocenter@knology.net 'THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER': 6 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre on Central Square. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. Details at LoveTheRep.com PANAMA CITY BOP & SHAG : 6:30-9 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City with dinner and dancing (East/West Coast Swing, Latin, Ballroom). Admission is $3. THE 'OLD DUTCH INN' REVISITED: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Bay County Historical Society hosts Bobby Bolton and Robert Register will offer a presentation on the history of the Old Dutch Inn and the in” uences it had on Panama City Beach, Bay County and the nation. Free and open to the public. Tuesday AARP TAX-AIDE PROGRAM: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Bay County Fairgrounds. IRS certi“ ed aides will provide free income tax preparation. Bring your 2017 tax documents, a picture ID, and a Social Security card for each person on the tax return; bring a checkbook to verify the routing and account number for a refund. The 2016 tax return will be helpful also. AARP focuses on low-to-moderate income taxpayers of all ages; you do not have to be an AARP member. No appointments; “ rst-come is “ rst-served. Details, Phil Cunningham at 850-7747953 or pwcinpc@gmail. com TAI CHI A BETTER BALANCE: 9 am. at the Lynn Haven Senior Center, Lynn Haven, facilitated by a certi“ ed instructor. For details, call 850-277-2730 FINAL CUT: THE IMPORTANCE OF FILM EDITING: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Filmmaker Teressa Longo will present a slice of perspective and history on the importance of editing picture, sound, and music in the realm of cinematic storytelling. This event is free and open to the public. Details, NWRLS.com CITIZEN SCIENCE TALK: 6 p.m. in the Gibson Lecture Hall, GCSC Campus, Student Union East building (second ” oor above the cafeteria) to discuss the Grasses and Classes program at Deane Bozeman school. Students and volunteers work to raise and then plant salt marsh grasses along the shores of St. Andrew Bay. FREE CONCERT: 6 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, corner of 15th Street and Sherman Avenue (American Legion Building), with Gospel and Old Country music featuring Grand Junction and Cross Cut. Details, 850-596-1271

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 E1 VIEWPOINTS PARENTING By Molly England Special to The Washington PostI was depressed. I can say it now, because Im gratefully not anymore. But I couldnt say it while I suffered through it for 10 months, probably due to shame. Im not alone. In 2016, almost 7 percent of the population experienced at least one major depressive episode. Yet the stigma and discrimination around mental health disorders, including depression, is still strong. According to 2017 findings from Mental Health America, 56 percent of American adults with a mental illness do not receive treatment. Labeling myself as depressed compounded my shame because it meant labeling my children as kids with a depressed mommy.Ž And I wasnt brave enough to admit that yet. So Im writing this, hoping to help other mothers who are stuck and need a hand to pull them out. What may have spun me into a deeper depression: My kids needs came first, which meant my depression came last. Depression crept insidiously into my busy, full life and slowly robbed me of joy. I started retreating from life in the fall of 2016. First, I stopped communicating with friends and family. Then I tried to escape even while at home with my kids by hiding in the closet. Shrouded by the dark stillness of my closet walls, I tried to disappear. My kids would find me. Id quietly shout through tired tears of despair, Mommy just needs some quiet time.Ž But theyd keep firing their demands through the closet door. She stole my apple slice.Ž Wheres the charger?Ž I pooped. Wipe me, Mommy!Ž I even contemplated hiding in the attic because I thought maybe there I could find quiet. My husband works long hours, and so the parental onus often fell heavily on me. Hiding from the outside world and then even hiding within my home wasnt working. I needed help. Feeling trapped in my own home, my fear of admission was imprisoning, too. If I cant care for myself, people will wonder how Im able to care for my three kids,Ž ages 7, 5 and 4, I thought. The potential for judgment and ridicule from my family, community and peers scared me into silence. I questioned my stability and capability as a parent. My dark thoughts cast a shadow on reality, even though things appeared fine on the surface. My children were fed, bathed and functioning well. Their bright spirits continued to shine. But inside, my sense of doom slowly suffocated me. Heres what I think can help others who find themselves in a similar situation. What does depression look like? Depression disrupts how you function in the day-to-day. I gained weight, felt hopelessly lethargic. Formerly a steadfast runner, I no longer even walked my kids to and from school. I couldnt concentrate on any task. Many of these symptoms were, I rationalized, just mom issues.Ž I thought being a busy mom contributed to my poor eating habits. Breaking point One hot summer night, dinnertime loomed, and I didnt know what to feed the kids. We all go through that„ one likes tacos, the other hates them, and the third wont eat anything anyway. And after all, Id been providing breakfast, lunch and dinner all summer long, no big deal. But things were getting to the point where I could barely cope with dishing up another meal. So, I buckled everyone into the car and started driving. But as we backed out of the driveway, I was paralyzed with confusion and felt completely stuck. I didnt know where to take them. Id never felt anything like this before. This simple task of feeding my kids had become unsettling and beyond challenging. I eventually steered us to a fast-food burrito place in a neighboring town. But I knew something was wrong. During my depression when my children cuddled up to me or said, I love you,Ž I remember thinking, How one mother manages her struggle with depressionLiberals manufacture one thing well: pious outrage. To a progressive,Ž any protest, no matter the thoughtlessness of it, is a good protest. The Resist!Ž movement, NFLers kneeling for the national anthem, and now high school kids demanding we get rid of all guns are the latest simplistic, feel-good examples. The self-proclaimed leader-in-exile of the resistanceŽ movement is the demure and enchanting Hillary Clinton. She recently made more angry news in India. Just when you wonder why we elected Donald Trump, Hillary resurfaces and reminds us. The latest was her slip and falls trip to India. She was propped up like a corrupt Middle Eastern regime by Americans. It is unclear who funded the speaking trip „maybe Life Alert. I would not mind us funding trips to faraway countries for our politicians, but the problem is that they always come back. Presumably bankrolled by lots of Clinton Cash talkin money, Hillary trashed the American voters, who she has called deplorablesŽ and irredeemable.Ž It was another bitter tirade on why she did not get elected. She said women voted for Trump because their sexist husbands told them to. SexistŽ is what liberals call opponents when they cant call them racist.Ž Trump touches all the bases and is called both. Winning! Hillary fractured her wrist in another accident while in the bathtub at her 5-star Mumbai luxury hotel. Indian doctors, who are almost all in America now, have told her that because of this wrist injury, she cannot wag her finger at the female American electorate for at least two weeks. And more karma in India (I think it was invented there). We saw on film that Hillary twice slipped and fell down stairs at the ancient ruins of Mandu. Her handlers had to prop her up, Weekend at BerniesŽ-style, after her angry speech. She was taken to the hospital. No word on where alley catMandu Bill Clinton was at the time; he was probably his usual four times zones away. I bet he felt her pain.Ž Maybe I am being callous. At this trying time, our thoughts and prayers should go out to her male handlers, ambulance drivers and paramedics. I hope they are OK. Not reported was that, when fossils were found at the ancient burial ground at Mandu, archaeologists first thought theyd stumbled upon the set of The View.Ž For the record, there was scant coverage about all this in the mainstream media. They were focusing on the tabloid trash accusations of Stormy Daniels against Trump from 12 years ago. It wasnt great timing or optics when Bill Clinton was alone when his wife was injured in India while the media moralized about adultery and Trump. Sadly, they never see their own hypocrisy. And of course the media covered Hillarys trip to India differently. Fox News called it another setbackŽ for Clinton, while CNN and Hillary slips after trashing American votersMy golden years are shaping up to be way better than I expected. CNBC reports the U.S. Census Bureau projects that in 2035, adults over age 65 will outnumber children under age 18 for the first time in U.S. history. I will be 72 in 2035„ if taxes dont kill me before then„ and it will be the most glorious time of my life. It will be glorious, partly, because surveys show Americans are happiest in their old age. It will be glorious, partly, because Ill be debt-free. All my risks, sacrifices and investments over the years (rental properties, etc.) will finally pay me back. But being 72 will be glorious mostly because Ill be part of a massive geezer voting bloc that will force younger generations to fund my government largesse. The irony of this demographic shift is delicious. Take millennials, ages 20 to 35. The Census Bureau expects them to become Americas largest generation in 2019. In 2016, reports The Washington Post, more millennials voted for progressiveŽ Bernie Sanders than for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton combined. According to a 2017 YouGov study commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, 44 percent of millennials would prefer to live in a socialist country„ 7 percent would prefer communism. Only 42 percent favor capitalism, the system that produced the incredible wealth that millions of Americans take for granted today. To be sure, the views each of us holds are influenced by our generation, and younger generations see things differently than I do. As a tail-end baby boomer„ baby boomers range in age from 51 to 69, and boomers on the tail end tend to be more conservative than those on the front end„ I favor more libertarian policies. Unlike millennials, I prefer that government policies seek to unleash the genius of American entrepreneurs, so that our country will innovate more and generate more wealth„ which, to me, is the best way to pay our bills and care for the needy. Such policies were not in style during the Obama years, when increasing regulations and taxes slowed the economy and ObamaCare caused healthinsurance premiums and deductibles to soar. For years, I was a selfemployed writer, selling my marketing wares to technology corporations. But as the stagnant economy decreased business opportunities, my taxes were ridiculously high and my health-care premiums and deductibles soared, I finally gave up and took a full-time position.Ready to support socialism „ come 2035In 2016, almost 7 percent of the population experienced at least one major depressive episode. [FILE PHOTO] Tom PurcellSee PURCELL, E2 Ron HartSee HART, E2 See ENGLAND, E2

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** E2 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News Herald VIEWPOINTS By David Agosta Guest columnistLast month I was privileged to participate in Bay District Schools Project Democracy.Ž Its an annual event the schools do with Supervisor of Elections Mark Andersen. The schools seniors and juniors are encouraged to become voters. Andersenor one of his associates speaks first about the constitutional right to vote. Mark shares personal stories of accomplishment „for example, his U.S. Navy service. Andersen desired to join the SEALs. Peers laughed at him, saying he was too short. Yet, his superiors couldnt stop him from trying. The criticism made him more determined to succeed. (If you watched Demi Moores G.I. Jane,Ž you get a small sample of the trainings difficulty). Mark passed his training and became a SEAL. Thats one of many examples that shaped his way of running Bays Supervisor of Elections Office (SEO). Hes been invited to other Florida counties, speaking to other SEOs and their people. He shares how his office remains top notch. So,Andersen tells the young people, if he can make a difference, they can too. Their votes count and shape government every two to four years. Along with Andersen, representatives from local parties are invited to speak. This year, representatives from the Bay Republicans, Democrats, Green and Libertarian parties spoke. For the first time in Project Democracys history, the Bay County Libertarian Party (BCLP)had a representative at all the schools. I spoke at Bay High, Palm Bay Prep and North Bay Haven. It was my first time speaking to young people at schools. As a former Protestant minister, I had experience in public speaking, but I never spoke to a large group of young people. I thought fora long time what to present. As I wrote before, you easily get an audiences attention. Its holding their attention that determineswhether theystick with you. Then, it came to me. Last year, the Justice LeagueŽ movie came out. Fans know its coming out on Blu-Ray and DVD this month. Remembering how successful our local Creative ConŽ was, I cashed in on DC Comics top three superheroes. I own 12-inch figures of Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman. I took a different figure to each event. The party reprentatives only had 4 or 5 minutes for their introductions. When it came my turn, I proceeded. I introduced myself and stated my office in the BCLP. Italked aboutwhen the party started and howI was honored to speak to students. They live in the greatest country ever. I saw future USA adults who can make our country better than it already is. Then I described what libertarianism is in a nutshell. I held up my action figure and asked if they knew who it was. They knew the character, which led to my next question: How many of you believe Im Batman/Superman/ Wonder Woman?Ž Many laughed and some raised their hands in good fun. I said, Obviously, Im not this superhero; Im David.Ž I explained I was my own self and not anyone else. I wasnt any of the young people. They were their own selves. Yes, they were Americans, but they were individuals too. Each one made a difference in our countrys greatness intheir own way. I continued, Now, I can keep saying Im this superhero and all know Im fooling you. But I wouldnt be offended. The Libertarian Party believes all individuals have the constitutional right to live their lives as they choose and please. It comes down to agree to disagree.Ž We can disagree with how one lives and feels, peacefully. Libertarians believe in open debate. But, when it turns into violence, thats breaking the law and goes against libertarian philosophy.ŽLiberty for allBatman and Superman served as props at a recent Project Democracy.Ž [SPECIAL TO THE NEWS HERALD] MSNBC called it more evidence of Trump collusion with Russia. Unless libs manufacture victims „ the key Democrat voting demographic, after all „ they do not get elected. Democrats have to keep their followers outraged so their lot in life never gets better and so they do not lose interest in protesting and resisting.Ž Over a year ago, they were all outraged at Chick-fil-As owners religious beliefs and turned their mighty disruptive ire toward the chain. Their protests were effective; just look what they did to Chick-fil-A. They shut the restaurants down „ every Sunday. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated oped humorist, award-winning author and TV/radio commentator, can be reached at Ron@RonaldHart.com, or visit www.RonaldHart.com. HARTFrom Page E1I feel empty.Ž I wanted distance from my kids, from my responsibilities, from my role as their mother. I thought about doing the things that I loved, like seeing friends, going on a run, reading a book, but I wasnt motivated to do anything. I was too tired, too overwhelmed. Instead, I cleared my calendar and retreated. A typical symptom of depression, I avoided doing the things I normally enjoyed. Isolating from life also meant my kids were isolated with me. Theyd ask for playdates, and Id say no. Tidying the house to have people over was a mountainous burden. Even being invited to someone elses house overwhelmed me. What if my kids wouldnt share or leave when I asked? Yet I declined help. My family lived thousands of miles away, but we had close friends all around us. When they offered to watch my kids, I said no „perhaps out of pride, but mostly because I felt fatigued and weak, and I thought, How could I ever repay them?Ž Non-judgment As a 35-year-old mom, I felt like I couldnt pause my life while my depression played out. I started seeing a therapist bimonthly and met for four months. She suggested I pay more money to be tested for attention deficit disorder. Unsettled by this and unable to handle the added expense, I eventually stopped seeing her. Without my sessions, I continued to struggle. Friends reached out and shared their experiences of depression and anxiety. I continued to suffer and eventually found another therapist. Looking back, I wish Id prioritized my needs„ even as a new mom. Asking for help in early motherhood is a way to get accustomed to making time and space for self-care. My stoic parenting style set the precedent for burnout and isolation. Also, I thought that since I didnt experience postpartum depression, I was immune from depression during motherhood. This proved very wrong. In fact, for people whove suffered one episode, depression is highly likely to recur. With a background in social work, I knew about the stigma around depression and mental health issues, and I wish Id applied my professional nonjudgment to myself. When my closest friends shared their stories of depression, I couldve asked for the names of their therapists and sought professional help. New home As we settle into our new home, I feel the wooden floors beneath my bare feet. I smell the salty water from the harbor, just minutes from our doorstep. Its as if color is bleeding back into my gray life. I feel like myself again. Im not sure how to prepare for my next episode, but I know that Ill tell people about my depression; after all, Im telling you. For now, jumping in headfirst to our new life is all I can do. I exchange phone numbers with every friendly new mom I meet. I attend school events, volunteer on field trips, assist in the classroom. Theres an older lady in our new neighborhood who walks her dog at least twice a day. We know each other now, and Im going to make sure she and I stay connected. She will unknowingly hold me accountable„ preventing me from letting my depression envelope me again without seeking help. If the depression returns? Ill find another therapist right away and seek professional guidance to help heal me rather than deceive myself and suffer. That much I know. Molly England is featured in The Washington Post, HuffPost, Scary Mommy, Salon, Babble and more. ENGLANDFrom Page E1Well, President Trump has, for the most part, restored pro-growth policies. I hope the robust economy we are currently enjoying allows me to invest more and grow my nest egg so that I will be in solid enough shape to enjoy my golden years 10 or 15 or 17 years from now. Because, at that point, I intend to liquidate all of my assets at great profit, hide the proceeds in a Swiss bank account and register as a Democrat. Ill have enough free time on my hands to attend 2035s early rallies for whoever the 2036 presidential elections progressive,Ž Bernie Sanders-style candidate is„ and do everything in my power to persuade my fellow libertarian/conservative retirees to ignore their consciences and vote for him or her. Well be the first older generation that understands technology and social media. Well use both to organize protests. Well threaten to toss out any politician who doesnt deliver our goodies. So, my young American pals, be careful what you wish for. The socialistic policies that look favorable to the young now wont look so good to them in 2035 when we seize the lions share of their earnings so we can vacation in the sun, sipping taxpayerfunded adult beverages with little umbrellas in them. Tom Purcell is a columnist with the Pittsburgh TribuneReview and Cagle Cartoons. PURCELLFrom Page E1 [MILT PRIGGEE/OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON] My stoic parenting style set the precedent for burnout and isolation. Also, I thought that since I didnt experience postpartum depression, I was immune from depression during motherhood. This proved very wrong. In fact, for people whove su ered one episode, depression is highly likely to recur.

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 E3 VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEWPresident Donald Trump says he wants to execute the drug traffickers responsible for the opioid crisis, but dont expect to see pharmaceutical executives getting the death penalty anytime soon. Pharmaceutical manufacturers and distributors made billions from prescription painkillers, creating a crisis by ignoring evidence the drugs were being overprescribed. Reducing overdoses and deaths of people who have become addicted requires investing in drug treatment programs, not doubling down on the failed tactics of the war on drugs. Trump unveiled his plan to address the opioid epidemic Monday, offering few details but lots of over-the-top rhetoric. He suggested his approach to the problem was influenced by world leaders such as President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines, a dictator who ordered the extrajudicial killings of suspected drug offenders. Trumps comments reflect his lack of respect for our countrys core values and a lack of understanding of the opioid crisis. He suggested a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border would keep out opioids, despite the fact that the drugs that hooked many Americans were produced right here. More than 200 cities and counties across the United States, including Panama City and Bay County, have joined the legal fight against opioid manufacturers and distributors. These companies misled the public about the dangers of prescription painkillers such as Oxycontin and looked the other way as they were sold in far greater amounts that could be used for legitimate purposes. The drug companies should now be required to help pay for the consequences. Here in Florida, the governor recently signed a measure into law that sets aside $53.6 million for treatment programs and other efforts aimed at combating opioid abuse. Experts say even that might not be enough. Opioids claims the lives of at least 16 Floridians each day. Some who became addicted to painkillers subsequently turned to heroin. Fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid that has been mixed with heroin, has been linked to a number of overdoses and deaths. Keeping fentanyl off the streets will require more than a wall, given that online pharmacies based in China have sent it through the U.S. mail system. Trump made passing mention of this problem Monday, but he needs to attack it with a much zeal as he has for the perverse idea of executing drug traffickers. The four decade-plus war on drugs has failed to stop drug use while creating massive fiscal and social costs. Tough-on-crime tactics such as mandatory minimum sentences „ another approach backed by Trump „ have devastated minority communities in particular. Trump called Monday for a massive ad campaign against drug abuse, hearkening back to the Just Say NoŽ campaign of the 1980s. When the president proposes such retrograde ideas, it show he either doesnt understand the opioid epidemic or doesnt take it seriously. A version of thiseditorial first appeared in the Gainesville Sun, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.OUR VIEWTrump misses cause of opioid crisisOne of the unavoidable tragedies of youth is the temptation to think that what is seen today has always been. Nowhere is this more noticeable than in our responses to the recent Parkland massacre. Part of the responses to those murders are calls to raise the age to purchase a gun and to have more thorough background checks „ in a word, to make gun purchases more difficult. Thats a vision that sees easy gun availability as the problem; thus, the solution is to reduce that availability. The vision that sees easyŽ availability as the problem ignores the fact of U.S. history that guns were far more available yesteryear. With truly easy gun availability, there was nowhere near the gun mayhem and murder that we see today. Im tempted to ask those who believe that guns are todays problem whether they think that guns were nicer yesteryear. What about the calls for bans on the AR-15 so-called assault rifle? It turns out, according to 2016 FBI statistics, rifles accounted for 368 of the 17,250 homicides in the U.S. that year. That means restrictions on the purchase of rifles would do little or nothing for the homicide rate. Leaders of the gun control movement know this. Their calls for more restrictive gun laws are part of a larger strategy to outlaw gun ownership. Gun ownership is not our problem. Our problem is a widespread decline in moral values that has nothing to do with guns. That decline includes disrespect for those in authority, disrespect for oneself, little accountability for anti-social behavior and a scuttling of religious teachings that reinforced moral values. Lets examine elements of this decline. If any of our great-grandparents or even grandparents who passed away before 1960 were to return, they would not believe the kind of personal behavior all too common today. They wouldnt believe that youngsters could get away with cursing and assaulting teachers. They wouldnt believe that some school districts, such as Philadelphias, employ more than 400 school police officers. During my primary and secondary schooling, from 1942 to 1954, the only time one saw a policeman in school was during an assembly period where we had to listen to a boring lecture on safety. Our ancestors also wouldnt believe that were now debating whether teachers should be armed. There are other forms of behavior that would have been deemed grossly immoral yesteryear. There are companies such as National Debt Relief, CuraDebt and LendingTree, which advertise they will help you to avoid paying all the money you owe. So after you and a seller agree to terms of a sale, if you fail to live up to your half of the bargain, there are companies that will assist you in ripping off the seller. There are companies that counsel senior citizens on how to shelter their assets from nursing home care costs. For example, a surviving spouse may own a completely paid-for home thats worth $500,000. The costs of nursing home care might run $50,000 a year. By selling her house, she could pay the nursing home costs, but her children wouldnt inherit the house. There are firms that come in to shelter her assets so she can bequeath her home to her heirs and leave taxpayers to foot the nursing home bill. In my book, thats immoral, but it is so common that most of us give it no thought. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George MasonUniversity and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.It hasnt always been like this ONLY ONLINETOP 10 VIEWED VIDEOS1. Cody Shirah testimony 2. Shirah trial day 3 3. Bay County Sheriffs Of“ ce announces arrest of Bryan Frank Broxton 4. New indoor trampoline park on Beach 5. Bay County Sheriff Helicopter ride-along 6. Mike Jones on the 2010 Bay District Schools School Board shooting 7. Humpback whale spotted near Panama City Beach 8. Rare right whale spotted off on Panama City Beach 9. Middle school students practice lockdown drill 10. Naturalization ceremony Panama CityTOP 10 MOST READ STORIES1. Destin drowning victim identi“ ed 2. ZooWorld employee puts trespasser in alligator hold 3. East announces “ rst 4 boys, girls 4. Mother, infant son die in “ re 5. Police: PCB Spring Break enforcement night and day 6. Couple awarded $800,000 in hospital lawsuit 7. Niceville mom desperate for bone marrow donor 8. BCSO: Meth baggie near 5-day-olds bottle; couple arrested 9. BCSO: Children badly beaten; baby sitter noti“ es police 10. Fish Tales: Sun“ sh catches some sun in PCB WRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.comGET INVOLVEDFLORIDA LEGISLATURERep. Brad Drake Chipola College, Administration Building, Room 186, 3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446-1701; 850-718-0047; brad.drake@my” oridahouse.gov Rep. Jay Trumbull 455 Harrison Ave., Suite A, Panama City, FL 32401; District Of“ ce: 850-9146300; Jay.Trumbull@my” oridahouse.gov Sen. George Gainer Tallahassee Of“ ce, 302 Senate Of“ ce Building, 404 South Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; (850) 487-5002 Sen. Bill Montford 208 Senate Of“ ce Building, 404 S. Monroe St., Room 210, Tallahassee, FL 32399; 850-487-5003 Sen. Doug Broxson 418 West Garden St., Room 403, Pensacola, FL 32502, (850) 595-1036 Gov. Rick Scott The Capitol, Tallahassee, FL 32399; 850-488-4441; rick.scott@eog.my” orida.comU.S. CONGRESSRep. Neal Dunn U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-225-5235; dunn.house.gov; Panama City Of“ ce, 840 W. 11th St., Suite 2250, Panama City, FL 32401; 850-785-0812 Rep. Matt Gaetz U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-225-4136, gaetz.house.gov; Pensacola Of“ ce, 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503 Sen. Bill Nelson U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-224-5274; billnelson.senate.gov Sen. Marco Rubio U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-224-3041; rubio.senate.gov TOP 10 PODCASTS1. Bridge collapse voicemail 2. Blotter Audible: The Case of the Dumb Thief 3. Reader comments on mall theater closing 4. Philip Moran jailhouse phone calls 5. Tentacles of addiction: Patrick Walsh 6. Bomb threat called in to Arnold High School 7. CatŽch-22: To feed feral cats or not to feed feral cats 8. Tentacles of addiction: Deputy Chris Sammons 9. Tentacles of addiction: Chris Jacksons story 10. Behind the scenes: Cody Shirah Trial day 1 Walter Williams Gun ownership is not our problem. Our problem is a widespread decline in moral values that has nothing to do with guns. That decline includes disrespect for those in authority, disrespect for oneself, little accountability for anti-social behavior and a scuttling of religious teachings that reinforced moral values.

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** E4 Sunday, March 25, 2018 | The News HeraldSend Scrapbook photos with a brief description and identi“ cation of those pictured to pcnhnews@pcnh.com with ScrapbookŽ in the subject line. Inclusion is at editors discretion. SCRAPBOOK Bay County Farm BureauFour generationsGFWC Womans Club of Panama CityBay County Farm Bureau President Larry White, right, and Holmes County Farm Bureau President, Jeremy Rolling, left, meet with District 2 state Sen. George Gainer during Farm Bureau Legislative Days at the Capitol in Tallahassee. They discussed agricultural issues that are priorities for the area related to this session of the Florida legislature. Craig Chaffee of Callaway is shown holding his “ rst greatgrandchild, Craig Todd Walker Jr., who was born Jan 27. The babys father, Craig Todd Walker from Margate, and grandmother, Becky Walker from Deer“ eld Beach, are also pictured. GFWC Womans Club of Panama City Education CSP member Kay Hicks reads to kindergarten students at Spring“ eld Elementary to commemorate the birthday of childrens author Dr. Seuss, and Read Across America Week. Optimist Club of the BeachesThe Optimist Club of the Beaches swears in two new members, Ken Waringa, left, and Danny Norwood. Two members of the Junior Optimist Club (J.O.I.) of Arnold High Schoolreceived student appreciation plaques from Optimist International and proclamations from Panama City Beach during the club's weekly meeting.Junior Optimist Club The Pilot Club of Panama City recently held its eighth annual Pancake Festival at Applebees on 23rd Street with sausage and pancakes, a bake sale, face painting for the kids, silent auction items, door prizes and a 50/50 raffle. Anchor Club members from Arnold, Bay, Mosley and Rutherford high schools served the customers and did the cleanup. Proceeds from the event will provide three $1,000 scholarships to Anchor seniors and help out with the charities the Pilot Club sponsors for those with brain-related disorders. Paris Janos of WJHG was the emcee, and celebrity servers included Mike Jones, Secret Santa; Andre Smith, Emerald Coast Rheumatology; Ryan Michaels, WJHG; Tom Neubauer, Neubauer ERA Realty; Scott Ervin, police chief, Panama City; Mark Anderson, Supervisor of Elections; and Judy Finch, past president, Pilot Club of Panama City and Florida District Governor, Pilot International.Pilot Club of PCBryon Bourgeois, center, receives awards from Lt. Gov. Guy Ellis, left, and Phil Chester, club president. Lt. Gov. Guy Ellis, left, and Phil Chester, club president, present awards to Azaria George. Emcee Paris Janos presents Angela Mayer with funds from the 50/50 raf” e. Local celebrity servers are shown with the door prize winner.

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 F F 1 1 15750 Panama City Beach Pkwy. #140 | Panama City Beach, FL 32413 | 850.252.4160www.PCB.BeachPropertiesFLA.com registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR AWARD WINNERS Hosted by Anita Norton Sunday 12:00 pm 3:00 pmDirections: From Hwy. 79 travel east to Argonaut St. and turn right (south). House is on the right. 110 ARGONAUT ST. SEACLUSION BEACH 2 Bed | 2 Bath | 1,039 Sq. Ft. | Pool $259,900 | MLS #666363 Hosted by Eva Sutherland Sunday 1:30 pm 4:30 pmDirections: From Hwy 98, go south on Richard Jackson the gate, bear right and Tower 4 is the last bldg. 10517FRONT BEACHRD.#207 LONG BEACH TOWERS 2 Bed | 2 Bath | 1,304 Sq. Ft. $410,000 | MLS #669187 OPEN HOUSES Hosted by Eileen Shaw Sunday 2:00 pm 4:00 pmDirections: From PCB Parkway, go north on Richard Jackson Blvd. past Breakfast Point Academy into 102 JOHNSON BAYOU BREAKFAST POINT 4 Bed | 3 Bath | 2,358 Sq. Ft. $388,900 | MLS #668390 Hosted by Chris White Sunday 1:00 pm 4:00 pmDirections: From SR-79, head East on CR-388 to the second RiverCamps entrance on the right. Once Trail. House is on the right. 6409RIVERBLUFF RIVERCAMPS 3 Bed | 3.5 Bath | 2,200 Sq. Ft. $629,900 | MLS #668169 Hosted by Michael Courson Sunday 12:00 pm 3:00 pmDirections: From Hwy. 79, go east on Front Beach Tarpon. House is at the corner of Tarpon and Bay Ave. 2 blocks from Front Beach Road. 14100BAYAVE. BIDAWEE 4 Bed | 3 Bath | 2,020 Sq. Ft. $314,900 | MLS #668119 Hosted by Eva Sutherland Sunday 10:00 am 1:00 pmDirections: From Hwy 98, go south on Richard Jackson the gate, bear right and Tower 4 is the last bldg. 10517FRONT BEACH RD. #1304LONG BEACHTOWERS 2 Bed | 2 Bath | 1,304 Sq. Ft. $425,000 | MLS #669193 Hosted by Cindy Armstrong Sunday 12:00 pm 3:00 pmDirections: on Northshore Rd., right on Baywood Dr. 4443 BAYWOODDRIVE LYNN HAVEN 4 Bed | 3 Bath | 2,718 Sq. Ft. $449,000 | MLS #665984 Sunday 1:00 pm 3:00 pmDirections: South on 77, (Martin Luther King Blvd.) / 322 N COVEBLVD. PANAMACITY 3 Bed | 2 Bath | 2,105 Sq. Ft. $252,900 | MLS #667795 Hosted by Cat Sebasco Sunday 11:00 am 2:00 pmDirections: From Pier Park, go west on PCB Parkway to the Whisper Dunes neighborhood. Turn right just past the mailboxes and follow the road to 340 Blue Sage Road. 340BLUESAGERD. WHISPERDUNES 3 Bed | 2 Bath | 1,800 Sq. Ft. $350,000 | MLS #669303 Hosted by Roni Fulton Sunday 1:00 pm 4:00 pmDirections: From Hwy 79, go west approx. 6 miles to 114CARILLON MARKET#315 CARILLONBEACH INN 1 Bed | 1 Bath | 620 Sq. Ft. $180,000 | MLS #667066Lynne Hand Panama City Beach ChairmanÂ’s Circle Gold Trudy Vanhorn Panama City Beach PresidentÂ’s Circle Cindy Armstrong Panama City Beach Leading Edge Society Amanda Corbin Panama City Beach Leading Edge Society Eileen Shaw Panama City Beach Honor Society Bassett Team St. George IslandChairmanÂ’s Circle Platinum Helen Spohrer St. George Island Leading Edge Society NF-1179254 REDUCED!

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 2 2 Sunday, March 25, 2018| The News Herald YOUR GUIDE TO AREA RENTALS S h o w c a s e Showcase NF-1168500 NF-1177778 Contact Century 21 Commander Realty for all your Property Management needs! ALSO OPEN ON SATURDAYS 8-4 AVAILABLE RENTALS: 850-769-5775Apply Online at c21commander.com COMMANDER REALTY, INC. 307 WILSON AVE #15 1/1 ..............$825 12 ALMA C 2/2 ..............$825 285 SUKOSHI DR 2/1.5 ...........$850 3806 17TH ST A 3/2 ..............$950 5205 9TH ST 3/2 ..............$995 4828 HOLLY AVE 4/2 ...........$1,250 1560 DONNA AVE 3/2 ...........$1,2958700 FRONT BEACH RD UNIT 12092/2.5 ........$1,525 201 FOREST CT. 3/2 ...........$1,650 108 CRENSHAW ST. 3/2 ..........$1,850 2931 CANAL DR 3/2 ...........$2,000NF-1179276 Bay Point Canal Home491 Wahoo Road 3 Bedroom / 2.5 BathGated Comm/Canal Front/2 Car Garage$2495 FEATURED PROPERTY www.PanamaBeachRentals.comYOUR GO TO COMPANY FOR ALL YOUR RENTAL NEEDSŽ918 Helen ........................................2/1 ......................$660 2100 Beach Dr. B203 .........................1/1 .....................$695 401 Transmitter ................................2/1 ..................... $750 215 S Kimbrel....................................3/2 ....................$1250 1333 Capri (waterfront) .....................3/2 ....................$1425 1201 Baldwin Rowe ..........................3/2.5 .................$1450 2104 Avensong Ln #P301...................2/2 ....................$1250 2106 Avensong Ln #O304 ..................2/2 ....................$1300 2106 Avensong Ln #O303 ..................2/2 ....................$1300 2104 Avensong Ln #P303...................2/2 ....................$1300 8601 Avensong Ln #E108 ...................2/2.5 .................$1400 2105 Avensong Ln #C102 ...................2/2.5 .................$1400 2103 Avensong Ln #B103 ..................2/2.5 .................$1400 Panama City Beach Rentals 636-6662 Villas at SuncrestIncludes: Water, Sewer, Trash, Wi-Fi, Basic Cable & Pest Control Panama City and Surrounding Areas 248-5000 2146 Sterling Cove Blvd Gated/Pool ..2/1.5 .................$1250 303 Lighthouse Rd Gated/Pool ..........4/3 ...................$1350 22125 Bataan St ...............................2/2 .................... $1350 10811 FBR #1703 Gulf Front .............2/2 ...................$1350 405 Paradise Blvd Gated/Pool ...........3/2 ...................$1750 301 Fairway Blvd ...............................4/3 ....................$1950 223 Windsor Way Comm Pool.............4/3 ...................$2100 7128 Dolphin Bay Gated ...................4/2.5 .................$2395 4100 Marriott Rd #PH1 Lagoon/Pool ..3/3 ....................$2495 6422 Hwy 98 #1601 Bay Front/Pool ...4/4.5 .................$4950NF-1179285 BAY COUNTY'S RENTAL CENTERBeach: 850-636-6662 Panama City: 850-2485000 www.RentERAFlorida.com740 S. Tyndall Pkwy Panama City, FL 32404850-785-1581 Please contact us or visit our website for a complete list of our available rentals. Se habla Espanol.~NF-1179260215 Maine Ave Unit 2C 2/1 $650 119 College Ave Unit 2 1/1 $700 5915 Pinetree Ave 2/1.5 $1000 1607 Cincinnati Ave 3/1.5 $1050 603 David Ave 3/2 $1100 1132 S Comet Ave 3/2 $1200 706 J.J. Crews Dr 3/2 $1225 213 Coquina Shell Way 3/2 $1400 510 Bunkers Cove 3/3 $1850 3201 Pleasant Hill Rd 3/2 $2100 SMITH & ASSOCIATESPROPERTY MANAGEMENT OF BAY COUNTY INC. 13510C Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach Bay County'sFull TimeProperty Management Company Serving Bay County for over 30 years Call us today for a FREE no obligation Rental Analysis 850-215-RENT (7368) www.smithrentsbaycounty.com We will put you in your place!NF-1181235 850-215-9942429 S. Tyndall Pkwy.BlueHeronRealtyPC.com | blueheronrealty@att.net BLUE HERON REALTY Property Management Services* No Set-Up or Leasing Fees *Long Term Residential Rentals 35 years experience sales, listings and rental management Serving Panama City € Tyndall AFB Area Lynn Haven € Panama City Beach NF-1179256 WELCOME OUR TWO NEWEST AGENTS OUR TEAM IS GROWING TO BETTER SERVICE YOUR RESIDENTIAL NEEDS visit us in person at 315 Harrison Ave or visit us online at DwightHicks.com850-215-1616 315 Harrison Avenuedwighthicks.com J O I N O U R JOIN OUR T E A M TEAMAlways looking for ambitious agents to work with us and be a part of our team. If interested call Dwight.NF-1177912DWIGHT HICKS, INC. Beth WilliamsRealtor850-867-0101beth.pc.realestate@gmail.com Veronica BarronRealtor850-867-0105veronica@dwighthicks.com Dwight HicksBroker850-867-05251@dwighthicks.comShirley RockwellRealtor850-890-3830shirleyrockwell@dwighthicks.comWesley PenningtonRealtor850-867-1767wesley@dwighthicks.com NF-1181581 CEDAR CREEK RANCHES FOR SALE10 to 33 AcresBCLFS.850-258-9677 Lynn Haven Water FrontBeautiful lot for sale by owner, located off 9th street on Iowa ave. in Lynn Haven. Lot has appx. 84 feet of water front on Anderson Bayou; deep water with easy access to bay and gulf. Appx.250 feet deep and cleared. Lot is high and dry and will not require flood insurance. Priced at $255,000 for quick sale; call 850-814-9577 or 850-258-9053 Large loft apt on Massalina Bayou w/dock, big backyard, porch, all utilities incl. furnishd, walking distance to downtown. Single person & No pets (850) 784-1127 L ynn Haven Comfortable, clean, furn, 1 br., 1 person APT, no pets. w/s/g incl. $650/mo. 850-265-4535 St. Andrews 2br/ 1ba, s mall pets ok. W/D hookups, 850-527-6879 Text FL90709 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2br, 1.5ba Study TH 1100sf, Quiet Area, Near Navy Base. 2605 Redwood St. No Pets $995/mo. Call 850-832-1457 Callaway, FL 6509 Pridgen StreetHOUSE FOR RENTVery close to town 2br, 1.5 baths Includes W/D. Asking $810 monthly Security deposit $850 Available in March! Call: 850-358-8297 Callaway: 2br 1ba, $550 +dep. No pets. Call (850)785-7341 or (850)814-3211 Text FL90515 to 56654 Near Tyndall, Nice 3br, 2 ba. Washer/Dryer Hkup, single car garage. NO PETS. incl lawn svc. $900mo+ dep. (850) 769-1726 1998 Mobile HomeLike new, very large, 3br, 2ba In quiet neighborhood, on leased private property. $18,990 asking price. Contact: 850-874-9342 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL75823 to 56654 $80,900!GRAND LAGOON COVE 6903 North Lagoon #21, PCB, FL 32408 1BR/1B UPDATED! Comm Pool & Docks.Cynthia Luster Coastal Property Services 850-691-7927 3712 E Third StPanama City, FL 3800 Sqft whse space w/ 3 offices! $135,500 Cynthia LusterCoastal Property Services850-691-7927 395 Wahoo Rd. Dock your yacht behind your house in this 3bd/2ba.Bay Point Canal Home! $379,000Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 Pirate’s Cove at 204 Cain Road Lake Powell 1bd/1ba Condo approx. 800 sq.ft. furnished, pools, private boat ramp, covered parking. $150K Call (850) 832-2782 or (850) 819-6929 t xt FL87402 to 56654 3102 Preserve Rookery Blvd. Fabulous 4bd/5ba executive home in the gated Preserve community. $659,900Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 99 Acre Farm for Sale4500 River Road Sneads, FL 32460 Jackson County, FL Hwy 271615ft of highway frontage, Two barns, House (Needs Renovating), Two 4” water wells, One 8” water well, totally fenced/cross fenced, gates, perm pastures, holding pens/carral, pond, aprox 10 acres of hardwood/pines. Located 1 1/2 miles from Public boat ramps, to Lake Seminole and the Chattahoochee River. Asking price $310,000. Contact: 850-557-2209 DEERPOINT LAKEWest Side, 2 1/2 ac 100’ x 1085’ 4300 Edwards Rd.Lagoon Realty 850-624-1074 3bd/2baBank Repo Like new, Double wide Set up in quiet mobile home park. 200 ft. from swimming pool. $28,957. In the heart of Panama City. 850 960-8452 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. FEATURED LISTINGSSouthportVacant Lot on Hwy 2302. 150 Frontage. Home, MH or Duplex OK. Only $27,500Bayou George3BR 2BA 1460 SF+ DWMH on .78 acre Beautiful trees. Finance Available. Adjoining property available Over 2400 SF Total.$89,0001st Time Home BuyerWe make it so easy to understand the procedures. No detail, confusing technical talk. Let me tell you how I can possibly put you in your 1st home for No out of pocket moneyŽ!!Venetian VillaCanal Front (Navigable) 3BR 2.5BA 2 Sty. T.H. Bonus Rm. Fireplace. Needs TLC. Below Mkt.at Only $179,000Lynn HavenHistoric 103 year old home. 2 story, beautiful lot in great area. Livable, but needs work. $109,000 Visit our Web/Email: actionrealty1.com dmalloy@knology.net Action R.V. StorageVeteran Discount Contact us at:dmalloy@knology.net265-1006 WE HAVE HOMES100%FINANCINGNF-1179252Appts Encouraged PUT MY 39 YEARS EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU! Lynn Haven4BR 2BA 1674 SF +Corner lot. Immaculate. New Roof. New AC. 100% Financing Available. Mixed use. $169,000No matter what anyone says Experience does make a difference.Ž Call me today and get more than your moneys worth. HUD HOMESFountainWewa River front 3BR 2BA. $80,999Lucas Lake Area2BR 2BA MH on lake. 29,999 CONTRACT PENDING

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 F F 3 3 726 omas Dr. Panama City Beach, FL 32408 Service You Deserveƒ People You Can TrustTHINKING ABOUT SELLING OR BUYING?CALL THE BEST WE MAKE IT HAPPENŽDeb Brown Eva M. Mullins, P.A. Kay Warneck Laura Hartzog Libby Sipple Linda Kirk Linda Sherrell Melissia Pennington Skyler Conzelman Terry Conzelman S ? People you can TrustŽ 2015 Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate. All Rights Re served. Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. 1260 W. Beach Dr € Panama CityMLS# 656436 $975,000 € Historic Beach Drive € 2 plus acre parcel 9860 S. Thomas Dr € Panama City BchMLS# 665480 $229,000 € Laketown Wharf € Amazing Gulf views € 2 BR/ 2 BA plus bunk Terry Conzelman, Realtor 850-832-4886 Melissia Pennington, Realtor 850-527-1513 1506 Wateroak Dr € Lynn HavenMLS# 664116 $269,400 € 3 BR / 3 BA, 2,243 Sq Ft € Just 3 years old! € Motivated Seller!! 2105 Pebble Beach Pl € Panama City BchMLS# 667621 $359,900 € 4 BR / 2 BA, 2,329 Sq Ft € Beautiful brand new build € Single Story € Open Contemporary Floor plan Eva M. Mullins, P.A., Realtor International Diamond Society 2016, 2017850-527-3269 0 Davenport Blvd € ChipleyMLS# 662566 $40,000 € Priced to Sell € Paved Road € Sunny Hills area € Adjacent lot also available 1848 Porter Rd € CottondaleMLS# 662566 $2,200 € 5 Full Acres € Small Creek in back € Great location € Bring horses Laura Hartzog, Realtor Presidents Circle 2016, 2017850-527-0325 4412 Bylsma Cir € Panama CityMLS# 669063 $290,000 € 4 BR/2 BA split plan € Heated & Cooled Florida Room € Large Master suite w/sitting room € Large garage w/workshop area 1508 Thurso € Lynn HavenMLS# 667396 $379,000 € 4 BR / 3 Full BA € Leaded glass solid wood frt door € 10 ft & 12 ft ceilings € Master suite/California style closet Skyler Conzelman, Realtor 850-832-2021 3686 Preserve Blvd € Panama City BchMLS# 659115 $122,900 € Beautiful mature trees € Gated Community € Close to water € Motivated Seller 23223 Front Bch Rd € Panama City BchMLS# 668869 $199,500 € Beautiful Gulf views, 1 Br/ 1BA € Stainless Appliances, new paint € 2 pools, 4 tennis courts, plus more € Minutes from 30-A! Linda Sherrell, Realtor 850-348-3500 9014 PC Bch Parkway € Panama City BchMLS# 657217 $999,999 € 100 Ft Hwy Frontage € High Traf c volume € Make Offer 3942 W. 21st Pl. A € Panama CityMLS# 667708 $179,900 € 3 BR/ 2 BA Totally remodeled € Metal Roof € New Appliances Kay Warneck, Realtor 850-890-8067 3442 Seminole Ln € MariannaMLS# 662713 $344,500 € Spectacular Views of Silver lake € Lake with Gulf access € Plenty of space € Spring/Summer time Memories Opportunities 901 Brandeis € Panama CityMLS# 660376 $210,000 € Spacious home w/great over ow € Large Mature fenced yard € 2 car garage w/great storage € Swimming Pool Linda Kirk, Realtor 850-630-0044 6500 Bridgewater Way PH-2 € Panama City BchMLS# $695,000 € 4 BR Penthouse € Incredible Views€ Boater Paradise on Intracoastal waterway 5115 Gulf Dr 302 € Panama City BchMLS# 669263 $245,000 € Ocean front € No elevator for entry € All Tile € Beautiful Deb Brown, Realtor 850-819-6726 4624 Delwood Park Blvd € Panama City BchMLS# 663880 $254,900 € 3 BR / 2 BA, 1,679 Sq Ft € New Roof, Paint and Landscaping € Large Screened Porch € Home Warranty Included 101 Sawgrass Ct 203 € Panama City BchMLS# 652952 $425,000 € Waterfront on Lake Powell € 4 BR / 3.5 BA, 2,214 Sq Ft € Gated Wild Heron Community € Fully Furnished 6422 W Hwy 98 402 € Panama City BchMLS# 667571 $278,500 € 2 BR/ 2 BA Bay front € Owner Financing € 1,384 Sq Ft, 4th Floor € Extra outside storage Libby Sipple, Realtor 850-832-7586 246 Marlin Cir € Panama City BchMLS# 669444 $799,900 3 BR / 3 BA Boaters Paradise Custom Built NF-1178698 REDUCED

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 4 4 Sunday, March 25, 2018| The News Herald C a l l 8 5 0 2 4 9 7 3 5 5 € T o l l F r e e 8 8 8 8 3 6 8 5 5 1 Call 850-249-7355 € Toll Free 888-836-8551 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e f o r u p t o d a t e l i s t i n g s a n d s a l e s i n B a y a n d s u r r o u n d i n g c o u n t i e s Visit our website for up-to-date listings and sales in Bay and surrounding counties! NF-1179269 U n d e r C o n t r a c t / S o l d Under Contract/Sold*These properties are either Sold or Under Contract N e w L i s t i n g s New Listings P r i c e R e d u c t i o n s Price Reductions $11,900 Old Gristmill Rdtwo congruent lots = half acre with county zoning, horses allowed $40,000 2520 Shady Oak Dr80x135 building lot in Lagoon Oaks area on cul-de-sac $59,000 00 St. Luke St1BR/1BA cottage, all new everything inside, close to Tyndall AFB $94,900 7514 Jefferson Ave2BR/1BA home on nearly half-acre, workshop, generator, built-ins $129,000 801 Reese Dr3BR/2BA mobile home on 2.13 acres, private pond, pole barn, corner $134,900 Endless Summer #C172BR/1BA condo overlooking courtyard and pool, across from beach $149,000 4010 Delisa Ave3BR/2BA renovated Pinnacle Pines home, close to Tyndall AFB $159,900 Bay Point Golf Villas #4222BR/2BA updated ground oor unit overlooking golf course $164,500 2000 Twin Oaks Dr3BR/2BA mobile home on corner lot, remodeled, insulated garage $169,000 2172 Sterling Cove Blvd3BR/2.5BA townhome in gated community, freshly painted $179,500 Continental #5021BR/1BA gulf front condo, renovated, private balcony, furnished $189,900 2416 Nicole Dr3BR/2BA Forest park home, completely renovated, shiplap, large yard $199,000 3708 Shoreline Cir3BR/2BA brick home close to Pretty Bayou, beautifully landscaped $219,000 434 Brady Way3BR/2.5BA Hidden Pines home, on cul-de-sac, openoor plan $247,900 205 Wisteria St3BR/2BA home close to the beach, two car garage, lots upgrades $264,500 Shores of Panama #13042BR/3BA condo with a bunk room, upgrades, furnished $269,500 124 Cottonwood Cir3BR/2.5BA Woodrun home, freshly painted, two car garage $498,000 3681 Preserve Blvd4BR/2..5BA Preserve home with pool, lots of extras and built-ins $23,000 Lucy Lanelake front lot in the Fountain area, 65x200, septic and well already in place $23,000 2634 Usery Rdmobile home lot 70x120, public water and sewer available $39,900 6351 Blue Gill Rdwaterfront lot on Bayou George Creek with access to Deerpoint Lake $119,000 Origin at Seahaven #413studio condo on same oor as pool and tness center $154,900 530 JH Crews Cir3BR/2BA home in Shadow Bay, wood oors, Callaway Bayou behind home $189,000 1200 Lindenwood Dr3BR/2BA updated Forest Park home, new roof and tile, workshop $227,000 21807 Palm Ave2BR/1BA Riviera Beach cottage 1.5 blocks from Gulf of Mexico $234,000 37 Park Place3BR/2.5BA Palmetto Trace townhome, wood oors, lake view, loft $240,500 7405 Market Stimmaculate 4BR/2BA home, new wood oors, roof replaced 2015 $255,000 Greenwood Estates #9F3BR/2.5BA condo on Grand Lagoon with boat slip and lift $985,000 3301 Harbour Place4BR/4BA Bay front home with pool, boat dock and lift, custom built$285,000 264 Sukoshi Dr3BR/2.5BA home on Callaway Bayou with new dock, inground pool $285,000 98 Sandalwood Ct3BR/2.5BA Summerwood home on cul-de-sac, new paint and carpet OPEN SUNDAY 1-5 PM Dir: West on Hwy 98, 3 miles past Hwy 79, right into Whisper Dunes community, rst right onto Blue Sage Rd. Home on right. Largest 3 bdrm plan in Whisper Dunes Fantastic open, bright, plan. Upgrades Galore! Tara DeVore Berry, Realtor850-319-5445NF-1177932225 Blue Sage Rd Panama City Beach 3/2 1951 sq ft. $335,990 NF-1181571 B a r b a r a S t e v e n s BarbaraStevens Broker/Owner 200SanGabrielSt PanamaCityBeachElCentroBeachSubdivision 2/2w/approx1,092SF. Excellentlocation.Only1/2mi toBeachAccess63,closeto PierPark,fewmilestoAirport, entertainment,dining&more! Pre e m i ie r rP ro op p ert i ie es of f Ba a y yC ou un ty, L LL L C 850-819-5291Acceptingnewlistings! $219,995-MLS#669313 1228BluestemSt€PanamaCity MLS#669334€$385,000Dir:FromintersectionofHwy390andBaldwinRd, southwestonHwy390forapprox.0.4miles,righton AirportRd,leftonBluestem.Homeonright. 4BR/2.5BA€2,488sqft€BreakfastBar€Security System€WalkinCloset€RaisedCeilingsHostedbyMichelleDecker850-896-0203NF-10986010 OPENSUNDAY2-4PM OPENHOUSE1:30…4PM MillBayou-223SShoreviewDrive 1,868sqft,3/2,2-cargarage,newconstruction home.ModelPhonenumber850-252-6215Locatedoff390behindBayHaven,N onHwy231,leftonHwy390,righton MillBayouBlvd,leftonShoreviewDr, leftonS.ShoreviewDr,Homeonleft. NF-1181575 NF-1181576 OPENHOUSE1…4pm WhisperDunes…318SandOakBlvdPCBeach 1,437Sqft,3/2.5,1-cargarage,2Stories,model Phonenumber850-249-4090 LimitedhomesitesremainFromtown,locatedonthewestendofPCB,WonUSHwy98 approximately5minpassedPierPark-Whisper DunesonrightafteryoupassAceHardware. NF-1181579 JenniferEthridge, RealtorFloridaMilitarySpecialist850-960-6050Comeseethiswonderfulnewerhome, 4bedroomsplusabonusroomandadownstairs mastersuiteonanice-sizedcornerlot. OPENHOUSESunday1-4 4/3.5€2,587SF€Built2014 4915BarrettWay€PanamaCity MLS#665535€$300,000 OPENSUNDAY1-4PM Dir:Hwy98West,justpastCampHelen,leftonto WaltonLakeshoreDr,leftonWaltonMagnoliaLn, entranceonright,townhomeattheend. 2BR/2.5BA€1,080sqft€AmazingGulfView 2PrivateDecks€ConvenientLocationDeborahClass,Realtor850-832-4988NF-1181574228WaltonMagnoliaLn#2InletBch MLS#667328$600,000 FEATURED HOMES FEATURED HOMES NF-1181577 NF-1177924 2192 ACORN PL CHIPLEY North Hwy 77 to Sunny Hills Subdivision turn right onto Sunny Hills Blvd Right on Carey Blvd immediate left on Linwood Dr Right on Acorn Pl house on the right -Sunny Hill Community -3/2 Open Floor Plan -Screened Porch -Large Back Yard MLS#662371 6004 STEPHANIE DR PANAMA CITY South on Tyndall Parkway to Highway 98. Soft left on Highway 98. Turn left on Wallace (at Sombrero restaurant). Right on South Gay. Left on Stephanie. Home on right. -3/2 Near Tyndall AFB -Granite, stainless steel -NEW Carpet, replace -Great Open Floor Plan MLS#668245 3202 ROSEWOOD WAY LYNN HAVEN Turn onto Mosley Dr. o Hwy 77, turn right into the Hammocks, turn left onto Azalea, turn right onto Rosewood Way-All Brick Custom -4BR/ 2 Full & 2 Half Bath MLS#667087 1701 MISSOURI AVE LYNN HAVEN From Jenks and Hwy 390, North on Hwy 390, Left on 17th Street, Home on Corner of 17th Street and Missouri Ave. -3BR/2BA Bonus Room -NEW Roof/NEW HVAC -NEW Kitchen/Fireplace -Lots of updates MLS#669156 1114 N HAVEN CIR LYNN HAVEN From Highway (Ohio Ave) 77 and 12 St, east on 12 St, left to North Haven -Large 4BR/2BA -Split Bedroom -Large Open Floor Plan -Covered Back Patio MLS#666371 REDUCED 3685 CEDAR PARK DR P ANAMA CITY From Panama City Mall Travel North on Hwy 231 for Approximately 3.5 Miles, Turn Right on Pipeline Rd, go 1/2 mile to Cedar Parkentrance will be on your right. Continue past Cedar Park Lane to Cedar Park Drive and home site is directly ahead-NEW Construction -4BR/2.5 BA w/ o ce -Near PCB and Tyndall -Brick, 2 car garage REDUCED 2913 C OUNTRY CLUB DR LYNN HAVEN NORTH on Highway 77, Turn EAST on 9th Street in Lynn Haven. Follow to Colorado Avenue. Turn left on Colorado and enter the Panama Country Club. After entering turn right. Home will be on your left -5BR/3.5BA Brick -18ft ceilings, gas replace -FL room, 14x14 bonus rm -Covered Patio REDUCED C21Commander.com 850-769-8326 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1:30 4:00PM COMMANDER REALTY, INC.$429,000 Hosted by: Kimberly Perry, REALTOR Hosted by: Cale OQuinn, REALTOR Hosted by: Brooke Rodriguez, REALTOR Hosted by: Kelly Hamlin, REALTOR Hosted by: Victor Jed, REALTOR Hosted by: Wilma Taylor, REALTOR Hosted by: Dianne Gunn, REALTOR $309,900 $299,000 $249,900 $163,500 $169,900 $237,800 MLS#655869 MLS#660629 -Large Master Bedroom -Double Garage, fenced back yard

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 F F 5 5 Won’t you join us?Visit our sales office to get all the news and information about new homes in SweetBay. Call 844-35-SWEET It’s beautiful outside. Feels like the perfect day for a bayfront run after walking the kids to school—and treating them to poolside popsicles when they get out. SweetBay is a new master-planned community in Panama City, Florida with miles of coastline to get in touch with nature and neighbors. Our bayfront village will foster a healthy lifestyle we like to call, “relaxed living with a dash of Southern charm.” It’s a friendly neighborhood with everything you need just a short walk away. Academy Park, our first neighborhood, features University Academy (UA)—a free public K-6 charter school, with expansion plans to 8th grade. UA placed 1st in the district based on 2014 state standard scores. And our location is an easy drive to nearby universities, hospitals, military bases, and many other work centers. A community of new & custom homesites now open in Panama City, Florida. Now Open NF-1179270 Open House TodayLakefront & Interior Homesites at 4132 CEDAR CREEK DR 4510 Tender Creek Cove 1-4pm850-258-9677CEDARCREEKFLORIDA.COM NF-1181572 19754 PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO ALABAMA STATUE THAT THE FOLLOWING GOODS WILL BE SOLD AT 1026 W 15TH ST P ANAMA CITY FL ON SUND A Y THE 1ST D A Y OF APRIL A T 10:00 AM. TO SATISFY LIEN CLAIMS BY U-HAUL. LESSOR WILL CONDUCT A PUBLIC AUCTION WITH RESERVE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH FOR THE CONTENTS IN THE UNITS OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS: TENANT HAS THE RIGHT TO REDEEM CONTENTS ANY TIME PRIOR TO SALE. ANY OF THE ABOVE ITEMS MAY BE WITHDRAWN FROM SALE BY U-HAUL WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE. Renee Carter 4713 Lyons Blvd, Tallahassee, FL Unit 158 (household goods) Cynthis Lunsford 1722 W 17th St, 203, Panama City, FL Unit A323 (household goods) Timothy Nicholson 1802 Flowers Ave., Panama City, FL Unit 197 (household goods) Joe Kominczak 2101 W Hwy 390 Apt 1122, Lynn Haven, FL Unit C15 (household goods) Nicole Wolf 2203 Beck Ave., D-6, Panama City, FL Unit AA7440D (household goods) Laconte Black 2429 Erin Dr., Panama City, FL Unit A485 (household goods) Tim Southerland 7226 Campflowers Rd, Panama City, FL Unit A561 (household goods) Justin Markowski 46 White Feather Ln., Palm Coast, FL Unit A543 (household goods) Janice McIntosh 4417 13th St, 208, Saint Cloud, FL Unit 414 (household goods) Owen Burke 600 SW 602nd Ave., Margate, FL Unit 212 (household goods) U-HAUL 1026 W. 15TH ST. PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AUCTION BEING HELD BY SMITH AUCTION SERVICES #916 March 18, 25, 2018 19614 PUBLIC NOTICE The PAEC Florida Buy program is seeking to receive proposals, RFP #18-09, to establish contracts to furnish fencing to schools, other public and non-profit entities in the PAEC Districts. To access RFP documents go to www .florida buy .org Pub: March 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2018 19860 TYNDALL AFB WETLANDS / FLOODPLAIN RESTORATION BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA MAND A TORY PRE BID MEETING PROJECT: XLWU17001 MGT Sealed bids for the work described herein will be received until 1:00 p.m. local time at the place of the bid Opening, T uesday April 10, 2018 in the office of Three Rivers RC&D, Inc. located at 5230 Willing Street in Milton, FL 32570, (850-623-0030) and at that time publicly opened. Any bid not received by 1:00 p.m. T uesday April 10, 2018 will not be accepted for consideration of the contract. Prospective bidders must assemble on T uesday April 3, 2018 at the Tyndall AFB Visitors Center (2359 Roosevelt Blvd.) at 10:00 a.m. to receive contract documents and details. If you have any questions, please contact, Three Rivers RC&D, Inc. at (850) 623-0030. Description of W ork: (approx. 50 acres) 1. Vegetation Removal -Mechanical 2. Vegetation Removal -Hand Work The following MUST be included in the Bid P ackage: 1. Signed Bid Form 2. Signed Bid Sheet 3. Signed Addendum (if applicable) 4. 10% Bid Bond, Company Check, or Cashier’s Check (if the project total exceeds $100,000.00) 5. Signed Special Instructions to Bidders Sheet Before a Contract is awarded the following documentation is RE QUIRED: 1. Proof of GENERAL LIABILITY INSURANCE 2. Proof of WORKER COMPENSATION March 25, April 1, 2018 French Bulldog PuppiesVet checked and vaccinated, $1,975 asking price. Call Denise: 760-596-2913 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar: 239-324-4650www .noahslittleark.com We Buy Anything OldItems we buy include: Signs (Gas and Oil, Soda, Tobacco, etc.) Images (Time Types, Ambrotypes, CDVs, etc) Antique Weaponry, Primitives, Antique Furniture, Clocks, Country Store Items, Jewelry. Taxisdermy, Oddities, Pottery, Architectural Items, Militaria, Folk Art, Lamps and a whole lot more! We pay cash! Contact Kris Clark 706 474 3443 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 6 6 Sunday, March 25, 2018| The News Herald NF-1178702 LINE COOK Please Apply at www.losantojitos.comor in person Monday … Friday 2:00pm … 4:00pm 1236 Beck Avenue, Panama City, FL 32404 Full-Time JobNOW HIRING LINE COOKS Experience needed. Great Pay and Fun Work Environment Competitive Pay, Year round Employment. SHORESPANAMACounts Oakes Resort Properties has immediate openings for the following full-time, year-round positionsCompetitive Wages • Paid Holidays • Paid Vacation Paid Personal Time Off • MedicalandDentalBene ts Panama City BEachVacation Rental Property Managers • Accounting Manager Maintenance Technicians • HVAC Maintenance TechnicianShores of panamaFront Desk Managers • Reservations Manager Front Desk Agents • Reservations Agents Maintenance Technicians • Floor Care Specialist30-AVacation Rental Property Manager Business Development Manager Destin/Miramar BeachFront Desk Agents • Maintenance TechniciansEqual Opportunity EmployerAs the preferred hospitality employer in the area we offer our Team Members the following…. Please send your resume to inspire@corp a.com or Apply in person at ShoresofPanama|9900S.ThomasDrive|PanamaCityBeach,FL32408 CountsOakesResortProperties|22623PCBParkway|PanamaCityBeach,FL32413 ERICA PRICE | Broker/Owner850-381-1358 www.PanamaCityExitRealty.com731-A Airport Rd | Panama City, FL 32405 NF-1178687 Now Hiring New Agents! EXIT Realty Offers:€ Nationally Recognized Branding € Extraordinary Technology € On-Going Training for new and seasoned agents € Of ce Culture … We treat our agents and customers like family € Residual Income OpportunityTEXT 4mm to 85377 2nd Shift Production Technicians Needed!REMEDY INTELLIGENT STAFFING now hiring 2nd Shift -PRODUCTION TECHNICIANS at TRANE Over 40 Positions Available $50 BONUS for “2nd SHIFT” New Hires beginning work March 26th thru April 30th Must complete a successful 30 days of work to obtain bonus payout. Apply at www .remedystaff .com or contact 850 873 8346 for detailed instructions. CITY OF PANAMA CITY CITY MANAGERThe City of Panama City, Florida, seeks a City Manager. The City of Panama City, the county seat for Bay County, is located in the Florida “panhandle”, is approximately 35 square miles with a population of 37,000+.Panama City is a community with historical charm, southern values, and is still growing. City Manager. Salary commensurate with training and experience, plus generous benefits.A five member commission (Mayor and four commissioners) elected for four year, nonpartisan staggered terms. $100M operating budget; 524 employees.A bachelor’s degree in public/business/administration/finance/economic/related field and a minimum three years’ experience in local government management or other equivalent experience is required;a master’s degree in public administration or business administration is preferred. Ideal candidate should have experience in dealing with a variety of economic .development issues, financial management, community re-development and considerable skills in leadership, inclusive of the ability to motivate and foster a team-oriented atmosphere.Must be self-motivated, enthusiastic and have an ability to build trust.Also needs to be a visionary for short and long-range planning and interface well with personnel and the community.Work in a first-class employment environment that takes pride in enhancing quality of life for citizens and employees. Resumes and Applications will be accepted until March 30th 2018 Please apply on city website: PCGO V .ORG Elite HousekeeperHiring Elite Housekeeper, full-time, Destin, M-F. We are seeking a domestic assistant to help the House and Kitchen Manager. Must be able to perform heavy cleaning with a great attitude. Some produce prep included. Are you helpful and willing? Pet friendly? This is a happy work environment, please only individuals with high energy apply! Possible salary with benefits for the right candidate. Send resume to: asterling2017@yahoo.com Join our team and enjoy marketing new clients for The Panama City News Herald! We are hiring self driven and self motivated individuals whom are experienced in P.R., Customer Service, or Sales. Excellent supplemental income for college students, senior citizens, & retired military. In return, we offer flexible schedule, weekly paychecks, bonuses & great earning potential. FT/PT positions available. Call Steve @ 916-934-8233. LOGISTICS SPECIALIS T  3 Plus Years Exp. in Logistics Support  DOD Knowledge / Aviation Part System A Plus  Aircraft Mechanic Exp. A Plus QUALITY ASSURANCE PROFESSIONAL  A&P License / 5 Years Exp. as Aircraft QA Insp.  DOD Knowledge / DASH-8 Aircraft Exp. A Plus  FAA IA highly preferred, but not required  Quality Exp. (ISO or AS) preferred A&P AIRCRAFT MECHANIC  A&P License / 5 Years Exp.  Exp. w/ OEM Wiring/Component/IPC Manuals  DOD Knowledge / DASH-8 Aircraft Exp. A Plus  Must be able to obtain a class 3 flight physical All Candidates Must be able to pass a background check. Full & Part-time positions available for qualified candidates. *Candidates must possess intermediate level computer skills in MS Office applications (Word, Excel & Outlook a must). Medical ReceptionistFull Time Position Monday thru Friday Busy Medical Practice looking for anExperienced Insurance Verification/ New Patient Coordinator.Required Qualifications:  Must have a medical background, and able to work well with others and alone. Ability to multi-task and possess excellent organizational skills.  Ability to efficiently handle heavy patient volumes.  Good communication skills and ability to present themselves in a professional manner at all times, by being compassionate and courteous.  Ability to type and experience with electronic medical records.  Willing to learn new skills. Be professional, and willing to follow clinic dress code. Have reliable transportation. Be team oriented and work well with others.Email resume to: neuroclinicspec@gmail.com OPS FISH & WILDLIFE TECHNICIANFL FIsh & Wildlife Conservation Com. BOX-R WIldlife Mgt. Area 300 Tilton Road, Apalachicola, FL 32320 $13.21/Hourly, plus benefits. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation control, road & facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts, and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at https://jobs.myflorida.com. For additional info contact:Kay Haskins kay .haskins@myfwc.com 850-265-3676Job closes 04/02/2018 EEO/AA/ADA and VP Employer Must Sell Need to Make RoomFull adjustable bed/head & foot firm mattress 27in floor to top mattress, hardly used great condition Asking 1200obo Text for pic/inquiry 8502586166 Bayou George 5231 Stewart Drive (Between John Pitts Rd. and Star Avenue) March 24th & 25th Saturday and SundayAll Must Sell SATURDAY AND SUNDAY2003 Subaru Outback, 2016 HP laptop, phones, electronics, professional culinary items and cutlery, guitars, real and costume jewelry, hundreds of women plus size garments, bicycles, toys, antiques, decor, all housewares from 20 year marriage, books, furniture and so much more Lynn Haven 601 North Bay Drive (Drive down Harvard until you reach the bay, turn left and drive along until you reach the house on right) Sat & Sun, March 24/25 Saturday 8am -4pm Sunday 10am -2pmMOVING!Kitchen things, dishes, glasses, holiday, TOOLS, Lawn tools, Fishing Equipment, Linens, FURNITURE, Records, DVDs Vintage magazines, Paintings, Serious Knick-knack! PLUS Nice shaded spots to sit enjoy the bay breeze. Sunday discounts for remaining items! FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring18 and older Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple PositionsPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Experienced• Managers •Asst Managers •Sales PersonelHeatwave & Purple Haze Now Hiring FT/PT -year round. Great pay. Great work environment. Apply at 10015 Front Beach Rd. Or fax to 850-234-9911 HELP WANTEDExperienced Body TechApply Garrett’s Automotive. 2626 West 23rd Street HVAC HelperWith benefits. 3 years documented exper. in the field. To apply, go to: www .bay .k12.fl.us Employment Opportunities, Support. For additional assistance call 850-767-4231 Deadline to apply is: 4:30pm on 03/26/2018 HVAC Service TechPd vacation & holidays. Med Ins, Retirement. DFWP. EOE. Tarpon Dock Air Conditioning (850) 785-9568 Newby’s Trading Co Night Shift Sales Clerk needed. Leave resume or apply at 8721 Thomas Dr. No phone calls please. IHOP: NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS!Ihop is now hiring for all positions at our locations on 23rd St and Pier Park. Are you a motivated individual who excels at everything you do? Please stop by and ask for an interview anytime you choose, we would love to talk with you LandscapingHiring for all positions in landscape construction and lawn maitenance. Good pay. Benefits. Year round employment. Apply at Noles Scapes 1812 West 27th Street Panama City, FL 850-248-0973 No drug users, please. Ms. Newby’s Two bartenders neededShift times may vary. Leave resume or apply at 8711 Thomas Drive. No phone calls please Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. 2007 Acura TL Navigation4 door, 3.2L V6, Automatic, AC, XM/Sirus Radio w/Bluetooth. All power options, leather, factory powered sunroof. Carfax, 1 owner, no accidents, only 88,326 miles. Carfax Retail -$10,090 Sale Price -$6,995. Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 BMW 328i Coupe, 2008, automatic, Great ride! $8998 Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars BMW 328i, 2012, only 82k miles, Low price! $14,999! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Corvette, 2004, automatic, only 75k miles, runs & looks great! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Chevy Camaro, ’15, auto, ss, #323, $26,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Corvette, 2004, 5.7L V8, only 74k miles, $14,988 Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Chevy Cruze, ’11, auto, turbo 4 cylinder, #034, $13,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Spark, ’13, hatchback, 1lt, #013, $7,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City850-250-5981. Chrysler 200, 2013, white, only 54k miles, Nice clean car! $10,988 Call Butch 785-1591 @ Bay Cars Chrysler 300, 2017, low miles, lthr, nav, sunroof, only $23,998! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger R/T, 2016, automatic, all pwr, only 12k miles. Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2016, 392 Scat Pack, R/T, Shaker hood, sunroof, only 12k miles! Like new! $37,998 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Challenger, 2017, 5.7L V8, manual, Must see! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Fiat I24 Spider Classica, 2017, black, only 9k miles, $23,988 Must see! Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Ford Fiesta SE, 2016, sedan, only 24k miles, Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Ford Fiesta, ’15, am/fm/cd, manual, #089, $9,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane! Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 25, 2018 F F 7 7 NF-1179074 NF-11790722007 Toyota TundraNice Truck, Clean, #973 Sale Price: $19,992 BillCramerGM.comOver 200 UsedPartial List Below Plus tax, title, license, $95 electronic 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, FL850-250-5489877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.com 2002 Nissan Frontier King Cab, XE, #753 Sale Price: $5,993 2012 Mazda CX-9 Auto, V6, Leather, #138 Sale Price: $10,9912009 Dodge ChallengerAuto, SRT8, Leather, #097 Sale Price: $27,9912017 RAMT Promaster 1500AM/FM/MP3, V6, #018 Sale Price: $19,994 2017 Chevy Silverado 2500 4WD, High Country, #283 Sale Price: $62,491 2013 Nissan 370Z Manual, Touring, #189 Sale Price: $19,495 Nice Truck Cl Cl l Cl Cl C l l Cl Cl C Cl Cl ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea n, n n n n n n n n n n #973 S ale Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic e: $ $ $ 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 9 19 19 9 9 19 19 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ,9 9 9 ,9 9 ,9 9 9 9 ,9 9 9 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 ShopHERE2017 Chevy Malibu Auto, Turbo 4 Cylinder, #291 Sale Price: $26,993 2013 Chevy Suburban 4 Wheel Drive, LTZ, #969 Sale Price: $29,995 2004 Chevy Corvette Auto, Convertible, #765 Sale Price: $17,994 2014 Toyota Camry Auto, V6, LS, #608 Sale Price: $10,995 2018 Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, 4WD, #084 Sale Price: $32,991 2012 Chevy Camaro 6 Speed, ZL1, #041 Sale Price: $36,991 2017 Chevy Equinox Auto, Cloth Seats, LT, #023 Sale Price: $20,994 2017 Jeep Compass Manual, Sport, #885 Sale Price: $15,9942016 Mercedes GLE 350Auto, V6, #910 Sale Price: $39,995 NF-1179075 NF-1179076 ENGINE RUNS ROUGH AFTER IT SITS James Morrisjames@masterautotech.comTHE AUTOADVISOR If you are staying in Panama City please stop by and demonstrate what your Jeep is doing you dont like. Call ahead at 850-763-0555 and let us know you are coming. If needed, we can loan you a vehicle at no charge until we solve your rough running problemƒNF-1177863James, I have a tough car question about my 2001 Jeep Cherokee with a 4.0 liter, straight six. It runs great 99% of the time and my problem is only after it sits for 10 minutes after I have driven it. I will start it up and it runs really rough for about 30 to 40 seconds. After I rev up the engine it smoothes out and runs normally. I have taken it to 3 shops in my hometown in Tennessee and they have told me it was spark plugs, coil pack, catalytic convertor to broken valve springs. I only have this problem when it starts up after it is at operating temperature. Any ideas on what I need to check? My spark plugs and coils are new and my valve springs have been checked and they are ne. I dont think a catalytic convertor will cause my engine to run rough after it sits for 10 minutes. Bob Bob, I took your symptoms and punched it into my data base and it suggested that a reprogramming of your cars computer is the rst step to solving this problem. The other area of concern was carbon buildup on the intake valves that are absorbing the fuel when it rst starts, causing your engine to miss and run rough until the carbon is saturated with fuel from the fuel injector. (This is very common in a lot of Ford cars and trucks as well)The TSB # 18-031-03 from September of 2003 it deals with vapor lock from the hot exhaust causing a rough idle after a hot soak engine is started back up. The manufacture wants you to insulate the injectors from heat and reprogram the computer to solve this elusive problem. If this helps, but does not completely solve your problem, then cleaning your injectors chemically would be the next step to possibly solving this problem. Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an aggressive leader in the new contracts to build various ships at their Panama City, FL location has immediate openings for the following positions: Ship tters € Structural Welders Pipe tters € Marine Electricians Heavy Equipment Operator € Carpenters Eastern offers a competitive salary and bene ts package including 401(K) and company-paid health, dental & life insurance. Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Af rmative Action Employer. All quali ed applicants will received consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identify, national origin, age, protected veteran status, disability status or any other status or characteristic protected under applicable federal, state, of local laws. Quali ed applicants may submit their resume/application in con dence to Human Resource, 13300 Allaton Road, Panama City, FL 32404 or via e-mail: HR@Easternshipbuilding.com NF-1179687 The Best Sales Job Ever!!!Have you ever sold?: -Autos -Cable/Satellite -Cell Phones -Any Direct Sales Product Are you?: -Self Motivated -Highly Energized -Outgoing and Personable -Driving Reliable Transportation Earn BIG $$$ (seriously) selling newspaper subscriptions in high traffic retail locations! This is NOT door-to-door or Telemarketing. TOP REPS MAKE $675+ PER WEEK!!! Oure reps are trained by the best in the business! We Provide: -Full hands on training -Weekly paychecks -Exciting work environment -Contests and Bonuses CALL ADAM: 850-900-0786 24 Hour Jobline: 1-888-413-7986 Ford Fusion SE, 2016, sedan, Ecoboost, only 30k miles, 1 owner, $14,988 Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Ford Mustang GT, 2007, 75k miles, Only $12,988! Call Scott 850-358-6223 @ Bay Cars Ford Mustang, 2012, runs great, lthr, only 52k miles! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Azera Limited, 2015, full size sedan! In the wrapper! Only 30k miles! $23,988 Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, 2016, only 8k miles! Under warranty! Only $17,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Kia Optima, ’14, am/fm/cd/mp3, #004, $11,900! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Lexus LS460, 2011, Beautiful candy apple red! 45k miles, LOADED! Won’t last at $25,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Town Car, 2005, Signature, Runs great! Must see! $6998 Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz C-Class, 2006, Sport, $7998 Call/text Gator 561-628-9862 @ Bay Cars Mercedes Benz SLK250, 2013, hard top convertible, only 21k miles, Priced to sell at $24,998! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mercedes SLK250, 2012, hard top convertible, automatic, Super nice, clean car! Only 22k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Nissan 370z, ’13, manual, touring, #189, $19,495! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981 Toyota Camry, ’14, auto, 4 door, $10,995! #608, Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981 TRUCK HEADQUARTERS!! EVERY MAKE & MODEL FROM GAS TO DIESEL! If I don’t have it, I will get it! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Volkswagen Passat, ’15, 1.8t, manual, sport, #780, $14,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Cadillac Escalade, ’16, auto, leather, #317, $58,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Toyota 4Runners-6 in stock! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Cadillac SRX, ’12, v6, premium, #213, $31,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevrolet Equinox, 2015, gray, 59k miles, Only $14,600! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Chevrolet Tahoe, 2015, great condition, only 30k miles, white, LOADED! Don’t pay new car prices, this vehicle is only $45,600! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Chevy Suburban, ’13, 4wd, ltz, $29,995! #969 Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. Chevy Tahoe, ’13, auto, v8, lt, #202, $26,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Dodge Durango GT, 2017, low miles, nav, lthr, backup cam, only $30,988 Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Dodge Durango Limited, 2014, sunroof, lthr, all pwr, 3rd row, only 19k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Dodge Journey, 2017, Crossroad, white, lthr, 14k miles, $23,988 Call Butch 785-1591 @ Bay Cars Ford Edge, ’14, auto, v6, limited, #361, $21,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, 2013, lthr, htd seats, backup cam, $14,988 Call Scott 850-358-6223 @ Bay Cars Jeep Cherokee Sport, 2017, 4x4, only 5k miles, tow pkge, Like new & save a lot! Call Tom 850-624-4230 @ Bay Cars Jeep Compass, ’17, manual, sport, #885, $15,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Jeep Compass, 2017, low miles, 1 owner, clean CarFax, like new! Only $14,988! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Patriot, 2017, low miles, 1 owner, Clean CarFax! Only $13,988! Call Tanner 850-628-6955 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2007, Great condition! Oversize wheels & tires, white, hard top, $14,988 Call Scott 850-358-6223 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler, 2017, Sahara, hard top, pwr windows, Bluetooth, Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Kia Sportage, 2017, only 17k miles, under warranty! Easy financing! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mazda CX-9, ’12, auto, v6, leather, #138, $10,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport, 2014, Excellent condition! LOADED w/ leather and more! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Toyota 4Runner, 2010, gray, Great low price $19,849! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Toyota Rav4, ’10, auto, 4wd, #429, $12,493! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. 1999 Dodge Ram V6Very good condition, $3500 or best offer. Call: 330-310-3072 2004 Chevy Silverado LTLT options, fully loaded 2WD. White exterior, leather interior; ARE cover; one owner; looks and runs good. $5000 OBO. 850-272-5305 2006 Dodge Dakota TruckSLT package, automatic, 49179 miles, original owner, asking $11000. Call: 850-441-3634 Chevy Silverado 2500, ’17, 4wd, high country, #283, $62,491! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Silverado, 2010, white, Payments as low as $350/month! Don’t let this deal get away! Call Bryan Penello 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Ford F-150, ’10, supercrew, platinum, #397, $18,791! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Ford F350, 2008, Diesel, 4x4, lthr, touchscreen radio, pwr seats, long bed, lift, and a toolbox! Runs like new! Call Bryan Penello 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars GMC Canyon, ’15, certified, 2wd, slt, #453, $27,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. GMC Sierra, 2013, quad cab, super clean truck! Only 60k miles! Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars Nissan Frontier, ’02, king cab, xe, #753, $5,993 Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. Ram 1500 Laramie, 2017, 5.7L V8 HEMI, automatic, LOADED! Beautiful truck! Call Cheryl 850-541-3253 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2014, Laramie, 30k miles, lots of extras! Only $34,988! Call Todd 850-252-3234 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500 Mega Cab, 2015, Laramie, 4x4, lthr, nav, all pwr, running boards, 2000# towing capacity, 6.4L V8, Save Thousands! Call Tom 850-624-4230 @ Bay Cars Ram 2500 SLT, 2017, Cummins diesel, 4x4, bedliner, pwr equipment group, Original List: $54,240, Save Big at $43,988 Call Tom 850-624-4230 @ Bay Cars Ram Laramie, 2015, red, 4x4, bed cover, very clean, only 36k miles, Like new, only 1 owner! $34,988 Call Butch 785-1591 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra, ’13, 4wd, crewmax, #909, $27,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Toyota Tundra, 2008, double cab, Only $11,100! Call David Meadows 706-393-1549 @ Bay Cars Chrysler Town & Country, 2011, only 75k miles, Great on gas! Stow-n-go and so much more! Low payments! Call Bryan Penello 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Dodge Grand Caravan, 2015,red, only 46k miles, perfect condition! Payments as low as $285/month! Great for a family! Call Bryan Penello 850-557-7093 @ Bay Cars Ford Transit Van, 2017, 15 passenger van, white, automatic, all pwr, Call Donna 850-258-8548 @ Bay Cars WANTED: LOOKING TO BUY JON BOATApprox 12-14” feet long. With electric motor and trailer. All in good condition. Contact: 850-238-0446

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 8 8 Sunday, March 25, 2018| The News Herald NF-1179018

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AGING WELL

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 3 2 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition COVER PHOTO: istock.com INSIDE PHOTOS: istock.comPremium Plus Editions is a division of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Herald-Tribune Media Group. HTMG is proud to be a part of Gatehouse Media. Our goal is to provide high quality Premium Edition products that engage and captivate all readers. 4 To rent or buy? 6 Home, sweet home 8 Play it safe: Use common sense with online dating 10 Protect your data online 12 14 Spending your golden years 15 Study links dementia risk, REM sleep time 16 Whats your number? Planning your retirement budget 18 Suddenly single: Money questions to answer after divorce, death 20 Overcoming the challenges of living alone 22 How to ease the stress of changing holiday traditions 24 Pharm-assistance: Important questions for your pharmacist 26 A better approach to using hearing aids 28 Better-eating guidelines for older adults 30 Excess sitting may reduce mobility in later lifeTABLE OF CONTENTS Getting old is like climbing a mountain; you get a little out of breath, but the view is much better! Ingrid Bergman

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 3 2 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition COVER PHOTO: istock.com INSIDE PHOTOS: istock.comPremium Plus Editions is a division of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Herald-Tribune Media Group. HTMG is proud to be a part of Gatehouse Media. Our goal is to provide high quality Premium Edition products that engage and captivate all readers. 4 To rent or buy? 6 Home, sweet home 8 Play it safe: Use common sense with online dating 10 Protect your data online 12 14 Spending your golden years 15 Study links dementia risk, REM sleep time 16 Whats your number? Planning your retirement budget 18 Suddenly single: Money questions to answer after divorce, death 20 Overcoming the challenges of living alone 22 How to ease the stress of changing holiday traditions 24 Pharm-assistance: Important questions for your pharmacist 26 A better approach to using hearing aids 28 Better-eating guidelines for older adults 30 Excess sitting may reduce mobility in later lifeTABLE OF CONTENTS Getting old is like climbing a mountain; you get a little out of breath, but the view is much better! Ingrid Bergman

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 5 4 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Looking to settle down after retirement? When its time to downsize, the question is often, should you rent or buy? The old cliche says that renting is like throwing money down the drain. While idea of renting a challenge, boomers have become one of the major drivers of the rental market, according to research by Harvard Universitys Joint Center for Housing Studies. Several considerations should go into a decision about renting versus buying. The answer depends on many factors, but the cost of living in the area plays a major role in determining the answer, said Lori A. Trawinski, director of banking and the AARP Public Policy Institute. Estimates of costs for both types of housing should be developed and compared. Many online calculators are available that can help people with these calculations. Some factors regarding renting include: Is suitable rental housing available? If so, at what cost? Can your budget handle subsequent increases in rent? she said. When considering buying: Can you afford mortgage payments, property taxes, homeowners insurance and maintenance costs going forward? Of course, personal preferences are also important to consider, Trawinski said. Advantages of renting While some may rent because they cant manage a mortgage, others choose lifestyle, said Shelby Heinemann, manager at Florida Network Property Management in Jacksonville, Florida. With renting youre not going to be tied down. Most people 55 and older who have a home have paid it off by now. They dont have home payments so the thought is, what else could they be doing with their money? Renting offers options, Heinemann said. A home may be a good investment but it is not a very liquid asset, meaning that if you want to use your money for a dream trip to Europe or for medical expenses, its not very easy to get your hands on. When downsizing, people dont want or need as much house. They dont want to worry about doing yard work or be responsible for expensive home leaky roof or replacing the motor in the air conditioner, Heinemann said. change things up, whether that means leaving a cold Northern clime for a few months to be a snowbird in the South or renting a home for a year or two to be close to children and grandchildren, Heinemann said. Advantages of buying That doesnt mean that owning a home isnt worth it for some people, especially for those who have it in their heart that they want to own where they live, said Mike Bugg, president of Jacksonville, Floridas The Condo Group. Its a huge psychological process, and owning offers distinct advantages, Bugg said. When you own youre more invested in the home, feel more secure and form stronger ties to the community, he said. Plus, part of the mortgage is taxdeductible. Even at retirement age, its worth it to buy because people are living so much longer and are still active and fun. Theyre living exciting lives and want a fresh, new home in a community that represents who they are at this stage in life, Bugg said. You may as well make the most of it. To rent or buy? By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 5 4 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Looking to settle down after retirement? When its time to downsize, the question is often, should you rent or buy? The old cliche says that renting is like throwing money down the drain. While idea of renting a challenge, boomers have become one of the major drivers of the rental market, according to research by Harvard Universitys Joint Center for Housing Studies. Several considerations should go into a decision about renting versus buying. The answer depends on many factors, but the cost of living in the area plays a major role in determining the answer, said Lori A. Trawinski, director of banking and the AARP Public Policy Institute. Estimates of costs for both types of housing should be developed and compared. Many online calculators are available that can help people with these calculations. Some factors regarding renting include: Is suitable rental housing available? If so, at what cost? Can your budget handle subsequent increases in rent? she said. When considering buying: Can you afford mortgage payments, property taxes, homeowners insurance and maintenance costs going forward? Of course, personal preferences are also important to consider, Trawinski said. Advantages of renting While some may rent because they cant manage a mortgage, others choose lifestyle, said Shelby Heinemann, manager at Florida Network Property Management in Jacksonville, Florida. With renting youre not going to be tied down. Most people 55 and older who have a home have paid it off by now. They dont have home payments so the thought is, what else could they be doing with their money? Renting offers options, Heinemann said. A home may be a good investment but it is not a very liquid asset, meaning that if you want to use your money for a dream trip to Europe or for medical expenses, its not very easy to get your hands on. When downsizing, people dont want or need as much house. They dont want to worry about doing yard work or be responsible for expensive home leaky roof or replacing the motor in the air conditioner, Heinemann said. change things up, whether that means leaving a cold Northern clime for a few months to be a snowbird in the South or renting a home for a year or two to be close to children and grandchildren, Heinemann said. Advantages of buying That doesnt mean that owning a home isnt worth it for some people, especially for those who have it in their heart that they want to own where they live, said Mike Bugg, president of Jacksonville, Floridas The Condo Group. Its a huge psychological process, and owning offers distinct advantages, Bugg said. When you own youre more invested in the home, feel more secure and form stronger ties to the community, he said. Plus, part of the mortgage is taxdeductible. Even at retirement age, its worth it to buy because people are living so much longer and are still active and fun. Theyre living exciting lives and want a fresh, new home in a community that represents who they are at this stage in life, Bugg said. You may as well make the most of it. To rent or buy? By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 7 6 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Home, sweet homeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaTimes and peoples tastes change. The best retirement communities are adapting to appeal to the nations 80 million baby boomers. Retirement is really changing. A couple of decades ago, you would have spent your career with one company, raised your family, retired when you were 65 and started collecting Social Security. You would have had a decade or so to enjoy yourself, reward yourself for all of your diligence and dedication to your family and your company. And then your life expectancy came into play in your early 70s, said Valerie Dolenga, spokeswoman for PulteGroup, a home-building company that includes Del Webb communities, which cater to adults 55 and older. Today, people have moved around a lot, theyve lived in different places, theyve worked for several companies. Theyre getting to that stage in life where theyre past career, family and child-rearing and theyre all of a sudden open to this whole new world and theyre faced with a long opportunity, perhaps 40 years, Dolenga said. While some consumers want to retire in place near family and grandchildren, others seek warmer climates such as Arizona or Florida, Dolenga said. Either way, people are looking for a highly amenitized community often near an urban environment, Dolenga said. These consumers want their community to be located near shopping/retail, restaurants and cultural amenities in the area, or near their family, church and friends, she said. Access to sports and leisure activities is key. Whether its pickleball, Zumba, yoga, walking or swimming, the majority of baby boomers report high levels of exercise. Depending on the location and the interests of our residents, we see everything from weight-lifting to softball leagues to line dancing and many more, Dolenga said. As for home design features, for active adults and boomers, its all about giving them a home that balances desire for innovative and desirable home features with affordability. They want a healthy home that has retreat spaces, a home that fosters entertainment and a home that is simple, Dolenga said. Some home feature trends include: homeowners dont need to carry loads of clothes throughout the house. level countertops for entertaining or accommodating a wheelchair, as well as raised dishwashers and lowered microwaves. area. While one-story homes are a must for boomers, loft spaces add a guest space or a grandkids hideout or movie den. attic spaces or to organized kitchen cabinets or very large closets. Many boomers have a lifetime of treasures, and they dont necessarily want to give them up.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 7 6 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Home, sweet homeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaTimes and peoples tastes change. The best retirement communities are adapting to appeal to the nations 80 million baby boomers. Retirement is really changing. A couple of decades ago, you would have spent your career with one company, raised your family, retired when you were 65 and started collecting Social Security. You would have had a decade or so to enjoy yourself, reward yourself for all of your diligence and dedication to your family and your company. And then your life expectancy came into play in your early 70s, said Valerie Dolenga, spokeswoman for PulteGroup, a home-building company that includes Del Webb communities, which cater to adults 55 and older. Today, people have moved around a lot, theyve lived in different places, theyve worked for several companies. Theyre getting to that stage in life where theyre past career, family and child-rearing and theyre all of a sudden open to this whole new world and theyre faced with a long opportunity, perhaps 40 years, Dolenga said. While some consumers want to retire in place near family and grandchildren, others seek warmer climates such as Arizona or Florida, Dolenga said. Either way, people are looking for a highly amenitized community often near an urban environment, Dolenga said. These consumers want their community to be located near shopping/retail, restaurants and cultural amenities in the area, or near their family, church and friends, she said. Access to sports and leisure activities is key. Whether its pickleball, Zumba, yoga, walking or swimming, the majority of baby boomers report high levels of exercise. Depending on the location and the interests of our residents, we see everything from weight-lifting to softball leagues to line dancing and many more, Dolenga said. As for home design features, for active adults and boomers, its all about giving them a home that balances desire for innovative and desirable home features with affordability. They want a healthy home that has retreat spaces, a home that fosters entertainment and a home that is simple, Dolenga said. Some home feature trends include: homeowners dont need to carry loads of clothes throughout the house. level countertops for entertaining or accommodating a wheelchair, as well as raised dishwashers and lowered microwaves. area. While one-story homes are a must for boomers, loft spaces add a guest space or a grandkids hideout or movie den. attic spaces or to organized kitchen cabinets or very large closets. Many boomers have a lifetime of treasures, and they dont necessarily want to give them up.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 9 8 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Online dating is booming among older adults because not only is it a productive way to meet a romantic partner, it can be fun. The share of 55to 64-year-olds who sign up for dating sites has doubled from 6 percent in 2013 to 12 percent in 2015, according to the Pew Research Center. Whether single, widowed or divorced, boomers are one of the largest markets in online dating, said online dating expert and digital matchmaker Julie Spira, founder of CyberDatingExpert.com. While people are comfortable dating online, they need to be aware of the risks involved, which are have to use the same common sense and trust your intuition when meeting someone online just like you would when dating in person. A positive online dating experience starts with Finding True Love Online. Too many people, males Theyll write one-liners such as I like sports. That doesnt tell a person anything about you, Solin said. The best thing is to be genuine. Talk about yourself like youre talking to your family or neighbors, not the person you want to be, Spira said.Here are some things to watch out for to stay safe when dating online: Steer clear if someone professes instant feelings of love or writes things like I cant wait to fall in love again or its destiny or fate that youre together. theyve said online matches up with their Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram account. You have so many Solin said. You can plug the photo into Google Images and do a reverse search to see if its a stock or fake photo, Spira said. ticket or for a sick relative run the other way and block them. Its a scam, Solin said. a potential date after a week or two, start to wonder why. If youre not in the same city, hop on a Skype call. Make it fun. Put some lipstick on, grab a glass of wine and have a dinner date, Spira said.Keep personal info safeSome other things to watch out for are someone who asks for your address, said OurTimes relationship expert, Dr. Terri Orbuch. Remain anonymous until you feel comfortable and guard your personal information such as your full name, phone number and email address, she said. Avoid people who dont give you straight answers. End communication with someone who talks in circles and/or seems uncomfortable when you ask them questions. If someone speaks in hushed tones or has to go all of a sudden, it may indicate the person is not single, or has something else to hide. Be wary of someone who is vague, wont answer direct questions or can only meet at odd hours, Orbuch said. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media PLAY IT SAFE:

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 9 8 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Online dating is booming among older adults because not only is it a productive way to meet a romantic partner, it can be fun. The share of 55to 64-year-olds who sign up for dating sites has doubled from 6 percent in 2013 to 12 percent in 2015, according to the Pew Research Center. Whether single, widowed or divorced, boomers are one of the largest markets in online dating, said online dating expert and digital matchmaker Julie Spira, founder of CyberDatingExpert.com. While people are comfortable dating online, they need to be aware of the risks involved, which are have to use the same common sense and trust your intuition when meeting someone online just like you would when dating in person. A positive online dating experience starts with Finding True Love Online. Too many people, males Theyll write one-liners such as I like sports. That doesnt tell a person anything about you, Solin said. The best thing is to be genuine. Talk about yourself like youre talking to your family or neighbors, not the person you want to be, Spira said.Here are some things to watch out for to stay safe when dating online: Steer clear if someone professes instant feelings of love or writes things like I cant wait to fall in love again or its destiny or fate that youre together. theyve said online matches up with their Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram account. You have so many Solin said. You can plug the photo into Google Images and do a reverse search to see if its a stock or fake photo, Spira said. ticket or for a sick relative run the other way and block them. Its a scam, Solin said. a potential date after a week or two, start to wonder why. If youre not in the same city, hop on a Skype call. Make it fun. Put some lipstick on, grab a glass of wine and have a dinner date, Spira said.Keep personal info safeSome other things to watch out for are someone who asks for your address, said OurTimes relationship expert, Dr. Terri Orbuch. Remain anonymous until you feel comfortable and guard your personal information such as your full name, phone number and email address, she said. Avoid people who dont give you straight answers. End communication with someone who talks in circles and/or seems uncomfortable when you ask them questions. If someone speaks in hushed tones or has to go all of a sudden, it may indicate the person is not single, or has something else to hide. Be wary of someone who is vague, wont answer direct questions or can only meet at odd hours, Orbuch said. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaPLAY IT SAFE:

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 11 10 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 1. Never swipe your card if it has a chipThe magnetic stripes on traditional credit and debit cards store data, such as a cardholders name, card number, expiration date and country code. Whoever accesses this data can make purchases online or create a copy of the card. The chip encrypts your payment information.2. Consider using another form of paymentIf a merchant is unable to process chip card payments, consider using cash or mobile payment such as Apple Pay, Android Pay or Samsung Pay. Using a credit card instead of a debit card will prevent your bank account from being drained if your information becomes compromised.3. Sign your name instead of using your PINIf paying with a debit card is your only option, sign for the purchase instead of typing in a personal the cashier to process the card as a credit card or by selecting credit card on the display.4. Be cautious when opening emailsAfter a big data breach makes the news, hackers ramp up efforts to steal by sending malicious emails about the breach or offers for free credit monitoring. A malicious email will contain links that direct you to fake websites that try to steal your information. If the email looks credible, go to the companys main website instead of clicking on any links inside the email. If a data breach has occurred, companies almost always provide information and instructions for those affected on their website.5. Monitor your accountsScan credit card and bank statements every month for any unauthorized charges. Pay close attention to small charges. Criminals only need to steal a small amount of money if they have stolen information from thousands of customers. No one should care as much about your money as you do. Check your bank statements and credit report frequently both now and after the latest data breach fades from the headlines.Protect your dataBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaIn the world we live in, its not a matter of if someone will try to steal your information but when. The latest major data breach at credit bureau Equifax affected 143 million U.S. consumers. Data breaches Brooks Brothers and Chipotle all made headlines. While youre checking Facebook 10 times a day, be diligent and check your online bank and credit card statements, too, because theft of credit card information through retail stores and restaurants is becoming more common, said Gary Warner, a cybersecurity expert and director of the Center for Information Assurance and Joint Forensics Research at University of Alabama at Birmingham. Advances in customer security include the addition of computer chips to credit and debit cards, but there are still many things people can do to protect themselves. safe when shopping or eating out.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 11 10 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 1. Never swipe your card if it has a chipThe magnetic stripes on traditional credit and debit cards store data, such as a cardholders name, card number, expiration date and country code. Whoever accesses this data can make purchases online or create a copy of the card. The chip encrypts your payment information.2. Consider using another form of paymentIf a merchant is unable to process chip card payments, consider using cash or mobile payment such as Apple Pay, Android Pay or Samsung Pay. Using a credit card instead of a debit card will prevent your bank account from being drained if your information becomes compromised.3. Sign your name instead of using your PINIf paying with a debit card is your only option, sign for the purchase instead of typing in a personal the cashier to process the card as a credit card or by selecting credit card on the display.4. Be cautious when opening emailsAfter a big data breach makes the news, hackers ramp up efforts to steal by sending malicious emails about the breach or offers for free credit monitoring. A malicious email will contain links that direct you to fake websites that try to steal your information. If the email looks credible, go to the companys main website instead of clicking on any links inside the email. If a data breach has occurred, companies almost always provide information and instructions for those affected on their website.5. Monitor your accountsScan credit card and bank statements every month for any unauthorized charges. Pay close attention to small charges. Criminals only need to steal a small amount of money if they have stolen information from thousands of customers. No one should care as much about your money as you do. Check your bank statements and credit report frequently both now and after the latest data breach fades from the headlines.Protect your dataBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaIn the world we live in, its not a matter of if someone will try to steal your information but when. The latest major data breach at credit bureau Equifax affected 143 million U.S. consumers. Data breaches Brooks Brothers and Chipotle all made headlines. While youre checking Facebook 10 times a day, be diligent and check your online bank and credit card statements, too, because theft of credit card information through retail stores and restaurants is becoming more common, said Gary Warner, a cybersecurity expert and director of the Center for Information Assurance and Joint Forensics Research at University of Alabama at Birmingham. Advances in customer security include the addition of computer chips to credit and debit cards, but there are still many things people can do to protect themselves. safe when shopping or eating out.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 13 12 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Retirees lead the nation in donating and volunteering, according to a Merrill Lynch Retirement Study conducted in partnership with Age Wave. The study, called Giving in Retirement: Americas Longevity Bonus, found that baby boomers are poised to give more than $8 trillion during the next 20 years. Broken down, that number is about $6.6 trillion in cash and $1.4 trillion in volunteer services, said Cyndi Hutchins, Merrill Lynchs The biggest surprise is not how much money they have to give, but how much time they will donate. They want to use their skills and experience to impact the greater good, Hutchins said. EXPERT VOLUNTEERS Baby boomers generate nearly half 45 percent of all volunteer hours, the study found. When you break it down thats about two to two-and-a-half hours a week. Compare that with the amount of time they spend watching TV, about 40 hours a week. Think of the impact they could have if they become week, Hutchins said. Charitable organizations have to reach out to retirees and make them feel welcome, Hutchins said. Often, people do not realize the value of what they have to contribute. We stereotype what we can do, she said. Organizations need to better communicate the value of the talent boomers bring to the table, she said. NOT THEIR PARENTS In contrast to the Silent Generation (their parents) who felt comfortable donating to large organizations and leaving it up to them to decide how the money was spent, boomers want to see how their donation will make an impact and understand how their money will be used. They want to control how the money is spent, Hutchins said. Compared to their parents generation, boomers are giving less money and volunteering less with religious and spiritual organizations, but are still inclined to give more than younger generations, Hutchins said. MORE FULFILLED Being charitable is a key ingredient to a better retirement, the study found. Before people retire, they report that the loss of a paycheck will be what they miss most, Hutchins said. After retirement, though, retirees report that what they miss most is feeling socially relevant and engaged. relevance and greater happiness, Hutchins said. Retirees are three times more likely to say helping others makes them happier than spending money on themselves (76 percent versus 24 percent). Retirees are also nearly six times more likely to say being than being wealthy. THE GENEROUS GENDER Women are increasingly taking control of inheritance and giving decisions, both to family and charitable causes, and not only because of their superior longevity. A woman taking the lead in a couples charitable decisionmaking is indicative of a shift were seeing. This is a generation of women who made their own money. With boomers, women and men are pretty much on the same generation of women who said, I made the money, I should have some control, Hutchins said. Women are more likely (90 percent) than men (79 percent) to how generous they are than how wealthy they are. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaAccording to an American Time Use Survey, retirees enjoy more leisure time than any other age group. While theres plenty of TV watching and visiting with the grandkids, retirees are also donating their time, energy and money to help to those in need. Retirees as robust givers with extended lifespans is good news for IN GIVING BACK BOOMERS FIND HAPPINESS

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 13 12 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Retirees lead the nation in donating and volunteering, according to a Merrill Lynch Retirement Study conducted in partnership with Age Wave. The study, called Giving in Retirement: Americas Longevity Bonus, found that baby boomers are poised to give more than $8 trillion during the next 20 years. Broken down, that number is about $6.6 trillion in cash and $1.4 trillion in volunteer services, said Cyndi Hutchins, Merrill Lynchs The biggest surprise is not how much money they have to give, but how much time they will donate. They want to use their skills and experience to impact the greater good, Hutchins said. EXPERT VOLUNTEERS Baby boomers generate nearly half 45 percent of all volunteer hours, the study found. When you break it down thats about two to two-and-a-half hours a week. Compare that with the amount of time they spend watching TV, about 40 hours a week. Think of the impact they could have if they become week, Hutchins said. Charitable organizations have to reach out to retirees and make them feel welcome, Hutchins said. Often, people do not realize the value of what they have to contribute. We stereotype what we can do, she said. Organizations need to better communicate the value of the talent boomers bring to the table, she said. NOT THEIR PARENTS In contrast to the Silent Generation (their parents) who felt comfortable donating to large organizations and leaving it up to them to decide how the money was spent, boomers want to see how their donation will make an impact and understand how their money will be used. They want to control how the money is spent, Hutchins said. Compared to their parents generation, boomers are giving less money and volunteering less with religious and spiritual organizations, but are still inclined to give more than younger generations, Hutchins said. MORE FULFILLED Being charitable is a key ingredient to a better retirement, the study found. Before people retire, they report that the loss of a paycheck will be what they miss most, Hutchins said. After retirement, though, retirees report that what they miss most is feeling socially relevant and engaged. relevance and greater happiness, Hutchins said. Retirees are three times more likely to say helping others makes them happier than spending money on themselves (76 percent versus 24 percent). Retirees are also nearly six times more likely to say being than being wealthy. THE GENEROUS GENDER Women are increasingly taking control of inheritance and giving decisions, both to family and charitable causes, and not only because of their superior longevity. A woman taking the lead in a couples charitable decisionmaking is indicative of a shift were seeing. This is a generation of women who made their own money. With boomers, women and men are pretty much on the same generation of women who said, I made the money, I should have some control, Hutchins said. Women are more likely (90 percent) than men (79 percent) to how generous they are than how wealthy they are. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaAccording to an American Time Use Survey, retirees enjoy more leisure time than any other age group. While theres plenty of TV watching and visiting with the grandkids, retirees are also donating their time, energy and money to help to those in need. Retirees as robust givers with extended lifespans is good news for IN GIVING BACK BOOMERS FIND HAPPINESS

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 15 14 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition People are used to planning for events such as a honeymoon or vacation where theyll go, what theyll do and how much theyll spend. By nature, we prioritize nearer-term things because they are more tangible and visible. Planning for retirement is a similar process, but even more important than planning for a short-term goal, because retirement will last much longer, potentially 20-30 years, McGurrin said.rf n Explore questions such as: Would you like to stay where you live now, or relocate closer to family? How will you spend your time? Hobbies, working, caring for grandchildren? Would you like to travel? Answering these types of questions will give you a great head start on what youll need to do, McGurrin said. The second step is to inventory how much income you may have in retirement and what all the needs and wants may cost. For example, retirees largest cost is typically housing. By determining where you may live and if you plan to downsize to less-expensive housing can help with tbffnThis planning process can help make sure youre both on the same page separately, then see how you compare, McGurrin said. Lastly, add detail and visualize your plan by imagining how you would spend a day in retirement as you write down your goals, McGurrin said.tfbBy creating and writing down a plan, a person is able to create a budget for now versus what they may spend in retirement. step is to explore what youll receive in Social Security income (see Social Securitys site ssa.gov). Some more good news is that people typically need only about 75 percent of the income they were earning before retirement to maintain their lifestyle in retirement, McGurrin said. For those who havent started to plan for retirement, McGurrin said it can actually be a fun exercise of thinking of what you might like to do in the The quicker you start planning and saving for retirement the more youll have time on your side, he said.By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaN ot surprisingly, people who write down their retirement plan report feeling more prepared for the future. Studies have shown that many people stop working at an earlier age than they anticipated. Some due to their own choice and some due to circumstances beyond their control. Those that have a plan will be in better shape when determining how to move forward. Sometimes its helpful to plan for the worst Life is unpredictable, and no retirement plays out as expected years earlier. work toward their goal. Without a plan, you may short-term and not making any progress toward what youd like to do long-term. Dont be surprised if your plan changes over time to adjust to unplanned life events, McGurrin said. O dreaming occurs. While scientists dont fully understand sleep and its connection to aging, a new risk of developing dementia. In the dream stage, the eyes move rapidly and there is increased brain activity, higher body temperature, quicker pulse and faster breathing. half into sleep and then recurs multiple times throughout the night as sleep cycles repeat. Sleep disturbances are common in dementia but little is known about the various stages of sleep and whether they play a role in dementia risk, said study author Matthew P. Pase, of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia. We set out to discover which stages of sleep may be linked sleep, we did with REM sleep. The people who developed dementia spent an average of 17 percent of sleep time in REM sleep, compared to 20 percent for those who did not develop dementia. For every percent reduction in REM sleep there was a 9 percent increase in the risk of dementia. physician and author of Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day, offers the following tips to achieve good sleep: 1. Establish a calming bedtime routine. 2. If you are not sleepy, get out of the bedroom and do something relaxing. 3. Avoid behaviors like caffeine after noon, alcohol to help you sleep, and computers and electronic devices for at least 60 minutes before bedtime. 4. If you cannot stay asleep, consult with your doctor. There may be an underlying sleep or medical disorder that is the cause.Study links dementia risk, REM sleep timeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 15 14 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition People are used to planning for events such as a honeymoon or vacation where theyll go, what theyll do and how much theyll spend. By nature, we prioritize nearer-term things because they are more tangible and visible. Planning for retirement is a similar process, but even more important than planning for a short-term goal, because retirement will last much longer, potentially 20-30 years, McGurrin said.rf n Explore questions such as: Would you like to stay where you live now, or relocate closer to family? How will you spend your time? Hobbies, working, caring for grandchildren? Would you like to travel? Answering these types of questions will give you a great head start on what youll need to do, McGurrin said. The second step is to inventory how much income you may have in retirement and what all the needs and wants may cost. For example, retirees largest cost is typically housing. By determining where you may live and if you plan to downsize to less-expensive housing can help with tbffnThis planning process can help make sure youre both on the same page separately, then see how you compare, McGurrin said. Lastly, add detail and visualize your plan by imagining how you would spend a day in retirement as you write down your goals, McGurrin said.tfbBy creating and writing down a plan, a person is able to create a budget for now versus what they may spend in retirement. step is to explore what youll receive in Social Security income (see Social Securitys site ssa.gov). Some more good news is that people typically need only about 75 percent of the income they were earning before retirement to maintain their lifestyle in retirement, McGurrin said. For those who havent started to plan for retirement, McGurrin said it can actually be a fun exercise of thinking of what you might like to do in the The quicker you start planning and saving for retirement the more youll have time on your side, he said.By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaN ot surprisingly, people who write down their retirement plan report feeling more prepared for the future. Studies have shown that many people stop working at an earlier age than they anticipated. Some due to their own choice and some due to circumstances beyond their control. Those that have a plan will be in better shape when determining how to move forward. Sometimes its helpful to plan for the worst Life is unpredictable, and no retirement plays out as expected years earlier. work toward their goal. Without a plan, you may short-term and not making any progress toward what youd like to do long-term. Dont be surprised if your plan changes over time to adjust to unplanned life events, McGurrin said. O dreaming occurs. While scientists dont fully understand sleep and its connection to aging, a new risk of developing dementia. In the dream stage, the eyes move rapidly and there is increased brain activity, higher body temperature, quicker pulse and faster breathing. half into sleep and then recurs multiple times throughout the night as sleep cycles repeat. Sleep disturbances are common in dementia but little is known about the various stages of sleep and whether they play a role in dementia risk, said study author Matthew P. Pase, of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia. We set out to discover which stages of sleep may be linked sleep, we did with REM sleep. The people who developed dementia spent an average of 17 percent of sleep time in REM sleep, compared to 20 percent for those who did not develop dementia. For every percent reduction in REM sleep there was a 9 percent increase in the risk of dementia. physician and author of Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day, offers the following tips to achieve good sleep: 1. Establish a calming bedtime routine. 2. If you are not sleepy, get out of the bedroom and do something relaxing. 3. Avoid behaviors like caffeine after noon, alcohol to help you sleep, and computers and electronic devices for at least 60 minutes before bedtime. 4. If you cannot stay asleep, consult with your doctor. There may be an underlying sleep or medical disorder that is the cause.Study links dementia risk, REM sleep timeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 17 16 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Nearing retirement, its a smart move to start thinking about a post-career budget. Middle-income baby boomers say theyre increasingly reliant on Social Security for their primary source of retirement income, according to a new report that details the mindset of current and soon-to-be retirees. Four in 10 (38 percent) middle-income boomers expect to rely on Social Security for their primary source of retirement income, up more than 25 percent from before 3, according to the study, which was commissioned by the Bankers Life Center for a Secure Retirement. Almost 10 years after the crisis and recession began, half of middle-income boomers feel the economy has recovered somewhat, yet two-thirds feel they have not personally lifetime. I am very concerned that so many older Americans may be so dependent on Social Security income in their retirement years. Even at current levels, Social Security is barely adequate to meet the most basic needs of those who rely on it as a supplement to other retirement income sources, said Bruce McClary, vice president of communications for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Based on those who seek credit and budget counseling from NFCC member agencies, we know that many seniors are also dealing with credit card debt and increased medical expenses. In some cases, they may also have lingering student loan commitments. The best advice is to make the most of the income generated before retirement begins, McClary said. The top priority should be to pay off as much debt as possible, especially high-interest credit cards. Living debtfree allows retirees to allocate more of their limited income to necessities like food, shelter and health care, McClary said. retirement, you have to focus on what you can control the earlier the better, said Joe Ready, director of Wells Fargo Institutional Retirement and Trust. are things you can control, including the age at which you retire, your savings rate and household budget, he said. In your early 50s you have the asset of time. Youre early with open eyes. What does it look like if you retire at 62, 65, 67? You have assets, possibly a frozen pension and Social Security. If you can hang in there (keep working) to 65, it can make a big monthly difference, Ready said. Next, think about when you want to start collecting Social Security. If youve saved a decent amount in your 401(k), you can put off collecting Social Security. The age you start withdrawing Social Security does not have to correspond with the age you retire, Ready said. thinking about a household budget. Determine how much money will be coming in and where will you be spending it, Ready said. Set a savings plan in motion. Saving 1 or 2 percent more a month can make a big difference over 10 years, Ready said. PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT BUDGETWHATS YOUR NUMBER?By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 17 16 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Nearing retirement, its a smart move to start thinking about a post-career budget. Middle-income baby boomers say theyre increasingly reliant on Social Security for their primary source of retirement income, according to a new report that details the mindset of current and soon-to-be retirees. Four in 10 (38 percent) middle-income boomers expect to rely on Social Security for their primary source of retirement income, up more than 25 percent from before 3, according to the study, which was commissioned by the Bankers Life Center for a Secure Retirement. Almost 10 years after the crisis and recession began, half of middle-income boomers feel the economy has recovered somewhat, yet two-thirds feel they have not personally lifetime. I am very concerned that so many older Americans may be so dependent on Social Security income in their retirement years. Even at current levels, Social Security is barely adequate to meet the most basic needs of those who rely on it as a supplement to other retirement income sources, said Bruce McClary, vice president of communications for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Based on those who seek credit and budget counseling from NFCC member agencies, we know that many seniors are also dealing with credit card debt and increased medical expenses. In some cases, they may also have lingering student loan commitments. The best advice is to make the most of the income generated before retirement begins, McClary said. The top priority should be to pay off as much debt as possible, especially high-interest credit cards. Living debtfree allows retirees to allocate more of their limited income to necessities like food, shelter and health care, McClary said. retirement, you have to focus on what you can control the earlier the better, said Joe Ready, director of Wells Fargo Institutional Retirement and Trust. are things you can control, including the age at which you retire, your savings rate and household budget, he said. In your early 50s you have the asset of time. Youre early with open eyes. What does it look like if you retire at 62, 65, 67? You have assets, possibly a frozen pension and Social Security. If you can hang in there (keep working) to 65, it can make a big monthly difference, Ready said. Next, think about when you want to start collecting Social Security. If youve saved a decent amount in your 401(k), you can put off collecting Social Security. The age you start withdrawing Social Security does not have to correspond with the age you retire, Ready said. thinking about a household budget. Determine how much money will be coming in and where will you be spending it, Ready said. Set a savings plan in motion. Saving 1 or 2 percent more a month can make a big difference over 10 years, Ready said. PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT BUDGETWHATS YOUR NUMBER?By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 19 18 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition W themselves suddenly single as they near retirement age face tough economic insurance coverage and Social Security concerns are just some of the issues that need to be understood. While divorce is becoming less common for younger adults, the divorce rate for people 50 and up has roughly doubled since the 1990s, according to the Pew Research Center. After rising sharply over the past 25 years, the divorce rate for adults 50 and older has remained relatively steady since 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureaus yearly American Community Survey. Whether youre suddenly single because of divorce or death, change at this stage of life can leave people and Money Matters, Greenwich, Connecticut. The higher earner, who is usually but not always the man, is much more likely to be better off 10 years after a divorce even if the divorce was equitable, even if there was spousal maintenance, said Dave Hamra, analyst and owner of Gordian Advisors in Tucson, Arizona. HEALTH INSURANCEEven a short gap in health coverage can expose people health insurance through their partners employer, he or she may be at risk of a gap in coverage before qualifying for Medicare. You have a right to continue coverage under COBRA for 36 months, but the cost could be exorbitantly expensive, Vasileff said. Its a good short-term solution, but you should investigate your options. Is there insurance available through your own employer? Health insurance can also be a part of the divorce negotiation and settlement, Hamra said.THE HOUSEOne of the biggest issues is the family home. People get nervous for change. Emotions get in the way. They dont want to disrupt their kids or sell the home they raised the kids in, Hamra said. Think about resale value, maintenance costs and taxes.SPLITTING ASSETSIn addition to the home and other property, retirement assets and Social Security also need to be split up. Think about what youll receive in terms of investment and dont forget about the tax implications, Vasileff said. Be aware that what youre receiving on paper is not always the same as after-tax value. So a lump sum settlement of $400,000 on paper may be worth less after capital-gains taxes are applied. When it comes to Social Security, a couple must have been married for 10 years before a spouse is entitled to Its good, but its just half, and keep in mind that if he added. SUDDENLY SINGLE: MONEY QUESTIONS TO ANSWER AFTER DIVORCE, DEATHBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 19 18 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition W themselves suddenly single as they near retirement age face tough economic insurance coverage and Social Security concerns are just some of the issues that need to be understood. While divorce is becoming less common for younger adults, the divorce rate for people 50 and up has roughly doubled since the 1990s, according to the Pew Research Center. After rising sharply over the past 25 years, the divorce rate for adults 50 and older has remained relatively steady since 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureaus yearly American Community Survey. Whether youre suddenly single because of divorce or death, change at this stage of life can leave people and Money Matters, Greenwich, Connecticut. The higher earner, who is usually but not always the man, is much more likely to be better off 10 years after a divorce even if the divorce was equitable, even if there was spousal maintenance, said Dave Hamra, analyst and owner of Gordian Advisors in Tucson, Arizona. HEALTH INSURANCEEven a short gap in health coverage can expose people health insurance through their partners employer, he or she may be at risk of a gap in coverage before qualifying for Medicare. You have a right to continue coverage under COBRA for 36 months, but the cost could be exorbitantly expensive, Vasileff said. Its a good short-term solution, but you should investigate your options. Is there insurance available through your own employer? Health insurance can also be a part of the divorce negotiation and settlement, Hamra said.THE HOUSEOne of the biggest issues is the family home. People get nervous for change. Emotions get in the way. They dont want to disrupt their kids or sell the home they raised the kids in, Hamra said. Think about resale value, maintenance costs and taxes.SPLITTING ASSETSIn addition to the home and other property, retirement assets and Social Security also need to be split up. Think about what youll receive in terms of investment and dont forget about the tax implications, Vasileff said. Be aware that what youre receiving on paper is not always the same as after-tax value. So a lump sum settlement of $400,000 on paper may be worth less after capital-gains taxes are applied. When it comes to Social Security, a couple must have been married for 10 years before a spouse is entitled to Its good, but its just half, and keep in mind that if he added. SUDDENLY SINGLE: MONEY QUESTIONS TO ANSWER AFTER DIVORCE, DEATHBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 21 20 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition The age pattern of women living alone has remained stable over the past 25 years, while the percentage of male older adults increased from 33 percent to 48 percent. is on the rise among middle-aged adults, said Susan L. Brown, professor of sociology and co-director of the (divorce for people older than 50) and the small but increasing share of midlife adults who have never been married. The lifestyle comes with challenges, but they can be met by planning in advance.LIVING ALONE IS EXPENSIVEIndividuals forgo the economies of scale that come from living with others. In addition to possible economic challenges in terms of being able to afford to live alone, independently without occasional help with tasks of daily living, Brown said.LONELINESS AND ISOLATIONThe biggest challenges facing older adults living on their own are loneliness and isolation, which impact health, well-being and quality of life, said Jenny Werwa, spokeswoman for the National Aging in Place Council. Trips out of the house are not as simple as they used to be maybe because the car keys were relinquished years ago or the steps outside the front door are too hard to climb and that makes the social interactions people used to enjoy fewer and far between. Limited comfortably going out and doing the things they once loved to do.AGING IN PLACETheres a saying about the strength of weak ties, said Sarah Szanton, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing professor and associate director for policy at the Center on Innovative Care in Aging. Family is a strong tie, but neighbors, church friends and the people at the grocery to age in place. It can often be the right decision. People do usually want to age in place, Szanton said.WHAT CAN FAMILIES DO?If you or someone you love might be lonely, plan a visit or look for resources that can facilitate a trip out, Werwa said. Transportation services and rideshare groups offer discounts to older adults, and senior centers offer free social gatherings and activities. When people are thinking ahead about staying in their homes, instead of in a group facility, its important to anticipate their potential needs as and entertainment. Planning ahead makes living alone work, said Ted Reed, former board chairman and current board member of Friends Center City in Philadelphia. When you need help, how are you going to access it? you can trust, Reed said. This is especially true if adult children dont live nearby. The National Aging in Place Council offers a workbook, the Act III template, to help plan ahead. Visit ageinplace. org. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaThe number of adults living on their own is on the rise. A 25year study from the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University found that 13.4 percent of the adult population were living alone and the majority were women 55 and older. OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES OF LIVING ALONE

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 21 20 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition The age pattern of women living alone has remained stable over the past 25 years, while the percentage of male older adults increased from 33 percent to 48 percent. is on the rise among middle-aged adults, said Susan L. Brown, professor of sociology and co-director of the (divorce for people older than 50) and the small but increasing share of midlife adults who have never been married. The lifestyle comes with challenges, but they can be met by planning in advance.LIVING ALONE IS EXPENSIVEIndividuals forgo the economies of scale that come from living with others. In addition to possible economic challenges in terms of being able to afford to live alone, independently without occasional help with tasks of daily living, Brown said.LONELINESS AND ISOLATIONThe biggest challenges facing older adults living on their own are loneliness and isolation, which impact health, well-being and quality of life, said Jenny Werwa, spokeswoman for the National Aging in Place Council. Trips out of the house are not as simple as they used to be maybe because the car keys were relinquished years ago or the steps outside the front door are too hard to climb and that makes the social interactions people used to enjoy fewer and far between. Limited comfortably going out and doing the things they once loved to do.AGING IN PLACETheres a saying about the strength of weak ties, said Sarah Szanton, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing professor and associate director for policy at the Center on Innovative Care in Aging. Family is a strong tie, but neighbors, church friends and the people at the grocery to age in place. It can often be the right decision. People do usually want to age in place, Szanton said.WHAT CAN FAMILIES DO?If you or someone you love might be lonely, plan a visit or look for resources that can facilitate a trip out, Werwa said. Transportation services and rideshare groups offer discounts to older adults, and senior centers offer free social gatherings and activities. When people are thinking ahead about staying in their homes, instead of in a group facility, its important to anticipate their potential needs as and entertainment. Planning ahead makes living alone work, said Ted Reed, former board chairman and current board member of Friends Center City in Philadelphia. When you need help, how are you going to access it? you can trust, Reed said. This is especially true if adult children dont live nearby. The National Aging in Place Council offers a workbook, the Act III template, to help plan ahead. Visit ageinplace. org. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaThe number of adults living on their own is on the rise. A 25year study from the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University found that 13.4 percent of the adult population were living alone and the majority were women 55 and older. OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGES OF LIVING ALONE

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 23 22 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition When kids hit a certain age they have their own ideas. When its the holiday season, those ideas may clash with what the family has traditionally done. Children of divorce may have to choose whom to to share their adult children, and kids need to respect family plans. The key to happy holidays is being open and avoiding hurt feelings. Two words come to mind: Respect and compromise, said Elaine Heffner, psychotherapist and parent educator in private practice in New York City, a senior lecturer in psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and GateHouse Media syndicated columnist. Heffner said. Ideally, the lines of communication are already open. some way to come to a compromise. Thats what compromise means: It may not be exactly the way its and a happy holiday, it can work, Heffner said.Bring it upClear communication of expectations and planning ahead are key elements of keeping peace in the family during holiday time, said marriage and family therapist Courtney Stivers of Summit Family Therapy in Peoria, Illinois. Adult kids may want to host a holiday gathering themselves or focus more on their immediate families. This is a natural part of how young families develop across the lifespan. Much like getting married or leaving for college, this is yet another step in letting go of how things have always it helpful to stay focused on the time you do have together. It might even been fun to take a last-minute weekend getaway if the kids are not coming home.Time togetherFamilies are about loyalty and obligation, so when a child chooses to spend time apart from the traditional family gathering, parents may feel she is being disloyal, said Suzanne Bartle-Haring, professor and program director of Couple and Family Therapy at Ohio State University. Setting aside time to be together is whats important. People get caught up in the day, but you can celebrate together another day. Carve out time together, BartleHaring said.Celebrate when you canFamily traditions are important and should be celebrated; however, families are also in a constant state of change. Between weddings, babies, crosscountry moves and break-ups, you may not get that picture-perfect Christmas card experience every year, Stivers said. What is most important is cherishing those fun times and never missing a chance to tell someone how much you care.Being together long-distanceIf you cant be together in person, you can still connect. With all the new technology we have, it might be fun to join by a video service like Skype. I have used this for long-distance family members to join my childrens birthday parties during military service. We were able to connect much more than on a phone call and share the actual experience, Stivers said. Stretching family ties: How to ease the stress of changing holiday traditionsBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 23 22 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition When kids hit a certain age they have their own ideas. When its the holiday season, those ideas may clash with what the family has traditionally done. Children of divorce may have to choose whom to to share their adult children, and kids need to respect family plans. The key to happy holidays is being open and avoiding hurt feelings. Two words come to mind: Respect and compromise, said Elaine Heffner, psychotherapist and parent educator in private practice in New York City, a senior lecturer in psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and GateHouse Media syndicated columnist. Heffner said. Ideally, the lines of communication are already open. some way to come to a compromise. Thats what compromise means: It may not be exactly the way its and a happy holiday, it can work, Heffner said.Bring it upClear communication of expectations and planning ahead are key elements of keeping peace in the family during holiday time, said marriage and family therapist Courtney Stivers of Summit Family Therapy in Peoria, Illinois. Adult kids may want to host a holiday gathering themselves or focus more on their immediate families. This is a natural part of how young families develop across the lifespan. Much like getting married or leaving for college, this is yet another step in letting go of how things have always it helpful to stay focused on the time you do have together. It might even been fun to take a last-minute weekend getaway if the kids are not coming home.Time togetherFamilies are about loyalty and obligation, so when a child chooses to spend time apart from the traditional family gathering, parents may feel she is being disloyal, said Suzanne Bartle-Haring, professor and program director of Couple and Family Therapy at Ohio State University. Setting aside time to be together is whats important. People get caught up in the day, but you can celebrate together another day. Carve out time together, BartleHaring said.Celebrate when you canFamily traditions are important and should be celebrated; however, families are also in a constant state of change. Between weddings, babies, crosscountry moves and break-ups, you may not get that picture-perfect Christmas card experience every year, Stivers said. What is most important is cherishing those fun times and never missing a chance to tell someone how much you care.Being together long-distanceIf you cant be together in person, you can still connect. With all the new technology we have, it might be fun to join by a video service like Skype. I have used this for long-distance family members to join my childrens birthday parties during military service. We were able to connect much more than on a phone call and share the actual experience, Stivers said. Stretching family ties: How to ease the stress of changing holiday traditionsBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 25 24 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition community pharmacist in an independent pharmacy, all pharmacies are required to hang a poster advising patients of their rights as far as their medications go. There is mandatory patient counseling on any new prescription or dose change of a currently prescribed medication, but of course the patient has a right to decline, said Person. Too often people skip the chance to have a one-on-one conversation with a knowledgeable pharmacist. People are often intimidated when they look behind the counter. They see us and we look busy. We are busy but never too busy. Or they dont want to bother the pharmacist or think they know all they need to already. Contrary to what people may think, pharmacists like to talk. We want to make sure patients take the right medications and get the should be asking your pharmacist: 1. WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE MEDICATION, AND WHAT IS IT SUPPOSED TO DO? A patient should know the names and uses of all the medications being taken. Additionally, prescription error does occur. Drug X might be used to treat high blood pressure, but a patient may say I dont have high blood error, Person said. 2. WHEN AND HOW DO I TAKE IT? Taking medication correctly is important so that it can give you the help you expect. Do you take the medication for the next week or for the rest of your life? This is an opportunity to ask the pharmacist what to do if you miss a dose. A good question, Person said, is If you forgot to take the medicine in the morning, is it allowable to double up in the evening? Also, should the medication be taken with food? Should it be taken at the same time each day? In the case of antibiotics, many people begin to feel better after a few day of treatment and do not complete the full prescription regiment. Instead they tuck the bottle away for later use, which has led to antibiotic resistance, Person said. The antibiotic was able to get rid of most, but not all, of the bacteria that was causing the illness. When you stop taking the antibiotic, those leftover bacteria eventually reproduce and multiply, which will lead to your doctor needing to prescribe an even stronger antibiotic in the future. 3. WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS, AND WHAT SHOULD I DO IF THEY OCCUR? All medications can cause side effects that may interfere with therapy, Person said. If the side effects make a person feel poorly, he may want to stop taking the medication, he said. A pharmacist can switch the medication to a different drug class that may relieve the side effects or to an extended-dose medication. Instead of taking a medicine three or four times a day, youll just take it once a day. 4. WILL THE NEW MEDICINE WORK SAFELY WITH OTHER MEDICINES AND SUPPLEMENTS IM ALREADY TAKING? Other prescriptions or vitamin supplements can interact with a new medication, resulting in increased or decreased effects of the drug, Person said. Never take a new medication without speaking to your pharmacist about how it will react with your other medicines. 5. WHAT FOODS, DRINK OR ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE AVOIDED WHILE TAKING A NEW MEDICATION? Some medications cant be taken with certain foods and beverages. For example, cholesterol-lowering drugs should not be taken with grapefruit juice, and people with high blood pressure should be careful with salt substitutes or alcohol, among other things. In some cases the interaction can be harmful, Person said. Central nervous system depressants, such as prescription pain medications and some over-the-counter cold and allergy medicines, should never be taken with alcohol. PHARM-ASSISTANCE IMPORTANT QUESTIONS FOR YOUR PHARMACISTA visit to the pharmacy can be more than just a quick stop to pick up a prescription or supplies for the medicine cabinet. Its also a convenient time to have an important medical conversation with your pharmacist. California Pharmacists Association. Pharmacists are trained to help patients manage their medications By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 25 24 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition community pharmacist in an independent pharmacy, all pharmacies are required to hang a poster advising patients of their rights as far as their medications go. There is mandatory patient counseling on any new prescription or dose change of a currently prescribed medication, but of course the patient has a right to decline, said Person. Too often people skip the chance to have a one-on-one conversation with a knowledgeable pharmacist. People are often intimidated when they look behind the counter. They see us and we look busy. We are busy but never too busy. Or they dont want to bother the pharmacist or think they know all they need to already. Contrary to what people may think, pharmacists like to talk. We want to make sure patients take the right medications and get the should be asking your pharmacist: 1. WHAT IS THE NAME OF THE MEDICATION, AND WHAT IS IT SUPPOSED TO DO? A patient should know the names and uses of all the medications being taken. Additionally, prescription error does occur. Drug X might be used to treat high blood pressure, but a patient may say I dont have high blood error, Person said. 2. WHEN AND HOW DO I TAKE IT? Taking medication correctly is important so that it can give you the help you expect. Do you take the medication for the next week or for the rest of your life? This is an opportunity to ask the pharmacist what to do if you miss a dose. A good question, Person said, is If you forgot to take the medicine in the morning, is it allowable to double up in the evening? Also, should the medication be taken with food? Should it be taken at the same time each day? In the case of antibiotics, many people begin to feel better after a few day of treatment and do not complete the full prescription regiment. Instead they tuck the bottle away for later use, which has led to antibiotic resistance, Person said. The antibiotic was able to get rid of most, but not all, of the bacteria that was causing the illness. When you stop taking the antibiotic, those leftover bacteria eventually reproduce and multiply, which will lead to your doctor needing to prescribe an even stronger antibiotic in the future. 3. WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS, AND WHAT SHOULD I DO IF THEY OCCUR? All medications can cause side effects that may interfere with therapy, Person said. If the side effects make a person feel poorly, he may want to stop taking the medication, he said. A pharmacist can switch the medication to a different drug class that may relieve the side effects or to an extended-dose medication. Instead of taking a medicine three or four times a day, youll just take it once a day. 4. WILL THE NEW MEDICINE WORK SAFELY WITH OTHER MEDICINES AND SUPPLEMENTS IM ALREADY TAKING? Other prescriptions or vitamin supplements can interact with a new medication, resulting in increased or decreased effects of the drug, Person said. Never take a new medication without speaking to your pharmacist about how it will react with your other medicines. 5. WHAT FOODS, DRINK OR ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE AVOIDED WHILE TAKING A NEW MEDICATION? Some medications cant be taken with certain foods and beverages. For example, cholesterol-lowering drugs should not be taken with grapefruit juice, and people with high blood pressure should be careful with salt substitutes or alcohol, among other things. In some cases the interaction can be harmful, Person said. Central nervous system depressants, such as prescription pain medications and some over-the-counter cold and allergy medicines, should never be taken with alcohol.PHARM-ASSISTANCE IMPORTANT QUESTIONS FOR YOUR PHARMACISTA visit to the pharmacy can be more than just a quick stop to pick up a prescription or supplies for the medicine cabinet. Its also a convenient time to have an important medical conversation with your pharmacist. California Pharmacists Association. Pharmacists are trained to help patients manage their medications By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 27 26 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Theres a problem with hearing aids or with the people who wear them. While hearing aids can help correct hearing loss, many people fail to adjust them as needed and often end up not using them. In response, a University of Missouri improve hearing-aid wear time among adults. More than half of older adults have some form of hearing loss that affects everyday activities, as well as assistant professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri. Hearing loss is related to other health problems. The biggest one is dementia, Lane said. If you experience hearing loss, you are 12 times more likely to be diagnosed with dementia. If you cant hear, you cant respond. You dont want to be thought of as a confused older person just because you cant hear.What to expectWhile hearing aids are an excellent solution to the Older people often go as long as 15 to 20 years denying that they have a hearing problem, Lane said: Its not their hearing; its that you mumble, for example. After so long untreated, when they put on a hearing aid, they are bombarded with noise that can be overwhelming, Lane said. Hearing aids have improved dramatically over the years, with a huge array of options available, Lane said. They are not necessarily as clunky and large as you might think. Additionally, people have to overcome the stigma that hearing aids make them old, Lane said. The sooner a person receives treatment for hearing loss the better the outcome will be.Easing inTo help adults adjust to hearing aid use, Lane developed the Hearing Aid Reintroduction (HEAR) program. HEAR is a gradual method to support adjustment to hearing aids. The intervention starts small, with one hour of use on day one, increasing slowly to 10 hours on day 30. In addition, sound complexity increases, beginning with sounds the house makes such as fans and the dishwasher to complex listening situations such as in a restaurant or theater. A self-guided workbook provides instructions, tips and encouragement, and patients record their progress in a journal as well as questions or concerns for their audiologist. To test the HEAR system, Lane enlisted individuals who had previously tried hearing aids but failed to adjust to time. We found an 80 percent increase in patients hearingaid wear time due to the intervention, Lane said. The patients also were able to tolerate more complex noises and reported more satisfaction with their hearing aids. This avoids hearing-aid-in-a-drawer syndrome, where people who are unhappy with their hearing aids simply put them away and dont seek further treatment. The Food and Drug Administration has ruled that people have up to 30 days to return a hearing aid, but most dont return them or even go back to the audiologist. They fall through the cracks, Lane said. If youve been diagnosed to wear a hearing aid, Lanes By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaA betterapproachto usinghearingaids

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 27 26 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Theres a problem with hearing aids or with the people who wear them. While hearing aids can help correct hearing loss, many people fail to adjust them as needed and often end up not using them. In response, a University of Missouri improve hearing-aid wear time among adults. More than half of older adults have some form of hearing loss that affects everyday activities, as well as assistant professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri. Hearing loss is related to other health problems. The biggest one is dementia, Lane said. If you experience hearing loss, you are 12 times more likely to be diagnosed with dementia. If you cant hear, you cant respond. You dont want to be thought of as a confused older person just because you cant hear.What to expectWhile hearing aids are an excellent solution to the Older people often go as long as 15 to 20 years denying that they have a hearing problem, Lane said: Its not their hearing; its that you mumble, for example. After so long untreated, when they put on a hearing aid, they are bombarded with noise that can be overwhelming, Lane said. Hearing aids have improved dramatically over the years, with a huge array of options available, Lane said. They are not necessarily as clunky and large as you might think. Additionally, people have to overcome the stigma that hearing aids make them old, Lane said. The sooner a person receives treatment for hearing loss the better the outcome will be.Easing inTo help adults adjust to hearing aid use, Lane developed the Hearing Aid Reintroduction (HEAR) program. HEAR is a gradual method to support adjustment to hearing aids. The intervention starts small, with one hour of use on day one, increasing slowly to 10 hours on day 30. In addition, sound complexity increases, beginning with sounds the house makes such as fans and the dishwasher to complex listening situations such as in a restaurant or theater. A self-guided workbook provides instructions, tips and encouragement, and patients record their progress in a journal as well as questions or concerns for their audiologist. To test the HEAR system, Lane enlisted individuals who had previously tried hearing aids but failed to adjust to time. We found an 80 percent increase in patients hearingaid wear time due to the intervention, Lane said. The patients also were able to tolerate more complex noises and reported more satisfaction with their hearing aids. This avoids hearing-aid-in-a-drawer syndrome, where people who are unhappy with their hearing aids simply put them away and dont seek further treatment. The Food and Drug Administration has ruled that people have up to 30 days to return a hearing aid, but most dont return them or even go back to the audiologist. They fall through the cracks, Lane said. If youve been diagnosed to wear a hearing aid, Lanes By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaA betterapproachto usinghearingaids

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 29 28 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition To help folks understand their dietary needs, nutrition scientists at Tufts University with help from the AARP Foundation recently updated MyPlate for Older Adults, basic food groups. MyPlate for Older Adults is intended to help people improve the quality of their diet in terms of foods and nutrients. It was not designed to help people track calories or use for weight control, said Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University near Boston. It is never too late to make smart changes in your diet. Shifting towards healthier food choices can improve symptoms or decrease risk for developing chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease all of which are more common in older than younger adults, Lichtenstein said. In general, nutritional requirements are similar across age ranges except for calcium and vitamin D, which are higher in older adults, Lichtenstein said. The big challenge is that caloric needs decline with increasing age, which means we need less food to maintain a stable weight, Lichtenstein said. Your food choices are more important to ensure you body is getting enough nutrients. We advise everyone, particularly older adults, to select nutrient-dense foods. That means foods that have a high concentration of nutrients per serving, Lichtenstein said. For example, using some fresh spinach in a salad in place of iceberg lettuce, eating deeply colored vegetables and fruits in place of apples and pears (although they are good choices some of the time). The higher the nutrient content.Load up on fruits and veggiesLooking at MyPlate for Older Adults, half of it is covered by fruits, vegetables, healthy oils and herbs. Produce fresh, frozen or even low-sodium canned cancers, diabetes, obesity and more. For fruits and vegetables, take advantage of season varieties and the excellent bags of frozen produce now available in the markets. Have vegetable oils in the house and use them for food preparation and in things like salad dressings. With regard to herbs the suggestion is to use them in place of salt to reduced sodium intakes, Lichtenstein said.Go whole-grain Read labels and within each category, including pasta and bread, select products which list whole grain as the these days, Lichtenstein said.Protein should be leanChoose a variety of protein-rich foods and those with lower fat contents, including lean meat over heavily marbled meat, nonfat and low-fat dairy products in place of full fat. Consider non-meat sources of protein occasionally such as nuts and nut butters, tofu, beans. I would suggest experimenting there might be new foods that turn out to be hits, Lichtenstein said. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaBetter-eating guidelines for older adultsYou might notice you just cant eat like you used to. Spicy chili may disagree with your tummy, or your taste buds may not feel as receptive as they once were. One thing is certain: Your bodys nutritional needs change as you age.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 29 28 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition To help folks understand their dietary needs, nutrition scientists at Tufts University with help from the AARP Foundation recently updated MyPlate for Older Adults, basic food groups. MyPlate for Older Adults is intended to help people improve the quality of their diet in terms of foods and nutrients. It was not designed to help people track calories or use for weight control, said Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University near Boston. It is never too late to make smart changes in your diet. Shifting towards healthier food choices can improve symptoms or decrease risk for developing chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease all of which are more common in older than younger adults, Lichtenstein said. In general, nutritional requirements are similar across age ranges except for calcium and vitamin D, which are higher in older adults, Lichtenstein said. The big challenge is that caloric needs decline with increasing age, which means we need less food to maintain a stable weight, Lichtenstein said. Your food choices are more important to ensure you body is getting enough nutrients. We advise everyone, particularly older adults, to select nutrient-dense foods. That means foods that have a high concentration of nutrients per serving, Lichtenstein said. For example, using some fresh spinach in a salad in place of iceberg lettuce, eating deeply colored vegetables and fruits in place of apples and pears (although they are good choices some of the time). The higher the nutrient content.Load up on fruits and veggiesLooking at MyPlate for Older Adults, half of it is covered by fruits, vegetables, healthy oils and herbs. Produce fresh, frozen or even low-sodium canned cancers, diabetes, obesity and more. For fruits and vegetables, take advantage of season varieties and the excellent bags of frozen produce now available in the markets. Have vegetable oils in the house and use them for food preparation and in things like salad dressings. With regard to herbs the suggestion is to use them in place of salt to reduced sodium intakes, Lichtenstein said.Go whole-grain Read labels and within each category, including pasta and bread, select products which list whole grain as the these days, Lichtenstein said.Protein should be leanChoose a variety of protein-rich foods and those with lower fat contents, including lean meat over heavily marbled meat, nonfat and low-fat dairy products in place of full fat. Consider non-meat sources of protein occasionally such as nuts and nut butters, tofu, beans. I would suggest experimenting there might be new foods that turn out to be hits, Lichtenstein said. By Melissa Erickson, GateHouse MediaBetter-eating guidelines for older adultsYou might notice you just cant eat like you used to. Spicy chili may disagree with your tummy, or your taste buds may not feel as receptive as they once were. One thing is certain: Your bodys nutritional needs change as you age.

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 31 30 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Its no surprise that sitting for prolonged periods is not healthy for your body. It all takes a toll: sitting at a worst of all, sitting on the couch and binge-watching TV. taking its toll on our mobility, especially for people 50 television a day and reported three or fewer hours of exercise a week were 65 percent more likely to have years later, according to a new study from the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. TV viewing is a very potent risk factor for disability in older age, said lead author of the study Dr. Loretta DiPietro, chairwoman of the Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at the Milken Institute. Sitting and watching TV for long periods (especially in the evening) has got to be one of the most dangerous things that older people can do because they are much more susceptible to the damages of physical inactivity. The study included more than 134,000 participants who were taking part in a national research project sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and AARP. It assessed all types of sedentary behavior, as well as light, moderate and vigorous physical activity in people ages 50 to 71 across eight to 10 years. Those who sat the most and moved the least had three study compared to more-active participants. For people who were the most physically active (seven or more hours a week), sitting for longer periods (up to six hours) was not associated with excess mobility disability. It seems this may be a consequence of getting older. Younger people might be able to get away with sitting for long periods because they are physiologically more robust, DiPietro said. But after age 50, this study suggests, prolonged sitting becomes particularly hazardous. TV viewing in the evening may be especially detrimental to health because it is not broken up with short bouts of activity, compared with sitting during the day, DiPietro said. To help reduce the risk, DiPietro suggests building more physical activity into daily life. For example, people who sit for long periods in front of a computer should get up every hour and/or switch to a standing desk. Commuters decide to take the stairs. Older people should walk about as much as possible throughout the day, and everyone should consider binging less on television or at least marching in place during commercials or in between episodes. To stay active and healthy as you age, move more and sit less throughout the day every day, DiPietro says. Excess sitting may reduce mobility in later lifeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition 31 30 BOOMERS: AGING WELL | GateHouse Media Premium Edition Its no surprise that sitting for prolonged periods is not healthy for your body. It all takes a toll: sitting at a worst of all, sitting on the couch and binge-watching TV. taking its toll on our mobility, especially for people 50 television a day and reported three or fewer hours of exercise a week were 65 percent more likely to have years later, according to a new study from the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. TV viewing is a very potent risk factor for disability in older age, said lead author of the study Dr. Loretta DiPietro, chairwoman of the Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at the Milken Institute. Sitting and watching TV for long periods (especially in the evening) has got to be one of the most dangerous things that older people can do because they are much more susceptible to the damages of physical inactivity. The study included more than 134,000 participants who were taking part in a national research project sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and AARP. It assessed all types of sedentary behavior, as well as light, moderate and vigorous physical activity in people ages 50 to 71 across eight to 10 years. Those who sat the most and moved the least had three study compared to more-active participants. For people who were the most physically active (seven or more hours a week), sitting for longer periods (up to six hours) was not associated with excess mobility disability. It seems this may be a consequence of getting older. Younger people might be able to get away with sitting for long periods because they are physiologically more robust, DiPietro said. But after age 50, this study suggests, prolonged sitting becomes particularly hazardous. TV viewing in the evening may be especially detrimental to health because it is not broken up with short bouts of activity, compared with sitting during the day, DiPietro said. To help reduce the risk, DiPietro suggests building more physical activity into daily life. For example, people who sit for long periods in front of a computer should get up every hour and/or switch to a standing desk. Commuters decide to take the stairs. Older people should walk about as much as possible throughout the day, and everyone should consider binging less on television or at least marching in place during commercials or in between episodes. To stay active and healthy as you age, move more and sit less throughout the day every day, DiPietro says. Excess sitting may reduce mobility in later lifeBy Melissa Erickson, GateHouse Media

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NF-1178492CHERYLE M., RESPIRATORY THERAPIST Expires: March 30, 2018Discount off MSRP. Cannot be combined with any other offers, coupons, insurance plans. Participation may vary by location. See location for details. Bene ts of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. 2018 Beltone beltone.comMEDICAL PROFESSIONALS RECOMMEND AN ANNUAL HEARING EVALUATION. HAVE YOU HAD YOURS? HEARING EVALUATION Expires: March 30, 2018 Expires: March 30, 2018FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLYSAVE 15%on Looking for the best in hearing care?Look to Beltone!BelCareBelCare TOP OF THE LINE Award-winning, discreet hearing technology. FREE LIFETIME INSTRUMENT CARE Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone instruments FREE ANNUAL HEARING EVALUATIONS Our 10-step evaluations help you address your changing hearing care needs SATISFY FEATURE Satisfy automatically lets you gradually adapt to amplification. FINANCING Affordable financing plans with low monthly payments available toqualified customers.With over 48 million Americans suffering from hearing loss, medical professionals believe it is important to get a baseline screening, followed by an annual evaluation after the age of 50. Panama City 1031 W. 23rd St. Suite A(850) 250-1990Panama City Beach 12234 PCB Pkwy.(850) 250-1990Fort Walton Beach 22 Beal Pkwy SW(850) 659-9799Crestview 2670 S. Ferdon Blvd(850) 398-4378DeFuniak Springs 1756 US Hwy 90 W.(850) 307-5152Chipley 1611 Main St.(850) 260-0436 Miramar Beach495 Grand Blvd Suite 206(850) 659-9799

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NF-1177922 Buying and selling a home can be complicated. ERA Neubauer Real Estate has been this areas trusted Real Estate Brokerage for over 40 years! We are deeply rooted in our community and vested to help make the best decisions for our customers. Let us show you how we can take the questions out of real estate and make a smooth transaction for you. Visit ERAF lorida.com to select your realtor today. Call 850-522-4401 to be directly connected to an agent today!Questionsall of yourReal EstateLet us answer NF-1177922

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NF-10985419 Around the world or around the corner... Well guide you home www.ERAFlorida.com 6545 Bayline Dr #667632 $6.75 8,500 SqFt Warehouse Located in Bay Industrial Park 3602 E 15th St #648864 $1,627 1,419 SqFt Vanilla Shell Retail Space with 2 Bathrooms 1800 Hwy 77 Unit 300 #668266 $3,750/mo Lease Restaurant Bldg 4,500 SqFt Fixtures & Furniture for Sale 733 Mulberry Ave #668150 Pole Barn & Warehouse Available Together or Separately 345 Michele Dr #669415 $245,000 4BR/3BA 2,096 SqFt Bay Views, Double trayed ceilings, Garden Tub, French Doors & Walk in Closet 121 N Marie Dr #669381 $210,000 3BR/2BA 1,270 SqFt Wooden Deck, Oversized Workshop & Garage 1228 Bluestem St #669334 $385,000 4BR/2.5BA 2,488 SqFt Sweetbay Neighborhood, Open 186 Derby Woods St #669160 $270,000 3BR/2BA 2,458 SqFt Walk in Pantry, Rachio Sprinkler System, Large Screen Room 12612 Silver Lake Rd & Hwy 231 #657881 $34,900 50Ft Hwy Frontage, BBQ Restaurant Equipment Included with Sale Panama City Beach Parkway #667263 $5.9 mil for 13.85 Acres Builders Plans Available 608 S Tyndall Pkwy #664105 $268,000 1,658 SqFt Building & 3BR/2BA House 4906 E Hwy 98 #654456 $149,000 Excellent Income Opportunity with Hwy Frontage Close to Tyndall Pkwy 1132 S Comet Ave #668077 $1,200/mo 3BR/2BA 1,377 SqFt New Appliances, Bonus Room & 8 mins to Tyndall AFB 1306 Vermont Ave #668732 $2,200/mo 4BR/3BA 2,220 SqFt Lynn Haven, Pool & Pool Service included with Rent 215 Main Ave #2C #669327 $650/mo 2BR/1BA 758 SqFt Washer & Dryer Hookups, 5423 Blue Dog Rd #668644 $1,400/mo 3 BR/2BA 1,530 SqFt Breakfast Nook, Fenced Yard & Covered Porch 6545 Bayline Dr #667632 $6.75 8,500 SqFt Warehouse Located in Bay Industrial Park 3602 E 15th St #648864 $1,627 1,419 SqFt Vanilla Shell Retail Space with 2 Bathrooms 1800 Hwy 77 Unit 300 #668266 $3,750/mo Lease Restaurant Bldg 4,500 SqFt Fixtures & Furniture for Sale 733 Mulberry Ave #668150 Pole Barn & Warehouse Available Together or Separately 345 Michele Dr #669415 $245,000 4BR/3BA 2,096 SqFt Bay Views, Double trayed ceilings, Garden Tub, French Doors & Walk in Closet 121 N Marie Dr #669381 $210,000 3BR/2BA 1,270 SqFt Wooden Deck, Oversized Workshop & Garage 1228 Bluestem St #669334 $385,000 4BR/2.5BA 2,488 SqFt Sweetbay Neighborhood, Open 186 Derby Woods St #669160 $270,000 3BR/2BA 2,458 SqFt Walk in Pantry, Rachio Sprinkler System, Large Screen Room 12612 Silver Lake Rd & Hwy 231 #657881 $34,900 50Ft Hwy Frontage, BBQ Restaurant Equipment Included with Sale Panama City Beach Parkway #667263 $5.9 mil for 13.85 Acres Builders Plans Available 608 S Tyndall Pkwy #664105 $268,000 1,658 SqFt Building & 3BR/2BA House 4906 E Hwy 98 #654456 $149,000 Excellent Income Opportunity with Hwy Frontage Close to Tyndall Pkwy 1132 S Comet Ave #668077 $1,200/mo 3BR/2BA 1,377 SqFt New Appliances, Bonus Room & 8 mins to Tyndall AFB 1306 Vermont Ave #668732 $2,200/mo 4BR/3BA 2,220 SqFt Lynn Haven, Pool & Pool Service included with Rent 215 Main Ave #2C #669327 $650/mo 2BR/1BA 758 SqFt Washer & Dryer Hookups, 5423 Blue Dog Rd #668644 $1,400/mo 3 BR/2BA 1,530 SqFt Breakfast Nook, Fenced Yard & Covered Porch

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NF-1174363 Subscribe now to the News Herald$1.00 per Week!FOR FOUR WEEKS!Call: 850-747-5061 Go Online: www.SubscribeNow.News Promo Code: Best O er Text NHBestO er to: 850-308-1078 Scan QR Code HOW TO SUBSCRIBE: CHECK US OUT e Panama City News Herald is launching an all out campaign to reach all of our former subscribers and new comers to the market.IF YOU STOPPED YOUR PAPER DUE TO: Price is is for you! TRY US AGAIN. YOU WONT BE DISAPPOINTED. Only $1.00 per week weeks AND, THATS NOT ALL!

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NF-1175944 There are more ways than ever to market your business, and The News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think.Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today.POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Its Time to Add Digital to Your Marketing Mix. NF-1179659

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NF-1174363 Subscribe now to the News Herald$1.00 per Week!FOR FOUR WEEKS!Call: 850-747-5061 Go Online: www.SubscribeNow.News Promo Code: Best O er Text NHBestO er to: 850-308-1078 Scan QR Code HOW TO SUBSCRIBE: CHECK US OUT e Panama City News Herald is launching an all out campaign to reach all of our former subscribers and new comers to the market.IF YOU STOPPED YOUR PAPER DUE TO: Price is is for you! TRY US AGAIN. YOU WONT BE DISAPPOINTED. Only $1.00 per week weeks AND, THATS NOT ALL!

PAGE 98

NF-1175944 There are more ways than ever to market your business, and The News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think.Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today.POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Its Time to Add Digital to Your Marketing Mix. NF-1179659

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SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2018 SUNDAY COMICS

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** Sunday, March 25, 2018 PANAMA CITY

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