We Stand For Peace While Others War

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Material Information

Title:
We Stand For Peace While Others War
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Language:
English
Publisher:
Will Rossiter
Place of Publication:
Chicago, Illinois
Publication Date:

Notes

General Note:
A single piece of sheet music (A single piece of sheet music (Will Rossiter - The Chicago Publisher - 1914) with words and music by W.R. Williams ("This PEACE POEM was inspired by President Wilson's appeal to Americans to remain neutral in thought and deed" by the "writer of the famous song I'D LOVE TO LIVE IN LOVELAND, etc.). - The Chicago Publisher - 1914) with words and music by W.R. Williams ("This PEACE POEM was inspired by President Wilson's appeal to Americans to remain neutral in thought and deed" by the "writer of the famous song I'D LOVE TO LIVE IN LOVELAND, etc.).
General Note:
Exhibit Case #3- Allies

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
System ID:
AA00026868:00001

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PRESIDENT WILSON'S




APPEAL TO AMERICANS




FMY FELLOW COUNTRYMEN:"I suppose that every thoughtful man in America has camps of hostile opinion, if not against each other;
asked himself-during the last troubled week what influence involved in the war itself in impulse and opinion, if not in the European war may exert upon the United States, action. Such diversions among us would be fatal to our and I take the liberty of addressing a few words to youin peace of min d might seriously stand in the way of the order to point out that it is entirely within our own proper performance of our duty as the one great nation at choice what its effects upon us will be and to urge very peace; the one people holding itself ready to play a part of earnestly upon you the sort of speech and conduct which impartial mediation and speak the counsels of peace and
will best safeguard the nation against distress and accommodation, not as a partisan, but as a friend.
disaster.
"The effect of the war upon the United States will NEUTRALITY IMPORTANT DUTY
depend upon what American citizens say and do. Every "I venture, therefore, my fellow countrymen, to speak man who really loves America will act and speak in the a solemn wod of warning to you against that deepest, true spirt of neutrality which is the spirit o impartiality most subtl, mstessential breach of neutrality which and fairness and friendliness to all concerned. may spring out of partisanship, out of passionately taking sides. The United States must be neutral in fact as well
RESTS WITH PEOPLE ALONE as in name during these days that are to try men's souls.
'I"The spirit of the nation in this critical matter will: be We must be impartial in thought as well as in action, must
determined largely by what individuals and society and put a curb upon our sentiments as well as upon every those gathered in public meetings do and say, upon what transaction that might be construed as a preference of one
newspapers and magazines contain, upon what our party to the struggle before another.
ministers utter in their pulpits and men proclaim as their "My thought is of America. I am speaking, I feel opinions on the streets. sure, the earnest wish and purpose of every thoughtful
"The people of the United States are drawn from many American that this great country of ours, which is of
nations and chiefly from the nations now at war. It is course, the first in our thoughts and in our hearts, should natural and inevitable that there should be the utmost show herself in this time of peculiar trial a nation fit variety of symoiathy and desire among them with regard beyond others to exhibit the fine poise of undisturbed to the issues and cricumstances of the conflict. Some judgment, the dignity of self-control, the efficiency of will wish one nation, others another, to succeed in the dispassionate action; a nation that neither sits in judgmomentous struggle. ment upon others, nor is disturbed in her own counsels a and which keeps herself fit and free to do what is honest PASSION EASY TO EXCITE and disinterested and truly serviceable for the peace of
"It will be easy to excite passion and difficult to allay the world.
it. Those responsible for exciting it will assume a heavy
responsibility; responsibility for no less a thing than that RESTRAINT MEANS HAPPINESS
the people of the United States, whose love of their coun- "Shall we not resolve to put upon ourselves the try, and whose loyalty to its government, should unite restraint which will bringto our people the happiness and them as Americans, all bound in honor and affection to the great and lasting influence for peace we covet for
think first of her. and her interests, may be divided in them?"
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Note- This "Peace Poem" was Inspired by President Wilson's appeal
to Americans to remain neutral in thought and deed.


We Stand for Peace while Others War
Words & Music
W. R. WILLIAMS
-.,.,. Writer of the famous song Temp di arel
empo d aia I'D LOVE TO LIVE IN LOVELAND ete .



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The world's turned back a thousand years, since war! i now the Who said the world was civ il ised, we'd found the dawn of













cry, The smile of Progress turns to tearsThe help less won-der why? There's day, That ed u ca tion's star of hope ,With love would find the way. This













noth ing worth the toll of 'life, Be fore or since the flood, Is
wars ef fect on us de pendsOn what we do or say, Our









Copyright MCMXIV by Will Rossiter Chicago
ritish Copyright Secured All Rights Reserved


Send "We Stand for Peace" Postal: to your friends
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so called "Hon or" worth the price, When riv ers flow with blood? great- est help is self con -trol, 'Till peace shall hold full sway.






























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Words and Music by
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