Citation

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

Full Text

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** CELEBRATE FAMILY | D1A LIFETIME OF SEAFOODNew generation continues Gandy family's business, tradition Sunday, March 18, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald$1.50 www.newsherald.com TUESDAYSome sun 72 / 49MONDAYRain 76 / 64TODAYA t-storm 75 / 64 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 LOCAL & STATE | B1MARINA REPAIRS ON FAST TRACKPanama City plans to conduct its own feasibility studies SPORTS | C1ALL-STAR CLASSICEast team announces rst 4 boys, girls NATION | A12FIU BRIDGE COLLAPSEVictims survivors mourn, rage at incompetence Lifestyle .................... D1-10 Local & State ............. B1-18 Obituaries ...................... B3 Sports........................ C1-7 TV grid ......................... C8 Viewpoints .................. E1-3News Herald staff reportsPANAMA CITY „ With Municipal Super Tuesday one month away, 10 candidates are vying for four open posi-tions in Callaway, Springfield and Panama City Beach.On April 17, voters will select a new member for the Panama City Beach City Council, with political newcomers Geoff McConnell, Skip Stoltz, Colleen Swab and Burnie Thompson competing for the Ward 3 seat. Josie Strange currently holds the seat but is term-limited. Strange has said after her term, she plans to run for mayor.On the Callaway City Com-mission, two newcomers are challenging incumbents. Scott Davis is challenging Melba Covey in Ward 1, with David Griggs taking on incumbent Wayne McLeod in Ward 2.On the Springfield City Commission, former commissioner Beth McLean will challenge Jack Kennington for his Ward 3 seat.Monday is the last day to register to vote. Early voting will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 9-13, with Election Day on April 17.MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS 2018Candidates face o in 3 citiesMore insideFind each candidates platform and goals if elected A2-3 By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ There is still a rhythm to Spring Break.Sparse crowds pepper the white sands of Panama City Beach during the day while police trucks and ATVs roam the landscape enforcing Spring Break laws, including the alcohol ban. As the sun sets, many of the college-aged visitors shuffle off the sand to prepare for whatever the nightlife has to offer. Likewise, law enforce-ment shifts its resources from beach patrol to what they refer to as the hard topŽ for night patrols.While the crowd sizes are much smaller than Spring Breaks of the pre-alcohol ban era, the types of calls officers respond to after the sun has gone down are much different as well, said Bay County Sheriffs Office Lt. Chad King.Its night and day,Ž he said. We stay busy. But in the past few years [before the Spring Break laws], with the Spring breakers walk across the street toward Hammerhead Freds in Panama City Beach on Friday night. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Bay County Sheriffs Department Lt. Chad King checks notes about a missing man who is suspected of being high on hallucinogens and a danger to himself in Panama City Beach on Friday night. King said the Beach is much more manageable to patrol since the passing of new Spring Break laws in 2015. Bay County Sheriffs Department Lt. Chad King monitors Club La Vela as it reaches closing time in Panama City Beach on Friday night. Former FBI deputy director, red by Sessions on Friday, provided his notes to special counsel MuellerBy Eric TuckerThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Andrew McCabe, the onetime FBI deputy director long scorned by President Donald Trump and just fired by the attorney general, kept personal memos detailing interactions with the president that have been provided to the special counsels office and are simi-lar to the notes compiled by dismissed FBI chief James Comey, The Associated Press has learned.The memos could factor into special counsel Robert Muel-lers investigation as his team examines Trump campaign ties to Russia and possible obstruction of justice. McCabes memos include details of his own interactions with the pres-ident, according to a person with direct knowledge of the situation who wasnt autho-rized to discuss the notes publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. They also recount different conversa-tions he had with Comey, who kept notes on meetings with Trump that unnerved him.Though the precise contents are unknown, the memos possibly could help substantiate McCabes asser-tion that he was unfairly maligned by a White House he says had declared warŽ on the FBI and Muellers McCabe kept memos on Trump McCabe BCSO: Spring Break calls had gotten out of handIts night and daySee MCCABE, A3 See BREAK, A4

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** A2 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY PANAMA CITY BEACH „ Burnie Thomp-son defines public trust as listening to what citizens want and need. The Ward 3 candidate plans to restore that public trust and the rule of law to residents if elected as councilman.I want to carry out one thing Vice Mayor Josie Strange has done, which is actually listen to the people,Ž he said. If Im your city councilman, youll know what the gov-ernment knows.ŽThompson suggest before officials build a new multimillion-dollar City Hall location, they focus on properly staffing the police department, implementing roads, storm drains, sidewalks and more. He said traffic congestion is a bother to residents, after construction projects linger on and are sometimes unfinished.In addition, Thompson said if he were elected, first responders would be one of his top priorities, not projects and studies. Too often, in local gov-ernment, consultants get the gold mine and first responders get the shaft,Ž he said. Theyve been spending too much money on studies, attorneys, con-sultants and projects.ŽThompson was among those firmly against the citys approval of a January fire assessment fee. [There will be] no more new taxes disguised as assessments to pay for the essentials of government,Ž he said.The U.S. Air Force veteran said the city should listen to department heads who possess institutional knowledge on subjects, much like how a military officer works together with a non-commissioned officer to complete a task. He said he and officials wont know the answer to everything, which is why department leaders should be valued, not microman-aged or overruled.The internet talk show hosts plans would require government transparency, he said. Thompson said officials should treat residents equally, and they should be well-informed about any decisions the government makes.[Government] should not exempt themselves from the laws and rules the rest of us have to play by,Ž he said. I think they are too secretive. I would like to see the city council be more open to suggestions, and even criticism.ŽThompsons under-standing of the proper role of government, combined with past military leadership, would make him the right person for the Ward 3 position, he said.Although Councilman Hector Solis recently filed both an election complaint and lawsuit against Thompson, the candidate said he still plans to work with Solis and other members of the council if elected.As long as they are fol-lowing the rule of law, honoring property rights, and have a transparent government, well work together just fine,Ž he said.ŽThere are professional standards that we need to follow. There is professional decorum. While I will compromise on policy, I will never compro-mise on principle.ŽAlong with the issues Thompson said he wants to address, he said the resi-dents will be heard.I plan to protect their property rights, liberty and their opportunity to address the city council, and to carry on Vice Mayor Stranges legacy of listening to their concerns and suggestions.Ž Compiled by Tyra Jackson Thompson: Council must listen, play by the rulesPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Panama City Beach needs to speak up, and Colleen Swab believes she is that voice for resid ents.I believe Panama City Beach has not had a voice for the voters,Ž she said. I ran because I love Panama City Beach, and I believe „ being in business and being a mother „ I know I can do the job.ŽThe California Cycles owner said she has watched the city grow over the three decades shes lived there, and she knows what residents want and need. And she thinks she is capable of creating change for citizens.Crowded roads, a shortage of police officers and childrens safety are on Swabs list of needed changes.Swab said local parents recently have contacted her expressing concerns about their childrens safety at schools, with some point-ing out certain areas that lack protection against intruders. Violence was another issue parents brought to her attention. Swab said she called offi-cials at Arnold High School and Surfside Middle School to address some of the con-cerns, but officials have not spoken with her.[Parents] want to know how their children are going to be safe and what security measures will be taken,Ž Swab said. I have a little girl, and I know how those parents feel.ŽWhether shes elected or not, Swab said she would like to meet with administrators to see what could be done to respond to any concerns regarding the safety of children „ a stance she maintained even before the Marjory Stone-man Douglas High School shooting last month.As for the Beach, Swab said she loves Panama City Beachs white sandy beaches and wants people to visit the city and enjoy themselves. However, she said Spring Break laws that include a March alcohol banmight be interfering with where tourists choose to spend their vacations. Swab said she knows of two adults who were arrested for drinking on the beach, and they probably never had a criminal record until they were arrested for drinking.I think we do have a way to compromise because all of our families are coming back. We need growth for people to come year-round,Ž she said.  I just dont believe in overregulating businesses and people. I think [the city] is over-regulating and overstepping.ŽSwab has filed multiple lawsuits against the city after it passed several laws against scooter businesses, including one that would prohibit overnight scooter rentals.Ive been fighting for six years for my business,Ž she said. I saw other busi-nesses going through the same thing, and I wasnt going to stand for that.ŽShe said her legal battles with the city will not affect her performance if elected, however, saying her fight for her business is separate from her potential seat as Ward 3s representative.If we can come together, I know I can work with [the city council],Ž Swab said. I cant say how they will feel or react. I will be cordial with everyone.Ž EveryoneŽ includes the locals who call the Beach home, and Swab said her door is open to anyone who has issues theyd like to see addressed.I want people to feel they have someone who has their back, and they can call me,Ž Swab said. I love Panama City Beach, and I want whats best for all of us. I believe I would bring good to this community and Panama City Beach.Ž Compiled by Tyra Jackson Swab: PCB is over-regulating and oversteppingPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Geoff McCo-nnell is a businessman and a family man. He wants to combine his love for his two pas-sions to become Panama City Beachs Ward 3 councilman.I want to build a place where my children can grow up and prosper, and be safe,Ž he said. If I can do that for my family, I can do that for everybodys family.ŽFor the past 23 years, McConnell has lived in Panama City Beach, where he and his wife have raised their three sons.The Avian LLC South-east operations manager is accustomed to overseeing million-dollar budgets and operating with a staff of about 250 people. So, he feels that expertise, combined with his U.S. Naval service, will fit well with the duties of a Ward 3 councilman.I plan to work with city council members like I do with any facet of my life,Ž he said. I make sure Im knowledgeable about the issues. I like to build consensus. I plan on bringing those same things to the city council.ŽThe biggest challenge the Beach is facing at the moment is traffic, McConnell said. He said he wants to make sure traffic and infrastructure plans are in place, so the city can continue to grow. He said officials should continue to develop road proj-ects like the one on Back Beach Road. If elected, he plans to work closely with the citys planning department to ensure officials have a long-range development plan to consider local systematic issues and all conditions that come with new developments.He also cites public safety as one of the citys top priorities. He said public safety was a main reason he decided to run for office, after the shooting death of a 16-year-old Arnold High School student in a CVS Pharmacy parking lot last year.I was able to put myself, emotionally, in the same place as the par-ents [of the student],Ž he said. I could empathize with the parents because my 14-year-old is also going to Arnold as a freshman.I wanted to be a force to try to fix that. Public safety became my No. 1 concern.ŽMcConnells public safety plans call for a more proactive police force that is community-based.Fiscal responsibility is also a top contender on McConnells list of things to address, if elected.I dont stand for new taxes without authoriza-tion from the citizenry,Ž he said. I feel it stifles growth and economic development. It takes money out of families pockets.ŽTo achieve those goals and more for the city, McConnell said officials need to better communicate with residents. He believes officials have taken steps to ensure they are knowledgeable about issues before a decision is made that affects the city, but he wants the citys communication and busi-ness to be conducted in a better manner.I would like to see the citys business done in a professional way,Ž McConnell said. I would like to bring back decorum and the professionalism to the way the citys busi-ness is conducted.Ž Compiled by Tyra Jackson McConnell targets roads, safety, professionalismPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Skip Stoltz considers himself to be a local helping locals.ŽIm well-liked in the community,Ž he said. Ive been serving the commu-nity for a long time, and [the Ward 3 Council seat] would give me an opportunity to serve at a different level.ŽSo far, Stoltz, a Ward 3 candidate for the Panama City Beach City Commission, has put 16 years of service into the community. He currently serves as president of the board for Beach Care Services, a nonprofit organization that grants emergency assistance to families on the Beach. He previously was on the board of direc-tors for the Panama City Beaches Chamber of Com-merce and chairman for the Chambers Ambassador Team, and he still holds his position as an ambassador.In addition, he has conducted many fundraisers and charity events with Anchorage Childrens Home, the Arc of the Bay and other organizations.Stoltz said the unrest between current council members and the community „ displayed at several council meetings „ inspired him to expand his role in the community and run for office.I understand youre not going to get everyone to agree, but the uproar. Whats up with that?Ž he said.The candidate prides himself on possessing people skills, which he plans to put to use addressing communica-tion between the public and government, infrastructure projects and more.Stoltz said road projects like Back Beach Road and stormwater runoff are among his priorities. He said there are a lot of roads in the city where people dump bottles and other debris, and citizens deserve a nice city to live in.Panama City Beach has seen a lot of growth, but Stoltz said there also has been a lot of non-commu-nication between residents and officials. He said people might notice developmen-tal changes in the area, for example, but might not have an idea of what is going on because officials might not have properly informed them. He said he wants to ensure residents are in tune with whats hap-pening in the community.People see traffic, and might not understand there are three or four plans in order to help traffic,Ž he said. Some of them dont know it.ŽIf elected, Stoltz hopes to take communication a step further by clearing up any rumors or misconceptions within the municipality, like if the police and fire departments are understaffed by certain percentages. He said investigating the truth and clearing up any fallacies will help him and others enact change in the city. In order to keep the lines of communication open, Stoltz already has ways in which he plans to work with the council and resi-dents. He said being a team player would be of great use when working with council members to better Panama City Beach.ŽIf its not good for Panama City Beach, then I have the strength to stand up and say it,Ž he said.Stoltz said if he is elected, Ward 3 residents would be able to contact him with questions and ideas.Were a tourist city, but we live here also. When you live in the city, you want to be able to live peacefully in your home. We should listen to the community to see what they need,Ž Stoltz said. I want to take it back to the community.Ž Compiled by Tyra Jackson Stoltz: Take PCB back to the communityPANAMA CITY BEACH CITY COUNCIL, WARD 3Colleen Swab is competing for the Ward 3 seat on the Panama City Beach City Council. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Burnie Thompson is running for the Panama City Beach City Councils Ward 3 seat. [PATTI BLAKE/ THE NEWS HERALD] Geoff McConnell is a candidate for the Panama City Beach City Councils Ward 3 seat. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Skip Stoltz is running for the Panama City Beach City Councils Ward 3 seat. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 A3CALLAWAY CITY COMMISSION, WARD 1CALLAWAY „ Steer-ing the Callaway City Commission away from micromanagingŽ the city manager is whats motivating David Griggs to run for the commis-sions Ward 2 seat.Griggs challenges incumbent Wayne McLeod, who has been in office since October. He replaced Pamn Hen-derson, who became mayor after Bob Pelle-tiers abrupt resignation. Griggs has been involved in Callaway government for over 10 years as a citizen and contributor, currently serving on the code enforcement board. He said the commission needs some common sense.ŽThe commissions responsibility is to lay out and approve the budget,Ž Griggs said. The city manager is, by charter, the one who is supposed to be executing the budget and the mis-sions that the commission have requested. Outside of some review and follow-up, the commission is supposed to let the city manager run the city. ... I think were going over our intended authority.ŽOther issues Griggs wants to focus on include reducing property taxes, improving stormwater management and improving blight so the area looks better. He suggested addressing blight by cleaning up older buildings and mobile homes and improving city ordinances.Flooding and making Callaway business and military-friendly are also important to Griggs, who had an extensive pri-vate sector career in the packing manufacturing industry before retiring in 2002.When we have fairly heavy rains, our current ditches or streams do not handle the stormwater in an efficient way,Ž he said. And some of the streets end up flooding.ŽGriggs also addressed the commissions recent approval of two addi-tional sheriffs deputies to patrol Callaway. The topic became a loud con-troversy in 2017, with several commissioners initially hesitant because of costs and Pelletier ultimately resigning in frustration. The commission eventually reached an unanimous approval after public outcry. Griggs called the situation unneces-sary and ridiculousŽ and said he would have voted to hire the additional law enforcement back in August when it first came up. The city contracts with the sheriffs office for police protection.Sheriff [Tommy] Ford came out and gave the commission a presentation, which apparently some of the commission-ers forgot about or it went over their head,Ž Griggs said. That was a nobrainer. ... After the two additional officers were approved, then it came out the sheriffs office executed all their war-rants and did a clean-up. Im 100 percent behind the sheriffs office. They do a great job for us.ŽGriggs said his campaign has been interesting,Ž and hes found citizens are recep-tive to his message. He predicted a win for himself and fellow new-comer Scott Davis, who challenges incumbent Melba Covey in Ward 1. Griggs has raised over $1,000 through cash and in-kind contribu-tions, some of which are from people he knows personally.Signs arent cheap,Ž he said.Callaway has good businesses, a good environment for families, great youth sports facili-ties and some of the best parks in the area,Ž Griggs said. We probably have the best boat ramp on this side of the bridge,Ž he said. Compiled by Collin Breaux Griggs: Reduce blight, empower city managerCALLAWAY „ Ward 1 Commissioner Melba Covey is nearing the end of her first term, and if she gets re-elected April 17, she wants to keep Cal-laway on its current path.Covey, campaigning against political newcomer Scott Davis to keep her seat, said the commission has accomplished a lot in the past few years, such as avoid-ing an increase in utility fees, enacting a two-dol-lar reduction in sewer fees, hiring a second code enforcement officer, paying off city debt and hiring two additional sheriffs deputies to patrol the area.In addition, City Hall has been renovated so it looks professionalŽ and nice,Ž she said, and lift station repairs are under-way at Veterans Park to address the odor issue there. She said Callaway is being cleaned up, and there are new businesses and housing moving in and being built.Weve listened to the people and tried to help them by making Callaway more financially stable,Ž Covey said. Were doing the job the taxpayers put us in there to do, and that is to watch their money.ŽTo that end, she noted city funds werent affected by the hiring of two additional deputies. The positions were controversial in Callaway last year, as several commissioners, including Covey, were initially reluctant to hire them because of questions over costs. However, the commission eventually unanimously approved the hires in November after re-examining the city budget and finding the extra help could be funded with no issues.The deputies worked out fine,Ž Covey said. We had to do due diligence before we hired them. We had no problem with hiring them. We had to make sure we could justify the costs. ... We want to be accountable to taxpayer funds.ŽScott Davis, who is also campaigning to get elected to the Ward 1 seat, said the commission has become a dictatorship.Ž Covey disagreed with that characterization and said she didnt know where hes getting his information from.Additionally, David Griggs „ campaigning for the Ward 2 seat held by incumbent Wayne McLeod „ said the com-mission is micromanaging the city manager, who by charter is supposed to run the city. Covey countered that the commission is not micromanaging the city manager, and works closely with him and city employees.She said the commission has appropriate oversight of the city, which she loves because its a small town where everyone knows your name.Ž Covey has lived in Callaway for 16 years. She is retired after working with the federal govern-ment and said she has great respect for veterans and the military.Covey raised about $1,000 in total contribu-tions by press time and is still receiving in-kind contributions. She said she hopes the election doesnt shape up to be an ugly one and wants to honor her constituents during her time in public office.We are the peoples representatives,Ž Covey said. This city is owned by the people.Ž Compiled by Collin Breaux Covey aims to keep Callaway on current pathCALLAWAY „ The current direction of the Callaway City Commission is driving Scott Davis campaign for the Ward 1 seat, currently held by incumbent Melba Covey. Davis, a political newcomer, said the current commission isnt looking aheadŽ and is a dictatorship.ŽI dont see the mayors as of late getting to make any more decisions,Ž said Davis, the general manager of the Ace Hard-ware store on East 15th Street. When youve got mayors resigning because the commissions lopsided, somethings wrong."Former Callaway Mayor Bob Pelletier abruptly resigned in Octo-ber amid a disagreement about whether the city should hire two additional sheriff's deputies."Whats happening for my kids that are going to be adults?" David contin-ued. "We dont have any infrastructure in place. We dont have any hous-ing outlooks in place.ŽDavis, who has lived in Callaway since 1999, has never served on any city boards but has ideas about how to move the city for-ward. He said previously planned businesses, for example, ha vent moved into town because of how the commission handled the deals. The city doesnt also have an adequate police budget, he said, call-ing that one reason people move out.As for last year's contro-versy over the additional deputies „ initially opposed by some com-missioners because of cost but ultimately approved „ Davis said he would have voted yes for the two patrols. Families wont come in if the crime rate is high and they dont feel protected, he said, and in fact, he'd be fine with even more police.I dont think you have to be a business person if somebody says, 'Ill give you two for the price of one,'Ž Davis said in ref-erence to Sheriff Tommy Fords proposal last year to the commission. Thats your own Bay County reaching out to say we will help you, and instead we want to stomp on them. That was unfor-tunate. I was stunned."Davis said he likes the easygoing attitude of Cal-laway and the friendly people who live there, and yearns for the curb appealŽ of days past before blight became a problem. I want this city and my kids and all my friends and family to stay. We dont want to move,Ž Davis said, adding the city also could use youth sports programs. Weve cut down recreation. Were losing our kids. ... We probably have the best looking complex of anywhere around here, and we shouldnt be losing kids. Recreation is what brings families in.ŽA lack of new housing is also something that bothers Davis, who said military families notice the shortage when they drive through Calla-way. He pointed to Lynn Haven as an area that has all kinds of new subdivisionsŽ and said Callaway has tons of land to grow.ŽWhen I want to do something, I do it whole-heartedly, to win,Ž Davis said. We have [over 15,000] people in Cal-laway but yet only 1,600 vote. Thats a big drop-off. Ive had a lot of people say, Im going to vote for you. Its just getting them to make sure they vote.Ž Compiled by Collin Breaux Davis: Housing, infrastructure will keep families hereCALLAWAY „ Since being named the new Callaway Ward 2 Commissioner last year, Wayne McLeod said hes enjoyed his time serving the public and has heard good feedback from citizens.McLeod was chosen in October from a field of 12 candidates to replace Pamn Henderson, who became mayor after Bob Pelletier abruptly resigned in September amid a disagreement over funding extra sher-iffs deputies for the area. He is semi-retired after working in real estate.I want to serve my community,Ž McLeod said. In years past, theres been decisions made in Callaway that were not in the best interests of the citizens. I became politically active several years ago in Callaway when the then-commission proposed a fire assess-ment tax on the citizens. Since then Ive become involved in a citizens group thats advocated for fiscal responsibility and transparency in our city government.ŽMcLeod was appointed during controversial dis-cussions over whether to hire additional deputies. Some commissioners were initially reluctant to approve the hires because of costs, but the commission unanimously approved the extra depu-ties after public outcry and are-examination of the city budget.McLeod was among the commissioners who voted yes and said in October he was a supporter of both law enforcement and crunching the numbers to see if its affordable.ŽThe commission was able to take on the extra officers without having to raise any revenues, McLeod said recently. While the deputies were undoubtedly needed, he said, the question was whether the city could afford it.David Griggs, McLeods challenger for the Ward 2 seat, said the commission micromanagesŽ the city manager, who by charter is supposed to run the city. McLeod, however, said he doesnt share his challengers opinion.The commission doesnt micromanage the city manager at all,Ž McLeod said. But we havent been hesitant to give the city manager our opinion on different mat-ters. Other than that, we have a city manager form of government and very good department heads and employees.Ž He agreed with Griggs, however, that blight and code enforcement are big issues. The city has hired an additional code enforcement officer, and Callaways looks have improved immensely in the last few months and year and will continue to do so,Ž McLeod said.Its hard to correct neglect that has taken place over the last 20 years with lax codes and ordinances that need to be tightened up,Ž he said. To me, theres a quality of life issue. I want to fight blight so our property values will not decline as a result. Callaway will be a safe and clean place to live.ŽMcLeod said his campaign is going well, and hes gotten good feedback from voters as the election approaches, he said. McLeod moved to Callaway in 1962, when he was 8, and said hes seen it transform from a rural, pristine areaŽ into the small, thriving community that we are now.ŽHe likes the friendly people and recreational opportunities in Callaway, and considers it a wonder-ful place to raise a family.ŽIts home,Ž he said. I have property in Callaway. I live in Callaway. I plan to live the rest of my life in Callaway, and I am invested in the community, and realize any decision the commission makes will affect all the citizens.Ž Compiled by Collin Breaux McLeod aims to make Callaway safe and cleanCallaway Ward 1 incumbent Melba Covey is campaigning to keep her seat. [CONTRIBUTED] Scott Davis is running for the Callaway City Commissions Ward 1 seat. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] CALLAWAY CITY COMMISSION, WARD 2 Wayne McLeod seeks re-election to the Callaway City Commission. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] David Griggs is running for the Callaway City Commissions Ward 2 seat. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] investigation. They almost certainly contain, as Comeys memos did, previously undisclosed details about encounters between the Trump administration and FBI that could be of interest to Mueller.The disclosure Saturday came hours after Trump called McCabes firing by Attorney Gen-eral Jeff Sessions a great day for DemocracyŽ and asserted without elaboration that McCabe knew all about the lies and corruption going on at the highest levels off the FBI!Ž In the last year, Trump has repeatedly condemned as emblematic of an FBI that he insists is biased against his administration.That sent former CIA Director John Brennan, an outspoken Trump critic, into a Twitter tizzy: When the full extent of your venality, moral turpitude, and political corruption becomes known, you will take your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history. You may scapegoat Andy McCabe, but you will not destroy America...America will triumph over you.ŽSessions said he acted on the recommendation of FBI disciplinary officials who said McCabe had not been candid with a watchdog office investi-gation. McCabe was fired two days before his retire-ment date on Sunday. The dismissal likely jeopar-dizes his ability to collect his full pension benefits and, more broadly, could add to the turmoil that has enveloped the FBI since Comeys firing and as the bureau moves ahead with an investigation the White House has dismissed as a hoax.An upcoming inspector generals report is expected to conclude that McCabe, who spent more than 20 years with the FBI, had authorized the release of information to the media and was not forthcoming with the watchdog office as it examined the bureaus handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation. McCabe has vigorously disputed the allegations and said his credibility had been attacked as part of a larger effort not just to slander me personallyŽ but also the FBI and law enforcement.It is part of this administrations ongoing war on the FBI and the efforts of the special counsel investigation, which continue to this day,Ž he added. Their persistence in this cam-paign only highlights the importance of the special counsels work.Ž MCCABEContinued from A1

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** A4 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldSPRINGFIELD CITY COMMISSION, WARD 3SPRINGFIELD „ Its been just over 10 years since Beth McLean represented Springfields Ward 3 on the City Com-mission, and this election cycle, she is hoping to reclaim her seat.I miss it,Ž she said. I want to be back in it and active. People still call me all the time.ŽThe calls, she said, are mostly about code enforcement and lighting issues, which the Springfield native has made the centerpiece of her campaign.Code enforcement is our biggest issue,Ž McLean said.An often talked about issue in Springfield is the number of abandoned properties, which when neglected can become hotspots for crime. As it stands, the city has tried to be proactive about bulldozing problem prop-erties when it can get them, but the process to acquire them, McLean readily admits, can be tedious.She said she hopes to continue what the city is doing, but also to look at ways to create stronger code enforcementŽ and to find more ways to clear abandoned buildings to make development-ready lots.If elected, McLean also said she would want to look at development and land use codes to see if there is room for improvement.Another top priority for McLean is public safety, with the candidate saying the city needs more streetlights and more police patrols.If possible, she would also like to find a way to provide the city employ-ees with better benefits, which she hears right now are "not very good." She said it might be "hard to do" in the current climate around health care costs.But overall, the retiree said the city seems to be doing well, pointing to the road paving projects the city has prioritized since passing the ad valorem tax four years ago. She also said the improve-ments being made to the sewer system are another good thing.We are moving for-ward,Ž she said.McLean left public office after she was voted out in a 45 to 54 percent split in 2007. But reports from the time indicate the reason she lost had very little to do with her and everything to do with a heated mayors race that had divided the city into camps for and against re-electing Robert Walker as mayor. McLean hap-pened to fall on the wrong side of that split when Walker was ultimately re-elected.But now, she hopes to come back. Compiled by Katie Landeck McLean targets code enforcement, cleanupSPRINGFIELD „ There was a time Jack Kennington thought all politicians were liars and cheats.Ž Ralph Hammond, the mayor of Springfield, helped change his mind.The mayor in Spring-field has made me see there are peo ple out there who want to help people, and thats why I want to be a part of it,Ž said Kennington, who is running for re-election to the Springfield City Com-mission. Thats what got my attention.ŽKennington, a 12-year resident of Springfield, joined the commission in June 2014 after another member's resignation. Voters in April 2015 opted to keep him in the seat. In that time, he said he has been happy with the prog-ress the city is making in its finances, infrastructure and quality of life.When I came on board, the city was trying to get away from being bankrupt," he said. I dont wanna see the city back up. I wanna see the city keep moving forward.ŽIn the next term, Kennington said his primary focus will be continuing to fix the citys infrastructure.Weve got sewer and water problems that have been neglected for 20-30 years,Ž he said. And were in Florida „ our ocean is our life. The last thing I want to see is the ocean contaminated by infrastructure that hasnt been maintained.ŽCity crews have been working on a massive sewer and road upgrade along Transmitter Road, a primary thoroughfare, since February 2017. Kennington said he also hopes to get the city into the electronic ageŽ and continue basic quality of life improvements.The main thing is just making our city look like it ought to,Ž he said. Roads being paved, things being paved up. Weve got a pro-gram going on now where we tear down dilapidated houses. Thats made a big difference in our city.ŽHe also touted upcom-ing work for emergency personnel.Were actually about to replace equipment now that was falling apart for the fire department and police,Ž he said.Weve got a lot of gov-ernment grants that are helping us. Were getting a lot more done than has been done in many years.ŽOutside City Hall, Ken-nington is the director of plant operations for Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center, a position in which he oversees equipment, security and safety at the hospital.Between that and being a commissioner, its a challenge,Ž he said. But I love a challenge.Ž Compiled by Steph Nusbaum Kennington aims to maintain forward progress Beth McLean is running for the Spring“ eld City Commissions Ward 3 seat. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Jack Kennington is campaigning to keep his seat on the Spring“ eld City Commission. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] guns, it was getting out of hand.ŽAs King drove along the beach midnight Friday, he had his flashlight pointed out the window illuminating the white dunes in search of a miss-ing college student. His friends reported that the man had taken LSD, had a bad reaction, escaped out the back door of their Gulf-side rental and run somewhere into the dark-ness on the beach. Just before calling in air sup-port to scan the beach with infrared technology, the college student staggered back up to the houseand wastaken to a hospital for treatment.King, who has worked the Beach during Spring Break since 1999, said so far most of the calls officers have been responding to at night this year have not been related to the annual migration of college stu-dents. A majorityhave beenlocal disturbances or traffic issues, he said.In the past, those local calls still would have demanded resources, but officers would have had the massive volume of rau-cous partiers contesting for attention. Many more offi-cers were at the disposal of authorities then, but the combination of massive crowds with the increasing presence of guns in the years leading up to the Spring Break laws meant more opportunities for something to go bad, King said.With these smaller crowds, it is easier to manage,Ž he said. We still have that criminal element coming down to take advantage of the situation. But its not near what it used to be. Were definitely happy about that.ŽKing said many violent crimes, like strong-arm robberies or rapes, have dropped off significantly. A few years before the imple-mentation of the laws, he investigated a case in which a girl was sexually assaulted inside a port-a-potty in the area of the Beach infa-mously known as The Triangle,Ž near the super clubs. It took place while thousands of people walked the sidewalks surrounding the incident.Years ago, it was fre-quent „ almost daily,ŽKing said, noting that manysexual assaultswere shared across social media platforms. It was publicized and even glorified. And that was one of the last straws.ŽIn the last year of unfet-tered alcohol drinking on the beach, BCSOpublicized a case in which an inebriated female was sexually assaulted on the crowded beach by three males in broad daylight. Later that same year, an Alabama man opened fire in a crowded house party and fired at seven college students, which led to an emergency ban of alcohol on the beach and the later ordinances.In the past few years, gunplay has remained an occurrence on Panama City Beach in March, with some of those being unrelated to Spring Break.As Friday night came to a close with the manda-tory shutdown of the clubs at 2 a.m., King was one of a couple officers watching the traffic from a parking lot that in years past would have been filled with patrol cars with their emer-gency lights on. The sparse crowds dispersed with little issue.King said officers remain aware of the criminal element and are still coming across firearms during traf-fic stops or other calls. He citedthose asmain reason the Spring Break laws, while achieving their goals, are still a necessity.Some might suggest we scale it back because its working,Ž King added. As soon as you do that, thats when it all hits the fan.Ž BREAKFrom Page A1A man is processed at a mobile booking station in Panama City Beach before being taken to jail on Friday night. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Bay County Sheriffs Department Lt. Chad King checks the license and registration of a woman driving with daylight running lights on instead of nighttime headlights in Panama City Beach on Friday night.

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** A6 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Marcy GordonThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ Could the crackdown on tax loopholes clamp down on corporate schmoozing?The new tax law ends a benefit prized by business for impressing customers or courting new ones. And the impact could be felt in the pricey boxes at sports stadiums, or even at Double-A baseball games in small towns with loyal company backers. In Washington, lobbyists who helped craft the Republican tax legislation could now be pinched by it.U.S. companies spend hun-dreds of millions annually on entertaining customers and clients at sporting events, tournaments and arts venues, an expense that until this year they could partially deduct from their tax bill. But a provision in the new law eliminates the long-standing 50 percent deduction in an effort to curb the overall price tag of the legislation and streamline the tax code.Congress didnt feel the government should subsidize it anymore. Firms are going to take a hard look at their entertainment budgets,Ž said Ryan Losi, a certified public accountant based in Glen Allen, Virginia.The provision is one of the many under-the-radar con-sequences slowly emerging from the new tax legislation, the most sweeping rewrite of the tax code in three decades. Also embedded in the law are little-noticed provisions with the potential to bring major changes to mundane parts of American life „ includ-ing home-buying, saving for school and divorce.You can believe theres going to be more pressure on the sales people and mar-keting people to not go so crazy on the expenditures,Ž predicted Ruth Wimer, an executive compensation attorney at law firm Winston & Strawn whos also a certi-fied public accountant. Its going to be a consideration for companies „ its going to cost them.ŽEnding the deduction will save the government about $2 billion a year and $23 billion through 2027 in formerly lost revenue, Congress bipartisan Joint Committee on Taxation estimates.Tax law might curb corporate cash at gamesPresident Donald Trump, surrounded by members of congress and supporters, speaks during a Dec. 20 event on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. New tax laws end a bene“ t long prized by business for schmoozing with customers or courting new ones.[CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** A10 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Allen G. Breed and Sharon CohenThe Associated PressCHICAGO „ It was 1934. Mobsters armed with fully automatic Tommy gunsŽ had left a trail of bloodstained sidewalks and pockmarked walls across the country, and the new president had narrowly escaped assassination the year before. It was time for action on gun control. And the National Rifle Associa-tion seemingly agreed.I do not believe in the general promiscuous toting of guns,Ž then-NRA Presi-dent Karl T. Frederick told members of the House Ways and Means Com-mittee. I think it should be sharply restricted and only under licenses.ŽThe resulting National Firearms Act „ passed five years after the infamous St. Valentines Day Massacre in Chicago „ taxed, rather than banned, machine guns. But it was a pivotal moment in Amer-icas history, marking the first comprehensive fed-eral gun-control law. It was also a big moment for the NRA, founded in 1871 by two Civil War veterans. The group had managed to get a seat at the table „ helping to gut most of the bills original provisions and establishing itself as a key player in Washington, D.C.Now the survivors of a modern-day Valentines Day massacre „ last months rampage in Parkland, Florida „ are demanding that members of Congress sever their ties with the NRA and do something about assault rifles like the legally pur-chased AR-15 Nikolas Cruz allegedly used.As it was in 1934, the debate over gun control is essentially the same „ whether civilians should have access to certain kinds of firearms.Americans then believed you had a right to have a gun in your house for personal protection,Ž says Adam Winkler, a professor at the UCLA School of Law and author of Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America.Ž What they didnt believe was that you had a right to have the most deadly forms of weapons.ŽIntroduced too late for World War I, the Thomp-son submachine gun was marketed as the perfect self-defense weapon „ ideal ... for the protection of large estates, ranches, plantations, etc.,Ž read one 1920s advertisement from its manufacturer. Full automatic, fired from the hip, 1,500 shots per minute.ŽDespite assurances the weapon would only be sold to responsible parties after a thorough investigation,Ž many found their way into the hands of bootleggers and bank robbers. Gangsters Al Capone, John Dillinger and George Machine GunŽ Kelly began terrorizing the nation, and forensics tied two Tommy guns to the Feb. 14, 1929, incident in which seven men associated with mobster George BugsŽ Moran were gunned down by Capone men dressed as police.Then in February 1933, during a visit to Miami, President-elect Roosevelt emerged miraculously unscathed from a barrage of five bullets from a .32-caliber pawnshop revolver. Hearings on the National Firearms Act began in April 1934.The original bill proposed registration and steep taxation on all firearms. There were also provisions for taking fingerprints and tracking future gun transfers.Then-Assistant Attorney General Joseph B. Keenan readily acknowl-edged that criminals would ignore the law. But by requiring taxes and registration, he said, we do hope to make it a simple matter ... to put them behind the bars when they violate these regulations.ŽEchoes of Capone heard in todays gun-control debateJohn Dillinger, center, strikes a pose with Lake County prosecutor Robert Estill, left, in the jail at Crown Point, Ind., in 1934. [THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A12 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald BALI, INDONESIAStreets deserted, airport closes for Day of Silence Indonesias normally bustling Bali has shut down social media, turned away flights and shuttered all shops for a Day of Silence that marks New Year on the predom-inantly Hindu island.NyepiŽ began at 6 a.m. on Saturday, emptying streets and beaches for 24 hours except for special patrols to ensure silence is observed. This year for the first time, phone compa-nies have agreed to turn off the mobile internet on the island thats home to more than 4 million people.Aside from no Face-book, Instagram or instant messaging apps, television and radio broadcasts cease and Balinese stay indoors for the day of reflection that is the most sacred in Balinese Hinduism.CLEVELANDMan unsuccessfully appeals dismissal of his own chargesRonald Bergrin appears to have both won and lost Friday when a slightly bemused three-judge appeals court panel upheld dismissal of his charges for threatening an FBI agent after deeming him mentally incompetent to stand trial. U.S. District Judge Dan Polster dismissed Ber-grins charges in 2016 after ruling he was incompetent for the second time. He was then released from federal custody after 22 months behind bars.It was likely Bergrin wouldnt have faced any prison time if he had been convicted. Under federal guidelines, that sentence would have been no more than 21 months, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Brian McDonough JOHANNESBURGMauritius president resigns amid misconduct claimsThe president of the Indian Ocean nation of Mauritius, Africas only female head of state, has resigned amid a financial scandal.Ameenah Gurib-Fakim Gurib-Fakim submitted her resignation in the national interest,Ž her lawyer Yousouf Mohamed told reporters Saturday, according to local news reports. Her resignation is effective on March 23.It has been alleged that Gurib-Fakim made personal purchases with a credit card provided by an NGO, whose Angolan founder has sought to do business in Mauritius and is under investigation for alleged fraud in Portugal. The Associated PressIN BRIEF By Jennifer Kay and Allen G. BreedThe Associated PressMIAMI „ As crews began removing bodies from beneath a collapsed pedestrian bridge Satur-day, a victims uncle raged against what he called the complete incompetenceŽ and colossal failureŽ that allowed people to drive beneath the unfinished concrete span.Why they had to build this monstrosity in the first place to get children across the street?Ž said an anguished Joe Smitha, whose niece, Alexa Duran, was crushed in Thursdays collapse at Florida Inter-national University. Then they decided to stress test this bridge while traffic was running underneath it?ŽAuthorities say at least six people were killed when the structure fell onto a busy six-lane road connecting the campus to the community of Sweetwater. Crews removed two cars co ntaining three bodies Saturday, but offi-cials said there were still at least two more victims beneath the rubble.Right now were just chipping away,Ž said Miami-Dade Police Direc-tor Juan Perez.The Miami-Dade Police Department confirmed the names of four victims Saturday.Rolando Fraga Hernandez and his gold Jeep Cherokee were pulled from the wreckage Satur-day. Later that morning, the bodies of Oswald Gonzalez, 57, and Alberto Arias, 54, were found inside a white Chevy truck.Navarro Brown was pulled from the rubble Thursday and later died at the hospital.Authorities have not released Durans name, but her family has said she died. The FIU freshman was studying political science.The National Transpor-tation Safety Board has confirmed that crews were applying whats known as post-tensioning forceŽ on the bridge before the failure. Authorities are investigating whether cracking that was reported just before the span fell contributed to the accident.Experts interviewed by The Associated Press were mixed on the significance of those reported cracks.Amjad Aref, a professor with the University of Buffalos Institute of Bridge Engineering, said they should have been a big red flag.ŽBridges are really very vulnerable when they are under construction, when there are just pieces,Ž he said. Its like still a flimsy structure. And when you see cracks, somebody has to raise really a big flag and say, We need to do something. We need to figure out whats happening quickly and do any mitigating actions to prevent further progression of damage and ultimately collapse, as we saw here.ŽVictims uncle rages at incompetenceJoe Smitha of Palm Harbor, Fla., speaks with reporters on Saturday about his niece, Alexa Duran, whose family has identi“ ed her as one of at least six victims of a bridge collapse near the Florida International University campus in the Miami area on March 15. [JENNIFER KAY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 A13By Bill BarrowThe Associated PressATLANTA „ Pennsylvanias Conor Lamb and Alabama Sen. Doug Jones, the new miracle men of the Democratic Party, offer a clear model for how to run in Republican terri-tory: Focus on economics, not guns, immigration or President Donald Trump.But that wont be easy when much of the party is whipped into a fervor over those topics. As the party barrels into primary season, its biggest success stories star Demo-cratic moderates who have run strong in Trump coun-try. But much of the energy in the party is on the left, where an active base is calling for single-payer health care, a $15-anhour minimum wage and bans on certain weapons and ammunition. Finding the balance between the bases demands and winning general elections is Democrats new m ission as they look toward the November midterms.The challenge will greet Democratic candidates across 75 targeted GOP-held districts that Trump won in 2016, as well as the 10 Democratic sena-tors facing re-election challenges in states Trump won.To be sure, most of those districts are friend-lier to Democrats than Jones Alabama, which Trump won by nearly 30 percentage points, and Lambs southwest Pennsylvania House dis-trict, where Trump won by nearly 20 percentage points. Lamb maintains a lead of fewer than 700 votes. That race has not been called.The questions of tone, emphasis and policy nonetheless hang over Democrats mission to flip the 24 GOP-held seats they need for a House majority and their path to reverse Republicans 51-49 Senate advantage.House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who is in line for a second stint as speaker if the Democrats are victorious in Novem-ber, says the dangers of competing „ and some-times unhappy „ factions are overblown.Its not a question of ideology. We all believe in working families, thats what unifies us,Ž she told The Associated Press. In order to win, it has to be an economic message.ŽRepublicans acknowledged Lambs strong performance this week in Pennsylvania as a wakeup call. But they also insist Lamb and Jones, who won his Senate seat last year, were unusual candidates. They competed in special elections where turnout is unpredictable, ran against flawed Republican nomi-nees and, importantly, emerged unscathed from primaries.Some top Democratic recruits face serious pri-mary battles.In southern New Jer-seys 2nd District, where Republican Frank LoBiondo is retiring, the Democratic Congressio-nal Campaign Committee touts state Sen. Jeff Van Drew as a bipartisan consensus builderŽ who wins his majority Repub-lican legislative district easily. Trump won the congressional district by almost 5 points in 2016; LoBiondo got 59 percent of the vote.Yet liberals hammer Van Drew as a National Rifle Association supporter and abortion-rights threat. Van Drew has backed cer-tain abortion restrictions as a legislator. His loud-est critics support retired teacher Tanzie Youngblood, who supports gun restrictions and abortion rights.Progressive activists have to save the party from itself, otherwise well be represented by Republicans masquerading as Democrats,Ž Youngblood said on her campaign Facebook account this week. Dem-ocratic leaders, she said, are out of touch with the base of the party.ŽLamb could be headed for a similar squeeze. Because of a new, court-ordered congressional map in Pennsylvania, he will need to start campaigning in a newly drawn district that is less Republican than his current one. There are already two declared candidates in that race, including a prominent local attorney who is to Lambs left on guns and health care.Dems seek balance between base, winningConor Lamb, the Democratic candidate for Tuesdays special election in Pennsylvanias 18th Congressional District, center, celebrates with his supporters at his election night party early Wednesday in Canonsburg, Pa. [GENE J. PUSKAR/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A14 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Kathleen FoodyThe Associated PressDENVER „ It opens with a warning: This video contains footage from real police body cameras. Viewer discre-tion is advised.Then, an introduc-tion: I would like you to hear from me, what hap-pened,Ž Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock says, facing the camera. The next eight minutes provide a carefully edited glimpse of the events that led to a 29-year-old dep-utys Dec. 31 death inside an apartment complex south of Denver.The video posted Jan. 8 on the departments social media accounts is punctuated by gunshots and shouts of panic and pain, and undoubtedly illustrates the danger Deputy Zack Parrish and other officers met during that call. Open government advocates also consider it a dramatic example of law enforcement agencies expanding efforts to release their own accounts of events to the public and media.Theres nothing wrong with police communicating through social media, open government advocates said. But they worry it allows law enforcement to bypass questions from traditional media and warn that taking advantage of the tools requires agencies to be completely transpar-ent, whatever the situation.In Colorado, Parrish was among three deputies in three counties shot dead while on duty in barely more than a month. The calls that preceded the kill-ings varied „ a mentally ill veteran, a reported fight and a stolen car investiga-tion. But the departments took similar approaches, relying on their social media accounts to release information and giving news outlets limited opportunity to ask questions about what happened.Police have made use of social media for years, from viral videos of officers dance-offs with kids to the Boston Police Departments extensive use of Twitter following the 2013 marathon bombing.Agencies are eager to cut the middleman and tell their own stories, said Lauri Stevens, a former TV news reporter who founded an annual conference in 2010 that teaches departments about promoting themselves on social media.Its not any less valid than any media, in this day and age,Ž she said.Stevens said many agencies are getting better at connecting with residents on routine days, sharing updates and knocking down rumors during high-profile incidents.Sgt. William Hutchison, Palm Springs police spokesman, presented at Stevens conference last year about his agencys communications strat-egy after two officers were shot dead in 2016. Looking back, Hutchison said he would have posted even more information directly to Facebook and Twitter.Hutchison said he doesnt view social accounts as a way to avoid traditional media, and complimented local coverage of the officers killings.More people watch the news than the number of people who watch us, and youve got to maintain that relationship,Ž he said. But law enforcement is becoming more skilled and has (our) own platform now that we didnt have before.ŽBut that takes a staff capable of providing regular updates as they balance other responsibilities, a challenge for smaller departments on any day.Sheriff Howard Sills leads rural Georgias Putnam County agency, which has no full-time communications staff. He became the primary spokesman during a June manhunt for two inmates accused of killing two prison guards on a transfer bus.Sills provided no social media updates and instead held regular press conferences on the case. He continued taking reporters calls on his personal cellphone through the day the inmates were arrested.Traditional media get things right usually,Ž Sills said. And if they dont get things right, its usually our fault.ŽIn Douglas County, the department cited an ongoing investigation to deny media requests for body camera footage from the call that led to Par-rishs death. Days later, the agency posted its video to Facebook and Twitter which includes some of the material denied to media.The video omits the shooters face and voice. And it includes only audio of the moment Matthew Riehl fired through his bedroom door, fatally wounding Parrish and striking four other officers trying to take the shooter into custody on a mental health hold.In an interview with The Associated Press nine days after the shooting, Douglas Countys sheriff defended releasing the edited video after the department denied journalists openrecords requests for the complete footage. I knew that if I went to the press, radio and tele-vision, Im going to get 60 seconds, and the rest was going to hit the edi-tors floor,Ž Spurlock said. Im not going to be able to tell the story in such a fashion that I thought was appropriate for the dignity of Zack Parrish and the other four officers that were shot „ and what I believe the citizens of Douglas County deserve.ŽPolice improve social media skills, raising worriesIn this frame grab from a Jan. 8 video on the Twitter feed of the Douglas County, Colo., Sheriffs Department, Sheriff Tony Spurlock speaks to subscribers to explain the incident in which a deputy was gunned down responding to a call on Dec. 31. [DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLO., SHERIFFS VIA AP] Open government advocates concerned about departments transparency with cops savvier tech use

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 A15Lisa Mascaro and Josh Boak The Associated PressWASHINGTON „ President Donald Trump is considering broad tariffs on imports from China, and an announce-ment could come as soon as next week. Industry groups and some law-makers are scrambling to prevent a new front in a potential trade war that could reverberate across the U.S. economy.Early indications from the White House have officials braced for tariffs across a wide variety of consumer goods, from apparel to electronics, and even on imported parts for products made in the U.S. The size and scope remain under debate, but the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is warning that annual tariffs of as much as $60 billion on Chinese goods would be devastating.ŽTrumps focus on China could be even more consequential, both at home and abroad, than the recently announced penalty tariffs on steel and aluminum. And amid the staff turmoil at the White House, its being read as a sign of rising influence for the administrations pop-ulist economic aides, led by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and adviser Peter Navarro.Even Larry Kudlow „ an avowed free trader tapped to replace Gary Cohn as director of the White House National Economic Council „ has said China deserves a tough responseŽ from the United States and its friends. He told CNBC this week, The United States could lead a coalition of large trading partners and allies against China.ŽBut with these tariffs, the Trump administration appears so far to be content to go it alone.On Friday, the National Retail Federation convened a conference call to update its members. Theyre all concerned about this,Ž said David French, vice president for government relations. Tariffs are a tax on consumers, and theyre best used sparingly as tools.ŽTrade experts and economists say the tariffs could lead to rising prices for U.S. consumers and businesses without accomplishing one of the presidents stated goals: reducing last years trade imbalance of $566 billion.China, the largest source of the trade imbalance, likely would respond to any tariffs by retaliating with higher import taxes on U.S. goods, among other possible restrictions.They signaled that they will aim at things that affect the United States politically as well as economically,Ž said Claude Barfield, a scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and former consultant with the U.S. trade representative.Lawmakers on Capitol Hill, who largely have been shut out of administration deliberations, fear tariffs would stunt economic benefits in the U.S. that could be stem-ming from the GOP tax cuts.Trumps possible China tari s send opponents scramblingCoils of steel are seen at the Direct Strip Production Complex at Essar Steel Algoma in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Wednesday. President Donald Trumps decision to slap tariffs on imports of aluminum and steel has drawn scorn and concern from around the world. [JUSTIN TANG/AP]

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** A16 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald The Associated PressCARLSBAD, N.M. „ The U.S. Department of Energy has commissioned a national group of scientists to study the viability of diluting surplus weapons-grade plutonium and storing it permanently at the federal governments underground repository in New Mexico.The panel of about 15 scientists from universities, corporations and laboratories around the nation will evalu-ate the storage potential at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nations only facility for permanently disposing of tons of Cold War-era waste con-taminated with small amounts of plutonium and other man-made radioactive elements.The scientists held their first meeting in November in Washington, D.C., then gathered again Tuesday in Carlsbad, where officials gave presentations and fielded questions on the feasibility of bringing plutonium to the repository, the Carlsbad Current-Argus reports.Critics are unconvinced the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant can safely hold the plutonium, or that the facilitys mission can be expanded via federal law in an appropriate amount of time.Experts estimated about 34 metric tons of surplus plutonium exist around the world, mostly in the U.S. and Russia. As part of a nonproliferation agreement between the two countries, 6 metric tons are being diluted at the Energy Departments Savannah River Site in Georgia for potential shipment to the southeastern New Mexico repository.The scientists are members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, a prestigious coali-tion that provides advice on complex problems and public policy questions. They will evaluate the repositorys transportation capabilities, current and future operations, and compliance with federal regulations before and after a nearly three-year shutdown caused by a 2014 radiological release.Senior Program Officer Jen-nifer Heimberg of the National Academies of Sciences Nuclear and Radiation Stud-ies Board said the group hopes to make a recommendation to the Energy Department by December. She said the study is considering only the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the program and has not evalu-ated other sites.Heimberg declined to comment on the boards impressions after hearing from Carlsbad leaders. New Mexico nuke repository studied for plutonium storageThe idled Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nations only underground nuclear waste repository, is near Carlsbad, N.M. The U.S. Department of Energy has commissioned a national group of scientists to study the viability of diluting surplus weapons-grade plutonium and storing it permanently at the federal governments underground repository in southern New Mexico. [AP FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 A17By Kim RingGatehouse Media MassachusettsSPENCER, Mass. „ Its easy to find a birthday gift for Roger LaPlume.His favorite things are dollar bills, pretty girls and white ice cream „ not necessarily in that order. At his recent 65th birthday celebration he received all of those things.LaPlume, at 65, is believed to be one of the oldest people in the United States with Down syndrome. Last year, Guin-ness World Records listed Kenny Cridge of Tintinhull, Yeovil, Somerset, England, as the oldest known person in the world with the syndrome.LaPlume was born in Worcester on March 3, 1953, the sixth of seven children. He lived with his mother until her age and health kept her from caring for him. She lived to be 102.He attended various pro-grams including the Mercy Center and later the Seven Hills Foundation. In those years, LaPlume would walk around the neighborhood, maybe buy something to drink that hed sip in Elm Park, and visit with neighbors.To this day he still knows that neighbor-hood,Ž his caregiver, Sandy Thibault, said. We were driving near there one day and he told me where to turn.ŽHis directions led her to the house where he grew up, and a sign for LaPlume TV „ a family members business.LaPlume enjoyed danc-ing every week, Holy Cross football games and spend-ing time with his family. While his age is slowing him down somewhat he still likes making puzzles, going out for ice cream and taking cruises with Thibault and her family. Hes been to the Caribbean and loved his trips aboard ship to Puerto Rico and Haiti.Hed been pretty healthy until last fall when a respi-ratory condition sent him to the hospital and doctors feared he might not survive.But survive he did, and although he now uses a wheelchair hes just about back to his old self, return-ing to his day program at BAMSI, a rehabilitation facility provider, seeking out his favorite foods and spending time with his dear friend Joanne Graves. Even his doctor was stunned to see how well he was doing at his physical last week.He said, See you next year,Ž Thibault said.For his 65th birthday, about 15 close friends and family members gathered at the Thibault home last Saturday. State Sen. Anne M. Gobi, D-Spencer, and state Reps. Donald R. Ber-thiaume Jr. and Peter J. Durant, both R-Spencer, brought citations from the Statehouse commemorating the event.He was very happy,Ž Thibault said. That (party) was just what the doctor ordered.ŽLaPlume came to live with the Thibaults after Thibault saw an ad seeking a place where he could live and receive assistance with things he couldnt do for himself. She thought he was the perfect fit, and for 14 years he has been part of the family.Some would say hes lucky, landing in a home with Thibault and her daughter, Cary Janke, who suffered damage to her brain from mercury poisoning when she was a baby. But Thibault said her family is lucky to have him. Were the fortu-nate ones,Ž she said. He brings so much love to our family.Ž Mass. man among oldest people living with Down syndromeRoger LaPlume, of Spencer, Mass., celebrates his 65th birthday with friends, caregivers and family. LaPlume is believed to be one of the oldest people in the United States living with Down syndrome. [MATT WRIGHT]

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** A18 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 B1 LOCAL & STATE FRIDAYS NUMBERSFLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Friday. Pick 2 (a ernoon): 4-0 Pick 2 (evening): 2-5 Pick 3 (a ernoon): 8-9-1 Pick 3 (evening): 5-3-9 Pick 4 (a ernoon): 3-7-9-7 Pick 4 (evening): 2-07-4 Pick 5 (a ernoon): 0-4-4-4-4 Pick 5 (evening): 7-8-1-2-0 Fantasy 5: 12-25-2829-34 Lucky Money: 18-19-3041-16 Mega Millions: 1-13-2633-52-11-x3 TALLAHASSEE | B12SCOTT SIGNS $88B BUDGETGovernor takes light approach to vetoes in nal term STATE | B10DAYTONA BIKE WEEKPolice shi focus from the to motorcycle gangs By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The con-ceptual marina drawing the Panama City Commission looked at Wednesday was downright humble.The drawing „ really more of a sketch City Engineer Dale Cronwell made years ago „ doesnt look that different from the current design. It keeps the large grassy patch in the middle and large sidewalks going around the edge. It added a couple more small green spaces and cul-de-sacs on each end.If the commission wanted, Department of Public Works Director Neil Fravel sug-gested during his explanation of the drawing, the side of the T-dock opposite the marina store could become a park, offering some flexibility to one day put a restaurant there.With these designs, the important part isnt so much the surface of the marina but what is happening beneath the roadways and sidewalks. Fravel was recommending the city make fiscal year 2019 the year the commission address the underlying issues on the marina „ the structural deficiencies in the sea wall, the utility systems and the lack of a stormwater system „ and the commission was buying in.P.C. to put marina repairs on fast trackBy Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comFOUNTAIN „ Two Bay County parents have been arrested after authorities allegedly found a baggie with methamphetamine residue close enough totheir 5-dayolds bottle and formula they feared the infant could ingest the nar-cotic and die, according to official reports.Jeana Marie Campbell, 39, and Paul Minton Wynn, 40, appeared in court Friday in the case. The Bay County Sheriff's Office arrested the couple after arriving at their 12299 Nona-wood Road home in Fountain to reportedly find their 5-day-old baby inside, within arm's reach of narcotics, and the couple outside.Campbell and Wynn are both being held at the Bay County Jail on bonds of $15,000, court records stated. They have been court ordered to not have contact with the infant.According to BCSO reports, officers were serving a search warrant when they found the infant sleeping in the master BCSO: Meth baggie near 5-day-olds bottle Campbell Wynn By Tamar HallermanThe Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionWASHINGTON „ The man widely expected to take over a powerful Capi-tol Hill committee later this spring is known as a fierce and cunning advocate for his state, a master legisla-tor who doesn't hesitate to work the system to achieve his political goals.That could spell very bad news for Georgia and one of its top Washington priorities: winning the edge in its decades-long water rights fight with Alabama and Florida.U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., is likely to be selected next month by his Republican colleagues as Senate Appropriations Committee chairman.The 83-year-old has kept Georgia's lawyers and con-gressional delegation in a Shelbys rise could spell trouble for GeorgiaAlabama senator sides with Florida in tri-state water wars More insideLegal experts: Water war likely to keep dragging B4 Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks to reporters in December. Shelby is expected to be named Senate Appropriations Committee chairman in April. [J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/AP FILE] Kids play ” ag football at the Kingdom Impact Center on Saturday. The day-long training camp and games were put on by the center to unite area youth and provide them with healthy activities to participate in. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Coach Van Mitchell of the Glenwood Rattler Youth Association tells kids at the Kingdom Impact Center to not tackle one another and to have fun during a ” ag football camp and game Saturday. By Genevieve Smith850-522-5118 | @PCNHGenevieve gsmith@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Citywide Impact Football Camp kept kids busy on Saturday with coach-ing, football drills, flag football games and a subtle deeper meaning.We wanted to put together a quality football camp for the kids over here in the inner city,Ž said Lynva Masslieno, who spearheaded the event. Masslieno, known by many as Big Holy, GRIDIRON OPPORTUNITIESFootball camp lls a void for area youth"We want to keep these kids busy so they dont have time to get in trouble. Its a sacri ce, but its well worth it.ŽVan Mitchell, the athletic director for Glenwood Rattlers Youth AssociationSee WATER WARS, B4 See FOOTBALL, B6 See MARINA, B6 See BCSO, B6

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** B2 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 75/64 76/65 77/62 74/67 74/67 77/66 80/65 81/66 80/61 77/57 80/65 80/66 81/62 75/66 76/65 76/66 80/63 75/6476/6472/4967/4566/45Cloudy with some rain and a t-storm Partly sunny; breezy in the p.m. SunshinePlenty of sunshine7562737164Winds: SW 10-20 mph Winds: W 10-20 mph Winds: WNW 10-20 mph Winds: N 7-14 mph Winds: WSW 6-12 mphBlountstown 8.88 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 7.21 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.04 ft. 42 ft. Century 7.81 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 24.52 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Sat.Apalachicola 5:11a 11:36a 5:29p 11:50p Destin 12:28a 7:22a 12:54p 7:06p West Pass 4:44a 11:09a 5:02p 11:23p Panama City 12:18a 6:40a 1:01p 6:16p Port St. Joe 1:30a 5:49a 2:15p 5:58p Okaloosa Island 11:27a 6:28a --6:12p Milton 2:41a 9:43a 3:07p 9:27p East Bay 1:45a 9:13a 2:11p 8:57p Pensacola 1:01a 7:56a 1:27p 7:40p Fishing Bend 1:42a 8:47a 2:08p 8:31p The Narrows 2:38a 10:47a 3:04p 10:31p Carrabelle 3:46a 9:23a 4:04p 9:37pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018FirstFullLastNew Mar 24Mar 31Apr 8Apr 15Sunrise today ........... 6:49 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 6:52 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 7:42 a.m. Moonset today ......... 8:10 p.m. Today Mon. Today Mon.Clearwater 76/65/s 77/69/pc Daytona Beach 80/61/pc 81/64/t Ft. Lauderdale 83/66/s 84/71/pc Gainesville 82/61/pc 78/64/t Jacksonville 83/60/c 77/64/r Jupiter 82/63/s 86/70/c Key Largo 80/70/pc 81/73/s Key West 81/71/pc 82/73/s Lake City 82/62/c 76/67/r Lakeland 84/61/s 84/68/t Melbourne 84/60/s 86/66/t Miami 84/66/s 86/71/pc Naples 81/66/s 82/70/pc Ocala 82/58/pc 82/66/pc Okeechobee 83/59/s 86/67/pc Orlando 85/61/s 86/67/t Palm Beach 81/65/s 83/71/pc Tampa 80/64/s 80/68/pc Today Mon. Today Mon.Baghdad 78/52/s 81/56/pc Berlin 34/19/c 40/22/s Bermuda 68/60/sh 63/59/pc Hong Kong 77/69/pc 78/66/sh Jerusalem 75/55/pc 79/56/s Kabul 62/41/c 59/41/t London 35/30/sf 41/34/s Madrid 54/35/pc 48/33/r Mexico City 82/54/pc 84/54/pc Montreal 23/7/s 25/10/s Nassau 82/68/pc 82/69/s Paris 39/30/sn 38/27/c Rome 58/46/t 54/41/t Tokyo 61/52/c 63/46/c Toronto 44/18/s 32/17/s Vancouver 49/35/c 48/34/pc Today Mon. Today Mon.Albuquerque 52/29/sh 54/29/s Anchorage 40/34/pc 40/26/sn Atlanta 72/56/pc 69/52/t Baltimore 55/32/s 50/31/pc Birmingham 70/56/c 76/51/t Boston 33/19/s 36/21/pc Charlotte 66/48/pc 58/48/r Chicago 55/32/s 44/29/c Cincinnati 55/37/s 53/31/r Cleveland 50/28/s 41/27/pc Dallas 81/57/pc 77/48/s Denver 57/27/c 43/24/c Detroit 56/28/s 42/24/pc Honolulu 82/69/pc 79/69/r Houston 84/68/t 85/53/s Indianapolis 55/37/s 52/28/r Kansas City 59/40/c 46/33/r Las Vegas 62/46/s 66/48/s Los Angeles 63/48/pc 70/53/s Memphis 65/56/t 73/44/t Milwaukee 54/31/s 41/27/c Minneapolis 47/30/pc 39/25/c Nashville 63/51/c 69/44/t New Orleans 79/67/c 82/57/t New York City 44/32/s 44/30/pc Oklahoma City 64/45/sh 57/37/pc Philadelphia 50/33/s 48/31/pc Phoenix 67/49/pc 73/51/s Pittsburgh 52/27/s 51/31/pc St. Louis 57/43/c 51/32/r Salt Lake City 46/32/c 51/34/c San Antonio 89/61/pc 85/52/s San Diego 63/51/pc 68/54/s San Francisco 58/44/pc 64/51/pc Seattle 55/40/c 55/38/pc Topeka 62/41/sh 48/34/r Tucson 63/40/pc 69/43/pc Wash., DC 58/38/s 51/36/pcMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursday Gulf Temperature: 64 Today: Wind from the southwest at 6-12 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility under a mile in areas of morning fog. Tomorrow: Wind from the southwest at 8-16 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility less than 2 miles at times in thundery rain; otherwise, clear.Today: fog in the morning; otherwise, mainly cloudy, a thunderstorm in the afternoon. Winds south-southwest 4-8 mph.High/low ......................... 74/58 Last year's High/low ...... 67/40 Normal high/low ............. 72/51 Record high ............. 84 (1977) Record low ............... 31 (1988)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... trace Month to date ................... 1.28" Normal month to date ...... 3.20" Year to date ..................... 9.30" Normal year to date ....... 13.20" Average humidity .............. 84%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 77/69 Last year's High/low ...... 68/50 Normal high/low ............. 69/53 Record high ............. 87 (2015) Record low ............... 29 (1947)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... 0.01" Month to date ................... 2.11" Normal month to date ...... 3.00" Year to date ................... 16.77" Normal year to date ....... 13.37" Average humidity .............. 75%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton Beach KICKER WEATHER By Heather Osbourne315-4440 | @heatheronwfdn hosbourne@nwfdailynews.comNICEVILLE „ The Okaloosa County School Board voted Friday to avoid court and settle a case involving two Baker School students who allegedly suffered pervasive racial harassment.The School Board voted 5-to-1 during a special session to approve an undisclosed set-tlement amount that, according to a board member Friday, will be finalized and available as a public record within 45 days.The School Board, Superintendent Mary Beth Jackson, School Board Attorney Jeff McInnis and another attorney in the case met privately for 40 minutes to discuss the settle-ment before the public vote.School Board member Rodney Walker, who cast thelone no vote, said the school districts previous insurance carriersrecommended the settlement. Walker said hecould not dis-close the settlement amount until the finalization.Tyronne and Lakish Adams, the parents of the two students, suedthe school dis-trict and Jackson in February 2016.A federal judge ruled last September that the case alleging a racially hostile school environmentŽ at Baker should be heard in court.In her ruling, Chief U.S. District Judge M. Casey Rodgers in Pensacola deliv-ered a scathing rebuke of the schools and the school districts efforts to protect the boys „ identified in court documents as eighth-grader T.A. and 10th-grader T.A. Jr. „ from the racial harassment.The district has offered no evidence to rebut T.A. Jr.s testimony that there was nobody to help him get through this situation, or both boys testimonies that they feared for their safety as a result of the harassment,Ž Rodgers wrote. There is no evidence in the record that the district provided any accom-modation for the boys.ŽRodgers ruled a case could be made as to whether a racially hostile environment existed at BakerŽ during the time T.A. and T.A. Jr. attended and whether the districts response was reasonably calculated to end the racial harassment.ŽMcInnis cautioned in a pre-vious interview with the Daily News against reading too much into Rodgers findings. Her ruling was made on a motion for summary judgment filed by the district, he said, and in cases such as those the judge is bound to rule in the light most favorable to the unmov-ing party,Ž which in this case would be the Adamses.We do not believe the district or the school acted deliberately and indifferently as to the students concerns,Ž McInnis said at that time. In fact, the district and the school spent a great deal of time initiating steps to address the issues that were arising at the school with these two stu-dents. Ultimately it will be up to a judge or jury to decide if those actions were adequate to address those issues.ŽIf the Adamses and a judgeapprove the settlement by April 30, the case will end.The Adamses, a military family, moved from Virginia to Florida and the boys attended Baker School from at least September 2014 through July 2015,Ž court records show. Lakisha Adams was a senior master sergeant at Eglin Air Force Base while Tyronne Adams was an HVAC mechanic with the Army 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne).In the first two months of the 2014-15 school year at Baker School, T.A. Jr. was called the N word, was told he would hang from a tree, was shown a KKK holding a noose and was told this will happen to you by C.R. a white student ... and grabbed by the face by an unknown student and asked why did he report a (football) player for making racial slurs,Ž according to the initial complaint filed by attor-ney Fred Flowers on behalf of the Adamses.Rodgers called the initial (C.R.) attack the most egregiousŽ of 10 documented incident for which undisputedŽ evidence existed that indicated district administra-tors, including Baker Principal Mike Martello and Jackson, were aware.She noted the record in this case shows that T.A. and T.A. Jr. were called n„„- at the very least eight times, once by a teacher, and threatened with a noose at least twice,Ž during their year at Baker.(The Adamses) argue that T.A. and T.A. Jr. were subjected to a racially hostile school envi-ronment that deprived them of access to educational benefits and opportunities. The district argues in response that the reported incidents were spo-radic and episodic, and because there were no repeat offenders and no evidence of a conspiracy among the students, T.A. and T.A. Jr. were not repeatedly the victims of student-on-student or teacher-on-student racial harassment, Ž Rodgers wrote. The Court disagrees.ŽA jury reasonably could find that the racially offensive remarks and actions towards T.A. and T.A. Jr. „ none of which (according to the record) were first instigated by either of the boys „ were sufficiently regular and con-tinuous to constitute severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive harassment,Ž Rod-gers wrote.Citing testimony from both boys in which they claimed to have missed class time either due to skipping class for fear of harassment or when being disciplined for retaliating after harassment, Rodgers said a jury could reasonably find harassment at Baker ... denied (students) access to educational opportunity.ŽShe also noted the Adam-ses eventually turned to home schooling and later moved back to Virginia.Although McInnis argued that the School District had striven during the time T.A. and T.A. Jr.attended Baker to create policies to streamline the reporting process for harassment and conducted a school assembly to addressthe topic, Rodgers said a jury could question whether enough was done.Okaloosa votes to settle school racism lawsuitOkaloosa County School Superintendent Mary Beth Jackson listens as School Board attorney Jeff McInnis discusses the lawsuit at Fridays meeting. [DEVON RAVINE/DAILY NEWS]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES & NEWSFuneral services for Rudolf Alphonse Carlson, 97, of Panama City, who died Tuesday, March 13, 2018, will be held Monday, March 19, 2018, at 10 a.m. in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow the service at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 5-7 p.m. Sunday.RUDOLF ALPHONSE CARLSON Laurel D. Carlson, 93, of Panama City Beach, died Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Memorialization will be by cremation. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www.heritagefhbeach.com.LAUREL D. CARLSONRetired SFC Coley Crawford, 73, of Southport, died Wednesday, March 14, 2018. Visitation will be 6-8 p.m. Friday, March 23, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home. The service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 24, 2018, also at the funeral home. Interment will take place at 2 p.m. (EST) Monday, March 26, 2018, at Tallahassee National Cemetery. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com.COLEY CRAWFORDJoseph WillardŽ Creamer, 79, of Panama City, died Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. Inurnment will take place at 1 p.m. (EST) Monday, March 19, 2018, at Tallahassee National Cemetery. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com.JOSEPH WILLARD CREAMERBarrie Howard Coffman, a retired business owner and longtime resident of Seacrest Beach, Florida, peacefully passed away at Life Care Center of Jacksonville, Florida, after an extended battle with cancer. Barrie Coffman was reared in Chicago, Illinois, and attended the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, where he served as president of the Sigma Chi fraternity. He began his business career at C & S Bank in Atlanta. He later moved to Dothan, Alabama, where he and his brother founded Coffman International, a familyowned and -operated Navistar dealership. Barrie will be remembered as a steadfast friend to many. An early believer in the random acts of kindness movement, he was fond of gifting those about whom he cared often. If the measurement of fortune is the breadth of true friendships, Barrie died wealthier than he ever imagined.Barrie loved to travel, read and learn about history, in particular the history of war. His kind and generous soul will be missed, not only along 30A in Walton County, but also in Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Nicaragua and Roatan, Honduras. He is survived by his mother, Alison Coffman; his brother, Bob (Nancy) Coffman of Santa Rosa Beach, Florida; and his sisters, Janet (Michael) Hoover of New York, New York, and Crickett (Peter) Harmer of Nashville, Tennessee; and many loving nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by his father, H.G. Coffman. A private memorial service and celebration of his life will be held by the family. In lieu of flowers, please consider a random act of kindness that will carry on Barries humble mission.BARRIE HOWARD COFFMAN Taylor Alexander Davidson (July 1, 1998 … March 14, 2018) was the first-born son of Brian and Kim Davidson, the big brother of Jackson, and the first grandchild of John and June Davidson and George and Claudia Veitch. Taylor was a Scout from 1st Grade as a Tiger Cub until he achieved the rank of Life Scout. He graduated from Arnold High School a year early and then attended Haney Technical Institute and became a welder and member of the Boilermakers Union. He was an amazing and talented artist who loved to draw, especially anim characters. His constant sarcasm and wit were unparalleled except by his big heart. TD would spend his own money on groceries for the homeless that he would deliver to their camps or on the street. He loved strongly and was a fierce and loyal friend to a fault. Taylor could never turn his back on his friends and family and was always there to lend a hand with any task or chore without complaint, grievance, or expectation of reward or payment. He was a defender of the family and his loved ones. A better son, brother, grandson, nephew, cousin and friend could not be asked for. Taylor is survived by his parents Brian and Kim Davidson; younger brother Jackson; Grandmother June Davidson; Grandparents George and Claudia Veitch; Great-Grandmother Margaret Marcrum; Aunt and Uncles Leslie and Jeff Crowe, Brittany Veitch, David and Jenni Veitch, Marshall and Shanda Davidson; Cousins Hannah Crowe, Emily Crowe, Mackenzie Veitch, Kaylea Sisson, John David Veitch and Michael Veitch; Allysa Dixon, and Will Dixon; and Great-Aunts and Uncles, Cousins, and friends all whom he would do anything for. Out of respect for Taylor, there will be no viewing or service. Taylor would have hated either. In lieu of flowers or other items, please make a donation in Taylors name to the Panama City Rescue Mission, 609 Allen Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 or online at www.pcrmission.org. The family will be receiving friends at their home at 335 Massalina Drive, Panama City, FL 32401 on Sunday, March 18, 2018, from 11 a.m.Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, FL 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.comTAYLOR ALEXANDER DAVIDSON Stephen Folds, 28, of Panama City, died Sunday, March 11, 2018, at his residence. Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date by Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home.STEPHEN FOLDS Daniel Leon Keefover, 72, of Panama City Beach, died Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. A Celebration of Davids Life will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 24, 2018, at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Visitation will one hour prior to services at the funeral home. Arrangements by KentForest Lawn Funeral Home and Cemeteries.DANIEL LEON KEEFOVER Mary Frances Smith Perkins, 77, of Panama City, passed away Sunday, March 11, 2018. She was born Dec. 9, 1940, in Panama City to Clyde Smith and Violet Cornwell. She worked at Pitts Sand Company for over 20 years. She was preceded in death by her husband, Hardy Lee Perkins, and both of her parents. She is survived by one sister, Bettina Cornwell (Steve Arquitt); nephews, Robert Perkins (Twyla), Ron Perkins (Deborah), David Q. Cornwell, Robert L. Cornwell-Arquitt and Luke A. CornwellArquitt; and niece, Melinda Bradshaw. Memorial services will be at noon Friday, March 23, 2018, in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Stuart Leach officiating. The family will receive friends from 11 a.m. to noon at the funeral home, prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial donation be made to the Humane Society in memory of Mary Frances.Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272MARY FRANCES SMITH PERKINS Rosemarie Schultz, 79, of Southport, died Saturday, March 17, 2018, at a local care facility. Memorial services will be held Saturday, March 24, 2018, at 10 a.m. at Kent Forest Lawn Chapel. The family will receive guests from 9 a.m. until time of service.ROSEMARIE SCHULTZJerry A. Simmons, 79, of Panama City, died Thursday, March 15, 2018. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, 2018, at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. The family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m. Monday, March 19, 2018, at the funeral home.JERRY A. SIMMONSThese obituaries appeared in The News Herald over the past seven days: Davian Skyler Aguon 9, Callaway, died March 7. Ouida Ann Alldredge, 81, Panama City, died March 13. Mary T. Askins Panama City, died March 8. Charles Beckman, Panama City Beach died March 10. Anna V. Boyarski, 101, Panama City, died March 12. Susie Baker Broadway, 78, Bayou George, Panama City, died March 9. Ashley Ivason Greenaway, 48, Lynn Haven, died March 12. Earl D. Jupin, 88, Lynn Haven, died March 6. Tony Ward Kyle, 70, Panama City, died March 8. Howard William Lancaster 88, Lynn Haven, died March 12. Diana Miller, Panama City Beach, died March 8. Robert C. Pierson, 86, Panama City, died March 11. Randall Michael Shelton died March 12. Daniel Shaffer Smith, 82, Lynn Haven, died March 11. Mary Frances Smith Perkins 77, Panama City, died March 11. John Howard Phillips Jr., 66, Panama City, died March 11. Daniel Shaffer Smith, 82, Lynn Haven, died March 11. William U. Stitt Jr., 76, Southport, died March 11. Deborah Kay Valentine, 63, Southport, died March 2. Nell VanSickle, 72, Panama City, died March 12. Barbara K. Verstring, 62, Panama City, died March 8. James A. Wilcox, 91, Panama City, died March 12.NOT FORGOTTEN By Jennie McKeon315-4434 | @jenniemnwfdn jmckeon@nwfdailynews.comMILTON „ Transportation services provided bythe non-profit group Santa Rosa Vets to VA Clinics will bediscontinuedat the end of March.For the past five years, Santa Rosa Vets to VA Clinics has provided transportation for Santa Rosa County veterans to and from the Joint Ambulatory Care Center and the Veterans Affairs Clinic in Pensacola. The program will end March 31 because of a lack of funds.Shawn Ward, the transportation planner for Santa Rosa County, said the program was eliminated after the countys Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund grant was cut by $87,917. Accord-ing to a press release from the county, the funding cut was in part because of the new distribution formula used by the state for Transportation Disadvantaged Trust Fund allocations. Direct costs to Santa Rosa Vets to VA Clinics averaged $2,000 to $4,000 monthly, so it could no longer afford to operate.It was a trickle-down effect,ŽWard said.The Vets to VA Clinics provided free rides twice a week to some 90 registered veterans. Itoriginally was funded by an Elks Lodge grant before it became a 501(c)(3) nonprofit.Veter-ans either had to take a taxi cab „ which cost about $100 „ to the clinic or they simply werent going,Ž Ward said.The group made 395 trips totaling 15,297 miles last year.Santa Rosa County does have a transportation system, but it is unlike Escambia County Area Transit or Emerald Coast Rider in that the county offers a door-to-door service. Residents must call to reserve a time, andthe program stays booked out at least a month. Veterans will nowcompete for those rides, Ward said.Weve had some calls from clients who were worried about their rides,Ž he added.Ward said there are other options for veterans. One possibility isthe local Disabled American Veterans shuttle bus, which takes veterans from Eglin Air Force Baseto the VA Clinic in Pensacola three days a week.If they can add a stop in Santa Rosa County, veterans may have an easier time getting a ride to the stop,Ž Ward said.Veterans in the county needing transportation to theclinic are eligible for the Transportation Disadvantaged Pro-gram and should contact Santa Rosa Transporta-tion at 850-626-6806.Santa Rosa vet transportation services endingWard

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** B4 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Heraldconstant state of paranoia over the past two decades by quietly using government spending bills and other must-pass legislation to aid Alabamas position in the tri-state water fight.Georgia lawmakers have mostly thwarted Shelbys under-the-radar moves by banding together and going over his head to party leaders. But Shelbys likely promotion could change the political dynamic on Capitol Hill, where committee chairmen have outsized power to look out for their interests.Were just trying to make sure that theres equity in the distribution of the water,Ž Shelby recently told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Weve got to protect our interests.Ž Divergent strategiesGeorgia, Alabama and Flor-ida have duked it out for the better part of three decades over water usage in the Ala-bama-Coosa-Tallapoosa and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basins, which both originate upstream of Atlanta and flow into the Gulf of Mexico.Alabama and Florida argue that Atlanta, which has seen its population explode in recent decades, and southwest Georgia agriculture have taken more than their fair share of water. That, they say, has harmed the environment and economic development in the two states, particularly the oyster industry in the Florida Panhandles Apalachicola Bay.Georgia says it has been a responsible steward and that major conservation efforts, particularly in metro Atlanta, have been effective in recent years. It has argued in court that none of the remedies being proposed by its neighbors would actually lead to more water flowing downstream and would mainly just hamstring Georgia economically.Talk to lawmakers from the three states on Capitol Hill about the water battle and they all more or less claim to want the same thing: They say the governors of their states should strike a compact setting mutu-ally agreeable terms for water usage in the two river basins to put three decades and tens of millions of dollars of litigation behind them.Despite a Supreme Court-appointed special masterŽ all but begging the governors to do so, deep mistrust between the states has made such a deal elusive. So multiple legal battles have continued, including one legal tributary recently argued before the high court.Georgia lawmakers want Congress to stay out of the water fight. The state has seen a series of favorable outcomes in court in recent years, and local lawmakers dont want the legislative branch to do anything that could halt Georgias momentum.No ones doing more for water stewardshipŽ than Geor-gia, said U.S. Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Lawrenceville, whose 7th Congressional District borders Lake Lanier, the reservoir at the heart of the water feud. No ones doing more for water con-servation, retention or storage. All the facts are on our side.ŽBut Alabama and Florida lawmakers see things differ-ently. Some think Georgia isnt working in good faith. The status quo benefits Atlanta and Georgia agriculture, they say, so Georgia has little incentive to negotiate a compact.Alabama Congressman Robert Aderholt pointed to Georgia lawmakers efforts to remove water rights language from an infrastructure bill in 2016 as a sign.It tells you that the merit of the so called water wars is not on their side,Ž the Republican told The Montgomery Adver-tiser at the time. Recent ghtsFirst elected to the Senate in 1987, Shelby had a reputation as an expert earmarker before Congress banned the practice in 2011. Since then, he has found other ways to exert his influence as the most senior lawmaker from the Southeast, occasion-ally angering other senators, including fellow Republicans, for his tough tactics.Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., unloaded on Shelby in 2015 after he said the Alabaman folded a provision into a spending bill in the middle of the night in the worst, disgraceful fashionŽ that would have removed restrictions on purchasing Russian-made rocket engines.McCain told Politico that Shelby didnt talk it over with him. Thats not the way Sen. Shelby does business,Ž he said.On the water rights issue, Shelby has used his position as a senior appropriator to include language in bills that he thinks could bring Georgia to the negotiating table with the other governors.I was always hoping the governors would work this out between the three states,Ž Shelby said last month.Hes deployed a few variations of language nudging specific federal agencies, including the Justice Department and Army Corps of Engineers, to take or not take specific actions related to Georgias water usage.He drew then-Congressman Nathan Deal into a fight in 2006 when he folded language into a spending bill that would have barred the corps from updating water use plans for the basins, a major priority for Atlanta at the time. The future gover-nor and his Georgia colleagues scrambled at the last minute to strike the provision from the legislation as it moved across the House floor, only narrowly succeeding on a 211-201 vote.It was just unbelievable that the appropriators would do something like this without telling anyone,Ž Deal said at the time. This is the kind of behind-the-scenes arrange-ment that just isnt proper.ŽSimilar tussles were waged almost every year since on appropriations bills, water policy measures and even a bipartisan weather forecast-ing bill.A major win for Alabama and Florida came in 2013, when Shelbys colleague, then-U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions, folded an amendment into a water policy bill that urged Con-gress to intervene in the water fight should it not be resolved among the three governors.That infuriated the Georgia delegation „ Florida cited the amendment in its case against Georgia currently before the Supreme Court „ and they stepped up their fight in the years since. New strategy?Ever since a 2015 blowup, the Georgia delegation has been able to contain Shelbys efforts. But that could all change in the months ahead.Shelbys promotion is all but assured in the seniorityfocused Senate, and he has backup on Senate Appropria-tions from Florida Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, because the two states frequently work together on the issue. No Georgia lawmaker sits on that Senate committee.Shelby also recently joined the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, giving him a seat at the table this year as the panel crafts the next bill to oversee the coun-trys water infrastructure. He has a very well-placed ally in the Trump administration, with Sessions now the attor-ney general. With Congress blessing, he could send lawyers to investigate Georgias water usage levels.Georgia lawmakers differ publicly about what Shelbys expected promotion could mean.Some are projecting confidence. They say Georgias lawmakers are well placed elsewhere to block him and that the states strategy wont change because it has both legal and political momentum on its side. Party leaders know very well that Georgia law-makers are united on the issue and arent afraid to flex their muscle, said Congressman Doug Collins of Gainesville.That doesnt scare me,Ž Collins said of Shelbys expected promotion. My recommendation to him is lets sit all three governors in a room, lets get this off. Because if we start legislating this kind of stuff, itll all of a sudden start getting beyond Georgia, Florida and Alabama.Ž But others admit that day-to-day maneuvering could become a lot tougher, because committee chairmen control levers of power.Were disadvantaged in ways that we have never been disadvantaged before,Ž Woodall said. That said, thats all political process. The facts are on our side.ŽThe posturing on Capitol Hill c omes as the states wait for the Supreme Court to rule on the Georgia-Florida case that was argued before the justices in January.Shelby in recent weeks has played coy about his ambitions out of respect for the retiring chairman. But he has said in the recent past that hell always keep his legislative options open when it comes to the water fight.I was always hoping the governors would work this out between the three states,Ž Shelby said. But, he added, Im just looking at everything.Ž WATER WARSFrom Page B1Lloyd DunkelbergerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Even if the U.S. Supreme Court gives Florida a favorable ruling in its lawsuit against Georgia over water flow into the Apalachicola River, the decision likely would result in more litigation and new legal challenges involving the decades-old water war between the states.Those were the observations of five legal experts who on Thursday addressed a conference at Florida State University on the Apalachic-ola River and Apalachicola Bay system. The conference was put together by the Flor-ida Conservation Coalition, a group headed by former U.S. Sen. and Gov. Bob Graham.The U.S. Supreme Court in January heard oral arguments in Floridas challenge to a special masters report that found Florida had not proved its case that a water-usage cap should be imposed on Georgia to help the river and Apalachicola Bay. Geor-gia has asked the nations highest court to uphold the report, arguing that a con-sumption cap would damage Georgias economy and agri-culture industry.Florida has asked for the case to be sent back to the court-appointed special master for more hearings on a plan for an equitableŽ distribution of water in the Apalachicola-Chatta-hoochee-Flint river basin.Although the lawyers on Thursdays panel and Florida officials have expressed opti-mism about the case based on the tone of justices ques-tions during oral arguments, Jonathan Williams, a former deputy solicitor general for the state, said he was taking a cautious view.Oral arguments are often not great predictors of what the ultimate outcome is going to be, particularly in cases that are as complicated as this one is,Ž said Williams, who was involved in the case while he was with the Attorney Generals Office. He is now in private practice with the firm Lash & Goldberg.Although the arguments went well,Ž Williams said. there are a lot of unsettled issues in this case right now, and there are a lot of thorny issues the special master will have to work through in the event the case gets remanded to him.ŽIf the case continues, a key issue in developing an equitable apportionmentŽ of water in the river system would be weighing the bene-fits to Florida against the cost to Georgia. Florida has said a diminished water flow has harmed the Apalachicola eco-system as well as the seafood industry, while Georgia has said a consumption cap could hurt the economic growth of the Atlanta region and impact a multibillion-dollar agriculture industry in Southwest Georgia.Richard Hamann, a retired law professor from the University of Florida, said he is pretty optimisticŽ about Flor-idas case, having once thought the state would have difficulty proving harm had been done.But if Florida wins the cur-rent case, he likened it to the dog chasing the car.ŽWhen you catch it, what do you get?Ž he asked. He said it may be difficult developing an accurate mechanism to measure a consumption cap.If we get there, I think that would be a huge challenge,Ž Hamann said. But I certainly look forward to seeing that day.ŽJason Oyler, a lawyer with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission in Pennsylvania, said the case likely would lead to more litigation that could go on for decades upon decades.Ž He and other lawyers on the panel said there are relatively few water cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court to give a clear indication of the outcome of the Florida-Georgia case.I think there could be twists and turns, even with a rela-tively favorable ruling, on that kind of economic analysis,Ž he said. And there are some pitfalls there.ŽLegal experts: Water war likely to keep draggingRay Morris plows up peanuts at his farm near Leesburg, Ga. Florida has said a diminished water ” ow has harmed the Apalachicola ecosystem as well as the seafood industry, while Georgia has said a consumption cap could hurt the economic growth of the Atlanta region and impact a multibillion-dollar agriculture industry in Southwest Georgia. [TODD STONE/AP FILE PHOTO] STATE BRIEFSA customer eats a plate of Apalachicola oysters on the half shell at Up The Creek Raw Bar Restaurant in Apalachicola in May 2016. Florida of“ cials allege reduced water ” ow from Georgia is damaging the states oyster industry. [TAIMY ALVAREZ/AP FILE] PALM BEACH GARDENSPolice: Teen who stabbed 3 had been monitoredA Florida teenager accused of fatally stabbing a 13-year-old boy during a fight about his religion during a sleepover had been monitored by fed-eral and other authorities for months, police said. The teen was arrested after police say he fatally stabbed Jovanni Sierra, 13; and wounded Elaine Simon, 43, and her 13-year-old son, Dane Bancroft, at a birthday sleepover. Police say the teen was upset because one of the boys had made funŽ of his Muslim faith by referring to celebrities as gods. A Jupiter, Florida, police report said several local law enforcement agen-cies, including the FBI, had been aware of threats the teen made to a school in England. The report also said he had sympathized with some terror groups, and that local authorities and the FBI had discussed pursuing charges. JUPITER, FLA.Uber driver convicted of raping passenger An Uber driver and then-Žhouse parentŽ at a group foster home has been convicted of raping a woman he drove home from a concert in Florida.News outlets report a six-person jury deliberated for nine hours Thursday before finding 58-year-old Gary Kitchings guilty of burglary, false impris-onment and three sexual battery charges. He was acquitted of one count concerning an alleged sex act in his car.Prosecutors said Kitch-ings told the 38-year-old passenger he had a gun and forced her to submit to sex acts inside his car and in her home after driving her home in May.Defense attorneys contended the sex was consensual, and Kitch-ings testified that he was only guilty of cheating on his wife. The Associated Press

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** B6 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Heraldbedroom of the residence where methamphetamine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia were located by the babys bottles and formula.It should be noted that methamphetamine is a narcotic that can be trans-ferred transdermally,Ž officers wrote. Since it was next to items that would go in the babys mouth, there is a great possibility that the baby could have been exposed to methamphetamine, which for a 5-day-old could be fatal.ŽThe residence did not have running water or electrical power. A gen-erator at the creek behind the residence was being used to pump water to the home to wash dishes, clothes and for drinking, BCSO reported.Investigators also discovered a small plastic swimming pool in the back yard. Dirty dishes and baby bottles were soaking in the stagnant, dirty water. There was no bottled or sanitary water within the residence. The infant was being fed bot-tles with formula, which investigators believe was being mixed with the creek water.The baby was sheltered by the Department of Children and Families (DCF). Both parents were taken into custody on charges of possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, keeping a public nuisance structure for drug activity and child abuse. BCSOFrom Page B1is the lead pastor at The Kingdom Impact Center. With the help of Coach JC Carlisle, the idea for a camp for conceptualized.Last year, we were talking about putting together a football camp for Spring Break to actually give the kids something to do for Spring Break,Ž Ma sslieno said. We started reaching out and connecting with other people in the community and it came together.ŽAfter the inaugural camp was a success, they decided to make the camp an annual event.But the days activities werent just about athleticism. Football camp, and myriad other activities set up by Kingdom Impact Center and other community groups, aim to connect area youth with each other, and with responsible adults, in a healthy, meaningful way.Early Saturday, local police officers joined in on the fun by participating in drills and helping coach. Masslieno said its important for the officers to be able to build a rap-port with the community, and for the community to see that police officers are human and they know how to have fun.ŽWere just out here today partnering up with the Impact Center,Ž said Van Mitchell, the athletic director for Glenwood Rattlers Youth Association, another youth program in the area. We know a lot of them are less fortunate. Theyre dealing with some things in life „ theyre not getting what they need at home. So were just trying to fill that void.ŽWere gonna be doing a lot this year,Ž he con-tinued. We want to keep these kids busy so they dont have time to get in trouble. Its a sacrifice, but its well worth it. Anything we can do to give them the opportunity so the streets wont swallow them up.ŽIncluded in the coaching staff this year was former Canadian Football League player and four-time Grey Cup Champion Anwar Stewart, and former 49er and Charger for the NFL Patrick Miller.I just think what theyre doing is terrific for Bay County,Ž Miller said. I just felt like this is my responsibility to give back.ŽMiller believes that while the sport teaches athletes many invaluable skills such as discipline, dedication and respect for people, the most important thing to teach youth is about the importance of getting an education.Without an education, there are not a lot of opportunities for young folks,Ž he said. My whole point today was to get their attention to let them know that going to school is what youre supposed to be doing. ƒ Also, to encour-age the parents to know that, Hey, this is part of your job, too. Lets not just put it all on the teachers. Lets take responsibility, too,Ž he said.Im a realist and Ima keep it real with them about what were not doing and what the strug-gle is, and I think, you know, one of the things that we gotta encourage these guys is at an early age that we gotta get our education. We cant wait until the last moment to get that.ŽMiller said the most important takeaway for Saturdays campers is to Love one another. Be respectful.Ž FOOTBALLFrom Page B1Lets put this on the fast track, please,Ž Commissioner Mike Nichols said.After several years of waiting for what Commissioner Jenna Haligas once called a saviorŽ for the marina and cycling through negotiations with two developers, the commission has adjusted its focus to the areas redevelopment.At the citys goal session meeting this year, commissioners shied away from talk of court-ing another developer and instead seemed focused on what they could do right now.They talked favorably about using the $7.9 mil-lion remaining of the $12.9 million loan the city took out in 2013 to move forward with repairs to the seawall, where the tiebacks have rusted away. The engineering work for the T-dock repairs has been completed for about a year, according to Fravel, and just need to be tweaked slightly now that Sonnen-blick Development is out of the picture to include stormwater and the surface. The previous plan was to leave it unfinished as Sonnenblick would be following behind the city.The public is not going to let us just have a sand pile down there to play in,Ž Fravel said.Commissioner Haligas said she wanted to see the decking issues addressed as she gets a great deal of complaintsŽ about loose boards and nails as the Ward 1 Commissioner.Making some of the repairs, the group said, might help to bring back some of the tenants who abandoned the marina during the uncertainty. Out of the 240 slips, about 60 are currently vacant, according to Budget Director Brandy Waldron. In contrast, the St. Andrews marina has a waiting list.Upgrades to the slips also were mentioned as a potential goal.Mayor Greg Brudnicki said instead of having a developer do feasibility studies, this year he wants to the city to put together a request for proposals to find how much it would cost for the city to do its own studies.What I would like is for the commission to make a list of the things they know they are satisfied with and would like to see on the marina and get that to (interim city manager) Jared (Jones),Ž Brudnicki said. From that, formu-late what we need to get a feasibility study done.ŽWith the feasibility giving the city an idea of what the longview of the project could be „ or as Brudnicki put it, what they would like to see built, the levelŽ it could be built and subsidies it would take to make it happen „ the short-term focus seems to be on shoring up the base and restarting stalled projects.The Harrison streetscape, for example, emerged as a priority because the upcoming fiscal year is the last one the Community Redevel-opment Agency can fund it under statutes. The design work for that proj-ect was also 100 percent done as of March 2017, but the city didnt want to move forward in case the project conflicted with Sonnenblicks plans. (At one point, the developer wanted to have a trolley going up and down Harri-son Avenue and the rotary proposed at the Fourth Street intersection would have been a problem.)While commissioners said they wanted to review the plans one more time to potentially suggest changes, they were unani-mous the project should move forward.Fravel also said work on Beach Drive from Fourth Street to Sixth Street, for which the city had received state funding, had stalled out at 30 percent complete when Sonnenblick briefly proposed moving the street. That project is also poten-tially back on the table.The overall attitude has shifted. Instead of leaving the campus blank and hoping a developer fund would work, the new approach is whoever comes afterwards has to work around it,Ž Brudnicki said.The changes are small, and Development Director Mike Lane assured the commission the work they are now talking about would go a long wayŽ with promoting the project.The first step is going to be finishing the design work for the T-dock repairs. Fravel said the design work would take his staff a couple of months, and then bidding out the repairs would take another 60 days.Commissioners said they wanted would pro-vide their feedback on the simple design in the near future, so the city could start creating a plan to bring to the public.That stuff has got to get done,Ž Brudnicki said. This will make a decision for us, and I dont see any reason not to.Ž MARINAFrom Page B1 Kids play two-hand touch football Saturday at Kingdom Impact Center in Panama City. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Im a realist and Ima keep it real with them about what were not doing and what the struggle is, and I think, you know, one of the things that we gotta encourage these guys is at an early age that we gotta get our education. We cant wait until the last moment to get that.ŽPatrick Miller, former NFL player

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** B10 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Patricio G. Balonapatricio.balona@news-jrnl.comDAYTONA BEACH„ More motorcycle gangs were in town for Bike Week last week, but the Volusia County sheriff said police were prepared to come down on them like white on riceŽ if they broke the law.Sheriff Mike Chitwood said he has seen an increase in motorcycle gangs coming to Bike Week in Daytona Beach. To prevent gang violence, the Sheriffs Office has taken a proactive approach and shifted the focus of its motorcycle theft task force that operated during the event for years. The team now monitors local, national and international motorcycle gangs.I would say that it seemed when I first got here in 2006, it was high, and then we hit a period where there was a lull, there was a period where we knocked their club house out of Daytona Beach,Ž Chitwood said.In August 2007, Daytona Beach police and the FBI raided and busted up the Outlaws motorcycle gangs clubhouse on Beach Street. The Outlaws gang tried making a comeback, but Day-tona Beach police and code enforcement has made it dif-ficult for them to set up house in other locations in the city. But now from what I see it looks like we are starting to see a proliferation of that. We are starting to see other motorcycle gangs come in, Hells Angels, the Mongols, there is a Puerto Rican motorcycle gang we are seeing coming in here, so in my opinion I think we are starting to see it come back on the rise.ŽThe FBI has the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club and Mon-gols listed as two of the largest Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs in the United States. The others are the Pagans, Vagos, Sons of Silence, Outlaws and Bandidos.Daytona Beach police Chief Craig Capri has seen the increase, too.Daytona is a national run for most motorcycle clubs during Bike Week,Ž Capri said. Meaning that most motorcycle clubs require their members to be here.ŽDaytona Beach police detectives have met with several of the gangs and laid down the rules of the city to them, Capri said.Our No. 1 goal is public safety,Ž Capri said. Weve met with them and told them they can have their fun, but weve let them know that if they cause problems, well be on them. Theyve been receptive to our rules.ŽVolusia County sheriffs Capt. Brian Henderson said the motorcycle theft task force long had worked to recover motorcycles stolen from other parts of the country assembled from parts, which were found at Daytonas Bike Week event. Recovering motorcycles is still done, but the groups concern now is preventing gang violence.We have a concentrated group of people that are out there for Bike Week monitor-ing the criminal street gangs and doing covert operations,Ž Henderson said.The sheriffo Office team keeping a close eye on motor-cycle gangs has studied the criminal history of the gangs in other parts of the United States, which includes fight-ing over territory, said Lt. Kurt Schoeps, who leads domestic security for the office.Several violent incidents involving motorcycle gangs in Florida makes it a priority for law enforcement to watch them, Chitwood said.In April 2017, an Outlaws motorcycle gang member was stabbed to death at the Crooks Den on Orange Avenue in Daytona Beach. Police still are looking for the killer. The next month, a member of the Kingsmen Motorcycle Club was shot to death in Leesburg by Outlaws members over gang colors.Then, in December 2017, the president of the Cross Bayou chapter of the Outlaws was shot and killed as he sat in his vehicle at a traffic light by members of the 69ers Puerto Rican motorcycle gang in Pasco County.And in Seminole County, a bomb placed on a 69ers car exploded without injuring the gang member, but he was shot and killed anyway, Chitwood said.This is not just a Florida issue, its a nationwide issue to where we have one club fighting with another club over jurisdiction,Ž Schoeps said. And like the sheriff said, we want to make sure that doesnt come here to Volusia County. But they (gangs) are in Volusia County this Bike Week.ŽNationally, there have also been violent encounters of rival gang members like the incident in Waco, Texas, in May 2015. Authorities said an argument in a bathroom and a parking space at a restaurant ended with nine people dead and a parking lot littered with shell casings, puddles of blood, bullet-riddled cars and aban-doned motorcycles.The incident involved the Bandidos motorcycle gang, according to the Department of Justice.Schoeps said motorcycle gangs partake in criminal activity, including drug trafficking, from which criminal street gangs make their money.Motorcycle gangs are domestic terrorists,Ž Chit-wood said.The sheriff said when the leadership of gangs such as the Oultaws, Hells Angels and the Mongols, go to federal prison, its for racketeering, child porn, human trafficking, murder and other violent crimes.So thats what these motorcycle gangs represent,Ž Chitwood said. So its impor-tant for us to know whats coming into our county to do everything humanly possible to prevent any type of violence from occurring.ŽThere is no law that says its illegal to be a gang member but authorities will not stand for anyone breaking the law, Schoeps said.They know they are being looked at,Ž Schoeps said. They know that they are being fol-lowed by law enforcement.ŽThe motorcycle gangs in Daytona Beach wear their colors, some as a symbol of pride or intimidation, Scho-eps said.When they are out wear-ing their colors, they are doing their ride but they know we are watching them,Ž Schoeps said.Chitwood said part of ensuring safety the cooperation of bar owners to not allow colors in their busi-nesses. Most motorcycle gang violence is know to happen over colors, the sheriff said.Ulti mately, the Sheriffs Office partners with federal, state and municipal authorities to try to do the best job to abate any violence, Chitwood said.When you look around the nation at these biker rallies and you see the shootouts that occur, we cant have a shootout on Main Street. We cant have a shootout at Destination Daytona, thats not going to happen,Ž Chitwood said. And if it happens, you know, we are going to come down like white on rice on top of them.ŽDaytona Police watch motorcycle gangs during Bike WeekOutlaws Motorcycle Club members gather at a former labor hall building on Madison Avenue on Wednesday. Police have contacted biker gangs to let them know illegal activity wont be tolerated during Bike Week. [NEWS-JOURNAL/ DAVID TUCKER]

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** B12 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldLloyd Dunkelberger and Jim TurnerThe News Service of FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ With a light touch of his veto pen, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed a new $88.7 billion state budget, eliminating only $64 million in spending and projects, the lowest total of his seven-plus years as governor.Today, Florida is strong, and I am proud of our hard work over the past seven years to grow the economy, invest in education, protect the environment and keep our families safe,Ž Scott said in a budget message.He said his final budget as governor will continue to advance the priorities of Florida fam-ilies for years to come and keep Floridas future strong.ŽScott wasted little time in dealing with the budget, which was passed by the House and Senate on Sunday and delivered to him Wednesday. The budget will take effect July 1.His $64 million in vetoes was lower than the $69 million he elimi-nated in 2014, when he was running for re-elec-tion. Scott, a Republican, is considering a run for the U.S. Senate this year against Bill Nelson, the Democratic incumbent. This years vetoes represent a little more than 10 percent of the $615 million Scott eliminated in his first year in office in 2011, his high mark for vetoed spending.But rather than focus on the vetoes Friday, Scott emphasized the spend-ing initiatives in the new budget, as well as a tax-cut package that includes sales-tax holidaysŽ and a slight reduction in a commercial-lease tax. The budget plan also avoided $377 million in increased property taxes for schools because law-makers decided to roll back a tax rate.In an interview Friday with The News Service of Florida, Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said he was pleased with the governors support for the Senates initiatives, including a $122 million increase in fund-ing for Bright Futures college scholarships.I think the vetoes were very modest, and Im grateful to the governor for his consideration of Senate priorities,Ž Negron said.While Scott and Repub-lican legislative leaders have touted the budget, the Florida Association of District School Superintendents this week asked Scott to call a special ses-sion to increase funding for the 67 school districts. Although the budget includes a $101.50 increase in per-student funding, the superintendents said districts, on average, would only see a 47-cent increase in basic funding per-student because much of the new money was tar-geted for mental health and safety issues after last months mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Doug-las High School in Broward County.In signing the budget, Scott rejected that request, emphasizing the recordŽ level of funding for the kindergarten-through-high-school system, including a $485 million increase over the current year.He also cited the $400 million school-safety ini-tiative, which will increase funding for mental-health services, school resource officers and security improvements at schools after the Feb. 14 mass shooting that killed 17 people.One area targeted by Scott in his vetoes was more than $29 million in local road projects, which Scott said were funded outside the Department of Transportations normal evaluation process. The largest veto was $7 million for a road project in Lake County.He also eliminated $2.5 million for an airport proj-ect in the Miami-Dade County community of Opa-locka, an expenditure he said did not undergo the normal evaluation process.Scott rejected an effort by lawmakers to force the Department of Health to return $15 million in fund-ing for research related to Zika, a mosquito-borne disease that can cause birth defects. Scott said the money cannot be returned because it is contractually obligatedŽ for research efforts.Scott also vetoed $5 mil-lion in funding for charter schools, noting the facili-ties are in line to receive more than $145 million as part of the states con-struction and maintenance program for schools.In addition, Scott rejected funding for two studies that lawmakers approved in reaction to troubles encountered by motorists who evacuated ahead of Hurricane Irma last September.He eliminated $1.5 mil-lion to study extending the Suncoast Parkway north to Georgia as an alternative to Interstate 75. Scott said the Department of Transpor-tation could complete the work without the addi-tional money.He also vetoed $750,000 for the DOT to conduct at least three exercises by May 1 using contraflow lanes „directing traffic on both sides of a highway to travel the same direction „to determine if such operations could speed evacuations.Scott wrote that traffic engineers and experts, as well as law enforcement, have determined through experience, review, and simulation modeling that contraflow is not an effec-tive disaster evacuation method.ŽState transportation officials favor using road shoulders to provide addi-tional lanes for fleeing motorists. A month ago, Scott backed his agency leaders by including the expansion of emergency shoulder useŽ when he issued a series of post-storm directives to the Department of Transportation.Scott also vetoed $270,000 to purchase a building that houses a quilt museumŽ in Gilchrist County, an issue that became the subject of a brief floor debate in the House on the final day of the 2018 session.Rep. Evan Jenne, D-Dania Beach, complained the money being spent for the building could be used for better purposes such as programs for disabled adults or senior citizens.Instead were going to spend that money on an empty quilt museum,Ž Jenne said.Scott said he rejected the project because it did not go through an estab-lished review process.Scott signs budget, takes it easy on vetoesGov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act in the governors of“ ce March 9. [MARK WALLHEISER/AP] But rather than focus on the vetoes Friday, Scott emphasized the spending initiatives in the new budget, as well as a tax-cut package that includes salestax holidaysŽ and a slight reduction in a commercial-lease tax.

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** B14 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Phuong LeThe Associated PressSEATTLE „ With the number of endangered orcas that frequent the inland waters of Washington state at a 30-year low, Gov. Jay Inslee has directed state agencies to take immediate and longer-term steps to protect the struggling killer whales.The fish-eating mammals that spend time in Puget Sound have strug-gled for years with a lack of food, pollution, noise and disturbances from boat traffic. There are now just 76 of the orcas in the state, down from 98 in 1995. Orcas still populate other regions of the ocean; the ones targeted in Washing-ton state are genetically distinct to the region, called southern resident orcas.ŽInslee said the orcas are in trouble and called on everyone in the state to do their part. His executive order aims to make more salmon available to the whales, give them more space and quieter waters, ensure they have clean water to swim in and protect them from potential oil spills.The destiny of salmon and orca and we humans are intertwined,Ž the governor said at a news conference at the Day-break Star Cultural Center in Seattle. As the orca go, so go we.Ž An orca task force form-ing now will meet for the first time next month and will come up with final recommendations by November. This is a wake-up call,Ž Suquamish Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman said, adding, Its going to take some pain. Were going to have to make some sacrifices.ŽMany have been sound-ing the alarm for years about the plight of the closely tracked population of southern resident killer whales. The federal gov-ernment listed the orcas as endangered in 2005, and more recently identified them as among the most at risk of extinction in the near future. A baby orca has not been born in the past few years. Half of the calves born during a celebrated baby boom several years ago have died. Female orcas also are having pregnancy problems linked to nutritional stress brought on by a low supply of chinook salmon, the whales pre-ferred food, a recent study said.We are not too late,Ž said Barry Thom, West Coast regional adminis-trator for NOAA Fisheries. From a biology perspective, there are still enough breeding animals, but we need to act soon.ŽWashington state moves to protect orcasBy Alex HortonThe Washington PostEvery now and then, a storm ravages the coast of southern Maine so totally that it provides a glimpse of Colonial history.The recent noreaster that killed eight people also excavated sand from the coastline of Yorks Shore Sands Beach, revealing the hull of a Rev-olutionary War-era ship, its remaining planks pro-truding from the sand like the ribs of a starving dog.The ship rests about 20 yards from a parking lot located near the shoreline, York Police Department Detective Matthew J. Calcina said. He snapped a photo of the ship, with snow-capped hotels and homes in the background.And this isnt even the first time this has happened with this partic-ular ship, the department wrote on Facebook. The ship has become a local point of historical pride, revealing itself only after devastating storms.The wreck was visible in 1958, leading to specula-tion about its origins.Then two decades later, another spring noreaster provided a closer glimpse of the vessel. Based on the type of construction, marine archaeologist Warren Riess hypothesized that the vessel is a sloop of about Revolu-tionary War age,Ž Sharon Cummins wrote for Sea-coast Online.Another storm did the same in 2007. The old relic appears infrequently, adding to its mystique,Ž Cummins wrote in 2013. Each time, roughly once every decade or two, new mar-itime history buffs are born.ŽIn addition to the Maine sloop, modern storms have been a boon to historians, scientists and archaeologists who tra-verse the depths to solve confounding mysteries.The last known slave ship, the Clotilda, was burned and partially buried off the Alabama coast in 1860. Its final resting place was a mys-tery until a January storm system that included a bomb cyclone swept away water and mud like rock dust from a fossil, revealing what is likely the ship.And after Hurricane Harvey pounded the Texas coast, a beach was introduced to a new horror near Galveston: A faceless, sharp-toothed sea creature that looked like a prehistoric oddity to some. It turned out to be a fangtooth snake-eel.And yet, with the several appearances throughout the years, not much is known about the uncovered sloop.The Maine Historic Preservation Commission declared it an archaeo-logical site. But a database search of 2,500 shipwrecks across the globe, from the Revolution to the nuclear age, did not return any records indicating it was a known American sloop, Navy history command spokeswoman Sandra Gall said Monday.The records arent entirely comprehensive, Gall noted, so the com-mand could not weigh in about its origins without further investigation. Noreaster reveals remains of Revolutionary War-era shipThis Revolutionary War-era ship was revealed in Maine after the regions recent noreaster. [YORK POLICE DEPARTMENT] By Theresa VargasThe Washington PostBefore there were computers and GPS bea-cons to track the oceans whims, there were slips of paper and bottles.Or more specifically, slips of paper in bottles.The worlds oldest message in a bottle recently was discovered in on a beach in Western Australia 132 years after it was tossed into the Indian Ocean as part of an experiment on ocean drift patterns, according to experts who call it an exceedingly rare find.ŽA report released by the Western Australia Museum details how the bottle was found and what its well-preserved message reveals about science and history.The dark green glass bottle, which measured less than nine inches long and three inches wide, was found in Janu-ary north of Perth by a woman named Tonya Illman, according to a museum press release Tuesday that quotes Illman on the surprising discovery. She and a friend were walking along the dunes when she saw it near where her sons car had become bogged in soft sand.It just looked like a lovely old bottle so I picked it up thinking it might look good in my bookcase,Ž Illman said. My sons girlfriend was the one who discovered the note when she went to tip the sand out. The note was damp, rolled tightly and wrapped with string. We took it home and dried it out, and when we opened it we saw it was a printed form, in German, with very faint German handwriting on it.ŽAfter some research and excitement, the family not knowing if what they found was historically significant or a very inventive hoax,Ž brought their discovery to the museum. Experts there took detailed mea-surements of everything from the opening of the bottle to the twine wrapped around the yel-lowed paper inside of it. There was no cork, and researchers believe it may have dried out, shrunk and became dislodged at some point. Because the paper was so well preserved, they also believe the bottle probably washed onto shore within a year of being thrown and lay buried for more than a century in damp sand.On the paper were two significant details: the date June 12, 1886, and the name of a ship, Paula.ŽMore digging, along with help from authorities in the Netherlands and Germany, revealed that the bottle was part of a long-term German Naval Observatory program studying global ocean currents. An entry in the Paulas Meteorological Journal written by the captain detailed the bottle being tossed overboard on the same date listed on the paper. The handwriting also matched his, down the extra curl in his Cs.The museums report lauds the discoverys sci-entific significance.Ocean current and drift patterns are still not completely understood,Ž it reads. The need to understand long-term climate change patterns has also seen historic data, such as that recorded in Paulas meteorological journal and other 19th century ships logbooks, added as datasets into global climate models.ŽWorlds oldest message in a bottle found after 132 yearsThe oldest known message in a bottle, 132 years old, recently was discovered in Australia. [KYMILLMAN.COM]

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** B16 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Aya BatrawyThe Associated PressDUBAI, United Arab Emir-ates (AP) „ Student survivors of one of the worst high school shootings in U.S. history took their message abroad for the first time on Saturday, calling for greater gun safety measures and sharing with educational professionals from around the world their frightening experience.The Feb. 14 attack in Flor-ida killed 17 people, 14 of them students, becoming one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history. The attack was carried out by a former student wielding an assault-style rifle who strode into one of the school buildings and opened fire.Its so important to be educated, and to be educated in a productive sense is to feel safe at school,Ž said Suzanna Barna, 17. No child should ever have to go through what we did.ŽBarna and her classmates Kevin Trejos and Lewis Mizen, all seniors at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, each wore a red ribbon representing the color of their school in honor of the victims as they talked about their experience and their push for stricter gun safety measures. They spoke in Dubai at the Global Education and Skills Forum that coincides with the $1 million Global Teacher Prize, awarded to one outstanding teacher from around the world each year.Trejos, 18, described the ordeal as scaryŽ and said stu-dents were crying and trying to comfort one another as they hid inside a closet in a class-room for almost two hours.We didnt know where the shooter was. We didnt know if he was coming to our classroom next,Ž Trejos said.We need to improve school safety,Ž he added, saying that the students are not trying to ban guns because we understand its practically impossible to do,Ž but are working to limit the accessibility of guns to criminals or potential criminals.Like other school shootings before it, the attack has renewed the national debate on gun control. On Wednesday, tens of thousands of students across the U.S. walked out of their classrooms to demand action from lawmakers on gun violence and school safety.President Donald Trump and some gun supporters say the solution is to put more guns in the hands of trained school staff „ including teachers. The student survivors speaking in Dubai strongly disagree, saying more guns is not the answer.Mizen, 17, said protocols shouldnt be preparing schools for when shootings happen, but should be stopping them before they happen.Teachers are there to educate their students. They shouldnt have to serve as the first line of defense between them and a rampant gunman on campus,Ž Mizen said, eliciting applause from the audience packed with educators.Mizen said addressing the global forum in Dubai was as a chance to talk to world education leaders and stress the importance of safety in schools.If we can get the interna-tional body on our side then that will make it so much easier to make change back at home,Ž he told The Asso-ciated Press.Barna said despite the sharp political divide over gun con-trol in the United States, all can agree that schools and children should be safe. She is calling for laws that would limit access to high-capacity magazine firearms, like the AR-15 assault-style rifle used by the shooter in Florida.Students next are plan-ning a March for Our LivesŽ rally in Washington on March 24. Since the shooting, they have taken trips to the U.S. capital and the Florida capi-tal of Tallahassee to confront lawmakers. In response, some major U.S. retailers have put curbs on the sale of assault-style rifles and will no longer sell firearms to people younger than 21.The Florida shooting was the latest in an era of school massacres that began with a shooting in 1999 at Columbine High School in Colorado that killed 13 people. The coun-trys deadliest school shooting killed 20 children in first grade and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut in 2012.Weve had to grow up a lot,Ž Barna told the AP. Emotionally its been tough to deal with the loss we have to see every day, but were also in the process of getting back to normal. It will happen eventually, but its going to take time.ŽShooting survivors take gun control message abroadFrom left, Parkland High School students Lewis Mizen, Kevin Trejos and Suzanna Barna speak in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Saturday. [JON GAMBRELL/AP] Actress Priyanka Chopra listens during a presentation on the Parkland High School shooting during the Global Education and Skills Forum on Saturday. [JON GAMBRELL/AP]

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** B18 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald

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** JUCO | C3SOFTBALL RALLIESThe Commodores split a Panhandle Conference baseball twinbill on Saturday with host Tallahassee. The GC so ball team ran its winning streak to 32 games in the rst game with a miracle rally in the seventh against NWF State. The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 C1 SPORTSThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ With the 14th edition of the annual All-Star Basketball Classic less than three weeks away, the first four boys and first four girls players for the East All-Stars have been selected.The event matches the top seniors from The News Heralds eight-county read-ership area comprising the East boys and girls teams against the best seniors from The Daily News in Fort Walton Beachs readership area in Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton county area.The East teams are chosen by The News Herald with assistance of the East All-Star coaches …Bozeman coach Michael Memmen for the boys, and Bozeman coach Desmond Brown for the girls. The full rosters for both teams will be revealed in next Sundays edition of The News Herald.Mosleys JaTayvia Holley, Port St. Joes Teiyahna Hutchinson, Holmes Countys Laura Jones, and North Bay Hav-ens Josselin Geer are the first four picks for the East girls team, while Rutherfords Lorenzo Ferrell, Blountstowns KK Godwin, Mosleys Stacy Burse, and Bethlehems Kobe Hendrix are the first four selections for the boys.The All-Star Basketball Classic will take place April 7 at the Billy Harrison Field House at Gulf Coast State College. The girls game will tip off at 11 a.m. followed by the boys game at 1 p.m. Admission is$6 for adults, $2 for children, and kids 4 and under will get in free.Passes will be accepted for high school and college coaches. Holley, a 5-foot-4 guard, had a memorable senior season in leading Mosley to itsfirst trip in school history to Lakeland for the state semifinals. She averaged 19.9 points per game to go along with 4.4 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 3.2 steals. Holley scored 17 of her teams 39 points in the region final victory over Bishop Kenny as the Lady Dolphinsadvanced to the final four.East announces rst 4 boys, girlsHolley Godwin Ferrell Hutchinson NOVA .........81 BAMA .......58 TTU ............69 FLA ...........66EAST NCAA Tournament scoreboardSaturdays results/scheduleUK ..............95 BUF ...........75 L-IL .............63 TEN ...........62SOUTHZAGS ..........90 OSU ..........84WEST Complete coverage, C5DUKE..........87 URI ............62 KU ..............83 SETN ........79MIDWEST By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comEvery player who was a part of Gulf Coasts run to the 2016 NJCAA women's basketball championship is gone. All but three who lifted the Lady Commodores to a second straight national crown in 2017 have departed.Despite the changing faces, Gulf Coast still cuts just as imposing a profile entering this weeks NJCAA Division I Womens Basketball Championship in Lubbock, Texas, while in search of a three-peat.The Lady Commodores (26-2), wholeft for Lubbock on a 20-hourbus trip Friday morning, come in as the No. 2 seed in the tourna-ment and open play Tuesday against the winner of Mon-days first-round game between San Jacinto-North (Texas,24-10) and Hutchin-son (Kan.,27-6).A victory would be the ninth in a row at the national tournament for Gulf Coast. The Lady Commodores have won 17 consecutive postseason games when factoring inthe state tour-namentthe past three years.The Gulf Coast squad entering this years national tournament looks pretty similar on paper, at least in aggregate,to the past two.The Lady Commodores outscore opponents by 25.2 points per game-… better than last years point differential (23.3) and slightly below the season before (25.6) …and come inred hot following three straight lopsided wins at the Region VIII tournament in Ocala.GC rolled over Broward by 43 points, Florida South-Western by 18, and Eastern Florida by 24 en route to a third consecutive state title. The Lady Commodores shot In search of a three-peatGulf Coast heads for Lubbock Gulf Coast States Jhileiya Dunlap head fakes against a Tallahassee defender during a game earlier this season. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD]See NJCAA, C3 See EAST, C3DALLAS „ Keenan Evans keeps making big plays, extending Texas Tech's season „ and his time with second-year head coach Chris Beard.They have another game with the Red Raiders headed to the NCAA Tournament's Sweet 16 for the first time since 2005.Evans, who treats every game like senior night and doesn't want to be done, scored 22 points and hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 2 minutes left as third-seeded Texas Tech beat Florida 69-66 on Saturday night.While the next loss will end All-Big 12 guard Evans' career, high-flying freshman Zhaire Smith is just getting started.Smith had 18 points, nine rebounds and seven assists, and was on the receiving end of an alley-oop pass from Evans with 29 seconds left for a punctuating dunk to send the Texas Tech ousts FloridaSee FLORIDA, C3

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** C2 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldYoung superstar has Winnipeg set up to be perennial contender for Stanley CupBy Stephen WhynoThe Associated PressThe Winnipeg Jets can thank their own St. Patrik for their success this season and potentially for years to come.Patrik Laine was the consolation prize in the 2016 NHL draft behind generational talent Auston Matthews. But he has been a cause for celebration in Winnipeg as a franchisechanging superstar at age 19.Mathieu Perreault saw the power Alex Ovechkin had to alter the direction of the Washington Capitals and turn them into a perennial playoff team and Stanley Cup contender. When Laine arrived from Finland, the winger started doing the same things in Winnipeg.The organization wasnt having a whole lot of success, and then they get Ovi as a young kid and he starts scoring goals, and all of a sudden the team starts winning,Ž Perreault said. They became a very dominant team for many years. So you kind of sense that here, where the teams been struggling for many years, not making the playoffs. And then you get this young kid coming in and scoring goals for your team and helps your team win games. I think coming up in Winnipeg well have a dominant team for many years.ŽThats because Laine is already a dominant player. With 16 goals and eight assists in his past 14 games, Laine has the longest point streak by a teenager and already passed Wayne Gretzky for the most goals by a player before turning 20.The best part for the Jets? Laine is just getting started.Its really impressive when you factor in hes still learning the game,Ž coach Paul Maurice said. His scoring has taken off of late, but so has his game, his all-around game.... Hes an impressive young man at 19. At any age, those numbers would be elite. But at 19, thats pretty exciting because theres lot of room as he physically matures, for his game to change and become a power forward and a big, strong man who can score off the rush. Take pucks to the net. There are lots of places Patty is going to improve over the years.ŽLaine is drawing comparisons to Ovechkin for his shot, which teammates and opposing goaltenders say is even more deceptive than the Russian 600-goal scorer s blast. Capitals goaltender Philipp Grubauer, who has taken Ovechkin shots in practice for years, said Laines long stick changes the angle of where the puck is going.He shoots it, he pulls it in a little bit weird „ long stick „ and makes it really hard for us to read,Ž Grubauer said.As much as Laine looked up to Ovechkin as a kid, the respect is now mutual. When Ovechkin scored twice Monday to reach 600 and get to 42 this season, Laine answered with his 41st and showed he has what it takes to go goal-for-goal with hockeys best.Hes a great talent and still young and still can produce lots of dangerous (chances),Ž Ovechkin said. Laine said it has always been a goal to win the Maurice RocketŽ Richard Trophy as the leagues top goal scorer, and hes in the race to do that. Entering Saturday, hes one behind Ovechkin and one ahead of Pittsburgh Penguins center Evgeni Malkin. Its always been one of my dreams to win it,Ž Laine said. Its good motivation for me.ŽLaine is also motivated by trying to help set the Jets up for the playoffs and make a long run this spring. Winnipeg has been banged up and secondary scoring has been hot and cold, but Laines scoring pace has his teammates believing any-thing is possible.You give him one opportunity and its in the back of the net,Ž Perreault said. Right now every shot it seems goes in. It helps us win games when he scores like that. Its been fun to see.ŽMaurice doesnt know what he sees as Laines ceiling, but doesnt think it matters. As Laines game rounds out, hell face different kinds of defensive challenges, and then itll be up to him to prove he can sustain scoring the way Ovechkin has over the past decade-plus.The overall game Patty will play will become far more important than whether its 40, 50 or whatever that number (of goals) ends up being,Ž Maurice said. By Arnie StapletonThe Associated PressENGLEWOOD, Colo. „ Already a dozen NFL teams have new quarterbacks, half of them starters. And next months draft features a deep class of QB prospects, a half-dozen of which could hear their names called in the first round.Why such a remarkable run on prime-time passers?Theyre hard to find,Ž Denver Broncos general manager John Elway said after introducing Case Keenum as his fifth quarterback since Peyton Mannings retirement just two years ago. Its a tough spot to play. There are a lot of expectations. Its a hard position. There are a lot pressures on it. Youve got to play with consistency and there are a lot of people that rely on that position.ŽSo, proven passers and projects alike see teams jockeying to throw multiple millions their way.The harbinger of the Great Quarterback ShuffleŽ of 2018 came during Super Bowl week when word got out that the Kansas City Chiefs were sending Alex Smith to the Washington Red-skins, freeing Kirk Cousins to become a free agent in his prime, one who would rewrite the conventional contract. Cousins made the media rounds at the Super Bowl, where he secretly scouted out the city he would soon call his own.Minnesota surged past Denver, Phoenix and New York as Cousins desired destination after the Vikings decided to let all three of their veteran quarterbacks hit the open market.While Cousins was working out a three-year, ground-breaking (fully guaranteed) and recordsetting ($28 million average) deal in Minnesota, the Broncos, Cardinals and Jets were picking through the Vikings quarterback bin:€ Coming off a $2 million deal in Minnesota, Keenum commanded a two-year, $36 million deal in Denver after leading the Vikings to an 11-3 mark and the NFC championship game.€ Sam Bradford, whose injury opened the way for Keenums breakout season, signed a one-year, $20 mil-lion with the Cardinals, who lost Carson Palmer to retirement.€ Teddy Bridgewater, once the Vikings established starter before a devastating knee injury two years ago, signed a one-year, $5 million con-tract with the Jets, who also re-signed Josh McCown for one year at $10 million.Trevor Siemian, who blew up the Broncos quar-terback plans two straight summers by beating out 2016 first-round flop Paxton Lynch, heads to the Vikings as Cousins backup after going 13-11 in Denver.Leading the Bills to their first playoff appearance in 18 years wasnt enough for Tyrod Taylor to secure his long-term future in Buf-falo. The Bills traded Taylor to Cleveland, which traded DeShone Kizer to the Green Bay Packers, where hell back up Aaron Rodgers.AJ McCarron finally gets his chance to prove himself after spending four seasons in Andy Daltons shadow. He signed a two-year deal with the Bills and said it makes no difference if his new team adds more competition by selecting one of the highly regarded quarterback prospects in the draft next month.I try not to ever waste any mental thought on it because its something I cant control,Ž McCarron said. ... You can either let it affect you in how you go about your work and let that define you. Or you can change everybodys thought process. My mind-set is to change anybody thats had any doubt.ŽKeenum said his mindset wont change should Elway draft a quarterback such as Oklahomas Baker Mayfield, Wyomings Josh Allen, USCs Sam Darnold, UCLAs Josh Rosen, Louisvilles Lamar Jackson or Oklahoma States Mason Rudolph.Ive been around long enough to know that any-thing is a possibility in this league. I was a starting quarterback when a team drafted somebody No. 1 overall and traded a bunch of draft picks. I know how that goes,Ž Keenum said, recalling when the Rams selected Jared Goff in 2016.Teams are also doling out big bucks for backups just two months after watching Nick Foles MVP performance in leading the Eagles past Tom Bradys Patriots in Super Bowl 52 while starter Carson Wentz watched from the sideline.Mike Glennon went from being the Bears backup to Arizona, Chase Daniel went from the Saints to Chicago and Tom Savage moved from the Texans to New Orleans. Great QB Shu e of 2018 is well under way Jets take Laine to successWinnipeg Jets right wing Patrik Laine, left, shoots against New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist during the second period of Tuesdays game in New York. Laine had a hat trick in the victory. [KATHY WILLENS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]With 16 goals and eight assists in his past 14 games, Winnipegs Patrik Laine, left, has the longest point streak by a teenager. [JEFFREY T. BARNES/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 C3Hutchinson, a 5-9 guard who has signed with Gulf Coast, also had her team on the brink of a state title as she led Port St. Joe to 28 wins and a runner-up finish in Class 1A. A versatile, do-everything player for the Tiger Sharks, she led the team in scoring with 17.3 points, rebounding (7.4), assists (4.5) and steals (5.2).In her teams 54-45 title game loss to Wildwood, Hutchinsonfinished with 26 points, 10 rebounds, four assists, and five steals while making 8 of 16 shots from the field and 4 of 6 from the 3-point line.Jones, a 5-6 guard, had an exceptional senior season in leading a young Holmes County team to 27 victories and a district championship. She averaged 21.1 pointson 44 percent shooting from the field and 38 percent from the 3-point line, making 67 shots from long distance for the year.Jones topped the 30-point mark five times during her senior season, including a season-high 44 on 10 3-pointers against Bay on Feb. 3 in Bonifay.Geer, a 5-10 guard, led the Buccaneers with 17.3 pointsalong with five rebounds, two assists, and 2.8 steals. She had 21 points, nine rebounds, and four assists in North Bay Havens stunning 48-44 upset win over South Walton in the District 1-5A tournament that advanced the Bucs to the region tournament.Ferrell, a 6-3 guard, led Ruth-erford to 22 wins and a second consecutive boys district title. The sharpshooting point guard led the Rams with 20.5 points per gameto go along with five rebounds and three assists. Fer-rell scored 10 of his 17 points in the fourth quarter of the Ruth-erfords 57-40 victory over Bay in the District 1-6A championship game.Godwin, a 6-1 guard who has signed with Gulf Coast, had a spectacular senior cam-paign for Blountstown with 23.7 points per game to go with 5.7 rebounds, 4.2 assists, and 2.3 steals.Godwin was outstanding in Lakeland despite Blountstown falling in the 1A title game. Hescored 25 points in a semifinal win over Chipley and 23 points in the title game loss to Wildwood.Burse, a 6-3 guard, led Mosley with 15.5 points per game on 45 percent shooting from the field and 31 percent from the 3-point line. He added 4.4 rebounds, three assists, and 1.6 steals per game. Burse topped the 20-point mark six times during the season.Hendrix, a 5-11 point guard, had a terrific all-aroundseason for Bethlehem, leading the Wildcats in scor-ing and assists while helping them win 22 games and the District 1-1A championship. Bethlehemadvancedwithin one victory of a trip to Lakeland.Bozeman coaches Michael Memmen and Desmond Brown have been chosen to helm the All-Star East teams, with Memmen to lead the East boys and Brown the East girls. Rutherford coach Rhondie Ross willhelp coach the boys. EASTFrom Page C1 50 percent from the field and 40 percent from the 3-point line, with All-American point guard Shayla Bennett going for 26.7 points, 5.3 rebounds, and 5.3 assists per game to earn Most Outstand-ing Player.If Bennett and her teammates can carry that momentumto Lubbock, the Lady Commodores could very well come back to Bay County with a third straight championship and a sixth in school history.You hope it does,Ž Gulf Coast coach Roonie Scovel said ofmomentum.You just hope being in pressure situa-tions with so much on the line (doesnt bother them), with having a lot of new players.They responded and didnt seem to be real nervous. I hope the experience there gives us some confidence to believe we can compete if we play well.ŽThe competition obviously ramps up at the national level and the field in Lubbock has one feature that the bracket in Ocala didnt; that being a team thathas beaten Gulf Coast this season. Topseeded and undefeated Shelton State (33-0) defeated the Lady Commodores 62-54 on Dec. 29 in Americus, Ga.There will be a couple more familiar foes at Lubbock in Panhandle Conference members Tallahassee and Northwest Florida State. Bothearned at-large bids to the tournament and are on the Gulf Coast side of the bracket, meaning that there is no chance for an all-Pan-handle Conference final.Scovel declined to comment onwhether it was fair for the No. 2 seed to be placed on the same side of the bracket with two teams it has already played and beaten on six occasions combined this season. Instead, she offeredthat the pathnever is easy under any circumstance.Hey, its tough. The bracket is tough,Ž Scovel said. Obviously the committee put people where they thought they should be, fortunately or unfortunately. At the end of the day, you can look at the brackets and com-plain, but were just thankful to be going to Lubbock.There are only 24 teams there and were one of them. Its a tough bracket and a tough field. There are probably six or seven teams that could get on a roll and win this thing. Either way, were going to have to go play and play very well to win it. Were just excited that we get to make the trip.ŽWhile the ultimate goal for Gulf Coast is to cut down the netsfor a third straight year, Scovel has been to the national tournament enough times to know that focusing on the finish line before leav-ing the starting block is a good recipe for going home early.Thats why she is encouraging her players to have a laser-like focus on their first opponent -… whomever that opponent might be.Weve got to be real careful not to talk about three-peating,Ž Scovel said. If you start talking about championship night, you forget about the first game. Were completely focused on that first game.We dont even know who were going to play first, but its very important that we worry about us and do our thing and not get too worried about the result of the tournament before we play our first game.Ž With a win, Gulf Coast will play again Thursday in the quarterfinals, with the semifinals to follow on Friday and the championship game on Saturday. NJCAAFrom Page C1 The News Herald will publish announcements of area interest concerning meetings or events. Announcements, which must be dated and contain contact information, can be mailed to the Sports Department, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 or emailed to sports@pcnh. com. Events that require entry fees or registration costs that dont benefit charities or go toward the operating expenses of youth leagues or school booster clubs, or toward the purchase of trophies and awards are not eligible, and must run as an advertisement. Shaldera Panthers 5KThe Shaldera Panthers Track Club is having a 5K/Mile Run on March 24 at Porter Park in Lynn Haven. The 5K will start at 8 a.m. Entry is $25 and students under 17 will be $15. All proceeds will go to support the track club athletes in their travel this season. For a race application, or if you want to be a sponsor please contact Sylvester Jones at sly1jones@yahoo.com Panhandle Seminole Club golfThe annual Panhandle Seminole Club Scholar-ship Golf Tournament will be held Thursday, April 12 at Indian Springs Golf Club in Marianna. Registration and warm-up will begin at noon CST with the shotgun start at 1 p.m. for this four-man scramble event. Cash prizes will be awarded to the first-, second-, and third-place teams. Entry is $65. Contact: Roy Baker 850-209-1326 or George Sweeney 850-482-5526. Rutherford bene“ t golfA golf tournament to benefit the Rutherford High School girls golf team will be held Saturday, May 19 at Nature Walk Golf Club begin-ning with 8 a.m. registration. Entry is $65 per player, $250 per team, in the select shot event. Total team handicap must be higher than 40 with only one player with 5 handi-cap or less. Contact: Coach Kerri Miller 850-767-4500,millekm@bay.k12.fl.us or Mike Nethero 850-747-9130 netheromd@knology.netANNOUNCEMENTSThe News HeraldTALLAHASSEE „ Alec Aleywine continued to give Gulf Coasts pitching staff a huge lift in the second game of a doubleheader as the Commodores split a Pan-handle Conference baseball twinbill on Saturday with host Tallahassee.Gulf Coast won the second game 5-2 behind Aleywine, who for the second straight Saturday took a no-hitter into the sixth inning during the finale of a four-game conference series. TCC won the opener 7-3.This time Keith Lyle tripled with one out in the sixth and Aleywine lost his shutout when Mason Miller followed with a single. The Eagles produced four hits and two runs during the rally to halve what had been a four-run deficit.J.T. Duncans third hit of the game brought in an insurance run against a parade of Eagles pitchers in the seventh inning. Corey Heffron added two hits and two RBIs for Gulf Coast and Jacquez Koonce had two hits and an RBI.The Commodores still werent clear, however. After one out in TCCs sev-enth, Trey Polewski singled and Aleywine walked Taylor Lomack and Keith Lyle to load the bases.Jacob Shumsky came on to notch the save by getting the final two outs in a clutch relief performance. Tallahassee responded to Gulf Coasts three-run rally in the top of the sixth inning of the opener with five runs in the bottom half to win in Game 1.Gulf Coast is in second place at 5-3 in the conference and 17-11 overall. Tallahassee settled at 3-5, 19-12. Idle Chipola is in first place at 3-1.Pensacola and North-west Florida appeared to be running out of pitching in their doubleheader opener, NWFS earning a 16-13 deci-sion to break through at 1-4 in the Panhandle. That dropped Pensacola to 3-4 with the second game out-come pending.The Eagles hammered out nine more hits than the Commodores (13-4) in the first game, but trailed 3-2 when Gulf Coast scored three runs on one hit in the sixth, a two-run single by Malik Spratling.The Eagles knocked out Gulf Coast starter Brett Wisely and went on to score five runs for an emphatic decision.Spratling had two of the Commodores four hits. Luke Ard paced the Eagles with three hits and four RBIs. Jayson Sowden had three hits and Tucker Ray-burn and Logan Lacey each had RBI singles.Alex Stobert took a two-hit shutout into the sixth inning for TCC before wild-ness ended his outing. Relief specialist Jake Kinney had a blown save for the Eagles, but pitched a scoreless sev-enth to improve to 3-0 in his 12th appearance of the season „ all of them out of the bullpen.Gulf Coast has a four-game series with Northwest Florida next, the Commo-dores traveling to Niceville for the first game at 5 p.m. on Tuesday. SOFTBALLGulf Coast 10 Northwest Florida 7NICEVILLE „ Gulf Coast ran its winning streak to 32 games in the first game with a miracle rally in the seventh inning on Saturday in a Pan-handle Conference softball doubleheader.The Lady Commodores trailed 7-2 after four innings and 7-4 entering the seventh inning before a six-run explosion produced the victory.Jamilah Johnson and Kris-tina Warford each had three hits and three RBIs for the Lady Commodores, 32-1, 3-0. Amie Hutchison added two RBIs for Gulf Coast.Chandler Sparkman pitched five innings with six strikeouts and Carson Hussey tossed two innings for the Lady Commodores.Elsewhere in the conference, Chipola handed Pensacola its first PC loss 8-0 in their opener and like Gulf Coast was 3-0 prior to the completion of the second game.Idle Tallahassee is 0-4 with NWFS temporarily in last place at 0-5, 22-17. Pensacola was 4-1, 19-13.Gulf Coast returns home for a doubleheader begin-ning 4 p.m. Monday against Chipola at Joe Tom King Field.Commodores split; softball rallies The News HeraldPENSACOLA „ Carson Bronnenberg, a 2016 graduate of Arnold High School, had a second-place showing for the University of West Florida in the recent New South Intercollegiate Swim Conference 3-meter diving championships.Bronnenberg, a sophomore, produced a runnerup score of 420.10, and also was fifth in the 1-meter competition with 381.55.Bronnenberg then competed in the NCAA Division II diving qualification meet in Greensboro, N.C., on Tuesday. She finished outside the qualifying totals for the finals placing 32nd in the 3-meter field with 189.10 points for six dives.Bronnenberg totaled 208.70 for six dives in the 1-meter competition to place 25th.She is a mechanical engi-neering major carrying a 3.45 GPA.Bronnenberg continues diving career for UWFBronnenberg Red Raiders (26-10) to Boston for a matchup against Purdue or Butler next Friday night.Chris Chiozza did go the length of the court for a Florida layup with 25 seconds left before Evans lost the ball when trying to fight through a dou-ble-team after the inbound pass.The Gators gathered the ball after a wild scramble. Egor Koulechov and KeV-aughn Allen both had 3-point attempts in the final 10 seconds that came up short.Florida (21-13) fell short of the Sweet 16 „ and the Elite Eight „ for the first time in their last six NCAA Tournament appearances. The last time they didnt even make it to the Sweet 16 was in 2010, when the SEC team lost a first-round game to BYU. FLORIDAFrom Page C1There are only 24 teams there and were one of them. Its a tough bracket and a tough eld. There are probably six or seven teams that could get on a roll and win this thing. Either way, were going to have to go play and play very well to win it. Were just excited that we get to make the trip.ŽGulf Coast coach Roonie Scovel

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** C4 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30, Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.hursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11:35 a.m, Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m.POKER ROOM… (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays.LOCATION… Intersection of State 79 and State 20.INFORMATION… 234-3943. AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPAUTO CLUB 400 LINEUPAfter Fridays qualifying, race today, at Auto Club Speedway, Fontana, Calif.(Car number in parentheses) 1. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 186.567 mph. 2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 186.437. 3. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 186.128. 4. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 186.047. 5. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 185.711. 6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 185.577. 7. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 185.185. 8. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 185.076. 9. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 184.848. 10. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 184.436. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 184.360. 12. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 184.341. 13. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 184.743. 14. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 184.596. 15. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 184.115. 16. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 183.819. 17. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 183.683. 18. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 183.397. 19. (43) Darrell Wallace Jr., Chevrolet, 182.848. 20. (23) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 175.161. 21. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 183.870. 22. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 183.603. 23. (00) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 176.043. 24. (55) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 133.735. 25. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 0.000. 26. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 0.000. 27. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 0.000. 28. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 0.000. 29. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 0.000. 30. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 0.000. 31. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 0.000. 32. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 0.000. 33. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 0.000. 34. (95) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 0.000. 35. (51) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 0.000. 36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 0.000. 37. (72) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 0.000.NASCAR XFINITYROSEANNE 300AUTO CLUB 400 LINEUPAftern Saturdays qualifying, race Saturday, at Auto Club Speedway, Fontana, Calif.(Car number in parentheses)1. (20) Christopher Bell, Toyota, 181.059 mph. 2. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 180.923. 3. (42) John H. Nemechek, Chevrolet, 179.996. 4. (00) Cole Custer, Ford, 179.933. 5. (21) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 179.879. 6. (7) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 179.645. 7. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 179.627. 8. (18) Ryan Preece, Toyota, 179.605. 9. (19) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 179.269. 10. (11) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 177.274. 11. (1) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 177.222. 12. (24) Kaz Grala, Ford, 176.757. 13. (4) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 178.909. 14. (60) Austin Cindric, Ford, 178.700. 15. (23) Spencer Gallagher, Chevrolet, 178.178. 16. (9) Tyler Reddick, Chevrolet, 177.866. 17. (39) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 177.795. 18. (5) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 177.454. 19. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 177.231. 20. (2) Matt Tifft, Chevrolet, 177.205. 21. (36) Alex Labbe, Chevrolet, 176.043. 22. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 175.914. 23. (35) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 175.264. 24. (38) JJ Yeley, Chevrolet, 175.182. 25. (0) Garrett Smithley, Chevrolet, 174.919. 26. (78) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 174.808. 27. (90) Josh Williams, Chevrolet, 172.844. 28. (40) Chad Finchum, Toyota, 172.476. 29. (76) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 172.451. 30. (15) Matt Mills, Chevrolet, 172.199. 31. (8) Tommy Joe Martins, Chevrolet, 171.912. 32. (93) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 169.507. 33. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 168.193. 34. (01) Vinnie Miller, Chevrolet, Owner Points 35. (66) Timmy Hill, Dodge, Owner Points 36. (52) David Starr, Chevrolet, Owner Points 37. (55) Stephen Leicht, Toyota, Owner Points 38. (45) Josh Bilicki, Toyota, Owner Points 39. (74) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, Owner Points 40. (28) Dylan Lupton, Ford, Owner PointsNHRAPAIRINGSSaturday at Gainesville Raceway, Gainesville, Fla. Pairings based on results in qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings.Top Fuel1. Clay Millican, 3.708 seconds, 324.98 mph vs. 16. Terry Totten, 7.106, 96.49. 2. Steve Torrence, 3.739, 323.19 vs. 15. Mike Salinas, 5.557, 117.91. 3. Antron Brown, 3.751, 327.74 vs. 14. Audrey Worm, 5.133, 137.96. 4. Tony Schumacher, 3.785, 329.67 vs. 13. Brittany Force, 5.021, 138.17. 5. Pat Dakin, 3.810, 291.26 vs. 12. Shawn Reed, 4.128, 239.74. 6. Leah Pritchett, 3.811, 325.77 vs. 11. Terry Haddock, 4.038, 252.90. 7. Doug Kalitta, 3.827, 327.19 vs. 10. Richie Crampton, 3.942, 305.49. 8. Terry McMillen, 3.830, 320.74 vs. 9. Scott Palmer, 3.889, 316.08.Funny Car1. Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 3.911, 332.18 vs. 16. Jim Campbell, Charger, 5.142, 156.37. 2. Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 3.914, 327.66 vs. 15. John Force, Camaro, 4.281, 222.88. 3. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.917, 333.66 vs. 14. Dave Richards, Ford Mustang, 4.133, 300.93. 4. Shawn Langdon, Toyota Camry, 3.926, 327.03 vs. 13. Gary Densham, Mustang, 4.089, 308.57. 5. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 3.933, 327.27 vs. 12. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.084, 290.26. 6. Matt Hagan, Charger, 3.941, 328.22 vs. 11. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.004, 315.05. 7. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.944, 325.06 vs. 10. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 3.989, 321.58. 8. J.R. Todd, Camry, 3.962, 326.40 vs. 9. Del Worsham, Camry, 3.979, 325.14. Did Not Qualify: 17. Cory Lee, 8.943, 85.95. 18. Jonnie Lindberg, 9.393, 80.65.Pro Stock1. Greg Anderson, Chevy Camaro, 6.522, 213.00 vs. 16. Wally Stroupe, Camaro, 7.042, 196.73. 2. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.525, 212.59 vs. 15. Val Smeland, Camaro, 6.664, 209.36. 3. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.529, 213.27 vs. 14. John Gaydosh Jr, Chevrolet Camaro, 6.612, 211.03. 4. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.534, 213.03 vs. 13. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.602, 210.24. 5. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.534, 212.93 vs. 12. Jeg Coughlin, Camaro, 6.581, 209.75. 6. Deric Kramer, Camaro, 6.541, 212.59 vs. 11. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.571, 212.83. 7. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.541, 212.69 vs. 10. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.570, 211.53. 8. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.544, 212.83 vs. 9. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.554, 212.06.Pro Stock Motorcycle1. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.773, 199.05 vs. 16. Mark Paquette, Victory, 6.943, 193.21. 2. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.785, 199.67 vs. 15. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.929, 196.64. 3. Joey Gladstone, Suzuki, 6.793, 196.93 vs. 14. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.917, 198.64. 4. Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.806, 201.01 vs. 13. Cory Reed, Victory, 6.910, 191.67. 5. Scotty Pollacheck, Suzuki, 6.816, 197.51 vs. 12. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 6.902, 195.59. 6. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.821, 196.50 vs. 11. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.889, 195.14. 7. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.855, 197.74 vs. 10. Angie Smith, Buell, 6.889, 196.10. 8. Angelle Sampey, Victory, 6.856, 196.07 vs. 9. Ryan Oehler, Buell, 6.881, 195.22. Did Not Qualify: 17. Matt Smith, 6.945, 195.87. 18. Kelly Clontz, 6.970, 192.11. 19. Lance Bonham, 7.205, 694.44. 20. Andie Rawlings, 7.223, 182.45. COLLEGE BASKETBALL MENS BASKETBALL NCAA TOURNAMENTAll times CentralEAST REGIONAL First Round March 15 At PPG Paints Arena, PittsburghVillanova 87, Radford 61 Alabama 86, Virginia Tech 83At American Airlines Center, DallasTexas Tech 70, Stephen F. Austin 60 Florida 77, St. Bonaventure 62Friday At Little Caesars Arena, DetroitPurdue 74, Cal State Fullerton 48 Butler 79, Arkansas 62At Viejas Arena, San DiegoMarshall 81, Wichita State 75 West Virginia 85, Murray State 68Second Round Saturday At PPG Paints Arena, PittsburghVillanova 81, Alabama 58At American Airlines Center, DallasTexas Tech (25-9) vs. Florida (21-12), lateToday At Little Caesars Arena, DetroitPurdue (29-6) vs. Butler (21-13), 11:10 a.m.At Viejas Arena, San DiegoMarshall (25-10) vs. West Virginia (25-10), 8:45 p.m.At TD Garden, Boston Regional Semi“ nals March 23Villanova (32-4) vs. Marshall-West VirginiaMurray State winner Purdue-Butler winner vs. Texas Tech-Florida winnerRegional Championship March 25Semi“ nal winnersSOUTH REGIONAL First Round March 15 At American Airlines Center, DallasTennessee 73, Wright State 47 Loyola of Chicago 64, Miami 62At Taco Bell Arena, Boise, IdahoKentucky 78, Davidson 73 Buffalo 89, Arizona 68Friday At Spectrum Center, Charlotte, N.C.Kansas State 69, Creighton 59 UMBC 74, Virginia 54At Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn.Cincinnati 68, Georgia State 53 Nevada 87, Texas 83, OTSecond Round Saturday At Taco Bell Arena, Boise, IdahoBuffalo (27-8) vs. Kentucky (25-10), lateAt American Airlines Center DallasTennessee (26-8) vs. Loyola of Chicago (29-5), lateToday At Spectrum Center, Charlotte, N.C.UMBC (25-10) vs. Kansas State (23-11), 7 p.m.At Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn.Cincinnati (31-4) vs. Nevada (28-7), 5:10 p.m.At Philips Arena, Atlanta Regional Semi“ nals March 22 Regional Championship March 24Semi“ nal winnersMIDWEST REGIONAL First Round March 15 At PPG Paints Arena, PittsburghRhode Island 83, Oklahoma 78, OT Duke 89, Iona 67At INTRUST Bank Arena, Wichita, Kan.Kansas 76, Pennsylvania 60 Seton Hall 94, N.C. State 83Friday At Little Caesars Arena, DetroitMichigan State 82, Bucknell 78 Syracuse 57, TCU 52At Viejas Arena, San DiegoAuburn 62, College of Charleston 58 Clemson 79, New Mexico State 68Second Round Saturday At PPG Paints Arena, PittsburghDuke 87, Rhode Island 62At INTRUST Bank Arena, Wichita, Kan.Kansas (28-7) vs. Seton Hall (22-11), lateToday At Little Caesars Arena, DetroitMichigan State (30-4) vs. Syracuse (22-13), 1:45 p.m.At Viejas Arena, San DiegoAuburn (26-7) vs. Clemson (24-9), 6:10 p.m.At CenturyLink Center Omaha, Neb. Regional Semi“ nals March 23Kansas-Seton Hall winner vs. Auburn„ Clemson winner Duke (28-7) vs. Michigan State-Syracuse winnerRegional Championship March 25Semi“ nal winnersWEST REGIONAL First Round March 15 At INTRUST Bank Arena, Wichita, Kan.Houston 67, San Diego State 65 Michigan 61, Montana 47At Taco Bell Arena, Boise, IdahoGonzaga 68, UNC Greensboro 64. Ohio State 81, South Dakota State 73Friday At Spectrum Center, Charlotte, N.C.Texas A&M 73, Providence 69 North Carolina 84, Lipscomb 66At Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn.Xavier 102, Texas Southern 83 Florida State 67, Missouri 54Second Round Saturday At Taco Bell Arena, Boise, IdahoGonzaga (31-4) vs. Ohio St. (25-8), lateAt INTRUST Bank Arena, Wichita, Kan.Michigan (29-7) vs. Houston (27-7), lateToday At Spectrum Center, Charlotte, N.C.North Carolina (26-10) vs. Texas A&M (2112), 4:15 p.m.At Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, Tenn.Xavier (29-5) vs. Florida State (21-11), 7:45 p.m.At STAPLES Center, Los Angeles Regional Semi“ nals March 22 Regional Championship March 24Semi“ nal winnersFINAL FOUR At The Alamodome, San Antonio National Semi“ nals March 31South champion vs. West champion East champion vs. Midwest championNational Championship April 2Semi“ nal winnersSECOND-ROUND BOX SCORES VILLANOVA 81, ALABAMA 58ALABAMA (20-16) Key 2-5 1-4 6, Hall 1-2 1-2 3, Ingram 2-6 0-0 4, Sexton 7-14 3-4 17, Jones 0-1 2-4 2, Barnes 0-0 0-0 0, Reese 2-5 3-4 9, Smith 2-3 1-2 5, Giddens 3-3 1-1 7, Johnson 0-3 2-2 2, Petty 1-5 0-0 3, Schaffer 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-48 14-23 58. VILLANOVA (32-4) Spellman 3-8 0-0 7, Paschall 2-6 2-2 7, Brunson 3-7 3-3 12, Booth 1-5 2-2 4, Bridges 7-16 4-5 23, Cosby-Roundtree 1-1 2-2 4, Delaney 1-2 0-0 3, Samuels 0-1 0-0 0, Leibig 0-0 0-0 0, DiVincenzo 6-13 1-2 18, Gillespie 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 25-63 14-16 81. Halftime„Villanova 32-27. 3-Point Goals„ Alabama 4-16 (Reese 2-5, Key 1-3, Petty 1-5, Johnson 0-1, Schaffer 0-1, Sexton 0-1), Villanova 17-41 (Bridges 5-8, DiVincenzo 5-11, Brunson 3-6, Delaney 1-2, Gillespie 1-3, Spellman 1-3, Paschall 1-5, Booth 0-3). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Alabama 31 (Ingram 7), Villanova 33 (Spellman 8). Assists„Alabama 13 (Schaffer, Sexton 3), Villanova 18 (DiVincenzo, Booth 5). Total Fouls„Alabama 13, Villanova 21. Technicals„Sexton.DUKE 87, RHODE ISLAND 62RHODE ISLAND (26-8) Berry 3-9 2-2 8, Dowtin 5-10 0-0 10, Terrell 4-13 1-2 10, Matthews 9-19 1-4 23, S.Robinson 0-1 1-2 1, Layssard 0-0 0-0 0, Akele 0-0 0-0 0, Langevine 2-3 0-3 4, Tertsea 0-0 0-0 0, Dadika 0-0 0-0 0, Russell 2-4 0-0 6, Garrett 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 25-63 5-13 62. DUKE (28-7) Carter 6-6 1-1 13, Bagley 8-10 5-7 22, Duval 3-10 4-5 11, Allen 3-6 1-1 10, Trent 5-13 4-4 18, J.Robinson 0-1 0-0 0, DeLaurier 2-2 2-4 6, White 1-1 0-0 2, Bolden 0-1 2-2 2, OConnell 0-0 0-0 0, Goldwire 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 29-51 19-24 87. Halftime„Duke 45-28. 3-Point Goals„Rhode Island 7-19 (Matthews 4-8, Russell 2-4, Terrell 1-5, Garrett 0-2), Duke 10-21 (Trent 4-9, Allen 3-4, Goldwire 1-1, Bagley 1-2, Duval 1-4, J.Robinson 0-1). Fouled Out„Russell. Rebounds„Rhode Island 28 (Berry 8), Duke 36 (Bagley 9). Assists„Rhode Island 15 (Dowtin 9), Duke 20 (Duval 7). Total Fouls„ Rhode Island 19, Duke 15.TEXAS TECH 69, FLORIDA 66FLORIDA (21-13) Hayes 2-4 0-0 4, Chiozza 4-12 2-2 11, Koulechov 5-13 0-1 12, Allen 2-11 2-2 7, Hudson 8-16 5-8 23, Stone 3-5 1-2 7, Bassett 0-0 0-0 0, Gak 0-0 0-0 0, Ballard 0-0 0-0 0, Okauru 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 25-63 10-15 66. TEXAS TECH (26-9) Gray 1-4 1-2 3, Odiase 0-1 0-1 0, Zh.Smith 8-13 0-0 18, Culver 5-13 0-0 11, Evans 8-14 3-5 22, Hamilton 1-1 0-0 2, Za.Smith 2-2 2-3 6, Francis 1-5 0-1 2, Moretti 0-2 0-0 0, Stevenson 2-8 1-2 5. Totals 28-63 7-14 69. Halftime„Florida 33-32. 3-Point Goals„ Florida 6-22 (Hudson 2-5, Koulechov 2-8, Chiozza 1-3, Allen 1-5, Stone 0-1), Texas Tech 6-15 (Evans 3-4, Zh.Smith 2-3, Culver 1-4, Moretti 0-1, Stevenson 0-1, Francis 0-2). Fouled Out„None. Rebounds„Florida 37 (Stone 10), Texas Tech 32 (Zh.Smith, Culver 9). Assists„Florida 11 (Allen 4), Texas Tech 17 (Zh.Smith 7). Total Fouls„Florida 18, Texas Tech 14.NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENTAll times Eastern Second Round SaturdayPenn State 73, Notre Dame 63TodayMississippi State (23-11) at Baylor (19-14), 12 p.m. Oregon (23-12) at Marquette (20-13), 3:30 p.m. Middle Tennessee (25-7) at Louisville (21-13), 5:30 p.m.MondayStanford (19-15) at Oklahoma State (20-14), 6 p.m. LSU (18-14) at Utah (20-11), 9 p.m. Washington (21-12) at Saint Marys (29-5), 10 p.m. Western Kentucky (25-10) at Southern Cal (24-11), 10:30 p.m.COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONALAll times Eastern Quarter“ nals Monday Campbell (17-15) vs. New Orleans (16-16), 6 p.m. North Texas (16-17) vs. Mercer (19-14), 7 p.m. Central Arkansas (18-16) vs. Jacksonville State (22-12), 7 p.m. Utah Valley (23-10) vs. San Francisco (19-15), 9 p.m.COLLEGEINSIDER.COM TOURNAMENT First Round March 12Central Michigan 94 at Fort Wayne 89 Drake 80 at Abilene Christian 73 Liberty 65, NC A&T 52 San Diego 88, Hartford 72March 14Eastern Michigan 83, Niagara 65 Illinois-Chicago 84, St. Francis (Pa.) 61 UTSA 76, Lamar 69March 15Austin Peay 80, Louisiana-Monroe 66FridayCentral Michigan 98, Wofford 94SaturdayPortland State (20-13) at San Diego (19-13), lateNCAA WOMENS TOURNAMENT All times Eastern ALBANY REGIONAL First Round Friday At Columbia, S.C. Virginia 68, California 62 South Carolina 63, N.C. A&T 52 Saturday At Storrs, Conn. UConn 140, Saint Francis (Pa.) 52 Quinnipiac 86, Miami 72 At Athens, Ga. Duke 72, Belmont 58 Georgia 68, Mercer 63 At Tallahassee, Fla. Florida State 91, Little Rock 49 Buffalo 102, South Florida 79Second Round Today At Columbia, S.C.Virginia (19-13) vs. South Carolina (27-6), 9 p.m.Monday At Storrs, Conn.UConn (33-0) vs. Quinnipiac (28-5)At Athens, Ga.Duke (23-8) vs. Georgia (26-6)At Tallahassee, Fla. Buffalo (28-5) vs. Florida State (26-6) SPOKANE REGIONAL First Round Friday At Notre Dame, Ind. Notre Dame 99, Cal State Northridge 81 Villanova 81, South Dakota State 74, OT At College Station, Texas DePaul 90, Oklahoma 79 Texas A&M 89, Drake 76 At Eugene, Ore. Minnesota 89, Green Bay 77 Oregon 88, Seattle 45 Saturday At Columbus, Ohio Central Michigan 78, LSU 69 Ohio State 87, George Washington 45Second Round Today At Notre Dame, Ind.Notre Dame (30-3) vs. Villanova (23-8), 6 p.m.At College Station, TexasDePaul (27-7) vs. Texas A&M (25-9), 1 p.m.At Eugene, Ore.Minnesota (24-8) vs. Oregon (31-4), 9:30 p.m.Monday At Columbus, OhioCentral Michigan (29-4) vs. Ohio State (28-6) KANSAS CITY REGIONAL First Round Friday At Raleigh, N.C. Maryland 77, Princeton 57 NC State 62, Elon 34 Saturday At Starkville, Miss. Oklahoma State 84, Syracuse 57 Mississippi State (32-1) vs. Nicholls (19-13), late At Los Angeles UCLA 71, American 60 Iowa (24-7) vs. Creighton (18-12), late At Austin, Texas Arizona State 73, Nebraska 62 Texas (26-6) vs. Maine (23-9), lateSecond Round Today At Raleigh, N.C.Maryland (26-7) vs. NC State (25-8), 1 p.m.Monday At Starkville, Miss.Mississippi State-Nicholls winner vs. Oklahoma State (21-10)At Los AngelesIowa-Creighton winner vs. UCLA (25-7)At Austin, TexasArizona State (22-12) vs. Texas-Maine winner LEXINGTON REGIONAL First Round Friday At Louisville, Ky. Louisville 74, Boise State 42 Marquette 84, Dayton 65 At Knoxville, Tenn. Oregon State 82, Western Kentucky 58 Tennessee 100, Liberty 60 At Waco, Texas Michigan 75, Northern Colorado 61 Baylor 96, Grambling State 46 Saturday At Stanford, Calif. Florida Gulf Coast 80, Missouri 70 Stanford (22-10) vs. Gonzaga (27-5), lateSecond Round Today At Louisville, Ky.Louisville (33-2) vs. Marquette (24-9), 11 a.m.At Knoxville, Tenn.Oregon State (24-7) vs. Tennessee (25-7), 1 p.m.At Waco, TexasMichigan (23-9) vs. Baylor (32-1), 7:30 p.m.Monday At Stanford, Calif.Florida Gulf Coast (31-4) vs. StanfordGonzaga winner, TBA PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times CentralEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division W L PCT. GBx-Toronto 52 17 .754 „ x-Boston 47 22 .681 5 Philadelphia 38 30 .559 13 New York 24 45 .348 28 Brooklyn 21 48 .304 31Southeast Division W L Pct GBWashington 39 30 .565 „ Miami 37 33 .529 2 Charlotte 30 39 .435 9 Orlando 21 49 .300 18 Atlanta 20 49 .290 19Central Division W L Pct GBIndiana 40 29 .580 „ Cleveland 39 29 .574 Milwaukee 36 32 .529 3 Detroit 30 38 .441 9 Chicago 24 44 .353 15 WESTERN CONFERENCESouthwest Division W L Pct GBy-Houston 54 14 .794 „ New Orleans 39 29 .574 15 San Antonio 39 30 .565 15 Dallas 22 47 .319 32 Memphis 18 50 .265 36Northwest Division W L Pct GBPortland 42 26 .618 „ Oklahoma City 42 29 .592 1 Minnesota 40 29 .580 2 Utah 39 30 .565 3 Denver 38 31 .551 4Paci“ c Division W L Pct GBy-Golden State 52 17 .754 „ L.A. Clippers 37 31 .544 14 L.A. Lakers 31 38 .449 21 Sacramento 23 47 .329 29 Phoenix 19 51 .271 33 x-clinched playoff berth; y-won division PRO HOCKEY NHLEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Tampa Bay 70 48 18 4 100 257 198 Boston 69 44 17 8 96 232 179 Toronto 71 42 22 7 91 239 204 Florida 69 35 27 7 77 210 216 Montreal 71 26 33 12 64 182 226 Ottawa 70 26 33 11 63 196 242 Detroit 71 26 34 11 63 183 219 Buffalo 71 23 36 12 58 172 232Metropolitan Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Washington 71 41 23 7 89 222 208 Pittsburgh 72 41 26 5 87 237 218 New Jersey 71 37 26 8 82 215 211 Columbus 71 38 28 5 81 198 198 Philadelphia 71 35 25 11 81 208 210 Carolina 70 30 29 11 71 188 218 N.Y. Rangers 71 32 32 7 71 205 227 N.Y. Islanders 71 30 31 10 70 228 258WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Nashville 71 47 14 10 104 232 178 Winnipeg 71 42 19 10 94 236 187 Minnesota 71 40 24 7 87 221 205 Colorado 71 38 25 8 84 226 208 Dallas 72 38 26 8 84 207 193 St. Louis 70 37 28 5 79 192 186 Chicago 72 30 34 8 68 204 218Paci“ c Division GP W L OT PTS GF GA Vegas 71 45 21 5 95 240 199 San Jose 71 39 23 9 87 214 196 Los Angeles 72 39 27 6 84 207 181 Anaheim 72 36 24 12 84 202 195 Calgary 72 35 27 10 80 202 213 Edmonton 71 31 35 5 67 200 228 Vancouver 71 25 37 9 59 183 231 Arizona 70 23 36 11 57 169 225 2 points for a win, 1 for OT loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffsFridays GamesWashington 6, N.Y. Islanders 3 Ottawa 3, Dallas 2, OT Nashville 4, Colorado 2 San Jose 7, Calgary 4 Anaheim 4, Detroit 2 Minnesota 4, Vegas 2Saturdays GamesBuffalo 5, Chicago 3 Edmonton 4, Florida 2 SCOREBOARD ON THE AIRTODAYAUTO RACING 2:30 p.m. FOX „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Auto Club 400, at Fontana, Calif. 6 p.m. FOX „ NHRA Drag Racing, Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals, at Gainesville, Fla. COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA ESPN „ NIT Tournament, second round, Baylor vs. Mississippi State 1:30 p.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 2 p.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ NIT Tournament, second round, Oregon vs. Marquette 4 p.m. CBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 5 p.m. TNT „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ NIT Tournament, second round, Middle Tennessee vs. Louisville 6 p.m. TBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 6:30 p.m. TruTv „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA 7:30 p.m. TNT „ NIT Tournament, second round, teams TBA 8:30 p.m. TBS „ NCAA Tournament, second round, teams TBA GOLF 1 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, “ nal round, at Orlando, Fla. 5 p.m. GOLF „ LPGA Tour, Bank of Hope Founders Cup, “ nal round, at Phoenix, Ariz. MLB 12 p.m. MLB „ Spring training, Philadelphia at Minnesota 3 p.m. MLB „ Spring training, L.A. Angels at Texas NHL 6:30 p.m. NBCSN „ St. Louis at Chicago SOCCER 7 a.m. FS1 „ Bundesliga, Borussia Dortmund vs. Hanover 96 9:30 a.m. FS1 „ Bundesliga, Cologne vs. Bayer Leverkusen TENNIS 1 p.m. ESPN „ BNP Paribas Open, Mens and Womens “ nals, at Indian Wells, Calif. WOMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 11 a.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA 1:30 p.m. ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA 6 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA 8 p.m. ESPN „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBA ESPN2 „ NCAA Womens Tournament, second round, teams TBANEW YORKWoodhead announces retirement from NFLDanny Woodhead went from undersized and undrafted to big-time playmaker in 10 NFL seasons.The versatile run-ning back announced his retirement from playing in a humble and heartfelt post on Instagram early Saturday.10 years!Ž Woodhead wrote. Wow, God had crazy plans for a small little kid from North Platte, NE! Its been a wild ride and feel so blessed He allowed me to do what I loved for so long. But now its time to say goodbye to the game I love.ŽThe 5-foot-8, 204pound Woodhead had 2,238 yards rushing and 15 touchdowns, along with 300 catches for 2,698 yards and 17 scores while playing for the New York Jets, New England, San Diego and Baltimore. He added an exciting element to the offenses in which he played, able to run the ball through seemingly the smallest of holes. Morocco needs $16B for 2026 World Cup venuesMorocco would need to spend almost $16 billion to prepare to host the 2026 World Cup, with every proposed sta-dium and training ground built from scratch or renovated, the bid said Saturday.With less than three months to go until the FIFA vote, the north African nation presented the first significant details of its proposal to take on the joint bid from the United States, Canada and Mexico.The North American bid plans to rely on existing infrastructure, including large NFL stadiums already hosting events.For the first time, a high-risk bid that does not meet FIFAs expectations on facilities and profit can be disquali-fied before the governing bodys congress votes on June 13.LONDONIreland earns rare Grand Slam in rugbyTo pull off a Grand Slam in Six Nations rugby, planning, talent and commitment takes you only so far. You need some luck,Ž Ireland coach Joe Schmidt added with a grin in the bowels of Twickenham on Saturday.Schmidt and his side were celebrating Irelands third clean sweep in the championship, beside 1948 and 2009, after smothering England in a fabulous 24-15 win.The Irish, who secured the championship a week earlier, put this result beyond doubt by halftime after spearing England with three converted tries to lead 21-5. The Associated PressIN BRIEF

PAGE 39

** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 C5 NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUND OF 32A look at Saturdays second-round games Saturdays starCoach K: Dukes victory over URI gave coach Mike Krzyzewski 1,098 wins during his Hall of Fame career, breaking a tie with Tennessee womens coach Pat Summitt for the most ever by an NCAA basketball coach.In the spotlightUMBC basks in 15 minutes of fame as tourneys Cinderella As the sun rose on the Saturday morning celebration of their unprecedented NCAA Tournament upset, Ryan Odom implored his suddenly-famous basketball team to get some sleep. It was time for family and friends of UMBC to leave the hotel and for the Retrievers to return to their rooms. On any other night, theyd have started a FortniteŽ video game battle to unwind. The gamers sat this one out. The only devices the Retrievers were tethered to were their phones. UMBC had made history as the “ rst No. 16 seed in NCAA Mens Tournament history to knock off a No. 1 seed and the texts and the calls never stopped buzzing. And it wouldnt take more than a quick scroll to “ nd out they were trending. Up next, UMBC plays No. 9 seed Kansas State (23-11) on Sunday with a Sweet 16 berth at stake. UMBC is a commuter school in Baltimore „ one in which the chess team reigns supreme, no less „ and they had just checkmated No. 1 Virginia. The bracket-busting sweethearts were suddenly linked with Buster Douglas, the Miracle on Ice and Chaminade on the short list of sports all-time upsets. The pithy tweets from its Twitter account made highlight reels. The school website crashed. Virginia turned into a punchline. For these players, the ones no other teams wanted, it was simply surreal. Im getting so many noti“ cations that my phone froze,Ž said K.J. Maura, the emotional ” oor leader who played all 40 minutes Friday night.The Associated Press Todays top gamesEAST REGION: No. 2 seed Purdue (29-6) vs. No. 10 seed Butler (21-13), Sunday in Detroit BOTTOM LINE: An elbow injury to Purdue center Isaac Haas has put a damper on the Boilermakers chances of a deep run this year. He was ruled out for the season Friday, but it now appears that a return may not be completely out of the question. Purdue and Butler met earlier this season, with the Boilermakers winning that matchup of in-state rivals 82-67. Butler shot 7 of 33 in the “ rst half of that game. Kentucky 95, Buffalo 75: Kentucky put an end to any upset talk on its watch Saturday, getting 27 points and a near-perfect shooting game from Shai Gilgeous-Alexander in a 95-75 pullaway from 13th-seeded Buffalo. Gilgeous-Alexander went 10 for 12 and made both of his 3-point attempts to send “ fth-seeded Kentucky (26-10) to the Sweet 16 for the second straight season. Coming into the day, the basketball world was still reverberating from Maryland-Baltimore Countys 16 vs. 1 stunner over Virginia the night before. Villanova and Duke both rolled early; the evening slate started with Kentucky, and the Wildcats, with their all-freshman starting lineup, trailed only once: 2-0. It wasnt a runaway until the last 7 minutes. Buffalo (27-9), which got here with a 21-point blowout over Arizona, twice trimmed a double-digit lead to “ ve midway through the second half. Gilgeous-Alexander answered both times „ once with a 3-pointer to extend the lead to eight, then again a few minutes later with a three-point play that started a 12-2 run and put the game away. Hamidou Diallo also went off „ going 9 for 12 and scoring all but four of his 22 points in the second half while South RegionDuke 87, Rhode Island 62: Mike Krzyzewski might want to stop worrying about his teams inexperience. The loaded if young Blue Devils hardly seemed intimidated by NCAA Tournaments bright lights. Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year Marvin Bagley scored 22 points to go with nine rebounds, fellow freshman big man Wendell Carter Jr. added 13 points and second-seeded Duke rolled by seventh-seeded Rhode Island 87-62 in the second round to earn the programs 26th trip to the Sweet 16. Duke (28-7) will play either Michigan State or Syracuse in the Midwest Regional semi“ nals in Omaha, Nebraska on Friday. Kansas 83, Seton Hall 79: Malik Newman scored 28 points, Udoka Azubuike stood toe-to-toe with Seton Halls bruising Angel Delgado, and No. 1 seed Kansas held off the plucky Pirates 83-79 to send the Jayhawks to their third consecutive Sweet 16. Svi Mykhailiuk added 16 points and Lagerald Vick had 13 for the Jayhawks (29-7), who converted on every crucial play down the stretch to advance to the semi“ nals of the Midwest Region. Theyll take on the winner of Sundays game between Auburn and Clemson in Omaha, Nebraska. Delgado “ nished with 24 points and 23 rebounds in a virtuoso effort for the No. 8 seed Pirates (22-11), who snapped a fourgame NCAA Tournament skid in the opening round. Midwest RegionVillanova 81, Alabama 58: Mikal Bridges hit “ ve 3s, scored 23 points and helped No. 1 seed Villanova put the “ eld on notice that its the team to beat with an 81-58 win over ninth-seeded Alabama on Saturday. The Wildcats (32-4) are in the Sweet 16 for the “ rst time since they won the 2016 national championship. Bridges, Jalen Brunson, Phil Booth „ and yes, The Big Ragu „ look every bit the favorite to make it two in three years. Villanova plays Friday in Boston against the Marshall-West Virginia winner. Alabama (20-16) failed to make it two No. 1s KOd in less than 24 hours. After a tense “ rst half in a round that has given the program “ ts, the Wildcats hit their “ rst six 3s in the second and put on a thrashing up there among the most dominant under coach Jay Wright. Bridges, who averaged 17.9 points and played his way into a likely NBA draft lottery pick, scored 1 point and missed all “ ve shots in the “ rst half. He found his groove once the second half tipped. Bridges scored the “ rst 5 points of the half and then “ nished a thunderous alley-oop on a pass from Booth that made it 41-27 East Region By Schuyler DixonThe Associated PressDALLAS „ Another NCAA Tournament prayer answered for Loyola-Chicago, and the Ramblers are set to bring Sister Jean to the Sweet 16.Clayton Custers jumper took a friendly bounce off the rim and in with 3.6 seconds left, and 11th-seeded Loyola beat Tennessee 63-62 in a South Region second-round game Saturday night.Custers winner came two days after Donte Ingrams buzzer-beating 3 for Loyola against Miami, surely to the delight of Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt, the 98-year-old nun, team chaplain and primary booster watching from her wheelchair on a platform near the main TV cameras.The Ramblers (30-5), who won the Missouri Valley tour-nament, broke the school record for wins set by the 1963 NCAA championship team. Loyola will play the Cincinnati-Nevada winner in the regional semifinals Thursday in Atlanta. No. 3 seed Tennessee (26-7) took its only lead of the second half on three-point play by Grant Williams with 20 seconds remaining. After Loyola almost lost the ball on an out-of-bounds call confirmed on replay, Custer dribbled to his right, pulled up and let go a short jumper that hit the front of the rim, bounced off the backboard and went in.A last-gasp shot from the Vols Jordan Bone bounced away, and Custer threw the ball off the scoreboard high above the court as he was mobbed by teammates in the same spot that the Ramblers celebrates Ingrams dramatic winner.The Ramblers fell behind 15-6 in less than 5 minutes before the Volunteers missed their next nine shots and fell behind for the first time on Custers 3-pointer with 6 minutes left in the first half.Admiral Schofield scored 11 of those first 15 Tennessee points but didnt score again until a 3 nearly 32 minutes later that started a rally from a 10-point deficit in the final 4 minutes by the SEC regularseason co-champions.Tennessee coach Rick Barnes lost at American Airlines Center, home of the NBAs Dallas Mavericks, for the first time in six NCAA games. The first four wins were during his 17 seasons leading the Texas Longhorns.Schmidt, who leads the pregame prayer and gives the players feedback after, wasnt the only one pulling hard for Loyola.Late-arriving fans waiting for crowd favorite Texas Tech in the late game joined the raucous Ramblers supporters wearing maroon-and-gold scarfs and standing almost the entire game in sections across the court from their teams bench.Aundre Jackson, who grew up in the Dallas area, led Loyola with 16 points, and Custer had 10. Prayers answered Dukes Marvin Bagley III grabs a rebound in front of Rhode Islands Jared Terrell, center, and E.C. Matthews, left, during the second half of Saturdays NCAA tournament second-round game in Pittsburgh. [GENE J. PUSKAR/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Ramblers hit go-ahead jumper with 3.6 seconds le advance to rst Sweet 16 since 1985Loyola-Chicago guard Clayton Custer (13) shoots over Tennessees Jordan Bowden and Jordan Bone and scores in the “ nal seconds of Saturdays NCAA tournament second-round game in Dallas. The shot helped Loyola to a 63-62 win. [TONY GUTIERREZ/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) „ Ninth-seeded Florida State has lots of guys who can score, and the Seminoles used that depth to win their fourth straight NCAA Tour-nament opener. Or as coach Leonard Hamilton calls it, a team effort.Mfiondu Kabengele scored 14 points, and Florida State beat No. 8 seed Missouri 67-54 on Friday night in the West Region.Florida State (21-11) will play No. 1 seed Xavier in the second round today.PJ Savoy had 12 points and Phil Cofer scored 11. A total of 10 Seminoles scored at least two points apiece „ by halftime„ as they wore out Missouri, which had only eight healthy players available."All season our identity was the quality of our depth," Kabengele said. "We knew they were a little short on the bench, so we needed to attack them, get them in foul trou-ble, minimize their bench and stay aggressive. We used that to our advantage."This was the first trip to the tournament for every player on the roster for Mis-souri (20-13). Even with new players and a new coach in Cuonzo Martin, the Tigers head home from their first NCAA appearance since 2013 with the program's fourth straight loss in a first round."We didn't get into a flow like we needed to," Martin said. "Give them a lot of credit for pressing us, getting out in the passing lanes, forcing us to make extra plays."Kassius Robertson had 19 points for Missouri. Michael Porter Jr. scored 16 in what might be his final college game, with 13 coming after halftime. Missouri never got closer than six in the second half before the Seminoles sealed the win with 15 straight points.The Tigers started well enough as Robertson opened the game with a 3-pointer, and Missouri scored seven of the first eight points.Late Friday: Florida State takes down Mizzou

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** C6 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldIndianapolis receives No. 6 pick, 3 secondrounders in massive dealBy Dennis Waszak Jr.The Associated PressNEW YORK „ The New York Jets shook up the NFL draft on Saturday by soaring three spots to No. 3 overall in a stunning swap with the Indianapolis Colts.The Jets acquired the third pick in a strong sign that they intend to get one of the top quarterbacks available. They sent the Colts their first-rounder „ No. 6 overall „ along with two second-rounders this year and a second-rounder next year to complete the massive deal.Colts general manager Chris Ballard said the teams had been discussing a potential trade since early in the week. After losing out to Minnesota in the Kirk Cousins sweepstakes at the start of free agency, New York re-signed veteran Josh McCown and agreed to terms with Teddy Bridgewater, both on one-year deals. But it was believed the Jets would still focus on finding a quarterback of the future with their firstround pick in next months draft.By moving up to No. 3, New York assures itself of getting one of the top-rated quarterbacks available. USCs Sam Darnold, UCLAs Josh Rosen, Wyomings Josh Allen and Oklahomas Baker Mayfield are all considered potential top-five selections.General manager Mike Maccagnan has been zeroing in on the QBs up close, attending the pro days of both Mayfield and Rosen. He also plans to attend the pro days for Darnold and Allen.The Jets have been very active during the first few days of the NFLs free agency period, which officially began Wednes-day. In addition to the moves with McCown and Bridgewater, New York signed cornerback Trumaine Johnson, running back Isaiah Crowell, kicker Cairo Santos and linebacker Avery Williamson, and agreed to terms with center Spencer Long. The Jets also re-signed cornerback Morris Claiborne, defensive lineman Mike Pennel, offensive tackle Ben Ijalana and safety Terrence Brooks.The flurry of activity comes as the Jets look to improve on two straight 5-11 seasons and try to end a seven-year playoff drought. Getting a quarterback to build around was a priority entering this offseason „ famil-iar territory for a franchise that mostly has struggled to find sustained success under center since the days of Joe Namath. The Jets have had 30 starting quarterbacks since Broadway Joes last game for them in 1976. The last time New York took a quarterback with a high firstround pick was 2009, when it drafted Mark Sanchez. After helping lead the Jets to the AFC championship game his first two seasons, Sanchez mostly struggled, and the likes of Greg McElroy, Geno Smith, Michael Vick, Ryan Fitzpatrick, Bryce Petty and McCown have all started games in the years since. Jets get No. 3 overall draft pick from ColtsNew York Jets general manager Mike Maccagnan speaks during a press conference at the scouting combine in Indianapolis. The Jets have acquired the No. 3 overall pick in the NFL draft from the Indianapolis Colts. [DARRON CUMMINGS/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] By Doug FergusonThe Associated PressORLANDO, Fla. „ Henrik Stenson did just enough right and was happy enough to take a one-shot lead in the Arnold Palmer Invitational, even if he wishes it could have been more.Stenson missed a short birdie putt and a 12-foot eagle attempt on the back nine Saturday, had his tee shot knocked down by a gust of wind that led to bogey and closed out a 1-under 71 to go into the final round with another chance to win at Bay Hill. Bryson DeChambeau also missed his share of chances in a round of 72 and was one shot behind. Rory McIlroy made eagle on No. 12 and birdied two of his last three holes and was two shots behind. He will be in the penultimate group with Justin Rose, who shot a 67 while play-ing in the same group with Tiger Woods and the massive crowd and wound up three shots behind. Ryan Moore (67) also was three back.Woods made another bold play on the par-5 16th, this time with his ball near the lip of a bunker. Instead of pitch-ing out to the fairway, he hit a shot over the trees and the water that set up a two-putt birdie, and he hit sand wedge into the 18th for a 12-foot birdie putt and a 69.Woods was five shots behind. Stenson takes 1-shot lead at Bay Hill; Woods 5 backHenrik Stenson reacts after missing a putt at the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Saturday in Orlando, Fla.[PHELAN M. EBENHACK/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] The Associated PressSTORRS, Conn. „ Azura Stevens scored 26 points to lead six UConn players in double figures and the Huskies opened their NCAA Tournament with a 140-52 record-setting rout of Saint Francis (Pa.) on Saturday. The tournaments top seed set a record for points in a tournament game and all-time NCAA records for points in a period (55 in the first) and a half (94 in the first).And UConns 88-point margin of victory was the second-biggest in tournament history. Baylor beat Texas Southern by 89 in the 2017 tournament.The previous record for points in a tournament game was 121. The previous mark for points in a half was 80 and for a quarter was 45. No. 3 Florida State 91, No. 14 Little Rock 49TALLAHASSEE „ Shakayla Thomas scored 26 points and Florida State defeated Little Rock. It is a tournament high for Thomas, eclipsing the 23 she scored against Western Illinois in the “ rst round last year. Thomas, a 5-foot-11 senior forward who was playing in her 12th NCAA Tournament game, was 11 of 15 from the “ eld in 19 minutes. She scored Florida States “ rst six points and had 16 in the “ rst half as the host team was ahead 53-30 at halftime. The Seminoles (26-6), who were 35 of 60 from the “ eld, put the game out of reach by going on a 23-0 run during an 8-minute span in the second and third quarters. Chatrice White and Nikki Ekhomu each scored 13 points and AJ Alix added 12 for Florida State. White also had 10 rebounds for her sixth doubledouble of the season. Tori Lasker led the Trojans (2310) with 13 points and Keanna Keys added 11.No. 4 Georgia 68, No. 13 Mercer 63Caliya Robinson had 23 points and 16 rebounds, Mackenzie Engram added 21 points and 10 rebounds, and Georgia held off Mercer. Que Morrison “ nished with 10 points and nine rebounds for the fourth-seeded Lady Bulldogs (26-6), who advanced to face Duke on Monday night. Kahlia Lawrence scored 23 points and KeKe Calloway had 15 for No. 13 seed Mercer (30-3). The Bears had won a school-record 27 straight, the nations third-longest active streak. Georgia had the games biggest lead at 11 early in the third, but let Mercer pull within one twice in the fourth quarter. After Robinson scored her teams last “ eld goal with 2:14 remaining, the Lady Bulldogs put Mercer away by hitting seven of their last eight foul shots.No. 5 Duke 72, No. 12 Belmont 58Leaonna Odom scored a career-high 25 points, including nine in Dukes dominant third period, and the Blue Devils beat Belmont in the “ rst round of the womens NCAA Tournament. Duke (23-8) led only 32-31 at halftime before outscoring Belmont 21-9 in the third period. Kylie Smith led Belmont with 20 points. Dukes Rebecca Greenwell, who had 18 points, opened the third period with a layup and closed the quarter by sinking a 3-pointer to give Duke a 53-40 lead. Belmont (31-4) saw its 22-game winning streak end. The Bruins were denied in their bid for their “ rst NCAA win.No. 11 Buffalo 102, No. 6 South Florida 79Cierra Dillard scored a careerhigh 36 points and Buffalo got its “ rst womens NCAA Tournament victory as it defeated South Florida. It is the “ rst time in an NCAA Tournament game that a MidAmerican Conference team has gone over 100 points. It is also the “ rst time since 1995 that Buffalo has scored more than 100 points. Buffalo, which is making its second NCAA appearance, trailed 29-18 midway through the second quarter but went on a 20-7 run the remainder of the quarter to take a 43-38 lead at halftime. Wilkins had eight points during the run and Stephanie Reid added six. Buffalo (28-5) was 14 of 27 from the 3-point line, including 7 of 13 from Dillard. Courtney Wilkins added 23 points and Reid 19. Buffalo was also strong from the foul line, making 22 of 24. Kitija Laksa led South Florida (26-8) with 28 points and Maria Jespersen added 23 points and 11 rebounds. USF was 32 of 63 from the “ eld, but was 7 of 23 on 3-pointers.No. 9 Quinnipiac 86, No. 8 Miami 72Jen Fay led a balanced ninthseeded Quinnipiac offense with 19 points and the Bobcats beat Miami, eliminating the Hurricanes from the womens NCAA Tournament for a second consecutive season. Paula Strautmane added 15 points and Edel Thornton and Carly Fabbri each had 14 for Quinnipiac (28-5), which extended its winning streak to 23 games, a new school record. Next up for Bobcats is a game against in-state neighbor UConn. Its the “ rst meeting between the schools in 20 years. Erykah Davenport led all scorers with 21 points for Miami. Emese Hof scored 16 and Endia Banks added 15 points in the losing effort.SPOKANE REGIONNo. 3 Ohio State 87, No. 14 George Washington 45Stephanie Mavunga scored 22 points and grabbed 13 rebounds as Ohio State routed George Washington. Alexa Hart had 12 points and Kelsey Mitchell added 11 points and seven rebounds as the Buckeyes (28-6) never trailed, took off in the second half and overwhelmed the Colonials (19-10), who had earned a tournament bid by winning the Atlantic 10 Tournament. Ohio State moves on to Monday to play Central Michigan, which outlasted LSU in the “ rst game on Saturday. Briana Cummings led GW with 14 points, and Neila Luma had 12 before fouling out late in the game.No. 11 Central Michigan 78, No. 6 LSU 69Tinara Moore scored 25 points to help Central Michigan get its “ rst womens NCAA Tournament win, beating LSU. The Chippewas, who had lost in their “ rst three trips to the NCAAs, got in the tournament for the “ rst time in “ ve years by upsetting Buffalo in the Mid-American Conference Tournament. Moore and Central Michigan dominated inside, outrebounding the Southeastern Conference team 40-27 and creating more second chances. Reyna Frost 12 points and 12 boards for the Chippewas before fouling out late in the game. Central Michigan led by as many as 11 in the second half. A 6-0 LSU run reduced the lead to “ ve, but the Tigers couldnt get any closer, despite limiting their opponents to only foul shots in the last 2:43. Micaela Kelly had 17 points for Central Michigan, and Presley Hudson added 12. Chloe Jackson had 24 points, and Ayana Mitchell had 16 points and nine rebounds for LSU.KANSAS CITY REGIONNo. 3 UCLA 71, No. 14 American University 60Monique Billings scored 20 points and had 10 rebounds, Kennedy Burke added 15 points to lead UCLA to a win over American University. Jordin Canada had 10 points and 11 assists for the Bruins (25-7), who advance to the second round. Cecily Carl led American (26-7) with 22 points and 10 rebounds and Elina Koskimies added 13 points and Maria Liddane scored 12 points. After the Eagles took an early lead to start the game, the Bruins countered with a 22-3 run over the “ nal 4:33 of the opening quarter to build a double-digit advantage and take control.No. 7 Arizona State 73, No. 10 Nebraska 62Robbi Ryan scored 16 points and Kianna Ibis added 14 to lead Arizona State over Nebraska. The Sun Devils opened up a tight, defensive struggle with a 14-0 run late in the third quarter. Jamie Ruden scored “ ve in the stretch and the Sun Devils pushed the lead as high as 16 early in the fourth quarter when Reili Richardson converted a 3-point play. Arizona State moves on to the second round for the “ fth straight season with a chance to make the Sweet 16 for the second time in four years. Taylor Kissinger scored 15 points for Nebraska (21-11).No. 9 Oklahoma State 84, No. 8 Syracuse 57Freshman Jaden Hobbs scored a career-high 27 points, Loryn Goodwin and Kaylee Jensen added 19 and Oklahoma State beat Syracuse. The 5-foot-8 Hobbs made 8 of 9 3-point attempts, blowing the game open single-handedly by making four 3-pointers in quick succession late in the third quarter. Oklahoma State (21-10) ended the “ rst half on an 11-0 run to take a 40-32 halftime lead. The rally was punctuated in the “ nal seconds by a perfect pass from Goodwin to Maria Castro, who made a 3-pointer as the buzzer sounded. The Cowgirls never trailed again, thanks to solid defense and Hobbs, who had never scored more than 12 points in a college game before Saturday. Oklahoma State shot 13 of 23 (56 percent) from 3-point range.LEXINGTON REGIONNo. 12 Florida Gulf Coast 80, No. 5 Missouri 70China Dow scored 21 points and played stingy defense in the paint against Missouri star Sophie Cunningham, and Florida Gulf Coast pulled off an upset in the Lexington Regional. Cunningham took over on the low block to get Missouri (24-8) going and scored a season-high 35 points „ most by a Tigers player in an NCAA tournament game „ and made 14 of 16 free throws. But she didnt get much help. Dow made two free th rows with 1:12 left as the Eagles kept pushing until the “ nal buzzer to run their winning streak to 11 games with a 21st victory in the last 22 games.NCAA WOMENS ROUNDUPUConn, FSU roll

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 C7 The Associated PressLOS ANGELES „ Keith Kinkaid has always performed well against the Los Angeles Kings.Entering the crux of a six-game road trip crucial to the New Jerseys playoff hopes, the Devils goalie tormented the Kings once again.Kinkaid stopped 38 saves for his first shut-out of the season, helping the Devils improve their playoff positioning with a 3-0 win over the Kings on Saturday.Hes a big reason why weve been able to be competitive and continue to be competitive down the stretch,Ž Devils coach John Hynes said. We need him to continue to be very good. Its nice to see Keith rise up. Hes playing extremely well right now, so lets keep going with it.ŽMichael Grabner, Nico Hischier and Miles Wood each scored for the Devils, who have won three straight and four of five. New Jersey remained in the second wild card spot in the Eastern Conference, one point behind Metropolitan Division rivals Philadelphia and Columbus, who both won later Saturday night.Jonathan Quick made 25 saves for the Kings, who are tied with Anaheim for third in the Pacific.Kinkaid is 3-0-0 in his career against the Kings with two shutouts. He has won four consecutive starts and is 9-2-0 in his last 11.I guess I like playing against them,Ž Kinkaid said with a smile when asked about facing the Kings. They come out real hard and we just had to weather their storm. Fortunately, we got a few good goals there and a few good breaks. ... Ill take wins no matter how they come, whether its 8-3, 7-5 or 3-0. Any win is good right now.ŽKinkaids dominance of the Kings was especially evident in the first period when he made 19 saves, stopping nine shots during the Kings four power-plays, including 58 seconds of 5-on-3 play.Hes played well against us, so we werent surprised he played because his record against us is very good,Ž Kings coach John Stevens said. I just thought we didnt do enough to make his job more difficult. We were at the net, but not taking his eyes away enough.ŽThe Kings inability to execute on the power play was costly, with Grabners short-handed goal at 8:29 of the first period giving the Devils a 1-0 lead when he intercepted Drew Doughtys pass at the blue line to spring his breakaway.New Jerseys 10 shorthanded goals are tied with Florida, Nashville and Edmonton for most in the NHL.It was the first shorthanded goal allowed at home by the Kings this season, which leaves Carolina as the only team in the NHL that has not conceded a short-handed goal at home.That turned out to be the biggest play of the game,Ž Kings center Anze Kopitar said. When you get those power play opportunities there, you want to cash in on them and we failed to do so.ŽKinkaid stops 38 shots as Devils defeat Kings Los Angeles Trevor Lewis, bottom, falls to the ice while “ ghting for the puck with New Jerseys Damon Severson during the second period of Saturdays game in Los Angeles. [JAE C. HONG/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] The Associated PressNEW ORLEANS „ James Harden had 32 points and 11 rebounds, and the Houston Rockets won for the 21st time in 22 games, beating the New Orleans Pelicans 107-101 on Saturday night.Hardens highlights included his usual array of explosive drives and pull-up jumpers, includ-ing a 27-foot, straight-on 3 that put the Rockets up by nine with 1:31 left.Chris Paul added 21 points and Clint Capela had 13 points and 11 rebounds for the Rockets, winners of four straight since their 17-game win-ning streak ended against Toronto.Anthony Davis had 26 points and 13 rebounds, and Jrue Holiday scored 19 points for New Orleans, which has lost four of five since winning 10 straight.The Pelicans had a chance to make it a onepossession game when Holidays driving layup as he was fouled made it 105-101 with 17 seconds left. Holiday appeared to missed the free throw on purpose in hopes of capturing a long rebound, but Paul foiled that plan by darting in front of the Pelicans guard to give Houston possession and force New Orleans to foul him.Paul made both free throws with 14 seconds left for the final margin.The Pelicans are one of only two teams to beat Houston in their last 23 games. That New Orleans victory was also the game in which AllStar DeMarcus Cousins season ended with a torn Achilles tendon in the final seconds.The Pelicans on Satur-day appeared determined not to give in, taking several slim leads in a competitive first half in which neither team led by more than seven, and which finished with the Rockets leading 60-54.But New Orleans struggled offensively to start the third quarter, scoring only two points through the first 6:45 of the period. Houston exploited that drought, going up by 20 when Trevor Ariza, who finished with 17 points, hit one of his four 3s with 5:28 left in the quarter.Holiday helped New Orleans regain momen-tum with a crowd-stirring block in transition, followed by his 3-pointer, and New Orleans trimmed its deficit to 12 by the end of the period.Darius Miller opened the fourth with a pair of 3s, one as he was fouled, and New Orleans was as close as four points when Cheick Diallos layup made it 85-81 with 10 minutes to play.Harden, Rockets earn 21st win in 22 gamesHoustons James Harden goes to the basket in front of New Orleans forward ETwaun Moore during the “ rst half of Saturdays game in New Orleans. Harden scored 32 points. [GERALD HERBERT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** C8 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald TV LISTINGS SUNDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 18 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Sunday Today W/ Willie GeistSpringfield Community ChurchMeet the Press (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Program CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 TomorrowIn Touch W/Charles StanleyKey of DavidCampmeeting: InspirationBill PurvisSeventh Day Adventist ChurchPaid ProgramPaid P rogram WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America This Week With George ...Hlnd Pk BptstCatholicSt. Dominics Catholic ChurchFirst Baptist ChurchCredit?Conture METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeakmanBeakmanBill NyeBill NyeSaved by BellSaved by BellSaved by BellSaved by BellBrady BunchBrady BunchBrady BunchBrady Bunch WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS News Sunday Morning (N) Face the Nation (N) Bill Purvis2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament MNT (18.2) 227 13 Into the WildAnimal AdvWild AnimalsExplorationAnimal RescueReal Life 1011st United Methodist ChurchPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Program WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Force of FaithBethel BaptistHigh PraisePaid ProgramCity Church at NorthsideFox News SundayPaid ProgramPaid ProgramXtreme OffPai d Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 PinkaliciousSplashBiz Kid$ SciGirls CrossroadsCapitol UpdateCrossroadsFace to FaceBrain Secrets With Dr. Michael Merzenich Rick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Hoarders Tami; GeorgeŽ Hoarders Adella; TeriŽ Hoarders Lloyd; CarolŽ Hoarders Glen & LisaŽ ‰‰‰ Black Mass (15) Johnny Depp, Joel Edgerton. AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:56) M*A*S*H (:26) M*A*S*H (7:56) M*A*S*H (:26) ‰‰ Green Lantern (11) Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard.(10:56) ‰‰‚ Spider-Man 3 (07) Tobey Maguire. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Rugged Justice Rugged Justice Rugged Justice Rugged Justice North Woods Law North Woods Law BET 53 46 124 329 House/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, BrownsTyler Perrys Meet the Browns COM 64 53 107 249 The Office (:35) The Office (:10) The Office (:40) The Office (:15) The Office The Office (:20) The OfficeThe Office (:25) The OfficeThe OfficeThe Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Operation SportsmanFast N Loud Dat CarŽ Shifting Gears With AaronStreet Outlaws SlickŽ Racers meet in Bowling Green, Ky. (N) Epic BathroomsŽ E! 63 57 114 236 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe Kardashians ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 (10) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) E:60 (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) College Basketball: NIT Tournament ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) 30 for 30SportsCenter (N) (L) E:60CheerleadingCheerleading2018 NCAA Womens Basketball Tournament FOOD 38 45 110 231 Trishas Sou.Valerie HomePioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo.Giada Enter.Pioneer Wo.ContessaContessaThe Kitchen FREE 59 65 180 311 Yogi Bear (10) ‰‰‚ The Flintstones (94) John Goodman, Rick Moranis. ‰‰‚ Gnomeo & Juliet (11) Voices of James McAvoy. ‰‰‚ Chicken Little (05) Joan Cusack FS1 24 27 150 219 Match DayBundesliga Soccer Borussia Dortmund vs Hannover 96. (N) Bundesliga Soccer FC Koln vs Bayer 04 Leverkusen. (N) (L) Frmula E Punta del Este. NASCAR Race FX 45 51 136 248 Mike & MollyMike & MollyHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I Met ‰‰‚ The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (14) Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Jamie Foxx. HALL 23 59 185 312 (6:00) Summer of Dreams (16) Wedding March 3: Here Comes the Bride (18) Jack Wagner. Love at the Shore (17) Amanda Righetti, Peter Porte. Love, Once and Always (18) HGTV 32 38 112 229 Fixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperHouse HuntersHouse Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Top Gear TaxisŽ Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsTruck Night in America Truck Night in America LIFE 56 56 108 252 Amazing FactsJeremiahJoel OsteenCindys SkinMommys Secret (16) Charisma Carpenter, Sarah Grey. A Mothers Instinct (15) Josie Bissett, Spencer Drever. PARMT 28 48 241 241 LifeLockTry Total GymEngine PowerXtreme OffTruck Tech Detroit MuscleBar Rescue (:36) Bar Rescue Momsters BallŽ (11:48) Bar Rescue SUN 49 422 656 Yoga Retreat!Drs. Co-hostGolf AmericaGolf LifeGolf Dest.Endless GolfJimmy HanlinSwing ClinicGolf the WorldInside RaysBaseball B eginBaseball Begin SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‚ Leprechaun 2 (94) Warwick Davis, Charlie Heath. ‰‰ Leprechaun (93) Warwick Davis, Jennifer Aniston.(:02) ‰‚ Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (87) TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends Brooklyn NineBrooklyn NineBrooklyn NineBrooklyn Nine ‰‰‚ The A-Team (10) Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. TCM 25 70 132 256 The Firefly ‰‰ Brewsters Millions (45) Dennis OKeefe. ‰‰‰‚ Crossfire (47) Robert Young, Robert Mitchum. ‰‰‰ Gun Crazy (50) Peggy Cummins. Face in Crowd TLC 37 40 183 280 Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings Four Weddings My 600-lb Life: Skin Tight TNT 29 54 138 245 Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order PossessionŽ Law & Order Law & Order ‰‰‚ Money Talks (97) USA 62 55 105 242 In TouchJoel OsteenUnsolved: Tupac and BIGLaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 YouseffLifeLockWalker, Texas Ranger 2018 Skechers Performance Los Angeles Marathon (N) (L) Cops Cops SUNDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 18 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 ScandalPaid ProgramPaid ProgramShepherds ChapelEarly TodayEarly TodayNewsChannel 7 Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 CopsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramTone&LiftOmegaPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPage Six TVCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 CSI: Miami (:35) Blue Bloods (:35) ABC World News NowMorningMorningNews 13 This Morning (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 The FugitiveThe UntouchablesPeter GunnPeter GunnMr. LuckyNight GalleryFacts of LifeDiffrent StrokeBev. HillbilliesMy Three Son s WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS Overnight News (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramBusiness FirstMorning News MNT (18.2) 227 13 Murdoch MysteriesBella Luce Jewelry (N) Silver Jewelry (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAgDay WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Big BangTwo/Half MenJudge JudyPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramOutdoor ShowAsk-Tech.Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Brain Secrets3 Steps to Incredible Health!-JoelMemory Rescue With Daniel Amen, MDWild Kratts (EI) Wild Kratts (EI) Ready Jet Go!Cat in the Hat A&E 34 43 118 265 Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsBarry WhiteMore SexRehab?Credit?Never FearDr. Ho Reliev.Parking WarsParking War s AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:52) The Walking Dead (1:59) Talking DeadComic Men (:29) The Walking DeadThree StoogesTighten ToneNever FearNewsWatchPaid Program ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:06) North Woods LawNorth Woods LawNorth Woods LawLone Star LawThe GuardiansDogs 101 Meet the Komondor. BET 53 46 124 329 Jamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie Foxx (:45) The Jamie Foxx ShowJamie FoxxJamie FoxxJamie FoxxShowdown of FaithJamie FoxxJamie Foxx COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkWorkaholicsWorkaholicsProstatePaid ProgramBoostingHair LoveScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:02) Naked and AfraidFast N Loud Harley and MeŽ Fast N Loud Camaro RisingŽ Fast N Loud (Part 1 of 2) Fast N Loud (Part 2 of 2) Vegas Rat Rods Wagon RodŽ E! 63 57 114 236 (11:02) ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 The KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe KardashiansThe Kardashians ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 30 for 3030 for 30Golic & Wingo (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 Beat BobbyBeat BobbyGuys Grocery GamesPaid ProgramSexy Hair CareMyPillowBalanceLarry KingMyPillowPaid ProgramPaid Program FREE 59 65 180 311 Paid ProgramTighten ToneCindys SkinPaid ProgramPiYo Workout!Makeup!Joseph PrinceRobisonJoyce MeyerJohn HageeYoung-HungryLast-S tanding FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RacingNHRA Drag Racing Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals.TMZ SportsFirst Things First FX 45 51 136 248 Legion Chapter 6Ž Paid ProgramBaldingCindys SkinBalanceMakeup!Pain SolvedPaid ProgramPaid Program ‰‰‚ Blackhat (15) HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHow CloseHow CloseTry YogaLarry KingMyPillowPiYo Workout!PiYo Workout!Old Home LvListed Sisters HIST 35 42 120 269 (12:03) Kingpin (:04) Kingpin The rise of gangster Whitey Bulger. Paid ProgramLearn theTry YogaPhilips!Paid ProgramDr. Ho Reliev. LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:03) The Other Mother (17) Annie Wersching, Tyler Christopher. Hair LoveCredit?LifeLockPaid ProgramPaid ProgramRobisonJoyce MeyerBalancing Act PARMT 28 48 241 241 (:01) Bar RescueBar Rescue Scary MarysŽ Sex ToysRelieve painMedical Disc.Paid ProgramMedical Disc.Better, LongerRelieve painCredit? SUN 49 422 656 Sex PillsEverstrongFoot PainSex PillsProstateEverstrongProstatePoop SayFins & SkinsShip Shape TVPaid ProgramDavid Meltzer SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:24) Superman: Doomsday (:09) ‰‰ Superman III (83) Christopher Reeve, Richard Pryor, Robert Vaughn. Krypton ‰‚ Skyline (10) Eric Balfour, Brittany Daniel. TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰ Blast From the Past (99) Brendan Fraser. New GirlNew GirlLove-RaymondLove-RaymondMarriedMarriedMarriedMarried TCM 25 70 132 256 Spring Dreams (60) A wealthy family takes in an elderly hobo. Farewell to Spring (59) Masahiko Tsugawa, Kazuya Kosaka. ‰‰ Devils Island (40)(:15) ‰‰‚ A Scandal in Paris TLC 37 40 183 280 (:06) Sister WivesExtreme Weight Loss A successful woman needs Chris help. What Not to WearWhat Not to Wear BerylŽ Say YesSay Yes TNT 29 54 138 245 (11:55) ‰‰‚ Tower Heist (1:57) ‰‰‚ Money Talks (97) Chris Tucker, Charlie Sheen. Law & OrderLaw & Order 3 Dawg NightŽ Charmed WitchstockŽ USA 62 55 105 242 (12:00) ‰‰ Gamer (09) Law & Order: SVUDateline On a Lonely RoadŽ Dateline On a Lonely RoadŽ CSI: Crime Scene InvestigationCSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 ElementaryElementary Miss TakenŽ ElementaryAge SpotsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramJoseph PrinceLes FeldickJoyce Meyer SUNDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 18 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Golf Arnold Palmer Invitational, Final Round. From Bay Hill Championship Course in Orlando, Fla. (N) (L) Nightly NewsLittle Big Shots CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 HollywoodTone&Lift ‰‰‰ My Girl (91) Anna Chlumsky, Macaulay Culkin. EngagementEngagementThe GoldbergsThe GoldbergsSaving Hope BreathlessŽ WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramAmerican Idol Hopefuls audition for the judges. Ridgecrest Baptist ChurchWorld NewsNews 13 5:30Amer. Funniest Home Videos METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Facts of LifeFacts of LifeDiffrent StrokeDiffrent StrokeMamas FamilyMamas FamilyThe Love BoatThe Love BoatTouched by an Ang el WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Basketball2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams TBA. (N) (L) 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament60 Minutes (N) MNT (18.2) 227 13 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramLaughsRaw Travel 50PlusPrimePositive PaulaExtra (N) The MomsHappi HouseFamily FeudFamily Feud WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Truck TechPaid ProgramNASCAR CupNASCAR Racing Monster Energy Cup Series: Auto Club 400. (N) (L) Bobs BurgersBobs Burgers WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Rick Steves Special: EuropeanAge Reversed With MirandaRetire Safe & Secure With Ed Slott 60s Pop, Rock & Soul (My Music) A&E 34 43 118 265 Black Mass ‰‰‰ The Lincoln Lawyer (11) Matthew McConaughey, Marisa Tomei. Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars AMC 30 62 131 254 (10:56) ‰‰‚ Spider-Man 3 (1:56) ‰‰ Fantastic Four (05) Ioan Gruffudd, Jessica Alba, Chris Evans. (:26) The Walking Dead HonorŽ (5:48) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 North Woods Law North Woods Law Cold CaseŽ North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law North Woods Law BET 53 46 124 329 Meet, BrownsMeet, Browns (1:58) ‰‚ A Madea Christmas (13) Tyler Perry, Kathy Najimy. (:28) Madeas Big Happy Family A dying woman gathers her family. COM 64 53 107 249 The Office The Office ‰‰‚ Horrible Bosses (11) Jason Bateman, Charlie Day, Jason Sudeikis.(:20) ‰‰ Horrible Bosses 2 (14) Jason Bateman, Charlie Day, Jason Sudeikis. DISC 36 39 182 278 Epic Homes Epic Homes High-tech homes. Epic Homes Naked and Afraid Naked and Afraid Naked and Afraid E! 63 57 114 236 (12:00) ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 (10) Sarah Jessica Parker. ‰‰‰ Pretty Woman (90) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. ‰‰‰ Pretty Woman (90) Richard Gere. ESPN 9 23 140 206 ATP Tennis BNP Paribas Open, Mens and Womens Finals. From Indian Wells, Calif. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Womens Basketball ESPN2 47 24 144 209 2018 NCAA Womens Basketball TournamentNCAA StudioCollege Basketball NIT Tournament -Oregon at Marquette. (N) NCAA StudioWomens Basketball FOOD 38 45 110 231 Worst Cooks in AmericaDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and Di vesGuys Grocery Games FREE 59 65 180 311 Chicken Little ‰‰‰ The Princess and the Frog (09) Bruno Campos (:35) ‰‰‰‰ Toy Story (95) Voices of Tom Hanks. (:35) ‰‰‰‰ Toy Story 2 (99) Tim Allen FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RaceDay (N) (L) Monster Jam (N) IMSA Racing WeatherTech Sportscar Championship: Sebring International Raceway. Drag Racing FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰ White House Down (13) Channing Tatum. Paramilitary soldiers take over the White House. ‰‰‰ Straight Outta Compton (15) OShea Jackson Jr., Corey Hawkins, Jason Mitchell. HALL 23 59 185 312 (12:00) Love, Once and AlwaysLike Cats and Dogs (17) Cassidy Gifford, Wyatt Nash. Love Blossoms (17) Shantel VanSanten, Victor Webster. The Sweetest Heart (18) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHouse HuntersBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach BargainBeach Barg ainBeach BargainBeach Bargain HIST 35 42 120 269 American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers Kingpin LIFE 56 56 108 252 A Mother Betrayed (15) Lynn Collins, Adam Kaufman. The Wrong Mother (17) Vanessa Marcil, Brooke Nevin. Mommys Little Angel (18) Amanda Clayton, Morgan Neundorf. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar Rescue Ice, Mice, BabyŽ Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Demolition ManŽ Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Punk as a DrunkŽ Bar Rescue SUN 49 422 656 P1 AquaX USA 2017 DestinationIns. LightningIns. LightningLightning Pre.NHL Hockey Edmonton Oilers at Tampa Bay Lightning. (N) (L) Lightning Post. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:10) ‰‰ Superman III (83) Christopher Reeve, Richard Pryor, Robert Vaughn.(:04) ‰‰‰‚ Superman II (80) Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman. TBS 31 15 139 247 The A-Team ‰‚ Red Dawn (12) Chris Hemsworth, Josh Peck. ‰‰‚ San Andreas (15) Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario. NCAA Basketball TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:45) ‰‰‰ A Face in the Crowd (57) Andy Griffith. ‰‰‰‰ The Philadelphia Story (40) Cary Grant. ‰‰‰ The Long, Long Trailer (54) Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz. TLC 37 40 183 280 My 600-lb Life: Skin Tight My 600-Lb. Life Junes StoryŽ My 600-Lb. Life Robert must try to save his own life. Sister Wives (N)(5:58) Sister Wives (N) TNT 29 54 138 245 (12:00) ‰‰‚ Money Talks ‰‰‚ Tower Heist (11) Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy. NCAA Tip-Off (N) (L) 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 CopsCopsCops Cops CopsCops Cops Cops Blue Bloods Blue Bloods The Extra MileŽ SUNDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV MARCH 18 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Little Big Shots (N) Genius JuniorTimeless The Darlington 500Ž NewsOutdoorsmanPerson of Interest BetaŽ Person of Interest CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Personal Effects (09) Michelle Pfeiffer, Ashton Kutcher. Family GuyFamily GuyClevelandClevelandMagma (06) Xander Berkeley, Amy Jo Johnson, Michael Durrell. WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 American Idol Hopefuls audition for the judges. (N)(:01) Deception (N) NewsLawcallHlnd Pk Bptst (:35) Branson Country USA (N) CSI: Miami METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Columbo Columbo investigates a hit and run. Touched by an AngelNight GalleryNight GalleryThe Twilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf. Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Instinct PilotŽ NCIS: Los Angeles LiabilitiesŽ Madam Secretary RefugeŽ (N) Castle Lucky StiffŽ BonesModern FamilyForensic Files MNT (18.2) 227 13 Leverage Parker gets jury duty. Rizzoli & IslesHaven ForeverŽ The X-Files GethsemaneŽ The X-Files ReduxŽ Major Crimes WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 The SimpsonsBrooklyn NineFamily Guy (N) Last ManOpen HouseBig BangBig BangBensingerAmerican Ninja WarriorDetroit MuscleEngine Power WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Magic Moments: The Best of 50s Pop Musicians perform. Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?Survival Guide for Pain-FreeBrain Secrets With Dr. Michael A&E 34 43 118 265 Storage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage WarsStorage Wars AMC 30 62 131 254 (6:53) The Walking DeadThe Walking Dead The KeyŽ(:08) Talking Dead (N)(:08) The Walking DeadComic Men (:45) The Walking Dead The KeyŽ ANPL 46 69 184 282 North Woods LawNorth Woods Law (N)(:01) Lone Star Law (N)(:04) North Woods Law (:05) Lone Star Law (12:06) Lone Star Law BET 53 46 124 329 ‰‰ Diary of a Mad Black Woman (05) Kimberly Elise, Steve Harris, Shemar Moore. MartinMartinMartinMartin (12:01) Martin(:32) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 ‰‚ Big Daddy (99) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams. ‰‚ Big Daddy (99) Adam Sandler, Joey Lauren Adams.(:05) ‰‚ Grandmas Boy (06) Doris Roberts, Allen Covert. DISC 36 39 182 278 Naked and AfraidNaked and Afraid: UncensoredNaked and Afraid (N)(:01) Naked and Afraid (:01) Naked and Afraid (12:02) Naked and Afraid E! 63 57 114 236 (5:30) ‰‰‰ Pretty Woman The Arrangement (N)(:01) The Royals (N)(:02) The Arrangement (:02) ‰‰ Sex and the City 2 (10) Sarah Jessica Parker. ESPN 9 23 140 206 Womens Basketball2018 NCAA Womens Basketball TournamentSportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Womens Basketball2018 NCAA Womens Basketball TournamentNine for IXESPN FC (N) SEC Storied FOOD 38 45 110 231 Guys Grocery Games (N) Guys Grocery Games (N) Beat BobbyBeat BobbyBeat BobbyBeat BobbyGuys Grocery GamesBeat BobbyBeat Bobby FREE 59 65 180 311 Toy Story 2 (:45) ‰‰‚ The Karate Kid (10) Jaden Smith. A Chinese master schools an American boy in the martial arts. ‰‰‚ Gnomeo & Juliet (11) Voices of James McAvoy. FS1 24 27 150 219 NHRA Drag Racing Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals. Frmula E Punta del Este. Monster JamNASCAR Racing Monster Energy Cup Series: Auto Club 400. FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰‰ Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (15) Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg. ‰‰‰ Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation (15) Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg. HALL 23 59 185 312 (6:00) The Sweetest Heart (18) When Calls the Heart (N) Meet the Peetes Lets DanceŽ Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 How CloseHow CloseCaribbean LifeCaribbean LifeIsland Life (N) Island Life (N) House HuntersHouse HuntersCaribbean LifeCaribbean LifeIsland LifeIsland Life HIST 35 42 120 269 (6:00) KingpinKingpin El Chapo created one unified cartel. (N)(:03) Kingpin The rise of gangster Whitey Bulger.(12:03) Kingpin LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Midwifes Deception (18) Katie Savoy, Penelope Mitchell.(:02) The Other Mother (17) Annie Wersching, Tyler Christopher.(:01) The Midwifes Deception (18) Katie Savoy. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Bar RescueBar RescueBar Rescue (N)(:01) Bar RescueBar RescueBar Rescue SUN 49 422 656 SportsmanFlorida SportFins & SkinsSport FishingFocused (N) SpotlightIns. LightningIns. LightningAfter Midnight With the Lightning SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‰‚ Superman: The Movie (78) Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando. Krypton (:39) Superman: Brainiac Attacks (06) Voices of Tim Daly. Superman TBS 31 15 139 247 2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams TBA. (N) (L) Inside MarchFinal SpaceFinal SpaceFinal Space TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ Madigan (68) Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda. ‰‰‰ Charley Varrick (73) Walter Matthau, Joe Don Baker. ‰‰ Spring Fever (27) William Haines, Joan Crawford. TLC 37 40 183 280 Sister Wives Confronting MeriŽ Christine confronts Meri. (N) Three Wives, One Husband (N)(:06) Sister Wives Confronting MeriŽ Christine confronts Meri. Three Wives, One Husband TNT 29 54 138 245 Basketball2018 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams TBA. (N) (L) The AlienistThe Alienist (11:55) ‰‰‚ Tower Heist USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family ‰‰ Gamer (09) Gerard Butler. WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods BlowbackŽ Blue BloodsBellevueShoot the MessengerBonesBones

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 D1 CELEBRATE FAMILY Celebrate Community is a partnership between The News Herald and local businesses to highlight the little things that make this area unique, that cause us to love it. Each Sunday in this space, well write about one of the topics important to our areas core. Email story ideas to Jan Waddy at jwaddy@pcnh.com. COMING UPThe Panama City Passion Play presented by St. Andrew Baptist Church returns to the Marina Civic Center for performances March 29-31. Admission is free; bring one canned food item to bene t the Center of Hope. Read more in Fridays Entertainer. EASTERThe free Bay County Easter Egg Hunt returns to H.G. Harders Parkat 1 p.m.Saturday, along with the Easter Bunny. Children will huntabout 7,000 hidden eggs, with special prizes for those who nd a gold or silver egg. INSIDEYou Can Help D3 Botanists Corner D3 Pets of the Week D6 Community Connections D6 Society D7 Whats Happening D8 Sunday Crossword D8 By Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Buddy Gandy's name is synonymous with seafood, and the family invites the community to celebrate that legacy during a63-year anniversary party from 4-8 p.m. Thursday at the market."It's a way of life, like a farm. It's our livelihood," Kenyon Gandy said Thursday at the market, 3004 W. U.S. 98.He and his "little brother," Buddy Gandy „ both in their 80s,retired from Buddy Gandy's Seafood in March 2017, inspiring the next generation „ Kenyon Gandy Jr. and longtime employee Rebecca "Becca" Buffing-ton „ to continue the family business.Buddy Gandy's Seafood continues to attract new and longtime custom-ers from all over the Southeast and beyond forits fresh local seafood."We're advertising from here to Atlanta,"Kenyon Gandy said. "Ask anyone on Peach Tree Street where to go for fresh seafood, and they'll say Panama City Beach, and most likely, it's Buddy Gandy's Seafood. We got a reputation."Buffington, who has worked at Buddy Gandy's for almost a decade, call the business "the heart of Panama City and St. Andrews.""She's close enough as family," Kenyon Gandy said. "She grasps the magnitude of the business, and she can run the steamer."In addition to established favorites, the new Buddy Gandy's Seafood steam bargives customers more options."We do a meal every day: a half pound of shrimp and three sides," Buffington said. "Call ahead and it will be ready, or just stop in. Sides include garlic parmesan cheese potatoes, corn on the cob, and Conecuh sausage „all made here."Buffington, a "50/50partner" with Kenyon Gandy Jr., was trained by Kenyon Gandy's wife, JoEllen, to take over as the business's accountant."My momma taught me how to survive, but JoEllen taught me how to thrive. I have two mommas," Buff-ington said. "Now I'm the mom of this place. Kenyon's the buyer and seller. He is the best fish dresser in this county. We cater to every culture. They may want the eyeballs out or the guts back."Kenyon Gandy Jr.was 11 years old when he cleaned his first professional fish."He's been here with the growth of the business and understands it from the foundation," Kenyon Gandy said. "Now he's the face around here."While some kids do chores around the house toearn alittle extra money,his sonhad more unique jobs."I used to make 50 cents for clean-ing the drains out. Before sharks got Join the Gandys, including Buddy Gandy, left, and his brother, Kenyon, for the Buddy Gandys Seafood 63rd anniversary celebrati on on Thursday afternoon at the market, 3004 W. U.S. 98. [JIM WILSON/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] A lifetime of seafood New generation continues Gandy family's business, tradition63RD ANNIVERSARY PARTYWhen: 4-8 p.m. Thursday, March 22 Where: Buddy Gandy's Seafood, 3004 W. U.S. 98, Panama City Details: 850-784-0663, Facebook.com/FRESHLOCALSFD/ or email Gandyssfd@aol.com Fresh grouper, Red Snapper, and mullet are for sale on March 15 at Buddy Gandys Seafood. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] See GANDY, D2

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** D2 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald Apalachicola Bay (Eastern Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/18 H 5:12 a.m. 1.4 L 11:37 a.m. 0.2 H 5:30 p.m. 1.3 L 11:50 p.m. 0.2 3/19 H 6:02 a.m. 1.4 L --H 5:48 p.m. 1.4 L 12:02 p.m. 0.4 3/20 H 6:57 a.m. 1.3 L 12:26 a.m. 0.1 H 6:10 p.m. 1.4 L 12:29 p.m. 0.6 3/21 H 8:00 a.m. 1.2 L 1:07 a.m. 0.0 H 6:38 p.m. 1.5 L 12:58 p.m. 0.7 3/22 H 9:15 a.m. 1.2 L 1:57 a.m. 0.0 H 7:10 p.m. 1.5 L 1:30 p.m. 0.9 3/23 H 10:51 a.m. 1.1 L 3:04 a.m. -0.1 H 7:51 p.m. 1.5 L 2:06 p.m. 1.0 3/24 H 12:56 p.m. 1.2 L 4:33 a.m. -0.1 H 8:44 p.m. 1.5 L 3:04 p.m. 1.1 3/25 H 2:25 p.m. 1.2 L 6:08 a.m. -0.1 H 10:00 p.m. 1.4 L 5:23 p.m. 1.1 3/26 H 3:05 p.m. 1.3 L 7:26 a.m. -0.1 H 11:38 p.m. 1.4 L 7:13 p.m. 1.1 3/27 H --L 8:28 a.m. -0.1 H 3:35 p.m. 1.3 L 8:22 p.m. 0.9 3/28 H 1:16 a.m. 1.4 L 9:20 a.m. -0.1 H 3:59 p.m. 1.3 L 9:14 p.m. 0.7 3/29 H 2:37 a.m. 1.4 L 10:04 a.m. 0.0 H 4:19 p.m. 1.3 L 10:00 p.m. 0.5 3/30 H 3:43 a.m. 1.4 L 10:41 a.m. 0.2 H 4:36 p.m. 1.3 L 10:42 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 4:41 a.m. 1.4 L 11:13 a.m. 0.3 H 4:51 p.m. 1.3 L 11:21 p.m. 0.2 4/1 H 5:33 a.m. 1.4 L 11:40 a.m. 0.5 H 5:06 p.m. 1.4 L 11:59 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 6:24 a.m. 1.4 L --H 5:23 p.m. 1.4 L 12:04 p.m. 0.7 4/3 H 7:15 a.m. 1.3 L 12:37 a.m. 0.0 H 5:44 p.m. 1.5 L 12:28 p.m. 0.8 4/4 H 8:09 a.m. 1.3 L 1:15 a.m. 0.0 H 6:11 p.m. 1.5 L 12:54 p.m. 0.9 4/5 H 9:09 a.m. 1.3 L 1:57 a.m. 0.0 H 6:43 p.m. 1.5 L 1:28 p.m. 1.0 4/6 H 10:18 a.m. 1.2 L 2:47 a.m. 0.0 H 7:23 p.m. 1.4 L 2:15 p.m. 1.1 4/7 H 11:33 a.m. 1.2 L 3:51 a.m. 0.1 H 8:13 p.m. 1.4 L 3:27 p.m. 1.1 4/8 H 12:42 p.m. 1.3 L 5:07 a.m. 0.1 H 9:19 p.m. 1.3 L 5:07 p.m. 1.1 4/9 H 1:35 p.m. 1.3 L 6:19 a.m. 0.2 H 10:45 p.m. 1.2 L 6:38 p.m. 1.0 4/10 H --L 7:20 a.m. 0.2 H 2:14 p.m. 1.3 L 7:44 p.m. 0.9 4/11 H 12:16 a.m. 1.2 L 8:11 a.m. 0.2 H 2:45 p.m. 1.4 L 8:34 p.m. 0.8 4/12 H 1:36 a.m. 1.3 L 8:53 a.m. 0.2 H 3:10 p.m. 1.4 L 9:16 p.m. 0.6 4/13 H 2:42 a.m. 1.3 L 9:30 a.m. 0.3 H 3:31 p.m. 1.4 L 9:52 p.m. 0.4 4/14 H 3:40 a.m. 1.4 L 10:03 a.m. 0.4 H 3:48 p.m. 1.4 L 10:26 p.m. 0.3Following are hour/minute adjustments to compute tide times at other locations: Sikes cut: high tide 1:11 earlier, low tide 1:12 earlier; West Pass: high tide and low tide :27 earlier; Carrabelle: high tide 1:25 earlier, low tide 2:13 earlier. Tid e c h artsForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather Inc. 2018 Panama City at St. Andrews Pass (Central Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/18 H 11:50 a.m. 0.5 L 6:07 a.m. 0.3 H --L 5:54 p.m. 0.3 3/19 H 12:54 a.m. 0.6 L 5:27 a.m. 0.5 H 11:39 a.m. 0.7 L 7:23 p.m. 0.1 3/20 H 11:50 a.m. 0.9 L --H --L 8:50 p.m. 0.0 3/21 H --L --H 12:18 p.m. 1.1 L 10:23 p.m. -0.1 3/22 H --L --H 1:02 p.m. 1.2 L --3/23 H --L 12:00 a.m. -0.2 H 1:59 p.m. 1.3 L --3/24 H --L 1:28 a.m. -0.3 H 3:09 p.m. 1.3 L --3/25 H --L 2:42 a.m. -0.4 H 4:28 p.m. 1.4 L --3/26 H --L 3:43 a.m. -0.4 H 5:51 p.m. 1.3 L --3/27 H --L 4:33 a.m. -0.3 H 7:11 p.m. 1.3 L --3/28 H --L 5:12 a.m. -0.2 H 8:26 p.m. 1.1 L --3/29 H --L 5:37 a.m. 0.0 H 9:42 p.m. 1.0 L --3/30 H 11:37 a.m. 0.5 L 5:41 a.m. 0.3 H 11:07 p.m. 0.8 L 3:46 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 10:46 a.m. 0.7 L 5:14 a.m. 0.5 H --L 5:38 p.m. 0.3 4/1 H 1:10 a.m. 0.6 L 3:48 a.m. 0.5 H 10:39 a.m. 0.9 L 7:00 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 10:52 a.m. 1.1 L --H --L 8:10 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H 11:16 a.m. 1.2 L --H --L 9:18 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H 11:47 a.m. 1.3 L --H --L 10:28 p.m. -0.1 4/5 H --L --H 12:25 p.m. 1.3 L 11:41 p.m. -0.1 4/6 H --L --H 1:09 p.m. 1.3 L --4/7 H --L 12:52 a.m. -0.1 H 2:02 p.m. 1.2 L --4/8 H --L 1:52 a.m. -0.1 H 3:04 p.m. 1.2 L --4/9 H --L 2:40 a.m. -0.1 H 4:14 p.m. 1.2 L --4/10 H --L 3:17 a.m. 0.0 H 5:30 p.m. 1.1 L --4/11 H --L 3:45 a.m. 0.0 H 6:48 p.m. 1.0 L --4/12 H --L 4:03 a.m. 0.2 H 8:10 p.m. 0.9 L --4/13 H 11:08 a.m. 0.6 L 4:10 a.m. 0.3 H 9:40 p.m. 0.8 L 3:16 p.m. 0.5 4/14 H 10:15 a.m. 0.7 L 4:02 a.m. 0.5 H 11:33 p.m. 0.7 L 4:44 p.m. 0.4Following are hour/minute adjustments to compute tide times at other locations: Parker: high tide 1:33 later, low tide 2:12 later; Laird Bayou: high tide 1:11 later, low tide :45 later; Downtown Panama City: high tide :42 later, low tide :30 later; Lynn Haven: high tide 1:08 later, low tide :40 later; Panama City Beach: high tide :38 earlier, low tide :54 earlier. East PassDestin (Central Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/18 H 12:29 a.m. 0.3 L 7:23 a.m. 0.1 H 12:56 p.m. 0.2 L 7:10 p.m. 0.1 3/19 H 2:00 a.m. 0.3 L 6:43 a.m. 0.2 H 12:45 p.m. 0.3 L 8:39 p.m. 0.0 3/20 H --L --H 12:56 p.m. 0.4 L 10:06 p.m. 0.0 3/21 H --L --H 1:24 p.m. 0.5 L 11:39 p.m. 0.0 3/22 H --L --H 2:08 p.m. 0.6 L --3/23 H --L 1:16 a.m. -0.1 H 3:05 p.m. 0.6 L --3/24 H --L 2:44 a.m. -0.1 H 4:15 p.m. 0.6 L --3/25 H --L 3:58 a.m. -0.1 H 5:34 p.m. 0.7 L --3/26 H --L 4:59 a.m. -0.1 H 6:57 p.m. 0.6 L --3/27 H --L 5:49 a.m. -0.1 H 8:17 p.m. 0.6 L --3/28 H --L 6:28 a.m. -0.1 H 9:32 p.m. 0.5 L --3/29 H --L 6:53 a.m. 0.0 H 10:48 p.m. 0.5 L --3/30 H --L 6:57 a.m. 0.1 H 12:43 p.m. 0.2 L 5:02 p.m. 0.1 3/31 H 12:13 a.m. 0.4 L 6:30 a.m. 0.2 H 11:52 a.m. 0.3 L 6:54 p.m. 0.1 4/1 H 2:16 a.m. 0.3 L 5:04 a.m. 0.2 H 11:45 a.m. 0.4 L 8:16 p.m. 0.0 4/2 H 11:58 a.m. 0.5 L --H --L 9:26 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H --L --H 12:22 p.m. 0.6 L 10:34 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H --L --H 12:53 p.m. 0.6 L 11:44 p.m. 0.0 4/5 H --L --H 1:31 p.m. 0.6 L --4/6 H --L 12:57 a.m. 0.0 H 2:15 p.m. 0.6 L --4/7 H --L 2:08 a.m. 0.0 H 3:08 p.m. 0.6 L --4/8 H --L 3:08 a.m. 0.0 H 4:10 p.m. 0.6 L --4/9 H --L 3:56 a.m. 0.0 H 5:20 p.m. 0.6 L --4/10 H --L 4:33 a.m. 0.0 H 6:36 p.m. 0.5 L --4/11 H --L 5:01 a.m. 0.0 H 7:54 p.m. 0.5 L --4/12 H --L 5:19 a.m. 0.1 H 9:16 p.m. 0.4 L --4/13 H 12:14 p.m. 0.3 L 5:26 a.m. 0.1 H 10:46 p.m. 0.4 L 4:32 p.m. 0.2 4/14 H 11:21 a.m. 0.3 L 5:18 a.m. 0.2 H --L 6:00 p.m. 0.1 Port St. Joe (Eastern Time)DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.DAY TIDE TIME FT. TIDE TIME FT.H=High Tide, L=Low Tide 3/18 H --L 6:12 a.m. 0.3 H 12:23 p.m. 0.6 L 5:59 p.m. 0.3 3/19 H 1:27 a.m. 0.7 L 5:32 a.m. 0.6 H 12:12 p.m. 0.8 L 7:28 p.m. 0.1 3/20 H --L --H 12:23 p.m. 1.0 L 8:55 p.m. 0.0 3/21 H --L --H 12:51 p.m. 1.2 L 10:28 p.m. -0.1 3/22 H --L --H 1:35 p.m. 1.3 L --3/23 H --L 12:05 a.m. -0.2 H 2:32 p.m. 1.4 L --3/24 H --L 1:33 a.m. -0.3 H 3:42 p.m. 1.4 L --3/25 H --L 2:47 a.m. -0.4 H 5:01 p.m. 1.6 L --3/26 H --L 3:48 a.m. -0.4 H 6:24 p.m. 1.4 L --3/27 H --L 4:38 a.m. -0.3 H 7:44 p.m. 1.4 L --3/28 H --L 5:17 a.m. -0.2 H 8:59 p.m. 1.2 L --3/29 H --L 5:42 a.m. 0.0 H 10:15 p.m. 1.1 L --3/30 H 12:10 p.m. 0.6 L 5:46 a.m. 0.3 H 11:40 p.m. 0.9 L 3:51 p.m. 0.4 3/31 H 11:19 a.m. 0.8 L 5:19 a.m. 0.6 H --L 5:43 p.m. 0.3 4/1 H 1:43 a.m. 0.7 L 3:53 a.m. 0.6 H 11:12 a.m. 1.0 L 7:05 p.m. 0.1 4/2 H 11:25 a.m. 1.2 L --H --L 8:15 p.m. 0.0 4/3 H 11:49 a.m. 1.3 L --H --L 9:23 p.m. 0.0 4/4 H --L --H 12:20 p.m. 1.4 L 10:33 p.m. -0.1 4/5 H --L --H 12:58 p.m. 1.4 L 11:46 p.m. -0.1 4/6 H --L --H 1:42 p.m. 1.4 L --4/7 H --L 12:57 a.m. -0.1 H 2:35 p.m. 1.3 L --4/8 H --L 1:57 a.m. -0.1 H 3:37 p.m. 1.3 L --4/9 H --L 2:45 a.m. -0.1 H 4:47 p.m. 1.3 L --4/10 H --L 3:22 a.m. 0.0 H 6:03 p.m. 1.2 L --4/11 H --L 3:50 a.m. 0.0 H 7:21 p.m. 1.1 L --4/12 H --L 4:08 a.m. 0.2 H 8:43 p.m. 1.0 L --4/13 H 11:41 a.m. 0.7 L 4:15 a.m. 0.3 H 10:13 p.m. 0.9 L 3:21 p.m. 0.6 4/14 H 10:48 a.m. 0.8 L 4:07 a.m. 0.6 H --L 4:49 p.m. 0.4 regulated, we used to lay fins on the roof and dry them out," said Kenyon Gandy Jr., 37, adding, "My dad's the one that named him 'Buddy.'" Gandys' legacyKenyon Gandy and Kenneth "Buddy" Gandy, just 15 months apart, were born to Melvin Gandy and Eunice Gandy in the 1930s."Most thought we were twins, because of how my mom named us," said Kenyon Gandy,who recalledmeeting his little brother for the first time."After my mom had him and I went to see him, they said it took me along time walking up the stairs, and I said, 'I'm going to see my littlebuddy. ... They said it was natural to say 'Buddy' after that."The Gandys have a history of adapting „the brotherstraded hunting for fishing in their youth, and their Dad, Melvin, went from selling pro-duce to running fish."We came here from Thomasville, Ga., in September 1948," said Kenyon Gandy, who first attended St. Andrew School in seventh grade. "We began to learn the area, live here going to school, doing paper routes, got to know the community. We played in the water, went crabbing, fishing, learning to throw cast nets like juveniles will do. My daddy became a truck driver for a fish com-pany, driving to New York, Texas, Chicago, wherever the trip would lead."In 1953, Kenyon Gandy drove the truck to become acquainted with the market system."I was still in school when I purchased the market at the end of 11th Street, a little metal building," he said.The11th Street Fish Market opened under Gandy and Sons in 1954. "It was a one-man oper-ation," said Kenyon Gandy, whose brother came on board two years later.Buddy Gandy had been working as a butcher atthe A&Psupermarket on Fifth Street, but with a growing family, was looking for something a little more prosperous."I told him I had a shrimp boat selling shrimp to me. He got on the shrimp boat and started decking, working on the boat while the captain drove the boat,culling out the shrimpandicing them down," Kenyon Gandy said. "Weweredoing good in St. Andrews."The St. Andrews pier closed in 1957. "The city built the mari-nas and gave notice to move," Kenyon Gandy recalled. "Boats had no place to dock in town."Herbert Sapp hired Melvin Gandy and his sons to built a dock on his property off Thomas Drive on the Grand Lagoon. Theyworked for three months building a "very primitive" dock on the corner of what became Treasure Island Marina.The brothersthen built a fish house before Sapp contracted out to have the rest of the dock completed."When the marina was built, we began to ice boats and sell bait. Party boats were served with bait, ice and fish cleaning and stor-age; we had exclusive rights to that," Kenyon Gandy said. "It was astreamlined fish cleaning service. We wouldweigh, service and store the fish for three days, ice and pack and dress it like they wanted it to be. If theydidn't catch any fish, they couldcome back and buy some. If they didn't want it, they could sell it. We had a supply of fish; got us established. It worked out to be a unique service at the time."Fishcould bedressed in a variety of different ways."They were drawn, or left whole. We called it gutting but that di dn't sound good to the public," Kenyon Gandy said. "There was scaling, cutting the head off and the filet, complete cleaning of the fish."By 1960, they were buying two-thirds of all the ice produced at the St. Andrews ice plant, located where Capt.'s Table parking lot currently sits. The ice plant owner was ready to retire, so he taught the Gandys how to runthe plantand financed the deal."We sold cocktail ice to restaurants and the white ice to shrimp and fishing boats," said Kenyon Gandy, who was operating the 11th Street Market and ice plant with his dad, while Buddy Gandy primarily oversaw operations at the Grand Lagoon.But the invention of new ice makers put the ice plant out of business by 1982. The property was sold, but Buddy Gandy bought and opened the current location on U.S. 98 in 1983 as Buddy Gandy's Seafood."This place here was a car wash. I still was ped-dling shrimp on the road when he opened up. It grew faster than I thought it would," said Kenyon Gandy, who came in as an employee when the business got established. "There's a lot to be said about the business. We have a natural resource, and it's an unlimited natural resource. The fed-eral government decided it wanted to manage it. They decided to put size limits on the fish, only puts burden on so many with regulations."Though wholesale busi-ness has gone down over the years, Buddy Gandy's Seafood still thrives with its retail business „ still serving and dressing fresh fishfor the customer while they wait. Buddy Gandy's Seafood has even extended store hours from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily from March to September, "opening on Sundays for locals," Buffington said."Bay County is depen-dent on fishermen whether they know it or not, like peanuts in Alabama," Kenyon Gandy said. "We serve up the fish just as fresh as when it came out of the water."Kenyon Gandy Jr. added, "Ninety-five per-centof fish on our case come wild call. We have boats, do business with others „ Waterstreet, Tarpon Dock and Harbor Docks in Destin, ship fish from Miami."On March 15, the new ice-filled display was packed with fresh shrimp, red snapper, grouper, mullet, oysters, crawfish."It looks like a boat, so when you walk in, it's like you're buying fresh off a boat," Buffington said.Customers also can pick out their crawfish from the live well, bag fresh crabs.On Thursday,customers cansample dips „ tuna, salmon and crab „ as well as enjoy finger foods, while livemusic is performed by Black and Tan (Jamah Terry and Sean Flood)."Chase Landry from 'Swamp People' will cook crawfish in the parking lot. We plan to steam a bunch of shrimp," said Buffington, who is having anniversary shirts made for this week'socca-sion."We want people to know this is the one and only Buddy Gandy's Sea-food. We clean crabs, we clean shrimp, we pack, we ship next day U.S. Air; we're not just a seafood market." GANDYFrom Page D1Owners Kenyon Gandy Jr. and Rebecca Buf“ ngton have given the inside of Buddy Gandys Seafood a new look with a boat display. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Buddy Gandy opened Buddy Gandys Seafood at its current location in 1983, but its roots go back to the 11th Street Market operated by Gandy and Sons. [JAN WADDY/ THE NEWS HERALD] Craw“ sh is available live or on the iced display. Join Chase Landry of The History Channels Swamp People at Buddy Gandys Seafood on Thursday for a craw“ sh boil in the parking lot. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 D3 LA TIMES CROSSWORD ANSWERSSubmit your agency's needs to pcnhnews@ pcnh.com with "You Can Help" in the subject line.Family Service Agency Family Service Agency of Bay County, a 501c3 nonpro“ t charity af“ liated with United Way of Northwest Florida, is at 114 E. Ninth St., Panama City. All donations are tax-deductible and are given to those in need for free. Donations can be delivered to the agency's of“ ce from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The agency is closed on Fridays and all holidays. For more information, call 850-785-1721, email FamilyServiceAgency@comcast.net, “ nd Family Service Agency of Bay County on Facebook, or visit www.FamilyServiceAgencyPC.org. The agency is in need of mens clothing, mens steel-toed work boots and black non-slip restaurant/kitchen-type shoes for work (sizes 10-13). Newborn to 3-month-old clothing is very low, and there is an overabundance of womens and childrens casual clothing and shoes. FOOD ROOM NEEDS: For food boxes, canned stew, chicken and dumplings, chili, and gravy/broth, coffee (tubes or small jars of instant) and drink packets that make 2 quarts are needed. New/gently used backpacks (not pink please; agency has an abundance of pink ones), manual can-openers, and plastic bowls and plates also are needed. HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: Dryer sheets, brooms, mops, mop buckets (Tidy Cat kitty litter empty yellow buckets are great for mop buckets, if anyone can donate them), white 13 gallon trash bags, and black 30/39 gallon trash bags. WOMEN'S HYGIENE SUPPLIES: womens deodorant and tampons/pads INFANT NEEDS: baby diapers (sizes newborn, 1 and 5), diaper cream, and baby lotion. The baby room and medical program are both in need of baby monitors. PERSONAL HYGIENE (TRAVEL/HOTEL SIZES): Travel/sample-sized shampoos, conditioners, soaps, toothpastes, and lotions are needed to create hygiene kits in quart storage bags and put them out for homeless clients to take one when they are in the agency's lobby. Storage bags (all sizes) and trash bags are also always appreciated. INCONTINENCE PROGRAM: Adult wipes/bathing cloths and A&D cream/ointment. DIABETIC PROGRAM: Diabetic testing meters, unexpired diabetic test strips, alcohol wipes, and pen tip needles; no lancets please. The agency does not supply or have funding to purchase insulin medication. WOUND CARE SUPPLIES: Band-Aids, gauze rolls, 4x4 gauze, 3x4 Telfa, and triple antibiotic cream.YOU CAN HELPPANAMA CITY „ The picture for this week is a form of Indian hawthorn called Majestic Beauty. This plant is easy to grow and has huge clusters of fragrant, pearl-pink flowers. Majestic Beautymay be used as a background shrub, screen, or small tree and reaches a height of 20-25 feetand widthof 8-10 feet. It does best in full sun or partial shade. Two other varieties are Snow White and Ballerina. Ballerina is a dwarf form with dark pink flowers. Each variety does well with minimum care. One of the best examples of Majestic Beauty is at the drive-through area at Tyndall Federal Credit Union near 23rd Street. Another example may be seen at Innovations Federal Credit Union off 23rd Street. New growth, prep Cleyera japonica is another plant starting to put on new growth this month. One is located at the northeast corner of Dr. James Mullins' office off 11th Street. Cleyera is the name of a Dutch botanist. This plant has white flowers that are fragrant and inchacross., and it is tolerant of shade. Protect foliage from scale insects. In the nursery last week, I saw a new variety of Gardenia, Veitchii, that grows 2-4 feethigh and 2-3 feetwide. Attention: check for 'Bee Hazard' warnings and pollinator warnings on pesticide labels before application. A dwarf form is also available called G. radicans enano. This plant grows 2-3 feethigh and 3-4 feetwide, and itdoes best in full sun or partial shade. These plants are the most fragrant of all flowering shrubs. They also are excellent as a container plant. Due to their intoxicating scent, plant them near windows, home foundations, and patios. In the warmer months, you may float the blooms in a water bowl, so you and your guests may enjoy their perfume. Now is a great time for prepping your beds for planting. Set out collards, broccoli, kale, English peas, and spinach. This also is a good time to divide daylilies and aga panthus. Howard C. Gray is a horticulturalist and former agent with the University of Florida Extension Office.BOTANIST'S CORNERMajestic Beauty lives up to its name Howard GrayMajestic Beauty is a form of Indian hawthorn. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** D4 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 D5

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** D6 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldBay County Community Connections Community Connections publishes regular meetings of clubs, groups and organizations with particular interests. Submit information to pcnhnews@pcnh. com with Community ConnectionsŽ in the subject line. Announcements are published as space allows.SPECIAL INTEREST ACLU Greater Bay Area Chapter: 6:30 p.m. second Mondays at Sonnys BBQ, 2240 State 77, Lynn Haven, in the back meeting room. Details, 850-763-8145 A.D. Harris Improvement Society Inc.: Board meeting 5:30-6:30 p.m. third Thursdays in A. D. Harris Learning Village Cafetorium, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. Axis Writing Lab: 3-5 p.m. Mondays with appointment made. Details, 850-215-4812 Bay County Audubon Society: 7 p.m. second Mondays at the Science and Discovery Center, 308 Airport Road, Panama City. The public is invited. A program and refreshments are provided. The society also hosts Saturday “ eld trips. For details, 850-871-1736 or BayCountyAudubon.org Bay County Chapter Military Officers Association: 11 a.m. “ rst Fridays at Holiday Inn Select, 2001 State 77, Panama City. Lunch and speaker program. Non-members welcome. For details, 850-233-7697, 850-763-7600, or email John.Law@knology.net or matt4626@comcast.net Bay County Genealogical Society: 1-2 p.m. third Saturdays at Bay County Public Library meeting room. Programs are designed for those with all levels of experience and interest in tracing their family tree and genealogy. Spring and Fall seminars are also sponsored with guest speakers. For details, Marqua Brunette, 850-769-9034 or northwest” oridagenealogy.com/ bcgs/index Bay County History Museum: 133 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Open 10 a.m. to 1 p.m Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. For details, 850-818-0964 Bay County Retired Educators: 10 a.m. the fourth Mondays at the Nelson Building. Lunch is at 11:30 a.m.; $8, reservations required. For details and reservations, 850-625-6778 Bay County Stamp Club: 7 p.m. “ rst and third Thursdays at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 3007 W. 14th St., Panama City. For details, Walt, 850-7841214 or walt.baldwin5002@ gmail.com Bay Storytellers: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays at Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Story listeners, tellers and lovers welcome. Details, 850-871-0165 Beach Art Group: Individual, family and artists pro memberships available. Details, www.beachartgroup.com Callaway Historical Society: 3 p.m. third Sundays at the Ettie Fox Memorial Museum on Beulah Avenue. Details, 850-871-0522 CASA (Christians Against Substance Abuse): 6 p.m. Wednesdays at Gulf Beach Baptist Church, Room 200, in the Annex. Coalition to Prevent Underage Drinking: 3:30 p.m. third Mondays at Bay County Public Library. For details, 850-872-4455, ext. 1150 or www.baycountyhealth.org/alcohol.html Community Associations Institute Panama City Chapter: noon third Thursdays at the Edgewater Beach Conference Center. For details, Stephanie Larabee, 850-502-7199 Emerald Coast Corvette Club: 6:30 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays at Holiday Inn Select on State 77. Buffet dinner 5:30 p.m.; cost $13 per person. For details, Frank VanDevander, FVander@ Knology.net, 850-866-3199 or emeraldcoastcorvetteclub.com Emerald Coast Woodturning Guild: 8:30 a.m. to noon second Saturdays at at the Freeport Community Center, 16040 Business Highway 331, Freeport. Any woodturners or anyone interested in learning to turn wood on a lathe is encouraged to join. For details, Earnest Nettles, 850-585-6064 or Bill Cunningham, 850-496-2032 Florida Trail Association, Panhandle Chapter: 6:30 p.m. “ rst Mondays at the Science and Discovery Center, 308 Airport Road, Panama City. For details, panhandlefta@gmail.com German-American Club of Bay County: 7 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays at Colony Club on Back Beach Road. For details, Len Pahl, 850-2343441 or lenpahl@aol.com Gulf Coast Chief Petty Officers Association: 4 p.m. third Thursdays at the FRA, 2117 Wilkinson St., Panama City Beach. For details, 850-628-3384 or 850-234-6236 Gulf Coast Shell Club: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays at Lake Huntington clubhouse. For details, gulfcoastshellclub.weebly. com or 850-763-2182 Historical Society of Bay County: 7 p.m. fourth Mondays at the Bay County Public Library. For details, Glenda Walters, 850-832-0840 Homeless and Hunger Coalition of Northwest Florida: 10:30 a.m. second Wednesdays at Grace Presbyterian Church. For details, www.nw” oridahomeless.org Loyal to Local Cash Mob: 10:30 a.m. third Thursdays. For details, L2LBayCounty. com or 850-215-7667 Lynn Haven Heritage Society: 7 p.m. “ rst Thursdays at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. All are welcome. For details, 850-248-1106 Meditation & Chi Training Class: 6:15-7:15 p.m. Monday and Thursday nights at The Zen Center, 3901 Hwy W 390, with Brother Monk Dorje Jangbu Bodhisattva. For details, 850-248-8997 or 850-248-0999 Metal Detector Club: Panhandle Research and Recovery Club: 7 p.m. second Saturdays at Gulf Beach Baptist Church. For details, Jack Dee, 850-271-8572 New Toastmasters Club: meets 5:30-6:30 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays at Saint Andrew United Methodist Church, 2001 W. 11th St. North Florida Landlords Association: 11:30 a.m. last Thursdays at Luigi BG Pasta & Pizza, 2105 State 77, Panama City. For details, Jane Simmons, 850-896-2065 or “ nd North Florida Landlords Association on Facebook Odd Fellows (Scarlett Lodge), IOOF, of Lynn Haven: 6:30 p.m. “ rst and third Mondays at Roberts Hall on Florida Avenue in Lynn Haven. For details, 850-265-6852 Panama City Amateur Radio Club: 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 130 Church St. in Millville. For details, www. w4ryz.org Panama City Dive Club: 6:30 p.m. “ rst Thursdays in the Hancock Bank community room, behind TGI Fridays, 1022 W 23rd Street, Panama City. In addition to regular monthly dives, the club schedules swap meets, cookouts and annual dive trips to the Caribbean. Come join us and make some new dive buddies. For details, PCDiveClub. com Panama City Gem and Mineral Society: 7 p.m. third Thursdays through May at the Joe Moody Park Clubhouse off Ninth Street between Sherman and East Avenue. Details, 850-871-1846 Panama City Parrot Head Club: Second Fridays at Runaway Island, 14521 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach, and informal phlockings on fourth Fridays at sites to be determined. For details, PanamaCityPHC.org Panama City Publishing Museum: Open 1-5:30 p.m. Tuesdays thru Fridays. Museum and visitors center in the heart of St. Andrews hosts a walking tour at 2:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. Panama City Ski & T ravel Club: 6 p.m. third Fridays at Uncle Ernie's, 1151 Bayview Ave., Panama City. Learn about the clubs upcoming trips and how to participate. RSVP to Mark, 850-832-1164 or mdlencke1@gmail.com Panama City Toastmasters: 6 p.m. second and fourth Tuesdays at Unity Church, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Learn leadership and speaking excellence in a fun, friendly and supportive environment. For details, panamacitytoastmasters@gmail.com Panama City York Rite: 7 p.m. fourth Mondays at Acme Lodge. For details, Richard Foreman, 850-265-9915 Panama City Writers Association: 6:30 p.m. “ rst and third Tuesdays at St. Andrews Civic Club, 2629 W. 10th St., Panama City. All genres. Details, www. panamacitywriters.org Panhandle Christian Singles: 5:30 p.m. “ rst and third Saturdays at different restaurants. For details, Sara at 850-276-3898 or Nell at 850-769-5010 Panhandle Gator Club, PGC: 6 p.m. second Tuesdays at Sonnys Bar-B-Q. Panhandle Writers Guild: 1-3 p.m. third Tuesdays at Bay County Library. For details, contact Wanda Goodwin, 850-624-8081 or PWGConnections.net. Second Chance of Northwest Florida: 6 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays at AD Harris Learning Village, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. Details, 850-769-7779 Silver Sands Coin Club: 7 p.m. third Tuesdays at Palo Alto Church of Christ fellowship hall, 3119 US 231, Panama City. For details, Jerry, 850-265-6120 or JerryJ@hotmail.com Sons of the American Revolution: 11:30 a.m. third Mondays at PoFolks, 989 W. 15th St. in Panama City. Details at sarpclf@gmail. com Sons of Confederate Veterans: 6:30 p.m. “ rst Tuesdays at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave. in Lynn Haven. For details, Norman Fowler, 850-265-2096. Spanish Speaking Christian Meetings At Home: 7 p.m. Mondays Panama City Beach. Details, 850-708-2407 SPARE Suicide Prevention Coalition: 3 p.m. “ rst Mondays at Life Management Centers Children Services, Room 205, 525 E. 15th St., Panama City. The SPARE group is a local nonpro“ t seeking to educate the community about suicide to prevent suicides. For details, visit their Facebook page at facebook. com/sparenw” or email nw” SPARE@gmail.com St. Andrew Bay Quilters Guild: 9:30 a.m. third Wednesdays, 7 p.m. third Thursdays at St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 1608 Baker Court, Panama City. For details: sabqg.org US Submarine Veterans Inc Seawolf Base membership meetings: at 2 p.m. third Saturdays in odd-numbered months at American Legion Post 392, 535 Oak Ave, Panama City. Family and friends luncheons at noon third Saturdays in even-numbered months. For details, John Schmitz, 256-508-8250. TelecomPioneers: noon last Thursdays at The Place Downtown, 429 Harrison Ave., Panama City. For details, cb4960@att.com Tupelo Beekeepers Association: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays at the UF/IFAS Bay County Extension Of“ ce, 2728 E. 14th St., Panama City. For details, Reno Plenge, 850-722-8496COMMUNITY CONNECTIONSLizzy,a 4-month-old beagle mix, is spayed and ready for a home. She isa sweet cuddler and wants to play with people and other dogs. Lizzy may be a little timid, but she is comfortable sleeping in her crate, barks minimally, and gives great kisses. If you can give her a loving home, please complete the adoption application on theluckypuppy.org, email tmmattson@aol.com, or text/call 850-814-6500.LUCKY PUPPY OF THE WEEK: 'LIZZY'Archer is housebroken and well behaved, especially when going for walks. He knows all kinds of tricks and is happy to learn new ones for treats. Archer is a 7-year-old brown and white Catahoula mix. He is heartworm negative, up to date on shots, microchipped andneutered. His adoption costis $25. Meet him at Bay County Animal Service, 6401 Bay Line Drive, Panama City or call 850-767-3333.BAY COUNTY PET OF THE WEEK: 'ARCHER'Archer is available from Bay County Animal Service. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Lizzy is available from Lucky Puppy Rescue. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 D7Today1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-68682 DEATH AND TAXESŽ: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 850-265-3226 or kt-online.orgMonday3 FROM PLEISTOCEN TO PRESENT: 1-3 p.m. at the Native Spirit Museum and Gallery, 1101 Beck Ave., Panama City, as part of Anthropology Week. Tom Detrick, co-curator of Native Spirit Museum and Gallery, will take you back to the Ice Age. Learn about the prehistoric animals that roamed the savanna and the humans who hunted them to survive. Details: 890-99054 ReadLOCAL INDIE AUTHOR REST: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Meet authors from across the Panhandle, including Tony Simmons and Jayson Kretzer of The Syndicate, Mark Douglas, S. Usher Evans, Douglas Wells, John Gibson, Craig Bush, T.S. Barnett, Megan Mitchum and Michelle Kay. Free; open to the public. Author talks will be 5:45-6:45 p.m., then visit authors booths until 8 p.m.; books available for sale. Details: NWRLS. com or 850-522-21205 PANAMA CITY BOP & SHAG: 6:30-9 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City, with dinner, dance and fun (East/West Coast swing, Latin, ballroom). Admission $3. PICTURE PERFECT GO AND DOWe want your photos: Post your photos to the Daily News Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to dstone@nwfdailynews.com.READER FEEDBACK CELEBRATE COMMUNITYLaura Vario sent us this photo and said that its a nice warm day!Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] DEAR ABBY: I'm a disabled middle-aged woman, married for 15 years. From the beginning, there was never much passion between my husband and me, but we're friends. I'm now becoming less able to go out and do things, and I will eventually be wheelchairbound. I want to leave him so he can find someone who is able to do things with him. I actually did it at one point. I moved into a cheap mobile home, but he sold the house and followed me. He's a loving husband, but he is messy. I exhaust myself picking up after him, and two months after moving into another house, the entire garage and basement cannot be walked through. I really think what I want is to live alone in a simple, clean apartment. He -and others -tell me I need him and I'm nuts to live alone on Social Security when I could stay in this nice house. I'm just so tired all the time, and cleaning up after him is torture physically. Should I stay or should I go? -EXHAUSTED IN NEW HAMPSHIREDEAR EXHAUSTED: Although you didn't say it directly, your messy husband may be a hoarder. If that's the case, whether you stay or live elsewhere may depend upon his getting help for it -not to mention getting the garage and basement cleared out. Obviously, your husband loves you or he wouldn't have followed you when you moved into the mobile home. Do not divorce him because you feel guilty about not being well. He may need you as much as you need him. If picking up after him is too tiring, then it may be time to get someone in periodically to clean. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.DEAR ABBYDisabled wife is overwhelmed by husband's messy habits Jeanne PhillipsHunter Hancock shared this photo in the Panama City Fishing Facebook group and said, Breaking the new setup in.Ž [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] CATCH OF THE DAYWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. Invasive iguanas tearing across properties and destroying local infrastructure have been put on notice by a team of marine biologists from the University of Florida, deputized by the state to kill them using methods as humane as possible. Marie Lalas: "Wow!!! Not cool at all!!! Live trap them and let the wildlife put them to sleep! Banging them upside their little heads is just inhumane!!" Springfield resident Annie Barrier asked for 90 cards for her 90th birthday. Spoiler alert! She received a lot more and is decorating her house with them. Happy Birthday, Annie! Patsy Lewis: "My husband worked with her in the Spring“ eld Police Department. She is a sweet and great lady." Lisa Richard Williams: "My grandparents live a few houses down from Mrs Ann. And have both lived in the same houses for 30 years. Mrs. Ann is such a beautiful soul. I miss seeing her walk the neighborhood in the evenings." Maxine Ramsey: "A very sweet lady." At Oscar Patterson Elementary, Principal Darnita Rivers said its tough to expect students to perform in a classroom where they cant see and where they arent warm or dont feel welcome. Welch Lorenz: "But yet the powers that be can spend millions on a non essential sports complex (Tommy Oliver Stadium) while children sit in buildings that are virtually inhabitable. I have a problem with this my friends and you should too. What is more important? A non essential sports complex or the environment in which children have to endure? All buildings should come “ rst were children attend then a non essential sports complex." Serena Rivera: "My issue with all of this is, it's too little too late. Now that they are under “ re and being threatened to close, they're willing to work hard on making changes. Maybe they should have done this BEFORE things got to this point. If the effort was put forth earlier there's a good chance they wouldn't be failing." Jay Wright: "Has voiced concern to the appropriate authorities? How much of this does she any control over?" Composer John Kander is 91. Country singer Charley Pride is 84. Nobel peace laureate and former South African president F.W. de Klerk is 82. Actor Kevin Dobson is 75. Jazz musician Bill Frisell is 67. Singer Irene Cara is 59. Movie writer-director Luc Besson is 59. TV personality Mike Rowe is 56. Singer-actress Vanessa L. Williams is 55. To submit birthdays, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with birthdayŽ in the subject line, or drop off a current photo and “ ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. The deadline is noon three business days prior to the birthday. Birthday announcements must include the persons “ rst and last name, city and age. The photo is a mug shot and must be a clear photo.BIRTHDAYS Leah Regah Grade 3 Tyndall Elementary SchoolYOUNG ARTIST Leah Today is Sunday, March 18 the 77th day of 2018. There are 288 days left in the year. Highlight in History: On March 18, 1963 the U.S. Supreme Court, in Gideon v. Wainwright from Bay County, ruled unanimously that state courts were required to provide legal counsel to criminal defendants who could not afford to hire an attorney. On this date: In 1766 Britain repealed the Stamp Act of 1765. In 1837 the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, G rover Cleveland, was born in Caldwell, New Jersey. In 1925 the Tri-State Tornado struck southeastern Missouri, southern Illinois and southwestern Indiana, resulting in some 700 deaths. In 1937 in Americas worst school disaster, almost 300 people, most of them children, were killed in a natural gas explosion at the New London Consolidated School in Rusk County, Texas. In 1938 Mexican President Lazaro Cardenas nationalized his countrys petroleum reserves and took control of foreign-owned oil facilities. In 1940 Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met at the Brenner Pass, where the Italian dictator agreed to join Germanys war against France and Britain. In 1959 President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Hawaii statehood bill. (Hawaii became a state on Aug. 21, 1959.) In 1962 France and Algerian rebels signed the Evian Accords, a cease-“ re agreement which took effect the next day, ending the Algerian War. In 1965 the “ rst spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov went outside his Voskhod 2 capsule, secured by a tether. In 1974 most of the Arab oilproducing nations ended their 5-month-old embargo against the United States that had been sparked by American support for Israel in the Yom Kippur War. In 1980 Frank Gotti, the 12-yearold son of mobster John Gotti, was struck and killed by a car driven by John Favara, a neighbor in Queens, New York. (The following July, Favara vanished, the apparent victim of a gang hit.) In 1990 thieves made off with 13 works of art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston (the crime remains unsolved). In 2008 German Chancellor Angela Merkel earned a standing ovation from Israels parliament with a speech that included a tribute to the victims of the Holocaust. In 2013 a mortar shell explosion killed seven Marines from Camp Lejeune and injured eight other people during mountain warfare training at Hawthorne Army Depot in Nevada.TODAY IN HISTORY

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** D8 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldAcross1 Peaks 6 Two-letter pop group 10 Prepares potatoes, in a way 15 Card in a wallet 19 Zagreb native 20 Vanishing sound 21 Seating option 22 It gives you the big picture 23 Most highly regarded seasoning? 26 Side 27 Call for icing, maybe 28 Author Binchy 29 Limo amenity 31 Literally, "shady side" 32 Like two Beethoven piano sonatas 33 Groom on a 1952 Life cover 34 B, in a sandwich 37 Bridget Riley's "Movement in Squares," e.g. 40 23rd of 24 41 Gets more friendly, with "up" 45 __ collar 46 Brusque orchestral violinists? 49 Alley in comics 50 Soft shoe 51 Portends 52 Bush boss 53 Singer DiFranco 54 Card game shout 55 "Trinity" novelist 56 "__ Not There": Zombies hit 58 Child with a sponsor, maybe 60 Homer's "Northeaster," for one 62 Wall covers 65 Quick quality 66 Italian noble family 67 Actress Helen with her personal programmer? 70 One of a program dozen 73 Big-eyed bird 75 "Tristram Shandy" author 76 Bag by the barbecue 78 Lit 81 Honey beverage 82 "Hamilton" award 83 97-Across output 84 Holiday drink 85 Knockoff hr. 88 Glittery rock 89 Logician's letters 90 Granite St. campus 91 Kids responsible for breakfast bread? 94 Town 95 Low choristers 97 See 83-Across 98 Golf bag set 99 "Not a chance!" 100 Pie nut 102 Kiss at the mall, brie” y 103 Security brie“ ng org. 104 Lunch with “ sh 107 Large crosses 109 Head honcho, e.g. 113 Finished 114 Well-ventilated chef's hat? 117 It's often stained 118 Language that gives us "kayak" 119 "The Clan of the Cave Bear" author 120 Old Eurasian rulers 121 Wine adjective 122 Ideal areas 123 Letters before Q? 124 Limited-choice, as a questionDown1 John follower 2 Sticking point? 3 Extra 4 Near the start 5 Yalta Conference notable 6 Informal pricing words 7 __ vivant 8 High time 9 __ de coeur: amorous relationship 10 Forgo 11 Put on 12 Musician's suf“ x 13 Pipes and such 14 Welcome 15 Former "Today" co-host 16 Source of “ lm trivia 17 Complex story 18 Lumberyard supplier 24 Staple __ 25 Doesn't hold back 30 Ski resort refreshment? 33 It borders three oceans 34 Mystify 35 Does penance (for) 36 Chocolate-loving gang? 37 Rex in the classics 38 It may be given with a bow 39 Saddlebag carrier 40 Radio tuning shortcut 42 Measurement for meat rotating on a spit? 43 Like many Bing Crosby records 44 Slant 46 Sacred scroll 47 Got hot online 48 Joke 51 Florida NFLer 56 Words often about details 57 Yogi Bear co-creator 59 CD part 61 Bastes, say 63 Talking point? 64 Educates 68 Lures 69 Straights and ” ushes 71 Place to grab a bite 72 Promise 74 Randy Johnson and Aroldis Chapman 77 Deli choice 78 Oscar __ 79 O'Neill's daughter 80 Giuseppe's god 86 Wanderer 87 80%-Disney-owned channel 88 Nats pitcher Gonz‚lez 92 Done with 93 Slow and steady 94 Just barely, at the track 96 Animated 99 Powerful 101 Adorable one 102 "Dead __ Society": 1989 “ lm 103 Half-__: coffee order 104 Stink 105 Middle eye layer 106 Part of the woods? 107 Really mess up 108 Hit hard 109 Shed 110 Start of a sad tale 111 Bird related to the noddy 112 Brand that's a homophone of its company's initials 115 N.Y. neighbor 116 Where some pounds are spent: Abbr.PT Exercise ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ Knowledge is the bread of life, and taking action is the meaty part of the sandwich. But constant action will be the thing that makes a difference. No one can live long off one sandwich. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ The change you desire is coming, though not immediately. Don't worry about the schedule. Every time you practice moving toward the goodness of life, you create momentum in that direction. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Don't let the obstacles get in the way of what you want to do. If you can't “ gure out how to conquer or control them, there is great power in ignoring them. Eventually, the troubles will fall away all by themselves. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Water transports nutrients and chemical messages to the vital organs. Being even 2 cups dehydrated can cause a mood swing in a negative direction. Stay happy. Stay hydrated. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ Don't be afraid to try new things. Whatever you get into today, there will be a way out. It may be about going back. It may be about climbing up. But more than likely, the way out is through. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ To be alive is different from feeling alive. You notice the difference particularly when you're around a certain person. That quickening -there's nothing quite like it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ You didn't get yourself into this position, but you're still the one who has to get yourself out of it. Buddha said: "No one saves us but ourselves. No one can, and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path." SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ It turns out that the small things that make life great -enjoying the sun, breathing fresh, sweet air, a wholesome taste, a gentle touch -are not such small things after all. Just ask anyone who can't do them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ Dare to leave your safety zone at least once a day. It doesn't have to be a big gesture. Just enough to trigger your fear will do. Success sequence: Trigger your fear; overcome; repeat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ When the pressure builds and you start feeling anxious -some days, that would be a sign to press on through. Not this time. Take a break! There's nothing good that comes from overwork today. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ People experience their own state of mind for their own reasons. You may be caught in the emotional weather of this, but don't take it any more personally than you would an actual rainstorm. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ Here's a way to avoid worrying about where to take a relationship next. At some point in your interaction, lay down the groundwork for your next interaction, whatever you want that to be. Envision it, and act on that picture.HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHISTodayGRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details at WaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 'DEATH AND TAXES': 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850-2653226 or kt-online.orgMondayAARP TAX-AIDE PROGRAM: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd. IRS certi“ ed aides will provide free income tax preparation. Bring your 2017 tax documents, a picture ID, and a Social Security card for each person on the tax return; bring a checkbook to verify the routing and account number for a refund. The 2016 tax return will be helpful also. AARP focuses on lowto-moderate income taxpayers of all ages; you do not have to be an AARP member. No appointments; “ rst-come is “ rst-served. Details, Phil Cunningham at 850-774-7953 or pwcinpc@ gmail.com ADVENTURES IN ALYS: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. One of a kind storytelling experience with audience participation. Details at LoveTheRep.com FROM PLEISTOCEN TO PRESENT: 1-3 p.m. at the Native Spirit Museum and Gallery, 1101 Beck Ave., Panama City, as part of Anthropology Week. Tom Detrick, co-curator of the gallery, takes guests back to the Ice Age. Learn about the pre-historic animals that roamed the savanna and the humans that hunted them to survive "From Pleistocene to Present." Details, 850-890-9905 STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com READLOCAL INDIE AUTHOR FEST: 5:30-8 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Meet authors from across the Panhandle, including Tony Simmons and Jayson Kretzer of The Syndicate, Mark Douglas, S. Usher Evans, Douglas Wells, John Gibson, Craig Bush, T.S. Barnett, Megan Mitchum and Michelle Kay. Open to the public and free to attend. Author talks will be 5:45-6:45 p.m., then visit authors' booths until 8 p.m.; books available for sale. Details at NWRLS.com or 850-522-2120WHATS HAPPENINGTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Is the book of 1 Timothy in the Old or New Testament or neither? Old, New, Neither 2. What did the Lord cast down among the Israelites who complained about their wilderness misfortunes? Fire, Hail, Stones, Winds 3. From Romans 3, who have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God? Jews, Gentiles, Heathens, All 4. What idol fell and broke after the Ark of the Covenant was placed nearby? Edrei, Dagon, Molech, Golden calf 5. Who built an altar and called it JehovahnissiŽ? Isaiah, Baal, Moses, Malachi 6. What was the name of John the Baptists mother? Elisabeth, Miriam, Sarah, Ruth ANSWERS: 1. New, 2. Fire, 3. All, 4. Dagon, 5. Moses, 6. ElisabethTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 E1 VIEWPOINTS Its always grand in March of every year to pour myself a pint of Guinness and enjoy the glorious Irish wit. Its my good fortune to be a fellow of Irish descent. I share my good fortune with a quarter of all Americans, who can trace their heritage to the rolling, green hills of Ireland„ including my Uncle Mike, rest his soul, whose grandparents came to America from Ireland. As a lad, I loved the way he and my father celebrated St. Patricks Day: by swapping the same Irish jokes and witticisms that Ive been retelling for years. Such as the one about a famous Irish dancer who decided to go to confession one Saturday. Father Sullivan began asking her about her work. She explained she was an acrobatic dancer, but the priest didnt know what she meant. Ill show you, father,Ž she said. She stepped out of the confessional and went into a series of cartwheels, handsprings and backflips. An elderly woman turned to another parishioner and said: Look at the penance Father Sullivan is givin out, and me without me bloomers on!Ž Catherine McHugh writes for biography.com that the Irish indisputably have a way with language, as countless phrases and sayings born on the Emerald Island have been quoted across the world.Ž She shares some of the most memorable witticisms from famous Irish writers, politicians and entertainers, such as these two lines from the great writer Oscar Wilde: Be yourself; everyone else is taken.Ž The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and never simple.Ž Playwright George Bernard Shaw spoke one of my all-time favorites: A government that robs from Peter to pay Paul can always count on the support of Paul.Ž He also coined this well-remembered line: Youth is wasted on the young.Ž The great satirist Jonathan Swift offers sound advice: May you live all the days of your life.Ž And Irish footballer George Best celebrates the Irish wit in all its glory with a line that made me laugh out loud: In 1969, I gave up women and alcohol. It was the worst 20 minutes of my life.Ž According to author Bob Callahan in a Salon article, the Irish influence on American culture is considerable. The melodies of the Irish fiddle were blended with the rhythms of African music to give birth to todays popular music. Irish vaudevillians, masters of knockabout physical comedy, influenced early Hollywood filmmaking and even gave birth to the newspaper comic strip. But it is the mischievousness of the Irish spirit and wit„ the hardboiled, darkly humorous, racetrack bittenŽ language of the Irish„ that really benefited America. Irish spirit and wit were the precursors to brilliant, wisecracking Irish-Americans,Ž who were precursors to the gregarious American spirit and sense of humor that are among our most treasured resources. We sometimes take ourselves too seriously and lose our sense of humor„ we sometimes get lost in the narrowness of our own point of view. Well, St. Patricks Day is a great day to pour yourself a pint of Guinness, and to feed and nurture our badly-needed sense of humor„ because nothing helps people get along better than a hearty laugh. Which reminds me of one joke that I am confident we can all agree on:Q: Why are Irish jokes so simplistic?A: So Congress can understand them. Tom Purcell is a columnist with the Pittsburgh TribuneReview and Cagle Cartoons.Time to nurture Americas Irishinspired sense of humorBy Sarah Kaplan The Washington PostIn March 2016, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly returned from an unprecedented 340-day mission on the International Space Station. A year later, his doctors released preliminary results of an extensive study comparing his health to that of his earthbound identical twin brother, Mark. And this past January, NASA announced attendees at a recent scientific workshop agreed on the initial medical conclusion„ that space travel takes a significant toll and can result in changes at the molecular level. At no point in that process was Scott Kelly zapped by an alien laser beam, attacked by a xenomorph or otherwise transfigured into a previously unknown mutant variety of human. But you wouldnt know that from reading some of the coverage the January announcement inexplicably spawned this week„ articles claiming the mission activated Kellys space genes,Ž that 7 percent of his genes didnt return to normal postspaceflight, and that he and Mark are no longer identical twins. Aside from being about old news, these stories are biologically impossible. If 7 percent of Kellys genome was altered, he would be about as different from a human as a rhesus monkey. The actual transformation is much subtler. According to NASAs research„ which is still preliminary, with the agency expecting to publish a more complete study this year„ its not Kellys genes that changed but how they were expressed. Your genome dwells inside the nuclei of your cells. Think of it as an instruction manual: It is the complete set of DNA that describes the form and function of every aspect of your being, with each gene pertaining to a particular task life requires. But this manual is also like a rare book that cant be taken out of the library. It must be transcribed by enzymes, resulting in a copy of the sequence known as RNA. That RNA is then translated into proteins, the molecules that do the actual work of keeping you alive. When Scott Kelly went into space, his DNA remained fundamentally the same. What changed was the way his DNA was transcribed and translated into functional products; the study of such shifts is called epigenetics. These epigenetic changes were likely the bodys way of responding to the low gravity, oxygen deprivation, increased inflammation and diet challenges of spaceflight. According to NASA, Johns Hopkins researcher Andy Feinberg, one of 10 investigators on the Twins Study, observed variability in patterns of methylation„ the process by which genes are chemically turned on and off. Chris Mason of Weill Cornell Medicine reported epigenetic changes in five biological pathways, including those related to The truth about astronaut Scott Kellys viral space genesEvery bad political idea starts with a false premise. The Affordable Care ActŽ lie, that we had an awful health care system and government could fix it and save families $2,500 a year,Ž spawned the ObamaCare disaster. The Bush-era intelligence agencies fibs were that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and we had to stop him. Thousands of lives and countless wounded later, we rule the rubble after our $1 trillion social studies lesson. With that lie and post-9/11 hysteria came the Patriot Act, which sacrificed freedoms (not patriotic). It created the TSA (Thousands Standing AroundŽ), the Department of Homeland Security, and the FISA court spying on U.S. citizens. Result: the Mueller Witch Hunt. A liberal, a conservative and a libertarian walk into a bar and the bartender says, What will you have, President Trump?Ž Displaying his liberal side, Trump agreed this past week to consider stricter gun controls and yielded to the pandering populist economic idea of tariffs. Welfare reform might be next. The difference between a welfare beneficiary and a tariff? If you held a gun to both their heads, the welfare queen might work. Tariffs go against GOP doctrine. The Southern evangelicals quickly forgave Trump for cavorting with porn star Stormy Daniels since the economy is roaring and they are getting raises. But if Wal-Mart raises the price of a bass boat because of his aluminum tariffs, the honeymoon might be over. Americans still love Trumps border wall and immigration policy. We are tired of Guatemalans coming to America and taking the low-paying jobs of our Mexicans. But Trump continues to defy conventional wisdom of the body politic,Ž which would say hed be dead by now. Hes the Keith Richards of politics. The reason? Poly-tics defines Washington, D.C., by meaning many ticks.Ž Trump is rich; he is not beholden to the GOP, NRA or any predetermined dogma. He comes to D.C. with no ticks on him, if you dont count Jared Kushner. America loves that. Trumps tariffsalso have angered our allies. The UK Prime Minister released an official statement that they were very disappointed,Ž harsh language for the Brits. Very DisappointedŽ is their highest security threat level and punishment for terrorist bombers, right ahead of Tsk, tsk,Ž and Blimey.Ž A casualty of the tariff debate was free-trader Gary Cohn. I worked with Gary at Goldman Sachs, and Trump lost a good man. Trump had tariff advocate and White House Trade Adviser Peter Navarro battle it out with Gary Cohn in his office, The ApprenticeŽ-style. He likes that team of rivalsŽ approach. Let two people like Omarosa and Gary Busey compete and you get the best outcome. Next, Trump plans to put a humidifier and a de-humidifier in his office and let them battle it out. And that, my friends, will determine our humidity going forward. Tariffs like this one, favoring some U.S. industries over others, are crony capitalism and an industrial swing-state political ploy. Tariffs are more popular in Wisconsin than Aaron Rodgers jerseys. In some degree, steel tariffs have been imposed by every president since Nixon „ and then adjusted. They are invariably kickbacks to unions and their executives at the expense of employees of other non-protected industries, and every consumer in America, because tariffs are inflationary. Trumps risk is that protectionism, a fast-growing economy, and loss of cheap illegal immigrant labor are all inflationary. They can hurt; just ask Jimmy Carter. Ron Hart, a libertarian syndicated oped humorist, awardwinning author and TV/radio commentator, can be reached at Ron@RonaldHart.com, or visit www.RonaldHart.com.Tari s cost Americans money Tom Purcell And they rarely work Astronaut Mark Kelly, left, Breitling CEO Georges Kern and astronaut Scott Kelly attend the Breitling Global Roadshow event Feb. 22 in New York. [EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION VIA AP] See SPACE, E2 Ron Hart

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** E2 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News Herald VIEWPOINTS At 10 a.m. on Wednesday, students across Ohio walked out of schools to pay tribute to the 17 people killed „ 14 of them teenagers „ in last months gun massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. In this same hour, a National Rifle Association spokeswoman sent an email to Ohio journalists with this subject line: OH „ pro-Second Amendment HS students to counter gun control protests.Ž Here we go. Amy Hunters email began: Hi Ohio reporters „ With all the protests today, I wanted to make sure you all had contact information for some high school kids in Ohio who feel strongly about protecting the Second Amendment. They are happy to talk to reporters.Ž She provided the cellphone number for the father of a girl, as well as the number for a father of two teen age kids.Ž She also included her cell and office numbers, both with a northern Virginia area code. Her email arrived within minutes of my return from covering the peaceful student walkout at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent, Ohio. I responded with a simple question: Ms. Hunter, how are the nationwide student protests threatening the Second Amendment?Ž Her response: Hi Connie „ I didnt say that they were. These are just the names of two students in Ohio who feel strongly about protecting the second amendment. The protests are covered extensively, so its timely.Ž Where to start. In her response, Hunter changed the number of students available for interviews. First it was three; then it was two. She also failed this time to capitalize her beloved Second Amendment. Ill cut her a little slack, as these were likely mistakes of haste. That can happen when youre so busy trying to undermine tens of thousands of teenagers, state by state, one time zone at a time. What I wont overlook is Hunters failure even to acknowledge why these high school students were protesting and her attempts to mischaracterize their mission. As a columnist, Ive been writing about the need for better gun safety laws for 16 years now, so Im accustomed to the dishonest tactics of the NRA. Trying to discredit protesting teenagers, however „ and only a month after 14 of their own were gunned down „ exposes a new low of desperation. If youre going to try to demonize kids speaking out against gun violence, youve lost whatever bit was left of your collective soul. Their mission is apparent with even a cursory review of media coverage of Wednesdays student protests. Students are scared and angry, and they are unwilling to be silent anymore for the simplest of horrible reasons: We have failed to protect our children, for decades. On Sept. 16, 1963, the Ku Klux Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four little black girls during Sunday services. The editor of The Atlanta Constitution, fellow southerner Gene Patterson, wrote a now-famous column about the tragedy. This paragraph, in particular, feels eerily familiar: We „ the heirs of a proud South, who protest its worth and demand it recognition „ we are the ones who have ducked the difficult, skirted the uncomfortable, caviled at the challenge, resented the necessary, rationalized the unacceptable, and created the day surely when these children would die.Ž Define weŽ now as voters and legislators and we are describing our collective failure to protect our children from guns and the NRA. In her email response to me, Hunter acknowledged, The protests are covered extensively.Ž Thats fear talking. Thanks to our kids, Americas attention span is evolving. Connie Schultz is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist with Creators Syndicate.What were seeing are student walkouts to the pollsStudents hold up their signs during a rally asking for gun control outside of the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday in Washington. [JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AP] oxygen deprivation, DNA repair and bone formation. This alterations may point to space genes,Ž the ones in which function is affected by time off Earth. Other researchers noticed changes in Scotts body mass, telomere length and cognition over the course of the mission and after it; most shifts were not lasting. In a statement Thursday, NASA clarified Scott and Mark Kelly are still identical twins. Their DNA does differ„ but so does the DNA of all humans, even twins, thanks to mutations that accumulate normally over the course of a lifetime. Scott didnt have to spend a year in space to establish his uniqueness. And the changes in gene expression that scientists observed during Scotts time in space are within the range of what theyd expect to see in a mountain climber, scuba diver or other human under stress. About 93 percent of the changes reverted to preflight levels within six months of Scotts return to Earth. The 7 percent that persisted is minimal,Ž the space agency said. But it suggests spaceflight does induce longer-term changes at the molecular level. This is important because NASA plans to someday send astronauts on a threeyear mission to Mars. If and when that day comes, it would be good to make sure they arrive at the Red Planet as healthy humans. SPACEFrom Page E1What the nation needs desperately as the 2018 midterm elections draw near is to hear more wisdom from Barack Obama and less venom from Hillary Clinton. Although former presidents tend to abide by a gentlemens agreement to go easy on their successor, Obama must step up and speak out more aggressively about Donald Trump and his policies. Obama is the most beloved Democrat, with an immense intellect, whose words are taken seriously„ even by opponents. Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, continues to draw a dark cloud over the political landscape. Democrats need to move on from her devastating loss in 2016, but she refuses to let go. During a recent visit to India, Clinton continued to stomp on sour grapes and, worse, blamed the backwardsŽ parts of America for her election defeat. Clinton said she won the places that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward.Ž The remarks were red meat for conservative commentators, who would love to link rising Democratic stars such as Deval Patrick, Adam Schiff, Kamala Harris, Chris Murphy and Amy Klobuchar, with the sad, misguided bitterness Clinton continues to foster. Reacting to Clintons latest comments, Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) said: Those are kind of fighting words for me, because Im partial to Missouri voters.Ž Seeking to distance herself from Clinton, McCaskill added, I dont think thats the way you should talk about any voter, especially ones in my state.Ž The conservative Wall Street Journal responded to Clintons remarks with this: The shock of losing the Presidency to Donald Trump has to be mind-blowing, but Hillary Clinton keeps offering evidence for why she may have been the only Democrat in 2016 who could have managed that feat.Ž Unlike Clinton, former President Obama has been too silent. It was nice that Obama agreed to be interviewed by David Letterman on Netflix, a pleasant treat for those of us who miss hearing him in any forum. But more recent news that he and wife Michelle are negotiating with Netflix to produce content for the streaming service might not be the best way for the Obamas to spend their enormous political capital. With Trump and Congress working to dismantle so much of what Obama achieved, not just in health care, but also affecting the environment, education and financial regulations, it is essential Obama speak out. It doesnt have to be on cable-TV talk programs or on op-ed pages; a series of well-attended, possibly televised speeches on college campuses would be a good way to start. Meanwhile, watching clips of Clintons recent remarks, I find myself acting like Archie Bunker and shouting at the TV: Hillary, stifle yourself!Ž And as Trumps presidency runs amok I feel like Im sitting in a fighter jet in the film Top Gun,Ž yelling, Engage, Barack! Engage!Ž Peter Funt is writer, speaker and columnist for Cagle Cartoons.The Obama-Clinton midterm soundtracks Peter FuntFILE In this Oct. 13, 2017 “ le photo, former President Barack Obama, right, and former “ rst lady Michelle Obama arrive for the “ rst session of the Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago. Barack Obama and Net” ix reportedly are negotiating a deal for the former president and his wife, Michelle, to produce shows exclusively for the streaming service. The proposed deal was reported Friday, March 9, 2018, by The New York Times, which cited people familiar with the discussions who were not identi“ ed. [AP PHOTO/CHARLES REX ARBOGAST, FILE] In this Monday, March 12, 2018 photo, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, waves to media as she visits the Jahaz Mahal monument in Mandu, Madhya Pradesh state, India. [AP PHOTO] Connie Schultz

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** The News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 E3Florida has a slow and tedious road to regaining voting rights for felons who have served their time, including restitution and probation. The bottom line is the only avenue to reclaiming aspects of citizenship „ including voting, seeking public office and sitting on a jury „ is to go before Floridas Clemency Board. Members are the governor, agricultural commissioner, attorney general and chief financial officer. Why would any clemency system depend upon four of the states top political leaders? And why, with a nearly 11,000 backlogged applications, would this board meet just four times yearly? The answer is selfevident. Clemency is a favor for a select few and an impossibility for the vast majority of Floridas former felons. Add to that gauntlet a minimum wait of five years before an application can be filed, and you see how the process is built for failure. Most dont even bother attempting to regain their civil rights. And that is wrong. Recently two things have occurred that might change the unpalatable status quo. First, a constitutional amendment to restore former felon rights has successfully been moved forward by a private group that gathered the necessary 799,000 petition signatures. It will be on the November ballot. It does not include returned rights for murderers or those charged with sex crimes. Second, on Feb. 1 a district court judge ruled the Clemency Board process to be arbitrary and unconstitutional. The judge said: Florida strips the right to vote from every man and woman who commits a felony ... To vote again, disenfranchised citizens must kowtow before a panel of high-level government officials over which Floridas governor has absolute veto authority. No standards guide the panel.Ž So with the court on its side and the voters deciding whether to restore citizenship to former felons, it looks like a green light ahead. Or not. Floridas Legislature recently showed its colors by failing to fund the backlog of cases. Again, there are nearly 11,000 applications for restoration of rights by former felons. According to the News Service of Florida, the Senate offered $750,000, then reduced it to $250,000. The House, under the leadership of Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O Lakes, offered no money „ and thats where it ends. The only avenue would have been for Gov. Rick Scott to intercede. But he has been dead set against it and likely willleave an expensive court battle to his successor. So it doesnt seem to matter that courts find the process unconstitutional, or that the voters of Florida support automatic reinstatement of rights at the polls, or that it is simply the moral thing to do. Nothing will happen, at least this year. This editorial first appeared in the St. Augustine Record, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse MediaA new way to deny former felons VIEWPOINTS ANOTHER VIEWWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.comGET INVOLVEDFLORIDA LEGISLATURERep. Brad Drake Chipola College, Administration Building, Room 186, 3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446-1701; 850-718-0047; brad.drake@my” oridahouse.gov Rep. Jay Trumbull 455 Harrison Ave., Suite A, Panama City, FL 32401; District Of“ ce: 850-9146300; Jay.Trumbull@my” oridahouse.gov Sen. George Gainer Tallahassee Of“ ce, 302 Senate Of“ ce Building, 404 South Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL 32399; (850) 487-5002 Sen. Bill Montford 208 Senate Of“ ce Building, 404 S. Monroe St., Room 210, Tallahassee, FL 32399; 850-487-5003 Sen. Doug Broxson 418 West Garden St., Room 403, Pensacola, FL 32502, (850) 595-1036 Gov. Rick Scott The Capitol, Tallahassee, FL 32399; 850-488-4441; rick.scott@eog.my” orida.comU.S. CONGRESSRep. Neal Dunn U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-225-5235; dunn.house.gov; Panama City Of“ ce, 840 W. 11th St., Suite 2250, Panama City, FL 32401; 850-785-0812 Rep. Matt Gaetz U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-225-4136, gaetz.house.gov; Pensacola Of“ ce, 4300 Bayou Blvd., Suite 13, Pensacola, FL 32503 Sen. Bill Nelson U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-224-5274; billnelson.senate.gov Sen. Marco Rubio U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20501; 202-224-3041; rubio.senate.gov [JEFF KOTERBA/OMAHA WORLD HERALD] TOP ONLINETOP 10 VIDEOS1. Students race underwater ROVs in SeaPerch Competition 2. Mike Jones on the 2010 Bay District Schools School Board shooting 3. Bay County Sheriffs Of“ ce announces arrest of Bryan Frank Broxton 4. Moran trial closing arguments (clip 3) 5. Moran trial closing arguments (clip 2) 6. Middle school students practice lockdown drill 7. Moran trial closing arguments (clip 4) 8. Volunteers clean beach by M.B. Miller County Pier 9. New indoor trampoline park on Beach 10. Moran trial video (clip 1) TOP 10 STORIES1. Teacher “ red after allegedly sitting on boys lap (PHOTOS) 2. Azalea Trail Pageant crowns 51st queen 3. Fast-food eatery temporarily closed 4. Woman pleads guilty in home invasion shooting 5. Mother, infant son die in “ re 6. Niceville mom desperate for bone marrow donor 7. Drugs, guns, stolen property seized in BCSO sweep 8. 9 PCB Spring Break laws to know in 2018 9. P.C. resident: Charging phones started “ re; house dest royed 10. More than 40 arrested for drinking on beach TOP 10 PODCASTS1. Bomb threat called in to Arnold High School 2. Blotter Audible: The case of the dumb thief 3. Blotter Audible The case of the man who ran 4. Philip Moran jailhouse phone calls 5. Panama City Growing Strong member talks about marina project 6. Two Bay District students arrested after threats 7. Behind the scenes: Cody Shirah trial Day 2 8. SandJam lineup: Love it or hate it? 9. Chick-“ l-A closed up to one year 10. Cruises: Trends, insider tips and more There are a couple of important economic lessons the American people should learn. Im going to title one the seen and unseenŽ and the other narrow, well-defined large benefits versus widely dispersed small costs.Ž These lessons are applicable to a wide range of government behavior, but lets look at just two examples. President Donald Trump recentlyenacted high tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum. Why in the world would the U.S. steel and aluminum industries press the president to levy heavy tariffs? The answer is simple. Reducing the amounts of steel and aluminum that hit our shores enables American producers to charge higher prices. Thus, U.S. steel and aluminum producers will earn higher profits, hire more workers and pay them higher wages. They are the visible beneficiaries of Trumps tariffs. But when the government creates a benefit for one American, it is a virtual guarantee it will come at the expense of another American „ an unseen victim. The victims of steel and aluminum tariffs are the companies that use steel and aluminum. Faced with higher input costs, they become less competitive on the world market. For example, companies such as John Deere may respond to higher steel prices by purchasing their parts in the international market rather than in the U.S. To become more competitive in the world market, some firms may move their production facilities to foreign countries that do not have tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum. Studies by both the Peterson Institute for International Economics and the Consuming Industries Trade Action Coalition show steel-using industries „ such as the U.S. auto industry, its suppliers and manufacturers of heavy construction equipment „ were harmed by tariffs on steel enacted by George W. Bush. Politicians love having seen beneficiaries and unseen victims. The reason is quite simple. In the cases of the steel and aluminum industries, company executives will know whom to give political campaign contributions. Workers in those industries will know for whom to cast their votes. The people in the steeland aluminum-using industries may not know who to blame for declining profits, lack of competitiveness and job loss. Theres no better scenario for politicians. Its heads, politicians win, and tails, somebody else loses. Then theres the phenomenon of narrow, welldefined large benefits versus widely dispersed small costs. A good example can be found in the sugar industry. Sugar producers lobby Congress to place restrictions on the importation of foreign sugar through tariffs and quotas. Those import restrictions force Americans to pay up to three times the world price for sugar. Another way to look at the cost side is that tens of millions of American families are forced to pay a little bit more, maybe $20, for sugar. You might wonder how this consumer rip-off sustains itself. After all, the people in the sugar industry are only a tiny percentage of the U.S. population. Heres how it works. It pays for workers and owners in the sugar industry to come up with millions of dollars to lobby congressmen to impose tariffs and quotas on foreign sugar. It means higher profits and higher wages. Also, its easy to organize the relatively small number of people in the sugar industry. The costs are borne by tens of millions of Americans forced to pay more for the sugar they use. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George MasonUniversity and a columnist with Creators Syndicate.Lessons from Trumps steel and aluminum tari s Walter Williams

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** E4 Sunday, March 18, 2018 | The News HeraldSend Scrapbook photos with a brief description and identi“ cation of those pictured to pcnhnews@pcnh.com with ScrapbookŽ in the subject line. Inclusion is at editors discretion. SCRAPBOOK Rotarian reader Robert Bob Britson and author Carol Boots Hensel read to preschool age children on Feb. 21 at the Panama City Beach Academy as part of Rotary Read Aloud, a program initiated between the Rotary Club of Downtown Panama City and the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida over 10 years ago. Pictured, from left, are Michele Bock, director of the Panama City Beach Academy; author Carol Boots Hensel; Mr. Bob, Bob Britson of the Rotary Club of Downtown Panama City; and Suzan Gage, executive director of the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida. The Womens Civic Club (WCC) of Panama City Beach recently received a grant from the St. Joe Community Foundation to sponsor its annual Beach Boogie Dance and Silent Auction, the clubs largest fundraiser of the year. Pictured are Silent Auction Chair Debra Fazzone; Janet Piepul from St. Joe Community Foundation; Lana Lowery and Connie Peterson, dance co-chairs; and WCC President Cheri Leistner. Rotary Read AloudU.S. Air Force Airman Christian S. Woods graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas.The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in mili-tary discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.Woods is the son of Eric M. Woods of Cowarts, Ala., and grandson of Mark A. and Rita K. Woods of Panama City.He is a 2017 graduate of Ashford High School, Ashford, Ala.U.S. Air Force Airman Christian S. WoodsAt the naturalization ceremony at the Bay County Courthouse, GFWC Womans Club of Panama City President Merle Johnson and Tsgt Vicki Ortiz presented a flag flown over the Gulf at Tyn-dall Air Force Baseto two newly naturalized citizens, Xing Lu from Korea, the youngest new citizen; and Antonio Di Bella from Italy, the wisest new citizen.GFWC Womans Club of Panama City Area Publix Super Markets raised $222,878 for United Way of Northwest Florida during the United Way of Northwest Floridas annual Community Campaign. Publix Appreciation Day celebrations took place Feb. 23 at the Lynn Haven, Panama City and Panama City Beach stores, wherethe United Way NWFL board members, staff and partner agency representatives were on hand forPublix Appreciation Day Proclamations.Publix helps United Way Womens Civic Club of PCB Christian Woods

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 F F 1 1 T O P T E A M F E A T U R E D H O M E S TOP TEAM FEATURED HOMES S e n d T e x t C o d e s t o 3 5 6 2 0 f o r M o r e I n f o r m a t i o n Send Text Codes to 35620 for More Information F E A T U R E D L I S T I N G S FEATURED LISTINGS Serving Bay County since 1977(850)230-366510740 Hutchison Blvd.Panama City Beach3434 Highway 77Panama City(850)872-3434Property Management(850) 785-1581740 S. Tyndall Pkwy.Panama City(850)785-1551 NF-1179261 3214 Ashmore Street $289,000 € 4BR/2BA For Details Text:287592 to 35620 Ariane 12612 Silver Lake Road $34,900 € 540 sq ftCelia 1030 S Jan Drive $209,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text:119446 to 35620 Sonya(#667863) 1219 Thomas Drive, #234 $99,800 € 2BR/2BA For Details Text:151066 to 35620 Robin 3209 Colter Street $315,000 € 4BR/3BA For Details Text: 150033 to 35620 Michelle(#668377) 600 Rue La Roche$335,000 € 31x205x246x146 For Details Text: 156060 to 35620 Dice(#663886) 114 Sandollar Drive $275,000 € 3BR/2.5BA For Details Text: 142360 to 35620 Alan(#668529) 226 Callaway Chase Lane $124,900 € 3BR/2.5BA For Details Text:298955 to 35620 Ann(#667625) 1036 La Paloma Terrace $549,000 € 3BR/3.5BA For Details Text: 287633 to 35620 Steve(#664537) 6513 Harbour Blvd $149,000 € 2BR/2.5BA For Details Text: 152462 to 35620 Holli(#668826) 1015 Bay Avenue$125,000 € 4BR/2.5BA For Details Text: 517779 to 35620 (#669151) 901 Iowa Avenue$128,000 € 2BR/1BA For Details Text: 142362 to 35620 (#668904) 2006 Greenbriar Blvd$157,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 296605 to 35620 (#669074) 217 Emerald Coast Club Blvd$189,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 287597 to 35620 (#669061) 356 Bell Circle$245,000 € 4BR/2BA For Details Text: 281707 to 35620 (#669087) 112 Shadow Bay Drive$375,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 119447 to 35620 (#668834) 720 Jersey Court$434,900 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 327793 to 35620 (#668388) 2014 Country Club Drive$470,000 € 3BR/2.5BA For Details Text: 527351 to 35620 (#669183) 1003 Ethlyn Road$230,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 275257 to 35620 (#668497) 186 Derby Woods Street$270,000 € 3BR/2BA For Details Text: 517215 to 35620 (#669160) C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S F E B R U A R Y T O P T E A M CONGRATULATIONS FEBRUARY TOP TEAM! H o l l i P e r s a l l Holli Persall R E A L T O R REALTOR S o n y a S a b o Sonya Sabo R E A L T O R REALTOR M i c h e l l e G i n n Michelle Ginn B R O K E R A S S O C I A T E BROKER-ASSOCIATE D i c e W y l l i e Dice Wyllie R E A L T O R REALTOR S t e v e W o o l s e y Steve Woolsey R E A L T O R REALTOR R o b i n F r e e m a n Robin Freeman, B r o k e r A s s o c i a t e Broker-Associate C e l i a B u s h Celia Bush R E A L T O R REALTOR A l a n S w i g l e r Alan Swigler B R O K E R A S S O C I A T E BROKER-ASSOCIATE (#663532) Relocation@ERAFlorida.com (#668916)(#657881) Our success is powered by a smarter community of real estate brokers and agents. Interested in learning more? Call Steve Butler, 850-872-3434 or Brian Neubauer, 850-230-3665 for a con dential interview or email Relocation@ERAFlorida.comWe look forward to welcoming you to our team! A n n W i l l i s Ann Willis R E A L T O R REALTOR A r i a n e J o h n s o n Ariane Johnson R E A L T O R REALTOR

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 2 2 Sunday, March 18, 2018| The News Herald 850-215-9942429 S. Tyndall Pkwy.BlueHeronRealtyPC.com | blueheronrealty@att.net BLUE HERON REALTY Property Management Services* No Set-Up or Leasing Fees *Long Term Residential Rentals 35 years experience sales, listings and rental management Serving Panama City € Tyndall AFB Area Lynn Haven € Panama City Beach NF-1179256 SMITH & ASSOCIATESPROPERTY MANAGEMENT OF BAY COUNTY INC. 13510C Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach Bay County'sFull TimeProperty Management Company Serving Bay County for over 30 years Call us today for a FREE no obligation Rental Analysis 850-215-RENT (7368) www.smithrentsbaycounty.com We will put you in your place!NF-1181235 www.RentERAFlorida.com740 S. Tyndall Pkwy Panama City, FL 32404850-785-1581 Please contact us or visit our website for a complete list of our available rentals. Se habla Espanol.~NF-1179259119 College Ave Unit 2 1/1 $700 1021 Pitts Ave 2/1 $850 218 E 1st Ct 2/1.5 $875 3900 Becora Ct 3/2 $1200 1132 S Comet Ave 3/2 $1200 401 E Beach Dr A-1 2/2.5 $1250 6302 Lake Dr 3/2 $1300 213 Coquina Shell Way 3/2 $1400 7418 Chipewa St 3/2.5 $1690 510 Bunkers Cove 3/3 $1850 NF-1177778 Contact Century 21 Commander Realty for all your Property Management needs! ALSO OPEN ON SATURDAYS 8-4 AVAILABLE RENTALS: 850-769-5775Apply Online at c21commander.com COMMANDER REALTY, INC. 307 WILSON AVE #15 1/1 ..................$825 12 ALMA C 2/2 ..................$825 285 SUKOSHI DR 2/1.5 ...............$800 3806 17TH ST A 3/2 ..................$950 5205 9TH ST 3/2 ..................$995 326 S MACARTHUR AVE 3/2 ...............$1,200 4828 HOLLY AVE 4/2 ...............$1,250 909 ROSEMONT ST 3/2 ...............$1,4508700 FRONT BEACH RD UNIT 1209 2/2.5 ............$1,525 7526 SUNSET AVE 3/2 ...............$1,750 108 CRENSHAW ST. 3/2 ...............$1,850 2931 CANAL DR 3/2 ...............$2,000 6836 TOEPFER BLVD 3/2 ...............$2,500NF-1179275 NF-1179663 Register to Win a $100 Gift Card Limited Seating. Call Today! Are you looking to buy a house in the next year? If so, this clinic is for you! March 20th, 6pm 8pm Call or Email Today to Register! (850) 661-1440 / admin@teamjadofsky.com First Time Home Buyers Clinic401 E 23rd St Suite A. Panama City, FL 32405 € Trustmark Bank € Three Little Pigs Home Inspectors € Kirkland Insurance € Mason Title Vendors On Site T E A M J A D O F S K Y TEAM JADOFSKY Bay Point Canal Home491 Wahoo Road 3 Bedroom / 2.5 BathGated Comm/Canal Front/2 Car Garage$2495 FEATURED PROPERTY www.PanamaBeachRentals.comYOUR GO TO COMPANY FOR ALL YOUR RENTAL NEEDSŽ918 Helen ................................................2/1 ............................$660 2100 Beach Dr. B203 .................................1/1 ...........................$695 6121 Harvey St #15 ...................................2/1.5 .........................$725 401 Transmitter ........................................2/1 ........................... $750 730 Mulberry Ave ......................................3/2 ............................$995 215 S Kimbrel............................................3/2 ..........................$1250 1333 Capri (waterfront) .............................3/2 ..........................$1425 1201 Baldwin Rowe ..................................3/2.5 .......................$1450 2104 Avensong Ln #P301...........................2/2 ..........................$1250 2106 Avensong Ln #O304 ..........................2/2 ..........................$1300 2106 Avensong Ln #O303 ..........................2/2 ..........................$1300 2104 Avensong Ln #P303...........................2/2 ..........................$1300 8601 Avensong Ln #E108 ...........................2/2.5 .......................$1400 2105 Avensong Ln #C102 ...........................2/2.5 .......................$1400 2103 Avensong Ln #B103 ..........................2/2.5 .......................$1400 Panama City Beach Rentals 636-6662 Villas at SuncrestIncludes: Water, Sewer, Trash, Wi-Fi, Basic Cable & Pest Control Panama City and Surrounding Areas 248-5000 2146 Sterling Cove Blvd Gated/Pool .........2/1.5 .......................$1250 303 Lighthouse Rd Gated/Pool ..................4/3 .........................$1350 22125 Bataan St .......................................2/2 ......................... $1350 10811 FBR #1703 Gulf Front .....................2/2 .........................$1350 405 Paradise Blvd Gated/Pool ...................3/2 .........................$1750 301 Fairway Blvd .......................................4/3 ..........................$1950 223 Windsor Way Comm Pool.....................4/3 .........................$2100 7128 Dolphin Bay Gated ...........................4/2.5 .......................$2395 491 Wahoo Rd Canal Front ........................3/2.5 ......................$2495 4100 Marriott Rd #PH1 Lagoon/Pool ..........3/3 ..........................$2495 6422 Hwy 98 #1601 Bay Front/Pool ...........4/4.5 .......................$4950NF-1179284 BAY COUNTY'S RENTAL CENTERBeach: 850-636-6662 Panama City: 850-2485000 C a l l 8 5 0 2 4 9 7 3 5 5 € T o l l F r e e 8 8 8 8 3 6 8 5 5 1 Call 850-249-7355 € Toll Free 888-836-8551 V i s i t o u r w e b s i t e f o r u p t o d a t e l i s t i n g s a n d s a l e s i n B a y a n d s u r r o u n d i n g c o u n t i e s Visit our website for up-to-date listings and sales in Bay and surrounding counties! NF-1179268 U n d e r C o n t r a c t / S o l d Under Contract/Sold*These properties are either Sold or Under Contract N e w L i s t i n g s New Listings P r i c e R e d u c t i o n s Price Reductions $11,900 Old Gristmill Rdtwo congruent lots = half acre with county zoning, horses allowed $59,000 00 St. Luke St1BR/1BA cottage, all new everything inside, close to Tyndall AFB $129,000 801 Reese Dr3BR/2BA mobile home on 2.13 acres, private pond, pole barn, corner $134,900 Endless Summer #C172BR/1BA condo overlooking courtyard and pool, across from beach $149,000 4010 Delisa Ave3BR/2BA renovated Pinnacle Pines home, close to Tyndall AFB $159,900 Bay Point Golf Villas #4222BR/2BA updated ground oor unit overlooking golf course $159,900 Island Reserve #72161BR/1BA condo with a bonus room, bamboo oors, balcony $164,500 2000 Twin Oaks Dr3BR/2BA mobile home on corner lot, remodeled, insulated garage $169,000 2172 Sterling Cove Blvd3BR/2.5BA townhome in gated community, freshly painted $189,900 2416 Nicole Dr3BR/2BA Forest park home, completely renovated, shiplap, large yard $199,000 3708 Shoreline Cir3BR/2BA brick home close to Pretty Bayou, beautifully landscaped $219,000 434 Brady Way3BR/2.5BA Hidden Pines home, on cul-de-sac, openoor plan $247,900 205 Wisteria St3BR/2BA home close to the beach, two car garage, lots upgrades $269,500 124 Cottonwood Cir3BR/2.5BA Woodrun home, freshly painted, two car garage $269,900 120 Bimini Ct2BR/2BA Summer Breeze home, built-ins, all tile ooring, FL room $335,000 6223 Little Dirt Rd3BR/2.5BA log cabin on the bay, 1 acre, screened porch, workshop $498,000 3681 Preserve Blvd4BR/2..5BA Preserve home with pool, lots of extras and built-ins$23,000 Lucy Lanelake front lot in the Fountain area, 65x200, septic and well already in place $23,000 2634 Usery Rdmobile home lot 70x120, public water and sewer available $39,900 6351 Blue Gill Rdwaterfront lot on Bayou George Creek with access to Deerpoint Lake $189,000 1200 Lindenwood Rd3BR/2BA updated Forest Park home, new roof and tile, workshop $227,000 21807 Palm Ave2BR/1BA Riviera Beach cottage 1.5 blocks from Gulf of Mexico $240,500 7405 Market Stimmaculate 4BR/2BA home, new wood oors, roof replaced 2015 $259,000 16209 Lullwater Dr3BR/2BA on Lullwater Lake, brand new roof, all brick home $895,000 829 N Bay Dr5BR/3.5BA home on Mill Bayou w/bay and gulf access, dock with lift $985,000 3301 Harbour Place4BR/4BA Bay front estate in Kings Point, dock with lift, pool, sauna$40,000 2520 Shady Oak Ctbuilding lot in North Lagoon Oaks, 80x135, septic tank in place $119,000 North Bay Drhalf-acre lot with bayou view, close to parks and boat ramps $285,000 98 Sandalwood Ct3BR/2.5BA Summerwood home, freshly painted, new carpet Callaway Village Square221-B N. Tyndall Parkway; General Retail Space; 1700 sq. ft; Available Immediately; Contact (850) 814-2998 L ynn Haven Comfortable, clean, furn, 1 br., 1 person APT, no pets. w/s/g incl. $650/mo. 850-265-4535 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. Andrews 2br/ 1ba, s mall pets ok. W/D hookups, 850-527-6879 Text FL90709 to 56654 2br, 1.5ba Study TH 1100sf, Quiet Area, Near Navy Base. 2605 Redwood St. No Pets $995/mo. Call 850-832-1457 Callaway, FL 6509 Pridgen StreetHOUSE FOR RENTVery close to town 2br, 1.5 baths Includes W/D. Asking $810 monthly Security deposit $850 Available in March! Call: 850-358-8297 Callaway: 2br 1ba, $550 +dep. No pets. Call (850)785-7341 or (850)814-3211 Text FL90515 to 56654 1998 Mobile HomeLike new, very large, 3br, 2ba In quiet neighborhood, on leased private property. $18,990 asking price. Contact: 850-874-9342 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL75823 to 56654 $80,900!GRAND LAGOON COVE 6903 North Lagoon #21, PCB, FL 32408 1BR/1B UPDATED! Comm Pool & Docks.Cynthia Luster Coastal Property Services 850-691-7927 3712 E Third StPanama City, FL 3800 Sqft whse space w/ 3 offices! $135,500 Cynthia LusterCoastal Property Services850-691-7927 395 Wahoo Rd. Dock your yacht behind your house in this 3bd/2ba.Bay Point Canal Home! $379,000Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 3102 Preserve Rookery Blvd. Fabulous 4bd/5ba executive home in the gated Preserve community. $659,900Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 OPEN HOUSESunday, March 18th 1pm until 4pm 6645 North Lagoon Dr. PCB, FL 32408NEW CONSTRUCTIONTidewater Creek Subdivision. 3br/Bonus Room 4Baths Boat slip Hosted by Cynthia Luster Coastal Property Svcs 850-691-7927 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 F F 3 3 Relocating?850.231.1483relo@countsrealestate.com Follow Us! PANAMA CITY3009 HWY 77, SUITE H Panama City, FL 850.248.3615 EMERALD COAST21901 PCB Pkwy Panama City Beach, FL 850.249.1414 THOMAS DRIVE2104 Thomas Drive Panama City, FL 850.249.3615 30-A5231 E. County Hwy-30A, #100 Santa Rosa Beach, FL 850.231.1483 PIER PARK100 Pier Park Dr., #115 Panama City Beach, FL 850.234.0336 RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES FOR SALE Massalina Bayou MLS# 668886 $438,975 248 E 3RD PL PEGGY WEIGEL-HANSON 309 S PALO ALTO KATHY WILLSOPEN HOUSE TODAY 1-4 PM e Cove MLS# 664066 $155,000 Forest Park MLS# 668204 $295,000 905 ROSEMONT DR SCOTT MAUNEY North Beach Estates MLS# 666683 $235,000 910 PELICAN PL SHAUNNAH YOUNG Deer Point Lake MLS# 668784 $234,500 4929 DEERWOOD AVE EREN SULLIVAN Pretty Bayou Island MLS# 668035 $425,000 2409 PRETTY BAYOU ISLAND TEAM TURNER Hamon Haven MLS# 667700 $748,655 233 HAMON AVE CATHERINE LANCASTER Call 850.814.0355 for access MLS# 664159 $239,900 1770 ANNABELLAS DR STEPHANIE INGRAM Newly Reduced MLS# 665868 $189,000 911 E 2ND PL LISA RHODES Waterfront Home MLS# 662767 $649,900 6608 S LAGOON DR ERIC AKINS Bayview Heights MLS# 665101 $315,000 1600 DRUMMOND AVE KRISTIAN HALL Massalina Bayou MLS# 666808 $438,500 250 E 3RD PL MARTHA GRAY Point Royal Home MLS# 666591 $334,900 5721 MAGNOLIA BEACH RD SCOTT FISHER Call Don for appointment MLS# 667269 $585,000 3105 PRESERVE ROOKERY DON COOLEY Hidden Pines MLS# 668047 $319,000 337 HIDDEN ISLAND DR INNA MCLELLAND Chipley Home MLS# 668643 $135,000 1988 EVA PL JASON LARSON Waterfront Home MLS# 663693 $699,000 7311 EMERSON DR ALAN GRAHAM Summerhouse Condo MLS# 664275 $285,000 6505 THOMAS DR 102A AARON PAYNE e Landings in Lynn HavenMLS# 667831 $359,000 408 LANDINGS BLVD BUBBA MCCANT Beach Front Home MLS# 666001 $649,000 14202 FRONT BEACH RD JANE MCGILLIVRAY NF-1177385 Pr e em m i e r P Pr op p e er ti e e s o o f B Ba a y Co o un ty y L LL C C 850-819-5291 Barbara Stevens Broker/Owner 3424 High Cli Rd 4/2 all brick on large wooded lot with 2,547 SF. Like new!For Lease $1800/mth For Sale $319,990 21810 Palm Ave. 2/2 Florida Cottage just a short walk to Gulf of Mexico Access 88. Located on much sought after west end of PC Beach.$212,000 Accepting new listings! OPEN SUNDAY 1-4PM 114 Sandollar Drive MLS# 668529 € $275,000 3BR/2.5BA € 1,982 sqft € New Water Heater € New A/C Close to Water € Fire Place € Indoor Garden Area Dir: From N Lagoon and Joan, East on N Lagoon, Left on Grand Lagoon Shores Dr, Left on Sandollar Dr. Home will be on your right.Joseph Pineda, Realtor850-960-5118NF-1178504 NF-1177386 FEATURED HOMES OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 226 Callaway Chase Lane MLS# 667625 € $124,900 3BR/2.5BA € 1,166 sqft Townhome € Garage Walk-In Closet € 6 miles to TAFB Dir: Tyndall Pkwy to East on Hwy 22, mile Callaway Chase is on the right.Hosted byBruce Mackay, Realtor850-209-9534NF-1177919 OPEN SUNDAY 1 3 1515 Michigan AvenueMLS# 663983  $169,900 3BR/2BA € 1,344 sqft € New Counter Tops & Cabinets New Water Heater € Tile Floors € Breakfast Bar Dir: From 23rd St & Hwy 77 go North on Hwy 77, R on 14th St, R on Michigan Ave.Larisa Stewart, Realtor850-276-3487NF-1179665 OPEN SUNDAY 1 4 7559 Shadow Bay Drive MLS# 668263 € $176,500Dir: From Tyndall Pkwy head East on HWY 22, left turn onto Summerset Ave. Left onto Shadow Bay Dr. The house is on the right. 3BR/2BA € 1,356sqft € Cathedral Ceiling Fireplace € Breakfast Bar € Privacy FencedRon Wilson, Realtor850-814-5743NF-1179666 Beautiful brick 3BR/2BA home with pool, laminate oors, open oor plan and replace.Dir: From 23rd st, North at the trafc light (23rd plaza) between Pep boys and Newks, follow the palm lined rd to right on Windy Lane, home on Right.Ida Hargaray OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3PM $225,000(850) 481-2438 609 Windy Lane NF-1177920 Just Listed 8526 LYDIA LANE #6 PCB  $154,900 OPEN HOUSE 1:00 4:00PM Deep Water BOAT SLIP INCLUDED! Dockside South Condo Waterfront 1 BR/1 BA, Corner/End Unit, Open Floor Plan; Updated Kitchen with Quartz Counters, Stainless Appliances; Outdoor Storage; MUST SEE!Dir: South omas Dr. 1/2 mile East of Wendys turn North on Bonita. End of Bonita, complex onle.Natalie Ryan Realtor850-960-1731 NF-1177921 OPEN HOUSE 1:00 4:00PM Enjoy life in this distinguished plantation-style gated community on beautiful St. Andrews Bay. 3BR/3BA 1608 SF featuring 10’ ceilings, hardwood floors, kitchen with top of the line amenities. Get your sunset now! Dir: From omas Drive, turn on Magnolia Beach Rd. Continue Le on Magnolia Beach Rd. Waterhaven will be on the le P053 in third building on le .Janet Roan, REALTOR(850)527-6039JRoan830@aol.com NF-1178524 2600 MYSTIC LN P053  PANAMA CITY BEACH $299,000  MLS#667135

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 4 4 Sunday, March 18, 2018| The News Herald www.C21Commander.com850-769-8326 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1:30 4:00PM 3685 CEDAR PARK DR P ANAMA CITY From Panama City Mall Travel North on Hwy 231 for Approximately 3.5 Miles, Turn Right on Pipeline Rd, go 1/2 mile to Cedar Parkentrance will be on your right. Continue past Cedar Park Lane to Cedar Park Drive and home site is directly ahead $314,900 -NEW Construction -4BR/2.5 BA w/ o ce -Near PCB and Tyndall -Brick, 2 car garage Hosted by: Cale OQuinn, REALTOR MLS#660629 3619 AZ ALEA CT PANAMA CITY Head north on Martin Luther King Jr Blvd 0.4 mi Turn right onto Baldwin Rd 1.0 mi Turn left onto Canal St 0.1 mi Turn right onto Azalea Way 0.2 mi Turn left onto Azalea Ct Destination will be on the left $269,000 -All Brick 4BR/2BA -Spacious Layout -Crown Molding/ replace -2 car garageHosted by Morgan Mason and Brooke Rodriguez, REALTOR MLS#668849 105 & 107 FERNWOOD ST PANAMA CITY BEACH Back Beach Rd to Fernwood St. (just west of Clara Ave). Travel south on Fernwood St and look for home on right OR from Wal-Mart at Front Beach and Middle Beach Rd, travel west on Middle Beach Rd, once you pass Hutchison Beach Elementary School, look for Fernwood St and turn right, travel three blocks, home is on the corner of Agave St and Fernwood St. $289,500 -NEW BEACH CONSTRUCTION -1/2 mile to Gulf & Pier Park -3BR/3BA plus Bonus Rm -Covered Patio, 2 car garage Hosted by: Kathy Fabian Brust, REALTOR MLS#667011 1701 MISSOURI AVE LYNN HAVEN From Jenks and Hwy 390, North on Hwy 390, Left on 17th Street, Home on Corner of 17th Street and Missouri Ave. $249,900 -3BR/2BA Bonus Room -NEW Roof/NEW HVAC -NEW Kitchen/Fireplace -Lots of updates Hosted by: Lennell Johnson, REALTOR MLS#669156 2382 OLD MILL RD BONIFAY From Highway 90 and 79, West on 90, right on Wrights Creek Rd, Right on Hathaway Mill Rd, right on Hickory, Hickory becomes Old Mill Rd. $39,900 -3BR/2BA + bonus room -Home back up to small lake -Fenced Yard -O ered As Is Hosted by: Victor Jed, REALTOR MLS#663390 4326 TR ANSMITTER RD PANAMA CITY Hwy 390 right on Transmitter house on the left $389,900 -Awesome Craftsman Style -Covered Parking, 3 car garage -Wrap porches, HUGE kitchen Numerous fruit trees & grapes Hosted by: Wilma Taylor, REALTOR MLS#669101 3121 C OUNTRY CLUB DR LYNN HAVEN From Hwy 77 turn EAST onto 9th Street (LH City hall) continue to entrance of Panama Country Club-At stop sign turn RIGHT and continue to 3121 Country Club Drive and home will be on your left Hosted by: Kelly Hamlin, REALTOR COMMANDER REALTY, INC.$599,000 -4/3.5 Panama Country Club -Over 3,400 SF, Large Corner Lot -Beautiful Columns & Chandeliers -In-Ground Screened Pool MLS#661165 NF-1177918 FEATURED LISTINGSSouthportVacant Lot on Hwy 2302. 150 Frontage. Home, MH or Duplex OK. Only $27,500Bayou George3BR 2BA 1460 SF+ DWMH on .78 acre Beautiful trees. Finance Available. Adjoining property available Over 2400 SF Total.$89,0001st Time Home BuyerWe make it so easy to understand the procedures. No detail, confusing technical talk. Let me tell you how I can possibly put you in your 1st home for No out of pocket moneyŽ!!Venetian VillaCanal Front (Navigable) 3BR 2.5BA 2 Sty. T.H. Bonus Rm. Fireplace. Needs TLC. Below Mkt.at Only $179,000Lynn HavenHistoric 103 year old home. 2 story, beautiful lot in great area. Livable, but needs work. $109,000 Visit our Web/Email: actionrealty1.com dmalloy@knology.net Action R.V. StorageVeteran Discount Contact us at:dmalloy@knology.net265-1006 WE HAVE HOMES100%FINANCINGNF-1179251Appts Encouraged PUT MY 39 YEARS EXPERIENCE TO WORK FOR YOU! Lynn Haven4BR 2BA 1674 SF +Corner lot. Immaculate. New Roof. New AC. 100% Financing Available. Mixed use. $169,000No matter what anyone says Experience does make a difference.Ž Call me today and get more than your moneys worth. HUD HOMESFountain4BR 2BA, 2007 2300 SF on 1 acre.$36,799 CONTRACT PENDING Pirate’s Cove at 204 Cain Road Lake Powell 1bd/1ba Condo approx. 800 sq.ft. furnished, pools, private boat ramp, covered parking. $150K Call (850) 832-2782 or (850) 819-6929 t xt FL87402 to 56654 99 Acre Farm for Sale4500 River Road Sneads, FL 32460 Jackson County, FL Hwy 271615ft of highway frontage, Two barns, House (Needs Renovating), Two 4” water wells, One 8” water well, totally fenced/cross fenced, gates, perm pastures, holding pens/carral, pond, aprox 10 acres of hardwood/pines. Located 1 1/2 miles from Public boat ramps, to Lake Seminole and the Chattahoochee River. Asking price $310,000. Contact: 850-557-2209 Deer Point Lake Waterfront Lot Eastside 230’on water. Cleared + Fenced $69,900. Call: 850-532-9043 850-866-2511 NF-1177914 Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 F F 5 5 B L B L Large lots, water, sewer, gated neighborhood850-265-6350www.lakemerial orida.com NF-1178506 Won’t you join us?Visit our sales office to get all the news and information about new homes in SweetBay. Call 844-35-SWEET It’s beautiful outside. Feels like the perfect day for a bayfront run after walking the kids to school—and treating them to poolside popsicles when they get out. SweetBay is a new master-planned community in Panama City, Florida with miles of coastline to get in touch with nature and neighbors. Our bayfront village will foster a healthy lifestyle we like to call, “relaxed living with a dash of Southern charm.” It’s a friendly neighborhood with everything you need just a short walk away. Academy Park, our first neighborhood, features University Academy (UA)—a free public K-6 charter school, with expansion plans to 8th grade. UA placed 1st in the district based on 2014 state standard scores. And our location is an easy drive to nearby universities, hospitals, military bases, and many other work centers. A community of new & custom homesites now open in Panama City, Florida. Now Open NF-1179270 18780 PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO ALABAMA STATUE THAT THE FOLLOWING GOODS WILL BE SOLD AT 1026 W 15TH ST P ANAMA CITY FL ON SUND A Y THE 1ST D A Y OF APRIL A T 10:00 AM. TO SATISFY LIEN CLAIMS BY U-HAUL. LESSOR WILL CONDUCT A PUBLIC AUCTION WITH RESERVE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH FOR THE CONTENTS IN THE UNITS OF THE FOLLOWING TENANTS: TENANT HAS THE RIGHT TO REDEEM CONTENTS ANY TIME PRIOR TO SALE. ANY OF THE ABOVE ITEMS MAY BE WITHDRAWN FROM SALE BY U-HAUL WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE. Renee Carter 4713 Lyons Blvd, Tallahassee, FL Unit 158 (household goods) Cynthis Lunsford 1722 W 17th St, 203, Panama City, FL Unit A323 (household goods) Timothy Nicholson 1802 Flowers Ave., Panama City, FL Unit 197 (household goods) Joe Kominczak 2101 W Hwy 390 Apt 1122, Lynn Haven, FL Unit C15 (household goods) Nicole Wolf 2203 Beck Ave., D-6, Panama City, FL Unit AA7440D (household goods) Laconte Black 2429 Erin Dr., Panama City, FL Unit A485 (household goods) Tim Southerland 7226 Campflowers Rd, Panama City, FL Unit A561 (household goods) Justin Markowski 46 White Feather Ln., Palm Coast, FL Unit A543 (household goods) Janice McIntosh 4417 13th St, 208, Saint Cloud, FL Unit 414 (household goods) Owen Burke 600 SW 602nd Ave., Margate, FL Unit 212 (household goods) U-HAUL 1026 W. 15TH ST. PANAMA CITY, FL 32401 AUCTION BEING HELD BY SMITH AUCTION SERVICES #916 March 18, 25, 2018 19654 CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2018-07 FIRE TRUCK EQUIPMENT Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for a “Fire Truck Equipment” will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday, April 13, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday, April 13, 2018,at 3:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “RFP 2018-07 Fire Truck Equipment”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Direct Purchase of a Fire Truck Equipment is further described in the bid description document. The bid description document is available at www .cityofportstjoe .com For questions concerning this project, please contact Chief John Ford at 850-227-8958. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer Pub: March 18, 2018 19614 PUBLIC NOTICE The PAEC Florida Buy program is seeking to receive proposals, RFP #18-09, to establish contracts to furnish fencing to schools, other public and non-profit entities in the PAEC Districts. To access RFP documents go to www .florida buy .org Pub: March 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2018 19658 CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2018-06 FIRE TRUCK Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for a “Fire Truck” will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday, April 13, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday, April 13, 2018, at 3:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “RFP 2018-06 Fire Truck”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Direct Purchase of a Fire Truck is further described in the bid description document. The bid description document is available at www .cityofport stjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact Chief John Ford at 850-227-8958. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer Pub: March 18, 2018 Grey Short Hair Mittenpawwith white feet. Male. Fixed. Purple collar and gold flea collar. Missing since Feb. Last seen in Lagoona Beach Area, off of Vespavia Street, by the Sun and Sand motel. Answers to Fuffums. 850-533-5857 We Buy Anything OldItems we buy include: Signs (Gas and Oil, Soda, Tobacco, etc.) Images (Time Types, Ambrotypes, CDVs, etc) Antique Weaponry, Primitives, Antique Furniture, Clocks, Country Store Items, Jewelry. Taxisdermy, Oddities, Pottery, Architectural Items, Militaria, Folk Art, Lamps and a whole lot more! We pay cash! Contact Kris Clark 706 474 3443 Appliances for SaleWasher and Dryer, Whirlpool brand washer, like new $200.00 Frigid Air brand Dyer, works like new $75.00 Contact: 850-890-8202 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794Text FL81660 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 BJs Lawn & Tree Service! Offering 25% off tree removal! Licensed & Insured. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 J3’s Lawn and Palm, LLCRetired Military looking to maintain your Lawn, we also Pressure Wash, and trim Palm Trees. Call or text Kay or James at 850-768-4589 or 850-703-1706. Discount for more than one customer in your general area. Steve Hauling and Land ClearingLand clearing, fill dirt, rock and clay. Free estimates. 850-896-4237 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Int/ext painting, Clean-ups/sod, pressure washing, rock/flower beds, lawns.Save 20% Call Roy 850-303-8526 Private Home Health Care24 Years of Experience. Referrences Available. Call: (850) 630-5451 ACLASSIC TOUCH An Honest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 18yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 774-3977 txt FL88189 to56654 Happy HouseDetail CleaningLic, bonded, insured850-258-1204 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 WHITE’S CONCRETESpring Special Lic. Ins.& 40yrs.exp. 874-1515 / 896-6864 Total Care Of Your Loved OnesIn Your Home, Refs, 20 Years Exp,Day or Night!850-960-1917 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 6 6 Sunday, March 18, 2018| The News Herald

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 F F 7 7 Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an aggressive leader in the new contracts to build various ships at their Panama City, FL location has immediate openings for the following positions: Ship tters € Structural Welders Pipe tters € Marine Electricians Heavy Equipment Operator € Carpenters Eastern offers a competitive salary and bene ts package including 401(K) and company-paid health, dental & life insurance. Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Af rmative Action Employer. All quali ed applicants will received consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identify, national origin, age, protected veteran status, disability status or any other status or characteristic protected under applicable federal, state, of local laws. Quali ed applicants may submit their resume/application in con dence to Human Resource, 13300 Allaton Road, Panama City, FL 32404 or via e-mail: HR@Easternshipbuilding.com NF-1179687 NF-1178703501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL 32401Telephone(850) 747-5000FAX(850) 763-4636Cooks & CashierFull-time jobNOW HIRING SMILING FACES!! COOKS & CASHIERS FULL & PART TIME https://waybackburgers.com/careers/ 15750 Panama City Beach Pkwy Join our Team Apply in person:275 South Highway 79 Panama City Beach, FLWeb ID#:34381001850-249-7200www.sandbarpcb.com Working The Sandbar Life! Experience Preferredas a hostess line cook server bartenders, and bussers. Are the positions available for hire NF-1178710 CITY OF PANAMA CITY CITY MANAGERThe City of Panama City, Florida, seeks a City Manager. The City of Panama City, the county seat for Bay County, is located in the Florida “panhandle”, is approximately 35 square miles with a population of 37,000+.Panama City is a community with historical charm, southern values, and is still growing. City Manager. Salary commensurate with training and experience, plus generous benefits.A five member commission (Mayor and four commissioners) elected for four year, nonpartisan staggered terms. $100M operating budget; 524 employees.A bachelor’s degree in public/business/administration/finance/economic/related field and a minimum three years’ experience in local government management or other equivalent experience is required;a master’s degree in public administration or business administration is preferred. Ideal candidate should have experience in dealing with a variety of economic .development issues, financial management, community re-development and considerable skills in leadership, inclusive of the ability to motivate and foster a team-oriented atmosphere.Must be self-motivated, enthusiastic and have an ability to build trust.Also needs to be a visionary for short and long-range planning and interface well with personnel and the community.Work in a first-class employment environment that takes pride in enhancing quality of life for citizens and employees. Resumes and Applications will be accepted until March 30th 2018 Please apply on city website: PCGO V .ORG Medical ReceptionistFull Time Position Monday thru Friday Busy Medical Practice looking for anExperienced Insurance Verification/ New Patient Coordinator.Required Qualifications:  Must have a medical background, and able to work well with others and alone. Ability to multi-task and possess excellent organizational skills.  Ability to efficiently handle heavy patient volumes.  Good communication skills and ability to present themselves in a professional manner at all times, by being compassionate and courteous.  Ability to type and experience with electronic medical records.  Willing to learn new skills. Be professional, and willing to follow clinic dress code. Have reliable transportation. Be team oriented and work well with others.Email resume to: neuroclinicspec@gmail.com Callaway5610 Boat Race Road &Tyndall Parkway Sat. 8am-12pmGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERANShare MinistryThrift Shop Clothing Sale!!! Drop in gas stove, sofa/couch, dresser drawers, household items, dining room table, electric stove, remote control bed,lift chair, over the stove microwave & washing machine, & Dryer!! Free Books!!!txt FL90629 to 56654 Fountain 12024 Ferndale Street 03/17 -8am until 4pm 03/18 -11am until 3pm 03/19 -03/23 11:00am until 4:00pm 03/24 -03/25 10:00am until 3pm 10am until 4pmEverything Must Go!Including the house -4 bed/3 bath, 2290 Sq ft, .93 acres. solid wood furniture (dining room sets, living room set, bedroom sets), China, Crystal, Silver, Pyrex, Tupperware, Corning Ware, Anchor Hocking, Iris Herringbone, Heartland, Fitz & Floyd (Christmas, Easter and Thanksgiving ceramics), Elvis, Clothes (womens 16-18, mens 38-40). Vintage & Antiques. Sale is inside and out. We have brought out more items. We will be here all of Bay County Spring Break. Shotguns for Sale 12 Ga. Mod. 37 $500 16 Ga. Mod. 37 $500 410 mod 500 $200 O/U .22/410 $400 30/30 Win Mod 94 $400 850-532-9043 Cemetery SpaceAt Evergreen Memorial Cemetery Garden of The Last Supper. $2,100 Call 850-527-5574 txt FL90145 to 56654 FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com Rachel’s Dress ShopEquipment for sale, Clothing store racks, Double, round and spiral racks available. All chrome equipment Asking $40.00 each. Call: 850-763-8483 Accounts Receivable RepresentativeFull time. Computer & communication skills needed. Please email resumes to: chaversstorage2@ gmail.com Anytime Tree Removal LLCis now hiring Class A & B CDL Drivers. Experienced Tree Climber Experienced Bucket Truck Operator Top Pay. Call 850-628-0211 CDL DriverContainer drayage. Good pay/benefits. Dispatched to & from Panama City, FL. No more than 2 nights away at a time. 1 year OTR exp. required. Send resume to Bienville.trucking@ gmail.com CDL Drivers NeededDrivers, CDL-A Home EVERY Weekend !!! Dedicated Southeast! Walk Away Lease, No Money Down. Drivers average $1500/wk 888-519-4085 x143 Experienced Cabinet PersonPanama Cabinet Company is currently accepting applications. Please send or bring your resume to: 3637 N. Highway 231 Panama City Fl 32404. 850-769-3518 HVAC Service TechPd vacation & holidays. Med Ins, Retirement. DFWP. EOE. Tarpon Dock Air Conditioning (850) 785-9568 Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring18 and older Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple PositionsPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Experienced• Managers •Asst Managers •Sales PersonelHeatwave & Purple Haze Now Hiring FT/PT -year round. Great pay. Great work environment. Apply at 10015 Front Beach Rd. Or fax to 850-234-9911 HVAC HelperWith benefits. 3 years documented exper. in the field. To apply, go to: www .bay .k12.fl.us Employment Opportunities, Support. For additional assistance call 850-767-4231 Deadline to apply is: 4:30pm on 03/26/2018 LandscapingHiring for all positions in landscape construction and lawn maitenance. Good pay. Benefits. Year round employment. Apply at Noles Scapes 1812 West 27th Street Panama City, FL 850-248-0973 No drug users, please. Local Company Needs A & B CDL Drivers and Truck Mechanics 850-769-8031 Plumber ServiceExperience. Salary DOE. Established company F/T. Please call Franklin Plumbing at 850-234-2168 Stock Clerk/ Sales ClerkPT/ FT. All shifts. Apply between 9am-12 7 days per week. Shell Port 9949 Thomas Dr. PCB. Retirees welcome Tow Truck DriverApplicant needs to be 25 years or older, experienced preferred, Apply at 2798 East 5th Street Panama City, FL 32401 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 NF-1178709 Job Title:Senior Bookkeeper, TravelStarting Salary: $25,765 Job Description: This job description is a general description of the essential job functions. It is not intended as an employment contract, nor is it intended to describe all the duties someone in this position may perform. All employees of Gulf Coast State College are expected to perform duties as assigned by Gulf Coast State College supervisory/management personnel, regardless of job title or routine job duties. This position is sensitive and will require a criminal background check. The primary function of this position is to perform all duties related to coordinating travel for employees and students, reconcile cash advances, and process tuition reimbursements.Essential Duties Summary:€ Coordinates all approved travel for employees and students € Ensures that all proper travel documentation is provided € Handles airfare, registration, and event reservations for all travel € Manages lodging and meal requests for groups traveling 3 or more € Processes check requisitions associated with travel € Ensures all charges and documentation are correct on reimbursement vouchers € Con rms that reimbursement for meals and mileage are paid per Florida Statutes € Manages car rental and gas cards € Reconciles car rental receipts and processes monthly car rental statements € Coordinates meal money for the athletic department € Reconciles monthly credit card statement € Manages employee tuition reimbursements € Handles all cash advance requestsRequired Quali cations: To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential duty satisfactorily. The ability to be exible in scheduling work hours including coverage demands due to training periods and equipment problems is required. The ability to work exible hours and regular attendance at work are essential functions of this position. The ability to travel locally and out of town on college related business and training is required. SUPERVISORYRESPONSIBILITIES: None EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE: High school diploma and Microsoft application experience required. CERTIFICATES,LICENSES,ETC: NonePreferred Qualifications:General working knowledge of accounting.PhysicalDemands: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to sit, stand, talk, and hear. The employee is frequently required to use hands to nger, handle, and feel. The employee is regularly required to walk and reach with hands and arms. The employee may be required to lift and/or move up to 40 pounds and climb/balance, stoop, kneel, crouch, and crawl. The vision requirements include close vision, distance vision, and ability to adjust focus as well as ability to determine the color of objects.Please visit https://www.gulfcoast.edu/human-resources/ employment-opportunities.html to apply.

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 8 8 Sunday, March 18, 2018| The News Herald Cemetery, Grounds, MaintenanceFull time position available for the rightcandidate. Responsible for assisting in all aspects of cemetery maintenance including interments, inurnments, etc. Previous experience in landscaping & grounds maint. work required. Requirements: High school diploma or equivalent and ability to show respect and sensitivity toward client families while working in a physically demanding environment. Some overtime will be required on weekends. To apply call (850) 763-4694. Elite HousekeeperHiring Elite Housekeeper, full-time, Destin, M-F. We are seeking a domestic assistant to help the House and Kitchen Manager. Must be able to perform heavy cleaning with a great attitude. Some produce prep included. Are you helpful and willing? Pet friendly? This is a happy work environment, please only individuals with high energy apply! Possible salary with benefits for the right candidate. Send resume to: asterling2017@yahoo.com HELP WANTEDLOOKING FOR MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT, BEACH ATTENDANTS, AND BANANABOAT OPERATOR. ALLPOSITIONS GUARANTEE SALARY. INQUIRE AT: ED’S SHEDS 8224 PANAMACITYBCH PKWY, PCB, FL MON -FRI 8:30 -12 AND 1-4:30 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Sales PersonAn established flooring company, 20 plus successful years, located in Panama City Beach is seeking to add a motivated sales person to our team. Prior flooring/construction/Designer/Retail experience is preferred •Professional appearance and demeanor Self-motivated team player w/strong work ethic Ability to read blueprints, field measure and calculate measurements, for design and job processing Working independently as well w/other team members Interior design skills in coordinating tile, wood, carpet, and other flooring within the setting. RFMS software knowledge This position is a high potential commission job w/draw to get you started. We request candidates submit their resume Bill@classiccarpetspcb.com No phone calls please. Seasonal Laborers Needed!Now hiring full-time, seasonal roadside weed-eating and litter removal laborers. Starting rate $11.00/hour. M-F with some Saturdays possible. Work performed in Bay and Calhoun counties. Please contact AARK Enterprises at 850 532 7645 or info@aarkenterprises.com using subject heading JOB. NF-1178702 LINE COOK Please Apply at www.losantojitos.comor in person Monday … Friday 2:00pm … 4:00pm 1236 Beck Avenue, Panama City, FL 32404 Full-Time JobNOW HIRING LINE COOKS Experience needed. Great Pay and Fun Work Environment Competitive Pay, Year round Employment. Countertop InstallerEstablished countertop business seeks granite/stone countertop installer or install helper. Experience preferred. Will train motivated person. Hours of work are M-F, with each work day starting at 7am. Benefits available: 401K, health insurance, and more! Family-oriented team. Pay based on experience, and is renegotiable after a brief period. Come grow with us! Apply through this ad anytime. Apply on-site M-F, 10am-4pm: 635 Briggs Ln, Southport, FL 32409. GENERAL MANAGER Highway 79 Corridor AuthoritySalary Range: $57,283 -$67,475. Closing Date: March 23rd, 2018 General Manager, Highway 79 Corridor Authority – This position will coordinate development of a 1549 acre commercial industrial area and oversee construction of 2.3 miles of new sewer and water service. Supervises staff consisting of one Executive Assistant as well as Consultants, Engineers, Planners, Accountant and Legal. This position reports to a five (5) member Board including three (3) elected officials. MINIMUM TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE – o Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, Engineering or other related field; and, o 10 years of Project Manager experience at the multi-million dollar level. Notes : 1. Experience in working with State and Federal Grants and with the Department of Transportation preferred. 2. Benefits include membership in the Florida Retirement System and other standard benefits available to all county employees. All interested applicants must submit a detailed resume to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to mhayes@washingtonfl.com by 4:00 PM on March 23, 2018. Equal Opportunity/Drug-Free Workplace Office ManagerAn established flooring company, 20 plus successful years, located in Panama City Beach is seeking to add a motivated Office Manager to our team. Pay is depending on experience. Bachelor Degree in Accounting / Business required. 3-5 Years of Management experience. Position will handle some HR tasks. Please send resumes to erin@classiccarpetspcb.com No phone calls please. Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. Cadillac XTS, ’13, auto, v6, xle, #105, $19,593! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981.

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Sunday, March 18, 2018 F F 9 9 DODGE CHRYSLER JEEP RAM HYUNDAI MITSUBISHI LINCOLN NOW HIRING!Come join the largest and busiest dealership in Bay County! We are looking to hire sales consultants for our New & Used Departments. Join our team and be able to sell from the largest selection of vehicles in the area. No experience necessary. We are offering a full training program! • $500/week plus commission! • Paid vacation!Please apply in person: 636 W. 15th Street Panama City, FL 32401Ask for Wayne BaileyNF-1179081 NF-1179074 2007 Toyota TundraNice Truck, Clean, #973 Sale Price: $19,992 BillCramerGM.comOver 200 UsedPartial List Below Plus tax, title, license, $95 electronic 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, FL850-250-5489877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.com 2002 Nissan Frontier King Cab, XE, #753 Sale Price: $5,993 2012 Mazda CX-9 Auto, V6, Leather, #138 Sale Price: $10,9912013 Cadillac XTSAuto, V6, FWD, #105 Sale Price: $19,5932017 RAMT Promaster 1500AM/FM/MP3, V6, #018 Sale Price: $19,994 2017 Chevy Silverado 2500 4WD, High Country, #283 Sale Price: $62,491 2013 Nissan 370Z Manual, Touring, #189 Sale Price: $19,495 Nice Truck, Cl l Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl C ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea n, n n n n n n n n n #97 3 Sale Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic e: $ $ $ 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 9 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ,9 ,9 ,9 9 9 9 9 ,9 ,9 9 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 ShopHERE2017 Chevy Malibu Auto, Turbo 4 Cylinder, #291 Sale Price: $27,992 2013 Chevy Suburban 4 Wheel Drive, LTZ, #969 Sale Price: $29,995 2004 Chevy Corvette Auto, Convertible, #765 Sale Price: $17,994 2014 Toyota Camry Auto, V6, LS, #608 Sale Price: $10,995 2018 Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, 4WD, #084 Sale Price: $32,991 2012 Chevy Camaro 6 Speed, ZL1, #041 Sale Price: $36,991 2017 Chevy Equinox Auto, Cloth Seats, LT, #023 Sale Price: $20,994 2017 Jeep Compass Manual, Sport, #885 Sale Price: $15,9942016 Mercedes GLE 350Auto, V6, #910 Sale Price: $39,995 NF-1179072 NF-1179075 NF-1179076 Thanks for getting back with me. I do my best to listen to your show when I can. Great TV program by the way. The crazy thing is Ive been using (non)-Mobile One full synthetic for the last 4 years, starting at 90,000 miles and now I have around 140,000. Changed synthetic every 9 10,000 miles. Before that I changed oil & lter every 5,000 miles using detergent oil that was speci ed by the manufacturer. As of now, no oil usage. Must have been the regular oil to cause sludge. Have had one lifter taping on occasion I noticed black sludge on the latest oil change. I used compressed air to try and blow sludge out of oil pan which apparently restricted oil pickup temporarily. Ran engine short time till pressure returned but was low. I suspect sludge is still around pickup tube / strainer. Oil pressure at idle is between 20/25 psi. I wasnt sure if ATF (Automatic transmission uid) would damage my converter or Oxygen sensor when used in conjunction with oil. I would like to try it just for short time say 50 100 miles then change oil & lter again. Most techs say to use a quart of ATF with oil change minus one quart oil. Most say sludge will come out and lifters will quit ticking. I need my truck working for a job tomorrow. Is there any way you or I could email Mark for his answer? I could then call in one morning to give an update as to what it does. Appreciate any help. Thanks in advance, Keith P.S. I did use Lucas oil treatment during regular oil changes 3 times prior to 90,000 miles. Keith, I have talked with Mark Sarlo my Automotive Engineer Co-host about your ticking and sludge build up problemŽ. The best advice we can offer to clean the sludge from the inside of your engine would be to replace your oil with 0w30 full synthetic motor oil. Please change your oil and lter after no more than 3 months 3,000 miles due to the sludge build up you have from going too long in the past between oil changes. Adding transmission uid to the oil will do a great job in cleaning the inside of your motor, the problem is it may poisonŽ the catalytic converter. The Catalytic converter when it works like it should will help maintain proper fuel mileage. Mark and I have seen damage that can be done in a short amount of time to a Cat converter using the wrong uids. When you add any other additives to FULL synthetic oil to help make it better, you are making it worse by degrading the oil. Remember the only true FULL synthetic oils that are made molecule by molecule in a test tube are Mobile One, Amsoil and a racing oil called Redline. The other oils you see advertised as full synthetic are petroleum basedŽ oils that have been heated and modi edŽ to meet the Federal Government de nition of Full SyntheticŽ. These type oils in some Automotive Engineers opinions are just a very good synthetically blended oils, not TRUE full synthetic oil by true de nition. P.S. Check your local newspaper for coupon for a Mobil 1 oil change and lter change special with a 30,000 miles inspection normally $129.95 plus Tax only $64.99 + tax. Only during the month of March Madness. THE TRUTH ABOUT MOTOR OILS THAT CLAIM THEY ARE FULL SYNTHETICŽ James Morrisjames@masterautotech.comTHE AUTOADVISOR Hope this gives you enough information to gure this problem out. If we can be of service, call us at 850-763-0555 during my show on Fox 28 at 6 to 6:30 am, Monday through Friday.NF-1177862 Mediacom Now Hiring! Santa Rosa Beach, Apalachicola & Mexico Beach Broadband Specialist | 11282 11590 Apply online at: MediacomCable.com/careers or call Devin: 850-934-7705 Mediacom Communications EOE MFDV NOW HIRING!Alice’s on Bayview is looking for experienced staff for full service casual restaurant in Historic St. Andrews! Come join our team and work with great staff and serve awesome guests in a beautiful location. Qualities we are looking for include:  2 Years full service restaurant experience preferred. Positive attitude Well groomed Dependability Team player Apply in person from 2:00pm until 4:00pm at 1000 Bayview Avenue 2007 Acura TL Navigation4 door, 3.2L V6, Automatic, AC, XM/Sirus Radio w/Bluetooth. All power options, leather, factory powered sunroof. Carfax, 1 owner, no accidents, only 88,326 miles. Carfax Retail -$10,090 Sale Price -$6,995. Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 Chevy Camaro, ’15, auto, ss, #323, $26,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Cruze, ’11, auto, turbo 4 cylinder, #034, $13,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Spark, ’13, hatchback, 1lt, #013, $7,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City850-250-5981. Ford Fiesta, ’15, am/fm/cd, manual, #089, $9,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Kia Optima, ’14, am/fm/cd/mp3, #004, $11,900! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Nissan 370z, ’13, manual, touring, #189, $19,495! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Subaru Impreza, ’12, auto, leather, #929, $11,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Toyota Camry, ’14, auto, 4 door, $10,995! #608, Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. 2006 GMC Envoy, 1 owner, low miles, LTRH, sunroof, all service records $7,495, call Jack 850-307-3476 2009 Mercedes E-350, 75K miles, NAV, sunroof, immaculate, value price $11,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2010 Chevy Camaro, 1 owner, 46K miles, AT, excellent cond., value price $12,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2010 Toyota Venza, 1 owner, 69K miles, sunroof, beautiful offer, value price $11,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2013 Cadillac SRX, 44K miles, LTHR, NAV, blindside alert, new tires, hurry for this one, $23,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2016 Buick Lacrosse, Premium, 1 owner, 8K miles, over 42K new, value price $25,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2016 Buick Lacrosse, Premium, 1 owner, 8K miles, over 42K new, value price $25,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 Cadillac Escalade, ’16, auto, leather, #317, $58,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Suburban, ’13, 4wd, ltz, $29,995! #969 Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. Chevy Tahoe, ’13, auto, v8, lt, #202, $26,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Trax, ’15, siriusxm, lt, #056, $15,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981 Ford Edge, ’14, auto, v6, limited, #361, $22,893! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Jeep Compass, ’17, manual, sport, #885, $15,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Toyota Rav4, ’10, auto, 4wd, #429, $12,493! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. 1999 Dodge Ram V6Very good condition, $3500 or best offer. Call: 330-310-3072 2006 Dodge Dakota TruckSLT package, automatic, 49179 miles, original owner, asking $11000. Call: 850-441-3634 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe, 37K miles, super cond., value price $14,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 Ford Ranger Sport 4x4Extended, 5-speed, 30k miles. 4.0 motor, tow package, news tires, toolsbox and brush guard included. Good condition, runs great, $11,000, Call 850-230-3420 2015 Cadillac ATS, 1 owner, 36K miles, new tires, LTHR, value price $21,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2016 GMC Canyon, 1 owner, V6, 16K miles, warranty, value price $27,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 Chevy Silverado 2500, ’17, 4wd, high country, #283, $62,491! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Ford F-150, ’10, supercrew, platinum, #397, $18,791! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981 GMC Canyon, ’15, certified, 2wd, slt, #453, $27,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Nissan Frontier, ’02, king cab, xe, #753, $5,993 Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-2505981. Toyota Tundra, ’13, 4wd, crewmax, #909, $27,994! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. 20’ Trophy Bay Liner (Cudby Cabin)Honda 130 4-Stroke Galv. Trailer $6900 (850)871-6023 WANTED: LOOKING TO BUY JON BOATApprox 12-14” feet long. With electric motor and trailer. All in Like new condition. Contact: 850-238-0446 2010 Tioga SLFleetwood manufactor Class C, two slides, 32 feet long, 29k miles. $39,500 asking price. Good condition. Call: 850-871-3071 or 850-832-3325 There are more ways than ever to market your business, and The News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive „ everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think.Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today. POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us). If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSF F 1 1 0 0 Sunday, March 18, 2018| The News Herald NF-1179011

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NF-1179957 CARS

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rffnnt www.tuscaloosanews.com @tuscaloosanews.com facebook.com.tuscnews

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PAGE 2 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING.There are more ways than ever to market your business, and News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think. Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today.(850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us).

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r fr n tbrtb rf ft rrfnr ttbnbrnr tntnrtbn ttntrt nbbrrbbt nrnbrrt tbtb n tnrnbbrr rt nrnbbt nnt rtnr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 3

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rf ntbf f f tf n r f r rr r n bf nb fffnn n r f f nfr f rnbf nbfffnrnr rn r tf rn f f nbf nb fffnrn r r rr rrf f n ff rb f f rrfntfnntbbtf nt rn rf r nb fnbfffn fn btrrnff rrr f nnnn rfbf n btntfn rfn rrf r n btrrrtr fn rr nf r nf f nr r n r n f rfn fn rrr n nt fr r rn n f fn ntrf fr fn fff rrr fnt frf ff rn PAGE 4 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf ntbf f f tf n r f r rr r n bf nb fffnn n r f f nfr f rnbf nbfffnrnr rn r tf rn f f nbf nb fffnrn r r rr rrf f n ff rb f f rrfntfnntbbtf nt rn rf r nb fnbfffn fn btrrnff rrr f nnnn rfbf n btntfn rfn rrf r n btrrrtr fn rr nf r nf f nr r n r n f rfn fn rrr n nt fr r rn n f fn ntrf fr fn fff rrr fnt frf ff rn THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 5

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rf nntb nrff tt f tnn tn n n ff rf fn n n f t fftff ntfn trff ffnf trfnnnff b tnt nnntbf fftt nbffbf t t f fffff nnttnftn fffft nf n ntbfffnff nfnnf ff tff nfnnrff ntff f ttf f ftf ttfrft bbtfn ffn nnftfn rfnnn ttt fttnf tf nt f fftt tfft f ntff fnntt nt fn ffnntff ttttf ffft nnf nft nftnfftft ntr rfttn ntf nt t fn nn f ffnf f t n f nn nn fbtn fn nft fn ff ff f f rff ft f tf nn ffnn n ff ff ff rff b n f f ftt ffft fftf ff f n rff fn ft n tn fft tf f nfnn fff n fft nnn fnfft n ftnt nt PAGE 6 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf nntb nrff tt f tnn tn n n ff rf fn n n f t fftff ntfn trff ffnf trfnnnff b tnt nnntbf fftt nbffbf t t f fffff nnttnftn fffft nf n ntbfffnff nfnnf ff tff nfnnrff ntff f ttf f ftf ttfrft bbtfn ffn nnftfn rfnnn ttt fttnf tf nt f fftt tfft f ntff fnntt nt fn ffnntff ttttf ffft nnf nft nftnfftft ntr rfttn ntf nt t fn nn f ffnf f t n f nn nn fbtn fn nft fn ff ff f f rff ft f tf nn ffnn n ff ff ff rff b n f f ftt ffft fftf ff f n rff fn ft n tn fft tf f nfnn fff n fft nnn fnfft n ftnt nt THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 7

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rrrffnfttbn trnbb nbnrbbn nfrbrfrb nbb tfnbrbrfb tt rtnrf bb tnbftt bfbb brfbnb brb bnbb ttbt tbtfbn nb brtbtb fbnbrb fntrfbbbfbft nrtrf nntnbftntnfbnn ntnfbffrbffb bbff nbft ffbbft b btt nfbt rb tfbbnr ftt ntn bbftr nb tbtft nnrb btnrff bbftrtbt nfn bb bbfnnnfbb frn ntr t fnn ttbnnt fff bnbft nfn rtbnn bbfrbb bfr ft nbb ntffn ff nnf bftfb nrbbbnbbnr ftbn bnbff n tnnft fnb bfnr br bbn nbb nf nb n rb ttbn ttr bnf tnt b brb fbn bn btbrfr ntnt tnrtn nbf bbb nnr ft nbn bnrnbb t nftb bbtf t tb r bbnb t tbbb bt tftn ttbr nb rf b btrb bbnb ffrn rtbb tb tffr btbb bb tbfrftb b bbfn fn f tbb bfrb btr nt ftr fr nnftbbnf t nbbtt fbrnr ffbbn bfn ttfbb bbbrf bn bnbf ff nbft ttn rrftbrb bb tr tb bnfb trbbb brf frbbn btffb f rtbn bf nt ttbrnt rt bntb t b ttnffrtrbf nbfftr b r ffbrbbr tbrrb t brbr fffrrbf tbtbf tb ttnbb rb tb rft r tbf b ff n b b fb b bnr b ttrtf bnbbn nttr bft nbttf ttb bntff fffb bfn fbfrt ftbtnrb tffbn ftt ttf bbnrnbbntb brn rbb tf tnnfbr tnnbrfbb r rt rfn nr nnt tff nnr nn rnb f fbb tbn ffn bbtnn bnnf rbrrf ttt tn bbf bb bbrb n r b fb PAGE 8 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rrrffnfttbn trnbb nbnrbbn nfrbrfrb nbb tfnbrbrfb tt rtnrf bb tnbftt bfbb brfbnb brb bnbb ttbt tbtfbn nb brtbtb fbnbrb fntrfbbbfbft nrtrf nntnbftntnfbnn ntnfbffrbffb bbff nbft ffbbft b btt nfbt rb tfbbnr ftt ntn bbftr nb tbtft nnrb btnrff bbftrtbt nfn bb bbfnnnfbb frn ntr t fnn ttbnnt fff bnbft nfn rtbnn bbfrbb bfr ft nbb ntffn ff nnf bftfb nrbbbnbbnr ftbn bnbff n tnnft fnb bfnr br bbn nbb nf nb n rb ttbn ttr bnf tnt b brb fbn bn btbrfr ntnt tnrtn nbf bbb nnr ft nbn bnrnbb t nftb bbtf t tb r bbnb t tbbb bt tftn ttbr nb rf b btrb bbnb ffrn rtbb tb tffr btbb bb tbfrftb b bbfn fn f tbb bfrb btr nt ftr fr nnftbbnf t nbbtt fbrnr ffbbn bfn ttfbb bbbrf bn bnbf ff nbft ttn rrftbrb bb tr tb bnfb trbbb brf frbbn btffb f rtbn bf nt ttbrnt rt bntb t b ttnffrtrbf nbfftr b r ffbrbbr tbrrb t brbr fffrrbf tbtbf tb ttnbb rb tb rft r tbf b ff n b b fb b bnr b ttrtf bnbbn nttr bft nbttf ttb bntff fffb bfn fbfrt ftbtnrb tffbn ftt ttf bbnrnbbntb brn rbb tf tnnfbr tnnbrfbb r rt rfn nr nnt tff nnr nn rnb f fbb tbn ffn bbtnn bnnf rbrrf ttt tn bbf bb bbrb n r b fb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 9

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rfrnft rbfrbtrnfrrbbf nfrnbrrrtfbrrfr bnffbfbbnt rfbfrbfnnnfrr rrfrfr nbfnnrfr nrrrfrffrrfb t brrf rrfrnr rfbfnnrbnb rbr rfrrfrrnfrfnr rbrfnrrrr nrfbrr rbfnrrbfr nrrfbrffbf frtffbbrrf rrfrnrrbbrnrrnrrf rfrfbrrnrfbr rnr frfrnfrr rfrbfnrfrfrn frfrbrrr rrfffrtrf rrnrfrfffr rrrfrrfnbr rfrrfrr rfrfrr brbfrfffrrt frbbrrbfrbb nffff nfrffr rrf nffrrrrrrrfr rrf nrnrbrfrnr rrfrrbfrrrfrbfr rrrnrbrrbbff rfrbrff rrrnffrnrr rnrrrfrbnr nfrfrbffr rrr nnnrbffnfrfnnr brrfrrnrr fbrf frtrbr frrnbbrnr rnrfrfffbrt frfrfnfrf nbrf rrrfrfrbfrrn fnr frrfr tfrrrbnbbffbrf bbfrnftnfrrbffr rbnrfbbrtfrfb fnrrfrrnr rrrnrnb bnbrrrnrrrrrfr rbnnrr brfrr nftrfrrrfnfrrrtbf rfnrrbfrrrrnfrr rbfrfrrnfrbrfbbffrbfbrff nfffbbnrbrr rfbrr frrfrfrf rrb nffnfrnfbfrfr rfrfnfnt rrrrfrfrr rrrfrr rfrfnrt frbfrrffrbf brrrfbbbrr ff fnrrrbfr nrbrbrnrbr fbbrrnfnrrbfnbr fbrbrnr brbrnrbffr bf rrfnr rbrfrnbf nrrrf rbrn ffrrrrr t frfbr fbrfrrrbnrt rnrrbtfrfbrfr brfrfb rtrrbrbbrbffnrrfrrnnrr rrrfrfrrfrfnrr fbbbrrffrnrfnrrt rrrrrbbnfrft ffnr rfrrrbbrff rfrbrfr frnrb brbrrbrrrt brnfr nfrnrfrb fn frrfr fnrrbbrfrt rrrnfrrrfr rfbnft ffnrr rfbfrnrfrf nrfnn fnrfbrffnrt frfnrnbrfrf r rrnrr rrnfnr fbbrrf rfbbrfrf rbrrrnf rtfnrrfbbr nrfrrnrr b rrrrfb ftrrffrrbbbfrf rrrfbbrrffrnrfbrrr frrnrrnfrfrfbrbrr nbrbfrrrrrffnfb bfrrfrnbb frrnffr rfrrffbb rbrnrrrrfrf rrffrfrr fbrr PAGE 10 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfrnft rbfrbtrnfrrbbf nfrnbrrrtfbrrfr bnffbfbbnt rfbfrbfnnnfrr rrfrfr nbfnnrfr nrrrfrffrrfb t brrf rrfrnr rfbfnnrbnb rbr rfrrfrrnfrfnr rbrfnrrrr nrfbrr rbfnrrbfr nrrfbrffbf frtffbbrrf rrfrnrrbbrnrrnrrf rfrfbrrnrfbr rnr frfrnfrr rfrbfnrfrfrn frfrbrrr rrfffrtrf rrnrfrfffr rrrfrrfnbr rfrrfrr rfrfrr brbfrfffrrt frbbrrbfrbb nffff nfrffr rrf nffrrrrrrrfr rrf nrnrbrfrnr rrfrrbfrrrfrbfr rrrnrbrrbbff rfrbrff rrrnffrnrr rnrrrfrbnr nfrfrbffr rrr nnnrbffnfrfnnr brrfrrnrr fbrf frtrbr frrnbbrnr rnrfrfffbrt frfrfnfrf nbrf rrrfrfrbfrrn fnr frrfr tfrrrbnbbffbrf bbfrnftnfrrbffr rbnrfbbrtfrfb fnrrfrrnr rrrnrnb bnbrrrnrrrrrfr rbnnrr brfrr nftrfrrrfnfrrrtbf rfnrrbfrrrrnfrr rbfrfrrnfrbrfbbffrbfbrff nfffbbnrbrr rfbrr frrfrfrf rrb nffnfrnfbfrfr rfrfnfnt rrrrfrfrr rrrfrr rfrfnrt frbfrrffrbf brrrfbbbrr ff fnrrrbfr nrbrbrnrbr fbbrrnfnrrbfnbr fbrbrnr brbrnrbffr bf rrfnr rbrfrnbf nrrrf rbrn ffrrrrr t frfbr fbrfrrrbnrt rnrrbtfrfbrfr brfrfb rtrrbrb brbffnrrfrrnnrr rrrfrfrrfrfnrr fbbbrrffrnrfnrrt rrrrrbbnfrft ffnr rfrrrbbrff rfrbrfr frnrb brbrrbrrrt brnfr nfrnrfrb fn frrfr fnrrbbrfrt rrrnfrrrfr rfbnft ffnrr rfbfrnrfrf nrfnn fnrfbrffnrt frfnrnbrfrf r rrnrr rrnfnr fbbrrf rfbbrfrf rbrrrnf rtfnrrfbbr nrfrrnrr b rrrrfb ftrrffrrbbbfrf rrrfbbrrffrnrfbrrr frrnrrnfrfrfbrbrr nbrbfrrrrrffnfb bfrrfrnbb frrnffr rfrrffbb rbrnrrrrfrf rrffrfrr fbrr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 11

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rfr fnrtfffbtrb ftnrrbrrr frbrnbrfr rtrffr frbrtrnrbr nfr trbrntrttt ftrfttffr brnnrrbr brrnrrrnr frnrrfrf ffrbrnr nrtrf trtnnrtr btrbrrbr f frntntrnr rbfr frttrf rfrrttnrrff trtfnttrrfttr fnnf rrffrtrt rrrrrtrfrr frrrrr rrffrtrt fr rnrrrfbnrf nrbrrntft tfrtr nrt nrttr fnn tr fttr ttfr rrr rrt rf rr bt rb bt tf nrr r frfr rr rnnn n rt rr trf tr rf rr rnrnrr rn nnr nrn nrf n r frr ffr bb rr bb fbrt f r bb rb r nft fb trt f rr trb rr f rf nrf f rrr r nnnr br rfntbtnbrbnntrtnf fnrfbnrffrrbnfb rfrnrfrnrrf bntffn trnnrtttrfrfrbttb brfrbttr rnrr rrrbf trfrb nrrtrf rrrn rrff frrrr frbrtrfrrnrf rr b nbftbfr ffrtrr rrr rff rnb brfrtnrnr rfrnnrtbnrt trr r frnr trbrb trfr fftt rf rrt frrr rrr r rrrrtr r rrfbnr rr ffrb ffrrr f nrrffr rrnrft rrf nrttr fntrrtr fnrtffn f r tffrtttftr frrrtfrb tttrttttr ttftf nttfrnrrtfr fftr bfr PAGE 12 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfr fnrtfffbtrb ftnrrbrrr frbrnbrfr rtrffr frbrtrnrbr nfr trbrntrttt ftrfttffr brnnrrbr brrnrrrnr frnrrfrf ffrbrnr nrtrf trtnnrtr btrbrrbr f frntntrnr rbfr frttrf rfrrttnrrff trtfnttrrfttr fnnf rrffrtrt rrrrrtrfrr frrrrr rrffrtrt fr rnrrrfbnrf nrbrrntft tfrtr nrt nrttr fnn tr fttr ttfr rrr rrt rf rr bt rb bt tf nrr r frfr rr rnnn n rt rr trf tr rf rr rnrnrr rn nnr nrn nrf n r frr ffr bb rr bb fbrt f r bb rb r nft fb trt f rr trb rr f rf nrf f rrr r nnnr br rfntbtnbrbnntrtnf fnrfbnrffrrbnfb rfrnrfrnrrf bntffn trnnrtttrfrfrbttb brfrbttr rnrr rrrbf trfrb nrrtrf rrrn rrff frrrr frbrtrfrrnrf rr b nbftbfr ffrtrr rrr rff rnb brfrtnrnr rfrnnrtbnrt trr r frnr trbrb trfr fftt rf rrt frrr rrr r rrrrtr r rrfbnr rr ffrb ffrrr f nrrffr rrnrft rrf nrttr fntrrtr fnrtffn f r tffrtttftr frrrtfrb tttrttttr ttftf nttfrnrrtfr fftr bfr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 13

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rfrrfr ntbnnr rrrnt nnt rnnrrn rrnnnntnr rrrt rrrrtr rrrrrnnr rt rrnrrrrt rrrrrr rnrnrt rnnrnrr t rrrnr frnr rrrt rnr rrrrrrn rrrnnnntrnn nr ttr nn rrrnrn rrnrn nnrrtnrrrrnn rr rnrnr rrnt nnn nnrtnrnnr nrrn rrrnnrt rrtrrr rnnr rr rrrt rnntrn rnnr rnrrrr rnr nnt rrtnrnrn rrrt bnfrnnnr frnn rtr rrrr rnn nnnrrt nnr rrr rrrrrnn nnn t nn nrnrrt rr nnr rr nrnnnrr rt rrr nnt rnnrr rrnnt nrnrr r nntr nrnn t rrfrrrrr n rrn rrrrt r rrr rnt nnrn t rnnrr rrtttrrrrrnrrnn rnrr rnr nrnt tnrrr nnnr rrr nrrrrr rrrrnrt nrrr frnr rrnrrr rrr nrrnrn nr r ntt rnrtnr rr rnn nntnnnnr rrrn nt rrrt rrr rr PAGE 14 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfrrfr ntbnnr rrrnt nnt rnnrrn rrnnnntnr rrrt rrrrtr rrrrrnnr rt rrnrrrrt rrrrrr rnrnrt rnnrnrr t rrrnr frnr rrrt rnr rrrrrrn rrrnnnntrnn nr ttr nn rrrnrn rrnrn nnrrtnrrrrnn rr rnrnr rrnt nnn nnrtnrnnr nrrn rrrnnrt rrtrrr rnnr rr rrrt rnntrn rnnr rnrrrr rnr nnt rrtnrnrn rrrt bnfrnnnr frnn rtr rrrr rnn nnnrrt nnr rrr rrrrrnn nnn t nn nrnrrt rr nnr rr nrnnnrr rt rrr nnt rnnrr rrnnt nrnrr r nntr nrnn t rrfrrrrr n rrn rrrrt r rrr rnt nnrn t rnnrr rrtttrrrrrnrrnn rnrr rnr nrnt tnrrr nnnr rrr nrrrrr rrrrnrt nrrr frnr rrnrrr rrr nrrnrn nr r ntt rnrtnr rr rnn nntnnnnr rrrn nt rrrt rrr rr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 15

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rf n tb t ntnn nnn n n ft bt f bt fn n fn n f tntntfn tnfnnrfnbnntn ff t tf b nfb b nnn b t r nt fnb f nn t tft tt ftn n f f nbn tf rn r t ftbn ntt f f fn fr r nt n ft n f fnt tt n f t f n tnt f bt rnf tbbf PAGE 16 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf n tb t ntnn nnn n n ft bt f bt fn n fn n f tntntfn tnfnnrfnbnntn ff t tf b nfb b nnn b t r nt fnb f nn t tft tt ftn n f f nbn tf rn r t ftbn ntt f f fn fr r nt n ft n f fnt tt n f t f n tnt f bt rnf tbbf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 17

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rfntrbr r fnt b b t nf bb t rftb tt nf b tf n btn nfbf tfbt nbtb tffbb tbfftt r frrnn tr bbrfnrfr t tf f ftb b nfnr f b fb f t ntr f b ft tf ttb tb t b r ftb bf tb ff b bttb f tfb t ffb b bbnbnnbf t n bt t brb fbrt t rbrb b t b tt tft bf f tt b tb b t b f rfbrt fbr t tb t fbn tb t tbr bn tt f rtr fr rffnrtfr f tf b brr bb fft fn ftf ff f fb rfbnbt nb bft ffffr f btt ff t rt t tb tf rtbfntb frbn rtff bf b f tb f ttb t rbrbtrnb tb t f rf t tbt f tbr tb b ff tbr ffb f b ffbr b tb b bnrbnt t fb b tt rtb ffff b ft bf btt b r ff b ft f f n ff t ff rt tffn nf b t b tt btf ffbt tfb ff PAGE 18 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfntrbr r fnt b b t nf bb t rftb tt nf b tf n btn nfbf tfbt nbtb tffbb tbffttr frrnn tr bbrfnrfr t tf f ftb b nfnr f b fb f t ntr f b ft tf ttb tb t b r ftb bf tb ff b bttb f tfb t ffb bbbnbnnbf t n bt t brb fbrt t rbrb b t b tt tft bf f tt b tb b t b f rfbrt fbr t tb t fbn tb t tbr bn tt f rtr fr rffnrtfr f tf b brr bb fft fn ftf ff f fb rfbnbt nb bft ffffr f btt ff t rt t tb tf rtbfntb frbn rtff bf b f tb f ttb t rbrbtrnb tb t f rf t tbt f tbr tb b ff tbr ffb f b ffbr b tb b bnrbnt t fb b tt rtb ffff b ft bf btt b r ff b ft f f n ff t ff rt tffn nf b t b tt btf ffbt tfb ff THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 19

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rf ntnb n nnr n bf nnr rn n rb nn nbr r bnb b n rbn rnrfb r fn rffn rnrtn rb bnnr tr r r bnnn rrn b br nrnt b n rnb rn nnbb rn nnnb rnbnn r rnbnn tr r rbr rb rn n nb n rn rntnrbrnt rrn nb nr b nr n r bn rbn n b r n nbr n nb nnn n n nn r r nr r rn n rr br b t b r fbnnr n n bbn rb bn fnf ft b r n rrnrtbrnb rn r nnnr fnbrnb nnbb nbbb nnr nn r nn nnrb rrnr nntr nbb nbnn r nn bn rnnn nbn b brnb nb b n nr nnn n nr nrn rf PAGE 20 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf ntnb n nnr n bf nnr rn n rb nn nbr r bnb b n rbn rnrfb r fn rffn rnrtn rb bnnr tr r r bnnn rrn b br nrnt b n rnb rn nnbb rn nnnb rnbnn r rnbnn tr r rbr rb rn n nb n rn rntnrbrnt rrn nb nr b nr n r bn rbn n b r n nbr n nb nnn n n nn r r nr r rn n rr br b t b r fbnnr n n bbn rb bn fnf ft b r n rrnrtbrnb rn r nnnr fnbrnb nnbb nbbb nnr nn r nn nnrb rrnr nntr nbb nbnn r nn bn rnnn nbn b brnb nb b n nr nnn n nr nrn rf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 21

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rffntb nrfrfrffn bnnnrffntt frtf nffrrrt tnfttrffrn tnfrf ffrffnt nttr tn n tn ffnt tf frrttnr ft ffb t rf ntttr t t t ttf f f ffff f fnr rtf ntb t fr ftfn r t tfft f tt trn ff f n f ft tt rfr ft r n f f tt tt rr t r fnr f f ftf r r n rff rt rfn bn nf f f f tff r n nrn nfff ft frfr f fffr nt fttrr tn frf ntf ft ft t f frt tr tfb ftr rn ffrrrt f nn rt f fff ff n fft frf nt t n ttf rf ffn fff ff nfrt ff tf nn rnt nt tt tftt fffr tntf rf ffrf f n rftrt t tnt tf tft ff tff nn trtn tttr nffr t ff rff tt nf tff ttf nfft nf f tt ftr tf fr tn nffnt f rrfntbfrrrnb tfftnrrfrntfnbn ttnrnbbntrbrn bbtrttrnbnt ttbtbnrrb btbnrbntbrrfb btr nttnrrbnntb brbtfntrnbtrrn r bbnrnfbttn bbrrtbnbtrtn btrnrtnnttttbnt rftt rrtrrrntbtrnbfr rrrrbrrnbbr trnrrbbttf ftnbtfrnff ntbrrfrntbtn ntbfrntrnrnt nbntfbfbftt rrrrfbtbnrbbf bntbtttbrtn tnttbrbftbtt bt rrftbttrftt brftrntbbntbrtnt nrntrntftrntnbb rtrnrfrfttb rffttbrtbrttt nrrtrrftbnrf PAGE 22 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rffntb nrfrfrffn bnnnrffntt frtf nffrrrt tnfttrffrn tnfrf ffrffnt nttr tn n tn ffnt tf frrttnr ft ffb t rf ntttr t t t ttf f f ffff f fnr rtf ntb t fr ftfn r t tfft f tt trn ff f n f ft tt rfr ft r n f f tt tt rr t r fnr f f ftf r r n rff rt rfn bn nf f f f tff r n nrn nfff ft frfr f fffr nt fttrr tn frf ntf ft ft t f frt tr tfb ftr rn ffrrrt f nn rt f fff ff n fft frf nt t n ttf rf ffn fff ff nfrt ff tf nn rnt nt tt tftt fffr tntf rf ffrf f n rftrt t tnt tf tft ff tff nn trtn tttr nffr t ff rff tt nf tff ttf nfft nf f tt ftr tf fr tn nffnt f rrfntbfrrrnb tfftnrrfrntfnbn ttnrnbbntrbrn bbtrttrnbnt ttbtbnrrb btbnrbntbrrfb btr nttnrrbnntb brbtfntrnbtrrn r bbnrnfbttn bbrrtbnbtrtn btrnrtnnttttbnt rftt rrtrrrntbtrnbfr rrrrbrrnbbr trnrrbbttf ftnbtfrnff ntbrrfrntbtn ntbfrntrnrnt nbntfbfbftt rrrrfbtbnrbbf bntbtttbrtn tnttbrbftbtt bt rrftbttrftt brftrntbbntbrtnt nrntrntftrntnbb rtrnrfrfttb rffttbrtbrttt nrrtrrftbnrf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 23

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rf nr t brft t tft f f rfb rtfbf r tf tb n b t ff b t ftt ft ftb t t tff b tt frtt rfnf rb r ft bt r f rr ftnb rfnrfr frfrr tt t nrtt tff nfft rt n b rtrn rt r rfnn rrttf trrb n ffrftr fb r t tfft fnrb r ttfn n nrtf ntfr ttnr rnrrt rtf rr rrt ffrtr nrb rr ttt b btbnn frf br nb tftf tfb ttnrt rftff tf b ftn rr tfb rft ntb ffft nb rnt tf trrn tffff trbbbrbtr fnnb t rtrr frbt tttr trfttfrrft tb ftrtr tnrfftnt tr fb ftrr rb fr t ttftrt tb tt fntr nt tfrb trttf f rrb tt rt rrft fntt rftrr bf ntrb nrt ff tf frtbr rttf t t ttfrt t rn fb nt trtb tf tb rffbf bfrttrrb rttrrn fnb rtrttt rbtftf ttrt nrt ttbtrff ff ftfb nrfft fbttr ftt tt tt rtt n b rrfntrt f rf tn bt r tfbt trt fr tb rfn rt tn fff bbfn f rb trt tt tb tr t rt nb f ftn ft nt ntrb tf tf rtb f bb f b t f tb fnnfr f trb rtt rt ffttf fb nrrt brb trtnttf tbffb tftfb PAGE 24 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf nr t brft t tft f f rfb rtfbf r tf tb n b t ff b t ftt ft ftb t t tff b tt frtt rfnf rb r ft bt r f rr ftnbrfnrfr frfrr tt t nrtt tff nfft rt n b rtrn rt r rfnn rrttf trrb n ffrftr fb r t tfft fnrb r ttfn n nrtf ntfr ttnr rnrrt rtf rr rrt ffrtr nrb rr ttt b btbnn frf br nb tftf tfb ttnrt rftff tf b ftn rr tfb rft ntb ffft nb rnt tf trrn tffff trbbbrbtr fnnb t rtrr frbt tttr trfttfrrft tb ftrtr tnrfftnt tr fb ftrr rb fr t ttftrt tb tt fntr nt tfrb trttf f rrb tt rt rrft fntt rftrr bf ntrb nrt ff tf frtbr rttf t t ttfrt t rn fb nt trtb tf tb rffbf bfrttrrb rttrrn fnb rtrttt rbtftf ttrt nrt ttbtrff ff ftfb nrfft fbttr ftt tt tt rtt n b rrfntrt f rf tn bt r tfbt trt fr tb rfn rt tn fff bbfn f rb trt tt tb tr t rt nb f ftn ft nt ntrb tf tf rtb f bb f b t f tb fnnfr f trb rtt rt ffttf fb nrrt brb trtnttf tbffb tftfb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 25

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rrfnntb tfnn nftn fftntb ffnnr ftntnn nftnn tt ntr rf tt ttn ntn fftnn tfnrn fttnn tnt fntr ntrnn nnb nnfn f tnntn tfb nnr nnnn rnfnntnb fnnt tfnfnfn trtn nn nnnt tnn rrftnb rtttnn fnnn tbntnrn nfntnnfnt nf nnnnn nnt bn n fntrn fntn ntnttb nntnnt nntn tnnnb nnnttfnn fntnnft nnttb nttnn rnnt frf nnn tnt tbnf tnnntn tnnnt nrntfn nfntnt nnnfnnn frn nrnn tnnn tnntnn nn f nntnrnfnfb nfnnfnf nrnnfn fntrtb nt nnt rtt nnnf rfntbtnb tn ffnn tn fntnt nnfnf nnt tnb nrtn ftnft rn nn rfn ntt nbrbnn nn ff ntn tbnb bnbfntfr nfnn tnnnft nr trnf ttf rtnftnn nrnr ff tbtntbrftnnf nrnt ntnb fnfntb tnntnn nnn nnntftnt nntfntt ntnn ntt tn btnffnfttnfnf ntrff tbntf nff nnnn nnn nnnrb nnnnft rtnn tn r nnn nn n nn nffnt tt n nrnnfnb nnrn fn n n nt ttttn ftn n fbnnrftb tnnnn tfnn n ntt fnnt nrf rnrfrfb nnnnn fnrfn t bbfb btnfrtbrnrbnn nnb nn ttfrr f nffn nttt ttn trf n PAGE 26 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rrfnntb tfnn nftn fftntb ffnnr ftntnn nftnn tt ntr rf tt ttn ntn fftnn tfnrn fttnn tnt fntr ntrnn nnb nnfn f tnntn tfb nnr nnnn rnfnntnb fnnt tfnfnfn trtn nn nnnt tnn rrftnb rtttnn fnnn tbntnrn nfntnnfnt nf nnnnn nnt bn n fntrn fntn ntnttb nntnnt nntn tnnnb nnnttfnn fntnnft nnttb nttnn rnnt frf nnn tnt tbnf tnnntn tnnnt nrntfn nfntnt nnnfnnn frn nrnn tnnn tnntnn nn f nntnrnfnfb nfnnfnf nrnnfn fntrtb nt nnt rtt nnnf rfntbtnb tn ffnn tn fntnt nnfnf nnt tnb nrtn ftnft rn nn rfn ntt nbrbnn nn ff ntn tbnb bnbfntfr nfnn tnnnft nr trnf ttf rtnftnn nrnr ff tbtntbrftnnf nrnt ntnb fnfntb tnntnn nnn nnntftnt nntfntt ntnn ntt tn btnffnfttnfnf ntrff tbntf nff nnnn nnn nnnrb nnnnft rtnn tn r nnn nn n nn nffnt tt n nrnnfnb nnrn fn n n nt ttttn ftn n fbnnrftb tnnnn tfnn n ntt fnnt nrf rnrfrfb nnnnn fnrfn t bbfb btnfrtbrnrbnn nnb nn ttfrr f nffn nttt ttn trf n THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 27

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rffntb f n nffn n t fr tn f nn fn t rn f tt t nfn ffnn ffn fff nt t f t n f tn nn ft fn nf t f rbt nnnnt rfntft tfn f t ff bfbnntn nnft f frbfbfnnnt f nfn nf fn f ftn nf f nnbnfnt n f f tn n f t nt n f t n f t f nn f n nn ffnn f tf r t f t nt t tf f rr f f t f n t f ffn trb n n tn f n tf nf n tf f ffff n nf n ttn f n f nt n f nf ntn n f nt n f n f tn f tn f n nf nt nt f PAGE 28 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rffntb f n nffn n t fr tn f nn fn t rn f tt t nfn ffnn ffn fff nt t f t n f tn nn ft fn nf t f rbt nnnnt rfntft tfn f t ff bfbnntn nnft f frbfbfnnnt f nfn nf fn f ftn nf f nnbnfnt n f f tn n f t nt n f t n f t f nn f n nn ffnn f tf r t f t nt t tf f rr f f t f n t f ffn trb n n tn f n tf nf n tf f ffff n nf n ttn f n f nt n f nf ntn n f nt n f n f tn f tn f n nf nt nt f THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 29

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rfnnrntb nnt frr nfn nr tt nnf nt nfn fnn nn nn nn tnrfn nn tff ftbn rnn fftrn rr n nnrtbn t nn nnnn t nrt rffnn fnnt nrftnnr fn r frn r nr ttt r ntr fftffn nn rbnr f rtffr nnrft rnrnnnfrntf ffnnnrnf ntrrtffr nrnf frnnn fnntfrn frntn fnrnnnrn n tfnntff ffnftfrfnt nfbtfrfn ftrn tr ntfntn ntnnnn rnrfn nn fft fnfr r ntfbrffnt nnn f n nn tb rfnf nt nnnr r rftbt nff rffft trn nnntt nt nn f fnn n f nr nf ftrn tbnbfnnn ntff nfrr n nnn tb ntn trn rn rr r nntn fntf f nb n frnn frf frf ftrr frtbn n t ntn nff ffnn ff rrtb n t nn f rf frf nn frr r nr nfrtbn rnnr nn rr nb PAGE 30 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfnnrntb nnt frr nfn nr tt nnf nt nfn fnn nn nn nn tnrfn nn tff ftbn rnn fftrn rr n nnrtbn t nn nnnn t nrt rffnn fnnt nrftnnr fn r frn r nr ttt r ntr fftffn nn rbnr f rtffr nnrft rnrnnnfrntf ffnnnrnf ntrrtffr nrnf frnnn fnntfrn frntn fnrnnnrn n tfnntff ffnftfrfnt nfbtfrfn ftrn tr ntfntn ntnnnn rnrfn nn fft fnfr r ntfbrffnt nnn f n nn tb rfnf nt nnnr r rftbt nff rffft trn nnntt nt nn f fnn n f nr nf ftrn tbnbfnnn ntff nfrr n nnn tb ntn trn rn rr r nntn fntf f nb n frnn frf frf ftrr frtbn n t ntn nff ffnn ff rrtb n t nn f rf frf nn frr r nr nfrtbn rnnr nn rr nb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 31

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rfnt br t rt t rf f rr r f rr ft r rr rrrt f rrftf fffr r frr frfff r f ff rfrfr rftf rf fr rrrrr rft r rbr rfrr rr fffr frbrtt rf f rrr rtr ff rftffr rrffffr frrrfr nt fff r nnfrr rrr rfrnn r rfr frt r fr rrrf rrf rfrr tfr rt rff frffr t b ff r rf t rrf rf rfrr ttftrrr rr rf frr t ttrt rrrrr rrr rrff rr rrr f rr r rfrrr rffrr rrr rfrfrr rrrttfr rrff rrr nffrrrr rfrt frrrr rrf rffrr frrr rr trt ffrff rt rtrnrrr fnft rtrt rr r rrrr rfrt rfrrr rr rft rfr rrtr r tr frr r PAGE 32 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfnt br t rt t rf f rr r f rr ft r rr rrrt f rrftf fffr r frr frfff r f ff rfrfr rftf rf fr rrrrr rft r rbr rfrr rr fffr frbrtt rf f rrr rtr ff rftffr rrffffr frrrfr nt fff r nnfrr rrr rfrnn r rfr frt r fr rrrf rrf rfrr tfr rt rff frffr t b ff r rf t rrf rf rfrr ttftrrr rr rf frr t ttrt rrrrr rrr rrff rr rrr f rr r rfrrr rffrr rrr rfrfrr rrrttfr rrff rrr nffrrrr rfrt frrrr rrf rffrr frrr rr tr t ffrff rt rtrnrrr fnft rtrt rr r rrrr rfrt rfrrr rr rft rfr rrtr r tr frr r THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 33

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r rrffrn tbb trb bbt ftb trb fbfb tbbrtn tbbrft btfbfbtf bbt f br rbtrbn tnn r fn t bb f rf bb tf f f rt rrbr n bf rrb tfrb btr n b brbbfbn bb t bbf fb bbbbt brb rf bfb bbrbb rf b btb brbbb nbnbbrt nf rtr bftbbtb t bb bbbbr rrrtf rtbr btrrb tfbb trn r fbrn br b t nntbr btbfb t bt ttf brbfnr bb b btbb rrfbtbbb bb f rrbb btb bttrbn rbttbt tbrbntbftrbrttn rbrtb n frtr rtfbb nb rnn fbf rbbtb br rbrtb rbrb frrr rr n rb n r f f r bbb bbtb trb r rbrb bb br n rbrr bt trb bf tbtbn frtfrtrbbrntn btrb tbft ttffbr tbrrb ttbrbtt brr n bbff bbtbtt brffbf btbrn n fr btft bbrtn f fbtrrtfb rbrfbt frfbbftf bbfr n bfb rtrbftb tn b tnrbb bb fr bbbt ftrrt rrtfrb b fffffrfbbb rfbfbr tf b bt PAGE 34 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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r rrffrn tbb trb bbt ftb trb fbfb tbbrtn tbbrft btfbfbtf bbt f br rbtrbn tnn r fn t bb f rf bb tf f f rt rrbr n bf rrb tfrb btr n b brbbfbn bb t bbf fb bbbbt brb rf bfb bbrbb rf b btb brbbb nbnbbrt nf rtr bftbbtb t bb bbbbr rrrtf rtbr btrrb tfbb trn r fbrn br b t nntbr btbfb t bt ttf brbfnr bb b btbb rrfbtbbb bb f rrbb btb bttrbn rbttbt tbrbntbftrbrttn rbrtb n frtr rtfbb nb rnn fbf rbbtb br rbrtb rbrb frrr rr n rb n r f f r bbb bbtb trb r rbrb bb br n rbrr bt trb bf tbtbn frtfrtrbbrntn btrb tbft ttffbr tbrrb ttbrbtt brr n bbff bbtbtt brffbf btbrn n fr btft bbrtn f fbtrrtfb rbrfbt frfbbftf bbfr n bfb rtrbftb tn b tnrbb bb fr bbbt ftrrt rrtfrb b fffffrfbbb rfbfbr tf b bt THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 35

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PAGE 36 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r r f n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r rf n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r rf n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n

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THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 37 By Deena Bouknight rf nt fbr rr r r r r r t r rnt b b r b f r b r nr r r r r r r rfr b rr b r rfr n frbr t nnn r nn br f nr r r nn n b rn rr r f br f nnn rr f t br r b t rr b r rf r br r n b fr f f r nbn r r ft n b f n n b r r b r rr r r r br rf r n n nr bn r br n rr nb rr r r nb r By Deena Bouknight r fnt b b rb rb b n b b b t r r b r b b r b b b r b b r b b b fnf b rb b b b r b b b b b b b b b b r b b b rb b b b b fn b r b b r b b b r r b r r r b b b b r rb b r b b b b b b b b b b rr b b rrb rb br b b rb b b b b b b b r b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b rb b b r b b b b rb b b b b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b rr b b r b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b fnt b b b b b n r ffBy Deena Bouknight b r b rb b b b r r r rb b r b b b b br b rb b r b b b b b b r r b r b b b r bb nn r b b b b b r r b b b fb b b b r b b b b r r b r b b b b b b b b b b b b b r r b b b rr b b b b r bb b b n b b r b bb rr b b b b b n b b b b b r fn t b bn r b t n t r t t b r t b b b r t b t b r b b b b b b b b b r r f f n t By Deena Bouknight rf nt fbr rr r r r r r t r rnt b b r b f r b r nr r r r r r r rfr b rr b r rfr n frbr t nnn r nn br f nr r r nn n b rn rr r f br f nnn rr f t br r b t rr b r rf r br r n b fr f f r nbn r r ft n b f n n b r r b r rr r r r br rf r n n nr bn r br n rr nb rr r r nb r By Deena Bouknight r fnt b b rb rb b n b b b t r r b r b b r b b b r b b r b b b fnf b rb b b b r b b b b b b b b b b r b b b rb b b b b fn b r b b r b b b r r b r r r b b b b r rb b r b b b b b b b b b b rr b b rrb rb br b b rb b b b b b b b r b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b rb b b r b b b b rb b b b b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b rr b b r b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b fnt b b b b b n r ffBy Deena Bouknight b r b rb b b b r r r rb b r b b b b br b rb b r b b b b b b r r b r b b b r bb nn r b b b b b r r b b b fb b b b r b b b b r r b r b b b b b b b b b b b b b r r b b b rr b b b b r bb b b n b b r b bb rr b b b b b n b b b b b r fn t b bn r b t n t r t t b r t b b b r t b t b r b b b b b b b b b r r f f n t

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PAGE 38 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n

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THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 39 By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f

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rffnnt www.tuscaloosanews.com @tuscaloosanews.com facebook.com.tuscnews

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PAGE 2 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING.There are more ways than ever to market your business, and News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think. Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today.(850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us).

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r fr n tbrtb rf ft rrfnr ttbnbrnr tntnrtbn ttntrt nbbrrbbt nrnbrrt tbtb n tnrnbbrr rt nrnbbt nnt rtnr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 3

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rf ntbf f f tf n r f r rr r n bf nb fffnn n r f f nfr f rnbf nbfffnrnr rn r tf rn f f nbf nb fffnrn r r rr rrf f n ff rb f f rrfntfnntbbtf nt rn rf r nb fnbfffn fn btrrnff rrr f nnnn rfbf n btntfn rfn rrf r n btrrrtr fn rr nf r nf f nr r n r n f rfn fn rrr n nt fr r rn n f fn ntrf fr fn fff rrr fnt frf ff rn PAGE 4 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf ntbf f f tf n r f r rr r n bf nb fffnn n r f f nfr f rnbf nbfffnrnr rn r tf rn f f nbf nb fffnrn r r rr rrf f n ff rb f f rrfntfnntbbtf nt rn rf r nb fnbfffn fn btrrnff rrr f nnnn rfbf n btntfn rfn rrf r n btrrrtr fn rr nf r nf f nr r n r n f rfn fn rrr n nt fr r rn n f fn ntrf fr fn fff rrr fnt frf ff rn THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 5

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rf nntb nrff tt f tnn tn n n ff rf fn n n f t fftff ntfn trff ffnf trfnnnff b tnt nnntbf fftt nbffbf t t f fffff nnttnftn fffft nf n ntbfffnff nfnnf ff tff nfnnrff ntff f ttf f ftf ttfrft bbtfn ffn nnftfn rfnnn ttt fttnf tf nt f fftt tfft f ntff fnntt nt fn ffnntff ttttf ffft nnf nft nftnfftft ntr rfttn ntf nt t fn nn f ffnf f t n f nn nn fbtn fn nft fn ff ff f f rff ft f tf nn ffnn n ff ff ff rff b n f f ftt ffft fftf ff f n rff fn ft n tn fft tf f nfnn fff n fft nnn fnfft n ftnt nt PAGE 6 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf nntb nrff tt f tnn tn n n ff rf fn n n f t fftff ntfn trff ffnf trfnnnff b tnt nnntbf fftt nbffbf t t f fffff nnttnftn fffft nf n ntbfffnff nfnnf ff tff nfnnrff ntff f ttf f ftf ttfrft bbtfn ffn nnftfn rfnnn ttt fttnf tf nt f fftt tfft f ntff fnntt nt fn ffnntff ttttf ffft nnf nft nftnfftft ntr rfttn ntf nt t fn nn f ffnf f t n f nn nn fbtn fn nft fn ff ff f f rff ft f tf nn ffnn n ff ff ff rff b n f f ftt ffft fftf ff f n rff fn ft n tn fft tf f nfnn fff n fft nnn fnfft n ftnt nt THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 7

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rrrffnfttbn trnbb nbnrbbn nfrbrfrb nbb tfnbrbrfb tt rtnrf bb tnbftt bfbb brfbnb brb bnbb ttbt tbtfbn nb brtbtb fbnbrb fntrfbbbfbft nrtrf nntnbftntnfbnn ntnfbffrbffb bbff nbft ffbbft b btt nfbt rb tfbbnr ftt ntn bbftr nb tbtft nnrb btnrff bbftrtbt nfn bb bbfnnnfbb frn ntr t fnn ttbnnt fff bnbft nfn rtbnn bbfrbb bfr ft nbb ntffn ff nnf bftfb nrbbbnbbnr ftbn bnbff n tnnft fnb bfnr br bbn nbb nf nb n rb ttbn ttr bnf tnt b brb fbn bn btbrfr ntnt tnrtn nbf bbb nnr ft nbn bnrnbb t nftb bbtf t tb r bbnb t tbbb bt tftn ttbr nb rf b btrb bbnb ffrn rtbb tb tffr btbb bb tbfrftb b bbfn fn f tbb bfrb btr nt ftr fr nnftbbnf t nbbtt fbrnr ffbbn bfn ttfbb bbbrf bn bnbf ff nbft ttn rrftbrb bb tr tb bnfb trbbb brf frbbn btffb f rtbn bf nt ttbrnt rt bntb t b ttnffrtrbf nbfftr b r ffbrbbr tbrrb t brbr fffrrbf tbtbf tb ttnbb rb tb rft r tbf b ff n b b fb b bnr b ttrtf bnbbn nttr bft nbttf ttb bntff fffb bfn fbfrt ftbtnrb tffbn ftt ttf bbnrnbbntb brn rbb tf tnnfbr tnnbrfbb r rt rfn nr nnt tff nnr nn rnb f fbb tbn ffn bbtnn bnnf rbrrf ttt tn bbf bb bbrb n r b fb PAGE 8 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rrrffnfttbn trnbb nbnrbbn nfrbrfrb nbb tfnbrbrfb tt rtnrf bb tnbftt bfbb brfbnb brb bnbb ttbt tbtfbn nb brtbtb fbnbrb fntrfbbbfbft nrtrf nntnbftntnfbnn ntnfbffrbffb bbff nbft ffbbft b btt nfbt rb tfbbnr ftt ntn bbftr nb tbtft nnrb btnrff bbftrtbt nfn bb bbfnnnfbb frn ntr t fnn ttbnnt fff bnbft nfn rtbnn bbfrbb bfr ft nbb ntffn ff nnf bftfb nrbbbnbbnr ftbn bnbff n tnnft fnb bfnr br bbn nbb nf nb n rb ttbn ttr bnf tnt b brb fbn bn btbrfr ntnt tnrtn nbf bbb nnr ft nbn bnrnbb t nftb bbtf t tb r bbnb t tbbb bt tftn ttbr nb rf b btrb bbnb ffrn rtbb tb tffr btbb bb tbfrftb b bbfn fn f tbb bfrb btr nt ftr fr nnftbbnf t nbbtt fbrnr ffbbn bfn ttfbb bbbrf bn bnbf ff nbft ttn rrftbrb bb tr tb bnfb trbbb brf frbbn btffb f rtbn bf nt ttbrnt rt bntb t b ttnffrtrbf nbfftr b r ffbrbbr tbrrb t brbr fffrrbf tbtbf tb ttnbb rb tb rft r tbf b ff n b b fb b bnr b ttrtf bnbbn nttr bft nbttf ttb bntff fffb bfn fbfrt ftbtnrb tffbn ftt ttf bbnrnbbntb brn rbb tf tnnfbr tnnbrfbb r rt rfn nr nnt tff nnr nn rnb f fbb tbn ffn bbtnn bnnf rbrrf ttt tn bbf bb bbrb n r b fb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 9

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rfrnft rbfrbtrnfrrbbf nfrnbrrrtfbrrfr bnffbfbbnt rfbfrbfnnnfrr rrfrfr nbfnnrfr nrrrfrffrrfb t brrf rrfrnr rfbfnnrbnb rbr rfrrfrrnfrfnr rbrfnrrrr nrfbrr rbfnrrbfr nrrfbrffbf frtffbbrrf rrfrnrrbbrnrrnrrf rfrfbrrnrfbr rnr frfrnfrr rfrbfnrfrfrn frfrbrrr rrfffrtrf rrnrfrfffr rrrfrrfnbr rfrrfrr rfrfrr brbfrfffrrt frbbrrbfrbb nffff nfrffr rrf nffrrrrrrrfr rrf nrnrbrfrnr rrfrrbfrrrfrbfr rrrnrbrrbbff rfrbrff rrrnffrnrr rnrrrfrbnr nfrfrbffr rrr nnnrbffnfrfnnr brrfrrnrr fbrf frtrbr frrnbbrnr rnrfrfffbrt frfrfnfrf nbrf rrrfrfrbfrrn fnr frrfr tfrrrbnbbffbrf bbfrnftnfrrbffr rbnrfbbrtfrfb fnrrfrrnr rrrnrnb bnbrrrnrrrrrfr rbnnrr brfrr nftrfrrrfnfrrrtbf rfnrrbfrrrrnfrr rbfrfrrnfrbrfbbffrbfbrff nfffbbnrbrr rfbrr frrfrfrf rrb nffnfrnfbfrfr rfrfnfnt rrrrfrfrr rrrfrr rfrfnrt frbfrrffrbf brrrfbbbrr ff fnrrrbfr nrbrbrnrbr fbbrrnfnrrbfnbr fbrbrnr brbrnrbffr bf rrfnr rbrfrnbf nrrrf rbrn ffrrrrr t frfbr fbrfrrrbnrt rnrrbtfrfbrfr brfrfb rtrrbrbbrbffnrrfrrnnrr rrrfrfrrfrfnrr fbbbrrffrnrfnrrt rrrrrbbnfrft ffnr rfrrrbbrff rfrbrfr frnrb brbrrbrrrt brnfr nfrnrfrb fn frrfr fnrrbbrfrt rrrnfrrrfr rfbnft ffnrr rfbfrnrfrf nrfnn fnrfbrffnrt frfnrnbrfrf r rrnrr rrnfnr fbbrrf rfbbrfrf rbrrrnf rtfnrrfbbr nrfrrnrr b rrrrfb ftrrffrrbbbfrf rrrfbbrrffrnrfbrrr frrnrrnfrfrfbrbrr nbrbfrrrrrffnfb bfrrfrnbb frrnffr rfrrffbb rbrnrrrrfrf rrffrfrr fbrr PAGE 10 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfrnft rbfrbtrnfrrbbf nfrnbrrrtfbrrfr bnffbfbbnt rfbfrbfnnnfrr rrfrfr nbfnnrfr nrrrfrffrrfb t brrf rrfrnr rfbfnnrbnb rbr rfrrfrrnfrfnr rbrfnrrrr nrfbrr rbfnrrbfr nrrfbrffbf frtffbbrrf rrfrnrrbbrnrrnrrf rfrfbrrnrfbr rnr frfrnfrr rfrbfnrfrfrn frfrbrrr rrfffrtrf rrnrfrfffr rrrfrrfnbr rfrrfrr rfrfrr brbfrfffrrt frbbrrbfrbb nffff nfrffr rrf nffrrrrrrrfr rrf nrnrbrfrnr rrfrrbfrrrfrbfr rrrnrbrrbbff rfrbrff rrrnffrnrr rnrrrfrbnr nfrfrbffr rrr nnnrbffnfrfnnr brrfrrnrr fbrf frtrbr frrnbbrnr rnrfrfffbrt frfrfnfrf nbrf rrrfrfrbfrrn fnr frrfr tfrrrbnbbffbrf bbfrnftnfrrbffr rbnrfbbrtfrfb fnrrfrrnr rrrnrnb bnbrrrnrrrrrfr rbnnrr brfrr nftrfrrrfnfrrrtbf rfnrrbfrrrrnfrr rbfrfrrnfrbrfbbffrbfbrff nfffbbnrbrr rfbrr frrfrfrf rrb nffnfrnfbfrfr rfrfnfnt rrrrfrfrr rrrfrr rfrfnrt frbfrrffrbf brrrfbbbrr ff fnrrrbfr nrbrbrnrbr fbbrrnfnrrbfnbr fbrbrnr brbrnrbffr bf rrfnr rbrfrnbf nrrrf rbrn ffrrrrr t frfbr fbrfrrrbnrt rnrrbtfrfbrfr brfrfb rtrrbrb brbffnrrfrrnnrr rrrfrfrrfrfnrr fbbbrrffrnrfnrrt rrrrrbbnfrft ffnr rfrrrbbrff rfrbrfr frnrb brbrrbrrrt brnfr nfrnrfrb fn frrfr fnrrbbrfrt rrrnfrrrfr rfbnft ffnrr rfbfrnrfrf nrfnn fnrfbrffnrt frfnrnbrfrf r rrnrr rrnfnr fbbrrf rfbbrfrf rbrrrnf rtfnrrfbbr nrfrrnrr b rrrrfb ftrrffrrbbbfrf rrrfbbrrffrnrfbrrr frrnrrnfrfrfbrbrr nbrbfrrrrrffnfb bfrrfrnbb frrnffr rfrrffbb rbrnrrrrfrf rrffrfrr fbrr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 11

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rfr fnrtfffbtrb ftnrrbrrr frbrnbrfr rtrffr frbrtrnrbr nfr trbrntrttt ftrfttffr brnnrrbr brrnrrrnr frnrrfrf ffrbrnr nrtrf trtnnrtr btrbrrbr f frntntrnr rbfr frttrf rfrrttnrrff trtfnttrrfttr fnnf rrffrtrt rrrrrtrfrr frrrrr rrffrtrt fr rnrrrfbnrf nrbrrntft tfrtr nrt nrttr fnn tr fttr ttfr rrr rrt rf rr bt rb bt tf nrr r frfr rr rnnn n rt rr trf tr rf rr rnrnrr rn nnr nrn nrf n r frr ffr bb rr bb fbrt f r bb rb r nft fb trt f rr trb rr f rf nrf f rrr r nnnr br rfntbtnbrbnntrtnf fnrfbnrffrrbnfb rfrnrfrnrrf bntffn trnnrtttrfrfrbttb brfrbttr rnrr rrrbf trfrb nrrtrf rrrn rrff frrrr frbrtrfrrnrf rr b nbftbfr ffrtrr rrr rff rnb brfrtnrnr rfrnnrtbnrt trr r frnr trbrb trfr fftt rf rrt frrr rrr r rrrrtr r rrfbnr rr ffrb ffrrr f nrrffr rrnrft rrf nrttr fntrrtr fnrtffn f r tffrtttftr frrrtfrb tttrttttr ttftf nttfrnrrtfr fftr bfr PAGE 12 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfr fnrtfffbtrb ftnrrbrrr frbrnbrfr rtrffr frbrtrnrbr nfr trbrntrttt ftrfttffr brnnrrbr brrnrrrnr frnrrfrf ffrbrnr nrtrf trtnnrtr btrbrrbr f frntntrnr rbfr frttrf rfrrttnrrff trtfnttrrfttr fnnf rrffrtrt rrrrrtrfrr frrrrr rrffrtrt fr rnrrrfbnrf nrbrrntft tfrtr nrt nrttr fnn tr fttr ttfr rrr rrt rf rr bt rb bt tf nrr r frfr rr rnnn n rt rr trf tr rf rr rnrnrr rn nnr nrn nrf n r frr ffr bb rr bb fbrt f r bb rb r nft fb trt f rr trb rr f rf nrf f rrr r nnnr br rfntbtnbrbnntrtnf fnrfbnrffrrbnfb rfrnrfrnrrf bntffn trnnrtttrfrfrbttb brfrbttr rnrr rrrbf trfrb nrrtrf rrrn rrff frrrr frbrtrfrrnrf rr b nbftbfr ffrtrr rrr rff rnb brfrtnrnr rfrnnrtbnrt trr r frnr trbrb trfr fftt rf rrt frrr rrr r rrrrtr r rrfbnr rr ffrb ffrrr f nrrffr rrnrft rrf nrttr fntrrtr fnrtffn f r tffrtttftr frrrtfrb tttrttttr ttftf nttfrnrrtfr fftr bfr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 13

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rfrrfr ntbnnr rrrnt nnt rnnrrn rrnnnntnr rrrt rrrrtr rrrrrnnr rt rrnrrrrt rrrrrr rnrnrt rnnrnrr t rrrnr frnr rrrt rnr rrrrrrn rrrnnnntrnn nr ttr nn rrrnrn rrnrn nnrrtnrrrrnn rr rnrnr rrnt nnn nnrtnrnnr nrrn rrrnnrt rrtrrr rnnr rr rrrt rnntrn rnnr rnrrrr rnr nnt rrtnrnrn rrrt bnfrnnnr frnn rtr rrrr rnn nnnrrt nnr rrr rrrrrnn nnn t nn nrnrrt rr nnr rr nrnnnrr rt rrr nnt rnnrr rrnnt nrnrr r nntr nrnn t rrfrrrrr n rrn rrrrt r rrr rnt nnrn t rnnrr rrtttrrrrrnrrnn rnrr rnr nrnt tnrrr nnnr rrr nrrrrr rrrrnrt nrrr frnr rrnrrr rrr nrrnrn nr r ntt rnrtnr rr rnn nntnnnnr rrrn nt rrrt rrr rr PAGE 14 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfrrfr ntbnnr rrrnt nnt rnnrrn rrnnnntnr rrrt rrrrtr rrrrrnnr rt rrnrrrrt rrrrrr rnrnrt rnnrnrr t rrrnr frnr rrrt rnr rrrrrrn rrrnnnntrnn nr ttr nn rrrnrn rrnrn nnrrtnrrrrnn rr rnrnr rrnt nnn nnrtnrnnr nrrn rrrnnrt rrtrrr rnnr rr rrrt rnntrn rnnr rnrrrr rnr nnt rrtnrnrn rrrt bnfrnnnr frnn rtr rrrr rnn nnnrrt nnr rrr rrrrrnn nnn t nn nrnrrt rr nnr rr nrnnnrr rt rrr nnt rnnrr rrnnt nrnrr r nntr nrnn t rrfrrrrr n rrn rrrrt r rrr rnt nnrn t rnnrr rrtttrrrrrnrrnn rnrr rnr nrnt tnrrr nnnr rrr nrrrrr rrrrnrt nrrr frnr rrnrrr rrr nrrnrn nr r ntt rnrtnr rr rnn nntnnnnr rrrn nt rrrt rrr rr THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 15

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rf n tb t ntnn nnn n n ft bt f bt fn n fn n f tntntfn tnfnnrfnbnntn ff t tf b nfb b nnn b t r nt fnb f nn t tft tt ftn n f f nbn tf rn r t ftbn ntt f f fn fr r nt n ft n f fnt tt n f t f n tnt f bt rnf tbbf PAGE 16 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf n tb t ntnn nnn n n ft bt f bt fn n fn n f tntntfn tnfnnrfnbnntn ff t tf b nfb b nnn b t r nt fnb f nn t tft tt ftn n f f nbn tf rn r t ftbn ntt f f fn fr r nt n ft n f fnt tt n f t f n tnt f bt rnf tbbf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 17

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rfntrbr r fnt b b t nf bb t rftb tt nf b tf n btn nfbf tfbt nbtb tffbb tbfftt r frrnn tr bbrfnrfr t tf f ftb b nfnr f b fb f t ntr f b ft tf ttb tb t b r ftb bf tb ff b bttb f tfb t ffb b bbnbnnbf t n bt t brb fbrt t rbrb b t b tt tft bf f tt b tb b t b f rfbrt fbr t tb t fbn tb t tbr bn tt f rtr fr rffnrtfr f tf b brr bb fft fn ftf ff f fb rfbnbt nb bft ffffr f btt ff t rt t tb tf rtbfntb frbn rtff bf b f tb f ttb t rbrbtrnb tb t f rf t tbt f tbr tb b ff tbr ffb f b ffbr b tb b bnrbnt t fb b tt rtb ffff b ft bf btt b r ff b ft f f n ff t ff rt tffn nf b t b tt btf ffbt tfb ff PAGE 18 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfntrbr r fnt b b t nf bb t rftb tt nf b tf n btn nfbf tfbt nbtb tffbb tbffttr frrnn tr bbrfnrfr t tf f ftb b nfnr f b fb f t ntr f b ft tf ttb tb t b r ftb bf tb ff b bttb f tfb t ffb bbbnbnnbf t n bt t brb fbrt t rbrb b t b tt tft bf f tt b tb b t b f rfbrt fbr t tb t fbn tb t tbr bn tt f rtr fr rffnrtfr f tf b brr bb fft fn ftf ff f fb rfbnbt nb bft ffffr f btt ff t rt t tb tf rtbfntb frbn rtff bf b f tb f ttb t rbrbtrnb tb t f rf t tbt f tbr tb b ff tbr ffb f b ffbr b tb b bnrbnt t fb b tt rtb ffff b ft bf btt b r ff b ft f f n ff t ff rt tffn nf b t b tt btf ffbt tfb ff THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 19

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rf ntnb n nnr n bf nnr rn n rb nn nbr r bnb b n rbn rnrfb r fn rffn rnrtn rb bnnr tr r r bnnn rrn b br nrnt b n rnb rn nnbb rn nnnb rnbnn r rnbnn tr r rbr rb rn n nb n rn rntnrbrnt rrn nb nr b nr n r bn rbn n b r n nbr n nb nnn n n nn r r nr r rn n rr br b t b r fbnnr n n bbn rb bn fnf ft b r n rrnrtbrnb rn r nnnr fnbrnb nnbb nbbb nnr nn r nn nnrb rrnr nntr nbb nbnn r nn bn rnnn nbn b brnb nb b n nr nnn n nr nrn rf PAGE 20 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf ntnb n nnr n bf nnr rn n rb nn nbr r bnb b n rbn rnrfb r fn rffn rnrtn rb bnnr tr r r bnnn rrn b br nrnt b n rnb rn nnbb rn nnnb rnbnn r rnbnn tr r rbr rb rn n nb n rn rntnrbrnt rrn nb nr b nr n r bn rbn n b r n nbr n nb nnn n n nn r r nr r rn n rr br b t b r fbnnr n n bbn rb bn fnf ft b r n rrnrtbrnb rn r nnnr fnbrnb nnbb nbbb nnr nn r nn nnrb rrnr nntr nbb nbnn r nn bn rnnn nbn b brnb nb b n nr nnn n nr nrn rf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 21

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rffntb nrfrfrffn bnnnrffntt frtf nffrrrt tnfttrffrn tnfrf ffrffnt nttr tn n tn ffnt tf frrttnr ft ffb t rf ntttr t t t ttf f f ffff f fnr rtf ntb t fr ftfn r t tfft f tt trn ff f n f ft tt rfr ft r n f f tt tt rr t r fnr f f ftf r r n rff rt rfn bn nf f f f tff r n nrn nfff ft frfr f fffr nt fttrr tn frf ntf ft ft t f frt tr tfb ftr rn ffrrrt f nn rt f fff ff n fft frf nt t n ttf rf ffn fff ff nfrt ff tf nn rnt nt tt tftt fffr tntf rf ffrf f n rftrt t tnt tf tft ff tff nn trtn tttr nffr t ff rff tt nf tff ttf nfft nf f tt ftr tf fr tn nffnt f rrfntbfrrrnb tfftnrrfrntfnbn ttnrnbbntrbrn bbtrttrnbnt ttbtbnrrb btbnrbntbrrfb btr nttnrrbnntb brbtfntrnbtrrn r bbnrnfbttn bbrrtbnbtrtn btrnrtnnttttbnt rftt rrtrrrntbtrnbfr rrrrbrrnbbr trnrrbbttf ftnbtfrnff ntbrrfrntbtn ntbfrntrnrnt nbntfbfbftt rrrrfbtbnrbbf bntbtttbrtn tnttbrbftbtt bt rrftbttrftt brftrntbbntbrtnt nrntrntftrntnbb rtrnrfrfttb rffttbrtbrttt nrrtrrftbnrf PAGE 22 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rffntb nrfrfrffn bnnnrffntt frtf nffrrrt tnfttrffrn tnfrf ffrffnt nttr tn n tn ffnt tf frrttnr ft ffb t rf ntttr t t t ttf f f ffff f fnr rtf ntb t fr ftfn r t tfft f tt trn ff f n f ft tt rfr ft r n f f tt tt rr t r fnr f f ftf r r n rff rt rfn bn nf f f f tff r n nrn nfff ft frfr f fffr nt fttrr tn frf ntf ft ft t f frt tr tfb ftr rn ffrrrt f nn rt f fff ff n fft frf nt t n ttf rf ffn fff ff nfrt ff tf nn rnt nt tt tftt fffr tntf rf ffrf f n rftrt t tnt tf tft ff tff nn trtn tttr nffr t ff rff tt nf tff ttf nfft nf f tt ftr tf fr tn nffnt f rrfntbfrrrnb tfftnrrfrntfnbn ttnrnbbntrbrn bbtrttrnbnt ttbtbnrrb btbnrbntbrrfb btr nttnrrbnntb brbtfntrnbtrrn r bbnrnfbttn bbrrtbnbtrtn btrnrtnnttttbnt rftt rrtrrrntbtrnbfr rrrrbrrnbbr trnrrbbttf ftnbtfrnff ntbrrfrntbtn ntbfrntrnrnt nbntfbfbftt rrrrfbtbnrbbf bntbtttbrtn tnttbrbftbtt bt rrftbttrftt brftrntbbntbrtnt nrntrntftrntnbb rtrnrfrfttb rffttbrtbrttt nrrtrrftbnrf THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 23

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rf nr t brft t tft f f rfb rtfbf r tf tb n b t ff b t ftt ft ftb t t tff b tt frtt rfnf rb r ft bt r f rr ftnb rfnrfr frfrr tt t nrtt tff nfft rt n b rtrn rt r rfnn rrttf trrb n ffrftr fb r t tfft fnrb r ttfn n nrtf ntfr ttnr rnrrt rtf rr rrt ffrtr nrb rr ttt b btbnn frf br nb tftf tfb ttnrt rftff tf b ftn rr tfb rft ntb ffft nb rnt tf trrn tffff trbbbrbtr fnnb t rtrr frbt tttr trfttfrrft tb ftrtr tnrfftnt tr fb ftrr rb fr t ttftrt tb tt fntr nt tfrb trttf f rrb tt rt rrft fntt rftrr bf ntrb nrt ff tf frtbr rttf t t ttfrt t rn fb nt trtb tf tb rffbf bfrttrrb rttrrn fnb rtrttt rbtftf ttrt nrt ttbtrff ff ftfb nrfft fbttr ftt tt tt rtt n b rrfntrt f rf tn bt r tfbt trt fr tb rfn rt tn fff bbfn f rb trt tt tb tr t rt nb f ftn ft nt ntrb tf tf rtb f bb f b t f tb fnnfr f trb rtt rt ffttf fb nrrt brb trtnttf tbffb tftfb PAGE 24 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rf nr t brft t tft f f rfb rtfbf r tf tb n b t ff b t ftt ft ftb t t tff b tt frtt rfnf rb r ft bt r f rr ftnbrfnrfr frfrr tt t nrtt tff nfft rt n b rtrn rt r rfnn rrttf trrb n ffrftr fb r t tfft fnrb r ttfn n nrtf ntfr ttnr rnrrt rtf rr rrt ffrtr nrb rr ttt b btbnn frf br nb tftf tfb ttnrt rftff tf b ftn rr tfb rft ntb ffft nb rnt tf trrn tffff trbbbrbtr fnnb t rtrr frbt tttr trfttfrrft tb ftrtr tnrfftnt tr fb ftrr rb fr t ttftrt tb tt fntr nt tfrb trttf f rrb tt rt rrft fntt rftrr bf ntrb nrt ff tf frtbr rttf t t ttfrt t rn fb nt trtb tf tb rffbf bfrttrrb rttrrn fnb rtrttt rbtftf ttrt nrt ttbtrff ff ftfb nrfft fbttr ftt tt tt rtt n b rrfntrt f rf tn bt r tfbt trt fr tb rfn rt tn fff bbfn f rb trt tt tb tr t rt nb f ftn ft nt ntrb tf tf rtb f bb f b t f tb fnnfr f trb rtt rt ffttf fb nrrt brb trtnttf tbffb tftfb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 25

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rrfnntb tfnn nftn fftntb ffnnr ftntnn nftnn tt ntr rf tt ttn ntn fftnn tfnrn fttnn tnt fntr ntrnn nnb nnfn f tnntn tfb nnr nnnn rnfnntnb fnnt tfnfnfn trtn nn nnnt tnn rrftnb rtttnn fnnn tbntnrn nfntnnfnt nf nnnnn nnt bn n fntrn fntn ntnttb nntnnt nntn tnnnb nnnttfnn fntnnft nnttb nttnn rnnt frf nnn tnt tbnf tnnntn tnnnt nrntfn nfntnt nnnfnnn frn nrnn tnnn tnntnn nn f nntnrnfnfb nfnnfnf nrnnfn fntrtb nt nnt rtt nnnf rfntbtnb tn ffnn tn fntnt nnfnf nnt tnb nrtn ftnft rn nn rfn ntt nbrbnn nn ff ntn tbnb bnbfntfr nfnn tnnnft nr trnf ttf rtnftnn nrnr ff tbtntbrftnnf nrnt ntnb fnfntb tnntnn nnn nnntftnt nntfntt ntnn ntt tn btnffnfttnfnf ntrff tbntf nff nnnn nnn nnnrb nnnnft rtnn tn r nnn nn n nn nffnt tt n nrnnfnb nnrn fn n n nt ttttn ftn n fbnnrftb tnnnn tfnn n ntt fnnt nrf rnrfrfb nnnnn fnrfn t bbfb btnfrtbrnrbnn nnb nn ttfrr f nffn nttt ttn trf n PAGE 26 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rrfnntb tfnn nftn fftntb ffnnr ftntnn nftnn tt ntr rf tt ttn ntn fftnn tfnrn fttnn tnt fntr ntrnn nnb nnfn f tnntn tfb nnr nnnn rnfnntnb fnnt tfnfnfn trtn nn nnnt tnn rrftnb rtttnn fnnn tbntnrn nfntnnfnt nf nnnnn nnt bn n fntrn fntn ntnttb nntnnt nntn tnnnb nnnttfnn fntnnft nnttb nttnn rnnt frf nnn tnt tbnf tnnntn tnnnt nrntfn nfntnt nnnfnnn frn nrnn tnnn tnntnn nn f nntnrnfnfb nfnnfnf nrnnfn fntrtb nt nnt rtt nnnf rfntbtnb tn ffnn tn fntnt nnfnf nnt tnb nrtn ftnft rn nn rfn ntt nbrbnn nn ff ntn tbnb bnbfntfr nfnn tnnnft nr trnf ttf rtnftnn nrnr ff tbtntbrftnnf nrnt ntnb fnfntb tnntnn nnn nnntftnt nntfntt ntnn ntt tn btnffnfttnfnf ntrff tbntf nff nnnn nnn nnnrb nnnnft rtnn tn r nnn nn n nn nffnt tt n nrnnfnb nnrn fn n n nt ttttn ftn n fbnnrftb tnnnn tfnn n ntt fnnt nrf rnrfrfb nnnnn fnrfn t bbfb btnfrtbrnrbnn nnb nn ttfrr f nffn nttt ttn trf n THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 27

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rffntb f n nffn n t fr tn f nn fn t rn f tt t nfn ffnn ffn fff nt t f t n f tn nn ft fn nf t f rbt nnnnt rfntft tfn f t ff bfbnntn nnft f frbfbfnnnt f nfn nf fn f ftn nf f nnbnfnt n f f tn n f t nt n f t n f t f nn f n nn ffnn f tf r t f t nt t tf f rr f f t f n t f ffn trb n n tn f n tf nf n tf f ffff n nf n ttn f n f nt n f nf ntn n f nt n f n f tn f tn f n nf nt nt f PAGE 28 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rffntb f n nffn n t fr tn f nn fn t rn f tt t nfn ffnn ffn fff nt t f t n f tn nn ft fn nf t f rbt nnnnt rfntft tfn f t ff bfbnntn nnft f frbfbfnnnt f nfn nf fn f ftn nf f nnbnfnt n f f tn n f t nt n f t n f t f nn f n nn ffnn f tf r t f t nt t tf f rr f f t f n t f ffn trb n n tn f n tf nf n tf f ffff n nf n ttn f n f nt n f nf ntn n f nt n f n f tn f tn f n nf nt nt f THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 29

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rfnnrntb nnt frr nfn nr tt nnf nt nfn fnn nn nn nn tnrfn nn tff ftbn rnn fftrn rr n nnrtbn t nn nnnn t nrt rffnn fnnt nrftnnr fn r frn r nr ttt r ntr fftffn nn rbnr f rtffr nnrft rnrnnnfrntf ffnnnrnf ntrrtffr nrnf frnnn fnntfrn frntn fnrnnnrn n tfnntff ffnftfrfnt nfbtfrfn ftrn tr ntfntn ntnnnn rnrfn nn fft fnfr r ntfbrffnt nnn f n nn tb rfnf nt nnnr r rftbt nff rffft trn nnntt nt nn f fnn n f nr nf ftrn tbnbfnnn ntff nfrr n nnn tb ntn trn rn rr r nntn fntf f nb n frnn frf frf ftrr frtbn n t ntn nff ffnn ff rrtb n t nn f rf frf nn frr r nr nfrtbn rnnr nn rr nb PAGE 30 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfnnrntb nnt frr nfn nr tt nnf nt nfn fnn nn nn nn tnrfn nn tff ftbn rnn fftrn rr n nnrtbn t nn nnnn t nrt rffnn fnnt nrftnnr fn r frn r nr ttt r ntr fftffn nn rbnr f rtffr nnrft rnrnnnfrntf ffnnnrnf ntrrtffr nrnf frnnn fnntfrn frntn fnrnnnrn n tfnntff ffnftfrfnt nfbtfrfn ftrn tr ntfntn ntnnnn rnrfn nn fft fnfr r ntfbrffnt nnn f n nn tb rfnf nt nnnr r rftbt nff rffft trn nnntt nt nn f fnn n f nr nf ftrn tbnbfnnn ntff nfrr n nnn tb ntn trn rn rr r nntn fntf f nb n frnn frf frf ftrr frtbn n t ntn nff ffnn ff rrtb n t nn f rf frf nn frr r nr nfrtbn rnnr nn rr nb THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 31

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rfnt br t rt t rf f rr r f rr ft r rr rrrt f rrftf fffr r frr frfff r f ff rfrfr rftf rf fr rrrrr rft r rbr rfrr rr fffr frbrtt rf f rrr rtr ff rftffr rrffffr frrrfr nt fff r nnfrr rrr rfrnn r rfr frt r fr rrrf rrf rfrr tfr rt rff frffr t b ff r rf t rrf rf rfrr ttftrrr rr rf frr t ttrt rrrrr rrr rrff rr rrr f rr r rfrrr rffrr rrr rfrfrr rrrttfr rrff rrr nffrrrr rfrt frrrr rrf rffrr frrr rr trt ffrff rt rtrnrrr fnft rtrt rr r rrrr rfrt rfrrr rr rft rfr rrtr r tr frr r PAGE 32 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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rfnt br t rt t rf f rr r f rr ft r rr rrrt f rrftf fffr r frr frfff r f ff rfrfr rftf rf fr rrrrr rft r rbr rfrr rr fffr frbrtt rf f rrr rtr ff rftffr rrffffr frrrfr nt fff r nnfrr rrr rfrnn r rfr frt r fr rrrf rrf rfrr tfr rt rff frffr t b ff r rf t rrf rf rfrr ttftrrr rr rf frr t ttrt rrrrr rrr rrff rr rrr f rr r rfrrr rffrr rrr rfrfrr rrrttfr rrff rrr nffrrrr rfrt frrrr rrf rffrr frrr rr tr t ffrff rt rtrnrrr fnft rtrt rr r rrrr rfrt rfrrr rr rft rfr rrtr r tr frr r THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 33

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r rrffrn tbb trb bbt ftb trb fbfb tbbrtn tbbrft btfbfbtf bbt f br rbtrbn tnn r fn t bb f rf bb tf f f rt rrbr n bf rrb tfrb btr n b brbbfbn bb t bbf fb bbbbt brb rf bfb bbrbb rf b btb brbbb nbnbbrt nf rtr bftbbtb t bb bbbbr rrrtf rtbr btrrb tfbb trn r fbrn br b t nntbr btbfb t bt ttf brbfnr bb b btbb rrfbtbbb bb f rrbb btb bttrbn rbttbt tbrbntbftrbrttn rbrtb n frtr rtfbb nb rnn fbf rbbtb br rbrtb rbrb frrr rr n rb n r f f r bbb bbtb trb r rbrb bb br n rbrr bt trb bf tbtbn frtfrtrbbrntn btrb tbft ttffbr tbrrb ttbrbtt brr n bbff bbtbtt brffbf btbrn n fr btft bbrtn f fbtrrtfb rbrfbt frfbbftf bbfr n bfb rtrbftb tn b tnrbb bb fr bbbt ftrrt rrtfrb b fffffrfbbb rfbfbr tf b bt PAGE 34 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS

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r rrffrn tbb trb bbt ftb trb fbfb tbbrtn tbbrft btfbfbtf bbt f br rbtrbn tnn r fn t bb f rf bb tf f f rt rrbr n bf rrb tfrb btr n b brbbfbn bb t bbf fb bbbbt brb rf bfb bbrbb rf b btb brbbb nbnbbrt nf rtr bftbbtb t bb bbbbr rrrtf rtbr btrrb tfbb trn r fbrn br b t nntbr btbfb t bt ttf brbfnr bb b btbb rrfbtbbb bb f rrbb btb bttrbn rbttbt tbrbntbftrbrttn rbrtb n frtr rtfbb nb rnn fbf rbbtb br rbrtb rbrb frrr rr n rb n r f f r bbb bbtb trb r rbrb bb br n rbrr bt trb bf tbtbn frtfrtrbbrntn btrb tbft ttffbr tbrrb ttbrbtt brr n bbff bbtbtt brffbf btbrn n fr btft bbrtn f fbtrrtfb rbrfbt frfbbftf bbfr n bfb rtrbftb tn b tnrbb bb fr bbbt ftrrt rrtfrb b fffffrfbbb rfbfbr tf b bt THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 35

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PAGE 36 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r r f n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r rf n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n rrf n tn b b r t r n brr r r f r r n b n n n r r r n n r n r r f n n nr r rn n r nr r nn r nr r nr r n nr n n nr rn br r rn n nn nr n n r r n n r r t t r nr n r r nrr fr n n n n r rnr b n b r n b n b r t nr r n n r tn r n f n b n r n r tn b t bt r f n t b r r rf n r f t b n n r n n t r r n rr r n r rr rnr r n rn r r b n r r n n n r rf n nr r r n rf rnfr nn n n nrn n n rn r rr r rn rf f n f n r nr nr rn rf n fr n n r n f n r n rn n n rf rn r f n t rrn n r n nn rr r n nr n rnr n n f r r nn nr tn rn r f n tb n b bn n n n bn t n b n n b n n b n n n n n n By Deena Bouknight f nn b n n n b n b b n t f b n f n n bn n bn n b b n n n b b b b n n n n n b b nn b b n n n b n Death Wish n brr r rn r r r f ntb ftR ed Sparr ow rn n n n n nr n bn n n r rn b b n n

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THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 37 By Deena Bouknight rf nt fbr rr r r r r r t r rnt b b r b f r b r nr r r r r r r rfr b rr b r rfr n frbr t nnn r nn br f nr r r nn n b rn rr r f br f nnn rr f t br r b t rr b r rf r br r n b fr f f r nbn r r ft n b f n n b r r b r rr r r r br rf r n n nr bn r br n rr nb rr r r nb r By Deena Bouknight r fnt b b rb rb b n b b b t r r b r b b r b b b r b b r b b b fnf b rb b b b r b b b b b b b b b b r b b b rb b b b b fn b r b b r b b b r r b r r r b b b b r rb b r b b b b b b b b b b rr b b rrb rb br b b rb b b b b b b b r b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b rb b b r b b b b rb b b b b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b rr b b r b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b fnt b b b b b n r ffBy Deena Bouknight b r b rb b b b r r r rb b r b b b b br b rb b r b b b b b b r r b r b b b r bb nn r b b b b b r r b b b fb b b b r b b b b r r b r b b b b b b b b b b b b b r r b b b rr b b b b r bb b b n b b r b bb rr b b b b b n b b b b b r fn t b bn r b t n t r t t b r t b b b r t b t b r b b b b b b b b b r r f f n t By Deena Bouknight rf nt fbr rr r r r r r t r rnt b b r b f r b r nr r r r r r r rfr b rr b r rfr n frbr t nnn r nn br f nr r r nn n b rn rr r f br f nnn rr f t br r b t rr b r rf r br r n b fr f f r nbn r r ft n b f n n b r r b r rr r r r br rf r n n nr bn r br n rr nb rr r r nb r By Deena Bouknight r fnt b b rb rb b n b b b t r r b r b b r b b b r b b r b b b fnf b rb b b b r b b b b b b b b b b r b b b rb b b b b fn b r b b r b b b r r b r r r b b b b r rb b r b b b b b b b b b b rr b b rrb rb br b b rb b b b b b b b r b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b rb b b r b b b b rb b b b b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b rr b b r b b b b b b r b b b b b b b b b b b b fnt b b b b b n r ffBy Deena Bouknight b r b rb b b b r r r rb b r b b b b br b rb b r b b b b b b r r b r b b b r bb nn r b b b b b r r b b b fb b b b r b b b b r r b r b b b b b b b b b b b b b r r b b b rr b b b b r bb b b n b b r b bb rr b b b b b n b b b b b r fn t b bn r b t n t r t t b r t b b b r t b t b r b b b b b b b b b r r f f n t

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PAGE 38 | TIME & MONEY THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n r f nf tb nrn tf tt t tf t rf t tf n f tr fftb t r t f r t n br t nt n fb rf nf nr n rf nt f n ff r f fb nt tb rrf fb f tt r f rr rf t t r t f tb r fb t t t r b f rr t n r f r f r nt fb f nf rf tf tb tf rr rtb f rr trr n rr t r t t f t r f nf n t n nbn f t f t r r tt r rtb rf t n fb t r f f f f t tf b n tb frrf n nr t t rt b n fntb brf tb tb tf fntb n fn trtb tf fb ttb tb tf t frf fntb rf ttf t tfrf tb f tb tf fn f f f ftb f tb rf t tb t tb tbf tb nf t r ffntb tb ttb rrtb fntb t tb bn tb t f tb tb tb ftb frr t ffff tb ftb tb t t n tbf tb t rtb ftb t rttb t rtb tbf n r bbf tb n r rtttb n r r rr tb fr ttb tb tf t n f t b ftb r nftb ftb n t f t t tb frf ttb tf r f nrrft n f f tb ff n ttb f n t r r n b f n ft n f rr f ff f n n t tb n r t t t rf rr tt fr nf n n tt n t t t rr r n f f f f f tf fn f t n n r t f f n b bnf rff nt t t nf n nr tf ftbf tb b f t fn tr n b f t rr t f f t f f f r f rf r rt r f By Melissa Erickson rf n t b f rn r n rr ft nr b n n b n r nb n t b nnnn rr n nb nb n nfn n nn r b n n getaway space n r b f r tr b ntrr n t r trn n n tt rb n nb tn n nn rn n r rr nrb n n n nf t n n nf nb n n ntn nn trrnb n n n n n r b tnr rnb nb n tr rnn f r n n nrr nt r t rtt f b rtr n tr nb n n n spa showers rr b nb n nr r tr n n rf b n r rn n n b n n r nb r rn n n b n n Home bars ttrb n r r t nnb n n n t n ntb n n rn f nb n r fb b ntnn r tr n b n Accessory apartmentn rn nr ttr n rn n nb r nn rn rr r nnb nn tn nt rr n n tt nn n nn nr r n r nn tnnb rr nn rnb n n n rn f rr nt r Mixed metals b n rr n nr r tr r rrn rf n rb tt nnb n n r n nrr ttr nb n tnn n rn rf beige, taupe and brownb n n b r n ultra violetb rn ttr ttt t nb rnb rr n rr r velvet furnishings rr b r ttr r b rf n r trrnb n nn rn painted ceilingsb nn n rr f r ntnr t t nrr r b t r n n n rr r n r n rf nrr b n n n n n r n tnn rb n n rf n

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THE TUSCALOOSA NEWS TIME & MONEY | PAGE 39 By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f By Melissa Erickson r f r n t b t n f n b b n f b n f r f r f r n f b f b r f r f f b f r b fn r ff f rn r n f f f t r r f b fr b r f b f r n r n b f n n r f r f n b f b r n b r f f f r bb r n bb f b b n b n r f f b fn f r fbn f b f b r f By Melissa Erickson r f nftb f f f f f f f f r f nf f r f f nf f f f nft rf f f f f f f f r nf f ff f ft f f r ft f r nft f f f f f f nf r t f f f f f f f f nt t f f f f f f n b ft f r f f fr f f f f f f f fr nf f ft n nf f fnf f f r f nf f rf fft f n f f f ft f f r nftb f nff f f n n f r nf fnf f ft r f nf n f f n f r ft f f f f f f f f nf f nf f f f ntb f f f f nt f f f f f f f f rn r nf f f t f nff r f tb f f f nnf r b r r f f b r f n t f r n n r fn f f b r t r n f r r n f ff n r r f rr f r r f r f r f r r f n t By Melissa Erickson t f n r f f f ff f f f f f fr f f f nt f nf f fr f f n f f f f ft f r f f t f f t f f n tb f f ft f n f ff f f n f ft f t nf t f f t f nn f n f f ftb f n ffnt ff n f f f f f f f r t ff f f ff f f nr f f n f nr t f f n n f f f f f n n n f nt f fr f n fntb ffn f n n f f f f n f f f ff f f f nt f f nf f ft n f f f nb f f f f f ft f f f nf nf f f f f t f r t f f f ft f f f ff ftb ffn f f f f nf t f f f f f f f f f f f f f t f f ft f f nf f r nf f f r t t ft f f f t ft f t f f n t f f t n f n f f n fr f f ft ff f f nf t f n f ft f f f f nn f r f f f f f f f f t f r f f f n ft f nn f ftb f f f n f f f f ff n f f f tb f f f f ff f f ft tb ffn f

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