Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of Canada

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Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of Canada
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q. ;
Physical Description:
10 p. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Strong, Lee A
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Canada   ( lcsh )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"May 12, 1941."
General Note:
Signed Lee A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030498796
oclc - 793230858
System ID:
AA00026163:00001

Full Text


LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOA~Jj 22/Canada





UNTD STATES DEPARTMTT OF AGRICULTURE Burauof Entomology and Plant q~ia~antine








B. 1. P.Q,.-514May 12, 1941. PIL1NT-QUABLINE IMPORT B2HESTICTIOYS

DOMINION 0F CANADA



























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E2/Cana da

UNITED STATES DiPART1NT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Washington, D. Co


B. E. P. Q.--514 May 12, 1941.


PIANT-QUARKNTIYE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

DOMIN ION OF CANADA


This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Dominion of Canada has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that country and plantquarantine officials.

The circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District
Supervisor, Certification for Exort, Division of Foreign Plant quarantines, from The Destructive Insect and Pest Act and Regulations
Thereunder, Edition of 1936, Customs M1emoranda, Series D, No. 37 with supplements, and No. 49, and The Fruit, Vegetables, and Honey Act and Regulations. It was reviewed by the Secretary of the Destructive Insect and Pest Act Advisory Board, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.

The information contained. in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.









Chief, Bureau f 'Eitom4olqo and Plant Quaxttn~m-







UNITED STATES DEPARTL NT OF AGRICULTURE
Burea.u of Entomology and Plant, Quarantine Washington, D. '.


1. E. P. Q.--514 ,:: .May 12, 1941.

PLANT-qUARANTIE IMPORT RESTRICTIGRS

DOMINION OF CTADA

BASIC LEGISLATION.

.The Destructive Insect and Pest Act
Revised Statutes of 1927 Chapter.47 Amended, Statutes of 1932- Chapter 19 Amended, Statutes of 1934 Chapter 13
An Act to Prevent the Introduction or Spreading of Insects,
Peats., and Diseases Destructive to Vegetation.

The General Regulations provide that no pest or disease, or plant infested with any pest or disease, shall be admitted into Canada. All plants are subject to inspection on arrival. Further provisions refer mainly to domestic matters relating to inspectors,
authority, certification of nursery stock and other. plant products, methods of enforcing control measures, promulgation of Orders in
Council, etc.


CONCISE SU ZURY

Certificate Requirements

Certificates of inspection are required,Tfor the following:

Nursery stock (based on inspection at .time of
packing); (pp. 3 and 4). .

Alfalfa meal from states infested with alfalfa
weevil; (p. 5).

Shelled corn, cut flowers and entire. plants, certain
vegetables, and oat and rye straw, from states infested with European corn borer; (pp. 6 and 9).

Hawaiian fruits ancdplants; (p. 7)...

Forest products, stone and quarry products from states
infested with gypsy. and brown-tail moths; (pp. 7 and 9).

Potatoes from Cna ifornia (fumigation certificate); (p. 8).

Potatoes from Pennsylvanin, West Virginia, and 1iaryland
(wart certificate); (p. 9).






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The certificate, of inspection may be issued by either Federal or State officials unless one or the other is specifically designated to do so in the regulations.

Certain fruits and vegetables from the United States must be
certified as meeting Canadian import requirements by the Agricultural Marketing Service (p. 10).


Prohibited or Restricted Seeds The importation of seeds in general, seed potatoes, and mushroom spawn into Canada is not restricted as a rule. However, the importation of the following seeds into Canada is prohibited or restricted:

Black currant (p. 5).

Rust barberry and European buckthorn (p. 5).

Corn on the cob (p. 6).

Seed potatoes (p. 9).

Tobacco (p. 9).

The importation of peach seeds into British Columbia from States in which the Oriental fruit moth and peach yellows occur, is prohibited (p. 8).

Prohibited and Restricted Products The following products are prohibited entry into Canada or
British Columbia. or are restricted:

Alfalfa hay: Prohibited from States infested with
alfalfa weevil (p. 5).

Barberry (rust-carrying) and Europe-an buckthorn:
Prohibited (p. 5).

Black currants (except fresh fruit): Prohibited (p. 5).

Chestnut and chinquapin: Restricted (p. 5).

Conifers, Christmas trees and greens: Prohibited from States infested with gypsy and browm-tail moths (p. 7).

Corylus op.: Prohibited entry into British Columbia
from States infected with filbert blight (p. 6).







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lm logs, wood, and burls: Prohibited (p. 7),

Living insects (except honey bees), pests, bacteria,
and fungus diseases destructive to vegetation: Prohibited,
except under permit from Ottawa (p. 7).'
Nursery stock from brown-tail or gypsy moth infested Sta-tes:
Restricted (p. 7).

Peach and nectarine stock: Restricted (pp. 7 and 8).

Peach stock and fresh peaches: Prohibited entry into
British Columbia from States in which the Oriental fruit
moth and peach yellows occur (p. 8).

Pines, 5-leaved: Prohibited (p. 8).

Potatoes from Maryl-ind, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia:
Restricted (p. 9).

Products liable to carry Japanese beetle: Restricted (p. 9).


FOHZIGN REGULA1?IONS (NURSERY STOCK)

Regulation No. 1 (Foreign) 2nd Revision Governing the Admission of Nursery Stock into the Dominion of Canada

The term "nursery stock" includes all living plants or portions of plants imported for ornamental purposes, propagation, or cropping. Seeds, seed potatoes, and mushroom spawn are not included.

Permit Necessary to Import Nursery Stock

Importers of nursery stock in Canada are required to apply to the Department of Agriculture in Ottawa for a permit. Detailed information must be given in the application regarding the proposed importation. In case a permit is issued to the importer, he is required to send the number of his permit to the shipper of the stock in the foreign country. The permit is retained by the importer for use in connection with the arrival of the shipment.

Certification of Inspection

Very shipment of nursery stock originating in the United
States ad entering Cnnada either by freight, express, or mail, must





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be accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued at the time of packing by an authorized official, either State or Federal. So-c.lled "bl nket" certificates, issued by State inspectors, b,"ed on field inspection only =d issued for varying periods of time, are not acceptable. The original certificate must -ccomprny the wV.bill or bill of lading and' be furnished-to the inspector at the port of importation by
-the transportation company. A copy certificate of inspection must be attached to each container. In the case of mail shipment the origin certificate may be attached to the container.

Marking of Containers

vach container of nursery stock, in addition to bearing a copy certificate of inspection, must be clearly marked with the name and address of both consignor-and consignee, the permit number, the port of importation, and a declaration showing the kinds of nursery stock contained therein. The permit number may be written on the label giving the other required information and should also appenr on the invoices.

Ports of Importation

Nursery stock may enter Canada only through one of the following Customs ports of importation:

Halifax, Nova Scotia F~iagra Falls, Ontario
Saint John, New Brunswick Windsor, Ontario
Montreal, Province of Quebec innipeg, Manitoba
Ottawa, Ontario Estevan, Saskatchewan
Toronto, Ontario (Parcel Post only) Vancouver, British Columbia

Inspection on Arrival

Nursery stock entering Canada shall be subject to inspection
before delivery to the consignee, preferably at the port of importation. If carrying any pest or disease it may be treated or destroyed as determined by the inspector. In some cases condemned nursery stock mqy be returned to the shipper with the expense involved borne by the importer or shipper.

Importation by Mail

Parcel-post importations of nursery stock must be routed via a
port of importation for inspection. Then granted a permit the importer
is furnished with a mailing label, which he is required to forward to the shipper to affix to the package of stock. No other address is necessary on the outside of the package as the label will direct the package to the proper port for examination. The shipper should place the ultimate consignee's name zand address on the inside of the package. After inspection a reforwarding label will be attached which will direct the packnge to the importer.






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REGLIATIOiS GOVIEIING THE IMPORTATION OF
MISCELL OUS PLANETS A~D PLANT PRODUCTS

Alfalfa hV.--The importation into Canada of alfalfa hay from
California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, nd Wyoming is prohibited on account of the alfalfa weevil (Phytonomus posticus Gyll.). Shipments consigned on through bill of lading via above-listed States are not affected. All shipments consigned to Manitoba, Srskatchewan, Alberta, or British Columbia must be accompcnied by a certificate of origin signed by the consignor. (Regulation No. 11 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)

Alfalfa meal.--Importations into Canada of alfalfa meal from the same above-listed seven States shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by an authorized official of the State in which the meal was ground, to the effect that the contents of the shipment were ground in and shipped from an area known to be free from the alfalfa weevil, and further that the alfalfa hay, from which the meal was prepared, was grown in -n area free from the alfalfa weevil. (Regulation No. 11 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)

Barbera and European buckthorn.--Importations into Canada from all countries are prohibited of all species, hybrids, and-horticultural varieties, including the seeds, of the following:

(a) European buckthorn, Rhamnus cathartica L.

(b) Barberry, genus Berberis, except in the case of
species, hybrids, and horticultural varieties which
have been determined as immune to black stem rust
of wheat (Puccinia graminis Pers.). There is no
restriction on the importation of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii D.C.). (Regulation No. 9 (Foreign), let Revision.)

Black currants.--Importations into Canada of rooted plants, gTafts, cuttings, or seeds of cultivated black currants from all countries are prohibited, as their presence is a serious obstacle to the control of white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisher). However, there is no restriction on the importation of fresh fruit of black currants. '(Regulation No. 8 (Foreign) 3d Revision)

Chestnut and chinquapin.--The importation into Canada of all species, hybrids, and horticultural varieties of the genus Castanea from Asia and the Un~ited States is prohibited, unless each importation is accompanied by a certificate, issued and signed by an authorized officer of the country of origin, stating that the stock originated in a district which has been free from the chestnut bark disease (Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And, and And.) for the last ten years, and has been inspected and found free from the disease. (Regulation o. 7 (Foreign) let Revision.) LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD






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Conifers, Christmas greens and greenery.--The importation
into Canada of conifers, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, Juniper, and arborvitae or the foliage thereof, -nd decorative plants, such as holly, laurel, etc., knonn and described as "Christmas greens and greenery," is prohibited from Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Hlassachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, on account of the gypsy
moth (Porthetria dispar L.), and the brown-tail moth (Iqynia phaeorrhoea Don.). (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) e1st Revision.)

Corn.--(a) On the cob.--The importation of corn on the cob
into Canada is prohibited from Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, EIngyland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, rnd Wisconsin, on account of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilLis Hubn. ).

Corn.--(b) Shelled.--The importation of shelled corn into
Canada is prohibited from the above 17 States (a) unless accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, or.a State Depertment of Agriculture, which states that the shipment is free from European corn borer.

Corn.--(c) Broom.--The importation of broomcorn, all sorghums,
and Sudan grass into Canada is prohibited from the above 17 States (a). There is no restriction on importations from other States when shipped
on a through bill of lading via the quarantined Statbs or in case of a reshipment from a listed State when accompanied by a certificate of origin signed by an authorized State or Federal inspector. (Regulation No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)

Corylus spp.--The importation into British Columbia of plants
or cuttings of all species, hybrids, and horticultural varieties of the genus Corylus (hazel, cob, or filbert) is prohibited from the States
of iContana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and all States east of these on account of the filbert blight (Cryptosporella anomala (Pk.) Sacc.). (Regulation No. 15 (Foreign).)

Cut flowers and vegetables.--During the period June 1 to
December 31, the importation into Canada of cut flowers and entire. plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, gladiolus, and dahlia, and celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, and rhubarb, is prohibited from the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, unless accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by a Federal or State inspector,
declaring the shipment to be free from European corn borer. (Regulation No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)






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Elm logs, elm wood, elm burls.--The importation into Can-da' of all species and vrieties of the genera Ulmus and Zelkova, including elm logs and elm burls of any description, from all countries, is prohibited on account of the Dutch elm disease (Ceratostomella ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman). (Regulation No. 17 (Foreign) 1st Revision.)

Forest products --logs, tan bark, cordwood,1posts;_ poles, railway ties, lumber.--Importition into Canada from: the States-of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, is prohibited, unless accompanied by a certificate issued by an officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, declaring the shipment free from brown-tail 6r gypsy moth, or both. (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) let Revision.)

Hawaiian fruits and plants.--The importation into Canada of all noncanned fruits and plants from Hawail is prohibited, except ginger root, taro, and the fruits of pineapple, banana, and coconut, which may be imported provided they have been inspected by an officer of the United States Department of Agriculture and have been certified to be free from infestation by the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.). (Regulation No. 4 (Foreign) 3d Revision.)

Living insects (except honeybees), pests, bacteria, and
fungus diseases destructive to vegetation.--Importation into Canada is prohibited from all countries unless a permit has been procured from the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa. (Regulation No. 21 (Foreign).)

Nursery stock from brown-tail and gypsy moth infested area.-The importation into Cnada of nursery stock, including all plants for the purpose of propagation, except conifers (see p. 4), etc., and seeds and seed potatoes, is prohibited from Maine, New H-mpshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, unless accompanied by a certificate issued by an officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, showing that the stock has been inspected ad found free from bro-wn-tail or gypsy moth, or both. (Regulation No.5 (Foreign) lst Revision.)

Peach and nectarine stock.--The importation of peach and nectarine stock (trees and roots), and any tree or shrub grafted or budded on such stock, is prohibited from the Uhited States, unless each importation is accompmied by a certificate issued and signed by an authorized Federal or State official, stating that the stock comes from a nursery on whichli the phony peach disease does









not occur nor within 1 mile of its boundaries; -nd that each piece of stock has been examined by an authorized inspector and found free from the peach tree borer (Aegeria exitiosa Say). (Regulation No. 14 (Foreign) 5th Revision.)

Peaches --fresh, peach seeds, and peach nursery stock.--The importation of fresh peaches, peach nursery stock, and peach seeds or pits into British Columbia is prohibited from the States of Wisconsin, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas, and all States east thereof on account of the Oriental fruit moth (Grapholitha molesta Busck) and the peach yellows. A certificate of origin, signed by the consignor, must accompany these products into British Columbia from States westof, but not including, the five abovementioned States. (Regulation No. 14 (Foreign) 5th Revision.)

Pines, 5-leaved.--The importation into Crtnada of all fiveleaved species of the genus Pinus and their horticultural varieties is prohibited from all countries on account of the white pine blister rust (Coronartium ribicola J. C. Fischer). (Regulation No. 6 (Foreign) 2nd Revision.)

Potatoes.--The importation of potatoes into Canada is prohibited from Europe, Azores, Canary Islands, Newfoundland, St. Pierre, and Miquelon.

Importation from California is prohibited unless shipments are accompanied by a certificate of fumigation issued by the California Department of Agriculture. The following fumigation methods have been authorized:

Seventy-five minutes in not less than 20" mercurial vacuum, with a dosage of not less than 28 pounds of carbon bisulphide and carbon dioxide in combination, per 1000 cubic feet of space. (Regulation No. 3 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)

Vacuum fumigation in not less than a 27" mercurial vacuum with dosage schedule of not less than 2 1/2 pounds of methyl bromide per 1000 cubic feet for a period of 90 minutes. (Supplement No. 2, Customs Memorandum, August 11, 1936.)

Vacuum fumigation in not less than 27" mercurial vacuum with a dosage schedule of not less than 35 pounds of methyl bromide and carbon dioxide in combination per 1000 cubic feet for a period of 90 minutes; (not less than ?7 of this mixture should be methyl bromide.) (Supplement No. 2, Customs Memor,ndum, August 11, 1936.)

Potatoes fumigated as above must not be exposed to reinfestation by the potato tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella Zeller).










Importations from Pennsylvania, 7est Virginia, and Maryland sball pe accompanied by a Fedoral or State certificate declaring that the potatoes. ,were grown outside any area quarantined on amount of the potato wart disease (Ynchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.). (Regulation 1to. 3 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)

Certified seed potatoes.--Each bag or other container must have attached thereto a CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES tag issued by the proper authority of the State or District in which the potatoes were grown, certifying that they have been grown and approved especially for use as seed, in accordance with the official rules and regulations of the Government of the country of production. (Customs Memorandum, Series D No. 49 T.M.R. 12.)

Stone and quarry products.--The importation of stone and
quarry products into Canada is prohibited from the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, unless certified to be free from gypsy and brown-tail moths by an officer of the United States Depvrtment of Agriculture. (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) 1st Revision.)

Straw-eat nd rye.--During the period June 1 to December 31, the importation of oat and rye straw into Canada is prohibited from the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, unless accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized State or Federal officer declaring 'the shipment to be free from European corn borer. Shipments passing through these States from other States on a through bill of lading, or reshipments from the listed States when accompanied by a, certificate of origin issued by an authorized State or Federal inspector, are not affected. (Regulation iNo. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)

Tobacco seed.--The importation of tobacco seed (Nicotian. tab.cum L.) including all hybrids and varieties, into Canada, is prohibited from Australia and the United States on account of the blue mold disease (Peronospora yroscy mi DeBy.). (Regulation No. 20 (Foreign).)

IMPORTS FROM AREAS Il THE UNITED STATES INFESTED UITH THE JAPANIESE BEETLE

Although no special regulations have been established under the Destructive Insect and Pest Act governing the importation of products liable to carry the Japanese beetle from the infested areas in the United States, it is required that any importations




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I1111111 11111111li ll II111 1 1
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of products affected by the Japanese Beetle Quarantine, maintained by the United States Department of Agriculture, conform with the provisions of that quarantine. Any importations which ate not accompanied by the required certificate will be refused entr? into Canada.. Such action is in accordnce with the provisions of the General Regulations under the Destractive Insect and Pest.Act And also in conformity with the Japanese Beetle Quarantine as applying to cases where shipments involved are transported from a quarantined area through a nonregula-ted area en route to Canada.


CERTIFICATION BY AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE

Fruits and vegetables.--The following fruits and vegetables are required to be accompanied by a Government Inspection Certificate stating that at the place and time of direct shipment to Canada the produce "meets Canadian import requirements:" Apples, apricots, asparagus, beets or carrots without tops, cabbage, cantaloups, celery, cherries, grapes, head lettuce, onions without tops, parsnips, peaches, pears, plums, prunes, potatoes, rhubarb, rutabagas, and tomatoes. The above noted "Government Inspection Oertificate" is issued by the Agricultural Marketing Service; an export certificate (Form Eq-375) is not required.

(Regulations under the Fruit, Vegetables, and. Honey Act.
Acts, Orders and Regulations No. 35 Revised 1940, Administered by The Dominion Depa-rtment of Agriculture, Marketing Service Fruit and Vegetable Division.)