Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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** Business .........................A7 Diversions .....................C7 Local & State ...............B1-7 Obituaries ..................B3-4 Sports........................C1-6 Viewpoints ....................A8 SUNDAYT-storms 79 / 65SATURDAYFog 79 / 68TODAYMostly sunny 80 / 64 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 ENTERTAINER INSIDELUCKY YOUHiaasen novel adapted for GCSC stage treatment Friday, February 23, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com LOCAL & STATE | B1DR. RAQUEL SKIDMOREP.C. doctors license on line over medical pot SPORTS | C1GIRLS PREP HOOPSMosley faces Bishop Kenny in Region 1-6A title game NATION & WORLD | A6GLOBAL FISHINGNew maps show 58 percent of oceans fully shed By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comLYNN HAVEN „ At 9:57 a.m. Thursday, every-thing was normal at Mowat Middle School.The long hallway of the 900 building was flooded with the usual stampede of students moving to their next class. Teachers, trying to keep some semblance of order, were drowned out by the sounds of chattering and laughter. The students were largely in a good mood as they bounded into their classrooms. The teachers, though, appeared nervous. They knew what was coming.Then, a crackling call came over the loudspeaker.Teachers and students, we are in a lockdown,Ž Prin-cipal Ed Sheffield called out.As instructed, teachers peeked out of their class-room doors, looked left and right, then ducked back in, locked the door and covered the window. Middle school practices active shooter drillINSIDE | B6Threats, arrests continue at area schools Sixth-graders hunch in front of a wall and hold books over their heads during a lockdown drill Thursday at Mowat Middle School. Teachers were advised to lock their classrooms while students knelt next to a wall and held textbooks over their heads to pract ice shielding from bullets or debris. Go to newsherald.com for a related video. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Students huddle under tables, hands on their headsMowat Middle School Principal Ed Shef“ eld speaks after a lockdown drill Thursday. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] By Zac Anderson zac.anderson@heraldtribune.comPropo sals to arm teach-ers to defend against school shooters have been floated in the Florida Legislature for years but always failed to gain enough GOP support to advance.Now it appears thata version of theidea „ one in which law enforcement would designate teachers and other school personnel who undergo trainingas"special deputies"who cancarry weaponson campus „ will be incorporated intolegislation being negotiated by Republican leaders in the stateHouse and Senate that is aimed at trying to prevent future school shootings.The plan „ which would be voluntary for each school district „ to increasethe number of armed individuals on school campuses is expected to bepart ofa sweepinglegislative pack-agethat also will include more funding for mental health programs at schools andsome of themost significant gun control measures everproposed by GOP leaders in the Legislature.But some leading Republicans already are speaking out againsttheidea of arming teachers, which also wasendorsed by President Donald Trump this week.State lawmakers consider plan to arm teachers See DRILL, A5 See TEACHERS, A5 By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Despite his attempts to convince the jury otherwise, Cody Austin Shirah was convicted Thurs-day of drunkenly plowing through a stop sign in Sep-tember 2016 and killing four visiting Ohio softball players.Immediately after receiving the verdict, Circuit Judge Michael Overstreet sentenced the 22-year-old Shirah to 60 years in prison and accepted part of the blame for releasing Shirah on drug offender probation only months before the fatal crash.It took jurors about two and a half hours to find Shirah guilty as charged of fleeing the scene of a crash, four counts of DUI manslaughter and a count of DUI with bodily injury. After hearing the verdict, Overstreet also heard statements from the family members of the four victims „ Anthony Gouge, 30, Eric Young, 25, William Gouge II, 29, and Josh Martin, 33, all of Ohio „ about how the crash has changed their lives. Shirah wept as each family called for the maximum pun-ishment: life in prison.This tragedy has affected my entire family,Ž said Vicki Gouge, mother of William Gouge and aunt of Anthony Gouge. I live daily through pain and suffering. I am empty inside, and I will never be the same.ŽShirah receives 60 years in DUI crashVictims sister: You should know how much destruction you causedCody Shirah embraces his mother Thursday at the Bay County Courthouse after being sentenced to 60 years in prison on four counts of DUI manslaughter. [ZACK MCDONALD/THE NEWS HERALD] See SHIRAH, A4

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** A2 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News HeraldRoss, 13, was the third student arrested over a school shooting threat in three days. BCSO on Tuesday arrested a 17-year-old Rosenwald High School student, followed by a 14-year-old Bay High School student on Wednesday. Theresa Simmons: These copy cats need to pay a penalty for what theyve done. Even if they think its a joke, its not!Ž Andrew Higgins Jr.: Its called parenting.. in this case and many others just like it... It the lack of proper parenting. But let me emphasize something... Fear of getting your backside beat shouldnt be the reason why you wouldnt ever say or do such a thing. Common sense should rule your life. Yes... during our lives there will be folks we dont like... does that mean we should kill them ?? Thats a can of worms I shouldnt have opened but I hope you know what Im referring to.Ž Panama City Beach is the lone Panhandle location on TripAdvisors Top 25 list for 2018. In this years T ravelers Choice Awards for U.S. beaches, PCB came in at No. 11. The rankings are based on the quantity and quality of traveler reviews on the booking and t ravel planning site. Joe Marshall: Not to put too “ ne a point on it, but if the rankings are based on reviews left on the TripAdvisor site how are we supposed to know whether or not PCB should be rated number 1?Ž Students from Parklands Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School converged on the Capitol with allied groups in a day of angry, frustrated and sad protest as Floridas reliably gunfriendly Legislature struggles to respond to the Valentines Day slaughter. Chad Rosamond: They should probably be in history class learning about why the second amendment was written instead of skipping school.Ž Craig Stovall: Yeah, those kids should be reading about constitutional rights instead of exercising them.ŽREADER FEEDBACKToday is Friday, Feb. 23, the 54th day of 2018. There are 311 days left in the year. Highlight in History: On Feb. 23, 1945, during World War II, U.S. Marines on Iwo Jima captured Mount Suribachi, where they raised two American flags (the second flag-raising was captured in the iconic Associated Press photograph.) On this date:In 1934, Leopold III succeeded his late father, Albert I, as King of the Belgians.In 1942, the first shelling of the U.S. mainland during World War II occurred as a Japanese submarine fired on an oil refinery near Santa Barbara, California, causing little damage.In 1965, film comedian Stan Laurel, 74, died in Santa Monica, California.In 1970, Guyana became a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations.In 2013, some 30 NASCAR fans were injured when rookie Kyle Larsons car was propelled by a crash into the fence at Daytona International Speedway, and large chunks of debris flew into the grandstands. The Ultimate Fighting Championship held its first womens bout as Ronda Rousey beat Liz Carmouche on an armbar, her signature move, with 11 seconds left in the first round of their bantamweight title fight at UFC 157 in Anaheim, California.In 2017, lottery officials said the sole winning ticket for an estimated $435 million Powerball jackpot was sold at a Lafayette, Indiana, convenience store.TODAY IN HISTORYActor Peter Fonda is 78. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Fred Biletnikoff is 75. Author John Sandford is 74. Actress Patricia Richardson is 67. Former NFL player Ed Too TallŽ Jones is 67. Rock musician Brad Whitford (Aerosmith) is 66. Singer Howard Jones is 63. Actress Kristin Davis is 53. Tennis player Helena Sukova is 53. TV personality/ businessman Daymond John (TV: Shark TankŽ) is 49. Country singer Steve Holy is 46. Actress Kelly Macdonald is 42. Rapper Residente (Calle 13) is 40. Actor Aziz Ansari is 35. Actress Dakota Fanning is 24. To submit birthdays, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with birthdayŽ in the subject line, or drop off a current photo and fill out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. The deadline is noon three business days prior to the birthday. Birthday announcements must include the persons first and last name, city and age. The photo is a mug shot and must be a clear photo.HAPPY BIRTHDAY FLORIDA LOTTERYThese Florida lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Fantasy 5: 17-22-28-34-36 Lotto: 03-15-24-27-37-50, estimated jackpot $3 million Lotto XTRA: 04 Powerball: 07-15-31-34-36, Powerball 8, Power Play 3, estimated jackpot $246 million Mega Millions: estimated jackpot $204 million Pick 2 Evening: 8-9 Pick 2 Midday: 9-1 Pick 3 Evening: 9-5-8 Pick 3 Midday: 5-5-6 Pick 4 Evening: 7-3-8-1 Pick 4 Midday: 9-2-4-5 Pick 5 Evening: 2-8-9-4-4 Pick 5 Midday: 4-8-9-0-1 YOUNG ARTISTBraxton Goff-Hyser Grade 2 Southport Elementary School CATCH OF THE DAYSandra Daniel sent this photo to us of Carol Sandy, who caught this 38-inch red with Capt. Joey off Indian Pass on Monday. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] 1 SPRING YARD AND BAKE SALE: 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Grace Presbyterian Church, 1415 Airport Road, Panama City, to bene“ t Bethel Village.2 FREE SENIOR HEALTH FAIR: 9 a.m. to noon at HealthPlex, corner of Baldwin Road and State 77, Panama City. Details: 850-747-65403 FREE HEALTH CLINIC: 1…4 p.m. at the Panama City Rescue Mission Support Center, 515 E. Sixth St., Panama City. Free; open to public the fourth Thursday of each month. Registration in morning before clinic opens. Details: 850-215-01594 GRAND SLAM 2018 FUNDRAISER: 6-10 p.m. at the Edgewater Resort Senior Center, Panama City Beach, to bene“ t the Panama City Beach Senior Center. Enjoy a delicious meal and listen to the instrumental music of saxophone artist Chris Godber. After dinner, there will be a live auction; dancing entertainment is Jennifer Jones and her band. Details: 850-233-5065 or www. pcbsc.com5 SHREK, THE MUSICALŽ: 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club. Tickets $15; $10 for students and children.6 LUCKY YOUŽ: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details: GulfCoast.edu/artsGO AND DOWe want to see your catch of the day: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. Email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. Rick Bywater, a snowbird from Huntsville, Ontario, Canada, shared this photo of a cormorant taking ” ight. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] PICTURE PERFECTWe want your photos: Post your photos to the News Herald Facebook page with your name, city of residence and information about the photo. You can email photos to yourpix@pcnh.com. CELEBRATE COMMUNITY NEWSROOM DIRECTORY Tim Thompson, Publisher .....................................850-747-5001 tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas, Editor ..............................................850-747-5094 mmcazalas@pcnh.com Shane Spence, Regional Operations Director .....850-747-5078 sspence@pcnh.com Robert Delaney, Regional Controller ....................850-747-5003 rdelaney@pcnh.com Jamie Smith, Human Resources Coordinator .....850-747-5005 jsmith@pcnh.com Michael McCabe, Advertising Sales Manager ....850-747-5082 mmccabe@pcnh.com Kathleen Smith, Advertising Digital Sales Manager ....850-747-5004 krsmith@pcnh.com Roger Underwood, Regional Circulation Director ... 850-747-5049 runderwood@pcnh.com CIRCULATION Missed Delivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Make the News Herald a part of your daily life. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Gatehouse Media. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when on the go, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Print delivery available within the newspaper distribution area only. By submitting your address and/or email, you understand that you may receive promotional offers from GateHouse Media and it related companies. You may opt out of receiving any such offers at any time by calling 850-747-5050. An additional one-time $5.95 activation fee applies. Due to the size and value of premium editions, there will be up to a $5.00 surcharge on each date of publication of any premium edition. However, rather than assess an extra charge for premium editions, we will adjust the length of your subscription, which accelerates the expiration of your subscription, when you received these premium editions. There will be no more than 2 premium editions per month. ADVERTISING To place a display ad, call 850-747-5030 Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To place a classi“ ed ad, call 850-747-5020. SINGLE COPIES Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50. DID WE MISS YOU? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402Setting it straight It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarif y a story, call 747-5070.P.O Box: 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 | Address: 501 W. 11th St. Panama City Fl, 32401 | Phone: 850-747-5000 | WATS: 800-345-8688 | Online: newsherald.com PANAMA CITY

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 A3

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** A4 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald The Associated PressMAIDUGURI, Nigeria „ More than 100 girls are still missing three days after sus-pected Boko Haram extremists attacked their school in north-ern Nigeria, parents said Thursday, as fears grew that they may have been kidnapped like those from Chibok town nearly four years ago.The announcement came after government officials in Yobe state acknowledged that some 50 young women remained unaccounted for in the Monday evening attack on the village of Dapchi. There have been a number of conflicting reports, in part because of limited access to the area.One parent, Bashir Manzo, told The Associated Press that the parents compiled a list of 101 missing children and presented it to the governor.The state governor, Ibrahim Gaidam, told us the girls have not been found and we should continue to pray for their safe return,Ž another parent, Rabiu Sani, told the AP.Boko Haram horrified the world when it abducted 276 girls from a boarding school in Chibok almost four years ago. While some escaped and many others were released as part of negotiations, about 100 remain with their captors. The extremist group has kid-napped thousands of people over the years.Boko Haram fighters invaded Dapchi on Monday evening, forcing residents, including students of Govern-ment Girls Secondary school, to flee into the bushes. Police and the state ministry of edu-cation initially denied claims that students were seized.Student Aishatu Abdullahi was among those who escaped on foot and spent the night hiding in an abandoned house. They were shooting guns and everyone was confused,Ž she told reporters. We saw some people pushing some of the students to enter their vehicles.Ž101 girls missing after Boko Haram attackBy Philip IssaThe Associated PressBEIRUT „ World leaders called Thursday for an urgent cease-fire in Syria as government forces pounded the opposition-controlled eastern suburbs of the capital in a crushing campaign that has left hundreds of people dead in recent days.The U.N. Security Council heard a briefing from U.N. humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock on what he called the humanitarian disaster unfolding before our eyesŽ in the rebel-held suburbs known as eastern Ghouta.Sweden and Kuwait were seeking a vote on a resolution ordering a 30-day cease-fire to allow relief agencies to deliver aid and evacuate the critically sick and wounded from besieged areas to receive medical care.But Russias U.N. ambassador, Vassily Nebenzia, who called Thursdays meet-ing, put forward last-minute amendments, saying the pro-posed resolution was simply unrealistic.ŽHe also accused global media outlets of a massive disinformation campaign that ignored what he claimed were thousands of fighters, includ-ing al-Qaida-linked militants, that were shelling Damascus from eastern Ghouta and taking refuge in hospitals and schools. Council members said they needed to study the Russian proposals.We will try and find a way forward that works for everyone,Ž Swedens U.N. Ambassador Olof Skoog told reporters, adding that a vote was likely on Friday.In eastern Ghouta, medical workers said they hadnt been able to see their families for days as they worked round the clock at hospitals that have been moved underground to protect them from bombing, while their spouses and chil-dren stay in shelters.You cant be above ground for even 15 minutes,Ž said a nurse in the town of Kafr Batna, who spoke on condition of anonymity to protect the identity of family mem-bers still living in government areas. At any moment I expect to have to treat my relatives for wounds,Ž he said.In the background the deep boom of a bomb could be heard exploding as the nurse spoke by Skype to The Associated Press. He said a barrel bomb had fallen less than half a kilometer (one-third mile) away. A spokesman for the Syrian Civil Defense search-andrescue group said eastern Ghouta was being targeted for extermination.ŽThis is a war against civil-ians,Ž said the spokesman, Siraj Mahmoud. The civil defense is being targeted as they rescue women and chil-dren, evacuate civilians from targeted areas and put out fires.ŽFour rescue workers of the organization, also known as the White Helmets, have been killed since Sunday, Mahmoud said.The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group said 400 people, including dozens of children, have been killed since Sunday.Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said al-Qaida-linked fighters were using civilians as human shields in the rebel-held suburbs outside Damascus.Al-Qaidas Syria affiliate is not known to have many fighters in eastern Ghouta, and government forces on Thursday concentrated their fire on hospitals, ambulances, apartment blocks and other civilian sites, according to rescue workers, war monitors, human rights groups, and sev-eral videos emerging from the war-scarred region.U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for an immediate suspension of all war activitiesŽ in the area where he said people were living in hell on Earth.ŽThe Russian military is sup-porting Assads forces in the assault on eastern Ghouta, as it did in the 2016 campaign that drove the rebels from the enclaves they controlled in Syrias largest city, Aleppo. Then, as now, it cited the presence of al-Qaida-linked groups as grounds for the sweeping operation.German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on the European Union to step up pressure on Russia and Iran to end the vio-lence in Syria.The regime is not fighting against terrorists, but against its own people, killing children, destroying hospitals, and this is a massacre to be condemned,Ž she told Parliament.Besides President Bashar Assad, Merkel said Iran and Russia have a particular responsibilityŽ as they are both supporting the govern-ment forces.We need to do everything in our power to put an end to this massacre,Ž she said.Lavrov said in remarks in Belgrade, Serbia, that an alQaida-linked group blocked a proposal by Russias mili-tary earlier this week to allow opposition fighters to leave eastern Ghouta in exchange for ending the governments offensive.That contradicted an asser-tion by one of the largest rebel groups in eastern Ghouta, which told the AP that Russia refused to allow al-Qaida fighters to leave in November, and accused Moscow of want-ing to keep the fighters there as a pretext for a comprehensive military campaign.Russian news reports said Moscow has beefed up its forces in Syria with addi-tional warplanes, including its latest fighter jets. The Krem-lin wouldnt comment on the reports, referring questions to the military, which has remained mum about the deployment.Russia has rejected allegations it was responsible for the mounting civilian casualties in eastern Ghouta, but anger has grown along with the death toll.On Thursday, scores of pro-testers, including prominent Syrian opposition figures, gathered outside the Russian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, chanting, Russia get out of SyriaŽ and Iran get out of SyriaŽ in Turkish and Arabic.Syrias conflict, which has killed more than 400,000 people and displaced millions in the past seven years, has escalated in recent weeks as Assad and his allies push to retake remaining rebel-held areas in the country.Leaders urge ceasere in Syria A Syrian man runs Thursday between destroyed buildings that were attacked during airstrikes and shelling by Syrian government forces, in Ghouta, a suburb of Damascus, Syria. [GHOUTA MEDIA CENTER VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Jessica Redmond, Martins sister, echoed a similar sentiment. She spoke about her brothers personality and told Shirah that Martin was more than a name on his charging documents.You should know how much destruction you caused,Ž she told Shirah. You should live with that, and no amount of jail time will make up for it. We hope one day you grow up and are a better person than you were when you killed my brother.ŽCharles Kennedy, Youngs grandfather, spoke about how his grandsons parents have sunk into a deep depression since the crash.They have trouble finding joy in their lives,Ž Kennedy told the court. Despair has overwhelmed them as their first born was taken away.ŽKennedy added that Youngs daughter and son also have been traumatized.Shirah stood before the court and pleaded for leniency from the court and forgiveness from the families of his victims. He was not greeted with sympathy.In the final day of trial, Shirah attempted to convince jurors of his version of events leading up to the crash. He took the stand to say he had only consumed two beers that night at a friends house and was heading home when he clipped a truck on U.S. 231 he was attempting to pass. Shirah claimed he tried to stop and swap information, but the driver of the other truck became very aggressive.ŽShirah said he then fled out of fear down Pinetree Road with the mother of his child, Kristun Nichole Tullier, in the passenger seat. As he approached the intersection with John Pitts Road, Shirah did not see the headlights of the van carrying the softball players pull into his path, he claimed.I was scared. The way he was acting, if I stopped, he wouldve hit me,Ž Shirah said, tearing up. I didnt see the stop sign. I was looking in my rear-view mirror behind me at the vehicle that was chasing me.ŽDespite admitting to drink-ing two beers „ which was contrary to the findings of expert toxicology witnesses from both sides that testified his blood alcohol content was above the legal limit of 0.08 percent „ Shirah would not agree his consumption con-stituted multiple beers.ŽShirahs defense attorney Caren Bennett focused in her closing arguments on the testimony of Williams Futch, the man Shirah sideswiped, to further her claim that Shirah feared harm when he left the hit-and-run. Futch testified that he immediately called 911 after being struck by Shirah. But Bennett told jurors it was suspicious that the 911 call started with the caller screaming about the fatal crash.It was never investigated what their role was,Ž Bennett said. Road rage in Florida is not something looked lightly upon. They would be in trouble, so they removed themselves.ŽBennett also called into question the instruments used to take Shirahs blood after the wreck and disputed the method of retrograde extrapolationŽ to determine his blood alcohol content at the time of the crash.However, prosecutor Larry Basford replied that doctors trust the tools used to take Shirahs blood all the time to make life and death decisions.The defense wants you to just throw that out „ its too close to the time of the wreck,Ž Basford told the jury.To show that the witness wasnt chasing Shirah before the crash, Basford referred to the testimony of surviving eyewitnesses in each of the softball vans who did not see the truck trailing Shirah. They did hear the roar of Shirahs exhaust as he accelerated through the stop sign, only to look up and see the fatal impact that scattered dead and wounded on the street.The jury sided with the prosecution.By giving his testimony, Shirah admitted he willfully violated his probation on three felonies by drinking alcohol and being out after his curfew. He faced up to an additional 15 years in prison, but Overstreet sentenced him to five years in prison concurrent with one of the DUI manslaughter sentences.Before handing down the sentence, though, Overstreet took part of the blame for the fatal crash. Only months ear-lier, he had released Shirah on drug offender probation.When these people consider how this happened, it started with this sentence. I did that,Ž Overstreet told Shirah, shaking his head. Every opportunity was afforded for you to live lawfully and address your problems with substance abuse. The system has failed this family, and I bear some responsibility for that.Ž SHIRAHFrom Page A1 Cody Shirah wipes away his tears Thursday as the family members of four Ohio softball players he killed while drunkenly plowing through a stop sign call for him to be sentenced to life in prison. [ZACK MCDONALD/ THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 A5U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio said during a CNN town hall Wednesday night that he is against having teachers carry weapons. Democrats, gun con-trol advocates andeducation groups alsoare likely to protest any effort to establish such a program in Florida.Rubio, a Florida Republican, was questioned Wednesday about arming teachers by Ashley Kurth, who teaches at Mar-jory Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward County, where 17 students and teach-ers were killed in a shooting last week. Kurth first noted that she is a registered Republican who voted for Trump.Am I supposed to get extra training now to serve and pro-tect on top of educating these children?Ž Kurth asked.Rubio responded that having his children attend a school where the teachers are armed is not something that, quite frankly, Im comfortable with.ŽThe idea also has practical problemsŽ Rubio said in noting that law enforcement could have trouble distinguishing between an armed teacher and a school shooter. SentinelsAs a House member, Sarasota state Sen. Greg Steube sponsored a bill for three years in a row that would have allowed certain teachers with training to carry a concealed weapon on campus if school district officials gave approval. Steubes bill cleared the House one year but stalled in the Senate.Ive said for years youre never going to prevent evil people from doing things like this, but you can train individu-als to be in our schools and be able to do something to protect our kids,Ž Steube said.Ocala state Sen. Dennis Baxley filed legislation this year to implement a similar plan in Florida schools. Baxleys bill was pulled from consideration in a Senate com-mittee this week, apparently so as not to inflame protesters „ including more than 100 stu-dents from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School „ who flooded into the Capitol Tues-day and Wednesday to call for gun control measures.Now attention is turning to a program in Polk County, where Sheriff Grady Judd already has begun arming teachers.Dubbed the SentinelŽ program, Judds initiative allows teachers and other school personnel who go through 132 hours of special training, criminal background checks, drug testing and a psy-chological evaluation to carry concealed weapons in school. Judd started the program in 2016 at Southeastern Univer-sity in Lakeland.Those who go through the program are appointed by the sheriff as volunteer Special Deputies for the limited purpose of providing security,Ž according to a description of the program on the Polk County Sheriffs Office website.Judd spoke on Fox News recently and called the program a game-changerŽ that will help defend against school shooters. State Sen. Bill Gal-vano, a Bradenton Republican who is line to be Senate presi-dent, has praised the Sentinel program and says he plans to incorporate it into thelegislative packagehes negotiating with the House in response to the school shooting. Details of the bills are expected to bereleased Friday.Galvano saidthelegislation will leave itup to each school district to decide whether they want to establish a Sentinel program.The programs will be run by locallaw enforcement, he noted.When you have schools like(Marjory Stoneman Douglas)with close to 3,000 students, two resource officers are not going to be able to cover the whole campus,Ž Galvano said Thursday. Its just an additional tool, and its different than just saying teachers can bring guns to school; it literally means you have additional sheriffs depu-ties on campus.Ž TEACHERSFrom Page A1Stray students were pulled inside whatever room is clos-est, and the sounds of students rushing around and having fun were replaced with the jingle of keys and the slamming of doors.By 10 a.m., the campus was a ghost town.Inside the classrooms, bind-ers were open, textbooks and pencils were ready, but the chairs were empty. Instead, students were on the floor, pressed against the front wall next to the door, huddling under a three-foot-wide table with their hands over their heads. Those who couldnt fit under the table held textbooks over their heads, in the hopes it would protect them from stray bullets or shrapnel.Seeing sixth-grade students, 11 and 12 years old, huddled under a table, is deeply unset-tling. It takes the air out of the room. Its quiet, much quieter than a pre-AP class-room should be. The students struggle, and for the most part succeed, to stay silent, but that only amplifies every noise „ and with it the implication that if this were real, someone could hear and find them.Eleven-year old Caden Davidson knows shes safe at school. Even with all the talk about school shootings and threats that have scared her peers „ in the past two days, students have been arrested at Bay, Rosenwald and Jinks „ she feels safe in her classroom. She had been told about the planned lockdown by teach-ers, and the school sent out an IRIS alert telling parents the drill was coming.But even with all that warn-ing, Davidson, huddled under a table in David Hicks pre-AP math class, was nervous when she heard the doorknob jiggle once, twice, three times.It was very quiet,Ž she said. It was kind of frightening. We were sitting there under the table.ŽThe minutes stretch on. The drill is only seven minutes long, enough time for admin-istrators to walk the campus and check doorknobs, but for a middle school student under a table with their hands on their head, its an eternity.Since the Parkland school shooting last week that killed 17 students in South Florida, Sheffield said there has been a heightened sense of aware-ness, and anxiety, on campus. Teachers have been keeping their doors locked, and the administration has really emphasized that all adults on campus must have credentials or a visitor badge, or they will be confronted and taken to the main office. They had been due to hold a lockdown drill anyway, but with the shooting at the forefront of everyones mind, Sheffield said they opted to have it this week.For staff and administrators, Thursdays drill was about trying to get students to take threats seriously and treat the lockdown as if it were real, even though they know its a drill. If the situation were real, he said, or if the school held a drill without warning, there would be 1,100 students instantly on their phones, tex-ting or calling their parents.They know its a drill,Ž he said. Thats the challenge.ŽFinally, about four min-utes after the doorknob jiggle, Sheffield announced over the loudspeaker that the lockdown was lifted and everyone could return to normal.If this had been a real situa-tion, I think we would have had a lot of people safe,Ž he said. Great job teachers, great job students.Ž DRILLFrom Page A1Sixth-grade student Caden Davidson said she feels safe in her school. She was among Mowat Middle School students and staff who participated in a lockdown drill on Thursday in case of a school threat or live shooter situation. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** A6 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News HeraldChris Mooney and Brady DennisThe Washington PostThat startling statistic is among the findings of a unique, high-tech collaboration that is providing a massive amount of new data about global fishing operations. The results, published Thursday in the journal Science, offer a powerful glimpse of the problem of overfishing on the hard-to-regulate high seas. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 31.4 percent of global fish stocks were overfished or fished unsustainably, as of 2013, while another 58.1 per-cent were fully fished.ŽThursdays findings relied on data from Global Fishing Watch, a collaboration encom-passing Oceana, SkyTruth and Google. Researchers compiled billions of data points from tracking systems that the International Maritime Organization requires for about 70,000 fishing vessels.The result was a picture of fishing that the study, led by David Kroodsma of Global Fishing Watch, claims has never been directly quantified.Ž Because of data limitations, the percentage of the oceans fished actually could be as high as 73 percent, the study said.Fishing is happening almost everywhere and all the time,Ž Jackie Savitz, chief policy offi-cer for the advocacy group Oceana. I think people dont really have a sense of how heavily fished our oceans are and how intensely they are fished.ŽShe said the intensity of global fishing documented by Thursdays study is far greater than researchers have been able to track in the past.That means were putting more pressure on fish popula-tions,Ž Savitz said, noting that increased fishing also means more inadvertent catching of other species, such as sea tur-tles. That means theres more pressure on our oceans than we thought.ŽThere was particularly intense fishing off the south-eastern coast of South America, the eastern coast of China, western Africa, and all around Europe and the Mediterra-nean, the research found. The North Atlantic, far northeast-ern Pacific, Indian Ocean and Southern Ocean were far more devoid of fishing.While Thursdays study itself doesnt delve into what areas are being overfished around the world, Savitz said experts have long documented overfishing in many places. But she said the latest data helps to illustrate that the tragedy of the commons is very much at place in the oceans,Ž and that it underscores a more thought-ful global approach is needed to regulating fisheries.What we need to do is, both within countries and internationally, put in place sustainable fisher management policies,Ž Savitz said. Unless we get policies in place to protect fishery sustainability, we were essentially doing is undermining our food security.ŽThe study found that ships from just five nations accounted for more than 85 percent of global fishing „ Spain, Taiwan, Japan, North Korea and China. Chinas fishing footprint was by far the largest, however, based on data for the year 2016. (The study used data from 2 012 through 2016.)One leading fisheries scientist said that while the studys methodology is novel, overall it reaffirms an existing picture of how much the oceans are being fished.The results are remarkably consistent with the catch data that have been traditionally employed to measure fishing effort,Ž Jeremy Jackson, a marine sciences expert at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, wrote in an email. Ditto the fact that China, Spain, Taiwan, Japan and South Korea take 85 percent of it all on the high seas. Still, its good to see the strong confirmation, and of course its unsustainable without massive restrictions in effort.ŽDaniel Pauly, a prominent expert on global fisheries and a professor at the University of British Columbia, added that Thursdays study adds a new dimension to the scientists and fisheries managers tool kit, a very effective one.ŽIt can be seen as one of the first instances of high-tech being turned against illegal fishing (until now, it was the pirates who used it),Ž he wrote in an email from Hong Kong. What is new is that the (Global Fishing Watch) enables civil society to use satellites to monitor the activity of fishing vessels, and thus to fight against illegal fishing and to increase transparency.ŽIn addition, he said the data help make a case that all fish-ing vessels „ not only the large commercial ones operating far offshore „ should be satellite-monitored. The next thing is thus to pressure the International Maritime Organization to close the loophole they have for smaller, coastal fishing ves-sels, which do not need to have (electronic tracking systems).ŽThe technology used by Global Fishing Watch to conduct the study relies on public broadcast data from the Auto-matic Identification System (AIS), which uses satellite and land-based receivers to track the movement of ships over time. Not all fishing vessels willingly broadcast their location, of course „ particularly those intent on breaking the law „ and vessels can switch off their trackers, potentially hindering the usefulness of the technology.But the United States and other countries already require vessels of a certain size to use the locator system, partly as a safety measure to avoid collisions at sea. Global Fishing Watch allows users to access that information to track spe-cific vessels over time.The new satellite technologies are one part of a broader, ongoing international push to reduce overfishing in the oceans and cut back on illegal fishing. One 2014 study found that between 20 and 32 percent of fish imported to the United States were caught illegally.The problem is just gigantic,Ž then-Secretary of State John F. Kerry said in 2016. A third of the worlds fisheries are overfished, and the ones that arent overfished are at max, with more and more demand. ... Its an ecosystem that requires sustainability to survive, and were not treating it in a sus-tainable fashion.ŽNew maps: 58 percent of oceans fully shedThis image provided by Global Fishing Watch shows “ shing activity around the world in 2016. According to a study released Thursday, researchers found more than 55 percent of the worlds oceans are “ shed commercially, with “ ve countries responsible for 85 percent of high seas “ shing. [GLOBAL FISHING WATCH VIA AP]

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 A7 BUSINESS THE DOW 30COMPANY CLOSE CHG. 3M $236.00 +3.82 Am. Express $97.35 -0.15 Apple $172.60 +1.53 Boeing $355.92 +3.55 Caterpillar $158.86 +3.63 Chevron $109.89 +0.83 Cisco $42.94 -0.37 Coca-Cola $43.52 +0.18 DowDuPont $71.93 +0.97 Exxon $75.86 +0.97 Gen. Electric $14.62 +0.13 Goldman Sachs $261.43 -1.97 Home Depot $185.47 +2.41 Intel $45.80 -0.14 IBM $153.18 -0.78 J&J $129.91 0.00 JP Morgan $114.98 -0.21 McDonalds $160.66 +2.02 Merck $54.57 +0.02 Microsoft $91.74 +0.25 Nike $67.13 +0.08 P“ zer $35.74 -0.02 Proc. & Gamble $80.84 +0.60 Travelers $137.64 -0.90 United Tech. $133.58 +4.32 Verizon $47.87 -0.09 Walmart $92.77 +1.25 Walt Disney $105.24 +0.19 United Health $227.09 +1.96 Visa $120.38 -0.05STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTCOMPANY CLOSE CHG. AT&T $36.47 +0.16 Darden Rests $95.19 -0.11 Gen Dynamics $220.14 -0.61 Hanger Inc $14.80 -0.09 Hancock Hldg $52.65 -1.00 Home Bancs $23.45 -0.45 Itt Corp $52.50 -0.03 The St Joe $18.15 +0.10 Kbr Inc $17.78 +0.11 L-3 Comms $212.02 +1.36 Oceaneering $19.00 +0.29 Regions $19.31 -0.31 Sallie Mae $10.94 -0.05 Southern $43.02 +0.10 Suntrust $70.34 -1.11 Westrock $65.28 +0.15 Ingersoll-Rand $90.31 +0.30 Engility Holds $26.49 -0.10 Source: Matt Wegner Financial Advisor The Edward Jones Co. Panama City, 769-1278 FOREIGN EXCHANGEU.S. $1.00 = Canadian 1.27 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican Peso 18.60 U.S. $1.00 = Euro 0.81 U.S. $1.00 = British Pound 0.72MARKET WATCHDow 24,962.48 164.70 Nasdaq 7,210.09 8.14 S&P 2,703.96 2.63 Russell 1,529.99 1.85 NYSE 12,711.75 16.22COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,330.60 0.60 Silver 16.579 .025 Platinum 999.40 2.80 Copper 3.2375 .0260 Oil 62.77 1.09Arbor Wealth to host investing presentation on WednesdayMIRAMAR BEACH „ Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, a fee-only, fiduciary registered investment advisory firm, will host a presentation titled: Investing in a Volatile, Late-Stage Bull MarketŽ in the Arbor Wealth Conference Room in Miramar Beach at 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.Investors already have dealt with a market correction in 2018 and heightened volatility is expected in the years remaining months.Led by syndicated economic columnist Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, the presentation will focus on how Arbor Wealths customized portfolios aim to provide protection against volatility and rising interest rates while gen-erating income and striving for growth. To reserve a seat, call 850608-6121. Refreshments will be served. News Herald staff reportIN BRIEFSpecial to The News HeraldYour future employee is a young man who has prior experience working as a stocker and retail store associate. He has recently graduated from high school and wants to work.He is very strong and has no lifting restrictions. He has interests in food service as a busser or dishwasher but is open to various types of general labor. He is very shy at first and needs an employer who will allow him to come out of his shell more. A supportive work environment that accepts him will help build his confidence greatly.He will be a dependable employee who is humble and always willing to learn. He would be a terrific addition to your team and is eligible for OJT, a program that provides an incentive for employers who hire clients of The Arc of the Bay. Wont you give him a chance?For information about this client or any of the other services offered by The Arc of the Bay, call Kathie at 850-896-5798, Crystal at 850-532-0884 or Paul at 850-635-1044.EMPLOYMENT HIGHLIGHTFreddie Guta, an Arc of the Bay client, was employee of the month for two months running at the McDonalds on Front Beach Road. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] By Brian FungThe Washington PostSpaceX hit another orbital milestone Wednesday: It launched a pair of experimental broadband satellites on a Falcon 9 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.The test satellites are another step forward for chief executive Elon Musk, who dreams of building a worldwide net-work of thousands of orbiting devices that can beam Internet signals down to Earth from low orbit. While much of the project is aimed at connecting developing countries to the Web, many people in wealthy nations are likely to benefit too, experts say, thanks to the increased broadband competi-tion it could prompt.SpaceXs effort is just one of many new communications innovations, which include 5G data and more efficient use of our airwaves, that could boost competition in your local broadband market in the coming years. If it pays off, the result could be faster Internet speeds, better service and lower prices.Along with SpaceX, about a dozen such companies are exploring the idea. Although satellite Internet isnt new, the companies are promising a new generation of satellites that orbit much closer to Earth than traditional data satellites and can send and receive signals in a fraction of the time. The idea is to blanket the globe in wireless broadband, effectively adding a new Internet provider in areas with only one or two services.The same goal is driving Microsofts initiative to transmit Internet signals over unused TV airwaves. The com-pany has said it hopes to bring 2 million rural Americans online by 2022. Since July, Microsoft has launched seven pilot proj-ects in areas such as Georgia, Kansas, Maine, Virginia and Washington state.Meanwhile, AT&T announced this week that it would start rolling out 5G „ a next-generation alternative to 4G mobile data „ in three met-ropolitan areas: Dallas, Waco, Texas; and Atlanta. Designed for cellular devices that havent hit the market yet, AT&Ts 5G capability hints at a future of incredibly fast speeds and low lag for mobile service, an ideal combination that could support self-driving cars, smart appliances and other gadgets in the so-called Internet of Things. Verizon has plans to make 5G a viable substitute for home broadband for up to 30 million households, and smaller carriers have looked into the idea, as well.This potpourri of new technologies could bolster competition in various ways, according to Michael Calabrese, director of the Wireless Future Project at the New America Foundation. For example, imagine if your local telephone company could set up a wireless 5G hotspot in your neighborhood rather than digging into the ground to lay expensive Internet cables to each house. Since the 5G might be just as good (if not better) than what the cable company offers, customers might benefit from more providers fighting for their loyalty.For competition its par-ticularly good,Ž said Calabrese, because itll allow these guys to overbuild „ in other words, to become a competitive pro-vider at relatively low capital cost.ŽSpaceX launches experimental broadband satellites Bobbie and Ric Brigman with Food4Kidz won the Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerces Humanitarian of the Year award Thursday night. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO] By Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Ric and Bobbie Brigman of Food4Kidz took home the Humani-tarian of the Year Award at the Panama City Beach Chambers annual award dinner Thurs-day at the Edgewa-ter Beach Resort. Were excited to be able to honor people who make a differ-ence,Ž said Kristopher McLane, Panama City Beach Chamber president. These individuals have been important in our community for making a difference or an impact.ŽThe dinner recognized residents for their achieve-ments in the Chamber and the community. The theme of the ceremony was The Secret Garden.ŽThe Young Professional of the Year Award went to Maria Wilson of Peoples First Insurance. Her commitment to her job as a young professional in Panama City Beach made a difference in the Chamber, a press release stated.The Ambassador of the Year Award was given to Jeremy Hinton of Innova-tions Federal Credit Union who represented the Chamber at ribbon-cutting ceremonies, networking events and more, accord-ing to the release.He is a valuable asset to not only the Beach Chamber, but also the com-munity,Ž the release stated.The Pioneer of the Year Award went to Bill PineŽ Buskell of Pineapple Wil-lys and the Wicked Wheel; and the Business Excellence Award was awarded to Larry Thompson of Grand Slam Sports Tournaments.Thompson said he is blessed to have such a wonderful staff, and thanks those who recognized his companys efforts in the community.Its an honor,Ž he said. I cant thank the community enough for their support. Weve been in business for 14 years. Weve given back and done a lot for Panama City Beach.ŽChamber members and the Board of Directors nominated individuals for the awards, McLane said.Ryan Davis, past chairman of the board of directors, was honored for his work with the Cham-ber. Current chairman Dave Trepanier honored him.Its been a great year,Ž Davis said. Weve come a long way. This chamber has evolved in the last 10 years. To be the 2017 chairman was an honor.ŽNoble Public Adjusting Group Edgewater Beach & Golf Resort, United Way of Northwest Florida and REEDS Jewelers and Peoples First Insurance sponsored the event.PCB Chamber honors Brigmans as humanitarians of the yearDavis Thompson Hinton Bill PineŽ Buskell of Pineapple Willys and Wicked Wheel was named the PCB Chamber of Commerces Pioneer of the Year on Thursday night. [NEWS HERALD FILE PHOTO]

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** A8 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com Trump story takes liberal slant Im really taken aback by your front page article written by Eric Tucker of the Associated Press: Counsel: Russians meddle with 2016 race.Ž The entire article points the finger at collusion with President Trump. Its quite the contrary. No one in the Trump campaign knew or was involved in any way shape or form with the Russian meddling. This liberal article on the front page should be retracted for having false information. Its ridiculous. Ive been a subscriber since I got here to Panama City Beach in 2010. Im American of Cuban dissent. My family came to this country after being ousted out of Cuba by the Communist regime. If this beautiful newspaper which I love so much continues on its path to the left, I will unsubscribe. I would hope that you try to report more honest and unbiased news for everyone to read. This way people can make up their own minds and not be influenced by false or one-sided reporting.Victor Carnero, Panama City BeachLETTERS TO THE EDITORVoters between 18 and 21 years old will remember politicians who decided to abandon their oath to protect the constitutional rights of citizens by infringing upon their right to bear arms. If liberals spent as much time building America as it does bashing President Trump, we would be better off. Im the NRA and I vote!Ž Thats a sticker you see on cars. Millions more are not the NRA and they vote, too! Department of Transportation, could the traffic light at Beck Avenue heading south be longer than 5 seconds? So frustrating. Lindsey Vonn should be in every TV commercial. I hold two jobs and signs! Public protest does not mean I am unemployed! Rail to riches? How about a rail to train that actually runs on them? Havent seen a real train for so long I cant remember what they look like. We get box cars ambling along holding up traffic. Oh, what a joy they are! Some people are allergic to all sorts of food. I am allergic to people. Thats why you see me surrounded by police yellow do not crossŽ tape. So be warned. Trump held a cheat sheet with empathetic things to say that was written for him by White House staff for his meeting with Parkland school shooting survivors and families. Trump is about as comforting as talking to a brick. Nobody wants more guns except the NRA. The survivors and parents of survivors are asking for fewer guns. I am a teacher and I will not carry a gun and dont believe students will be safer. Its wrong. If you suspect malfeasance or misspending with the city, make a complaint to the auditor general of Florida. If it exists, they love to out it!Ž Students texting while driving causes deaths and accidents! Protest that!SQUALL LINE ANOTHER VIEWAntidotes to „ or, at least, temporary distractions from „ news about destruction and divisiveness: € Downhill skier Lindsey Vonn is among the most celebrated athletes of her era „ an Olympic gold medalist and four-time overall World Cup champion. But Vonn has never been more impressive than on Tuesday when „ following years of grueling recoveries from painful injuries „ she won a bronze medal in the Olympic downhill competition. At 33, she became the oldest woman to win a medal in the Alpine. In interviews after her run, Vonn emotionally recalled her wish for a gold medal in what was likely her last downhill race. But, upon instant reflection and in response to a question about the influence of her deceased grandfather „ to whom she dedicated her last Olympics „ Vonn humbly recognized that the bronze was not a consolation prize. Of course, I would have liked a gold medal, but I mean, honestly, this is amazing,Ž Vonn said. I wanted to win so much because of(my grandfather), but I still think I made him proud. ... I never gave up, I kept working hard and Im really proud of this medal and I know he is too. I gave it my best shot, you know. ... And Im so proud to have competed with such amazing girls ... Its my last downhill. I wish I could keep going. I have had so much fun, I love what I do ... but my body probably cant take another four years. Im proud. Im proud to have competed for my country. Im proud to have given it my all ...Ž Pride in hard work. Pride in overcoming adversity and challenges. Pride in doing ones best „ and recognizing the contributions of others, whether family, teammates or even fellow competitors. By displaying and articulating those values, Vonn made not only her grandfather, but her country proud, in deeds and words Americans want to see and hear. € Just weeks after the state Senate voted unanimously to honor a great Floridian „ Mary McLeod Bethune „ with a statue in the U.S. Capitol, the House of Representatives voted 111-1 to do the same. Gov. Rick Scott should quickly sign the bill into law. (Rep. Jay Fant, a Republican from Jacksonville who is running for attorney general, cast the lone vote in opposition. Talk about a fringe candidate.) Bethune was born in South Carolina in 1875, a child of former slaves. Bethune worked in the fields until she was 10 and enrolled in a one-room school. Later, Bethune attended seminary, then moved to Florida, where in 1904 she founded a five-girl school that grew exponentially until it finally became Bethune-Cookman University, a historically black institution. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Ledger, a News Herald sister paper with GateHouse Media.OUR VIEWVonn, Bethune reasons to be proudA fellow libertarian is syndicated columnist Dave Barry. In 1993, CBS had a show called Daves World.Ž It starred Harry Anderson and was based on a book Barry wrote. It was titled Dave Barry Turns 40.Ž February is my birthday month. I turned 40 in 2013, and my life is better. Ive joked, If I knew life was this good, I wouldve turned 40 sooner.Ž I wish I had my 40-yearold mind when I turned 20. But, such is life. Turning 45 this month, I reflected on my favorite boxer; George Foreman. I rooted for Big George, when he beat Gerry Cooney, in 1990. Sports reporters named it, Two Old Geezers At Caesers (Palace).Ž Big George won and continued his quest for a title shot. I pulled for George because I wanted him to fight Mike Tyson. Facing Tyson was a match made in heaven. Tyson was the reigning champion. Also, he was the youngest champion ever. But, after George beat Cooney, Iron Mike lost to Buster Douglas. Douglas was an overweight journeyman Tyson shouldve beat, but he took the fight lightly and lost. This ended the dream fight of Foreman vs. Tyson.Ž Sports history shows Big George won the title and the record of oldest heavyweight champion. But, folks forget why George made his comeback. It wasnt to break records, but to raise money for his Houston, Texas, youth center. George opened it as an outreach of his church. It was in response to a personal failure. A mom asked George to teach her troubled son boxing. He turned her down because he was a preacher now. He told her to bring him to church. Weeks later, the boy robbed a convenience store. He shot the manager (who lived) and went to prison. That devastated George, as he couldve stopped the boy by listening to his moms plea. So, he tapped into his retirement fund and opened the George Foreman Youth and Community Center.Ž As time went on, the center lost money. George didnt ask his church to subsidize it. He paid its bills out of his own pocket. He took monthly honorarium fees, doing speaking engagements. He refused fundraisers nor accepted outside offerings. He wanted the youth center to run self-sufficiently. Some advised George to apply for government assistance. He refused that because he didnt believe in welfare. He viewed the government dole as a poverty trap. Thats when he returned to boxing. After two years of breaking even, Georges purse money went to the monthly bills and mortgage payments. In 1991, he fought Evander Holyfield and earned a $12.5 million purse. Not only did it pay off the youth center mortgage, it made a permanent endowment fund. The George Foreman Youth and Community CenterŽ remains debt free to this day. The writer is secretary of the Libertarian Party of Bay County.Liberty For All Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTS D a v i d A g o s t a David Agosta

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 A9 DATELINESMONTGOMERY, ALA.Alabama Senate votes to allow execution by nitrogen gasAlabama has moved closer to approving the use of nitrogen gas in executions „ a method so far untested in the United States.The Alabama Senate approved a bill Thursday that permits execution by nitrogen hypoxia if lethal injection drugs are unavail-able or are ruled unconstitutional. State Sen. Trip Pittman said Alabama needs an alternative as lethal injection face legal challenges. The Death Penalty Information Center says no state has used nitrogen gas in an execution, although Oklahoma and Mississippi have voted to authorize the use of the gas as a back-up. MONTREAT, N.C. Billy Graham will lie in honor in the US Capitol RotundaThe Rev. Billy Grahams body will lie in honor in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda next week, the first time a private citizen has been accorded such recognition since civil rights hero Rosa Parks in 2005.The two-day viewing in Washington on Feb. 28 and March 1 will be part of nine days of mourning for postwar Americas most famous evangelist, who died Wednesday at his home in North Carolinas mountains at age 99.Americas PastorŽ will be laid to rest March 2 at the foot of a cross-shaped walkway at the worldwide headquarters of his evan-gelical empire in Charlotte, buried in a simple prisonmade plywood coffin next to his wife, Ruth, who died in 2007.MOGADISHU, SOMALIA US military says drone strike in Somalia kills 4 extremistsThe United States mili-tary for the second straight day is announcing a drone strike that killed al-Shabab extremists in Somalia.The U.S. Africa Command says the strike on Wednesday killed four terroristsŽ near Jamaame in Lower Juba region in the south. The statement says the U.S. assesses no civil-ians were killed.The U.S. on Wednesday said a drone strike killed three al-Shabab extremists near Jilib town in Middle Juba region ear-lier this week. This latest U.S. drone strike is the fifth this year in Somalia. LONDONOnline dating couple jailed in UK for IS-inspired bomb plot A man and woman who met on a Muslim dating website were handed prison sentences Thurs-day for plotting an Islamic State-inspired bomb attack in Britain.Prosecutors say Munir Mohammed, an asylum-seeker from Sudan, and London pharmacist Rowaida El-Hassan met on SingleMuslim.com and bonded over their shared extremist views, exchanging videos of beheadings and other extremist material.Prosecutors said Mohammed volunteered to carry out an attack during Facebook exchanges with a man he believed to be an Islamic State group commander.LONDONUK police probe racist package sent to Harry and Meghan Police are investigating a suspicious package that was sent to Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle as a racist hate crime, Scotland Yard said Thursday.The Metropolitan Police force said a package con-taining a substanceŽ was delivered to St. Jamess Palace, where Harry has his office, on Feb. 12.The force said the substance was tested and confirmed as non-suspicious.Ž The force said counterterrorism detectives are investigating the inci-dent as an alleged malicious communication offense, and it is being treated as a racist hate crime.Ž The Associated Press

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** A10 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 B1 TRIP BACK IN TIME | B2FAMOUS AMERICANSBreakfast Point Academy students make history ERIC SCOTT BRANCH B4EXECUTION CARRIED OUTKiller put to death for 1993 slaying of UWF student PANAMA CITY BEACH B6TRAFFIC WOESCouncil moves ahead with Bay Parkway extension By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A Panama City doctors medi-cal license is on the line after the state health department alleges she illegally prescribed marijuana to a former patient.Dr. Raquel Skidmore, how-ever, insists she gave nothing more than a recommendation, and stands behind the health benefits of the drug.For more than six hours Tuesday, Skidmore, who treats patients through Gulf Coast Holistic and Primary Care at 219 Forest Park Circle, was the subject of an administrative hearing before the Florida Department of Health Board of Medicine. The DOH has leveled seven counts against Skidmore, Bay doctors license on the line over medical potON THE WEBRead the DOH's administrative complaint at newsherald.com .Dr. Raquel Skidmore: Recommendation was legal, not a prescriptionBy Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ In Court-room D of the Bay County Courthouse, Jeff Kelley did one of the hardest things he ever will have to do „ look in the eye the man who killed his brother and say he would forgive him.As a follower of Christ, I am instructed to forgive, and I will struggle with that for the rest of my life,Ž Kelley said to the open court, flanked by friends and family who packed the room Thursdays hearing. But to the best that I know how, Ill try.ŽMoments before, Billy Herman Shaffer, 26, had pleaded guilty to first-degree murder with a firearm in the killing of his 48-year-old former roommate Matthew Sha er pleads guilty in Kelley murderVictims brother: I am instructed to forgive Shaffer See SHAFFER, B7 See DOCTOR, B7 LOCAL & STATEDr. Raquel Skidmore, center, sits with her attorney Alvin Peters during a Department of Health administrative hearing Tuesday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Matthew Shack speaks Thursday during Eracism, a discussion about the transition from segregation to integration in Bay County. He told the story of going to a movie with a white friend, and the people along the way who told him he was not welcome in whit e designated spaces. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Collin Breaux747-5081 | @PCNHCollinB CollinB@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Matthew Shack experienced segrega-tion firsthand.Shack, 75, went to the movies with a white friend named David at the Martin Theatre in the early 1950s after he met David at a huckleberry patch in town. David joined Shack, whos black, in the back of the bus and black part of the theater when Shack wasnt allowed to sit in the front of the bus or in the white movie theater.It was then that Shack first learned about racism.Racism isnt hereditary,Ž Shack said. Its learned.ŽShack was one of several older black residents who told Speakers encourage unityEracism event is intended to address racism and promote progressGeorge Hines speaks Thursday at Eracism. He spoke about his experience living under segregation in Bay County as a child. See SPEAKERS, B7The following activities are planned locally during Black History Month: BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays through March 12 at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave. See the works of local artists Christon Anderson, Brianna Bennett, Arieon Gautier, Amauri Pilot, Gary Pope, Cecile Scoon, Ricky Steele and Linda Williamson Pitts, sponsored by the Bay Arts Alliance. Artwork available for purchase through the Panama City Center for the Arts. BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION: Saturday and Sunday at New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, 1401 Iowa Ave., Lynn Haven. At 5 p.m. Saturday, recognition of successful black businesses in the community. On Sunday, guest speaker the Rev. Richard Quinney of Alexandria, Louisiana, at 11 a.m., and music with local choirs and talent at 3 p.m. Details: 265-5417 DAVE THE POTTER PRESENTATION: 3 p.m. Monday at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 898 W. 11th St. The Florida Public Archaeology Network will read Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave,Ž by Laban Carrick Hill, winner of the Coretta Scott King 2011 Illustrator Award. The free reading, geared toward elementary-aged students, is part of the librarys Archaeology Story Time. After hearing Daves story, children will learn how and why people painted pottery in the past and will paint their own pieces of pottery to take home. Details: 850-522-2118 or www.nwrls.com. LIFE IN ECONFINA WITH THE GAINERS: 7 p.m. Monday at the Bay County Library, 898 W. 11th St. Faye Gainer and Harold Dybdal will give a presentation on the harmonious relationship between the black and white Gainer families, the turpentine business and the community at the time. Attendees also will hear gospel music sung by a Gainer family choral group. Free, hosted by the Historical Society of Bay County. Details: 850-522-2118 or www.nwrls. com. LECTURE AND PERFORMANCES: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday at Florida State University Panama Citys Holley Lecture Hall. Dr. Larry Rivers, author and distinguished professor of history at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, will be the keynote speaker at a Black History Month lecture. Event also will include performances by the Nu Gulf Coast Choir and singer DeDrinique Barnes. Rivers books Slavery in FloridaŽ and Rebels and RunawaysŽ have captured national book awards, and he has co-authored or coedited several other works. His most recent co-authored book, Mary Bryan: Her Early Life and Works,Ž was published in 2015 by the University Press of Florida. Space is limited. Details: Tiesha Alston at 850-7702193 or email tealston@fsu.edu. BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION: 6 p.m. at the Lynn Haven City Chambers, 108 E. Ninth St., Lynn Haven. The public is invited to help the mayor and city commission celebrate National Black History Month.News Herald staff reportBLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS

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** B2 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald WEATHER 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 80/68 78/69 82/61 77/68 77/68 80/64 84/61 84/64 82/62 79/61 83/62 84/62 82/60 78/64 76/64 77/62 83/63 80/6479/6879/6574/6075/63Fog in the morning; mostly sunny Couple of thunderstorms Mostly cloudy with occasional rain Nice with times of sun and clouds8064787164Winds: SSE 8-16 mph Winds: S 8-16 mph Winds: SW 7-14 mph Winds: E 6-12 mph Winds: SSE 7-14 mphBlountstown 9.48 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 9.30 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.12 ft. 42 ft. Century 8.48 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 22.90 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu.Apalachicola 11:33a 3:59a 8:24p 1:58p Destin 3:55p 2:05a ----West Pass 11:06a 3:32a 7:57p 1:31p Panama City 3:04p 2:32a ----Port St. Joe 3:47p 2:26a ----Okaloosa Island 2:28p 1:11a ----Milton 6:08p 4:26a ----East Bay 5:12p 3:56a ----Pensacola 4:28p 2:39a ----Fishing Bend 5:09p 3:30a ----The Narrows 6:05p 5:30a ----Carrabelle 6:59p 1:46a -----Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018FirstFullLastNew Feb 23Mar 1Mar 9Mar 17Sunrise today ........... 6:15 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 5:37 p.m. Moonrise today ...... 11:24 a.m. Moonset today ....... 12:18 a.m. Today Sat. Today Sat.Clearwater 84/69/pc 84/70/s Daytona Beach 80/66/s 82/66/s Ft. Lauderdale 81/73/pc 81/72/pc Gainesville 82/62/pc 84/64/s Jacksonville 80/62/pc 83/65/s Jupiter 82/72/s 82/71/pc Key Largo 81/74/s 80/74/pc Key West 82/73/s 82/74/sh Lake City 81/62/pc 84/61/s Lakeland 86/63/pc 85/66/pc Melbourne 83/71/pc 83/69/s Miami 84/73/pc 84/72/pc Naples 86/68/s 85/67/pc Ocala 83/62/pc 85/64/s Okeechobee 83/64/s 82/64/pc Orlando 85/62/pc 85/63/s Palm Beach 82/74/s 81/73/s Tampa 87/68/pc 86/70/s Today Sat. Today Sat.Baghdad 68/51/sh 66/50/pc Berlin 32/20/s 33/16/pc Bermuda 71/66/pc 70/65/s Hong Kong 67/63/c 71/65/c Jerusalem 58/45/sh 59/44/s Kabul 53/35/c 45/31/r London 42/30/s 42/30/s Madrid 49/26/s 52/29/s Mexico City 74/53/pc 77/53/pc Montreal 36/33/sn 39/23/pc Nassau 84/71/pc 85/71/pc Paris 39/28/s 41/26/s Rome 53/44/r 54/40/r Tokyo 48/39/pc 56/40/s Toronto 43/33/r 41/31/c Vancouver 37/33/sn 41/37/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 53/26/s 43/26/s Anchorage 26/16/s 25/10/sn Atlanta 79/62/c 79/64/c Baltimore 49/45/r 59/48/sh Birmingham 80/64/c 78/60/c Boston 42/38/r 55/36/c Charlotte 78/58/c 78/63/c Chicago 47/30/r 42/34/r Cincinnati 64/50/r 61/50/r Cleveland 58/37/r 45/43/r Dallas 55/50/r 69/38/r Denver 34/14/c 33/15/pc Detroit 51/35/r 41/35/r Honolulu 82/72/sh 82/72/sh Houston 80/67/c 78/57/c Indianapolis 57/43/r 56/41/r Kansas City 41/30/c 47/26/r Las Vegas 52/33/pc 56/39/s Los Angeles 61/42/pc 63/44/s Memphis 69/60/r 74/48/t Milwaukee 45/30/sh 39/32/r Minneapolis 34/13/c 35/21/sn Nashville 78/61/r 75/57/t New Orleans 80/69/sh 84/66/pc New York City 43/40/r 56/44/r Oklahoma City 48/36/r 58/25/r Philadelphia 47/44/r 60/47/r Phoenix 59/37/pc 59/38/s Pittsburgh 63/46/r 52/49/r St. Louis 54/40/c 56/34/r Salt Lake City 33/19/sn 33/25/pc San Antonio 70/61/sh 72/44/sh San Diego 59/45/pc 65/48/s San Francisco 57/42/pc 57/42/pc Seattle 38/34/sn 45/38/c Topeka 42/30/c 47/25/r Tucson 62/32/pc 56/32/s Wash., DC 52/48/c 61/54/shSaturdaySundayMondayTuesday Gulf Temperature: 68 Today: Wind from the southeast at 7-14 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Wind southeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Fog late. Tomorrow: Wind from the southeast at 7-14 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility less than a mile in areas of morning fog.Mostly sunny and pleasantly warm today. Winds southeast 7-14 mph. Mainly clear and warm tonight; areas of fog late.High/low ......................... 81/63 Last year's High/low ...... 73/60 Normal high/low ............. 67/48 Record high ............. 81 (2018) Record low ............... 27 (1978)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 4.76" Normal month to date ...... 3.97" Year to date ...................... 7.88" Normal year to date ......... 8.86" Average humidity .............. 85%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 76/69 Last year's High/low ...... 77/62 Normal high/low ............. 64/48 Record high ............. 80 (1949) Record low ............... 25 (1978)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date ................. 11.14" Normal month to date ...... 4.02" Year to date ................... 14.36" Normal year to date ......... 9.10" Average humidity .............. 79% PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachNews Herald staff reportPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Panama City Beach is the lone Panhandle location on TripAdvisor's Top 25 list for 2018.In this year's Traveler's Choice Awards for U.S. beaches, PCB came in at No. 11. The rankings are based on the quantity and quality of traveler reviews on the booking and travel plan-ning site.Clearwater Beach took the top U.S. spot, after slipping to No. 4 in 2017. Worldwide, Grace Bay in Turks and Caicos was the winner.Soft sand, clear waters and balmy temperatures are common threads among these Travelers Choice award-winning beaches that have delighted millions of TripAdvisor reviewers across the globe,Ž said Brooke Ferencsik, senior director of communications for TripAdvisor. The Caribbean and Flor-ida stake claims as the most decorated on the world and U.S. lists respectively, and based on TripAdvisor price reports, travelers can still find outstanding value on warm-weather escapes to these popular beaches this year.ŽView the complete list and galleries of the winning beaches at newsherald.com.TOP 15 U.S. BEACHES1. Clearwater Beach, Fla. 2. Siesta Beach, Siesta Key, Fla. 3. Ka'anapali Beach, Lahaina, Hawaii 4. South Beach, Miami, Fla. 5. Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve, Honolulu, Hawaii 6. Fort Lauderdale Beach, Fla. 7. St. Pete Beach, Fla. 8. Hollywood Beach, Fla. 9. Santa Monica Beach, Calif. 10. Lanikai Beach, Kailau, Hawaii 11. Panama City Beach, Fla. 12. Waikiki Beach, Honolulu, Hawaii 13. Kailua Beach Park, Hawaii 14. Fort Myers Beach, Fla. 15. Napili Beach, Lahaina, HawaiiTOP 10 WORLDWIDE BEACHES1. Grace Bay, Turks and Caicos 2. Baia do Sancho, Brazil 3. Varadero Beach, Cuba 4. Eagle Beach, Aruba 5. Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman 6. La Concha Beach, Spain 7. Clearwater Beach, USA 8. Seven Mile Beach, Jamaica 9. Bavaro Beach, Dominican Republic 10. Playa Norte, Isla MujeresTripAdvisor names PCB No. 11 U.S. beach in 2018News Herald staff reportPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Dozens of famous Americans assembled at Breakfast Point Academy this week „ in the form of second-graders. For an hour Wednesday and Thursday mornings, the students were in character as historic Americans during the schools 10th annual Famous American Wax Museum. Appearing in costume „ complete with props „ the students presented their research and gave minispeeches on an American of their choosing. Photos courtesy of keri weatherly/breakfast point academyMaking history at Breakfast PointAlana Allen portrayed talk show host Oprah Winfrey. Panama City Beach ranked No. 11 in the list of top U.S. beaches according to TripAdvisors 2018 Travelers Choice Awards. [TRIPADVISOR] Madison Clunan portrayed astronaut Sally Ride. Levi Merritt portrayed automaker Henry Ford. Payton McKampson portrayed nurse Clara Barton.

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 B3Guidelines and deadlinesObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following days newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. View todays obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIES Calling hours for Mother Susie M. McNair Allen, 79, will be from4-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, at First Providence Community M.B. Church, Inc., 5209 E. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32404. Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at First Providence Community M.B. Church, Inc. Interment will follow in Hillside Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to The wRight Choice.Ž Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary, 1547 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, Florida 32405, 850-640-2077.SUSIE M. MCNAIR ALLENJudy Durrett Brower, 76, of Suwannee, Florida, passed away Feb. 18, 2018. She was born Jan. 7, 1942, to John and Clennie Durrett of Bessemer, Alabama. She married her sailor, Peter H. Brower, III, on Feb. 19, 1961, while attending Florida Southern College and they were married for 57 years to the day on Feb. 18, 2018. After graduation, the couple was stationed at Jacksonville, Florida, Norfolk, Virginia, and Key West, Florida. Upon being discharged from the Navy, they owned and operated The Beacon Motel of Panama City Beach, Florida. That was followed by the founding of Creations Unlimited, a specialtymanufacturing firm.She continued her education and received a masters degree in accounting. After graduation, she was employed by Florida Cypress Gardens setting up an accounting system as a condition of sale of Cypress Skis. On Jan. 28, 1999, she received her license to practice as a certified public accountant. She joined General Electric and she set up an accounting system for new acquisitions, and she later transferred by sale of company to Lockheed Martin Financial Services. She retired from Lockheed and was hired by Marriott. After one year at Marriott, Lockheed offered to reinstate her and continue her previous benefits with an increase in compensation. She returned to Lockheed after a brief bidding war and she was posted as a team leader responsible for the payroll of all Lockheed employees worldwide. She was always highly regarded for her people skills, always soft spoken and her willingness to listen. She was a problem solver rather then cast blame and always praised where warranted and was slow to criticize.She always loved being with family and friends. She enjoyed boating, water skiing, and the outdoors, or just being on or around the water. She adored walking her two Jack Russells, Willie and Coco. She had a multitude of loving friends who will sorely miss her. She battled the demons of dementia until the bitter end. Rest well my beautiful wonderful lady. Ill always love you. Until we meet again. Left behind are her husband, Peter H. Brower, III, of Suwannee, Florida; sister, Francis Hundley of Panama City Beach, Florida; son, Peter H. Brower, IV, wife Kelly, granddaughter Katherine, and grandson Christopher, all of Jacksonville, Florida; and son, Benjamin Durrett Barrington Brower, wife Cristina and grandson David, all of Panama City Beach, Florida. A memorial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to your favorite charity in Judys memory or The Salt Creek Baptist Church, P.O. Box 340, Suwannee, FL 32692. Arrangements have been placed under the care of Rick Gooding Funeral Home, Cross City, Florida, 352-4985400, and Chiefland, Florida, 352-493-0050. Please sign the online guest book at rickgoodingfuneralhomes.com.JUDY DURRETT BROWERMrs. Rosa Lee Street Carpenter, 88, was called home to be with the Lord on Feb. 15, 2018. She was born on Aug. 10, 1928, in White Oaks, Georgia, to Willie Mae Strivings and George Street. Rosa spent most of her early life in New York, with relatives, after her mother died at an early age. She was raised by family members and later moved to Panama City. Rosa later met and married her late husband, Willie B. Carpenter Sr. From that union God blessed them with a son, Willie. Rosa was selfemployed for many years as a licensed cosmetologist. She was known for her hair weaving technique and fancy curls. Those left to cherish her memory include her son, Willie B. Carpenter Jr.; stepdaughter, Anne Carpenter Wilson (John) of Miami, Florida; brother, Willie Mallard of Panama City; grandchildren, Angela Makinde, Sharon Rolle and Kimberly Dorvilier (Jean); Godson, Jesse Jones of Jacksonville, Florida; niece, Annie Bell Harris of Panama City; nephew, Derrick Armstrong of Miami, Florida; extended family, Loraine Roland, Mose Hill Sr. and James Cruse Jr.; close friends, Sherry Mack, Cleola Ransome and Neva Galloway; as well as many relatives and friends of Albany, Georgia. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Redemption Lutheran Church with Pastor Robert R. Lydick officiating. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com.Heritage Funeral Home & Cremation Services 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, Fla. 850-785-1316ROSA LEE STREET CARPENTERA celebration of life ceremony for Robert BobŽ Conner, 99, who died Feb. 19, 2018, will be held in Michigan at a later date. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed online at www.kentforestlawn.com.ROBERT BOB CONNERAdrian DeRhan Culver was born Dec. 8, 1979, to Jacqueline Smith Frazier and the late Jeffery Jerome Culver. He attended Bay County public schools, and he was a 1996 graduate of A.D. Harris High School, and formerly employed with the City of Panama City Leisure Services Department. Adrian was a DIEHARD FSU fan! He loved family gatherings, restoring antique cars, his neighborhood Bay HarborŽ and most of all his children and family. He was preceded in death by his father,Jeffrey Jerome Culver; grandparents,Laura LuramaeŽ Smith and William and Dorothy Culver; his great-grandparents, William James Johnson Sr. and Louise Clemmons Johnson; his uncle, Samuel Smith; great uncles, William James BoyŽ Johnson, Jr., George RicoŽ Johnson and Clarence Johnson; and greataunts, Mary Elizabeth Lizzie BethŽ Jones and Nettie Mae Brown. He leaves to cherish his memories his loving and devoted mother, Jacqueline Frazier (Andre); his son, Adrian DeRhan AJŽ Culver,Jr.; two daughters, Jozlynn Elise and Alissa Elizabeth Culver;six brothers, Sanchez Williams (Leah), Adrian McCray, Damon Walker, Jr. (TaLesa), Roy Smiley, Jr.,John Franklin, III, and Patrick Smiley; six sisters, Maja Williams, Bianca Frazier, Dartra Frazier, Jacquelyn Frazier, Shayla Culver and LaToya Long (Donald); six aunts, Tammy Hughley, Carolyn Walker (Damon), Lisa Franklin (John), Caroline Smith, Vanessa Williams and Maggie Banks (Elijah); two uncles, Bryon Culver and Dexter Culver; his friend and the mother of his children, Jasmine Martin; his nieces and nephews, Jaydon, Graceson, Zaiden, Zacai, Bray'kel, Kalista, Makayla, Jaiyah, Jaiclynn, Italy and India; four greataunts, Bonita White, Gloria Jean Snead, Doris Mannings and Betty Jean Miller; two great-uncles, Lewis LCŽ Johnson (Jackie) and Charles Johnson (Mattie); his godmother, Kimberly Bush; his special friend, Felicia Jones; all of his Bay Harbor SOLDIERS!; the doctors and staff of Fresenius Dialysis Center; Dr. Azzam Adhal and a host of cousins other relatives and friends. Visitation will be held from 4-8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 at the mortuary. Homegoing celebration will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Fellowship Church of Praise Inc., 2511 E. Third St., Panama City, FL 32401. Repast will follow at the Parker Community Center, 101 W. Park St., Panama City, FL 32404. Arrangements are entrusted to Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary.ADRIAN DERHAN CULVERFuneral services for Patricia Edes, 91, of Panama City, Florida, will begin at 11 a.m.Monday, Feb. 26, 2018, at KentForest Lawn Funeral Home. Entombment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 5-7 p.m. Sunday.PATRICIA EDESFuneral services for Carolyn High, 84, of Panama City Beach, Florida, who died Feb. 22, 2018, will begin at noon Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, at Heritage Shores Funeral Home in Panama City Beach. The family will receive friends beginning at 11 a.m. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhbeach.com.CAROLYN HIGHFuneral services for George Neal will begin at 11 a.m. today, Feb. 23, 2018, at Springfield Baptist Church. Wilson Funeral Home is handling arrangements.GEORGE NEALHosie Lee Peterson, 83, of Mill Creek (Vernon), Florida, by way of Panama City, Florida, peacefully passed away surrounded by his loving family on Feb. 15, 2018. He was affectionately known as Po Pete.Ž Mr. Peterson held a lifelong business, his slogan, No Job Too Large, No Job Too Small....... Po Pete Does It ALL!!!!!!Ž He was known for his craftsmanship with stucco home building businesses along the coasts of Florida and Mississippi. He was a member of Providence Full Gospel Methodist Church. Po Petewas greatly loved and will be forever missed. Mr. Peterson was preceded in death by his parents, Lee and Vinnie Peterson; daughters, Gwendolyn, Rose and Karen; greatgrandson, Alton; and his sister, Katie Ward. Po Pete is survived by his wife and soul mate for more than 60 years, Willie Mae Reaves-Peterson; his only brother and best friend, Samuel C.(Emma) Peterson; sons, Anthony (Charlene) and Tommy (Annie); daughters, Zinella (Charles), Mary (Ronald), Lela (Wiley) and Diane; grandchildren,Tommy, Jr., Derrick, Darrell, Danielle, Willie Mae, James Jr., Nicolaus, Jamie, Nakia, Anthony, Jr., Tanisha, Williams Jr., Deleria, Cornelius, Hosea, Tierra, Rutherford, Keyana, Erica, Eric Jr., Latoria and Christian. Dont forget those darling 50 greatgrands;uncles, Clarence, Lorenza, Leonard Brown and Willie Brown, Jr. (Betty); aunts, Arlene Butler andHilda Burns (Jerry);special nieces and nephews who were like his own children, Edith, Priscilla, Patricia, Samuel Tony,Ž Tonya P., Tonya E., Willie and Mitch; dedicated friend, Mr. Louis Wright; brothers-inlaw, William(Lilie) andM.A. (Charlotte) Jordan; sisters-inlaw, Dorothy (the Rev. Joseph) Dennis and Letha Campbell (Eli); and many loving cousins and friends who all had a special place in his heart. Visitation will be held from 4-8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 at the mortuary. Homegoing celebration service for Mr. Hosie Peterson will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Providence Full Gospel Methodist Church, 5209 E. 11th St., Panama City, Florida, with Bishop Russell Allan Wright, Sr. officiating. The family will receive food and tokens of love to Mrs. Lela Peterson Carter at 3207 E. Second Place, Panama City, Florida. Repast will follow the serviceat the Panama City Lodge, 2030 E. Seventh St., Panama City, Florida. Russell A. Wright Sr., Mortuary, 1547 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, 850-6402077, is entrusted with arrangements.HOSIE LEE PETERSONVisitation for Aubrey Hillman ChuckyŽ Sylvester, 67, of Panama City, Florida, who died Feb. 13, 2018, will be from 5-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, at Battle Memorial Funeral Home. Homegoing services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Panama City. The body will lie in state one hour prior to services. Burial will follow at Garden of Memories Cemetery with full military honors.AUBREY HILLMAN CHUCKY SYLVESTER Memorial services for Mary Odelle Guerino will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at Wilson Funeral Home.MARY ODELLE GUERINO More obituaries on B4

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** B4 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald OBITUARIESDr. Kenneth Dale Randall, 70, of Panama City, Florida, passed away on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. He was preceded in death by his parents, Cleo Clevesta and Geneva Ruth Randall of Rose Hill, Kansas; and a niece, Maria Randall of Las Vegas, Nevada. Ken is survived by his wife of 41 years, Diane; two sons, Ryan P. Randall (Emily Davis) and David K. Randall (Megan); two grandchildren, Henry William Randall and Isla June Randall; two brothers, Darrel D. Randall (Helen) and Marvin E. Randall (Rosalyn); and numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Ken spent his professional life dedicated to the education of deaf and blind children and adults. After graduating from the University of Kansas in 1970, he began his career as a history teacher at the Florida School for the Deaf and became principal in 1978. He became the superintendent of the California School for the Deaf in 1989 and moved to Arizona in 1999 to become the superintendent of the Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind. Throughout his life, he kept in touch with the many friends he made among the students and staff at the three schools. After moving to Panama City in 2004, he continued to support and mentor young deaf administrators. Even though he was dedicated to his career, Ken always put his family first. His kindness, humility, high moral standards, sense of humor, and gentlemanly ways presented a positive role model for Ryan and David. He loved his family so much and was eager to share their news and accomplishments. Although not outwardly demonstrative, he quietly professed his love for Christ in the way he treated everyone. He always chose to do the right thing even though it was not necessarily the popular or easy thing to do. Ken loved the Florida Gators and was proud to have obtained his Ed. D. in Educational Administration and Leadership there. He avidly followed the Gator Nation football and basketball teams. Ken was diagnosed with Parkinsons Disease in 2009. He received excellent treatment both here in Panama City at the Brain and Spine Center and in Gainesville at the Florida Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence, a component of the University of Florida Health Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration. He constantly sought ways to maintain his physical health and movement, including joining dance and exercise classes specifically designed for people with Parkinsons Disease. He was adamant to help find a cure so that no one should ever have to endure what he did in his last three years of life. A celebration of life will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, at KentForest Funeral Home. Visitation will begin at 1 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Dance for Hope Healing and Health at Dance Life Studios in Panama City, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinsons Research, or a charity of your choice.Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com KENNETH DALE RANDALLThe Associated PressSTARKE „ Florida executed a man Thursday who was convicted of raping and killing a college student in 1993 so he could steal her car.The governors office said Eric Scott Branch, 47, was pronounced dead at 6:05 p.m. CST Thursday after a lethal injection at Florida State Prison. Branch was convicted of the rape and fatal beating of University of West Florida student Susan Morris, 21, whose naked body was found buried in a shallow grave near a nature trail.Evidence in the case shows Branch approached Morris after she left a night class on Jan. 11, 1993, so he could steal her red Toyota and return to his home state of Indiana. He was arrested while traveling there.In denying one of Branchs appeals, the Florida Supreme Court noted that the crime was particularly brutal.She had been beaten, stomped, sexually assaulted and strangled. She bore numerous bruises and lacerations, both eyes were swollen shut,Ž the justices wrote.Branch also was con-victed of sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl in Indiana and of another sexual assault in Panama City that took place just 10 days before the fatal attack on Morris.The jury in his murder case recommended the death penalty by a 10-2 vote under Floridas old capital punishment system, which was ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2016. The high court said juries must reach a unanimous recommendation for death and judges cannot overrule that. Florida legislators subsequently changed the system to comply.One of Branchs final appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court involved whether he deserved a new sentencing hearing because of that jurys 10-2 vote in his 1994 trial. The Florida Supreme Court has ruled the new system of sentencing does not apply to inmates sentenced to death before 2002.Branch claimed in a last-minute appeal that the Florida courts decisions on which inmates get new sentencing hearings and which do not is unfair and arbitrary. Killer executed for 1993 slaying of student Branch

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 B5

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** B6 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald WHATS HAPPENINGTodayTRUNK SHOW: ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER: Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn Whites innovative wearable. Runs until March 10. For details, 850-231-4500 ART SHOW Of MARY GARRISH: Open during regular hours through March 15 at The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City. For details, TheArtistCoveStudio.com SPRING YARD AND BAKE SALE: 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Grace Presbyterian Church, 1415 Airport Road, Panama City, to bene“ t Bethel Village. 2018 NURSING EXPO/CAREER FAIR BAY MEDICAL SACRED HEART: 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Careersource Gulf Coast, 625 N. U.S. 231, Panama City. For details, 850-747-6785 BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12 at the Marina Civic Center. Presented by Bay Arts Alliance. Free; exhibit features local artists. For details, 850-763-4696 FREE SENIOR HEALTH FAIR: 9 a.m. to noon at HealthPlex, corner of Baldwin Road and State 77, Panama City. For details, 850-747-6540 SPANISH CLASS: 12:30 p.m. at Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance class offered. For details, 850-277-2730 FREE HEALTH CLINIC: 1-4 p.m. at the Panama City Rescue Mission Support Center, 515 E. Sixth St., Panama City. Free; open to public. The clinic is open the fourth Thursday of each month. Registration in morning before clinic opens. For details, 850-215-0159 GRAND SLAM 2018 FUNDRAISER: 6-10 p.m. at the Edgewater Resort Senior Center, Panama City Beach, to bene“ t the Panama City Beach Senior Center. Enjoy a delicious meal and listen to the instrumental music of saxophone artist Chris Godber. After dinner, there will be a live auction; dancing entertainment with Jennifer Jones and her band. Purchase a table for eight or buy individual tickets. For details, 850-233-5065 or www.pcbsc. com BALLROOM DANCING: 6:308:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-277-0566 or dpgordon01@yahoo.com CHURCH AND THE ARTS „ ARNOLD HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND ENSEMBLE: 7 p.m. at Gulf Beach Presbyterian Church, 271 S. State 79, Panama City Beach. Part of the 26th annual Church and the Arts Concert Series. Admission $10; proceeds bene“ t the Community Food Pantry at Gulf Beach Presbyterian, as well as the performing organization. For details, PinkChurch.org SHREK, THE MUSICALŽ: 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club. Tickets $15; $10 for students and children. THE CHARITABLE SISTERHOOD OF THE SECOND TRINITY VICTORY CHURCHŽ: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. When the ladies of the Charitable Sisterhood meet to organize a relief effort for homeless Guatemalans, they are greeted with a small mountain of community donations „ but one womans junk is another womans treasure. For details and tickets, 850-265-3226 or kt-online.org LUCKY YOUŽ: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. For tickets and details, GulfCoast.edu/arts SEVEN BRIDGES: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tribute to the music of the Eagles, using no backing tracks or harmonizers, they recreate the experience of an Eagles concert. Buy season tickets for all six shows in the series for $150. Individual memberships are $25. For details and tickets, MartinTheatre.com or 850-763-8080 LIVE AT THE REP „ AMY BLACK: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Meeting Hall Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets $25. For details, LoveTheRep.com PANAMA CITYJinks student arrested, Walton school locked down after threatsAcross the Panhandle, police on Thursday reported responding to two more threats of violence at schools.The Bay County Sheriffs Office responded Wednes-day to Jinks Middle School in reference to a report of a student threatening to shoot students at the school. The school resource deputy reported being given information concerning student Riley James Ross, 13.Witnesses told BCSO after Ross heard about last weeks shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, he began making comments that he would shoot up the school and pointed his fin-gers like a gun, shootingŽ at other students. Ross allegedly said he would pull an alarm to get all the students outside and then would shoot them,Ž according to BCSO.When investigators spoke to Ross, they reported he initially denied but eventu-ally admitted making such statements. However, he said he only meant that if a shooter were to be at his school this is how and who they would shoot.ŽRoss was arrested and charged with making a false report concerning the use of a firearm in a concerning manner, a second-degree felony.Ross was the third student arrested over a school shooting threat inthree days. BCSO on Tuesday arrested a 17-year-old Rosenwald High School student, followed by a 14-year-old Bay High School student on Wednesday.In DeFuniak Springs, a school was put on temporary restriction Thursday after the discovery of a writ-ten threat. Just after noon, a student attending the In10sityŽ Magnet School at the Wise Center located a composition notebook in a classroom containing a note of a threat to harm students, according to the Walton County Sheriffs Office.The student immediately notified a teacher, who alerted the school resource deputy. Within minutes, the school imposed a temporary restriction on student movement on school grounds. An administrative search was conducted including all classrooms, common areas and backpacks, which yielded no weapons.Each student attending the magnet portion of the school was addressed either in a group setting or one-on-one, and WCSO has identified a person of interest. The investigation is con-tinuing, but WCSO officials said they do not believe there is a current credible threat.Every threat to student safety, written or otherwise, will be addressed swiftly and to the fullest extent of the law,Ž Sheriff Michael Adkinson said.PANAMA CITYBay Haven settles another suit with former administratorBay Haven Charter Acad-emy has settled a second lawsuit with a former administrator, according to court documents.The amount and terms of the settlement have not been released, but the char-ter academy previously had settled a suit with another former administrator for $150,000.Michelle Gainer, former principal of North Bay Haven Middle/High School, filed her lawsuit, along with former Assis-tant Principal Erin Harper, in January of last year, claiming they were retali-ated against after reporting sexual and religious harass-ment by former Bay Haven CEO Tim Kitts.After signing an agree-ment that they would drop the harassment complaints in exchange for Kitts resig-nation, Kitts left the school in February 2016. In the ensuing days, Gainer and Harper alleged that they experienced new harassment and discrimination and filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Council a few weeks later. Claiming that they had violated their agreement, Bay Haven placed both administrators on leave and sued them for breach of contract in April. That suit was later dropped, but neither Gainer nor Harper returned to North Bay Haven.In the following months, Harper and Gainer were given clearance by EEOC to sue Bay Haven for retaliation and harassment. News Herald staff reportsAREA BRIEFS By Tyra L. Jackson850-522-5121 | @TyraJackPCNH tjackson@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Plans for road projects are moving along as Panama City Beach officials approved resolu-tions for the Loop RoadŽ project and the Front Beach Road Community Redevelopment Projects at Thursdays council meeting.The council passed a resolution involving an interlocal agreement between the city and the County Commission regarding funds for the Bay Parkway Project „ which will provide an alternate road from Bay Parkway to Nautilus Street. Portions of the Phase II funding agreement state the county will contribute no more than $3.5 million to the project. The county is set to pay half of the cost in 2020 and the other half in 2021.The road will be an extension of Bay Parkway from Pier Park Drive to Nautilus Road.In addition, city officials approved a task order with appraisal company Chan-dler and Associates. The task order is for appraisals for three sites that will be needed for stormwa-ter purposes for the Front Beach Road Community Redevelopment Projects.The total cost of the appraisals is $13,650.PCB moves ahead on Bay Parkway extension

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 B7chief among them that she pres cribed cannabis when she had neither the training nor legal grounds to do so.The case stems from Skidmores interactions with a patient identified only as R.S., a 64-year-old part-time resident from Minnesota, beginning in late 2015.R.S., a Vietnam veteran with stage 4 metastatic cancer and other medical issues, began seeing Skidmore in September 2015. She tried acupuncture and other recommendations „ the state and Skidmore agree R.S. did not fulfill his end of providing his previous medical records or having lab tests performed „ before the patient asked about marijuana as an option.Skidmore long has been an outspoken proponent of medical marijuana in certain circumstances, and during testimony Tuesday, she cited her extensive research into the drug and its benefits.Medical marijuana takes care of many organs,Ž she said. The risk of dependence is there, but its determined to be milder than opiates and alcohol.ŽAfter a mid-January appointment, Skidmore issued a certificate for a maximum of 2 grams of cannabis per day,Ž which she and her attorney Alvin Peters have labeled a rec-ommendation but the state has labeled a prescription.During Tuesdays hear-ing, Peters sought to clarify the distinction during a phone interview with R.S.Isnt it true, Mr. R.S., that Dr. Skidmore uniformly referred to this document that you received as a certificate?Ž Peters asked.Yes she did,Ž R.S. replied.Isnt it true that she never, ever told you that it was a prescription?Ž Peters said.No she did not,Ž R.S. said.And its also true that when you received this certificate, you understood that you werent going to be able to go to a CVS or Walgreens or any other pharmacy and get this cer-tificate filled,Ž Peters said. Isnt that true?ŽThats correct,Ž R.S. said. I was told I would have to go to a dispensary in Pensacola.ŽThe legality of the certif-icate itself remains murky.Skidmore said she began issuing the recommenda-tion certificates on the advice of local attorney Billy-Joe HootŽ Crawford, who said he was given a similar certificate for medical marijuana use while in Orlando. Crawford confirmed giving the advice during his testimony.Other patients testi-fied they also had received recommendations from Skidmore and procured marijuana from regional dispensaries with varying success.R.S. was not in the suc-cess column. When he tried to procure marijuana with Skidmores certificate, he discovered the Pensacola dispensary he hoped would provide it had closed. Skid-more refunded his money, and R.S. filed his complaint with the DOH in February 2016.I thought Dr. Skidmore was deceiving her patients and being fraudulent,Ž he said Tuesday. It was a matter of ethics. I felt I had to do it.ŽThe DOH ultimately brought seven counts against Skidmore. Its administrative complaint, filed in August 2017, states at the time of her recommendation to R.S., Skidmore had not completed an 8-hour course or subsequent examina-tion offered by the Florida Medical AssociationŽ to prescribe low-THC cannabis and was not authorized or qualified to order low-THC cannabis or any other type of cannabis.ŽThe state also says Skid-mores recommendation did not specify that the cannabis be low-THC.In phone interviews with The News Herald before and after the hearing, Peters said Skidmore had fully complied with current medical marijuana laws and that the drug was a common law medical necessityŽ when the cer-tificate was issued.The prosecution by the State Department of Health is related to her courageous decision,Ž Peters said. She was caring for the patient.ŽSeveral of Skidmores other patients agreed. About 40 pe ople demonstrated in the parking lot before the hearing began, some demonstrators held pro-medical marijuana signs and chanted slogans.Patient Mary Larri-more, who called medical marijuana an untapped industry,Ž said Skidmore is an absolutely reputable and good doctor.Ž Larrimore suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and said she gets ill from other medications. I think (the hearing) is ridiculous. ... We need the doctor to tell us what we need to replace our medi-cations that are making me physically ill. It would save my health.ŽBelinda White, 48, another of Skidmores patients, said she has been disabled since age 18 because of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome, a disease in the muscular dystrophy family that attacks her muscles, skin, ligaments and everything in my body.ŽAt the age of 22 they put me on methadone,Ž White said. Little at that age or time did they know it was a drug that they used for heroin addicts. I dont take it no more since I see Dr. Skidmore. Theyve got me off that drug.ŽWhite said she would be devastatedŽ if Skidmore lost her license. She is a good woman,Ž she said. She is a very good doctor. She knows what shes doing.ŽThe DOH has declined to comment on the pend-ing case. Skidmore has no other complaints or disci-plinary actions on record with the state.A representative with the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, a group working to reform mari-juana laws,Ž said the organization is not famil-iar with any cases of other Florida physicians losing their license for the reasons in Skidmores case, calling hers an isolated incident.ŽSkidmore and the DOH now will send their proposals for action to a judge, who will make a recommendation on Skid-mores license to the Board of Medicine. DOCTORFrom Page B1Kelley, taking a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole. Jeff Kelley said he and his family had been granted peace, knowing youll never step outside in society again and do this to another family.ŽShaffer also pleaded guilty to several other charges stemming from the Nov. 18, 2017, homicide, including burglary of a dwelling and being a felon in possession of a firearm. Shackled at his hands and feet and wearing the orange jumpsuit of a high-priority inmate, the thin, almost lanky Shaffer listened as Jeff Kelley gave his victim impact statement, but did not address the family. After receiving his life sen-tence, he was fingerprinted before thanking the judge and leaving the courtroom.Early Nov. 18, police found Shaffer just a few blocks away from Kel-leys home „ and Shaffers former residence „ sleep-ing in a storage container. He was issued a notice to appear for trespassing and let go.Released from the self-storage lot, Shaffer sneaked into Kelleys Buena Vista Boulevard home through a back entrance and laid in wait in Kelleys bedroom with the victims own shot-gun in hand, waiting for him to return. When Kelley returned, Shaffer shot him in the head at close range, killing him. Shaffer then called police to the scene, and was arrested shortly after.He later told police he and Kelley had lived together in a failed domestic relationshipŽ until he had been evicted from the home, and he had planned to kill Kelley for about a month-and-a-half.At a pre-trial hearing earlier this month, the state announced it would not pursue the death penalty against Shaffer, paving the way for a possible plea deal.Outside Thursdays hearing, as Cody Shirahs DUI manslaughter trial broke for recess and the courtroom cleared, Jeff Kelley joined hands with the people who had come to support him and prayed for the strength to confront the man who killed his brother „ the only surviving member of his immediate family „ during the hear-ing, and the strength to heal when it was over.I hope someday you will realize the depth of the pain you have inflicted on this family,Ž he later said during the hearing. You left a wound in our lives that will never heal.Ž SHAFFERFrom Page B1stories about their firsthand experiences with segrega-tion and racism during an Eracism event Thursday night at the Bay County Government Center on 11th Street in Panama City. The event, intended to address racism and promote unity and progress, also fea-tured younger motivational speakers who encouraged the multi-ethnic standing room crowd to be compassionate and help one another.Eracism was co-sponsored by ACURE, the Bay County Democratic Black Caucus, CAIR-Florida, Democratic Womens Club of Bay County, JUDOS, Kingdom Impact Center, the LEAD Coalition of Bay County, the League of Women Voters of Bay County and the NAACP. The audience clapped at certain points in the night as speakers related their personal and emotional experiences.Leon Belton, president of the Black Caucus, said some of the things he experienced in Panama City when he was young will go to my grave.Ž One was when his uncle was assaulted after drinking from a whites-only water fountain.Ill never forget when me and my uncle walked to town, he was thirsty,Ž Belton said. So he decided to drink some water. And this white guy came out of the service station. It was located on Harrison (Avenue) and Sixth Street. This man kicked my uncle in the rear end. ... We didnt go home and tell our parents what happened because we probably would have gotten a whipping for drinking water at the foun-tain we knew we should not have been drinking in.ŽGeorge Hines Jr. also said he encountered racism in Panama City and in the military. Hines grew up in the same neighborhood as Shack and also got a hostile reaction when he drank from a white fountain. Hines, who turns 65 in a few weeks, said after he entered integrated education a teacher told him not to worry about learning how to write a check because he was an n word.ŽAfter 11th grade I got so tired of racism in Bay County I just decided Id quit school,Ž Hines said. I said Id join the militaary. I went and joined the military and guess what? Racism! ... I have had racism all my life. I have dealt with it. It has not been easy. ... We can live together if we try.ŽSue Carol Elvin, a white woman, told stories about hearing her neighbors using racist slurs and her mother being terrified of the Ku Klux Klan. Elvin said read-ing books by black authors gives her a background on how she was raised because back then she was told she had no idea what was going on.ŽThere was such a gulf and theres still a gulf,Ž Elvin said.Kevin Warren, CEO of the Tallahassee-based Life Group, looked toward the current generation and future during his turn to speak. Warren encouraged the audience to bridge gaps, keep fighting against racism and negativity and said people have stopped loving each other. Warren also said older and younger genera-tions can work together and understand one another.Love is the only thing that can produce true, powerful courage,Ž Warren said. SPEAKERSFrom Page B1

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** B8 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 C1 SPORTS COLLEGE BASEBALL | C220 RUNS ON THE BOARDCommodores win streak reaches four BASKETBALL LOCALS | C3PERISCOPEKeep tabs on how local basketball stars are doing in the college and professional ranks Except that this time its Mosleys opponent in the Region 1-6A girls basketball title game.By Pat McCannThe News HeraldLYNN HAVEN -It wouldnt take a giant leap of faith to claim that tonights Bishop Kenny at Mosley Region 1-6A girls basketball championship game simply is a preview of whats to come.Except that every high school season, like every team, is a separate entity. There are no guarantees that just because the visiting Cru-saders, like the host Dolphins, only have one contributing senior that these teams merely are on the cusp of basketball dominance.It doesnt always work that way, and Mosley coach Jon Mason is thankful that his ballclub still is playing while representing the first county girls basketball team ever to play for a region title. Tipoff is 7 p.m. Admission, as set by the Florida High School Athletics Association, is $7.The similarities between the teams dont end with their youthful rosters. Kenny, 18-9, lost three of its last five regular-season games before regrouping for the playoffs. Mosley, 20-5, lost three of its last four.And theres no small item that Kenny has been the school to eliminate Mosley in the region championship in volleyball three times during the last four years.Thats pretty much where the similarities end, however.Theyve got balanced size, shoot it pretty well, play matchup zone and 1-3-1,Ž Mason assessed the Jacksonville opponent. From the film Ive watched they do a good job of moving it around and finding open shooters.ŽThat translates into a strategy where the Crusaders prefer a low-possession formula to prevail. Therefore, this time it could be Mosley, like it was Rickards on Tuesday, that prefers a baseline-to-baseline tempo.Its Bishop Kenny againLadaiizha Taylor puts up a shot for Mosley during its 54-51 victory over Rickards on Tuesday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See BISHOP, C2By Teresa M. WalkerThe Associated PressGANGNEUNG, South Korea „ Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson skated slowly back and forth toward the net, showing forehand, then leaning quickly to the left to fake a backhand that pulled Canadian goalie Shannon Szabados out of the crease.On the sports biggest stage, against the Americans greatest rival, with all her teammates leaning eagerly over the boards watching her every move, the three-time Olympian came back to her forehand to finish off a daz-zling, triple-deke move by sliding the puck into the net past the outstretched glove of Szabados for the deciding goal in the sixth round of a shootout thriller.I knew when that went in that Maddie was going to stop the next one,Ž Lamou-reux-Davidson said.That would be 20-yearold goalie Maddie Rooney, who stuffed the last two Canadian shooters to wrap up a 3-2 victory Thursday that snapped the Americans 20-year gold medal drought and ended Canadas bid for a fifth straight title in the first shootout in an Olympic womens final.US defeats Canada for womens hockey goldThe United States Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, left, beats Canada goalie Shannon Szabados in the penalty shootout during the womens gold medal hockey game Thursday in Gangneung, South Korea. [BRUCE BENNETT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See HOCKEY, C5Rutherfords Eddie Dubose has his shot blocked from behind by Godbys Kamari Richardson during Thursdays Region 1-6A quarter“ nal game. Godby won 60-57. Lorenzo Ferrell dunks the ball after a steal in the “ rst half. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Godby snaps Rutherfords 16-game winning streak with 60-57 lossBy Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comSPRINGFIELD „ Rutherfords season up until Thursdays Region 1-6A quarterfinal matchup with Godby was by any measure an overwhelming success for a Rams team featuring eight first-year varsity players. A 60-57 home defeat at the hands of the Cougars, how-ever, is certain to leave a sour taste for Rutherford players and coaches.The Rams were eliminated with the loss, which snaps a 16-game winning streak, and finishes their season at 22-5. Godby improved to 16-11 and will get a fourth matchup with District 2 rival Rickards on Tuesday in the region semifinal.Its disappointing,Ž Ruth-erford coach Rhondie Ross said of the loss. You win Second-half surge lifts Cougars past RamsSee RAMS, C2

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** C2 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News HeraldThey are the kind of team we want to press and speed up,Ž Mason said. Theyve mostly been winning low-scoring games, but I attribute that to how they play offense. They want to get one good shot on a possession.ŽMosley is about the oppo-site in the sense that it wants to create chaos to make its offense more of a progression of defensive intensity.Mason believes his teams basketball IQ belies its youth, and he doesnt worry about effort and application. Getting back sophomore Mattie Towson from injury prior to the district tournament helped round out the rotation, and eliminating Rickards was a huge momen-tum builder. She agitates ballhandlers, makes shots „ she had some big 3s against Rickards „ and has the speed to get in the lane,Ž Mason said of Towson. Shes one of those players who plays hard every time.We want to make the game kind of crazy and play fast because it gives us more pos-sessions. And we have players that are able to adapt, take in what I say and put it to use on the court.ŽAnd the Dolphins realize that finally getting past the region semifinal hurdle, and Rickards, wasnt the end gameŽ as Mason put it.The girls believed they could beat Rickards, but that was not the last step,Ž Mason said. We want to get to Lakeland.Ž BISHOPFrom Page C1The News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ Gulf Coasts run of good pitching continued and the Commodores stretched their winning streak to four games with 13-3 and 7-2 wins over Coastal Alabama-South on Wednesday at Bill Frazier Field.Gulf Coast, 9-6, backed winning pitcher Trever Kilcrease with 15 hits in the opener to triumph in six innings. Kilcrease improved to 2-1, allowing eight hits but no earned runs while going the distance.Alec Aleywine had three singles, a triple and four runs batted in to ignite the offense. Cory Heffron had four hits and an RBI, Malik Spratlin a single, double and three RBIs, Stevie Moffatt two hits and two RBIs and Ben Rowdon two RBIs.The Commodores scored in every inning of the first game. Conversely, they scored all of their runs in the fourth inning of the second game to erase a two-run deficit.Jake Rice, 2-2, tossed a five-hitter but more importantly only walked one while striking out two. Josh Nowak had a two-run triple and Rowdon a two-run double during the rally. Gulf Coast only had four hits in the nightcap.The Commodores have another doubleheader upcoming when they travel to Cuthbert, Ga., to face Andrew College on Saturday. The first game is scheduled to start at 12:30 p.m. CST.Commodore win streak reaches four The News HeraldSAND HILLS „ Bozeman improved to 2-0 on the season and 1-0 in District 1-4A competition with a 17-1 five-inning victory over Vernon in baseball action Thursday night. The Bucks scored 11 runs on nine hits in the first inning, getting home runs from Noah Gus-tason and Reese Bozeman along the way.Gustason and Bozeman both finished 2 for 3 with three RBI, with Gustasons long ball a three-run shot, and Bozemans a two-run homer. Cade Parker was 3 for 4 with two doubles and two RBI, and Cory Herron went 2 for 3 with two runs scored.Charlie Red and Taylor Gay combined for a no-hitter on the mound, with Gay strik-ing out six in three innings to get the decision. Bozeman next plays at Cottondale at noon Saturday. Vernon (1-1) is at Sneads tonight. Bay 3, Crestview 0CRESTVIEW „ Dawson Erbacher struck out 13 batters and allowed just one hit in six innings to get the win for the Tornadoes, who improved to 1-1 on the season. Tanner Sandlin earned the save with two strikeouts in the seventh inning. Charlie Owens went 2 for 2 with a walk and an RBI, with Amilcar Torres also going 2 for 2 with an RBI sacrifice. Jenson Barker was 1 for 3 with an RBI. Bay next plays at home Tuesday against Port St. Joe.Late resultsSOFTBALLMosley 12, Bay 2LYNN HAVEN „ Mosley won in six innings as Bristol Lovrekovic and Brianna Oudean combined for the win. The Dolphins had eight hits. Arnold 11, Rutherford 1SPRINGFIELD „ Erin Ramsey had a single, two home runs and four runs batted in for Arnold, 4-0. Ashley Allgood homered and had three RBIs, Danielle Lee was 3 for 3 with a double and two RBIs, Alex Smith had a single, double and RBI and Ashely Troutman was 1 for 3 with four stolen bases.Pilar Egge scattered seven hits and struck out two.PREP ROUNDUPBozeman run-rules Vernon the district and put your-self in position to be at home throughout the playoffs (and lose). Its disappointing because youve got to get it done. Its right where you want to be where you dont have to travel, and we couldnt get it done.ŽTrey Jones scored 19 points on five 3-pointers to lead the Cougars, while Tavaris King added 16 points, and Wilyum Omer had 13. Kamari Richardson scored all eight of his points in the second half. Justin Martins 16 points led Rutherford, followed by Eddie Dubose with 15. Lead-ing scorer Lorenzo Ferrell was limited to eight points and struggled to find open looks against a Godby defense geared to stop him all night.They made (Ferrell) work all night,Ž Ross said. They ran two guys at him. They had the same strategy that we did (against King). They wanted to slow down our best player. You have to give credit to Godby. They made more plays than we did tonight.ŽRutherford led 24-18 at halftime, but Godby domi-nated the third quarter 20-10 to seize control of the game. A 3-pointer by Jones opened the second half for the Cougars and another three from Lewis gave them their first lead since the first quarter at 28-27. A driving basket by Lewis at the third quarter buzzer put Godby up 38-34 going into the fourth.Another 3-pointer from Jones and a basket inside by Richardson quickly grew the Godby lead to nine less than a minute into the final quarter, though Rutherford responded with a 9-2 run featuring a pair of three-point plays from Dubose and Tony Jackson to cut the deficit to 45-43 with 4:53 to play.The Cougars answered with a 10-2 run of their own, with a basket in the paint by Omer making it 55-45 with 1:36 on the clock. The Rams furiously fought their way back into the game with an aggressive full court press and with the aid of some Godby missed free throws. Four straight free throws by Martin and a driv-ing basket by Dubose cut the lead to four, with a threepoint play by Martin after a Godby turnover making it a two-point game at 56-54 with 1:02 remaining.Rutherford had a chance to tie it up with 23.1 points left after Trevon Sims grabbed an offensive rebound and was fouled, but Sims missed both free throws and Jones made two at the other end to push the lead to 59-55 with 19.9 seconds on the clock. The Rams tried to extend the game with a driving layup by Ferrell and then a quick foul on Jones, who split a pair of free throws with 10.3 seconds to play.Ferrell went for the tie on the ensuing Rutherford possession, but his 3-point attempt rimmed out and the Rams had to foul with 2.8 seconds on the clock. Terry Bruton missed both free throws for the Cougars, but Rutherford was unable to get a desperation shot off before time expired. GODBY (60) King 4 5-14 16, Omer 6 0-1 13, McElwain 0 0-0 0, Rucker 0 0-0 0, Jones 5 4-6 19, Sumlin 0 1-2 1, Webster 0 0-2 0, Richardson 4 0-0 8, Shingles 0 1-2 1, Bruton 1 0-2 2. Totals: 20 11-29 60. RUTHERFORD (57) Ferrell 3 2-4 8, Fisher 0 0-0 0, Sims 1 0-4 2, Jackson 1 5-5 7, Edwards 1 3-5 5, Martin 4 8-9 16, Dubose 5 5-10 15, Hills 1 0-0 2, Hines 1 0-0 2. Totals: 17 23-37 57. Godby 11 7 20 22 „ 60 Rutherford 13 11 10 23 „ 57 3-point “ eld goals: Godby 7 (Jones 5, King, Omer), Rutherford 0. Total fouls: Godby 26, Rutherford 22. Fouled out: Richardson, Omer, Jackson, Edwards. Technical fouls: none. Rickards 61, Bay 25 TALLAHASSEE „ The Raiders imp roved to 19-7 with the victory and will host Godby on Tuesday in the Region 1-6A quarter“ nals. The Tornadoes season ends at 6-19. Alic Troutman led Rickards with 12 points, followed by Zion Brown with 11. Stats were not available for Bay. Other area scores Region 1-1A Bethlehem 57, Cottondale 45 Blountstown 47, Laurel Hill 36 Region 2-1A Franklin County 54, Baker 53 Chipley 58, Port St. Joe 47 Region 1-5A Pensacola Catholic 63, Marianna 56 RAMSFrom Page C1 Rutherfords Justin Martin puts up a shot as Godbys Tyreke McElwain looks on. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] The Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. „ Joel Eriksson Ek and Chris Stew-art scored in a 39-second span during Minnesotas three-goal second period, and the Wild rallied from two down to beat the New Jersey Devils 4-2 on Thursday night.Wild defenseman Mike Reilly also scored in the second period and Eric Staal iced the game with an empty-net goal, his 900th NHL point. Backup goalie Alex Stalock made 38 saves as the Wild moved into third place in the Central Division after winning for the 11th time in 17 games (11-3-3).Taylor Hall and Stefan Noesen scored for the Devils, who have lost two in a row after a four-game winning streak. Eddie Lack made 21 saves. Eriksson Ek, who snapped a 50-game goal drought on Tuesday, poked a great, one-handed, cross-ice pass by Daniel Winnik past Lack at 12:25 to tie the game.Stewart, who had played in only one of the last seven games, capped the outburst with a shot from the left circle that Lack probably should have stopped. It was Stewarts first goal since Dec. 19.Stalock made the lead stand up in the final period, stopping 16 shots including excellent saves on Hall, Nico Hischier and Kyle Palmieri. FLYERS 2, BLUE JACKETS 1: Nolan Patrick scored the goahead goal midway through the third period and Petr Mrazek made 19 saves in his Philadelphia debut, leading the streaking Flyers to a 2-1 victory over the Columbus Blue Jackets on Thursday night. Claude Giroux had a goal and an assist and Shayne Gostisbehere added two assists for the Flyers, who won their fourth straight game while improving to 8-0-2 in the last 10. PANTHERS 3, CAPITALS 2: Vincent Trocheck scored the winning goal with 19.1 seconds left to lift the Florida Panthers over the Washington Capitals 3-2 on Thursday night, hours after victims of last weeks shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were honored with a somber video tribute. With the score tied at 2, Trocheck redirected a shot by Jonathan Huberdeau past goaltender Braden Holtby during a power play. Nick Bjugstad scored the tying goal for the Panthers late in the third period, and Maxim Mamin got his “ rst NHL goal. Roberto Luongo made 33 saves in his third game since returning from a groin injury. CANADIENS 3, RANGERS 1: Antti Niemi made 31 saves and the Montreal Canadiens beat the struggling New York Rangers 3-1 on Thursday night to snap their six-game losing streak. Tomas Plekanec, Jeff Petry and Phillip Danault scored for Montreal (23-29-8), which avoided matching its longest skid of the season. Niemi got the start in place of injured Carey Price. Before the game, Montreal announced Price will be sidelined inde“ nitely with a concussion. The goalie took a shot to the mask in Tuesdays loss to Philadelphia.Wild rally to overcome 20 de cit, drop Devils New Jersey Devils right wing Stefan Noesen, center, battles for the puck between Minnesota Wild right wing Nino Niederreiter, right, and defenseman Nate Prosser during the second period of Thursdays game in Newark, N.J. [ADAM HUNGER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 C3 The News HeraldThe following is a list of area athletes now playing college basketball. All statistics and records are through Feb. 21, unless noted.MenJerrod Blount (Cottondale), Thomas University, Sr., 6-5, 195, G „ Averaging 5.3 points and 1.6 rebounds while shooting 37.9 percent from the “ eld, 31.3 percent from the 3-point line, and 75 percent from the foul line. Alex Brown (Vernon), Arkansas Tech, Jr., 6-3, 195, G „ Averaging 12.9 points, 6.4 rebounds, and 1.7 assists while shooting 47.8 percent from the “ eld, 35.4 percent from the 3-point line, and 76.3 percent from the free throw line. Jairen Butler (Rutherford), Hillsborough College, Fr., 6-4, 180, F „ Averaging 4.5 points and 1.6 rebounds while shooting 39.3 percent from the “ eld and 66.7 percent from the foul line. Jacorian Calloway (Mosley), Daytona State, Fr., 6-3, 180, G „ Averaging 9.7 points, two rebounds, and 1.2 assists per game while shooting 42.3 percent from the “ eld, 34.4 percent from the 3-point line, and 52.9 percent from the foul line. Destin Dunton (Rutherford), Southern, Jr., 6-3, 175, G „ Dunton is redshirting this season. Nat Dixon (Mosley), Chattanooga, Jr., 6-4, 180, G „ Averaging 14.5 points, 4.7 rebounds, and two assists per game while shooting 43.9 percent from the “ eld, 39.9 percent from the 3-point line, and 76.4 percent from the foul line. Damani Flanagain (Arnold), Coastal AlabamaMonroeville, So., 6-4, 176, G „ Averaging 9.4 points and three rebounds while shooting 56.7 percent from the “ eld, 28.6 percent from the 3-point line, and 63.5 percent from the foul line. Trent Forrest (Chipley), Florida State, So., 6-5, 215, G „ Averaging 6.6 points, 4.7 rebounds, 3.8 assists, and 1.3 steals per game while shooting 47.5 percent from the “ eld, 20 percent from the 3-point line, and 69.6 percent from the foul line. Donovan Franklin (Gulf Coast), Pittsburg State, Jr. 6-5, 195, G „ Averaging 16.4 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 2.1 assists per game while shooting 49.4 percent from the “ eld, 43 percent from the 3-point line, and 86.3 percent from the foul line. Cobe Goosby (Gulf Coast), Arkansas-Monticello, Sr., 6-5, G „ Averaging 14.4 points, 5.7 rebounds, 5.9 assists, and 1.5 steals per game while shooting 54.5 percent from the “ eld, 36.4 percent from the 3-point line, and 66.1 percent from the free throw line. Alex Hamilton (Bay, Chipley), Santa Cruz Warriors, NBA D-League, 6-4, 195, G „ Averaging 10.6 points, 4.2 rebounds, 5.4 assists, and two steals per game while shooting 46.8 percent from the “ eld, 34 percent from the 3-point line, and 69.6 percent from the free throw line. Jeremy Harris (Gulf Coast), Buffalo, Jr., 6-7, 176, G „ Averaging 14.6 points, 5.7 rebounds, 2.4 assists, and 1.1 steals per game while shooting 46.2 percent from the “ eld, 40.8 percent from the 3-point line, and 74.5 percent from the foul line. Antwain Johnson (Malone, Chipola), Middle Tennessee, Jr., 6-2, 197, G „ Averaging 10.2 points, 1.9 rebounds, and 1.8 assists while shooting 43.9 percent from the “ eld, 39.8 percent from the 3-point line, and 86.2 percent from the foul line. Chancellor Lockett (Malone), Lurleen B. Wallace, So., 5-9, 140, G „ Averaging 8.4 points, 1.8 rebounds, and one assist while shooting 49.1 percent from the “ eld, 45.6 percent from the 3-point line, and 75.6 percent from the free throw line. Kruize Pinkins (Marianna, Chipola), Mitteldeutscher BC Weissenfels, Germany-BBL, 6-7, 215, F „ Averaging 10.7 points, 6.6 rebounds, and 1.6 assists while shooting 55.3 percent from the “ eld, 32.1 percent from the 3-point line, and 88.2 percent from the free throw line. Demetrius Rivers (Bay), Thomas University, Fr., 6-4, 180, G „ Rivers hasnt played yet this season. D.J. Roulhac (Cottondale), Thomas University, Sr., 6-0, 170 G „ Averaging 5.9 points, 2.3 rebounds, and 1.7 assists per game while shooting 40.6 percent from the “ eld, 37 percent from the 3-point line, and 50 percent from the foul line. Christian Shorter (Arnold, Gulf Coast), Enterprise State, So., 6-6, F „ Averaging 5.4 points and 2.2 rebounds per game on 34 percent shooting from the “ eld and 86.7 percent from the foul line. Khaliel Spearman (Rutherford, Gulf Coast), Talladega College, Jr., 6-4, 180, G „ Averaging 14.7 points, 3.5 rebounds, two assists, and one steal per game on 53.7 percent shooting from the “ eld, 34.7 percent from the 3-point line, and 73.2 percent from the free throw line. Josh Wade (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, So., 6-3, Fr., G „ Averaging 5.1 points and 3.2 rebounds while shooting 33.3 percent from the “ eld, 31.5 percent from the 3-point line, and 68.8 percent from the free throw line. Tommy Wade (Bay), North Greenville University, Sr., 6-7, 225, F „ Averaging 10.1 points, 5.9 rebounds, and 1.2 assists per game while shooting 44.1 percent from the “ eld, 28.2 percent from the 3-point line, and 60.3 percent from the free throw line. Chris Walker (Holmes County), Rio Grande Valley Vipers, NBA D-League, 6-10, 220, F „ Averaging 9.8 points, 5.7 rebounds, and one assist per game while shooting 59.7 percent from the “ eld, 12.5 percent from the 3-point line, and 60.1 percent from the free throw line. Derrick White (Graceville), Hillsborough College, Fr., 6-1, 175, G „ Averaging 10.1 points, 2.8 rebounds, 3.9 assists, and 1.4 steals per game while shooting 35.5 percent from the “ eld, 31.5 percent from the 3-point line, and 75 percent from the foul line.WomenEvelyn Ahkator (Chipola), Dallas Wings, WNBA 6-3, F „ Averaging 0.9 points and 0.6 rebounds while shooting 25 percent from the “ eld and 83.3 percent from the foul line. Curteeona Brelove (Malone), St. Johns, Jr., 6-2, F „ Brelove is sitting out this season after transferring from VCU. Audrey-Ann Caron-Goudreau (Gulf Coast), Texas, Sr., 6-4, F „ Averaging six points, “ ve rebounds, and 1.6 blocks while shooting 47.8 percent from the “ eld, 29.2 percent from the 3-point line, and 66.7 percent from the free throw line. Maria Castro (Gulf Coast), Oklahoma State, Jr., 6-0, G „ Averaging 4.3 points and 1.8 rebounds while shooting 40 percent from the “ eld, 35.7 percent from the 3-point line, and 53.8 percent from the free throw line. JNyiah Daniels (Mosley), West Alabama, So., 5-6, G „ Averaging 10.3 points, 3.3 rebounds, 2.1 assists, and 1.7 steals per game while shooting 39.4 percent from the “ eld, 35.8 percent from the 3-point line, and 67.1 percent from the free throw line. Fatou Diagne (Gulf Coast), Purdue, So., 6-4, C „ Diagne hasnt played this season. LaSonja Edwards (Gulf Coast), Middle Tennessee, Jr., 6-1, F „ Averaging 2.2 points and 0.9 rebounds per game while shooting 53.8 percent from the “ eld and 35 percent from the foul line9. Taylor Emery (Gulf Coast) Virginia Tech, Jr., 5-10, G „ Averaging 18 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.7 assists, and 1.1 steals per game while shooting 49.6 percent from the “ eld, 40.2 percent from the 3-point line, and 86.6 percent from the free throw line. Raven Fox (Gulf Coast), Syracuse, Jr., G „ Averaging three points and 2.9 rebounds per game while shooting 40.8 percent from the “ eld, 25 percent from the 3-point line, and 69.6 percent from the foul line. Chelsey Gibson (Gulf Coast), Troy, Sr., F „ Averaging 4.8 points and 3.5 rebounds per game while shooting 42.5 percent from the “ eld, 66.7 percent from the 3-point line, and 82.6 percent from the foul line. Halie Jasinski (Port St. Joe), Coastal AlabamaMonroeville, Fr., 6-1, C „ Averaging 3.9 points and 3.9 rebounds per game while shooting 35.7 percent from the “ eld, 21.4 percent from the 3-point line, and 76.9 percent from the foul line. Rosemarie Julien (Chipola), Florida Gulf Coast, Sr., 5-11, F „ Averaging 13.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, and 1.5 assists per game while shooting 44.4 percent from the “ eld, 34.8 percent from the 3-point line, and 84.5 percent from the free throw line. Kristina King (Gulf Coast), West Virginia, Sr., 6-3, F „ Averaging 10 points, 7.4 rebounds, two assists, 1.3 blocks, and 1.1 steals per game while shooting 51.6 percent from the “ eld and 53.3 percent from the free throw line. Brittany Lee (Chipley), Lurleen B. Wallace, So., 5-6, G „ Lee hasnt played this season. Shaterrika ONeal (Gulf Coast), Troy, Jr., 5-8, G „ Averaging 7.1 points, 3.3 rebounds, 1.6 assists, and 1.1 steals per game while shooting 36 percent from the “ eld, 42.9 percent from the 3-point line, and 52.9 percent from the free throw line. Amanda Paschal (Chipley, Gulf Coast), Kentucky, Jr., 5-7, G „ Averaging four points, 1.8 rebounds, and 1.2 assists per game while shooting 42.4 percent from the “ eld, 21.1 percent from the 3-point line, and 57.1 percent from the foul line. Mallory Peak (Wewahitchka), Coastal Alabama-Monroeville, So., 6-3, C „ Averaging 2.9 point and 2.8 rebounds while shooting 46.5 percent from the “ eld and 54.5 percent from the free throw line. Cynthia Petke (Chipola), Georgetown, Sr., 6-2, F „ Averaging 12.9 points, 10 rebounds, 1.2 assists, and 1.5 steals per game while shooting 42.2 percent from the “ eld, 23.9 percent from the 3-point line, and 63.1 percent from the free throw line. Ty Purifoy (Gulf Coast), North Florida, Jr., 5-1, G „ Averaging “ ve points, 1.7 rebounds, 3.3 assists, and 1.6 steals while shooting 28.9 percent from the “ eld, 36.4 percent from the 3-point line, and 60.8 percent from the free throw line. Bri Williams (Gulf Coast), Austin Peay, Sr., 5-4, G „ Averaging 5.6 points, 2.7 rebounds, 3.4 assists, and 1.6 steals per game while shooting 37.3 percent from the “ eld, 29.1 percent from the 3-point line, and 69.8 percent from the free throw line. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area athletes now playing college basketball is asked to call The News Herald at 747-5065 or e-mail Dustin Kent at dkent@pcnh.com. COLLEGE BASKETBALL PERISCOPE The Associated PressORLANDO, Fla. „ Trey Burke came off the bench with a sea-son-high 26 points and six assists Thursday night to help the New York Knicks break an eight-game losing streak with a 120113 victory over the Orlando Magic.Tim Hardaway Jr. had 23 points and six assists for the Knicks, who won for the first time since Jan. 30 and the first time since losing Kristaps Porzingis for the season to a torn ACL.Evan Fournier scored 25 points for the Magic, who lost their fourth straight.The first game after the All-Star break for both teams marked the first Knicks start for guard Emmanuel Mudiay, who was acquired from Denver in a three-team trade on Feb. 8. It also marked the returns from injury for center Nikola Vucevic and forward Aaron Gordon of the Magic.Vucevic finished with 19 points and six rebounds.The Magic made 11 of their first 12 shots, including all five 3-pointers, on their way to a 41-point first quarter and a 10-point lead.Orlando led 76-65 early in the second half, a lead that disappeared quickly when Enes Kanter scored three baskets a 12-0 run that put the Knicks ahead for the first time since the middle of the first quarter.A layup by Lance Thomas early in the fourth quarter put the Knicks ahead perma-nently and launched an 18-6 run that produced a 113-102 lead. Burke, who shot 12 for 22 in the game, scored three baskets during that rally.HORNETS 111, NETS 96: Dwight Howard grabbed a season-high 24 rebounds and added 15 points, Kemba Walker scored 31 and the Charlotte Hornets beat the Brooklyn Nets 111-96 on Thursday night. Dante Cunningham had 22 points and 12 rebounds for the Nets, who lost their eighth straight game and fell to 19-41. DAngelo Russell, starting for the “ rst time since November knee surgery, scored 19 points on 7-of-16 shooting. All “ ve Charlotte starters scored in double digits and the Hornets hit 52.4 percent from 3-point range. Charlotte improved to 25-33 with its second straight victory.Knicks top Magic to snap 8-game slide The Associated PressPALM BEACH GAR-DENS, Fla. „ Tiger Woods had what he called easilyŽ his best round hitting the ball, and he didnt even break par at the Honda Classic.Alex Noren and Webb Simpson shared the lead at 4-under 66 in steady wind on a penal PGA National golf course, and felt as though they had to work hard for it. Both dropped only one shot Thursday, which might have been as great an accomplishment as any of their birdies.When you stand on certain tee boxes or certain approach shots, you remember that, Man, this is one of the hardest courses we play all year, including majors,Ž said Simpson, who is playing the Honda Classic for the first time in seven years.Only 20 players broke par, and just as many were at 76 or worse.Woods had only one big blunder „ a double bogey on the par-5 third hole when he missed the green and missed a 3-foot putt „ in an otherwise stress-free round. He had one other bogey against three birdies, and was rarely out of position. Even one of his two wild drives, when his ball landed behind two carts that were selling frozen lemonade and soft pretzels, he still had a good angle to the green.It was very positive today,Ž Woods said. It was a tough day out there for all of us, and even par is a good score.ŽIt was plenty tough for Adam Scott, who again stumbled his way through the closing stretch of holes that feature water, water and more water. Scott went into the water on the par-3 15th and made double bogey, and then hit into the water on the par-3 17th and made triple bogey. He shot 73.Woods shoots solid 70 at Honda; 2 share leadTiger Woods tees off on the 13th tee during the “ rst round of the Honda Classic on Thursday in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. [WILFREDO LEE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** C4 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald EBRO SCHEDULEMondayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.TuesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m.WednesdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Aqueduct 11:50 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30, Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.ThursdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.FridayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 p.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:35 p.m.SaturdayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast:Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:35 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Dania Jai Alai 5:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:45 p.m.SundayMatinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 11 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM … (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. LOCATION … Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION … 234-3943. ODDS PREGAME.COM LINENATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONTodayFAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG Boston 1 204 at Detroit at Indiana Off Off Atlanta at Washington 3 212 Charlotte at Toronto 8 215 Milwaukee at New Orleans 2 214 Miami Cleveland 5 212 at Memphis at Houston 8 226 Minnesota at Denver Off Off San Antonio at Utah Off Off Portland L.A. Clippers 4 224 at Phoenix at L.A. Lakers 3 224 DallasCOLLEGE BASKETBALL TodayFAVORITE OPEN UNDERDOG Wright St. 5 at IUPUI Yale 2 at Cornell Harvard 1 at Princeton at Pennsylvania 11 Dartmouth at Columbia 5 Brown at Rhode Island 13 Dayton Ohio State 1 at Indiana N. Kentucky 3 at Ill.-Chicago at Ball St. 5 W. Michigan at Toledo 7 Cent. MichiganNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE at Chicago -123 San Jose +113 Minnesota -147 at N.Y. Rangers +137 Pittsburgh -110 at Carolina +100 at St. Louis -119 Winnipeg +109 at Vegas -244 Vancouver +224 Updated odds available at Pregame.com PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times EasternEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division W L PCT. GB Toronto 41 16 .719 „ Boston 40 19 .678 2 Philadelphia 31 25 .554 9 New York 24 36 .400 18 Brooklyn 19 41 .317 23 Southeast Division W L PCT. GB Washington 34 24 .586 „ Miami 30 28 .517 4 Charlotte 25 33 .431 9 Orlando 18 40 .310 16 Atlanta 18 41 .305 16 Central Division W L PCT. GB Cleveland 34 23 .596 „ Indiana 33 25 .569 1 Milwaukee 32 25 .561 2 Detroit 28 29 .491 6 Chicago 20 38 .345 14 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L PCT. GB Houston 44 13 .772 „ San Antonio 35 24 .593 10 New Orleans 31 26 .544 13 Memphis 18 38 .321 25 Dallas 18 40 .310 26 Northwest Division W L PCT. GB Minnesota 36 25 .590 „ Oklahoma City 33 26 .559 2 Denver 32 26 .552 2 Portland 32 26 .552 2 Utah 30 28 .517 4 Paci“ c Division W L PCT. GBGolden State 44 14 .759 „ L.A. Clippers 30 26 .536 13 L.A. Lakers 23 34 .404 20 Sacramento 18 39 .316 25 Phoenix 18 41 .305 26Thursdays GamesCharlotte 111, Brooklyn 96 New York 120, Orlando 113 Philadelphia 116, Chicago 115 Washington 110, Cleveland 103 Oklahoma City at Sacramento, late L.A. Clippers at Golden State, lateTodays GamesAtlanta at Indiana, 6 p.m. Boston at Detroit, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Washington, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Cleveland at Memphis, 7 p.m. Miami at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.Saturdays GamesOrlando at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Boston at New York, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 8 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 9 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL MENS BASKETBALL THE AP TOP 25 RESULTSWednesdays GamesNo. 1 Virginia 65, Georgia Tech 54 No. 3 Villanova 93, DePaul 62 No. 4 Xavier 89, Georgetown 77 No. 5 Duke 82, Louisville 56 Oklahoma State 79, No. 6 Texas Tech 71 No. 10 North Carolina 78, Syracuse 74 No. 12 Auburn 90, Alabama 71 No. 13 Wichita State 93, Tulane 86 Virginia Tech 65, No. 15 Clemson 58 No. 17 Michigan 72, Penn State 63 No. 19 Tennessee 62, Florida 57 No. 20 Nevada 80, San Jose State 67Thursdays GamesNo. 6 Gonzaga at San Diego, late No. 9 Purdue 93, Illinois 86 No. 11 Cincinnati 77, UConn 52 No. 14 Arizona at Oregon State, late No. 22 Saint Marys vs. Pepperdine, late No. 23 Houston at Memphis, lateTHURSDAYS RESULTSEASTDrexel 85, Delaware 83 LIU Brooklyn 81, St. Francis Brooklyn 76 Monmouth (NJ) 91, Rider 77 Mount St. Marys 72, Robert Morris 53 Northeastern 80, Towson 75 Sacred Heart 94, Bryant 84 St. Francis (Pa.) 90, Fairleigh Dickinson 82 Wagner 64, CCSU 62SOUTHCharleston Southern 72, Campbell 68 Coll. of Charleston 79, Elon 58 E. Kentucky 91, SE Missouri 88 FIU 69, North Texas 68 Florida Gulf Coast 76, Stetson 60 Gardner-Webb 78, Presbyterian 63 High Point 75, Longwood 56 Hofstra 77, James Madison 61 Jacksonville 86, North Florida 81 Jacksonville St. 78, Belmont 67 Lipscomb 83, Kennesaw St. 74 Louisiana-Lafayette 81, Troy 76 Louisiana-Monroe 66, South Alabama 62 Morehead St. 70, UT Martin 53 NJIT 76, SC-Upstate 67 Old Dominion 84, Marshall 79 Radford 63, Liberty 50 Rice 79, FAU 76, OT UNC-Asheville 89, Winthrop 75 W. Kentucky 93, Charlotte 55 William & Mary 96, UNC-Wilmington 83 Tennessee St. at Tennessee Tech, late Houston at Memphis, lateMIDWESTAustin Peay 86, SIU-Edwardsville 82 Cincinnati 77, UConn 52 Green Bay 96, Oakland 90 Milwaukee 72, Detroit 49 Murray St. 76, E. Illinois 66 Oral Roberts 83, Nebraska-Omaha 75 Purdue 93, Illinois 86 S. Dakota St. 76, South Dakota 72 UMKC 83, Rio Grande 59 W. Illinois 82, N. Dakota St. 74 Wisconsin 70, Northwestern 64SOUTHWESTArkansas St. 82, Appalachian St. 79, OT Coastal Carolina 65, UALR 60 Georgia St. 77, Texas State 50 Texas A&M-CC 76, Abilene Christian 67 Texas-Arlington 83, Georgia Southern 63 UTSA 64, Southern Miss. 56 Louisiana Tech at UTEP, lateFAR WESTN. Arizona 58, Sacramento St. 53 Portland St. at S. Utah, late E. Washington at Weber St., late Chicago St. at New Mexico St., late Seattle at Grand Canyon, late Arizona at Oregon St., late Idaho at Idaho St., late UCLA at Utah, late Gonzaga at San Diego, late Washington at Stanford, late Utah Valley at CS Bakers“ eld, late Pepperdine at Saint Marys (Cal), late Loyola Marymount at Santa Clara, late CS Northridge at Cal Poly, late San Francisco at Paci“ c, late UC Santa Barbara at UC Irvine, late Washington St. at California, late BYU at Portland, late Arizona St. at Oregon, lateWOMENS BASKETBALL THE AP TOP 25 RESULTSWednesdays GamesNo. 1 UConn 91, Tulane 47 No. 14 Ohio State 88, Northwestern 54 No. 18 South Florida 81, Houston 65 No. 23 Belmont 66, Jacksonville State 35 Kansas 66, No. 25 Oklahoma State 59Thursdays GamesNo. 2 Mississippi State 81, Auburn 61 No. 4 Louisville 51, Virginia 39 No. 5 Notre Dame 89, Virginia Tech 59 No. 7 South Carolina 57, No. 24 Louisiana St. 48 No. 9 Florida State 67, Boston College 39 No. 10 UCLA vs. Colorado, late No. 11 Missouri 83, Vanderbilt 68 Michigan 71, No. 13 Maryland 65 No. 15 Tennessee 70, Florida 42 No. 17 Texas A&M 104, Arkansas 60 No. 19 Georgia 49, Alabama 43, OT No. 21 N.C. State 77, Pittsburgh 66 PRO HOCKEY NHLEASTERN CONFERENCEAtlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 61 41 17 3 85 219 164 Boston 58 37 13 8 82 191 142 Toronto 63 38 20 5 81 209 175 Florida 58 27 25 6 60 169 188 Detroit 60 24 26 10 58 159 180 Montreal 60 23 29 8 54 154 189 Ottawa 60 21 29 10 52 163 211 Buffalo 61 18 32 11 47 146 200 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 61 34 20 7 75 189 183 Pittsburgh 61 35 22 4 74 195 180 Philadelphia 61 32 19 10 74 183 175 New Jersey 61 31 22 8 70 183 187 Columbus 61 30 26 5 65 160 172 N.Y. Islanders 62 29 26 7 65 206 223 Carolina 60 27 23 10 64 162 180 N.Y. Rangers 61 27 29 5 59 174 194 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Nashville 60 37 14 9 83 192 155 Winnipeg 60 35 16 9 79 199 161 Minnesota 60 33 20 7 73 181 171 Dallas 60 34 22 4 72 179 159 St. Louis 61 34 23 4 72 173 156 Colorado 59 32 23 4 68 184 177 Chicago 61 26 27 8 60 173 175 Paci“ c Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vegas 60 40 16 4 84 209 163 San Jose 61 33 20 8 74 179 170 Anaheim 62 31 20 11 73 171 170 Los Angeles 60 33 22 5 71 174 149 Calgary 61 30 22 9 69 172 182 Vancouver 60 23 30 7 53 161 194 Edmonton 59 24 31 4 52 164 194 Arizona 59 17 32 10 44 143 197 2 points for a win, 1 point for OT loss. Top three teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs.Thursdays GamesPhiladelphia 2, Columbus 1 Minnesota 4, New Jersey 2 Toronto 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO Florida 3, Washington 2 Buffalo 3, Detroit 2, OT Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Tampa Bay 4, Ottawa 3 Nashville 7, San Jose 1 Colorado at Edmonton, late Calgary at Arizona, late Dallas at Los Angeles, lateTodays GamesMinnesota at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Carolina, 6:30 p.m. Winnipeg at St. Louis, 7 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at Vegas, 9:30 p.m.Saturdays GamesPhiladelphia at Ottawa, 1 p.m. Colorado at Calgary, 3 p.m. Pittsburgh at Florida, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Dallas, 6 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Washington, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Arizona, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. GOLF PGA TOURTHE HONDA CLASSICThursdays leaders at PGA National, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Purse: $6.6 million. Yardage: 7,140; Par: 70 (35-35) First Round Alex Noren 31-35„66 Webb Simpson 32-34„66 Morgan Hoffmann 33-34„67 Justin Thomas 33-34„67 Daniel Berger 33-34„67 Mackenzie Hughes 30-37„67 Louis Oosthuizen 31-36„67 Dominic Bozzelli 35-33„68 Jamie Lovemark 37-31„68 Russell Henley 33-35„68 Ben Crane 32-36„68 Martin Piller 36-33„69 Jason Dufner 35-34„69 Nate Lashley 34-35„69 Thomas Pieters 32-37„69 J.B. Holmes 34-35„69 Chris Stroud 34-35„69 Rory Sabbatini 35-34„69 Keegan Bradley 34-35„69 Adam Schenk 34-35„69 Lucas Glover 35-35„70 Stewart Cink 33-37„70 Graeme McDowell 35-35„70 Rafa Cabrera Bello 35-35„70 Tiger Woods 36-34„70 Tommy Fleetwood 34-36„70 Talor Gooch 36-34„70 Tyler Duncan 32-38„70 Sam Burns 33-37„70 Scott Piercy 36-34„70 Byeong Hun An 34-36„70 Ryan Moore 35-35„70 Harold Varner III 32-38„70 Ben Martin 34-36„70 Corey Conners 37-33„70 Roberto Daz 36-35„71 Troy Merritt 34-37„71 Andrew Landry 34-37„71 Dylan Frittelli 35-36„71 Chris Kirk 35-36„71 Emiliano Grillo 34-37„71 Peter Malnati 35-36„71 Shane Lowry 35-36„71 Nick Watney 37-34„71 Chad Campbell 36-35„71 Luke List 34-37„71 John Huh 35-36„71 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 35-36„71 Harris English 34-37„71 William McGirt 36-35„71 Rickie Fowler 35-36„71 Michael Kim 35-36„71 C.T. Pan 33-38„71 Abraham Ancer 34-37„71 Keith Mitchell 35-36„71 Jim Furyk 36-36„72 Sergio Garcia 34-38„72 Robert Streb 36-36„72 Ollie Schniederjans 34-38„72 Jonathan Randolph 34-38„72 Scott Brown 34-38„72 Patrick Rodgers 38-34„72 Cody Gribble 35-37„72 Patrick Reed 35-37„72 Rory McIlroy 35-37„72 Grayson Murray 36-36„72 Tyrone Van Aswegen 38-34„72 Kelly Kraft 38-34„72 Peter Uihlein 36-37„73 Matt Every 36-37„73 Vaughn Taylor 36-37„73 Hudson Swafford 36-37„73 Gary Woodland 37-36„73 Scott Stallings 38-35„73 Martin Flores 36-37„73 Kevin Tway 34-39„73 Anirban Lahiri 36-37„73 Russell Knox 36-37„73 Brian Gay 37-36„73 Adam Scott 34-39„73 Derek Fathauer 35-38„73 Sung Kang 36-38„74 Ian Poulter 35-39„74 Ryan Blaum 36-38„74 Brian Harman 34-40„74 Tyrrell Hatton 36-38„74 Patton Kizzire 36-38„74 Brandt Snedeker 35-39„74 Blayne Barber 37-37„74 Sean OHair 33-41„74 Retief Goosen 35-39„74 Lanto Grif“ n 34-40„74 Joel Dahmen 35-39„74 Chesson Hadley 34-40„74 Ryan Palmer 39-35„74 Richy Werenski 35-39„74 Billy Horschel 37-37„74 Billy Hurley III 38-36„74 Greg Chalmers 36-38„74 Charles Howell III 35-39„74 Jhonattan Vegas 37-37„74 Alex Cejka 35-39„74 Shawn Stefani 40-34„74 Bronson Burgoon 36-38„74 Andrew Putnam 36-38„74 TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLAmerican LeagueBALTIMORE ORIOLES „ Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Tillman on a one-year contract. BOSTON RED SOX „ Traded OF Bryce Brentz to Pittsburgh for cash considerations. DETROIT TIGERS „ Agreed to terms with RHPs Sandy Baez, Michael Fulmer, Eduardo Jimenez, Joe Jimenez, Gerson Moreno, Zac Reininger, Warwick Saupold and Spencer Turnbull, LHPs Chad Bell, Matthew Boyd, Jairo Labourt, Gregory Soto and Daniel Stumpf, INFs Dawel Lugo and Dixon Machado and OFs Mike Gerber and JaCoby Jones on one-year contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS „ Named Mark Zarthar president of Fayetteville (Carolina). MINNESOTA TWINS „ Agreed to terms with RHP Anibal Sanchez on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS „ Traded DH Corey Dickerson to Pittsburgh for RHP Daniel Hudson, INF Tristan Gray and cash.American AssociationFARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS „ Traded RHP Carlos Pimentel to Cleburne for future considerations. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS „ Signed INF Nate Samson. Traded INF Tanner Vavra, INF Joel Davis and OF Jayce Ray to Sussex County (Can-Am) for INF Jay Baum. ST. PAUL SAINTS „ Signed INF Josh Allen.Atlantic LeagueLONG ISLAND DUCKS „ Signed RHP Dennis OGrady.Can-Am LeagueTROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES „ Signed RHP Yender Caramo.Frontier LeagueFLORENCE FREEDOM „ Signed 2B Angelo Gumbs. NORMAL CORNBELTERS „ Traded OF Nolan Meadows to New Jersey (Can-Am) for a player to be named. Signed INF Dan Kennon. TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS „ Signed C Jake Simpson.BASKETBALLNational Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS „ Signed G Antonius Cleveland to a 10-day contract.NBA G LeagueAGUA CALIENTE CLIPPERS „ Acquired 2018 “ rstand third-round draft picks, the returning player rights to F-C Micheal Eric and G Tu Holloway from Texas for F Cory Jefferson, a 2018 fourth-round draft pick and the returning player rights to G Cameron Ayers.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueINDIANAPOLIS COLTS „ Signed K Adam Vinatieri to a one-year contract extension.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueARIZONA C OYOTES „ Signed G Darcy Kuemper to a two-year contract. CAROLINA HURRICANES „ Recalled RW Josh Jooris from Charlotte (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS „ Assigned F Dylan Sadowy and D Patrick McCarron from Grand Rapids (AHL) to Toledo (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS „ Recalled G Jack Campbell from Ontario (AHL). Assigned F Michael Mersch and D Paul LaDue to Ontario. NEW YORK RANGERS „ Recalled F Vinni Lettieri from Hartford (AHL).American Hockey LeagueAHL „ Suspended Iowa D Hunter Warner one game for a kneeing incident in a game vs. Texas on Feb. 19. HARTFORD WOLF PACK „ Recalled F Dan DeSalvo from Tulsa (ECHL). Traded F Eric Selleck to Belleville for future considerations. SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE „ Recalled F Julien Nantel and D Nolan De Jong from Colorado (ECHL).SOCCERMajor League SoccerATLANTA UNITED „ Signed MF Oliver Shannon. COLORADO RAPIDS „ Signed F Niki Jackson to a one year contract. FC DALLAS „ Signed G Kyle Zobeck. LOS ANGELES FC „ Signed D Tristan Blackmon. MINNESOTA UNITED „ Acquired MF Luiz Fernando on loan from Fluminense FC (Brazil) for the 2018 season. NEW YORK RED BULLS „ Named Carlo Acquista assistant scout. SPORTING KANSAS CITY „ Signed D/MF Brad Evans to a one-year contract.COLLEGESALABAMA „ Promoted Mike Locksley to offensive coordinator and Josh Tupoi to defensive coordinator. Named Dan Enos quarterbacks coach and Craig Kuligowski defensive line coach. RUTGERS „ Named Noah Joseph co-defensive coordinator and safeties coach and Cory Robinston cornerbacks coach and pass game coordinator. WINTER OLYMPICS THURSDAYS RESULTSALPINE SKIING Mens Slalom Final Ranking(Run 1; Run 2 in parentheses) 1. Andre Myhrer, Sweden (2, 47.93; 8, 51.06), 1:38.99. 2. Ramon Zenhausern, Switzerland (9, 48.66; 2, 50.67), 1:39.33. 3. Michael Matt, Austria (12, 49.00; 1, 50.66), 1:39.66.U.S. Finishers18. David Chodounsky, (17, 49.43; 14,, 51.41) 1:40.84. 31. Mark Engel, (43, 56.18; 27, 53.13), 1:49.31. NR. Nolan Kasper, (34, 52.44; DNF), DNF.Womens Combined Final Ranking(Downhill; Slalom in parentheses) 1. Michelle Gisin, Switzerland, (3, 1:40.14; 4, 40.76) 2:20.90. 2. Mikaela Shiffrin, United States, (6, 1:41.35; 3, 40.52) 2:21.87. 3. Wendy Holdener, Switzerland, (10, 1:42.11; 1, 40.23) 2:22.34.Other U.S. Finishers15. Alice Merryweather, (18, 1:43.17; 16, 43.73) 2:26.90. NR. Lindsey Vonn, United States, (1, 1:39.37; DNF). BIATHLON Womens 4x6km Relay1. Belarus (Nadezhda Skardino, Darya Domracheva, Iryna Kryuko, Dzinara Alimbekava), 1:12:03.4 (0+9). 2. Sweden (Mona Brorsson, Anna Magnusson, Linn Persson, Hanna Oeberg), 1:12:14.1 (0+12). 3. France (Anais Bescond, Marie Dorin Habert, Anais Chevalier, Justine Braisaz), 1:12:21.0 (0+14). 13. United States (Susan Dunklee, Clare Egan, Joanne Reid, Emily Dreissigacker), 1:14:05.3 (1+10). FREESTYLE SKIING Mens Halfpipe Final Ranking1. David Wise, United States (17.0; 6.4; 97.2), 97.2. 2. Alex Ferreira, United States (92.6; 96.0; 96.4), 96.4. 3. Nico Porteous, New Zealand (82.4; 94.8; 30.0), 94.8. 7. Aaron Blunck, United States (81.4; 5.6; 84.8), 84.8. 9. Torin Yater-Wallace, United States (65.2; 28.8; 12.2), 65.2. NORDIC COMBINED Team (Large Hill) Final Ranking(K120 Jump; 4X5km Race in parentheses) 1. Germany (Eric Frenzel, Johannes Rydzek, Fabian Riessle, Vinzenz Geiger), (2, 464.70; 1, 46:03.8), 46:09.8. 2. Norway (Jan Schmid, Joergen Graabak, Espen Andersen, Jarl Magnus Riiber), (4, 449.20; 2, 46:35.5), 47:02.5. 3. Austria (Wilhelm Deni” Bernhard Gruber, Lukas Klapfer, Mario Seidl), (1, 469.50; 3, 47:17.6), 47:17.6. 10. United States (Bryan Fletcher, Talyor Fletscher, Ben Berend, Ben Loomis), (9, 324.80; 10, 48:13.5), 51:26.5. SHORT TRACK SPEEDSKATING Mens 500Final B1. United States (John Robert Celski, John-Henry Krueger, Thomas Hong, Aaron Tran), 6:52.708. 2. Kazakhstan (Nurbergen Zhumagaziyev, Denis Nikisha, Yerkebulan Shamukhanov, Abzal Azhgaliyev), 6:52.791. 3. Japan (Ryosuke Sakazume, Kazuki Yoshinaga, Hiroki Yokoyama, Keita Watanabe), 7:02.554.Final A1. Hungary (Viktor Knoch, Shaolin Sandor Liu, Shaoang Liu, Csaba Burjan), 6:31.971. 2. China (Wu Dajing, Han Tianyu, Chen Dequan, Xu Hongzhi), 6:32.035. 3. Canada (Charles Hamelin, Pascal Dion, Samuel Girard, Charle Cournoyer), 6:32.282. 4. South Korea (Kim Dokyoum, Lim Hyojun, Kwak Yoongy, Seo Yira), 6:42.118.Womens 1000 Final A1. Suzanne Schulting, Netherlands, 1:29.778. 2. Kim Boutin, Canada, 1:29.956. 3. Arianna Fontana, Italy, 1:30.656. 4. Choi Minjeong, South Korea, 1:42.434. NR. Shim Sukhee, South Korea, PEN. SNOWBOARD Womens Big Air(Start position in parentheses)Final Ranking1. (12) Anna Gasser, Austria, (JNS; 89.0; 96.0), 185.0. 2. (7) Jamie Anderson, United States, (90.0; 87.25; JNS), 177.25. 3. (8) Zoi Sadowski Synnott, New Zealand, (65.5; 92.0; JNS), 157.5. 10. (4) Julia Marino, United States, (JNS; 74.5; 18.75), 93.25. 11. (1) Jessika Jenson, United States, (JNS; 21.5; 19.0), 40.5.WOMENS ICE HOCKEYThursday, Feb. 22 At Gangneung Hockey CentreBronze Medal: Finland 3, OA Russia 2 Gold Medal: United States 3, Canada 2, SOLATE WEDNESDAY UNITED STATES 3, CANADA 2, SOCANADA 0 2 0 0 „ 2 UNITED STATES 1 0 1 0 „ 2United States wins shootout 3-2 First Period„1, United States, Marie-Philip Poulin (Meghan Agosta, Melodie Daoust), 19:34. Penalties„Jennifer Wake“ eld, Can (illegal hit), 9:35; Jocelyne LaRocque, Can (interference), 13:18; Sarah Nurse, Can (interference), 18:26. Second Period„2, Canada, Haley Irwin (Blayre Turnbull), 2:00. 3, Canada, Marie-Philip Poulin (Meghan Agosta, Melodie Daoust), 6:55. Penalties„ Marie-Philip Poulin, Can (tripping), 2:18; Sidney Morin, USA (illegal hit), 32:00; Melodie Daoust, Can (slashing), 15:13; Monique Lamoureux-Morando, USA (boarding), 17:58. Third Period„4, United States, Monique Lamoureux-Morando (Kelly Pannek), 13:39. Penalties„Emily Clark, Can (tripping), 15:49. Overtime„No scoring. Penalties„Megan Keller, USA (illegal hit), 18:25. Shootout„United States 3 (Gigi Marvin G, Hannah Brandt NG, Emily Pfalzer NG, Amanda Kessel G, Hilary Knight NG, Jocelyne LamoureuxDavidson G); Canada 2 (Natalie Spooner NG, Meghan Agosta G, Marie-Philip Poulin NG, Melodie Daoust G, Brianne Jenner NG, Meghan Agosta NG). Shots on Goal„Canada 7-9-8-7-0-31. United States 10-12-10-9-1-42. Goalies„Canada, Shannon Szabados. United States, Maddie Rooney. Referees„Nicole Hertrich, Germany; Katarina Timglas, Sweden; Lisa Linnek, Germany; Johanna Tauriainen, Finland. SCOREBOARD ON THE AIR AREA EVENTS Softball Bozeman at Mosley 6 p.m. Track and “ eld Bozeman Invitational 10 a.m. Baseball Mosley at Rutherford 6:30 p.m. South Walton at North Bay Haven 6 p.m. Tennis Arnold at North Bay Haven 3:30 p.m. Boys weightlifting Arnold 3:30 p.m. Wrestling Region 1-1A meet at Jacksonville Bolles Today AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500, practice, at Hampton, Ga. Noon FS1 „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Rinnai 250, practice, at Hampton, Ga. 1 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, Active Pest Control 200, practice, at Hampton, Ga. 2 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Rinnai 250, “ nal practice, at Hampton, Ga. 3 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, Active Pest Control 200, “ nal practice, at Hampton, Ga. 4 p.m. FS1 „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500, qualifying, at Hampton, Ga. BASKETBALL 10 p.m. ESPNU „ FIBA 2019 World Cup, Americas quali“ ers, Cuba vs. United States, at Santa Cruz, Calif. COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. CBSSN „ Cent. Michigan at Toledo 6 p.m. ESPN2 „ Dayton at Rhode Island ESPNU „ Harvard at Princeton 7 p.m. FS1 „ Ohio St. at Indiana 8 p.m. ESPN2 „ W. Michigan at Ball St. ESPNU „ Manhattan at Iona DRAG RACING 6 p.m. FS1 „ NHRA, Arizona Nationals, qualifying, at Chandler, Ariz. GOLF 4 a.m. GOLF „ European PGA Tour, Commercial Bank Qatar Masters, second round, at Doha, Qatar (same-day tape) 1 p.m. GOLF „ PGA Tour, Honda Classic, second round, at Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Midnight (Saturday) GOLF „ LPGA Tour, Honda LPGA Thailand, third round, at Chonburi, Thailand MLB Noon MLB „ Spring training, Washington vs. Houston, at Palm Beach, Fla. NBA 7 p.m. ESPN „ Minnesota at Houston 9:30 p.m. ESPN „ Dallas at L.A. Lakers SOCCER 1:30 p.m. FS2 „ Bundesliga, Mainz vs. Wolfsburg WINTER OLYMPICS 4 a.m. NBCSN Speed Skating: Men's 1,000m Gold Medal Final (LIVE) OLY CHANNEL Medal Ceremonies (LIVE) 5:30 a.m. NBCSN Men's Hockey: Semi“ nal (LIVE) 8:30 a.m. NBCSN Men's Curling: Bronze Medal Match 11:30 a.m. NBCSN „ Women's Curling: Semi“ nal; Medal Ceremonies 2 p.m. NBC „ Biathlon: Men's 47.5km Relay Gold Medal Final 3 p.m. NBCSN „ Hockey Game of the Day (replay); Hockey Game of the Day II (replay); Olympic Ice 4 p.m. CNBC „ Curling: Women's Semi“ nal 7 p.m. NBC „ Alpine Skiing: Team Event Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Snowboarding: Men's Big Air Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Four-Man Bobsled: Competition; Speed Skating: Men's 1000m Gold Medal Final NBCSN „ Biathlon: Men's 47.5km Relay Gold Medal Final; Women's Curling: Semi“ nal (replay) 10:35 p.m. NBC „ Snowboarding: Men's & Women's Parallel Giant Slalom competition 11 p.m. NBCSN „ Cross Country: Men's 50km Gold Medal Final (LIVE) 2 a.m. (Saturday) NBCSN „ Curling: Men's Gold Medal Final The Associated PressTALLAHASSEE „ Nicki Ekhomu scored nine of her 17 points in the third quarter, and No. 9 Florida State beat Boston College 67-39 on Thursday night.The Seminoles grabbed control by outscoring the Eagles 22-7 in the third quarter. The score was tied at 29 when Florida State pulled away with a 16-1 run, which included seven points by Ekhomu. The sophomore has scored in double figures in four of the past five games.Imani Wright scored 12 points while Shakayla Thomas and AJ Alix added 11 apiece for Florida State (23-5, 11-4 Atlantic Coast Conference), which led by as many as 29 in the fourth quarter. Alix also had a career-high 11 rebounds.Andie Anastos led Boston College (7-21, 2-13) with nine points. The Eagles have dropped 12 of 13.Boston College scored the first nine points of the game on three 3-pointers before Florida State countered by scoring the next 14. The Seminoles were up 20-13 with 7:41 remain-ing in the second quarter when the Eagles closed out the half with a 14-5 run.No. 9 FSU women blow out Boston College 6739

PAGE 23

** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 C5The Americans piled over the boards, throwing gloves in the air before piling on top of Rooney on the ice „ 20 years after their last gold medal in womens hockey and 38 years to the day after the mens famous Miracle on IceŽ vic-tory over the Soviet team in group play at Lake Placid.Joys the only word that comes to mind,Ž said Gigi Marvin, a three-time Olympian and at 30 the oldest American on the roster.This victory capped a year that started with the Americans threatening a boycott of the world championships to secure more money and the same kind of treatment that USA Hockey gives to the mens team.They should make a movie on it,Ž forward Hilary Knight said. We had all the drama and everything. Its sort of a storybook ending to an incredible series of accomplishments.ŽNothing was more incredible than the move by Lamoureux-Davidson, who decided to use the deke called Oops, I did it again  „ something she had practiced uncounted times in practice, skating around tires set up on open ice to mimic defenders.Im just thrilled beyond words,Ž the beaming Lamou-reux-Davidson said with a U.S. flag draped around her shoulders and gold hanging on her chest. Ive butchered it a thousand times, just ran into tires, tripped over tires just working on my hands. Just glad it worked out this time.ŽHer twin, Monique Lamou-reux-Morando said coach Peter Elander, now at Ohio State, had taught the sisters the shootout move when the three were at the University of North Dakota.Not everyone can take the pressure like that, and she took it like a champ,Ž she said.Marvin and Amanda Kessel also scored in the shootout, another nail-biter ending four years after Canada won its fourth-straight gold medal in Sochi after rallying to stun the Americans in overtime.Knight gave the U.S. a 1-0 lead with 25.4 seconds left in the first, redirecting a shot from Sidney Morin through Szabados pads to give the Americans a jolt of energy.That lasted only 2 minutes into the second when Haley Irwin tipped a midair pass from Blayre Turnbull over Rooneys left leg for Canada. And when Morin lost the puck, Melodie Daoust grabbed it and passed to Meghan Agosta who hit Marie-Philip Poulin for the wrister into the left side of the net at 6:55 for a 2-1 lead. Lamoureux-Morando tied it up with a breakaway with 6:21 left in regulation. Knight also had a goal and Rooney was spectacular, making 29 saves for the win. Rooney stopped the last two Canadian shooters in the shootout in Brianne Jenner and then Agosta on her second attempt. HOCKEYContinued from C1 WINTER OLYMPICS AROUNDUPOFTHURSDAYSHIGHLIGHTS///LOOKINGAHEADTOFRIDAYWhat towatch fortoday SPEEDSKATING Mens1000m. Thisshouldbe the“nalOlympicraceofShani Davisdecoratedcareer.Hewon the1000min2006and2010and then“nishedeighthaspartofa disastrousU.S.speedskatingshowinginSochi. ALPINESKIING Teamevent. MakingitsOlympic debut.Sixteencountrieswith fourskierseach(twomen,two women)competeinhead-toheadslalomracingwithnations advancinginabracketsystem. HOCKEY Menssemi“nals. Will Germanyssurprisingrun continue?Theymeettheirmost formidablefoeyet,takingon Canadainanearlymorning battle. ROUNDUPCURLING JohnShusterandhisU.S.team willplayforagoldmedal againstSwedenaftera5-3 semi“nalupsetoverCanada, acountrythathasstruggled atthePyeongchangOlympics despitedominatingtheworldof curlingforyears.TheU.S.victoryThursdaywasaremarkable comebackstoryforteamwhich hadneverbeatenCanadaat theOlympicsandhadntmade thepodiumsincethe2006Turin Games,whentheywonabronze medal.Justasremarkablewas thelossforCanada,whichhas wonthegoldinmenscurling atthelastthreeWinterOlympics.TheCanadianwomens team,meanwhile,didnteven makethesemi“nals,despite beingthedefendingworld champions.TheWorldCurling Federationsaysitsupportsa decisiontostripaRussiancurler ofhisOlympicmedalafterhe admittedtoadopingviolation atthePyeongchangGames. Thecurlingfederationsaid inastatementThursdaythat theviolationinvolvingRussian curlerAlexanderKrushelnitsky hascastashadowoverour sport.ŽTheCourtofArbitration forSportannouncedearlier ThursdaythatKrushelnitsky wouldbestrippedofhismedal aftertestingpositiveforthe bannedsubstancemeldonium. BIATHLON DaryaDomrachevahasled Belarustoagoldmedalinthe womens4x6-kilometerrelay atthePyeongchangGames. Domrachevawonthreegold medalsatthe2014Sochi Games,butthiswasher“rst atPyeongchang.Sheteamed withNadezhdaSkardino,Iryna KryokoandDzinaraAlimbekava towintheracein1hour,12 minutes,3.4secondsThursday. Swedenbattledbackfroman earlyde“cittotakethesilver, andFranceclaimedthebronze. Biathleteshadatoughtimeon theshootingrangeasheavy windspickedup,andsnowfell earlyonintherace. SPEEDSKATING Hungaryisthesurprisewinner ofthemens5,000-meterrelay inthelasteventofshorttrackspeedskatingatthe PyeongchangOlympics.Liu ShaolinSandortookthelead withonelaptogoand“nished inanOlympic-recordtimeof 6minutes,31.971seconds.Liu skatedwithhisyoungerbrother, LiuShaoang,alongwithViktor KnochandCsabaBurjan.TheLiu brothershaveaChinesefather andHungarianmother.Itwas Hungarys“rstOlympicmedal inshort-trackandthenations “rstofthePyeongchangGames. ChinaearnedsilverandCanada tookbronze. SNOWBOARDING AustriasAnnaGasserstomped acabdouble10Ž„basically, two”ipsandthreefullrotations „inher“naljumptoslippast AmericanstarJamieAnderson toclaimtheOlympicdebutof womensBigAir.Gassersscore of96wasthehighestoftheday andboostedhertwo-jumptotal to185.00,providingameasure ofredemptionafteradisappointing15th-place“nishduring thewind-marredslopestyle“nal lastweek.Andersonthrewdown a1080andacab900tolead throughtwojumpsbutovershot thelandingabitwhiletryingto nailacab10onherthird.That leftanopeningthatGasser,who earnedtherighttogolastafter toppingqualifyingonTuesday, sprintedthrough.TheAssociatedPress THURSDAYSSPOTLIGHT MEDALCOUNTThroughFeb.22 CountryGSBT Norway13121035 Canada108826 Germany137525 UnitedStates87621 Netherlands76417 France54615 Austria52613 Switzerland36312 OARussia04812 SouthKorea44311 Japan35311 Sweden55010 Italy32510 China1629 CzechRepublic1236 Britain1034 Finland0044 Belarus2103 Slovakia1203 Australia0213 Poland1012 NewZealand0022 Spain0022 Hungary1001 Ukraine1001 Slovenia0101 Kazakhstan0011 Latvia0011 Liechtenstein0011GAMESFACESVonnscattersgrandfathers ashesneardownhillcourse LindseyVonncametoSouthKorea withthegoaloftakinghomean Olympicmedalandleavingsomethingevenmorespecialbehind. Shedidboth.TheAmericanski greatsaidThursdaysherecently scatteredsomeoftheashesofher grandfather,whoservedduring theKoreanWar,onarocknear themountainwherethedownhill raceswererun.Iknowthatit wouldmeanalottohimtobe backhere,apartofhimisinSouth Koreaalways,ŽsaidVonn,who sharedherstorywithTheAssociatedPressandtheChosunIlbo newspaper.Vonnsaidshesprayed partsofDonKildowsashesjust afewdaysagoŽonarockthatshe wastoldwasspecialwhenshe visitedSouthKorealastyeartobe namedaPyeongchangOlympic ambassador.Shedescribedthe locationasrightbythemens downhillstart.ŽVonnburstinto tearswhenshewasaskedabout hergrandfatherduringanews conferenceinPyeongchangthis monthbeforetheOlympics.He diedinNovember.Imisshimso much,Žshesaid.Hesbeensucha bigpartofmylife.AndIreallyhad hopedthathewouldbealivetosee me(atthisyearsOlympics).But Iknowheswatching,andIknow thathesgoingtohelpmeandIm goingtowinforhim.ŽVonnwona bronzemedalinthedownhill,but skiedoutofThursdaysslalomleg oftheAlpinecombinedinwhat waslikelyherlastOlympicrace. Laterintheday,agroupofelderly SouthKoreanmengaveherfamily somegiftsandaletterofthanks tomarkhergrandfathersservice duringthe1950-53KoreanWar. Tobeabletoraceforhiminthese Olympicswasveryspecialforme. AndItriedeverythingIcouldto winforhim,ŽVonnsaid.Igota bronze,which,youknow,tome wasveryspecial.AndIthinkhe wouldbeproudofthat.ŽTheAssociatedPress WithSchultingsgold, Dutchprovetheyregood atshorttrack,tooByRafCasertTheAssociatedPressGANGNEUNG,SouthKorea„Science,method,investment,sheerdetermination „theDutchsetupashorttrackprogramfromscratchadozenyearsagointhehopeof b ranchingoutitsgoldmedal incomefromlong-trackspeedskating.Frustratingly,theirprogramhadnoOlympictitletoshowforit„untilnow.Andinsteadofscience,itwasawomanknownasBouncing BallŽthatthrewallthatmethodologyoutthewindow.AfteranuglystarttothePyeongchangGames,SuzanneSchultingsurprisinglyskated intothesemifinals,theninto Thursdaysfinal.Andthen,thegiddy20-year-oldDutch-womansurprisinglyreached thetopofthepodiumonthe lastdayoftheshort-trackprogram.Itsgold,ŽSchultingsaid.Thatscrazy.ŽBesidesher,DutchtechnicaldirectorArieKoopscouldntmaintainhisunflappablecoolandprettymuchwentout ofhishead,too.Finally,the programhesetupdelivered, howeverunlikelythebearerofgoldwas.A12-yearinvestmentnowpaysoff,ŽhetoldTheAssoci-atedPress.Attheendoftheshort-trackcompetition,theNetherlandswassecondtoonlySouthKoreainthemedalstandings.IntheOlympichistoryof thesport,theDutchonlyhadonebronzecomingintoSouthKorea,andnowintwoweeks ithasgold,twosilversanda bronze.Onlythehostnationdidbetterwiththreegold,one silverandtwobronze.AndKoopsambitiontoexpandbeyondlongtracknowhastheDutchinfifthplaceoverallinthemedalstandingswithsevengoldand17overall.NowondertheGangneung IceAreawasahappymess oforangecolors.AndwhataturnaroundforSchulting.Justafewdaysago,she wasaheapmiseryafterher firstOlympicshadyielded nothingbutmishapandearlyelimination.ThingschangedonTuesday.TheDutchrelayteam hadfailedinthesemifinals, butintheirBfinal,theyseta worldrecord.Andtheninanunprecedentedturnofeventsintherelayfinal,twoteamsweredisqualifiedandsuddenlySchultingandherteammateshadbronze. Short(track)andsweet Schultingcelebratesafterwinningthewomens1000meters shorttrackspeedskatingA“nalonThursday.[DAVIDJ.PHILLIP/THE ASSOCIATEDPRESS]SuzanneSchultingoftheNetherlandsreactsasshecrossesthe“nishlineaheadofChoiMinjeongof SouthKoreaduringherwomens1000metersshorttrackspeedskatingsemi“nalintheGangneungIce ArenaattheWinterOlympicsThursdayinGangneung,SouthKorea.[JULIEJACOBSON/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS]

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** C6 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFCOLORADO SPRINGS, COLO.USA Swimming chief: No tolerance for sex abuseThe new head of USA Swimming has sent a letter to members of the national governing body saying the organization doesnt tolerate sexual abuse or misconduct.The letter signed by president and CEO Tim Hinchey went out to member clubs and indi-viduals Thursday.Let me be clear: USA Swimming does not tolerate sexual abuse or misconduct, and I assure you that this organization is facing this extremely serious issue with one very clear goal „ protect-ing children and athletes,Ž he wrote.This month, former Olympian and world champion swimmer Ariana Kukors alleged publicly that her former coach Sean Hutchison sexually abused her for a decade starting when she was a minor. Hutchison has denied the allegations. He acknowledged they were in a relationship after the 2012 Olympics, when she was 23 and he was 41.We will not shy away from acknowledging or supporting sur vivors of abuse, and we will strive to ensure that there is never a lapse of a support system again,Ž Hinchey said in the letter.EAST LANSING, MICH.Michigan States interim president to donate salaryFormer Michigan Gov. John Engler will donate his salary while serving as Michigan State Universitys interim president amid fallout over a now-imprisoned sports doctor who sexually assaulted female athletes.The universitys Board of Trustees said Wednes-day that Englers annual salary will be $510,399. His contract was final-ized this week, but he agreed his salary would go back to the school in East Lansing.His predecessor, Lou Anna Simon, resigned in January amid criticism of the universitys handling of issues related to Larry Nassar.The former doctor worked for Michigan State and USA. Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. More than 250 women and girls gave statements in court about how Nassar abused them under the guise of medi-cal treatment. He was sentenced to decades in prison.Michigan State plans to find a permanent replace-ment for Simon. ESPN adds Herbstreit to NFL draft coverageKirk Herbstreit will take Jon Grudens place on ESPNs coverage of the NFL draft.ESPN announced Thursday that Herbstreit will be part the open-ing night coverage of the first round in prime time on April 26 at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Herbstreit will be joined by host Trey Wingo, draft analyst Mel Kiper and NFL analyst Louis Riddick.Rounds two and three are April 27, and rounds four through seven are April 28. The Associated Press United States skier Lindsey Vonn, center, smiles as she receives gifts and a letter of appreciation for her grandfathers servi ce during the Korean War on Thursday from members of the Yongsan Club in Jeongseon, South Korea. [FELIPE DANA/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Vonn carried memory of her grandfather, a Korean War vet, with her during OlympicsBy Hyung-Jin KimThe Associated PressJEONGSEON, South Korea „ Lindsey Vonn came to South Korea with the goal of taking home an Olympic medal and leaving some-thing even more special behind. She did both.The American ski great said Thursday she recently scattered some of the ashes of her grandfa-ther, who served during the Korean War, on a rock near the mountain where the downhill races were run.I know that it would mean a lot to him to be back here, a part of him is in South Korea always,Ž said Vonn, who shared her story with The Associated Press and the Chosun Ilbo newspaper.Vonn said she sprayed parts of Don Kildows ashes just a few days agoŽ on a rock that she was told was special when she visited South Korea last year to be named a Pyeongchang Olympic ambas-sador. She described the location as right by the mens downhill start.ŽVonn burst into tears when she was asked about her grandfather during a news conference in Pyeongchang this month before the Olympics. He lived in Milton, Wisconsin, and died in November.I miss him so much,Ž she said. Hes been such a big part of my life. And I really had hoped that he would be alive to see me (at this years Olympics). But I know hes watching, and I know that hes going to help me and Im going to win for him.ŽVonn won a bronze medal in the downhill, but skied out of Thurs-days slalom leg of the Alpine combined in what was likely her last Olympic race. Later in the day, a group of elderly South Korean men gave her family some gifts and a letter of thanks to mark her grandfathers service during the 1950-53 Korean War.To be able to race for him in these Olympics was very special for me. And I tried everything I could to win for him,Ž Vonn said. I got a bronze, which, you know, to me was very special. And I think he would be proud of that.ŽDuring Thursdays brief meeting with seven elderly South Korean men, Vonn nodded a greeting several times and repeated thank you so muchŽ to them. In their letter of appreciation, the South Korean men said they expressed their thanks for what they call her grandfathers contribution for the freedom of South Korea. They also gave her traditional Korean fashion accessories and gloves.Kildow served two years in South Korea in the Army Corps of Engineers in areas near Jeongseon, one of the three Olympic venues. He never had a chance to return to South Korea, but he had talked about the country in a very favorableŽ way, according to his son, Alan Kildow, who attended Thursdays event with his two other daughters.Alan Kildow broke into tears Thursday while talking about his fathers memories of South Korea during the war. He said he separately scattered parts of his fathers ashes in the country. After the Olympics, Vonn plans to go home to get ready for the World Cup finals. She said shes enjoying the last remaining days of the OlympicsŽ with her family.At the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, Vonn won gold in the downhill and bronze in the super-G. She missed the 2014 Sochi Games because of injury.The elderly South Koreans are from a fraternal society in Seoul called Yongsan Club, named after a neighborhood in the capital where the U.S. military command is headquartered.About 37,000 U.S. troops were killed during the war, which ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty, technically leaving the Korean Peninsula in a state of war. The United States still stations about 28,000 sol-diers in South Korea to deter potential aggression from North Korea.Its military presence and cultural influence have been a long-running source of antiAmerican sentiments among many South Koreans who want greater foot ing in relations with Washington.He would be proudBy Brian MahoneyThe Associated PressThe Golden State Warriors have never lost more than 15 games in a season under Steve Kerr.They could reach that total in the first night after the All-Star break.The Warriors who return Thursday night arent the same ones who dominated the NBA for the last three seasons. The defending champions sputtered into their week off with four losses in their final eight games, falling into second place in the Western Confer-ence behind Houston „ ending a three-year run of taking the leagues best record into the break.At 44-14 and loaded with four All-Stars, the Warriors are still very good, but not as good theyve been.This year weve had a pretty solid season, but feel that we can play a lot better,Ž Stephen Curry said. So thats what were trying to do this next 20 games before another champi-onship run.ŽTheir performances against their first two opponents out of the break show how differ-ent things have been for these Warriors. The Los Angeles Clippers, who visit Golden State on Thursday, won in Oakland last month after losing the previous 12 meetings in the series.Some other things to watch in the second half: Race to the bottomWhile the NBA fined Dallas owner Mark Cuban $600,000 on Wednesday for his public comments about tanking, the Mavericks have plenty of company near the bottom of the standings. Phoenix has lost seven straight to share the worst record in the league with Atlanta at 18-41, and six other teams, including the Mavs, have 20 or fewer victories. The team who finishes last has the best chance to win the draft lottery, though if its Brooklyn (19-40), that makes a winner out of Cleveland, which has the Nets pick that belonged to Boston after acquiring it in the Kyrie Irving trade. Dominant DavisAnthony Davis scored 44, 38 and 42 points in his last three games before the All-Star break, leading New Orleans to victories in all of them. He leads the league with 22 games of 30 points or more and the Pelicans might need him to keep it up, as they are just a half-game ahead of the Clippers for the final playoff spot in the Western Conference. Men of mysteryTwo of the NBAs strange absences could be cleared up after the break „ or could last through the rest of the season. Spurs star Kawhi Leonard con-tinues to rehabilitate a right thigh injury and coach Gregg Popovich said Wednesday that he would be surprised if Leonard returned this season. How late do you bring somebody back? Thats why Im just trying to be honest and logical,Ž Popovich said. Philadelphia guard Markelle Fultz, the No. 1 draft pick, remains sidelined with a right shoulder injury after play-ing in just four games. Neither player has been ruled out for the season, though theres not much time left if theyre going to come back.Will Warriors dominance return in second half?This year weve had a pretty solid season, but feel that we can play a lot better,Ž said Golden State guard Stephen Curry. So thats what were trying to do this next 20 games before another championship run.Ž [MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] I know that it would mean a lot to him to be back here, a part of him is in South Korea always.ŽU.S. skier Lindsey Vonn, on her grandfather

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** The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 C7 DIVERSIONSARIES (March 21-April 19) „ For the versatile singer who is great at doing impressions, the most challenging song is the one sung in his own voice. Today youll be challenged to deliver like only you can „ to sing your song in your voice. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ Why not just believe that youre lucky? Someones going to “ nd that money on the ground. It may as well be you. Youre looking out for it ... and for all the metaphorical representations in which money on the ground can come. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ Youre not a daredevil exactly, but youre still a risk taker, especially in nonphysical areas of life. The bold move youre considering is pretty audacious, even for you. Position yourself well “ rst. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ First impressions will be important today. All future interactions will be colored by someones initial response to you -but, hey, no pressure! As long as you dress the part and put away your phone, youll be ahead of the game. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ To learn about the world, babies observe the design, behavior, purpose and effect that things have. Then they make an association and record it as fact ... but that doesnt make it true. Its a case study. Most of life is just a case study. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ Boredom is a fun killer. Yes, theres always something more interesting about the situation if you can break free from the old frame. But life is much simpler if youre already somewhat fascinated by your subject. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ A friend who knows you well enough to sense when youre hiding something ... now thats a treasure! There are cons to it, of course, but they are not as important as being truly seen and understood. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ Eventually, youll have the experience and wisdom to run things, but for now youre better off coming up with ideas from the naive position in which you happen to be. Strikingly bold insights come to you because youre free of in” uence. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ That feeling of familiarity upon meeting someone for the “ rst time takes many forms. Instant love: (SET ITAL) Where have you been all my life? Instant kinship: Its like youve been here all my life. (END ITAL) Instant boredom: (SET ITAL) Oh. You again. (END ITAL) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ Youre usually so ambitious, but right now you may not want to commit to business, or even to a hobby. Why should you? Isnt it enough to just have interests? You can have so many at once. And interests are totally free. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ Its a pain to have to pretend or fake a story to spare someones feelings. Youll do it if you have to, because its kind (though youll avoid the dynamic completely by being around people with whom you can be honest). PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ Youll be met with resistance, but dont let this deter you. All you have to do is raise your energy a few points -the resistance will back down, and the road will be clear.HOROSCOPES Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@ TriviaGuy.com 1. Hypapist, khopesh, shotel and madu were among the names of ancient ...? Medicines, Languages, Weapons, Tombs 2. Which branch of the service is home to the helicopters Blue KnightsŽ? Army, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard 3. From older TVs Beverly Hillbillies,Ž what was the last grade Jethro graduated? Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh 4. How old was George Washington when he became president? 52, 57, 61, 64 5. What country owns Easter Island in the South Pacific Ocean? England, Chile, Brazil, Denmark 6. What is H-3 in Hawaii? Motel, Volcano, Airport, Hig hway ANSWERS: 1. Weapons, 2. Marines, 3. Sixth, 4. 57, 5. Chile, 6. HighwayTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers tomorrow) MESSYDOUSE FLINCH EMBODY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: The company couldnt make a profit selling origami, so the „ BUSINESS FOLDED Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. RFOEF CYITH NIESUG CANUNE 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app Answer here: SUDOKUAnswer to yesterdays sudokuDEAR ABBY DEAR ABBY: I suffer from a debilitating, rare, chronic illness. Two years ago, my parents convinced me to move across the country to live with them in a city Ive never lived in. They promised it would be only for a year,Ž theyd pay the cost of moving and finance a year of wellness.Ž I was to receive acupuncture, massage therapy, physical therapy, help from doctors, a personal trainer, etc. They paid to move me, but have not followed through with any of their promises to help treat my disorder. Whats more, I have had to fit an entire apartments worth of furniture and other items into a small bedroom, and Im not allowed to use the rest of the house. Now that I am here, I cant afford to pay to move back east or possibly find a place to live or work without being established in this new city. Is there a way to address the predicament? „DESPERATE DAUGHTERDEAR DAUGHTER: You should not be isolated the way you are. And you need more help than I can give you in a letter. From your description, you are a prisoner in your parents home. Contact your doctor back east about what has been going on. Of course, if you have friends there, you should alert them, too. You will not get better living as you are. For your parents to have promised help and reneged is inexcusable. If there is an organization that supports your rare illness, it should be contacted too. Please do not wait.DEAR ABBY: Im 22 and Im dating this amazing guy a couple of years older than me. He really checks off so many things on my listŽ that I cant help but be attracted to and appreciate him.Heres the issue: He is not as tall as I would prefer. Hes not super short, but we are the same height and when I wear shoes with a small heel, hes slightly shorter. Am I being superficial? What should I do?„UNSURE IN PENNSYLVANIADEAR UNSURE: Ask yourself this: Is your self-confidence so lacking that you would seriously allow his height to bother you? If the fact that you would be selfconscious wearing heels with him could deter you from a long-term relationship, you should let him go because your values are not as alike as you would like to think.DEAR ABBY: My husband passed away nine months ago at the age of 52. I miss him every day. Recently, a man who was a friend of ours asked me out on a date. I must be honest „ the last nine months have been very sad and lonely, so when he asked me, I experienced a mixed bag of emotions. Would it be wrong to accept his invitation? And how do I deal with the guilt Im feeling because I would like to go out with him? „ MUST BE MOVING AHEAD IN VIRGINIADEAR MUST BE MOVING AHEAD:Its not surprising that the period since your husbands passing has been difficult. There is no set timetable for grieving the loss of a loved one. If you feel the time is right to have companionship again, you should not feel guilty about it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold.Parents fall short on promises to help their ailing daughter

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** C8 Friday, February 23, 2018 | The News Herald COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 23 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today What to bring home from Korea. (N) Megyn Kelly Today (N) Today With Kathie Lee & HodaNewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Maury The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Jerry Springer Jerry Springer Ageless BodyPaid Program WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Actress Heather Graham. (N) Live with Kelly and Ryan (N) The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew Weekend WinnersŽ METV (13.2) 209 133 2 BeaverBeaverPerry MasonMatlock The Man of the YearŽ Diagnosis Murder The Big ValleyGunsmoke Ring of DarknessŽ WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning (N) Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the RestlessNews at NoonBold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Forensic FilesJerry Springer (N) The Real (N) The Wendy Williams Show Paternity CourtCouples CourtJudge FaithJudge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid ProgramDragonFlyTVPaid ProgramPaid ProgramJudge Mathis (N) The Peoples Court The Peoples Court (N) CityLine WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Nature CatCuriousPinkalicious & PeterrificDaniel TigerSplashSesame StreetSuper Why!Dinosaur TrainPeg Plus CatSesame StreetSplas h A&E 34 43 118 265 Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Nightwatch Nightwatch Nightwatch Nightwatch 105 and RisingŽ AMC 30 62 131 254 Cue VaporLifeLockM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*H ‰‰ Ghost Rider (07) Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes, Wes Bentley. ‰‰‰ True Lies (94) ANPL 46 69 184 282 My Cat From Hell Too Cute! Little WildcatsŽ Animal Cops Philadelphia Animal Cops Philadelphia Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees BET 53 46 124 329 House/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneHouse/PayneMeet, BrownsTyler Perrys Meet the BrownsMeet, BrownsMeet, Br ownsMeet, Browns COM 64 53 107 249 Scrubs Scrubs Scrubs Scrubs (:05) Scrubs70s Show70s Show70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Dual Survival Mars on EarthŽ Dual Survival MeltdownŽ Dual Survival Dual Survival The Green HellŽ Dual Survival Twin PeaksŽ Dual Survival CastawaysŽ E! 63 57 114 236 Revenge Body With KhloRevenge Body With KhloRevenge Body With KhloRevenge Body With KhloE! News: Daily Pop (N) The Kardashians ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) Outside LinesNFL Live (N) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (5:00) Golic & Wingo (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) First Take FOOD 38 45 110 231 Ageless BodyYoga Retreat!Cindys SkinPioneer Wo.Giada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada at HomeGiada Enter.Pi oneer Wo.Pioneer Wo. FREE 59 65 180 311 Last-StandingLast-StandingLast-Standing700/InteractiveThe 700 Club grown-ish ‰‰ Never Been Kissed (99) Drew Barrymore, David Arquette. FS1 24 27 150 219 First Things FirstSkip and Shannon: Undisputed (N) (L) NASCAR RacingNASCAR Racing FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) ‰‰‚ True Story (15) ‰‰ Kick-Ass 2 (13) Aaron Taylor-Johnson. How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetMike & MollyMike & Molly HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsHome & Family 6116Ž James Brolin; Lori Loughlin. (N) Home & Family 6115Ž Saffron Burrows; Moe Bandy. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Fixer UpperNorthwestTiny House HIST 35 42 120 269 Hamilton: Building America Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesUnsolved MysteriesI Survived...Beyond & BackI Survived...Beyond & BackI Survived PARMT 28 48 241 241 MedicarePaid ProgramCops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops TexasŽ ‰‰‚ The Replacements (00) Keanu Reeves. SUN 49 422 656 Facing WavesReel AnimalsFlorida SportShip Shape TVFins & SkinsSport FishingSportsmanSport FishingLunch with the Lightning SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:15) Night of the Wild (15) (:15) ‰‰‚ Paul (11) Simon Pegg, Nick Frost.(:12) ‰‰ Immortals (11) Henry Cavill, Stephen Dorff, Isabel Lucas. Snakes TBS 31 15 139 247 MarriedKingKingKingSeinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends TCM 25 70 132 256 (5:45) Caged (:45) ‰‰‰ Some Came Running (58) Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin.(:15) ‰‰‰‚ Two Women (60) Sophia Loren, Eleanora Brown. (:15) A Streetcar Named Desire TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSeeking Sister Wife Seeking Sister Wife Little and Looking for Love Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Muse to My EarsŽ Charmed Supernatural (Part 2 of 2) Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural USA 62 55 105 242 NCIS: Los Angeles FamiliaŽ NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS: Los Angeles Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Creflo DollarLifeLockMurder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote Murder, She Wrote In the Heat of the Night In the Heat of the Night FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 23 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 2018 OlympicsPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramBig DealPaid ProgramToday (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Top 30 (N) The 60sPaid ProgramRehab?Paid ProgramSex PillsBeetsGrilling!Tone&LiftPaid ProgramBISSELL PetPaid Program WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge KarenLuminess AirOmegaContureDrs. Co-hostEat & RunPaid ProgramOpen HouseInsuranceTri-StatesGood Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Mannix The Glass TrapŽ Cannon77 Sunset StripGomer PyleGomer PylePetticoat Junc.Petticoat Junc.Bev. HillbilliesBev. Hillbillies WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 (:07) AccessCelebrity PagePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramCBS This Mo rning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Forensic FilesUnexplainedBella Luce Jewelry SaleSilver Jewelry An amazing assortment of jewelry styles! (N) Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramWonderama WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Imp. JokersImp. JokersStevePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramAirfryer OvenPaid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Great Performances Awards for actors, films and filmmakers. Impossible BuildsThe This Old House HourMister RogersDinosaur TrainBob BuilderDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindEat & RunMakeup!BISSELL PetPaid ProgramMarie OsmondLifeLockVacation RentVacation Rent AMC 30 62 131 254 (:02) The Walking Dead (:03) The Walking Dead (:07) The Walking Dead NowŽ(:08) The Walking Dead (:09) The Walking Dead (:10) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 (:04) Treehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersTreehouse MastersDr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain VetDr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramMercy ShipsPaid ProgramPaid Program COM 64 53 107 249 Ali Siddiq: ItsChappellesChappellesChappellesChappellesAmy SchumerSex ToysPaid ProgramMakeup!Amazing AbsScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 (:06) Gold RushFlying Wild AlaskaFlying Wild AlaskaRoad Trip Scott MartinNorth AmericaSport FishingOut Da Bayou E! 63 57 114 236 Hollywood M.Hollywood MediumHollywood MediumHollywood MediumHollywood M.Hollywood M.Hollywood MediumHollywood M. ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenterNBA Basketball Minnesota Timberwolves at Houston Rockets. SportsCenterSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers. SportsCenterSportsCenterSEC StoriedNFL Live FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveBrew & QueBrew & QueSexy HairBISSELLSexy Hair CareCindys SkinThe Kitchen FREE 59 65 180 311 Sexy HairPain SolvedThe 700 ClubPaid ProgramDr. Ho Reliev.Paid ProgramNonstick CookSexy YouCindys Skin ‰‰‰ Winnie the Pooh (11) FS1 24 27 150 219 UndisputedRoad to the OctagonUFC Weigh-InDrag RacingNASCAR Race NASCAR RacingNASCAR FX 45 51 136 248 (12:00) ‰‰‰ Neighbors (14) ‰‚ Pixels (15) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. Barry WhiteBISSELLTry Total GymMakeup!How I MetHow I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 FrasierFrasierFrasierFrasierCheersCheersI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyI Love LucyHarvest Moon (15) HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeTry Yoga!New Larry K.Credit?LifeLockYoga Retreat!Cindys SkinFlipping Virgins HIST 35 42 120 269 (11:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien AnnihilationŽ CoinCoinCoinCoinCoinTry YogaSwamp People LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:03) The Rap Game There Can Only Be OneŽ(:26) Bring It!Paid Program Grow HairHelp Now!Credit?Air Fryer OvenHair LoveTry YogaLifeLock PARMT 28 48 241 241 ‰‰‚ Crank (06) Jason Statham, Amy Smart. KnifeTone&LiftFish OilYoga Retreat!Cindys SkinSex PillsTransformYoga Retreat! SUN 49 422 656 Airfryer OvenSex PillsPaid ProgramProstateFoot PainProstateProstatePaid ProgramPaid ProgramBISSELL PetReel Animals SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:02) Zombie Shark (15) Cassie Steele, Jason London.(:01) Rise of the Zombies (12) Mariel Hemingway, Danny Trejo. Tighten ToneLifeLockBISSELLLifeLock TBS 31 15 139 247 Team America: World Police ‰‰‚ Warm Bodies (13) Nicholas Hoult, Teresa Palmer. Love-RaymondLove-RaymondMarriedMarriedKingKing TCM 25 70 132 256 (:15) ‰‰‰‚ Klute (71) Jane Fonda, Donald Sutherland, Roy Scheider. ‰‰‰ Women in Love (69) Alan Bates, Glenda Jackson.(:45) ‰‰‰ The Story of Louis Pasteur (36) TLC 37 40 183 280 Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E .R.Untold Stories of the E.R. TNT 29 54 138 245 The Alienist (:35) The AlienistTNT PreviewLaw & Order Navy BluesŽ Law & Order HarvestŽ Law & Order NullificationŽ Law & Order BloodŽ USA 62 55 105 242 (12:00) ‰‰ Couples Retreat (09) Jon Favreau ChrisleyDateline (Part 1 of 2) Dateline (Part 2 of 2) NCIS: Los Angeles DeadlineŽ Yoga Retreat!BISSELL WGN-A 13 239 307 How I MetHow I MetHow I MetHow I MetPerson of Interest GhostsŽ Try YogaYoga Retreat!Paid ProgramTry YogaLifeLock FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 23 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) 2018 Winter Olympics Mens Biathlon. (N Same-day Tape) Family FeudJeopardy! (N) NewsNightly NewsNewsWheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Eat & RunGrilling!Maury The Robert Irvine Show (N) The GoldbergsThe GoldbergsAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench The Dr. Oz Show (N) Dr. Phil (N) NewsWorld NewsNews 13 at 6Ent. Tonight METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza BallerinaŽ The RiflemanThe RiflemanWagon TrainThe Wild, Wild WestHawaii Five-0M*A*S*HM*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) MillionaireMillionaireFamily FeudFamily FeudThe Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Day JeopardyLocal 18 NewsEvening NewsInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Divorce CourtDivorce CourtThe Doctors (N) Dateline DailyMailTV DailyMailTV Last-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Maury (N) Crime Watch DailySteve (N) ThisMinuteThisMinuteJudge Judy (N) Judge Judy (N) Big BangBig Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 CuriousPinkalicious & PeterrificWild KrattsWild KrattsOdd SquadOdd SquadCapitol UpdatePBS NewsHour (N) World NewsRick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -06.10.17Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Live PD -02.17.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:00) ‰‰‰ True Lies (94) Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‰‰‚ Mr. & Mrs. Smith (05) Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Vince Vaughn. ‰‰ U.S. Marshals (98) Tommy Lee Jones. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 Fresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceMartin Martin Martin ‰‰‚ Sparkle (12) Jordin Sparks, Whitney Houston, Derek Luke. COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:40) The Office (:15) The Office (:15) The Office The Office (:25) The Office DISC 36 39 182 278 Dual Survival Gold Rush: White Water Gold Rush: White Water Gold Rush (:05) Gold Rush Broken MenŽ Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 KardashianThe KardashiansThe Kardashians ‰‰‰ The School of Rock (03) Jack Black, Joan Cusack, Mike White. E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:30) NFL Live (N) (L) The JumpSportsNation (N) QuestionableAround/HornInterruptionSportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Countdown (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 JalenOutside LinesNFL LiveIntentionThe JumpQuestionableAround/HornInterruptionCollege Basketball FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, Drive-Ins a nd DivesDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 ‰‰ You Again (10) Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. ‰‰ Shes All That (99) Freddie Prinze Jr., Matthew Lillard. ‰‰ Just Go With It (11) Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston. FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR RacingNASCAR RacingNASCAR RacingNASCAR RacingNASCAR Race Drag Racing FX 45 51 136 248 Mike & Molly ‰‰‚ Man of Steel (13) Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon. ‰‚ Identity Thief (13) Jason Bateman. A victim of identity theft fights back. HALL 23 59 185 312 My Secret Valentine (18) Lacey Chabert, Andrew Walker. Autumn Dreams (15) Jill Wagner, Colin Egglesfield. A Royal Winter (17) Merritt Patterson, Jack Donnelly. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Tiny HouseTiny HouseTiny HouseTiny HouseDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream Home HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens The ReturnedŽ Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 I Survived Abducted; mauled. I SurvivedWhitney (15) Yaya DaCosta, Arlen Escarpeta, Yolonda Ross. ‰‚ Tyler Perrys Temptation (13) Jurnee Smollett-Bell. PARMT 28 48 241 241 (11:00) The Replacements (00) Two/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenFriends (:33) Friends (:06) Friends (:44) Friends SUN 49 422 656 NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Ottawa Senators. GatorZoneFuture Phen.ACC AccessPower of to Do FloridaInside HEATInside HEATPregame SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:37) ‰‰ Snakes on a Plane (06) Samuel L. Jackson.(2:59) ‰‰ Jeepers Creepers 2 (03) Ray Wise, Jonathan Breck. ‰‰ The Mechanic (11) Jason Statham, Ben Foster. TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Friends Friends American DadAmerican DadAmerican DadAmerican DadFamily Guy Family Guy Brooklyn NineBrooklyn Nine TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:15) ‰‰‰‰ A Streetcar Named Desire (:45) ‰‰‰‚ I Want to Live! (58) Susan Hayward, Simon Oakland. ‰‰‚ Butterfield 8 (60) Elizabeth Taylor, Laurence Harvey. TLC 37 40 183 280 Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. Untold Stories of the E.R. TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones The Finger in the NestŽ Bones Bones Bones The He in the SheŽ Bones Bones USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVULaw & Order: SVUModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Family WGN-A 13 239 307 In the Heat of the NightIn the Heat of the NightBlue Bloods Blue Bloods The UniformŽ Blue Bloods The JobŽ M*A*S*HM*A*S*H FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 23 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 2018 Winter Olympics Alpine Skiing, Snowboarding, Bobsled, Speed Skating. (N) (L) News2018 Olympics2018 Olympics CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 The 3rd Annual Howie Mandel Stand-Up GalaWhose LinePage Six TVSeinfeldSeinfeldEngagementEngagementKingKing of the HillCops WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 ‰‰‰‚ Wreck-It Ralph (12) Voices of John C. Reilly. 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (N)(:37) Nightline (12:07) Mom (:37) Mom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy GriffithAndy GriffithGomer PyleMamas FamilyHogan HeroesHogan HeroesCarol BurnettPerry MasonTwilight ZoneAlf. HitchcockAlf Hitchcock WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Big Brother: Celebrity Edition (N) Blue Bloods Love LostŽ Modern FamilyLate Show-ColbertLate Late Show/James CordenModern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 American Ninja WarriorAmerican Ninja Warrior2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsAnger MgtAnger MgtThe GameThe GameCorrupt CrimesKiller WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Showtime at the Apollo Steve Harvey hosts a showcase event. Two/Half MenTMZ (N) Crime Watch DailyPawn StarsPawn StarsTwo/Half MenHow I Met WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 WashMeToo, NowGreat Performances Awards for actors, films and filmmakers. Capitol UpdateAmanpour-PBSPBS NewsHourWashMeToo, Now A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -02.23.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) (L) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (5:30) ‰‰ U.S. Marshals (98) Wesley Snipes ‰‰‚ The Book of Eli (10) Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman, Mila Kunis. The Walking Dead (12:01) The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters (N) Treehouse Masters (N)(:03) Treehouse Masters (:03) Treehouse Masters (:04) Treehouse Masters (12:04) Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 (4:30) Sparkle ‰‰‰‚ Ray (04) Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington. Ray Charles overcomes hardships to become a legend. The Death Row ChroniclesThe Death Row Chronicles COM 64 53 107 249 ‰‰‚ Office Space (99) Ron Livingston, Jennifer Aniston. Kevin Hart: Laugh at My PainAli Siddiq: Its Bigger ThanThis Is NotKevin Hart: Laugh at My PainAli Siddiq: Its DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) Gold Rush King KongŽ (N)(:03) Gold Rush: White Water (:04) Gold Rush King KongŽ(:05) Gold Rush: White Water (12:06) Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 ‰‰ Hes Just Not That Into You (09) Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston. ‰‚ Bride Wars (09) Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway. E! NewsHollywood M. ESPN 9 23 140 206 NBA Basketball Minnesota Timberwolves at Houston Rockets. (N) (L) NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College BasketballCollege Basketball Western Michigan at Ball State. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) World/Poker FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and Dives (N) Diners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, DriveDiners, Drive-Ins and DivesDiners, DriveDiners, Drive FREE 59 65 180 311 Just Go With It ‰‰‚ The DUFF (15) Mae Whitman, Robbie Amell, Bella Thorne. The 700 Club ‰‰ You Again (10) Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. FS1 24 27 150 219 College Basketball Ohio State at Indiana. (N) (L) UFC Weigh-InRoad to the OctagonTMZ SportsSkip and Shannon: Undisputed FX 45 51 136 248 ‰ Grown Ups 2 (13) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. ‰ Grown Ups 2 (13) Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. ‰‰‰ Neighbors (14) HALL 23 59 185 312 Cooking With Love (18) Ali Liebert, Brett Dalton. Meet the PeetesGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsGolden GirlsFrasierFrasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Dream HomeDream HomeDream HomeDream HomeHunters IntlHouse HuntersHouse HuntersHunters IntlDream HomeDream HomeHunters IntlHo use Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien AnnihilationŽ New evidence about disaster myths. (N)(:03) Ancient Aliens: Declassified Alien AnnihilationŽ LIFE 56 56 108 252 ‰‰ Daddys Little Girls (07) Gabrielle Union, Idris Elba. (:02) The Rap Game There Can Only Be OneŽ(:25) Bring It! (:01) ‰‰ Daddys Little Girls (07) Gabrielle Union, Idris Elba. PARMT 28 48 241 241 (6:44) Friends (:22) Friends ‰‰‰ John Wick (14) Keanu Reeves, Michael Nyqvist, Alfie Allen. ‰‰‚ Limitless (11) Bradley Cooper. A writer takes a mind-enhancing drug. SUN 49 422 656 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at New Orleans Pelicans. (N) (L) PostgameInside HEATInside HEATAfter Midnight with the HEAT SYFY 70 52 122 244 FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturama (:32) FuturamaFuturama (:32) Futurama TBS 31 15 139 247 ‰‰‚ Step Brothers (08) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. ELEAGUE ‰‰‰ Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (04) Team America: World Police TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰‚ Suspicion (41) Cary Grant, Joan Fontaine. ‰‰‰‚ Johnny Belinda (48) Jane Wyman, Lew Ayres. ‰‰‰‰ Dead Man Walking (95) Susan Sarandon, Sean Penn. TLC 37 40 183 280 Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R. (N) Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R.Untold Stories of the E.R. TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰ Unstoppable (10) Denzel Washington, Chris Pine. The Alienist (:09) The Alienist A Fruitful PartnershipŽ(:18) The AlienistThe Alienist USA 62 55 105 242 Modern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern FamilyModern Fam ily ‰‰ Couples Retreat (09) WGN-A 13 239 307 M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HBellevueM*A*S*HM*A*S*HEngagementEngagementEngagementHow I Met The News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 D1 TV LISTINGS

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CLASSIFIEDSD D 2 2 Friday, February 23, 2018| The News Herald 19232 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 08005204CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-43CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 200643CB Plaintiff, vs. RUSS, LARRY, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 08005204CA of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for BAY County, Florida, wherein, THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-43CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 200643CB, Plaintiff, and, RUSS, LARRY, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, WWW BA Y .REALFORE CL OSE .COM at the hour of 11:00 A.M., on the 13th day of March, 2018 the following described property: LOT 20, WILLOW BEND, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 22, PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 1st day of February, 2018. BILL KINSAUL Clerk Circuit Court By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, PA., 100 West Cypress Creek Road Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-491-1120 File No.: 32875.1159 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19156 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION, FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, BAY COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017-DP-0153-A Division: A IN THE INTEREST OF: S.W.K DOB: 07/25/2013 MINOR CHILD NOTICE OF ACTION (SEC. 39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to LUZ RODRIGUEZ, natural mother of the child, S.W.K., whose last known residence and address is 2102 Anne Avenue, Panama City Beach, Florida 32408. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court concerning Termination of Parental Rights in the case of S.W.K., minor child, for placement with a licensed child placing agency or the Department for the purposes of subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Ana M. Garcia, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Bay County Juvenile Justice Courthouse, 533 E. 11th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, on the 4th day of April 2018, at the hour of 8:30 a.m., C.T. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. BILL KINSAUL, Clerk of Circuit Court By: Viola Cushman Deputy Clerk Pub: Feb. 23, March 2, 9, 16, 2018 19234 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTHEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 17001284CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR THE IMPAC CMB TRUST SERIES 2004-5, Plaintiff, vs. JOAN AVENUE REALTY LLC. et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: KENNETH W. BRADBURY. whos residence is unknown and all parties having or claiming ot have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 6, BLOCK 2, OF AMENDED PLAT OF THE PINES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7 AT PAGE 65 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487. (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Bay County, Florida this 7 day of Feb, 2018. BILL KINSAUL, Clerk of the Circuit Court BY: Sharon Chambers Deputy Clerk ROBERTSON, ANSCHUTZ & SCHNEID, PL 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: mail@rasflaw .com 17-075281 Pub: Feb16, 23, 2018 19236 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 17000313CA U.S. BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE F/B/O HOLDERS OF STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS ll INC., BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3, Plaintiff, -vs GLENN R. SCHEIVE; PAUL V. GALLO; EDGEWATER BEACH RESORT, L.L.C.; EDGEWATER BEACH RESORT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; EMERALD EDGE, LLC; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN PARTY #1, UNKNOWN PARTY #2, UNKNOWN PARTY #3, and UNKNOWN PARTY #4 the names being fictitious to account for parties in possession, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE I HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of January, 2018, entered in the above captioned action, Case No. 17000313CA, I, BILL KINSAUL, Circuit Court Clerk, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale beginning at 11:00 A.M. CST/12:00 P.M. EST on May 16, 2018 at www .bay .real foreclose.com the following described property as set forth’ in said final judgment, to-wit: CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 312, OF EDGEWATER TOWER I, A CONDOMINIUM, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST OR SHARE IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 1028, PAGE 1971, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this January 23, 2018. BILL KINSAUL Clerk, Circuit Court By: Sharon Chambers Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19256 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 17000074CA DIV NO.: MARRIOTT OWNERSHIP RESORTS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. JOHN G. MOUCHATI, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE AS TO COUNT II TO: SUSAN J. SWENSON 173 CHARLES AVE. MASSAPEQUA PARK, NY 11762 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on the February 6, 2018, in the cause pending in the Circuit Court, in and for Bay County, Florida, Civil Cause No. 17000074CA, the undersigned Clerk will sell the property situated in said County described as: Unit Week 21 in Unit 1104, in LEGENDS EDGE CONDOMINIUM, according to the Declaration of Condominium thereof, as recorded in Official Records Book 1919 at Page 323 in the Public Records of Bay County, Florida, and any amendments thereof. at Public sale to the highest and best bidder for cash starting at the hour of 11:00 a.m. Central Time on the 26th day of March, 2018 online at www bay .realforeclose.com Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 6th day of February, 2018. BILL KINSAUL Clerk of the Court By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk EDWARD M. FITZGERALD HOLLAND & KNIGHT LLP Attorney for Plaintiff 200 S. Orange Avenue, Suite 2600 Post Office Box 1526 Orlando, FL 32802 H&K# 110516.0240 IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850) 747-5327 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711. Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19248Government Surplus Auction2/24/18 at 10:00 a.m. 3847 E. Bus Hwy 98 Panama City, FL 32401 850-896-2343 facebook.com/flauc tion networkauctionzip.com ID# 42719 trailers, automobiles, tractors, attachments, and tons of misc items from Bay County, City of Mexico Beach, City of Parker and other consignors. Florida Auction Network LLC Jon Sewell, Manager/Auctioneer 13% Buyer’s Premium 3% Discount for cash/check, cash, check, credit cards accepted + tax, tag, and title fees AB# 3488 AU# 4677 Feb. 16, 17, 23, 2018 19258 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 17001087CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 20053, Plaintiff, vs. MAURICE E. JONES A/K/A MAURICE JONES; KIMBERLY D. JONES A/K/A KIMBERLEY D. JONES, ET AL. Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 5, 2018, and entered in Case No. 17001087CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for BAY aunty, Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-3, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-3 (hereafter “Plaintiff”), is Plaintiff and MAURICE E. JONES A/K/A MAURICE JONES, KIMBERLY D. JONES A/K/A KIMBERLEY D. JONES A/K/A KIMBERLEY JONES, FOUNDATION FINANCIAL GROUP LLC, are defendants. Bill Kinsaul, Clerk of the Circuit Court for BAY, County Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash via the Internet at www .bay realforeclose.com at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of March 12, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 10, BLOCK 34, HIGHLAND CITY; AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK 4 PAGE 28 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 185 FEET; THENCE EAST 150 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF VOLUSIA AVENUE; THENCE NORTH ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE 185 FEET; THENCE WEST 150 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org Dated this 7th day of February, 2018. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Sharon Chambers As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110 Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone (954) 571-2031 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19260 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 17000830CA BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA JO SHEETS, TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORP., BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEMS LLC DBA BAY MEDICAL CENTER -SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA) N.A., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed February 8, 2018, and entered in Case No. 17000830CA of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit, in and for BAY County, Florida, where in BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company, is the Plaintiff and DEBRA JO SHEETS, TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORP., BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEMS LLC DBA BAY MEDICAL CENTER -SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM, CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA) N.A. are the Defendants, the Clerk of Court shall offer for sale to the highest bidder for cash on March 27, 2018 at 11:00am, at https://www .bay realforeclose.com the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment lying and being situate in BAY County, Florida, to wit: BEGINNING 82.5 FEET EAST OF THE SW CORNER OF LOT 23, ACCORDING TO PLAT OF FIVE (5) ACRE TRACTS OF PARKER, FLORIDA, LOCATED IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST, AS PER PLAT ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA; RUNNING THENCE EAST 82.5 FEET; THENCE NORTH 133 FEET; THENCE WEST 82.5 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 133 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Appraiser: 5111 Lance Street Panama City FL 32404 NOTICE: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO $70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING, AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF THE SALE. NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED HEREIN. DATED this 9th day of February, 2018. Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk STRAUS & EISLER, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 10081 Pines Blvd, Suite C Pembroke Pines, FL 33024 954-431-2000 eMail: Service.pines@ straueislercom File: 17-025518-FC-BV Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19262 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 03-2017-CA-000747 DIVISION: CIT BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, JOAN K, WILSON, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 1, 2018, and entered in Case No. 03-2017-CA-000747 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Bay County, Florida in which CIT Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustee, or other Claimants claiming by, through, under, or against, Joan K, Wilson, deceased, Chyspa Adams Ross, Craig Albert Wilson, Karon Wilson Wakstein, United States of America Acting through Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Bay County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on www .bay .real foreclose.com, Bay County, Florida at 11:00AM CST, 12:00PM EST on the 2nd day of April, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 5, BLOCK 7, WAINWRIGHT PARK, BEING SUDDUTH REALTY COMPANY’S SEVENTEENTH ADDITION TO PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 30, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 5000 WEST 19TH COURT, PANAMA CITY, FL 32405 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Bay County, Florida this 2nd day of February, 2018. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court Bay County, Florida By: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw .com AB -17-012078 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19348 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 18000139CP Division ______ IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD BARTELS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Richard Bartels, deceased, whose date of death was January 30, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, 19272 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida State Law “SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT”, 83.801-83.809, Anytime Storage at 3311 Hwy 389, Panama City, FL 32405, will sell the contents of the following units on Monday, March 5, 2018 at 10:00 A.M. #10 Dustin Davis #34 Marcus Vinson Unit contents may be redeemed by owner prior to sell date and time. CASH ONLY! Anytime Storage reserves the right to cancel the sale without notice. Pub: Feb. 16, 23, 2018 19308 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College Foundation, Inc. Military Campaign Committee will meet on Tuesday, February 27, 2018, in Student Union West Room 302 aat 11:30 a.m. CDT at Gulf Coast State College Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19336 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College District Board of Trustees will hold a meeting. Contact person for the meeting is Dr. John Holdnak, president, Gulf Coast State College. WHEN : 10 a.m., March 15, 2018 WHERE: William C. Cramer Jr. Seminar Room (Room 306), Robert L. McSpadden Student Union West, Gulf Coast State College PURPOSE: Regular Meeting Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19346 NOTICE TO NATAVUS BOYD OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF A MINOR, A.B. A Petition for Change of Name of a Minor to a female child, A.B., born September 6, 2011 in Americus, Sumter County, Georgia has been filed in the Circuit Court of Bay County, Florida, Case No.: 16-001237 DR. A final hearing has been scheduled for March 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM at the Bay County Courthouse, 300 East 4th St., Panama City, Florida 32401. You are hereby notified that this proceeding is for the purpose of changing the legal name of the minor child. You are hereby notified that in accordance with Florida Statute Section 68.07 (8), you will lose all rights to object to the change of name and will neither further receive notice nor be entitled to object to the change of name of the minor child unless you appear at the date, time and place of the hearing and show cause why the Petition for Change of Name of a Minor should not be granted. Petitioner’s Attorney: Patrick B. Calcutt, FL Bar #869971, 106 W. Lamar St., Americus, GA 31709, Telephone -229-9243900, Fax -229-9249003. Pub: Feb. 23, March 2, 9, 2018

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 D D 3 3 Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is February 23, 2018. Personal Representative: William Dean Bartels 4685 Jefferson Township Lane Marietta, GA 30066 Attorney for Personal Representative: Amelia M. Campbell Attorney FL Bar No: 500331 Hill Ward Henderson 101 E. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 3700 Tampa, Florida 33602 Phone: (813) 221-3900 Fax: (813) 221-2900 E-Mail: amelia.camp bell@hwhlaw .com Secondary E-Mail: probate.efile@hwh law .com Feb. 23, March 2, 2018 19356 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Elkans Dispatch & Back Office Services located at 949 Jenks Ave, Suite 13, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32401 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 20th day of February, 2018. Yehudah Enterprises, LLC Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19354 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: CAT 5 CONCRETE located at 7940 Front Beach Rd, Ste 102, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City Beach, Florida, 32408 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City Beach, Florida, this 20th day of February, 2018. Desi Omar Arellano, Ernesto Espino Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19364 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Coastal Towing and Roadside Service Inc., Gives notice of lien and intent to sell these vehicles on MARCH 5, 2018 @ 9:00am ET at 4610 County Rd 386, Port St Joe, FL 32456 pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Coastal Towing and Roadside Service, Inc. reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 2002 Mit 4A3AC54H02E010023 1999 Nissan JN8AR05YXXW319796 Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19358 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: On-Site Medical Providers located at 6928 Bayou George Dr., in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32404 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 20th day of February, 2018. Jennifer Reyes & Stephanie McCroskey Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19360 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Anytime Anywhere Mobile Detailing located at 2410 Drummond Ave., in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32405 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 20th day of February, 2018. Steven H. Wangoon Pub: Feb. 23, 2018 19362 Notice Of Sale Of Abandoned Personal Property Is Hereby Given That Pursuant To Florida Civil Code §1715 SPLLC will sell at public sale abandoned personal properties left at: 2 Regency Park Dr Mary Esther, 1857 Hopkins Dr Tallahassee, 516 Tracey Dr Panama City, 534 Ridge Lake, Crestview, Fl. Competitive bid Auction available online only at storage treasures.com on 3-4-18 at 6:00 pm ET. Register at Storage Treasures enter this address: 2501 Martin Luther King Blvd, Panama City FL All personal items left at these properties, will be auctioned 951-676-8998 ext 112. Pub: Feb. 23, 27, 2018 19238DLO IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY FLORIDA. CASE NO. 17000469CA QUICKEN LOANS INC., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY G. MCCORMICK, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgement of Foreclosure entered on August 3, 2017, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on March 28, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.(CT) at www .bay .realfore close.com. THE SOUTH 33 FEET OF LOT 5 AND THE NORTH 39 FEET OF LOT 6, BLOCK 22 IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 15 WEST, BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1607 HICKORY AVENUE, PANAMA CITY, FL 32405 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: Jan 24, 2018. BILL KINSAUL, Clerk, Bay County Circuit Court BY: Jennifer Estrada Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Persons with a disability needing special accomodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a cout proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following;: Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; Phone: 850747-5327; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1800-955-8771; Email: AD ARequest@jud14.fl courts.org QPWB# 104197 Feb. 23, March 2, 2018 19366 JACKSON COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FDOT FPID NO. 438131-1-68-01 The Jackson County Board of County Commissioners is seeking professional consultant services for Construction Engineering Inspection (CEI) Services on the Jackson Road Sidewalk Project. The scope of this project will include the construction of sidewalk along Jackson Road and CR 162 between Bethune Court on Jackson Road and the City Park on CR 182 in Jacob, FL as identified in the plans and specification prepared by Dewberry Preble-Rish. Consideration will be given to only those firms that are qualified pursuant to law and that have been prequalified by FDOT to perform the indicated types of work. W ork T ypes: 10.1 Roadway Construction Engineering inspection Response Deadline: Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 1:00 P.M. CT Opening Date: Same as above This project is federally funded with assistance from the FDOT and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). By submitting a letter of response, the Consultant certifies that they are in compliance with FDOT Procedure No. 375-030-006 (Restriction on Consultants Eligibility to Compete for Department Contracts) and that no principle is presently suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible or voluntarily excluded from participation on this transaction by any Federal Department or Agency. Information regarding the proposal can be obtained at the Jackson County -County Engineer’s office at 2828 Owens Street, Marianna, Florida or by email to lalvarez@ jacksoncountyfl.com and on the County’s Web Site at www jacksoncountyfl.net In order to ensure a fair, competitive, and open process, once a project is advertised for Letters of Qualifications, all communications between interested firms and the County must be directed to Mr. Larry Alvarez, County Engineer, 850-482-9677 or at lalvarez@jackson countyfl.com If interested, qualified consultants are required to submit the original and five (5) copies of the qualifications package to the Jackson County Engineer’s office, 2828 Owens Street, Marianna, FL 32446 by the response deadline. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed proposal for the “ RFQ #438131-1-6801-Jackson Road Sidewalk Project CEI Services ”. Feb. 23, March 2, 2018 LOST GOLD NECKLACEGold chain with a cross Very important to me, if found please call 850-785-9799 LITTER OF BOXERSPure bred, litter of boxer puppies, $400. 850-703-9931 FREE TO LOVING HOMEWeimaraner, Male, Rustic Brown in color, very large, well kept, thourough bred clipped nails. Very friendly. Free to good and loving home. Call: 850-871-3768 Toy TrainsI buy pre-war and post war O,S and standard gauge train collections. Call 757-377-1122 FREON R12 WANTED Certified buyer will pickup, pay cash for R12 cylinders, and cases of cans. 312-291-9169 www .Refrigerant Finders.com CDL DriverContainer drayage. Good pay/benefits. Dispatched to & from Panama City, FL. No more than 2 nights away at a time. 1 year OTR exp. required. Send resume to Bienville.trucking@ gmail.com Panama City 2922 US BUS 98 (On Business 98 between East and Everitt Ave) Feb 23 -Feb 24th Friday 10am -4:30pm Sat 9am -3pmBAG SALE!Catholic Charities Thrift Store is having a bag sale this weekend. All clothing you can fit into a brown paper bag! Text FL89406 to 56654 Panama City Feb. 24th Saturday ONLY 8am 12pm, Corner of Mound & 4312 West 25th StreetYARD SALEGeneral household goods, some sporting equipment, etc. Text FL89393 to 56654 Panama City Saturday ONLY, 9am-4pm 1214 Calabria Rd INSIDE YARD SALE Venetian Villa off of 390, right on Milano, left on Calabria Text FL89529 to 56654 Southport 3321 Nautical Drive (Kirkland Manor off Dam Road) Feb. 24th & 25th Sat: 8 am -2pm & Sun: 9 am -2 pmTons of Gifts & Household itemsNew items, clothes, decorative accessories, kids items, household items, and much more! Text FL89342 to 56654 Southport7331 Market St. Fri 23rd & Sat 24th. 8am till 2pmGiant Yard SaleTools, pocket knives, toys, DVD’s, jewlery, kitchen and home items, towels, small appl., clothes, purses, shoes, microwave, craft items. Cookbook collection. txt FL89414 to 56656 Panama City 1100 Kristanna Drive Saturday, Feb 24th 8am until 12pmLIVING ESTATE SALE GIFT SHOP OWNERCut crystal, vintage china + dishes, furniture, sleeper sofa by lazyboy, lamps, collectibles. Text FL89537 to 56654 Panama City 542 Harrison Avenue (Parking available downtown, left hand parking lot) Friday & Saturday Feb 23rd, 10am 4pm Feb 24th, 7:30 12pmOLD AVENUE SEA LIQUIDITION ESTATE SALEFeaturing tabletop decor, florals, lamps, furniture, electric appliances, stove, fridge, large wooden tables with extensions for dining or conference rooms and much more! Avenue Sea has relocated to Pier Park at Panama City Beach, FL is now open! (850) 708-3210 Text FL89547 to 56654 Panama City Beach 9105 Abba Lane Friday 2/23, Sat 2/24 7am until ???MULTI-FAMILY SALESomething for everyone! Lots and lots of books, lawnmower, shop-vac, bow, decorator items, lamps, some furniture, small appliances, dishes, glassware, purses. Mens, childrens, and ladies clothing (Size S-XL) Will have new items on Saturday. Text FL89454 to 56654 Cedar Grove -2803 Gwendolen Ct. -Friday & Saturday, Feb 23, 24, 8am-1pm;Downsizing & MovingFurniture & miscellaneous. Lynn Haven 1001 West 18th Street (HWY 390 to Maine Ave, Turn Right onto West 19th, 5th hosue on right)EMPTIED OUR STORAGE UNIT!Small Sailboat/trailer, Fishing Gear, Camping Gear, Tools, Outdoor Furniture, Books, Electronics, music, movies, linens, kitchen, clothes, hot tubs, sports equipment, yard equipment & more Text FL89407 to 56654 Lynn Haven: 804 W. 8th St. Turn at the Grocery Outlet, which is W. 9th, go to Tn. Ave., turn right then left on W. 8th. Feb 24th, 8am-1pmGetting Ready To Move!!Lighted china cabinet, roll top desk, treadmill, upright freezer, chainsaw, Hoyer lift, wheel chair, original Stetson hat (sz 6 7/8 in box), misc yard tools, various size baby girl clothes, and more! Text FL89356 to 56654 Panama City 10932 Old Bicycle Rd. Look for the big red barn! Thursday-Saturday 8 am until 12 pmRed Barn Garage SaleTools, furniture, lawn equipment, etc. txt FL89357 to 56654 Callaway 7014 Hugh Dr. (Corner of Mark & Hugh.) Fri. 23rd & Sat. 24th 8am till 12pmBackyard SaleNike and Jordan clothes and backpacks, NBA and NASCAR hats, Victoria Secret, ladies jeans and shoes. Beanie babies and stuffed animals, homeschool items, housewares, toys, books, tools, and lots more! txt FL89516 to 56656 Grace Presbyterian ChurchFri. 23rd 7:30-3pm& Sat. 24th 7:30-12pmFundraiser Sale all Proceeds to Benefit Bethel VillageFurn., HH items, dishes, linens home decor, jewlery purses shoes toys baby items, books, and too much to list so come out and see us!!! text FL88702 to 56654 Forest Park 104 Loyola Lane (Loyola Lane is off of Harrison Avenue between 23rd St & Baldwin road) Friday and Saturday Feb 23rd / Feb 24th 7am until 2pmINDOOR & OUTDOOR MOVING SALECherry Wood Executive Roll Top Desk, Formal Dining Room, Entertainment Cabinet, Oil Paintings, Art, Guitar, Dresser, Ficus trees, Craftsman Tool Chest, Clothes, Toys, Filing Cabinets, Exercise bench, Air Compressor, Books, Leather ottoman, Chairs, Bar stool, Coffee table, other furniture, China, Crystal, Legos, Swords/knife collection, Tools, antiques, much more. Text FL89491 to 56654 Beach East End 108 Boca Lagoon Dr. Sat, Feb 24th. 8am -NoonAnnual Yard SaleHousehold items, furniture, construction tools. A little bit of everything! Text FL89532to 56654 Beach East End Heritage Village: First right on Panama City Beach Pkwy, just west of Thomas Dr. Between Panama City Golfcarts and the Shell gas station. Sat, Feb 24th, 7a-12p Annual Community Yardsale Heritage Village will have numerous homes participating with various items for sale. Text FL89385 to 56654 Beach East End: 6922 South Lagoon Dr Friday & Saturday 8am-??? Furniture, clothes, deisigner purses, household & misc! Text FL89380 to 56654 Callaway 201 Forrest Court Feb 23rd, Feb 24th 9am unitl 3pmESTATE / MOVING SALE Call To Place An Ad 747-5020 Classifieds work! Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSD D 4 4 Friday, February 23, 2018| The News Herald SHORESPANAMACounts Oakes Resort Properties has immediate openings for the following full-time, year-round positionsCompetitive Wages • Paid Holidays • Paid Vacation Paid Personal Time Off • MedicalandDentalBene ts Panama City BEachMaintenance Technicians • HVAC Maintenance Technician Vacation Rental Property Managers • Accounting ManagerShores of panamaFront Desk Managers • Reservations Manager Front Desk Agents • Reservations Agents Maintenance Technicians • Floor Care SpecialistDestin/Miramar BeachFront Desk Agents Front Desk Agent Overnight Shift Maintenance TechniciansEqual Opportunity EmployerAs the preferred hospitality employer in the area we offer our Team Members the following…… Please send your resume to inspire@corp a.com or Apply in person at ShoresofPanama|9900S.ThomasDrive|PanamaCityBeach,FL32408 CountsOakesResortProperties|22623PCBParkway|PanamaCityBeach,FL32413 Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to HR@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen. Web Id 34370619 DIRECT SERVICELiberty County Senior Citizens Association Inc. – Franklin County is currently seeking applicants for a 30-40 hour a week Direct Service position. The candidate must be able to pass a Level II Background Screening, possess a valid driver’s license, reliable transportation and valid motor vehicle insurance. Job duties include light housekeeping and bathing assistance. Certified CNA or Home Health Aide preferred but not required. Salary will be based on experience. Qualified applicants can obtain an employment application at Fort Combs Armory 66 4th St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 or Franklin Senior Services 302 W Ave. F Carrabelle, FL 32322 or Fax Resume with cover letter to 850-643-5672. Liberty County Senior Citizens Association, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer. PH: 850-643-5690 Immediate OpeningsFirst Florida Bank is seeking a Branch Manage r at its Panama City location. To view full job posting and apply on line, please visit the Careers page of our website at www .FirstFlorida.bank Resumes can also be faxed to Jennifer Brown at (850) 269-0661 Immediate Position for a Full Time Private Nurse!!!Full-time LPN/CNA needed for young adult with multi-system illness in Destin Florida. Full Time Weekends with Benefits. Must have knowledge/willingness to work in a functional/holistic setting. Will work along side RN and a team of doctors. Detailed job description available upon request. Send resume to: laurap@how .gccoxmail.com is accepting applications for:Registered NursesFull-time 7-3, Monday-Friday Full-time 3-11 Shift, Monday-Friday Baylor Applications may be obtained from Marianna Health & Rehabilitation Center or online at www .cityofmarianna.com/mhrc 4295 5 th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 482-8091 We offer the Florida State Retirement System and 100% Employer Paid Health and Dental Insurance Sr Commercial Lines Account ManagerPeoples First Insurance is seeking a FT experienced Sr Commercial Lines Account Manager. This position is dedicated to providing caring and expert service for select clients representing some of the largets and most complex accounts. Required Experience : Ten or more years of agency experience in commercial lines insurance, with the last five years working with large, complex accounts. Active 2-20 License required Proficient in Outlook, Word, and Excel Experienced with Applied TAM or similar related software Peoples First Insurance offers competitive salaries, great benefits, Paid Time Off, 401(k) retirement plan, etc. We are an EEOC and DFWP Employer. To apply, please submit your resume to info@pfinsurance.com Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Now Hiring18 and older Ride Attendants Cashiers Multiple PositionsPick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Stock Clerk/ Sales ClerkPT/ FT. All shifts. Apply between 9am-12 7 days per week. Shell Port 9949 Thomas Dr. PCB. Retirees welcome Experienced X-Ray TechnicianNeeded part time for single physician medical office. Back office skills a plus. Candidate must be detail oriented and professional. Hours vary up to 30 hours per week. Position available immediately. Fax resume to 850-522-7179. Maintenance TechLaguna Beach Christian Retreat seeking motivated and qualified individuals for general property maintenance FT & PT. Apply online christiancamp.com or in person at 20016 Front Beach Rd. Web ID # 34389354 Now HiringScipio Creek Marina is seeking a certified experienced marine outboard mechanic to work in our family friendly marina. We will train individual as needed in order for them to become forklift certified. Applicant must be willing to work weekends. We are located at: Scipio Creek Marina, 301 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 850-653-8030 E-mail: info@scipiocreek marina.com PIANIST PART TIMEExp. required to play for Church in Laguna Beach at 10 am Sunday service and weekly rehearsal w/ adult choir. Send resume to gulfviewofc@gmail.com or mail to Gulfview UMC, PO Box 7106, PCB, FL 32413. PilotSeeking Commercial, MEL Pilots with military fighter aircraft experience. Send resumes to Blind Box 3699 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 or email to: nowhiringpc@gmail.c om The Panama City News Herald is in need of aHome Delivery Independent ContractorFor the East End Beach area. This person will deliver papers to home delivery patrons. Must have a dependable vehicle, and be able to work early hours 7 days a week. This is a good opportunity for someone wanting to earn extra cash. Come by 501 W. 11th St. in Panama City & complete an application or email: sfristoe@pcnh.com. Commercial BuildingReduced for Sale Small cafe / Resturant Good Location Ready for business Call: 850-774-8441 850-258-2611 Text FL89192 to 56654 707jenks.com Nice, big office spaces. From 200 sqf and up. Shared Reception, conf. areas. Utilities included Starting at $460 and up. Gatewood Apartments1/2 off first months rent in F eb. & Mar! 2BR HC & non-HC Apts. 7100 Noel Rd, Bayou George 850-784-9893 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerTxt FL89272 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 3BR/2BA Brand New Home$1900/mo Call Lauri at (850) 774-3977. Text FL86099 to 56654 Near Tyndall, Nice 3br, 2 ba. Washer/Dryer Hkup, single car garage. NO PETS. incl lawn svc. $900mo+ dep. (850) 769-1726 Panama City 3br 1ba, no pets. $700 + $700 dep. Call 785-7341 or 814-3211 Text FL78133 to 56654 Bayou George 3bd/2ba, 16x80,also avail. 2bd, Clean, quiet, lrg yrd, no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 Springfield 2br/1.5 ba townhome $595/mo 850-624-1997 Ask for Jean. Text FL89518 to 56654 ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL75823 to 56654 $80,900!GRAND LAGOON COVE 6903 North Lagoon #21, PCB, FL 32408 1BR/1B UPDATED! Comm Pool & Docks.Cynthia Luster Coastal Property Services 850-691-7927 Cove 3br/2ba Lg Brick HomeAll electric, remod. & hardwood floors. Landsc. Spacious backyard workshop. (850) 832-4590. Text FL84867 to 56654 Panama City The Cove 416 PaloAlto AveNEW TO MARKET HOMEnew to market, recently renovated 1400 sqf. 2br, 2bath, $142k Make offer for quick sale Call: Don at Nations Realestate 850-814-4242 Waterfront Home 1211 Venetian Way WATERFRONT Beautiful home on 2 lots, 3bd/3ba, 2,500sq.ft. on the water! $332,900 Call Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850) 866-2158 txt FL83503 to 56654 1012 Barracuda Dr Bay Point Perfect homefor your family located on cul-de-sac in exclusive, gated neighborhood. Kitchen lovers delight, granite & custom cabinets. 3 bdrm with a bonus room/ office. 1st floor master 2.5 baths + pool bath. Hope Abbott Bay Point Real Estate 850-596-7653 3712 E Third StPanama City, FL 3800 Sqft whse space w/ 3 offices! $135,500 Cynthia LusterCoastal Property Services850-691-7927 395 Wahoo Rd. Dock your yacht behind your house in this 3bd/2ba.Bay Point Canal Home! $379,000Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 3102 Preserve Rookery Blvd. Fabulous 4bd/5ba executive home in the gated Preserve community. $679,900Bay Point Real EstateCall Ray Young (850) 832-9999 Pirate’s Cove at 204 Cain Road Lake Powell 1bd/1ba Condo approx. 800 sq.ft. furnished, pools, private boat ramp, covered parking. $150K Call (850) 832-2782 or (850) 819-6929 t xt FL87402 to 56654 FOR SALE BY OWNER138 +/-Acres(12 miles North of PC) 103 modular home lots platted. 80% uplands, grass roads, lots of Magnolias and Oaks. 1/4 miles creek frontage. ($359,000) $2,600/acre Clear Creek Lands, LLC 850-865-8585 txt FL89448 to 56654 Emerald ResourceKitchens/Baths/Tile/ Flooring/Carpentry Decks/Stairs Architectural Productswww.emeraldwoodworx.com850-276-4363 Free Estimates $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Guyson Construction & Roofing Lic # CCC1330599 (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAY ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood, Call/Text 850-527-7017 Any Time Tree Removal!850-265-9794Text FL81660 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 BJs Lawn & Tree Service! Offering 25% off tree removal! Licensed & Insured. Free Estimates! Accepting all major credit cards! (850) 596-4642 Steve Hauling and Land ClearingDriveway repair and fill dirt. Free estimates. Contact Steve Pitts 850-896-4237 Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 PAINTING Interior & Exterior References! 35+yrs exp.! Call (229)894-4916 or (229)894-4917 !!Bob’s Home Repairs!!Roof, soffit, facia, door & window replacement or repair.and light remodeling Dial850-257-6366 Home Repairs Any Job, Large Or Small. New Installs, Kitchens, Baths Paint, Tile, Wood rot, Electric, Plumb. Robert 850-832-7972 Int/ext painting, Clean-ups/sod, pressure washing, rock/flower beds, lawns.Save 20% Call Roy 850-303-8526 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 Just Cuttin UpLawn Care Svc, Palm Tree Trimming. Best prices in Bay Co. with references. Long or Short term. Free Estimates. Sam 850-832-5928 Private Home Health CareNeed in home care for your elderly loved ones? Then callWe Care For You, LLCto assist with your daily needs. 850-358-1995 All Home Repairs & RemodelingWood rot, roofs repairs, drywall, painting, vinyl, windows, doors, fencing. Lic & Ins. Sam (850)348-0207 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 ACLASSIC TOUCH An Honest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 18yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 774-3977 txt FL88189 to56654 Happy HouseDetail CleaningLic, bonded, insured850-258-1204 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 Starfish Beach Concrete, foundations, remodeling, building, decks, maintenance and repairs! (850) 819-0300 Bill W Hash Remodeling & Consulting Master Craftsman w/ 33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569txt FL66163 to 56654 Exp CNA Will care for Elderly in your home! meals,light housekeeping! Non-smoker. 36 yr exp. Ref. 850 348-5866 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. TOGETA BETTERJOB become a better reader.Free tutoring for adults. Call Literacy Volunteers of Bay County Public Library.872-7500 Classifieds work! Call To Place An Ad 747-5020 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Friday, February 23, 2018 D D 5 5 NF-1180157 NF-1116606 2007 Toyota TundraNice Truck, Clean, #973 Sale Price: $19,992 BillCramerGM.comOver 200 UsedPartial List Below Plus tax, title, license, $95 electronic 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, FL850-250-5489877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.com 2005 Ford Freestar Auto, V6, SEL, #001 Sale Price: $5,993 2010 Ford Explorer Auto, V6, XLT, #622 Sale Price: $10,9932011 Cadillac CTSPerformance, XM Radio, #187 Sale Price: $12,9942017 RAMT Promaster 1500AM/FM/MP3, V6, #018 Sale Price: $20,992 2017 Chevy Silverado 2500 4WD, High Country, #283 Sale Price: $62,491 2013 Nissan 370Z Manual, Touring, #189 Sale Price: $21,992 Nice Truck, Cl Cl Cl l Cl Cl l Cl Cl Cl Cl C ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea n, n n n n n n n #973 Sale Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr Pr ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic ic e: $ $ $ 19 19 19 19 19 9 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 9 19 19 19 19 19 1 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ,9 9 9 9 9 ,9 9 9 9 9 9 ,9 9 ,9 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 92 ShopHERE2015 GMC Acadia Auto, Low Miles, #054 Sale Price: $29,993 2013 Chevy Suburban 4 Wheel Drive, LTZ, #969 Sale Price: $31,692 2012 Hyundai Veloster Auto, 4 Cylinder, #171 Sale Price: $9,994 2014 Toyota Camry Auto, V6, LS, #608 Sale Price: $10,994 2015 Toyota Highlander V6, Platinum, #548 Sale Price: $26,994 2013 Toyota Avalon Auto, V6, XLE, #180 Sale Price: $16,492 2015 Hyundai Genesis Bluetooth Phone, #918 Sale Price: $17,994 2017 Jeep Compass Manual, Sport, #885 Sale Price: $15,9942016 Mercedes GLE 350Auto, V6, #910 Sale Price: $42,994 NF-1178113 NF-1180158 NF-1180159 NF-1180161 Classic German Sportscar 1980 Mercedes Benz 450SL -Great condition with new soft top, original hard top, and new tires. Approximately 92K original miles. $8,000 or OBO. Call (850)319-4265 or (850) 774-1190. txt FL89388 to 56654 2002 Toyota Camry LE4-Door, Automatic, AC, power windows, power locks, AM/FM CD. Cruise Control. Very good condition. Local trade. Only $3,888. Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 Text FL82206 to 56654 2006 Toyota PriusOne owner, no accidents, 50 miles per gallon. Power windows, power locks, cruise control. AM/FM CD, 96k miles, $5,495. Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 Text FL82206 to 56654 2008 Toyota Avalon Limited4-door sedan, blizzard pearl, excellent condition, one owner, 128,300 miles. $7,800. Call: 850-685-2389 2011 BMW 335i, hard top convertible, 66K miles, NAV, beautiful car, value priced at $17,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 Buick Lucerne CXL, 1 owner, low miles, LTHR, excellent cond., value priced at $8,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, 1 owner, only 36K miles, showroom cond., value priced at $14,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2014 Cadillac ATS, 1 owner, 3K miles, LTHR, warranty, save $$$, value priced at $18,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2014 Nissan Altima S4-Door, 4Cyl, Automatic. AC, power windows, power locks, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM CD, 63K miles, white, new tires and in excellent condition. $8,995 Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 Text FL82206 to 56654 2014 Toyota Carolla L4-door, 4cyl, automatic, AC, power windows, power locks, AM/FM CD w/Bluetooth. New Tires, one owner, white, only 25k miles. Excellent condition, still under factory warranty! $10,980. Call Bay Auto Outlet 850-265-3535 Text FL82206 to 56654 2015 Cadillac SRX, 1 owner, 22K miles, NAV, blindside alert, warranty to 100K miles, value priced at $29,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2016 Cadillac CTS, 1 owner, 22K miles, warranty, NAV, save $$$ off new, value priced at $29,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2016 Ford Explorer LTD., 1 owner, only 29K miles, LTHR, NAV, warranty, value priced at $29,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2017 Audi A3, TFSI Premium, 1 owner, 5K miles, warranty, save $$$$, value priced at $25,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2017 Toyota Camry XSE: Gray mica, 1500 miles. Pur. at PC Toyota; loaded with tech features. Sticker Price $29,500; but due to illness wife cannot drive. Asking $24,500. 850-914-9174. txt FL89390 to 56654 ONE OWNER SUPER CLEAN MUSTANG2008 Ford Mustang, mustang blue 2/ grey interior. 6 Cal, 5 Speed, 114k miles. $6000.00 Call: 850-527-2868 to see or test drive. 1997 Ford F-850 Diesel Box TruckBody copy, all tires like new, 163k miles, very good condition, sales price $6,500. Call Don Nations (850) 814-4242 2014 Dodge Tradesman PickupGreat Condition, 2 tone paint. P/W P/L Automatic only 20K miles. 4 Door spray in bed liner.. $22,500. Call: 850-236-8138 2011 Keystone Cougar 5th Wheel28 ft, with 2 slides, very good condition. Xlite with outdoor kitchen and shower. Upgraded T.Vs. $14,200. Call: 850-236-8138 2015 Sunseeker2500 TS. Like new. 4k miles. $57,500. 850-774-0400 Text FL89355 to 56654 There are more ways than ever to market your business, and The News Herald is here to help!Weve added the power of ThriveHive „ everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think.Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today. POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us). If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Spot Advertising works! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSD D 6 6 Friday, February 23, 2018| The News Herald NF-1180058 BILL CRAMER CHEVROLET BUICK GMC Our Pre-Owned Business Is Great, & We Need YOUR Vehicle To Supplement Our Inventory! 15 MINUTE NO OBLIGATION APPRAISALWE’RE BUYING THEM ALL! ALL YEARS! ALL MODELS! YOU NAME IT, WE’LL BUY IT! WE WILL NOT BE OUTBID!WE NEED TO BUY YOUR VEHICLE! 2251 West 23rd St. Panama City, Fl 850-250-5489 • 877-361-1815 BillCramerGM.com**$159 2013 Focus, $199 2016 Altima, $199 2016 Cruze, $215 2017 Patriot and $245 Renegade down cash or trade; 75 months at 2.99 % APR ($14.63/mo per $1000 borrowed) WAC; selling price of $10,900 2013 Focus, $13,800 2016 Altima, $13,992 Cruze, $14,900 Patriot and $16,995 Renegade. Plus tax, title, license, dealer adds, $95 electronic filing fee, and $595 dealer prep fee on all vehicles. Pricing good through 2/28/18. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. HOURS: Mon-Fri: 8:30am 7:00pm Saturday: 8:30am 6pm Sunday: 1:00pm 5pmFive Decades.... Three Generations.... One Tradition. 2005 FORD FREESTAR#18500100AUTO, V6, SEL $5,994 2013 CHEVY SPARK #18101310HATCH, 1LT, SIRIUS $7,991 2009 CHEVY IMPALA#18221920 AUTO, V6, LS $8,992 2012 HYUNDAI VELOSTER#18217110AUTO, 4 CYLINDER $9,994 2013 JEEP COMPASS# 18222610AUTO, AM/FM/CD $10,992 2010 FORD EXPLORER#17262210 AUTO, V6, XLT $10,993 2014 TOYOTA CAMRY#17560810AUTO, 4 DOOR $10,994 2011 TOWN & COUNTRY#18217610AUTO, TOURING-L $10,995 2005 GMC YUKON XL#17302910AUTO, 4 WD, V8 $10,995 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX#17770820AUTO, 1LT $11,874 2014 KIA OPTIMA#18600400AM/FM/CD/MP3 $11,900 2012 SUBARU IMPREZA#17292910AUTO, LEATHER $11,991 2013 NISSAN ALTIMA#17244620AUTO, AM/FM/CD $11,991 2014 KIA SOUL#18501110AM/FM/MP3, 4 CYL. $11,992 2015 DODGE DART#17144610MANUAL, SXT $11,994 2010 TOYOTA RAV4# 17142910AUTO, 4WD $12,493 2009 CADILLAC STS#18600300AUTO, V6, LEATHER $12,990 2011 BUICK LUCERNE#17113110 AM/FM/XM/CD $12,991 2015 CHEVY IMPALA#18504400AUTO, V6 $12,992 2001 CHEVY CORVETTE#17293910AUTO, 5.7L $12,992 2011 CADILLAC CTS#17318720PERFORMANCE, XM $12,994 2016 JEEP PATRIOT#18705300SPORT, MANUAL $13,592 2014 KIA OPTIMA#18406300AM/FM/CD, LX $13,791 2015 HONDA CIVIC#18505800LX, CVT, CLOTH $13,991 2015 CHEVY EQUINOX#18243310AUTO, 4 CYL., 2LT $13,991 2016 KIA OPTIMA#18802900AUTO, 4 CYL., LX $13,992 2016 CHEVY CRUZE#18703400AUTO, TURBO 4 CYL. $13,992 2015 FORD ESCAPE#18205710AUTO, LOW MILES $13,993 2015 CHEVY MALIBU#18205010AUTO, 4 CYL., 1LT $14,992 2015 CHEVY TRAX#18705600SIRIUS XM, LT $15,991 2016 NISSAN ALTIMA#17124410AUTO, AM/FM/CD/MP3 $15,994 2017 JEEP COMPASS#17788500MANUAL, SPORT $15,994 2013 TOYOTA AVALON#17218011AUTO, V6, XLE $16,492 2015 CHEVY EQUINOX#18218020AUTO, 4 CYL., 1LT $16,991 2017 JEEP RENEGADE#17788300AUTO, LATITUDE $16,995 2014 HONDA CR-V#18245910EX-L, AM/FM/CD $17,991 2015 CHEVY EQUINOX#18807600AUTO, 4 CYL., LT $17,991 2012 CADILLAC SRX#17490710AUTO, V6, BOSE $17,993 2015 HYUNDAI GENESIS#17591800BLUETOOTH PHONE $17,994 2013 CADILLAC SRX#17280810 V6, LUXURY $19,991 2017 RAMT PROMASTER 1500#18701800 AM/FM/MP3, V6 $20,992 2017 RAMT PROMASTER 1500#18701300AM/FM/MP3, V6 $21,492 2013 NISSAN 370Z#17318920MANUAL, TOURING $21,992 2016 CHEVY MALIBU#171283104 CYL., PREMIER $21,995 2015 JEEP WRANGLER#188049004WD, V6, SPORT $24,992 2015 RAM 1500#18503300AUTO, CREW, 5.7L $25,992 2015 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER#17254810V6, PLATINUM $26,994 2015 CHEVY CAMARO#18232310 AUTO, SS W/1SS $26,994 2017 CHEVY MALIBU#17129110AUTO, TURBO 4 CYL. $27,992 2013 TOYOTA TUNDRA#175909004WD, CREWMAX $27,994 2016 CADILLAC SRX#18706000AUTO, V6, LUXURY $29,991 2015 GMC ACADIA#17205410AUTO, LOW MILES $29,993 2013 GMC YUKON XL#18231210AUTO, DENALI $30,995 2013 CHEVY SUBURBAN#172969104WD, LTZ $31,692 2015 FORD EXPEDITION#18235430KING RANCH $34,991 2017 TOYOTA 4RUNNER#18240310AUTO, ROOF RACK $34,992 2016 MERCEDES GLE 350#17591000AUTO, V6 $42,994 2016 GMC YUKON#18245310SIRIUS, SLT $44,991 2014 GMC SIERRA 2500HD#182111104WD, SLT, CREW $45,991 2017 RAM 2500#187027004X4, CREW CAB $45,992 2016 CHEVY TAHOE#18228510 LTZ, SUNROOF $49,892 2016 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500HD#18225110HIGH CNTRY, CC $52,795 2016 GMC YUKON#18504500AUTO, V8 $58,992 2016 CADILLAC ESCALADE#18231710AUTO, LEATHER $61,992 2017 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500#182283104WD, HIGH CNTRY. $62,491 2016 Chevy Cruze 2013 Ford Focus$159DOWN $159PER MO.** 2016 Nissan Altima $199DOWN $199PER MO.** 2017 Jeep Patriot$215DOWN $215PER MO.** HUGE USED CAR SALE!$16,995 $245DOWN $245PER MO.** 2017 Jeep Renegade$13,992$199DOWN $199PER MO.** “DEALS OF THE WEEK”

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Dining: Boomerang Pizza | 10-11 Beach Insider: Wings of Freedom | 19-21 Movietown: Black Panther | 26 LUCKY YOU:Hiaasen novel adapted for GCSC stage treatment | 6-7ENTERTAINERISSUE NO. 157 €F riday, February 23, 2018 € FREE

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E2 Friday, February 23, 2018 | INSIDE SAVE THE DATEUndercurrents ..............4 Lucky You .............. 6-7 Jam Sessions .................8 Boomerang Pizza Kitchen 10-11 Seen-on-Scene: Food trucks 14-15 Liquid Dream Fishing Team 17 Community Spotlight ..18 Beach Insider: Wings of Freedom .................19-21 Nightlife ....................22 Lifes A Beach ..............23 Movietown: Black Panther 26 A Land Remembered .....28 Snowbird Calendar ......29 GO & DO: Calendar 31-36Gulf Coast State College presents Lucky You,Ž adapted from a novel by Carl Hiaasen and opening Friday in Panama City. [TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] ABOUT US Tony Simmons 850-747-5080 tsimmons@pcnh.com Jan Waddy 850-747-5072 jwaddy@pcnh.com Patti Blake 850-522-5182 pblake@pcnh.com Carson Graham Advertising Executive 850-747-5040 Josh Boucher 850-747-5095 jboucher@pcnh.com Alex Fos Advertising Executive 850-747-5033 ABOUT THE COVERAndrew Lloyd Webber hit show coming to PC in MarchNews Herald Staff ReportPANAMA CITY „ Andrew Lloyd Webbers Broadway hit The Wizard of Oz,Ž one of the most beloved of all family musicals, will fill the Marina Civic Center stage in a fullscale production on Sunday, March 11, at 7:30 p.m. OzŽ is the fourth of five season productions in the Panama City Music Associations 76th season in presenting the musical fine arts to greater Panama City audiences. The show, a spectacular celebration of the iconic 1939 MGM film, twists its way on a magical tour from the moment the tornado touches down and transports the audience to a dazzling Oz, complete with munchkins and flying monkeys.The musical tells the story a Kansas farm girl who travels over the rainbow to discover the magical power of home. The audience will have the virtual experience of traveling down the yellow brick road and beyond with Dorothy, Toto, and their friends the Cowardly Lion, Tin Man and Scarecrow. Its a faithful adaptation of the film recreating the dialogue and structure of the MGM classic nearly scene for scene, though it is adapted for live stage performance. Thelavish production features breathtaking special effects, dazzling choreography and classic songs. The show includes the songs Over The Rainbow,Ž Munchkinland (Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead),Ž If I Only Had A Brain/A Heart/ The Nerve,Ž Were Off To See The Wizard (Follow The Yellow Brick Road),Ž The Jitterbug,Ž The Merry Old Land of OzŽ and If I Were King Of The Forest.Ž Tickets ($35-$50) are available at the Marina Civic Center box office, 8 Harrison Ave.,at 850-763-4696 or by visiting the Panama City Music Association website, PCMusicAssociation.com. PCMAs final production of the season will be a performance of the worldacclaimed mens chorus, Chanticleer, on March 21. The chorus will perform an inspiring program called The Heart of a Soldier.ŽThe Wizard of Oz hits homeThe Wizard of OzŽ is the fourth production of the Panama City Music Associations “ ve-show season. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] What: Andrew Lloyd Webbers Broadway hit musical; presented by Panama City Music Association When: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 11 Where: Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City Tickets: $35-$50 at the Marina Civic Center Box Of“ ce, 850-763-4696, or www.pcmusicassociation.comWIZARD OF OZ

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E3

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E4 Friday, February 23, 2018 | PANAMA CITY Despite the headline, this is not a column about death. Or about the passage of time. Its not about loss or grief, or nostalgia for a golden era long past, either. But youd be forgiven if you got that idea. Ten years ago on the morning of Feb. 23, hundreds of lives changed „ some shaken to the foundations, some not so deeply. The ripples continue to spread, rebounding off the unseen shores of past and future along which we all travel together and back again, crossing and crisscrossing, but somehow never completely fading away. And thats what this is about „ an intersection of souls in the ripples of time. In the weeks that followed that day, a grief counselor handed me a book she thought would bring me ... something. Comfort, perhaps, or a modicum of understanding that would provide some peace. Dont be dismayed at good-byes,Ž the book told me. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends.Ž The paperbackwas IllusionsŽ by Richard Bach, author of Jonathan Livingston SeagullŽ and other stories. Id read it in high school, when it was new. Back then, about age 14, I was moved by its tale of a reluctant messiah,Ž and felt my world being opened by its descriptions of how mortal perceptions limit our interaction with the greater cosmos. The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each others life,Ž I read. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.Ž Its not great literature, but its compelling. Id already re-read it a few times in the intervening decades. Id even picked up copies from used bookstores and given it to friends. It seemed somehow prescient of her to recommend it to me in that moment. SoI read it again, but with a gaping hole in my heart that it couldnt fill. Your friends will know you better in the first minute you meet than your acquaintances will know you in a thousand years,Ž it said. Ten years later, tears in my eyes, Im reading it again. I have to remember some things, and despite the visual nature of modern memory „ all those thousands of digital photos and video clips we keep and share „ I guess my default memory-stimulus is text-based. What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the master calls a butterfly,Ž the book says. I know these things. Theyre in my bones. I shouldnt need to be reminded. And yet, as time goes by, simple truths become obscured by the trappings of daily life. The paradoxical struggleŽ to be alive in the moment means losing sight of past and future „ though those constructs are shared illusions. Ten years ago on the evening of Feb. 23, the black box theatre at Gulf Coast State College was loaned out for a gathering of drama students, family and friends to meet and share stories about a singular soul that had passed among them and left her mark. This year on Friday the 23rd, a show called Lucky YouŽ is opening. She isnt here any more, but she will always be here. Andhow lucky were we toknow her? Lucky me. Lucky you. This is a test to see if your mission in this life is complete,Ž the Messiahs Handbook says. If you are alive, it isnt.Ž Peace.UNDERCURRENTSTime, death and other Illusions Tony SimmonsRemembering Marisa Williams on the 10th anniversary of her passing. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] IllusionsŽ by Richard Bach, subtitled The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah.Ž Dont let the title fool you, for even the narrator agrees that Everything in this book could be wrong.Ž

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E5

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E6 Friday, February 23, 2018 | Only fourth time Lucky You has played on stageBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Luck had little to do with getting author Carl Hiaasens permission to present a stage play based on his novel, Lucky You.Ž It took some hard work by director and associate professorJason Hedden of the Division of Visual and Performing Arts at Gulf Coast State College. The novel was brilliantly adapted for the stage by Matthew Francis and Denis Calandra, whom I had the honor of studying with while an undergraduate theatre major at the University of South Florida,Ž Hedden explained. They were instrumental in helping me connect with Mr. Hiaasen to gain permission to present their script at GCSC.Ž Hedden said that, whether youre a longtime fan of Hiaasens work or a newbie, the audience is in for a treat with this production. The story focuses on several residents of Grange,famous for its miracles, who share a winning lottery number and the mayhem that ensures as they fight over the $28 million jackpot. His readers know he creates hilarious, unforgettable characters and plots while skillfully addressing social, political, economic and environmental injustices,Ž Hedden said.This is the onlyof Hiaasens novels to be adapted into a play, and only the fourth time this unpublished script has been produced. ... Its the first time a college has been permitted to produce it.Ž The cast consists of current GCSC students, alumni and community actors, including Anastasia Dengerud, Dylan Van Slyke, Natalie Sorrento, Hannah Elise Roberson, Rachel Eiland-Hall, Christian Sullivan, Anthony Mathis, Hollye Helms, Austin Roberts, Ian Edmonds, Kamal A. Lewis and Mat Birmingham. Seating is limited and the production is recommended for mature audiences due to adult content. The brief production history includes a 2003 workshop production, a month-long production in late 2006/early 2007 by the Key West Players, and most recently a 2008 production at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. Hedden had to work through Hiaasens agents and receive special permission from the author before proceeding with the show. Carl Hiaasen is very particular, as most authors are, but hes known for not allowing adaptations of his work,Ž Hedden said. Word was he was not happy with Striptease, which was adapted for film in the mid-90s with Demi Moore in the lead role. Since then, I think there have been only two other adaptations of his work, and they were childrens books.Ž Hedden also securedrights to music specially written for the show: The great Loudon Wainwright III generously donated use of the music he composed and performed for the 2008 Edinburgh production,Ž he said.GCSC comedy adaptation Hiaasen-approved GO & DOWhat: Comedic play based on a novel by Carl Hiaasen Where: Amelia Center Theatre Lab, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City When: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 23 and 24, and March 1, 2 and 3; and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24 and 25, and March 4 Admission: $20; $10 for high school students, seniors and military; free to GCSC and Florida State University Panama City students, faculty and staff with a valid ID Details and advanced tickets: GulfCoast.edu/artsLUCKY YOUAnastasia Dengerud, left, and Dylan Van Slyke star as Jolene and Tom in the Gulf Coast State College production of Carl Hiaasens Lucky You.Ž [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] Mat Birmingham and Rachel Eiland-Hall perform a scene from Lucky You. See COMEDY, 7

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E7Intimate experience The play will be presented in the Amelia Center Theatre Lab at GCSC, 5230 W. U.S.98. Heddens approach to staging the production makes use of the specific traits of the black boxŽ lab, which has limited seating and places the actors close to their audience for an intimate theatre experience. I chose to make this production scenically minimalistic to allow the words and characters to take precedence and give the audience an opportunity to fill in the visual gaps with their imagination, much the way we do when reading a novel,Ž Hedden said. The actorsuse wooden cubes to simulate everything from car seats to tables to beds. Only the costumes and characters are colorful. There are no other props. It allows for a lot more imaginative work as well as honing in on our pantomime skills,Ž Dengerud said of workingwithout set decorations or props. You have to imagine it and it has to be real enough for the audience to see it too.Ž Dengerud plays Jolene,Ž whose winning lottery numbers were her age at the time each of six romantic relationships ended. She wants to use her winnings to buy a plot of land, but thats endangered when her ticket is stolen. Van Slyke plays Tom,Ž a reporter who helps Jolene while searching for his own motivations. I really like how close it is, so they can really get into it,Ž Van Slyke said of his first time working in the black box theater. Pantomime allows you to be more free with your hands and with character choices.Ž Hedden credited many sources with making the play happen here:I am grateful to Carl Hiaasen for creating these characters and allowing us to be the first college to present this work.Lastly, I am indebted to my colleagues, students and community members for their active collaboration on this production.Ž Birmingham, one of the community members and former students in the production, called GCSC his home away from homeŽ because he remains active with the theater. He playstwo characters in Lucky YouŽ „ a newspaper editor and an arsonist. Its a pretty interesting dynamic between the two of them,Ž he said. Its always a challenge when playing two separate characters and making them completely different.Ž Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday,Feb. 23 and 24, and March 1, 2 and 3; withmatinee performances at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday,Feb. 24 and 25, and March 4. General admission tickets are $20; $10 for high school students, seniors and military; free to GCSC and Florida State University Panama City students, faculty and staffwith a valid ID. Advanced tickets can be purchased at GulfCoast.edu/arts. COMEDYFrom Page 6 GO & DOThe cast of Lucky YouŽ includes current GCSC students, alumni and community members. [PHOTOS BY TONY SIMMONS/THE NEWS HERALD] From left, Ian Edmonds, Tony Mathis, Natalie Sorrento and Christian Sullivan stage a bit of scheming and eavesdropping from Lucky You. Kamal A. Lewis, left, and Rachel Eiland-Hall have two different ways of communicating in Lucky You.Ž

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E8 Friday, February 23, 2018 | By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ They were a group of friends, fellow members of the Ukulele Orchestra of St. Andrews, and were sitting in a knitting and crocheting class at Floriopolis studio and gallery when they decided to form a band. We were making hats, and they never turned out to plan,Ž said band member Valerie Woods. Our friend Karen ... told us about the Japanese concept of wabi sabi and how thatsOK.Perfectly imperfect is OK.Ž When they needed a name for a random gig theyd agreed to play in August 2017, they landed on Wabi Sabi. My husband I were going to play, but then they started billing it as Vals band is coming,Ž Woods said. So she needed aband, and the band needed a name. Since then, theyve played the Strumming Man ukulele festival, Little Village and other local gigs. Along with Woods on uke, the group includes Denise Denaro on washboard and bells, Jennifer Rollins on uke, Julie Merritt on upright bass and Amanda Matthews on miniature piano/keyboards. We love house parties, especially with big bathrooms cause the acoustics are great,Ž Denaro said. Woods is a software training specialist, Rollins is an elementaryschool librarian, Merritt does wildlife safety assessments for airports, Denaro is an advisor for a graduate nursing program, and Matthews is a working musician who also teaches piano. The interview was often broken by their laughter as they tossed jokes fast and furious. Woods said, This is what every rehearsal islike. We just laugh a lot.Ž Its therapeutic,Ž Denaro said. Its our Bunko.Ž Merritt said her husband is with a band that is nothing like hers since they dont worry about what theyre going to wear or what colorstocoordinate. Meanwhile, the Wabi Sabis drink tea and share essential oils at rehearsals. Were so punk rock,Ž Denaro said. Were hardcore. We end rehearsals at 8:30 flat,Ž Woods said, with Rollins adding that she has to get to bed early so she can be at school early. The members share a taste in music and they all contribute suggestions for the songs they choose to perform.Merritt said the songs also illustrate a nice balance of our ages.Ž Amanda is such a vat of information about music too,Ž Rollins said. Jazz music and standards „ shes brought a lot to it.Ž The group also credits Matthews with their unique arrangements and ensuring the harmonies are right. We dont want to sound like the original,Ž Denaro said. We want to sound like a girlified version of whatever.Ž They said a lot of people mispronounce their name as the Wasabis,Ž which theyre actually OK with to the extent that it suggests theyre hot, spicy women.Ž Woods said they were a tribe,Ž and Rollins suggested they were a found family.Ž But they still have trouble processing or acceptingwhat theyre doing on stage. I guess the biggest lesson is like, who knew that this kind of thing could happen late in life,Ž Denaro said. Im 50 years old and now I just started in a band? ... Its so fun.Ž This is our life,Ž Woods said. That just happened.ŽWabi Sabis strive for perfect imperfection JAM SESSIONSThe Wabi Sabis performed in the News Herald newsroom on Feb. 16. They are, from left, Julie Merritt, Jennifer Rollins, Valerie Woods and Denise Denaro. [PHOTOS BY KRISTY SMITH/THE NEWS HERALD] Denise Denaro says shes playing her grandmas ol washboard. The group formed when Valerie Woods needed a band to back her at a party. The gathered members of a knitting class. Julie Merritt also has a bass ukulele she plays, but she looks for venues where she can bring out the upright. Who: Singer-songwriter Aaron Bearden Where: View the show live on Facebook.com/PanamaCityNewsHerald; visit the News Heralds event listings on Facebook for a link to request tickets to see the show at The News Herald When: 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23NEXT JAM SESSION

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E10 Friday, February 23, 2018 | By Jan Waddy747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Boomerang Pizza Kitchen in Pier Park North plays to owner Deb Beckers playful spirit „ from the retro Shenanigans and Mousetraps boardgames on the wall to the Clue and Rock Em Sock Em Robots that customers can take back to their tables. I love the 60s toy era,Ž said Becker, who ran Polkadots Toys and Gifts in Pier Park for five years. Im so drawn to colorful things. ... Im like an Easter egg.Ž Her homemade fudge washer toy shops bestseller, and she now makes a variety of fudge flavors for Boomerang „ from traditional chocolate and chocolate peanut butter to carrot cake and red velvet. This is more of a smooth, creamy fudge done in abig kettle and a double-boiler,Ž Becker said. Caramel pecan cheesecake is one of my favorites.Ž Itmight have beenher Easy Bake Oven in the early60s that was the first clue toBeckers passion forbaking. I always loved to bake my brownies. I won first place in the county fairinChicago in fourth grade,Ž said Becker, 58. Now she makes her brownies from scratch with butter and bakesthemin the bottom ofthe double-decker brick oven at Boomerang, where her original Easy Bake Oven isalso on display. Those aremySkipper Dolls, my Barbie Doll and some games on the wall, game of Clue„ a lot of them are mine, a lot of fun memories. Like Strange Change, my brother and I used to play; it turnsfrom a square to a monster and squishes back to a square and monster again. It was a happy time really.Ž Boomerangs beach location opened in October, and now Becker goes back and forth between the new location and her original restaurant in Milton that opened more than three years ago. I lived in Atlanta for 30 years and every chance I got I would go to the Panhandle to vacation,Ž said Becker, whose background is in marketing. She realized the key to success in Milton, where she has a house, was changing her focus from a toy shop in historic downtown to food „ and making it one of Americas favorites. If its going to be pizza, it has to be the best in the Panhandle,Ž said Becker, who also has a condo at the beach. I practiced on my neighbors in Panama City Beach for two years. I used to have a stone in the oven, practiced with a brick and was getting pretty good at it, but the icing on the cake was going to pizza school and going to the master.Ž Becker went to the International School of Pizza in San Francisco, Calif., where she was trained by 12-time world pizza champ Tony Gemignani. The crust is the main thing. You have to get it right. We weigh everything out. Its chemistry,Ž Becker said. We use filtered water, and Tonys dough method to proof overnight. Something about using all fresh ingredients and real (extra virgin) olive oil.Ž Though she hails from Chicago, Ill., Boomerang serves New York style. This is more of the pizza people know about, but Chicago can go either using deep dish or cracker crust „a thin square cut pizza. This is authentic New York style, but it was an American pizza class; I also did Chicago style,Ž said Becker, as she tossed the pizza dough „ laughing as she got a little flour on her face. I was in the circus in college. I was a juggler; this is harder.Ž Troy Hill, part of the Boom Crew,haslearned never to assume customers are finished. The crust is so good, some customers get it to-go to munch on it later.Ž No crust gets leftbehind (even with kids). Someone the other day just had crust and said, No, Im taking this home,Ž Hill said. It seems everyone who comes in, comesback. Some customers come three to four times a week.Ž While Becker named the restaurant for its retro feel, boomerangŽ has taken on deeper meaning. The pizza is full of flavor, yet light „ and Boomerang Pizza Kitchen brings customers back FOOD & DRINK : DININGSpecialties: New York style pizza, housemade fudge Where: 15750 Panama City Beach Parkway, Unit 180, Panama City Beach (in Pier Park North in front of Dicks Sporting Goods) Hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday Discounts: Locals get 10 percent off Mondays; “ rst responders and military get 10 percent off Wednesdays Take out or order online: 850-775-1202 or www.boomerangpizzakitchen.com Details: boomerangpizzapcb@ gmail.com or Facebook: Boomerang Pizza Kitchen PCB See a video of owner Deb Becker making a Supreme pizza at Boomerang at NewsHerald.com.BOOMERANG PIZZA KITCHENBoomerang Pizza Kitchens Supreme features a made-from-scratch New York style crust topped with a house recipe San Marzano tomato sauce, Grande mozzarella, large slices of pepperoni, black olives, fresh green peppers and mushrooms, and Italian sausage that is cooked right on the pizza in the brick oven. [PHOTOS BY JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] See PIZZA, 11

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E11 FOOD & DRINK : DININGit all starts with the slightly chewy and crispy crust. When its done right, its so much easier on the digestive system. Of course the sauce is all made from scratch every day, herbs and everything,Ž said Becker, who uses San Marzano tomatoes in the sauce. I kind of came up with the sauce recipe on my own. Iwanted to have that whole tomato feel in there.Ž For the Supreme, she layers the dough with housemade sauce, Grande mozzarella, large pepperoni, black olives, green peppers and mushrooms, then the Italian sausage that spreads its flavor beneath the surface. We wear gloves to put the sausage on; the raw sausage bakes right into the pizza, the real New York way to do it,Ž Becker said. The pizza takes about eight minutes in the 550degree brick oven, and is rotated halfway through baking. Beckerhas a long wooden bubble popperŽ with metal prongs to pop the dough. Myfavorite is the Spinach Ricotta with sun-dried tomatoes, but sometimes Im in the mood for the Thai Chicken „ totally different,Ž Becker said. Hills favorite is the Meatball pizza. The Meatball with minced garlic that goes on and Parmesan cheese adds another flavor,Ž he said. The most popular is the Meat Lovers and a lot have been trying the Spinach Ricotta and Buffalo Chicken. Anyone can tell its good and fresh withmade-fromscratch dough.Ž On Tuesday, Savannah Langford and Joshua Cook of Panama City Beach stopped by to build their own favorite „ half chicken, spinach, mushrooms and jalapenos for her andhalf pepperoni for him. We love pizza and knew Maddios was here. We thought we would try it, and it looked so good on Facebook,Ž Langford said. Cook admitted, We eat pizza at least two or three times a week.Ž Customers and employees walk in and feel right at home, like grandmas house in a good way,Ž Becker said. Its great food, a fun wait staff. Were not a big chain, not treated like numbers.Ž Hill echoed the sentiment „ Its like family,Ž he said. And if you want to recreate the same feel at home, the retro clocks on the wall „ from cats to cows and stand mixers „and the cherry plates are for sale. PIZZAFrom Page 10Boomerang Pizza Kitchen features an assortment of retro 50s and 60s toys and games, many from owner Deb Beckers childhood in Chicago, Ill. Boomerang owner Deb Becker prepares the dough, which was proofed overnight, for her New York style crust using methods taught by 12-time World Pizza Champ Tony Gemignani at his International School of Pizza in San Francisco, Calif. A Simple Side Salad features Romaine, cucumbers, Roma tomatoes, carrots, mozzarella and house croutons „ with a side of freshly made Greek Vinaigrette. When its done right, its so much easier on the digestive system. Of course the sauce is all made from scratch every day, herbs and everything. I kind of came up with the sauce recipe on my own. Iwanted to have that whole tomato feel in there.ŽDeb Becker, owner of Boomerang Pizza Kitchen

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E12 Friday, February 23, 2018 |

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E14 Friday, February 23, 2018 | SEEN-ON-SCENESend us photos of events you've attended and your photos appear in an upcoming Seen-on-Scene. Email jwaddy@pcnh.com and tsimmons@pcnh.com.SHARE YOUR PHOTOSPCB Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival forges aheadCraft beer from across the Panhandle and nation was served at the Panama City Beach Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival on Feb. 17 at Aaron Bessant Park. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] A Key lime pie treat is just one of the gourmet frozen ice pops available from Frios. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Gekko sells hibachi chicken. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] When they arent in line, festival-goers enjoy food and drinks on their blankets and chairs, or at one of the tables provided. A few even sit on the stage, where children played Duck, Duck, Goose near the festivals DJ. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD]

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E15 SEEN-ON-SCENEDantonio Griggs prepares pork ribs for Smokin on Wheels at the Panama City Beach Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival on Feb. 17. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Back Beach Barbecue sells barbecue sandwiches and pulled pork nachos at the food truck festival.[JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Thousands of friends and families, including a few fourlegged members, came out for the Panama City Beach Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Guests 21 and older could buy craft beer tickets and then make their selections from the different breweries housed under tents at the Panama City Beach Food Truck & Craft Beer Festival. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD] Litas Treats food truck from Columbia, S.C., sold a variety of cupcakes (red velvet, chocolate, strawberry, banana pudding and salted caramel), and each VIP ticket holder received a free dessert. [JAN WADDY/THE NEWS HERALD]

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E16 Friday, February 23, 2018 |

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E17 LIQUID DREAM FISHING TEAMPANAMA CITY „ My cousin came to town from North Carolina and asked if Jake and I could take him fishing while he was here. My cousin has done limited fishing in his life; what he has done has been offshore or live bait. The next catch to this was that it is getting close to tournament time and we are in pre-fish mode. That meanswe spend the day finding the fish and schools but not hammering them until tournament time. We try to see or catch a tournament fish, we release and we leave so as not to sore lip the whole school. The plan was to meet at the landing at noon, as my cousin is not an early riser. I couldnt wait until noon and headed out at 9 a.m. While launching the boat, I noticed the water was very tannic from all the rain water north of us and the riversdumping in the bays. That meant sight fishing, and a lot of visual cues would be absent, unless you could find the handful of areas around the bays thathold a little bit clearer water. While waiting on them, I decided tocheck on a couple of spots that I couldnt take my cousin due to noise and movement. I went to a couple of docks and ponds that have held this time last year, and the last couple of weeks we made it out „ nothing. I knew fishing a 7:30a.m. dead low tide with 15 mph winds and tannic water would be tough, but didnt expect this tough. I headed back at 11a.m. toward the landing and wanted to check one more spot before I picked them up. There areseven docks in the bays' systems around here I fish that 80 percentof the time will produce reds. I thought of another one of those docks to hit and see if it was holding before I picked up the fellas. I got to the dock. Again, no visibility, so I continued to throw the shad with pro cure.I made a cast thatwas close to a piling and chose not to reel until moving forward so I didnt hang the piling. I got into position to reel and it didnt budge, so I jerked trying to snatch it off the piling. The line started running and drag going out; it wasnt a piling. The fish ran throughthree sets of piling and went out the other side. From the pull and run, I assumed I had hooked a big ugly (Black Drum). All I could do was spin the bow toward the dock and reel, hoping it didnt pop. I got it back throughtwo sets and it started busting the top. I could see the toad of a red I had. I needed to land this fish for a quick measure, weigh and release to see if it was worth fishing on tournament day. I got it out from under the dock and let it run a little bit on the flats by the dock until I could get the net and land it. The red turned out to be 26.25 inches, weighing6.13 pounds. After measuring, weighing and a quick pic, I released it to fight on tournament date. I immediately left that spot not to sore lip the rest and headed to the landing to pick up my stepson and cousin. Itwas about time for thetide to start moving, so we headed for some flats. We stopped on the flats in a position so the windwould push us the way we wanted to go and byother docks to investigate. I had my cousin throwing a spoon since he didnt fish artificial; my sonthrew a chartreuse tail paddle; and Ithrew the blazing hornet shad with procure. We were throwing deep, shallow, retrieving fast, slow, jigging and popping. We werent catching trout, reds, catfish „ I mean nothing.Wegotto the point we were about to move spots, and I saw a roll on my sons bait.He threwright back and his drag immediately took off. We could make out maybetwo more reds with it, so I had my cousin throw at those to see if he could have hooked up „nothing. My son landed a chunk of a red at 23 inches,weighing 5.87 pounds. His red had shoulders and was so gorged up on something it looked like the fishs stomach could bust at any moment. We released and took off immediately, knowing we had good fish. I told my son it was too bad we werethree weeks from tournament and nottwo, as the tides would be the same. He was like, "Um, we aretwo weeks out." I had to check the calendar and he was correct. The tides are the sametwo weeks out, unless there is a new moon. So we like to prefish, startingthree weeks out because: 1) Finding the fish on different possible tides; 2) Week 2 the tides are the same as tournament unless a new moon; and 3) It allows the fish to recover from being hooked and not be pressureduntil tournament day. We checked two more spots that day and managed to catch a couple of small trout and a rat red. The fishing was tough and the conditions were rough, but we managed to land 12 pounds which is a good weight to weigh in around here.Caught 2 for 12 A n t h o n y W a t s o n Anthony WatsonAJ shows off his 6.13 pound red. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Jake holds his 5.87 pound red.

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E18 Friday, February 23, 2018 | COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHTWant to be in the spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Todd Herendeen Age: Adult Occupation: Entertainer Where you grew up: Garrett, Ind. Favorite local restaurant/favorite dish: PoFolks/ fried “ sh Favorite hangout: Todd Herendeen Theatre What you do for fun: Golf Name: Tara M. Grif“ n, DMD, Diplomate, ABDSM, ASBA Age: 42 Where you grew up: Fairhope, Ala. Favorite local restaurant: Sandbar Oyster Bar & Grill Favorite hangout: Local beach and condo pool What you do for fun: Golf

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WINGS OF FREEDOM: Historic aircra o er tours, ights | 20-21 BEACH INSIDERISSUE NO. 157 € Friday, February 23, 2018

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E20 Friday, February 23, 2018 | | Friday, February 23, 2018 E21 BEACH INSIDERHistoric World War II aircra open for tours, ightsBy Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ The skies above the beaches will roar as a touring flock of aging warbirds fly into Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. The Wings of Freedom Tour will bringthe WWII vintage Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O NineŽ;a Consolidated B-24 Liberator, WitchcraftŽ; a North American B-25 Mitchell, TondelayoŽ; and a P-51 Mustang, Toulouse NutsŽfor aunique historical display starting Wednesday, Feb. 28, and running through March 2. The Collings Foundation is sponsoring this living historyŽ tour of 110 U.S. cities. The foundation is a 501(c)3 nonprofit educational organization devoted to organizingevents that allow people to learn more about their heritage and history through direct participation. This is a rare opportunity to visit, explore and learn more about these unique and rare treasures of aviation history,Ž according to a release from the Foundations director of marketing, Hunter Chaney. The B-17 is one of only nine in flying condition in the United States. The B-24 Liberator is the sole remaining example of its type flying in the World. The B-25 is best known for being used in the daring Doolittle raid, and the P-51fighter recently received the prestigious Oshkosh Grand Champion Award for restoration.Ž Visitors are invited to explore the aircraft inside and out. Cost is $15 for adults and $5 for children under 12for access to up-close viewing and tours through the inside of the aircraft. Discounted rates are available for school groups. Daring visitors may also experience the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to actually take a 30-minute flight aboard these rare aircraft. Flights on either the B-17 or B-24 are $450 per person. B-25 flights are $400 per person. One might also claimsome stick timeŽflying in the worlds most storied airfighter. P-51 flight training is $2,200 for a half hour and $3,200 for a full hour.For reservations and information on flight experiences, call 800-568-8924. Touring through and flying in these aircraft is an experience in WWII history you will never forget,Ž Chaney said. Hope you can catch the planes flying in.Ž The Wings of Freedom touris celebrating its 29th year and visitscities in more than 35 states annually. Since its start, tens of millions of people have seen the bombers and fighter ondisplay. The planes are expected to arrive at the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport at 2 p.m. on Wednesday,and will be on display at SheltAir, 5325 Johnny Reaver Road,until they depart after noon operations onMarch 2. Hours of ground tours and display are: 2-4:30 p.m. Wednesday; 9:30 a.m. to4:30 p.m.on Thursday; and 9:30 a.m. to noononMarch 2. The 30-minute flight experiences are normally scheduled before and after the ground tour times listed. According to Chaney, the tour is a flying tribute to the flight crews who flew the planes, the ground crews who maintained them, the workers who built them, the soldiers, sailors and airmen they helped protect,and the citizens and families that share the freedomthey helped preserve. The B-17, B-25 and B-24 were the backbone of the American effort during the war from 1942 to 1945 and were famous for their ability to sustain damage and still accomplish the mission,Ž the foundation said. Despite the risks of anti-aircraft fire, attacking enemy fighters, and the harrowing environment of sub-zero temperatures, many B-17s, B-25s and B-24s safely brought their crews home.Ž The P-51 Mustang was affectionately known as the bombers Little FriendŽ „ saving countless crews from attacking enemy fighters. After the war, many aircraft were scrapped for their raw aluminum to rebuild a nation in post-war prosperity, and therefore very few were spared. The rarity of the B-17, B-25, B-24 and P-51 „ as well astheir importance to telling the story of WWII „ is why the Collings Foundation continues to fly and display the aircraft nationwide, the marketer said. At each location, we encourage local veterans and their families to visit and share their experiences and stories with the public,Ž according to Chaney. For aviation enthusiasts, the tour provides opportunity for the museum to come to the visitor and not the other way around.Ž ABOUT THE AIRCRAFTConsolidated B-24 Liberator WitchcraftŽ:In August 1944, the Collings Liberator was built at the Consolidated Aircraft Co.s Fort Worth, Texas plant.Delivered to the U.S. Army Air Force,in October of 1944 it was transferred to the Royal Air Force. Under the British flag, the B-24 saw combat in the Pacific Theater in operations ranging from anti-shipping to bombing and re-supply of resistance force operations.Abandoned after the war in a bomber graveyard in Khanpur, India,it was one of 36 B-24s the Indian Air Force succeeded in restoringto operational status, used until 1968. Itsat abandoned in India until British aircraft collector Doug Arnold obtained it in 1981. The aircraft was disassembled and transported back to England in a Heavy Lift cargo plane, whereit was advertised for sale in as isŽ condition. In 1984, Dr. Robert F. Collings purchased it;it brought to Stow, Mass., in four truckloads after a sea voyage. The Foundation intended to restore the plane for static display only, but Collings was persuaded to restore it to flying status by local B-24 crewmen. This made it about five times greater a project,Ž Collings said. We were convinced by the argument that only about three thousand people a year would see a static display, but three million might see it on a nationwide tour.Ž In 2005, she was repainted as WitchcraftŽ in honor of the veterans of the 8th Air Force, who flew in the European Theater during WWII.P-51 Mustang Toulouse NutsŽ: After WWII, the USAAF consolidated much of its fighter aircraft. Most piston powered fighters served substantially reduced roles as more advanced jet powered aircraft emerged. TF-51D Mustangs (two-seat trainers) were used to train fighter pilots until jet-trainerswere fully utilized. The Foundations TF-51D is one of three original TF-51Ds remaining in the world, painted in its original markings as a West Virginia Air Guard, 167th Fighter Squadron P-51. Tens of thousands of hours went into rebuilding this fighter to brand newŽ condition, including every surface, rivet, wire and instrument.Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O NineŽ: The most widely recognized and revered aircraft type of World War II, the B-17 Flying Fortresswas built at Long Beach, Calif., by the Douglas Aircraft Co. and accepted on April 7, 1945. Too late for combat, she served as part of the Air/Sea 1st Rescue Squadron and later in the Military Air Transport Service. In April 1952, she was instrumented and subjected to the effects of three different nuclear explosions. After a 13-year cool downŽ period,she sold as part of an 800-ton scrap pile and Aircraft Specialties Co. began the restoration. For 20 years, she served as a fire bomber dropping water and borate on forest fires. Sold in January 1986 to the Collings Foundation, she was restored back to her original wartime configuration andnamed Nine-ONineŽ in honor of a 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron plane of the same name which completed 140 missions without an abort or loss of a crewman.North American B-25 Mitchell, TondelayoŽ: Most famous for the Doolittle Raid on Japan, the first American attack made on the Japanese mainland after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Thisraid saw 16 B-25s take off from the aircraft carrierUSS Hornet on a daring mission that brought morale back to America in a time of war. The B-25 was never conceived to fly off of an aircraft carrier, but it adapted. Employed as a bomber in every theater of operations, and even as a ground attack aircraft and low-level bomber, the B-25 was a reliable aircraft with a proven record. After WWII, the B-25 saw considerable use in the civilian sector as a transport aircraft and as a fire-bomber over Americas forested regions. Visitors can find out more at the website, CollingsFoundation.org.Wings of Freedom soar over surfThe Wings of Freedom Tour will bring these WWII vintage aircraft to Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport for a uniqu e display Feb. 28 through March 2. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] The planes will be open for tours, with discounts available for school groups. A North American B-25 Mitchell, Tondelayo,Ž is one of the series of planes best known for being used in the daring Doolittle raid over Japan. A vintage Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, the Nine O NineŽ is one of only nine in ” ying condition in the United States. What: Tours of historic aircraft; ” ights also available Where: Northwest Florida Beaches International Airports SheltAir location, 5325 Johnny Reaver Road When: Tours and display are 2-4:30 p.m. Wednesday; 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday; and 9:30 a.m. to noon on March 2 Tour: $15 for adults and $5 for children under 12; discounts available for school groups. Flight: 30-minute ” ight aboard the B-17 or B-24 is $450 per person; B-25 is $400 per person; P-51 ” ight is $2,200 for a half hour, $3,200 for a full hour Details and reservations: 800-568-8924WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR

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E22 Friday, February 23, 2018 |

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E23 LIFES A BEACHEd French shows off the perfect sand dollar he found.[PHOTOS BY HEATHER HOWARD/THE NEWS HERALD] A “ sherman shows off his huge catch at the jetties. A “ sherman tries his luck by the jetties. A pair of “ shermen head toward the water with their poles. A seagull takes a bath in the middle of the kiddie pool at St. Andrews State Park.

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E24 Friday, February 23, 2018 |

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E26 Friday, February 23, 2018 | MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUBEach week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com Cole: Black Panther explores duality Kendrick Lamar says in the Black PantherŽsoundtrack, I am TChalla/I am Killmonger.Ž Clearly Kendrick was aware of the provocative duality the film presents. The origin story of King TChalla/Black Panther is a transcendent success because director Ryan Coogler was able to bring his (black) interests and sensibilities despite the (white) Marvel machine (or even white Hollywood). The story opens in 1992 Oakland, the site of Cooglers first masterpiece, Fruitvale Station,Ž which detailed the infamous final day of Oscar Grants life before it ended at the hands of a policeman. Black PantherŽ absolutely brings the heart behind that film into this one. TChalla may be typical as a hero, but its the villain Killmonger who brings the thematic interests to the forefront. Killmonger is Marvels best villain by a mile „ maybe all of cinemas. There is another version of Black PantherŽ where hes the hero. His motives and story are so compelling I found myself rooting for him more than once. Its he who brings into focus the thematic battles of generosity vs. isolationism, righteous rage vs. peacekeeping, and TChalla vs. Killmonger, each of which have astonishing arcs. Killmonger is so rightly impassioned that hes actually at the core of TChallas redemption. In a brilliant reversal, the white characters exist only to serve the black characters agendas. Klaue (white) steals Wakandan resources and culture. In fact, the afrofuturist Wakanda exists as a could-havebeen Africa had Europe not stolen its resources through colonialism. TChalla/Killmonger are blockbuster sides of the same coin W.E.B. Du Bois described: One ever feels his twoness „ an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.ŽRating: out of Matt: Black Panther celebrates culture Black PantherŽ uses the superhero genre to have conversations were all currently having: Should we serve our country with blind commitment, or push back against the forces that are destroying it?Ž Should we use our resources to protect our people, or help others in need?Ž That deep interest in societal culture is in every frame of Marvels latest venture. To be sure, its a celebration of black culture, and a bright and proud one at that. However, its also a celebration of culture in general, an awards assembly giving medals to those who lean into their own history, even while improving it. Those themes help Black PantherŽ exude confidence and power in even its quietest moments. Its vigor vibrates from the fictional country of Wakanda, a place so vibrantly beautiful and well-realized youll wish to jump into the screen. The story of a prince-turnedwarrior-king doesnt provide tons of plot surprises or even a super compelling protagonist. Nevertheless, it soars in its emotionally exciting action scenes (waterfall ceremony), its stacked cast of characters (greatest superhero sibling ever?), and potent villain psychology. Sure, Ryan Coogler has fallen into the Marvel trope of the hero having to fight the evil version of himself at the end of the film. It also follows the recent Marvel trend of creating villains who are empathetic and fully logical, to the point that you find yourself rooting for them. And with Jordans Killmonger, were shown one of the most rich and heartfelt antagonists in superhero history, making Bosemans Black Panther confront the truth in the films line, Its hard for a good man to be king.Ž Thankfully, Black Panther knows thats a challenge worth taking. Wakanda forever.Rating: out of Marvels Black Panther reigns Chadwick Boseman stars in Black Panther. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] 'Black Panther'Director: Ryan Coogler Starring: Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyongo, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, Andy Serkis, Sterling K. Brown Rated: PG-13 (for prolonged sequences of action violence, and a brief rude gesture)

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E28 Friday, February 23, 2018 | By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ A novel that reveals the daily struggles of pioneer families first moving into Florida will be celebrated with a multimedia presentation on March 1. It really gives the nittygritty about what pioneers had to go through to inhabit Florida „ wild hogs, bears, panthers, the mosquitoes and other varmints,Ž said Bob Daffin of theHistorical Society of Bay County. They had to deal with raiders, runaways from the army tormenting them. Dirt-poor people eking out a living. ... Im not sure Id have had that kind of fortitude.Ž The Historical Society will host a presentation and book signing for A Land Remembered,Ž the historical novel by Patrick D. Smith, at Forest Park Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St., on Thursday, March 1. The interactive multimedia show begins at 6 p.m., preceded by a book signing at 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 18 and younger. Advance tickets are on sale at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., or by calling 850-8180964. Proceeds benefit the Historical Society. Rick Smith, son of the author, will tell the story of his father and the experiences that led him to write his novels. Special emphasis will be placed on the saga of Florida pioneers as told in A Land Remembered.Ž The show combines Smiths quirky humor and storytelling with videos, photos, music and visual effects. People should be issued a copy of A Land Remembered when they cross the Florida state line,Ž Rick Smith said. It shows you the real Florida, not the vacation destination so many people think of it as.Ž Our mission is to educate parents and children on Florida history,Ž said Daffin, whose family originally homesteaded in the Marianna area. Were trying to tell people to bring your kids. It will keep childrens attention. Fifth grade to high school will grasp what hes trying to tell of Florida history.Ž The story starts in northern Florida with cattle ranchers driving herds to ports. This is the origin of the term crackers,Ž Daffin said, which referred to the sound of the whips cracking over the herds. At that time, Florida provided more beef to other regions than Texas did. Cuba became a big export target, as the merchants paid in gold. It deals in a very healthy way with race relations,Ž Daffin said of the novel. It doesnt shy away from the issues, and it uses the negative terminology because thats the language of the day and time.Ž The novel also tells how Seminole tribes suffered as cattle ranchers expanded into the state. Although the IndiansŽ taught the white men how to best herd their cattle in the lowlands, they were often the target of violence. Its historically accurate and won all of the Florida literary awards,Ž Daffin said. Anybody who wants information on the history of the state of Florida ought to read this book.Ž Patrick D. Smith also wrote Angel City,Ž which dealt with the trials of immigrants employed in Florida orange groves. He went and lived with them for a time,Ž Daffin said. Its a conscious reflection on how we treat people.Ž The last time Rick Smith was in town, his presentation filled the library to standing room only, Daffin said. They made sure to offer a larger venue this time. Interested readers can sample the novel and learn about its creation at the website, ALandRemembered.com.State history recalled to lifeThe Histoical Society of Bay County will host a multimedia presentation on The Land Remembered on March 1 at the Forest Park Methodist Church in Panama City. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] Rick Smith tours the nation providing a perspective on his fathers work. 'A Land Remembered'What: Multimedia presentation detailing the historical novel by Patrick D. Smith Where: Forest Park Methodist Church, 1401 W. 23rd St., Panama City When: Book signing at 5 p.m., followed by show at 6 p.m., on Thursday, March 1 Tickets: $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 18 and younger; on sale at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., or by calling 850-818-0964 GO & DO

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E29 GO & DO : SENIORS & SNOWBIRDS CALENDARWant to be included?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@ pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events is at editors discretion. Friday, Feb. 23SNOWBIRDS AND LOCALS WINTER CRAFT PROGRAM: at the Ark, Panama City Beach. Wood Burning 9-11:30 a.m.; Wood Carving 1-3 p.m.; Bridge 1-3 p.m. Cost is $40 a month, plus supplies; attend as many classes and activities as often as you wish for the monthly fee. Details, email layden32@ charter.net FREE SENIOR HEALTH FAIR: 9 a.m. to noon at HealthPlex, corner of Baldwin Road and State 77, Panama City. Details: 850-747-6540 SPANISH CLASS: 12:30 p.m. at Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance class offered. Details, 850-277-2730 GRAND SLAM FUNDRAISER: 6-10 p.m. at Edgewater Resort Conference Center, Panama City Beach. Enjoy a meal, dining music by saxophone artist Chris Godber, dancing entertainment by Jennifer Jones and her Edema & Bruisers Band. Tickets: $800 for a table, $100 per person. Bene“ ts the Panama City Beach Senior Center. Details, call Jim Barr at 850-814-8586 or the Senior Center at 850-233-5065 BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road in Panama City. For all levels. $5 per person at the door. For details, 850-2770566 or dpgordon01@yahoo. com Saturday, Feb. 24END OF SEASON CRAFT FAIR: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ark, 12902 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Sunday, Feb. 25SNOWBIRD DANCE: 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort and Convention Center's ballroom, Panama City Beach, with DJ Jim Lawson. Beer and wine specials, free popcorn, drawings, prizes and giveaways. General admission $3. Monday, Feb. 26WINTER RESIDENT GRAND FINALE: at Sheraton Bay Point Resort, Panama City Beach. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach. com LINE DANCING: noon at the Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance classes offered. For details, call 850-277-2730 Tuesday, Feb. 27TAI CHI A BETTER BALANCE: 9 am. at the Lynn Haven Senior Center, Lynn Haven, facilitated by a certi“ ed instructor. For details, call 850-277-2730 BEGINNER LINE DANCE CLASS: 10-11:30 a.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. All dancers welcome, $3 per person. Details, 850-233-5045 Wednesday, Feb.28CALLAWAY SENIORS PROGRAM: 9 a.m. to noon the Callaway Fellowship Center, hosted by the Bay County Council on Aging, with Exercise Classes, Tai Chi, Bingo, Line Dancing, Cards, Bingo and Lunch. Seniors 60 and over. Details, 850-769-3468. ART & FUN: 10:30 am. at the Lynn Haven Senior Center. For details, call 850-277-2730 LINE DANCING: noon at the Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance classes offered. For details, call 850-277-2730. CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH CLASS: 12:30 p.m. at the Lynn Haven Senior Center, facilitated by retired Spanish Teacher. For details call the center 850-277-2730. SENIOR'S WINTER SOFTBALL: 1-3 p.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Every Wednesday through March 14, enjoy recreational and semicompetitive slow-pitch softball. Open to all seniors, male or female, age 55 and older. Price: Free. Details at 850-238-0549 SNOWBIRD DANCE: 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort and Convention Center's ballroom, Panama City Beach, with DJ Jim Lawson. Beer and wine specials, free popcorn, drawings, prizes and giveaways. General admission $3. Thursday, March 1BEGINNER LINE DANCE CLASS: 10-11:30 a.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. All dancers welcome, $3 per person. Details, 850-233-5045 Friday, March 2SPANISH CLASS: 12:30 p.m. at Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance class offered. Details, 850-277-2730 Monday, March 5LINE DANCING: noon at the Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning & Advance classes offered. For details call 277-2730. Tuesday, March 6TAI CHI A BETTER BALANCE: 9 am. at the Lynn Haven Senior Center, Lynn Haven, facilitated by a certi“ ed instructor. For details, call 850-277-2730 BEGINNER LINE DANCE CLASS: 10-11:30 a.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. All dancers welcome, $3 per person. Details: 850-233-5045 RETIREMENT PLANNING WORKSHOP: 6 p.m. Jeff Cherry of Cherry Wealth Advisors will be hosting a retirement planning workshop for people nearing retirement or already retired at a local restaurant in Panama City Beach. Dinner is complementary. Reservations are required. Details, 850-243-7799 Wednesday, March 7ART & FUN: 10:30 am. Wednesdays at the Lynn Haven Senior Center, Lynn Haven. For details, call 850 277-2730 LINE DANCING: noon at the Lynn Haven Senior Center. Beginning and advance classes offered. For details, 850-277-2730. SENIOR'S WINTER SOFTBALL: 1-3 p.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Every Wednesday through March 14, 2018, enjoy recreational and semi-competitive slow-pitch softball. Open to all seniors, male or female, age 55 and older. Price: Free. Details at 850-238-0549 Wednesday, March 14SENIOR'S WINTER SOFTBALL: 1-3 p.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Enjoy recreational and semicompetitive slow-pitch softball. Open to all seniors, male or female, age 55 and older. Price: Free. Details at 850-238-0549 Thursday, March 15SPRING CONCERT: 6-9 p.m. at the Oat“ eld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. The “ nal Senior Center event of the season. Entertainment provided by Two Ole Guys and a Mic. This event is open to the public. Admission is $5 at the door. Hot dogs, chips and a drink will be served. Wine will be available. There will be a gift basket and 50/50 drawing. Winter residents dance at Snowbird Prom at the Edgewater conference center on Feb. 13. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] More eventsSee the GO & DO: Calendar on pages E31-E36 for more area events.

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E31 GO & DO : CALENDARHave an event?Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion of events in this calendar is at editors discretion.Friday, Feb. 23TRUNK SHOW 'ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER: Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn White's innovative wearables. Show runs until March 10. Details, 850-231-4500. ART SHOW Of MARY GARRISH:Open during regular hours through March 15 at The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City.Details at TheArtistCoveStudio.com 'LOCAL LANDSCAPES' ART BYHELEN BALLANCE: exhibit on display through FebruaryatSheraton Bay Point, Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach.Free admission, open to the public. BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12, at the Marina Civics Center. This exhibit features local artists. Admission is free. Details: 850-763-4696 30A WINE FESTIVAL: all day in Alys Beach off 30A. Bene“ ts Children's Volunteer Health Network. Mix 'n' Mingle 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Alys Beach Fire Pit with music by the Blue Ribbon Healers; tickets $95 per person plus Weekend Pass ticket. Bourbon, Beer and Butts 6-9 p.m. at Kelly Green with music by Marc Broussard; tickets $135 (included with Weekend Pass). Details, AlysBeach.com CHURCH AND THE ARTS ARNOLD HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND ENSEMBLE: 7 p.m. at Gulf Beach Presbyterian Church, 271 S. state 79, Panama City Beach. Part of the 26th annual Church and the Arts Concert Series. Admission is $10, and proceeds bene“ t the Community Food Pantry at Gulf Beach Presbyterian, as well as the performing organization. Details at PinkChurch.org 'SHREK, THE MUSICAL': 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club. Tickets: $15; $10 for students and children. 'THE CHARITABLE SISTERHOOD OF THE SECOND TRINITY VICTORY CHURCH': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. When the ladies of the Charitable Sisterhood meet to organize a relief effort for homeless Guatemalans, they are greeted with a small mountain of community donations but one woman's junk is another woman's treasure. Details and tickets, 850-265-3226 or kt-online.org 'LUCKY YOU': 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/arts SEVEN BRIDGES: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tribute to the music of the Eagles. Using no backing tracks or harmonizers, they re-create the experience of an Eagles concert. Buy season tickets for all six shows in the series for $150. Individual memberships are $25. Details and tickets at MartinTheatre.com or 850-763-8080 LIVE AT THE REP AMY BLACK: 7:30 p.m. at the Seaside Meeting Hall Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle Seaside. Tickets: $25. Details at LoveTheRep.comSaturday, Feb. 2430A WINE FESTIVAL: all day in Alys Beach off 30A. Bene“ ts Children's Volunteer Health Network. Festival seminars 1-3:30 p.m. at Fire Pit Park; tickets $30 plus Weekend Pass. Grand Tasting 3:30-6:30 p.m. at South Charles Street; tickets $230 each (included in Weekend Pass). Details, AlysBeach.com STRIDES FOR SCHOLARS 5K RUN: 8 a.m. starting at the walking park on Balboa Avenue, Panama City. Entry fee: $25for runners, $15 for walkers. Brunch and awards at 1311 Balboa Ave., immediately following the event. Preregistration and race packet pickup on Friday, Feb. 23,from 3-5 p.m. at 1311 Balboa Ave. Proceeds bene“ t the Foundation's Take Stock In Children Scholarship program. Details: 850-767-4111 or BayEducationFoundation. org or Active.com ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m.to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as“ ne art, master craft people. PLAN PROPAGATION: 9 a.m. to noon at the Panama City Garden Club, 810 Garden Club Drive. Presented by Master Gardener Steve Bates. Free and open to public. See GO, 32

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E32 Friday, February 23, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARDetails: 763-9563 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details atWaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through March on Central Square in Seaside. Get your pick of fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products, native plants and other unique items, special cooking demos and activities. Help sustain local growers and makers. Details at SeasideFL.com FLORIDA MOPARS 9TH ANNUAL CAR SHOW: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fridays, 1022 W. 23rd St., Panama City. Great music, cool cars, door prizes, more. Portion of proceeds to bene“ t the Animal Rescue Center of Bay County and Operation Spay Bay. Free admission for the public; entry fee for car owners is $20 ($10 for second car). Details at 850-866-8964, online at Facebook.com/ FloridaMopars, or email FloridaMopars@gmail.com SPAY-GHETTI LUNCHEON: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The Barn at the Wicked Wheel, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Lucky Puppy Rescue's annual fundraiser spaghetti lunch is 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. followed by a silent auction and raf” e prizes until 3 p.m. Admission is $10 at the door($5 per child) plus an item from the rescue's wish list: Purina One brand wet and dry dog and puppy food, puppy pads, sanitary wipes, bleach, laundry detergent and paper towels. For details, call Vicky Perkins at 850890-7774 orAnn Patterson at 850-625-1427 orvisit The Lucky Puppy Rescue on Facebook. BURLESQUE WORKSOP WITH BURGUNDY: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. In this 2 hour workshop, Burgundy will teach some basic burlesque dance moves and boa technique. Boas are provided, orbring your own. $30 per person.Ages 18 and up, LGBTQ-friendly. Detailsonline at https:// tinyurl.com/BurlyGirlBoas 'ATTUNE TO LOVE UNPLUGGED': 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Unity Spiritual Center of Panama City, 1764 Lisenby Ave. Founder of 'Attune to Love' and author of 'Poetic Ascension,' Korrine Holt, will give a talk on letting love lead the wayto dissolving stressful patterns and unplugging from distractions. Details, AttuneToLove.com 'LUCKY YOU': 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast.edu/arts 'SHREK, THE MUSICAL': 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club of A.C. Mosley High School. Tickets: $15; $10 for students and children. 'VISION PROBLEMS' BY CHRISTENCE TAYLOR: 7-10 p.m. at Blasted Screen Print, 424 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Opening reception of artist exhibit. Live music with Tara and Giles begins at 8 p.m. Kid friendly. 'THE CHARITABLE SISTERHOOD OF THE SECOND TRINITY VICTORY CHURCH': 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850265-3226 or kt-online.org OPENING NIGHT PERFORMING ARTS SERIES: 7:30 p.m. at FSU Panama City, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, in the Holley Academic Center. Vocalist, trumpeter and songwriter Bria Skonberg shares her con“ dent vocals and timeless jazz chops. Details and tickets, OpeningNights. fsu.edu CRYSTAL BLUE BAND: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave Panama City.Special guests include Terry Brock, Todd Allen Herendeen, Johnny and The Halos. Tickets start at $29. For information or tickets visit marinaciviccenter.com MIKE JONES IN CONCERT: 9 p.m. at Club La Vela, 8813 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Ages 18 and older. Door open at 7 p.m. Tickets $10-$20; tickets and details at ClubLaVela. comSunday, Feb. 2530A WINE FESTIVAL: all day in Alys Beach off 30A; today's Rose' and Croquet event is sold out. Details, AlysBeach.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Anderson's Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details atWaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 ATTUNE TO LOVE UNPLUGGED: 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Unity Spiritual Center, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City. Korrine Holt will lead an event to kick off her 2018 tour. Cost: $25 for adults, $20 for students and seniors. Details: UnityOfPanamaCity.org or 850-769-7481 'THE CHARITABLE SISTERHOOD OF THE SECOND TRINITY VICTORY CHURCH': 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets, 850265-3226 or kt-online.org 'LUCKY YOU': 2:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/arts GOFrom Page 31 See GO, 33Musician Amy Black plays live at the Rep Theatre in Seaside on Friday, Feb. 23. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E33 GO & DO : CALENDARCITIZEN SCIENCE TALK: BEST HERBS TO GROW IN NW FLORIDA : 6-7 p.m. on the third ” oor of the Advanced Technology Center (ATC)on the GCSC campus. Julie McConnell will focus on growing herbsbut will talk brie” y about growing vegetables. Free and open to public.Monday, Feb. 26TRUNK SHOW 'ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER': Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn White's innovative wearables converted from scarves. Show runs until March 10. Details: 850-231-4500. BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12, at the Marina Civics Center. This exhibit features local artists. Admission is free. Details: 850-763-4696 'SHE IS OF THE SOUTH': Art exhibit open through March 16 at Gulf Coast State College's Amelia Center Gallery, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. Free admission. 'DAVE THE POTTER' PRESENTATION: 3 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, 898 W. 11th St.,Panama City.The Florida Public Archaeology Network will read "Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave," by Laban Carrick Hill. The free reading is geared toward elementary-aged students and is part of the library's Archaeology Story Time. After hearing Dave's story, kids will learn how and why people painted pottery in the past and will paint their own pieces of pottery to take home. Details, 850-5222118or www.nwrls.com BEACH CLEAN UP: 3:30-5:30 p.m., hosted by Gulf World Marine Park, 15412 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details, 850-234-5271 LIFE IN ECONFINA WITH THE GAINERS: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Librabry presented by the Historical Society of Bay county. This is open and free to the public.Tuesday, Feb. 27LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sharon Shef“ eld Park, 903 Ohio Ave., Lynn Haven. Produce, honey, jelly, baked goods, plants, handcrafted items. LECTURE AND PERFORMANCES: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holley Lecture Hall Florida State University Panama City. Dr. Larry Rivers, author and distinguished professor of history at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, will be the keynote speaker at a Black History Month lecture. The presentation will featureperformances by the Nu Gulf Coast Choir and singer DeDrinique Barnes. Space is limited. For more information, call Tiesha Alston at 850-7702193or email tealston@fsu.edu. ESCAPE 2 CREATE PLAYWRIGHT KEVIN DOYLE: Noon at Seaside Repertory Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25. Details at LoveTheRep.com 'GIRL WAITS WITH GUN' SKYPE BOOK CLUB: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. New York Times best-selling author Amy Stewart will be the guest viaSkypeto discuss her novelbased on the true story of one of the nation's “ rst female deputy sheriffs. Learn more about Constance Kopp, the Kopp sisters, and the book series.Free admission. FREE CONCERT: 6 p.m. at the American Legion Building (Fairground, corner of 15th Street and Sherman Avenue). Gospel and old country music featuring Grand Junction and Cedar Creek. Details, 850-596-1271Wednesday, Feb. 28WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR: 2-4:30 p.m. tours and display at SheltAir at the Northwest Florida Beaches International GOFrom Page 32Mike Jones will be in concert at Club La Vela in Panama City Beach on Saturday, Feb. 24. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See GO, 34

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E34 Friday, February 23, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARAirport, 5325 Johnny Reaver Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring a B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O Nine,Ž B-24 Liberator Witchcraft,Ž B-25 Mitchell TondelayoŽ bomber and P-51 Mustang Toulous NutsŽ “ ghter. Visitors are invited to explore the aircraft inside and out; $15 for adults, $5 for children under 12. Take a 30-minute ” ight for $450 each on either the B-17 or B-24, or $400 each for the B-25. Get stick time in the P-51 for $2,200 for a half-hour or $3,200 for a full hour. Reservations and details at 800-568-8924Thursday, March 1WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. tours and display at SheltAir at the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport, 5325 Johnny Reaver Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring a B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O Nine,Ž B-24 Liberator Witchcraft,Ž B-25 Mitchell TondelayoŽ bomber and P-51 Mustang Toulous NutsŽ “ ghter.Visitors are invited to explore the aircraft inside and out; $15 for adults, $5 for children under 12. Take a 30-minute ” ight for $450 each on either the B-17 or B-24, or $400 each for the B-25. Get stick time in the P-51 for $2,200 for a half-hour or $3,200 for a full hour. Reservations and details at 800-568-8924 DR. SEUSS BIRTHDAY PARTY: 2:30-4:30 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City,in the Youth Services Department. Crafts and activities provided. The event is free to attend and open to all ages. Details, 850-522-2118 or nwrls.com FULL MOON CLIMB: 6-7:30 p.m. EST at the Cape St. George Lighthouse, in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive ends at Gulf Beach Drive. With light hors doeuvres and sparkling cider toast. Cost: $15 for general public, $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 850-9277745 LUCKY YOU: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/artsFriday, March 2TRUNK SHOW ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER: Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn Whites innovative wearables. Show runs until March 10. Details, 850-231-4500 ART SHOW Of MARY GARRISH:Open during regular hours through March 15 at The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City.Details at TheArtistCoveStudio.com EMERALD COAST BOAT & LIFESTYLE SHOW: at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12, at the Marina Civic Center. This exhibit features local artists. Admission is free. Details: 850-763-4696 WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR: 9:30 a.m. to noon tours and display at SheltAir at the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport, 5325 Johnny Reaver Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring a B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O Nine,Ž B-24 Liberator Witchcraft,Ž B-25 Mitchell TondelayoŽ bomber and P-51 Mustang Toulous NutsŽ “ ghter.Visitors are invited to explore the aircraft inside and out; $15 for adults, $5 for children under 12. Take a 30-minute ” ight for $450 each on either the B-17 or B-24, or $400 each for the B-25. Get stick time in the P-51 for $2,200 for a half-hour or $3,200 for a full hour. Reservations and details at 800-568-8924 SHREK, THE MUSICAL: 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club. Tickets: $15; $10 for students and children. LUCKY YOU: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/artsSaturday, March 3ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m.to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as“ ne art, master craft people. 3RD ANNUAL SAVE THE BAY CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort, 4114 Jan Cooley Drive, Panama City Beach. Details, 850-236-6065 PANAMA CITY BEACH SCOTTISH FESTIVAL: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway. Bring hats, sunglasses and folding chairs. This event includes Scottish athletic competitions, Scottish Clan representitves, Bagpipe Bands, British Car Club Show, childrens activities, Scottish and Irish food, Irish Step Dancers and more. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details atWaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 FUN IN THE SUN MUD RUN: at H.G. Harders Park in Panama City. Muddy 5K obstacle course fun run. All proceeds go to local charities.Details: FunInTheSunMudRun.com EMERALD COAST BOAT & LIFESTYLE SHOW: at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through March on Central Square in Seaside. Get your pick of fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products, native plants and other unique items, special cooking demos and activities. Help sustain local growers and makers. Details at SeasideFL.com DR. SEUSS DAY: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd. Crafts, snacks, stories, a scavenger hunt, and a photo booth will be provided. Details, 850-233-5055 or nwrls.com FOUNDERS DAY FESTIVAL: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Henry Brooks Memorial Walking Park beside Spring“ eld GOFrom Page 33She is of the South,Ž an exhibition of art depicting the experience of Southern women, will be on display at Gulf Coast State Colleges Amelia Center Gallery through March 16. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK] See GO, 35

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| Friday, February 23, 2018 E35 GO & DO : CALENDARSpring“ eld City Hall. Marking the 83rd anniversary of the citys incorporation. Start with a ” ag-raising ceremony by the Tyndall squadron; enjoy local craft and food vendors, live music, classic car show, in” atable bounce houses, face painting, cake walk, pony rides, and dunking booth. Fire and police demos include a photo opp with Sparky the Fire Dog. Admission and all activities are free to the public. Details, 850-872-7570, ext. 123. AMERICANA MUSIC AT THE LODGE: 2 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway. Free admission. Guests will receive a number upon arrival and the opportunity to select a seat by placing the number on a chair. Then, feel free to roam around Camp Helen and enjoy the beauty of the park. The Friends of Camp Helen request a donation to help with the continuance of the series and special projects that bene“ t the park. Refreshments will be available for a donation. Details at 850-233-5059 SHREK, THE MUSICAL: 7 p.m. in the Gretchen Nelson Scott Fine Arts Center at Mosley High School; presented by the Drama Club of A.C. Mosley High School. Tickets: $15; $10 for students and children. LUCKY YOU: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/arts LATE NIGHT COMEDY: 9-11 p.m. at Bearded Clam, 6908 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Featuring Pam Bruno, Christina Galston and Nikki Carr. May contain strong language. Admission: $20 at the door.Sunday, March 4GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details atWaterfrontMarkets.org or 850-481-6868 EMERALD COAST BOAT & LIFESTYLE SHOW: at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Details, VisitPanamaCityBeach.com BANDS OF 30A BENEFIT CONCERT: 1-6 p.m. at The Hub 30A in Watersound. Bene“ ting Special Olympics Florida/Walton County and the Foundation for Prader-Willi Syndrome Research. Lineup includes the Luke Langford Band at 1 p.m., Shatzi and the String Bof“ n at 2 p.m., Songwriters Round at 3 p.m., New Earth Army at 4 p.m., and Cadillac Willy at 5 p.m. Free admission, but a $10 donation is requested per person. Open to the public. Limited seating. For details, including VIP ticket information, visit BandsOf30A.com LUCKY YOU: 2:30 p.m.at the Amelia Center Theatre Lab, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Based on the novel by Carl Hiaasen. Limited seating. Mature audiences. Tickets and details, GulfCoast. edu/arts STORYTELLING AT THE ARK:5 p.m. at The Arks coffee shop, The Pour, 12902 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring a variety of stories for ages 12 and up. Free event and fundraiser for The Ark. Coffee and other refreshments will be available for purchase. Details, 850-871-0165Monday, March 5TRUNK SHOW: ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER:Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn Whites innovative wearable. Runs until March 10. Details: 850-231-4500 BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12, at the Marina Civic Center. This exhibit features local artists. Admission is free. Details, 850-763-4696 SHE IS OF THE SOUTH: Art exhibit open through March 16 at Gulf Coast State Colleges Amelia Center Gallery, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. Free admission. ADVENTURES IN ALYS: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. One of a kind storytelling experience with audience participation. Details at LoveTheRep.com STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and GOFrom Page 34 See GO, 36

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E36 Friday, February 23, 2018 | GO & DO : CALENDARchances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER: 6 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre on Central Square. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. Details at LoveTheRep.comTuesday, March 6CRASH COURSE IN PHOTOGRAPHY: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library Meeting Room, Panama City. A beginner photography class taught by Bonnie Tate-Woodby of The Light Room. Part of the Tuesday @ 2 series, free and open to the public. Details, NWRLS. com or850-522-2120 19TH ANNUAL DEATH BY CHOCOLATE: 5-8 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Presented by Emerald Coast Business Women Association. POTTERY CLASS HAND BUILDING: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E 4th St, Panama City. Price is $180 for members and $200 for non-members. Details: 850-640-3670Wednesday, March 7EMERALD COAST CRUIZ-IN: Through the weekend at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Today: 8 a.m. registration and vendor set up;10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Block Party in Pier Park; 5 p.m. Parade through Pier Park; 6:30 p.m. Kick Off Party. Details, emeraldcoastcruizin.com AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV HOUR: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Reps improv troupe plays games, makes up scenes and songs on the spot. Audience members can workshop on Wednesday and perform with them on Thursday. Details at LoveTheRep.comThursday, March 8EMERALD COAST CRUIZIN: Through the weekend at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Today: 8 a.m. registration at Pier Park and event site opens Aaron Bessant Park; 11 a.m. Grand Opening at main stage; 1 p.m. live music onstage; 6:30 p.m. Welcome Party. Details, emeraldcoastcruizin.com AWKWARD OXEN IMPROV HOUR: 10 a.m. at Fonville Press in Alys Beach. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Reps improv troupe plays games, makes up scenes and songs on the spot. Audience members can workshop on Wednesday and perform with them on Thursday. Details at LoveTheRep.com POTTERY CLASS HAND BUILDING: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Panama City Center for the Arts, 19 E 4th St, Panama City. Price is $180 for members and $200 for non-members. Details: 850-640-3670 JOHN CONLEE CONCERT: 7 p.m. at the Callaway Arts & Conference Center with country legend John Conlee, Mr. Rose Colored Glasses,Ž who is a regular performer at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. Tickets for can be purchased online at www.itickets. com or call 800-965-9324. MOTOWN THE MUSICAL: 7:30 p.m. at at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Tickets start at $55. Details and ticket, MarinaCivicCenter.comFriday, March 9TRUNK SHOW ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER: Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn Whites innovative wearables. Show runs until March 10. Details, 850-231-4500 ART SHOW Of MARY GARRISH: Open during regular hours through March 15 at The Artist Cove Studio Gallery, 36 W. Beach Drive, Panama City.Details at TheArtistCoveStudio.com EMERALD COAST CRUIZIN: Through the weekend at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Today: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration at Pier Park; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Event Site opens at Aaron Bessant Park; 10 a.m. Auto Tech demo with Cristy Lee; 10:30 a.m. meet-and-greet Cristy Lee; Live bands (schedule TBA); 2 p.m. Auto Tech Demo; 6:30 p.m. HOTRODS/ Flame Throwing contest Party. Details, emeraldcoastcruizin. com BLACK HISTORY MONTH ART EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday until March 12, at the Marina Civic Center. This exhibit features local artists. Admission is free. Details, 850-763-4696 STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30 p.m. at Solomon Square, 45 Central Square, Seaside. Free admission. Suitable for all ages. The Seaside Rep offers new stories and chances for participation daily; Improv Bootcamp for Kids students join the performance each Friday. Details at LoveTheRep.com A COUPLE OF BLAGUARDS: 7:30 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. A two-man show by literary greats Frank and Malachy McCourt, is a bubbling stew of their well-known humor with a dash of poignancy to sharpen the ” avor. A comedic springboard for Angelas Ashes, Tis, and Malachys A Monk Swimmin, this brilliantly structured comedy is a proven crowd-pleaser offering solid entertainment. Details and tickets at MartinTheatre.com or 850-763-8080Saturday, March 10TRUNK SHOW ARTISTRY AND IMAGINATION IN FIBER: Newbill Collection By The Sea, 309 Ruskin Place, Seaside. Daily trunk show featuring Tennessee “ ber artist Carolyn Whites innovative wearables converted from scarves, hand knitted and felted hats with hand-needlefelted surface design, hand knitted asymmetrical wraps and cowls. Show runs until Mar. 10th. Details: 850-231-4500. EMERALD COAST CRUIZIN:at Aaron Bessant Park, Panama City Beach. Today: 8 a.m. to noon Registration at Pier Park; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Event Site open at Aaron Bessant Park; 10 a.m. Auto Tech demo with Cristy Lee; 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. meetand-greet Cristy Lee; 10 a.m. collector car auction; Live bands TBA; 2 p.m. Auto Tech with Cristy Lee; 4:30 p.m. awards and cash giveaways; 6:30 p.m. Last Call Bash Party. Details, emeraldcoastcruizin.com WARRIOR DASH: 8 a.m. at Sweetbay, 3204 E. Heartleaf Ave., Panama City. Details, WarriorDash.com ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m.to 1 p.m. on the Smith Yacht Basin with a variety of veggies, fruits, jams, jellies, artisan bread and gourmet confections, as well as“ ne art, master craft people. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and Sunday at Capt. Andersons Restaurant parking lot, 5551 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Hosting makers, bakers and growers year-round. Details atWaterfrontMarkets. org or 850-481-6868 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through March on Central Square in Seaside. Get your pick of fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products, native plants and other unique items, special cooking demos and activities. Help sustain local growers and makers. Details at SeasideFL.com WEST INDIES MARKET: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Emerald Coast Events Venue, 17760 PCB Parkway, Panama City Beach. Paintings, sculptures, baked goods, jewelry, handmade furniture, and more. Details: hilltopproductionevents.com GOFrom Page 35Kaleidoscope Theatre in Lynn Haven presents The Charitable Sisterhood of the Second Trinity Victory Church on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. [CONTRIBUTED ARTWORK]

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