Plant-quarantine import restrictions of Japan

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Material Information

Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of Japan
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q. ;
Physical Description:
4 p. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Hoyt, Avery S
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Edition:
Rev.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Japan   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
"May 5, 1949."
General Note:
"Avery S. Hoyt, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine."--P.1.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030486019
oclc - 792739266
System ID:
AA00026134:00001

Full Text

$1 AT PLAN I E~ /~Japan



UNTWE STATES DEPdfLCUIT O1 A&Y!-ITCU7rUFPE
Agzd4~iltural Research Aena19 _to
Bureau of Entocwlogy and Qumantlrne
Washirngton 25, 1). 0.


B. E. P. Q- 470, Rovioied May 5; 194i9



PLAT-QUARAUTINE IMPOT RESTRICTIONS

OF JAPN


This revie ed digest of 'the pilanb -qrmarantine .pc'rt restri,,ttons of Japan has been prepared for the information. of nmrserytnen, plant quarantine officials, and& others interested in the exportation of plants anid plant products to thfdt country.

It was prepared by Richard Faxon, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantine,, from the PlJ'ant Quarantine ILw No. 86, proinulgated July 5, 19148, which repent Led the Plant 1(-,axanine Law No. 11 of March 25, 1914A, and from Enforcement Re~ulations d'n Agriculture and Forestry Ordinance No. 87 of Septemnber 1948, whiCh abolished the Ministerial Ordinance Tic. 27 of :.914.

The informtion included in 1t'his oircular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but VU is not intended to be used iadepandently of, nor as a subst-1tute for, the original teXts, and i'V ig not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.








Acting hie ~ Boe'_'F0ntomology a-z,(,11,ant Carantine









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Research Administration
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Wa hington 25, D. C.



PIANT-QUARNTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF JAPAN


BASIC LEGISLATION

Plant Quarantine Law (Law No. 86, Promulgated July 5, 1948)

This law, in five Chapters and 27 Articles, provides for the
prohibition or restriction of the importation of plants and plan: products, injurious iJ.asects and plant diseases, and for inspection and treatment procedures, the establishment of a Plant Quarasntine Council, and provides ponalties for infractioas of trie law. Pertinent articles from the law fo.Iow.


DI F ITIONS

Article 1. The term "plant diseases" as used herein is defined to mean fungi, bacteria, viruo, and other injurious plants that are injurious to plants, and the tor-i "injurioUs insects" used herein is defined to mean insects, ticks, other arthropoda, nematoda, and other insect-like animalo that are injurious to plants.


CERTIFICATION

Article 3. Plants specified in an ordinance (See p. 3), referred to as "designated plants", shall not be imported without being accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by a proper authority of an exporting country stating that to the best of his Knowledge and belief the plants are not infected with plant diseases or injurious insects.


PRO HIBITION

Article 4- In order to prevent the introduction of plant. diseases or injurious insects, nro person shall import any of the items specified below, referred to as"prohibited articles". However, the









Minister of Agriculture and Forestry may grant special permlission to import such articles for research or experimental purposes.

1. Plants designated by an ordinance (See P. 3) which have
been shipped from, or ha~ve- passed through districts
designated by an ordinance. (See P. 3).
2. Plant diseases or Injurious insects.
3. Soil or any plant with soil.


INSPECTION

Articles 5-7. All imported plant material must be submitted to plant quarantine officials for inspection at designated plant quarantine stations. Inspection may tbe waived for properly certified shipments.

Articles 8-9. The same procedure is'to be followed with plant material arriving by mail. Mail importations must be small parcels.

Article 10. Plant quarantine officials are authorized to inspect any ship, vessel, airplane, warehouse, or other place, for designate 'd plants, prohibited articles, etc., suspected of being infected with plant &iseases or injurious insects. This includes passengers' baggage and personal effects.


TREATMENT

Article 11. Plant quarantine officials are authorized to sterilize or destroy plant material determined to be infected with plant disease or Injurious insects.


The remaining articles of the Plant Quarantine Law deal with
matters of domestic interest. Article 27 states "The Plant
Quarantine Law (Law No. 11 of 19141) shall be repealed. -PLANT QUARANT7E LAW E1NFORCOEAENT REG-ULATTI0?T,(Agriculture and Forestry ordinance No. 87, September 19418.)

DESIGNATED PLANTS

Article 2. Designated plants specified in Article 3 of the Law shall be as follows:






19. Living plants.
2, Living out flowbrs,grafts, sacions, cuttings, Ibeding plants,
roots, stalks, leaves, or any part c.f a plant.
3. Bulbs.
4. Seeds, except soy-bean of Manchi'ria and cereals to be used
as food.
5. Fresh fruits, exclusive of raw chestnut produced in China or
Korea, and pineapples.


APPLICATION FOR PERMIT AND INSPECTION

Articles 4-5. Any person who wishes to obtain a permit specified in the proViso of Article- 4 of the law eshiall make application in writing to the Minister of Agriculture and Forestry thorough the Plant Quarantine Stati-on, Applications for inspection shall be made without delay upon arrival of the plants, to the Plant Quarantine Station.


INSPECTION STATIONS

1. Sea Ports. Otaru, Hakodate, Tokyo, Yokoiama, Yokosuka, Shimizu,
Tsuruga, Nagoya, Yokkaichi, Maiz;ru, Osaka, Kobe, Hiroshima,
Shimonoseki, Moji, Fukuoka, Nagasaki, Sasebo, Kagoshima.

2. Post Offices. Tokyo Central Post Office, Osaka Central Post
Office, Yokohama, Shimonoseli, Moji a-nd Nagasaki Post Offices.


PROHIBITED DISTRICTS AND PLANTS (Art. 4 (1.) of the Law.)

Fresh fruits (excluding pineapples) from districts where the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitaxa Wied.) has been reported, including Hawaii and the West indies.

Fresh fruits of cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, squashes, other Cucurbitaceous plants, tomatoes, kidney bears, and cowpeas, from districts where the melon fly (Dacuys cucuarbitae Coq.) has been reported, including Hawaii.

Fresh fruits of apples, pears, quinces, peaches, plums, apricots,
cherries, and fresh fruits of walnuts and whole walnuts in a shell, from countries, including America, where the codling motn (Carpocapsa pomonella L.) Is known to occur.

Fresh fruits of citrus, loquats, persimmons, plums, peaches, mangoes, papayas, longans, litchies, coromandel gooseberries, rose apples, malay apples, guavas, breadfruits, jack-tree, Garcinia spicata, avacado pears, Erenga engleri, Solanum verbacifolium, Brazil cherries,




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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Anona plants, capsicums, betelnuts, and mature bananas, from Pacific areas where the mango fly (Chaetodacus ferruginets Fabr.)-has been reported. (For Chaetodacus ferrugineus Fabr. read Dacus dorealis Hendl.)

Tubers of sweet potatoes from many countries, including America and the West Indies, to prevent the introduction of sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicarius Fabr.), sweet potato moth (0mphisa anastomosalis Guen.7, and (Euscepes postfasciatus Fairm.)

Potatoes, eggplant, tomatoes, capsicums, and other Solanaceous plants and their fruits and tubers, from many countries, including North America, Hawaii and Guam, to prevent the introduction of potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum Pere.), powdery scab (Spongospora subterranea (Wallr.) Lagerh.), ring rot disease of potato (Bacteriumn sepedonicum Spieck.), potato tuber moth (Phthorimaea operculella Zell) and Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.,

Straws of wheat, barley, oats and rye, including straw-wrapper, straw-matting and other mattings for packing purposes, from several countries including North America, to prevent the introduction of Hessian fly (Phytophaga destructor Say.).