Plant-quarantine import restrictions of French colonies

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Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of French colonies
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q. ;
Physical Description:
35 p. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Strong, Lee A
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Colonies -- France   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
Includes import restrictions for Cameroons, Equatorial Africa, Guadeloupe and Dependencies, Guiana, India (Settlements in), Indo-China, Madagascar and Dependencies, Martinique, New Caledonia and Dependencies, New Hebrides, Oceania (Settlements in), Reunion Island, Somaliland, Togoland, and West Africa.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format.
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"October 14, 1937."
General Note:
Signed Lee A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030485841
oclc - 792730488
System ID:
AA00026122:00001

Full Text









UNITED STATES DEPARTIVEH11T OF LGR CUTF
3ureaa-. of Entonmology and Plant Q~arantine Washington, D. C.




B. E. P. Q,.--465 October 14, 1937.




PLAM-qUAPANINUE IIvIPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF

FREN\CH COLONIES


(Cameroons, Eqmf-torial Africa, Guadeloupe and Dependencies, Q-uiana,
india (Settlements in), Indo-China, Madagascar and Dependencies, Martinique, INew Caledonia and Dependencies, New Hebrides, Oceania (Settlements in), Reunion Island, Somnaliland, Togoland, and West Africa)













U ITED STATES DEPAETTENT OF AC-GRICULTU-TE
bureau of Entomology end Plant quarantine Washington, D. C.




B. E. P. Q.--465 October 14, 1937.



PLANT-QUARANTINZ I PORT RESTRICTIONS

OF

FRENCH COLONIES


This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of French Colonies has been prepared. for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to those colonies.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, Plant Quarantine Inspector in Charge, Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of the pertinent decrees and orders of the French Minister of Colonies and of the respective Colonies, and reviewed by the French Ministry of Colonies.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used Independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees and orders concerned. They should be consulted for the exact texts.






Chief ureau o ntomolo and i quarantine. Chief, Bureau o Entomology and an quarantine.













PLIJ'TT-UARA0NTi2 i0R PRSCT9i CT10NS



TrIRENCH COLONIES




CONTENT S


Page


Basic legislation -1
Plants affected by import restrictions of French colonies 2
Summary of restrictions of each colony - - --------- 3
Cameroon------------------------- 3
EtorialAfrica------------------ 4
Gui na----------------------- --- 5
India, Settleents in------ ------ ------ 6
Indo-China----------------------- 7
I;,adagascar and Dependencies --------------- 13
M art inique ------------------------ 14
New Caledonia and Dependencies ------------- 15
New Hebrides---------------- ---- - 18
Oceania, Settlements in ----------------- 19
Reunion Island --------------------21
Somililand- ----------------------- 22
Togoland ------------------------- 23
West Africa 24
General quarantines applying to designated colonies
Banana plants (Order of Dec. 7, 1926, as amended) - - 25 Cocoa plants (Order of Dec. 3, 1929, as amended) - - 26
Coffee plants (Coffee-berry borer) (Order of Feb. 27, 1922, as amended) -------------- 28
Coffee plants (Coffee rust) (Order of Miay 19, 1924)- - 30
Cotton import restrictions (Order of Feb. 22, 1926, as
amended) --------------- 32
Sugarcane (Order of Dec. 3, 1929) ----------- 34

















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013











http://archive.org/details/frencoloniOOunit








PLANT-QUARA-NTI NE IIAORT RESTRI ACTIONS

OF

YP.E.,CH COLONIES


I ncluding


Cameroons, Equatorial Africa, Guadeloupe and Dependencies, Guiana,
India (Settlements in), Indo-China, Madagascar and Dependencies, Martinique, New Caledonia and Dependencies, New Hebrides, Oceania (Settlements in), Reunion Island, Somaliland, Togoland,
West Africa.



BASIC LEGISLATION

Decree of May 6, 1913, to prevent the introduction of coffee rust
(Hemiloia vastatrix B. & Br.) and other pests and diseases.


Article 1 of this decree, in order to prevent the distribution of plant diseases caused by animal or plant parasites or by larvae or
nonparsitic insects, empowers the Minister of Colonies, through special orders that name the disease and the plants susceptible to infection, to prohibit the entry into the French Colonies and Protectorates, other than Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, of:

1. Plants susceptible to the declared disease;
2. All other plants whereby that disease could be transported;
3. Soils or composts that may contain parasites, larvae,
or nonparasitic insects in any stage of development.

The same article prescribes that Governors-General or Governors, by Order, shall determine plants, soils, or composts which are capable of carrying the disease, and prescribes that the importation of the containers or packing of such materials may also be prohibited.

Article 2 prescribes that the Minister of Colonies may, in default of a prohibition, determine through a special order the conditions to which the entry and distribution of the plants and articles mentioned shall be subject in the colonies and protectorates, and the conditions under which branches, leaves, fruits, seeds, and refuse of the said plants may enter into and move within the said colonies and protectorates.








-2


Plints Affectod by iniport Rstrictions of the French Colonies

General Orders have been issued by the French Miinister of Colonies to irmpoose restrictions upon or prohibitions against the importation of certain plants and plant products into all French colonies, or groups of French colonies. From time to time these general orders have been a applied to particular colonies by special or local Orders promulgated by the respective Governors-General or Governors of the colonies concerned.


The plants hitherto affected by these orders are:

Lanana (Musa spp.).
Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.).
Cocor -b palm (Cocos nucifera L.).
Coffee (Coffea spp.).
Cotton (Gossypium spp.).
Rubber (Hevea spp.)
Sugarcane (Saccharwum officinarum L.)
Tea (Thea spp.)
Fruits. (Applied to Indo-China only.)
Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). (Applied to New Caledonia orgy.)
Trees, cuttings, roots, seeds, bulbs. (Applied to New Caledonia
only.)

The prohibitions and restrictions are applicable to the abovementioned plants proceeding from the sources named in the respective orders, which should be consulted.

Consequently, the importation of other plants and plant products into the French colonies is not restricted, except in the cases of Indo-China, New Caledonia, and Oceania.

Special Orders have been promulgated to control the importation of plants and plant products into Indo-China and New Caledonia.

The import restrictions and prohibitions are summarized under each colony separately, with references to the respective local and general Orders; the latter should be consulted for full particulars.
















BANANA PLANTS (M1usa spp.): See Orders of Februa.ry 11, 1931, and
February 9, 1935, applying the Order of December 7, 1926, page 25. COFFEE (Coffea spp.): Domestic restrictions only. COTTON (Gossypium spp.): See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32. SUGARCAITE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.













(Including Gabon, Middle Congo, Oubangi-Chari, Tchad)



BANANA PLANTS (Musa spp.): See Orders of February 11, 1931, and
February 9, 1935, applying the Order of December 7, 1926, page 25.

COCOA PLAINTS (Theobroma cacao L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, page 26.

COFFEE PLANTS (Coffea spp.), berries, or seeds, and any plant capable
of distributing coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.): See
Order of May 19, 1924, page 30.

SUG.ARCANE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
pa-e 34.







-5


GUIANA



BAINAIA PLAIMTS (Iusa spp.): See Order of February 9, 1935, applying the
Order of December 7, 1926, page 25.

COCOA PLANTS (Theobroma cacao L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, page 26.

COFZE PLANITS (Coffea. spp.), berries, or seeds: See Order of May 19,
1924, to prevent the introduction of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. & Br.), page 30.

COFF= PLANTS (Coffea spp.), and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans,
beans in parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil
and composts, containers, and plants capable of harboring the
coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes ha i Hag.), especially
Hibiscus and Rubus: See Order of February 27, 1922, page 28.

COTTON (Gossypium spp.), plants or parts thereof in the dry or
green state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or
compost, packing or containers, and seeds, plants, etc., capable
of harboring the pink bollworm, especially Hibiscus cannabinus,
H. esculentus, and Eaulainia: See Order of February 26, 1926, page 32.

SUGA2CAiE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.









INDIA, SETTLEIvkENTS IN

(Including Chendernagore, Karikal, Mahe, Pondichory, and Yanaon)



3ANANA PLANTS: No restrictions. COCO1UT (Cocos nucifera L.) palms, nuts, and leaves, and any material
capable of harboring parasites that attack the coconut palm:
See Order of August 1, 1927, below.

COTTON (Gossypium spp.): See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32. SUGARCAIE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.




Importation of Coconut Palms, Nuts, and Leaves Prohibited

(Ministerial Order of August 1, 1927)


Article 1. The importation by sea, the distribution, storage,
and transit of coconut palms, coconuts, and leaves of the coconut palm,
and of any other material that may contain parasites that attack this palm are prohibited for the French Settlements of India and Oceania.






-7


I IMO- CH I NA

(Including Annam, Cambodia, Cochin-China, Laos, and Tonkin)



Separate Orders have been promulgated to control the importation of plants and plant products into Indo-China. A summary of those Orders follows:

BANAITA (Musa spp.): The importation, distribution, storage, and transit are prohibited of entire plants or parts thereof, fruits,
and seeds of all species of banana, and of soil and packing accompanying them, provided that they may be imported from a country declared not infected by the Panama wilt disease (F-sarium cubense
E. F. Sm.) on condition that they are conveyed in packages containing not more than 10 plants, and that they are accompanied by
a certificate indicating the number of plants and their origin.
The certificate must be visaed by the French administrative or consular authority in the country of origin. After entry, the plants will be grown in quarantine for 1 year. (Order of Mar.
28, 1928.)

COCOA (Theobroma cacao L.): The importation, distribution, storage,
and transit of plants, pods, and seods of Theobroma cacao, as well
as of soils and packing accompanying them, are prohibited both
from countries declared infected by witches'-broom (M'.rasmius
perniciosus Stahel) and from any country into which the importation of the said products is neither prohibited nor subjected to
phytosanitary control.

The said products may be imported from countries not
declared infected under an authorization obtained in advance
which will determine in each case the number of plants admitted
to importation on condition that they are conveyed in closed
containers and are accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed
by the French administrative or consular authority of the producing country, attesting that the plants have not been collected
in a country in which the presence of the said disease has been determined, or in a country into which the importation of such plants
is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control.
(Order of June 23, 1930.)

COFFEE (Coffea spp.): The importation, distribution, storage, and
transit of plants or parts thereof, fruits and seeds, soils and packing accompanying them, are prohibited; provided, that beans for use as seed and in parchment may be imported from countries
not declared infected by coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.)
These must be packed in perfectly closed metal receptacles weigh-










ing not more than 20 kilograms and accompanied by a certificate indicating the number of containers nd the source of the seeds. The certificate must be visaed by the French
administrative or consular authority of the country of origin and the seeds shall be disinfected on entry. For the inrmportation of such beans from countries declared infected by the
said disease, the importer shall obtain an import authorization in advance, and the beans shall be packed as above indicated and be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by the
phytosanitary service of the country of origin, attesting that the seeds were regularly disinfected before being placed in the
containers. A second disinfection is required on entry.

COFFEE PLANTS may be imported under an authorization obtained in advance. They must be packed in closed sacks or other containers, free from debris of the coffee plant, and be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin and
attesting that the plants are free from disease; the certificate
must be visaed by the French consular authority. After inspection on arrival, the plants will either be destroyed or placed
in quarantine for 1 year, according to the findings. (Order
of Mar. 28, 1928.)

COFFEE (Coffee spp.) plants and parts thereof, dry or fresh coffee
berries, coffee beans in parchment, hulled coffee seeds (fresh
or unroasted), soil and composts, any sacks, cases, and packing that have served to transport those products, and all plants and
parts thereof, and seeds capable of harboring the coffee-berry
borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hagedorn), especially plants of
Rubus and Hibiscus: Importation, distribution, storage, and
transit prohibited of such products proceeding from Netherlands Indies, British ;:est Indies, French Equatoriel Africa, Belgian
Congo, Brazil, -nd French 17est Africa, as well as from countries
into which the importation of those products is not prohibited
or subjected to phytosanitary control.

Authorization may be granted in the case of such products proceeding from other sources but only on presentation of a certificate issued by the competent authority of the country of origin,
duly visaed, attesting that the said products had not been gathered
in a region infested by the coffee-berry borer, nor in a country into which the importation of those products is not prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control. Entry per.aitted only through
designated ports and on inspection showing the products to be
free from parasites and apparently healthy. (General Order of
Feb. 27, 1922.)







-9


COTTON (GossYium spp.): Importation, distribution, storage,
and transit of plants, parts thereof, fruits, seed, cottonseed cake of any species of cotton, of Hibiscus or Banhinia, and of
soil or packing accompanying them, are prohibited to prevent
the introduction of the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossyiella
Saund.); provided, that seeds may be imported, but only when
delinted for use as seed, under the following conditions:

From countries not declared infested: They must be shipped
in closed sacks or other receptacles, and be accompanied
by a certificate of origin duly visaed. They will be
disinfected on entry.

From a country declared infested: The importer must obtain
an import authorization in advance. The seeds must be
shipped in sacks or closed receptacles, sealed or marked by the phytosanitary service of the country of origin, and accompanied by a certificate of origin affirming that the
seeds have been regularly disinfected. They will be disinfected again on entry.

COTTON LINT for the local industries may be imported under
the following conditions:

The importer must furnish advance notice of arrival to the
phytosanitary inspector for each shipment. Bales of cotton
will first be opened in the factory unless it is deemed necessary
to make an examination in the port. Manufacturing wastes, especially
the seeds and refuse thereof, will be burned and the packing disinfected by heat in the factory.

Plants of the family Malvaceae and of the genus Bauhinia within
a radius of 300 meters from the mill shall be destroyed. (Order
of Mar. 28, 1928.)

FRUITS: Importation permitted of the following fruits originating in
any country not declared infested by the Mediterranean fruit fly
(Ceratitis capitata Wied.): Achras sapota, Annona muricata, Artocarpus incisa, Averrhoa carambola, Carica papaya, C. quercifolia,
Tt-rus b garardia, C. indica, C. limoni. C. nobilis and its hybrids,
C. aurantium, C. japonica, C. sinensis, C. decumana, Diospyros
decandra, Eriobotrya jaonica, Fortunella "kgonic Garcinia
manBostana, Litchi chinensis, Mangifera indica, Persea gratissima,
Psidium guajavya, Prunus armentaca, P. persica var. nectarina,
P. communis, Punica granatum, Pyrs communis, and P. malus, subject
to inspection by the phytosanitary service on arrival. If accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, they will be exempt from any
phytosanitary fee.










The importation of those fruits from the following, countries
known to be infested by the ilediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis c pitata Wied.) is prohibited: Azores, France, Greece, Italy,
Madeira, Malta, Sicily, Spain, and Turkey in Europe.

ASIA: Cyprus, Palestine, and Syria.

AZRCA: The African Continent, Canary Islands, Cape Verde Islands,
and Mauritius.

AMEICA: Argentina, Bermuda, and Brazil.

OCEANIA: Australia, Hawaii, and New Zealand.

Exceptionally, the importation of those fruits is authorized
from France, Algeria, Tunisia, Australia, and the Union of South Africa, which are declared to be infested by Ceratitis capitata, but which exercise on exported fruits a sanitary control offering sufficient guaranties. Fruit from these countries must be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate of the country of origin; the fruits are also subject to inspection on arrival.


HEEA spp.: Importation, distribution, storage, and transit of plants
and parts thereof, fruits, and seeds, as well as of soil and packing accompanying them, are prohibited; provided, that the seeds
may be imported for planting only, when clean and free from hulls, and when they proceed exclusively from countries not declared infected by diseases and pests of that plant. Such seeds must be
packed in closed sacks or receptacles and be accompanied by a duly visaed certificate indicating the number of packages and the source
of the seeds. After inspection on arrival, the seeds will be
delivered to the importer or disinfected.

Stocks or portions thereof may be imported exclusively
from countries not declared infected, in closed receptacles
and accompanied by a duly visaed certificate. After inspection
on arrival, these stocks will either be destroyed or subjected
to quarantine for 2 years. (Order of Mliar. 28, 1928.)

SUGARCANE (Saccharumn officinarum L.): Importation,distribution, storage,
and transit of plants, parts thereof, seeds, and of soils and packing accompanying them, are prohibited; provided, that the seeds may
be imported exclusively for use as such, when free from hulls,
under the following conditions:






11


FroT,, a. country riot declared infected: They must te conveyed
in -oerfoctl.-.7 closed metal receptacles aj:.Ld be L-,ccompamied
by a dul, visaed certificate indicating the m,.Tije of the
consi.c-nees and the source of the seeds. 'I"he seeds, will be
disinfected on entry.

From country, declared infected: The importer si-all obtain
an import authorization in advance,; the seE ds shall be conveyed in pdrfectly clos-ed miet-3 1 receptacles rmrlk(. d b-- the -,)hytosar-Jt; :ry s :.---vice of the country of ori! 'in; the certil icEte shall attt.2 v tiiat tn'k2 s -,,zd6 liad 'D,--en diSin-"'J-cted
before buin- -,,)ack, d. Such sevds chall agein be disinfected
on arrival.

Entire c-,n-,s o- o,-,,rt3 t"- ereof, sturi-pped o--" leaves and roots,
may be iq.,or'ved un -Ier -,n authol-izatior. obtained -a in advance, indicatin,, th,--, q-caq--ity of cutt.I.P Ds to b-, ad-i--.itted and, tKt si.)eci-I conditions, eas well ?.s und ,r Iv-I)e 1cli cond.-Itions:

From 4, country rot d-,cla-t)d in' 'ect-L;d: Tlie s -.all be shj pped in of not irmre tnl!,,n 50, in frc ,, from soil and
cane r ,fuse. The-,- s1iall b,--I ace olaI2 --- iied by (,.7. dul,,T visaed cortificate indicatinr-, lvhk,- ruii.ber of ID, cIv-tL,es the oric-in of
the cuttin.--s. Afij-c.r a, lif.y1t;osanit ,,ry ins
1-. the cuttings
will be destro-ved or quar,-.ntined -for 2 ye rs.

From a. gqu-:n, _ry cl. 3clarod infected: The c-.nl-s inizst be ship -Oed in
.,ckapDs cf not more tli-.n 10, in containers su-7 led or marked
bY the ohytosanitary s 3rvice of the country ,,i n, attest
i.-.g in the ce-til"icate of ori ,in that eac h clatvinc oxc mined
and found free from- diseases. (Order of 28, 1928, -,-s
amended by t',-1;.A of -,qcv. 17, 1928.)
TEA (Thoa -mportatior i s ib i) -ago and tr,-- nsit of
d- t- -tion, stol
I-U ,arts 1-h-reof, fruits, an -L)--d.c of al' sjp- ci -,s of toc.,
an soil and uac.,., ing -,.ccor-,)anyJ - the-m, c--re orciiibitcd; )rovidod, that set ds exclusive Iy for u.;u such b,:, introduced
if c,-,.(.comj)p-ni-d by a certificate, issued by thu -,I,.ytos : -nitary
service of the. coimtry of ori,,--,,-Ln, indic :.,ting nzmL) ,,r of
-p Cka,7es, thz so-arce of tho s-,Deds, -- n-d their frt,,edom
from discasos and porasites. After ins- sectionn LIlt the port of
entr-,r, they will be delivered or di3infooted. (Order of Lv?I--Ir. 22
1928 .)








-12


COUNTRIES DECLARED INFECTED (Order of Mar. 28, 1928) The countries declared infected with respect to certain plants and plant protects aro as follows:


Sugarcane

Australia, Fiji, Formosa, Guinea, Hawaii, Japan, New Guinea, Philipp ines.

Hevea

The countries of South America.

Coffee

Belgian Congo, British West Indies, Equatorial Africa, Ivory Coast, Netherlands Indies, South America (countries of).


Cotton

Brazil, British East Africa, British India, British West Indies,
Egrpt, Eawaii, Madagascar, MIexico, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, United States (Louisiana, Mew Mexico, and Texas only).


Banana

The American Continent, Canary Islands, Gold Coast, Sierra Leone, West Indies.


Authorized Port of Entry (Orders of July 1, 1927, and Jan. 17, 1928)

The port of saion is opened for the importation of plants, soils, and materials for transportation covered by phytosanitary regulations.









GT
MA )A(G.kSC.0 UT DEPEN-DEN LES

(including SteNariedeyarjagpscpx' : !Jd COT Oro, A n j oua n a nd IvI c) h j I i



B L LOA P IIAN T S S P'. O-P P See Order of December 7, 1926, pa,,.,,e 25.
0 0 1 p ,r-_-e 26.
COCOA (Thcobroma caca L.): Sue Order olC Dec,3mbor 3, 19 9,

C 0 n'E E ( C of f ea, s-2,) Pla-its and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans, Coffee b ,,-.nj in parchment, hulled coffee -beans (fres'-r-i or unro,,)cted), soils or coTi-tposts, packing, ,,7 and contLiners, and plants
ca 4" ffeo-berr-,- borer (Stephanoderes ham
pable of harborilng the cof Pei
Hapg. Sce Crdur of Zebz-aary 127, 1-0/22, pa,,-o 28.

SUGARCAYE (SaccIL',-ui-i officnar-Lun Sea CrIer of ec(;mber 3, 192D.
.pa-Ge 34.








-14


LAR~ INQUE



BAAIT~A PLANTS (Musa spp.): See Orders of February 11, 1931, and February.
9, 1935, applyin;,, the Order of December 7, 1926, page 05.

CCOCOA (Theobroma caceo L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, page 26.

COFFEE (Coffea sup.) plants, berries, or seeds, and any product capable
of distributing coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.): See
Order of Mlay 19, 1924, page 30.

COFFEE (Coffea sop.) plants and parts thereof, dry or fresh berries, beans
in parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, packing and containers, and plants capable of harboring the coffeeberry borer (Stemhanodores hppei Hag.), especially Hibiscus and
Rubus: Sea Order of F bruary 27, 1922, page 28.

COTTON (Gossypium spp.): See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32.

SUGARCHYE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.










iNEW CALEDONIA AID DEPENDENCIES

(Superseding B. E. P. Q.--398)


(Including Isle of Pines, Loyalty Islands, Hucn Islands, Fortuna,
and Alofi Islands, and the allis Islands)



AGRI CULT L ALND HORTICULTURAL PL1ODUCTS I T-ELDED FOR CONSUMPTION,
as well as truck crops (culinary vegetables.), seeds, and fruits
for the same purpose: Importation unrestricted. See Order
of February 27, 1918, article 4, page 16.

BANANA PL.ATS (Musa spp.): See Order of December 7, 1926, page 25.

COCOA (Theobroma cacao L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, page 26.

COCONUT (Cocos nucifera L.): Importation of the nuts, hearts of
coconut palms, and bascet-meking materials of coconut palm leaves
from any source prohibited. See Order of February 27, 1918, article
6, page 16.

COFFEE (Coffea spp.): Plants or parts thereof, dry or fresh berries, beans in parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted),
soil and composts, packing and containers, and plants capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hag.), especially Hibiscus and Rubus. See Order of February
27, 1922, page 28.

POTATOES (Solanum tuberosum L.): Phytosanitary certificate issued
by an authorized agent of the exporting country affirming freedom from all dangerous parasites. See Order of February 27, 1918,
article 7, page 17.

SUGARC-E (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.

TRES, STOCKS, CUTTINIGS, leaves, roots, seeds, flower bulbs, soil
and vegetable fertilizers, and other similar articles and their
packing materials: See articles 1, 2, and 3 of the Order of
February 27, 1918, page 16.






-16


GE~BAL REGULAJT IONS

ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS, BULBS, AND SEEDS


(Order of Feb. 27, 1918, as applied by Governor's Decree No. 103 C of Jan. 27, 1934)


Article 1. The introduction of trees, stocks, cuttings, leaves, roots, seeds, flower bulbs, soil and vegetable fertilizers, and other similar materials, as well as- packing that has served for their transportation, iscubject to the following restrictions:


Shipper's Declaration and Phytosanitary Certificate Required

Art. 2. The products mentioned in the preceding article must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and a certificate issue by the coL.petent authority of the place of origin, visaed by the French consular authority, if there is one, affirming that no special parasite or disease of the imported species exists in the country of origin.


Disinfectin on Arrival Required

Art. 3. To be admitted into the Colony, the products, whatever their origin, shall be disinfected by a method to be determined by the local administration.

Any imported plant, seed, or product found on arrival to be infected or parasitized shall be destroyed at the expense of the importer.


Importation of Plant Products for Consurption Unrestricted

Art. 4. Agricultural and horticultural products intended for consupption, as well as truck crops (culinary vegetables), seeds, and fruits for the seme use, are free from the preceding formalities.

Art. 5. Seeds for cooking are not restricted by any special measures.


Importation of Coconuts Prohibited

Art. 6. The importation into New Caledonia and Dependencies of coconuts, hearts of coconut palms, and basket-naking materials of palm leaves from outside the archipelagoes of New Caledonia and Loyalty is rigorously prohibited. Any product in this category seized on arrival at Noumea will be destroyed by fire.






-17


potatoes Mjust Be e'Accor-manied. by a Certifica-,te

-rt. 7. Potatoes will1 not be a&:ritted to k.-ortr'tion unless t.11y are accompanied by -, phytosa:Aitary cetiict issod by an oxathorized
agent of the exporting country, attesting that they have be en xind and found free from all dangerous parasites.

Tubers found on arrival. to be infested will be relad. or dsti'yed.











(Including the Ba~nks and. Torres Islands)



COCOA- PLANITS (Theobr'cma cacao 2>): See Order of Deocmbur 3, 1929, page 26. SUGARCANE (SaccharurD off icinarun L>) See Order of Dacaiber 3, 1929, page
34.







-19


OCEANIA, SETTLEMiENTS IN

(Including Gambier Archipelago, Miarquesas Islands, Tuamotou, French
Leeward Islands, Society Islands, and Tubuai)


BANANA PLANTS (Musa spp.): See the Order of January 12, 1916, page 20,
as rendered applicable to Oceania by that of February 11, 1931.

COCOA PLANTS (Theobromra cacao L.): See the Order of December 3, 1929, page
26.

COCONUT (Cocos nucifera L.) palms and all plants and leaves of the
palm family, and soils and composts that may carry their parasites: See order of January 12, 1916, as amended by that of 'lovember
15, 1924, page 20; also Ministerial Order of August 1, 1927, oelow.

COFFEE (Coffea spp.) plants, berries, or seeds, and any product capable
of distributing coffee rust (Hemeleia vastatrix B. and Dr.):
See Order of May 19, 1924, as rendered applicable to Oceania by the Orders of January 12, 1916, and November 15, 1924, page 30.

COTTON (Gossypium spp.) plants or parts thereof, in the dry or green
state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost,
and packing or containers thereof: See Order of February 22, 1926,
page 32.

SUGARCANE (Saccharum officinerumr, L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, page
34.


Importation of Coconut Palms, Nuts, and Leaves Prohibited

(Ministerial Order of Aug. 1, 1927)


Article 1. The importation by sea, the distribution, storage, and transit of coconut palms, coconuts, and leaves of the coconut palm, and of any other material that may contain parasites which attack this palm
are prohibited for the French Settlement of India and Oceania.







-20


OCEANIA



GENERAL PGUTIAT IONS

(Order of Jan. 12, 1916, as amended by that of iNov. 15, 1924, also te Or&er of Aug. 1, 1927)


Entry of Coconut Palms, Coffee, and Banana Plants Prohibited

Article 1. The entry by sea into the Settlements of Oceania is prohibited of coconut trees (Cocos nucifera L.) and all other plants of the palm family, coffee (Coffea spp.), banana and other Musaceae and their fruits, leaves, or branches, and soils or composts that may
carry parasites of those plants.


Certification of iMerchandise from Tropical Regions

Art. 2. Merchandise proceeding from tropical regions may
be unladen only on a certificate issued by the customs service, affirming that the packing does not consist of hay, straw, fiber, or any
other agricultural product that may represent a danger from the agricultural point of view. In case of doubt or dispute, recourse shall be made to the Chief Pharmacist in the Service of the Colonial Hospital
and/or the Crop Agent (agent de culture) in charge of the Station of Agriculture and Animal Husbandry.


Phytosanitary Certificate Required for Other Plants

Art. 3. No living plants or parts thereof, stocks, cuttings,
buds, other than those mentioned in article 1, including seeds, shall be admitted into the Colony unless they are accompanied by a certificate indicating the name and address of the shipper and the place of origin of the products; that document, duly countersigned by an inspector or an agent of the phytosanitary service of the country of origin, shall affirm that the plants or seeds are not infested by any disease; that they do not proceed from a contaminated locality, or that
they have been disinfected and, especially with respect to coffee seeds, that Hemileia does not oxist in the country of origin. Furthermore,
unlading may be effected only after the said certificate, visaed by the customs service, shall have been signed by the Chief Pharmacist or the Crop Agent.







-21


REUNION ISLAND



BANANA PLANTS (ivMusa spp.): See Order of December 7, 1926, page 25.

COCOA PLANTS (Theobroma cacao L.) : See Order of December 3, 1929, page 26.

COFFEE (Coffea spp.) plants and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans,
beans in parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, packing and containers, and plants capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hag.): See
Order of February 27, 1922, page 28.

COTTON (Gossypimm spp.) plants or parts thereof in the dry or green state,
ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost, packing or containers that have served to transport those products,
and any plants, seeds, or parts thereof capable of harboring the
pink bollworm, especially Eibiscus cannibinus, H. esculentus,
and Bauhinia: See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32.

SUGARCAIE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.







-22


SOMALI LAD



COTTON (Gossypium spp.) plants or parts thereof in the dry or
green state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost, packing or containers that have served to transport those
products, and any seeds, plants, or parts thereof capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially Hibiscus cannabinus,
H. esculentus, and Bauhinia: See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32.

SUGARCANE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.











TOGOLAND



BANANA PLANTS (Musa spp.): See Order of December 7, 1926, page 25,
as applied to Togoland by the Order of February 11, 1931.

COCOA PLANTS (Theobroma cacao L.): See Order of December 3, 1929, as
applied to Togoland by the Order of February 13, 1932, page 26.

COFFEE (Coffea spp.) plants, berries, seeds, or any product capable
of distributing coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.):
See Order of May 19, 1924, page 30, as applied to Togoland
by the Order of July 30, 1924.

COTTON (Gossyi~m spp.) plants or parts thereof in the dry or green
state, j .ed or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost,
packing containers that have served to transport those articles,
and any ,.eds, plants, or parts thereof capable of harboring the
pirnk boll worm', especially of Hibiscus cannabinus, H. esculentus,
and Bauhinia: See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32.

SUGARCAiLE (Saccharmm officinarLum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.







-24


;EST AFRICA

(Including Dahomey, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal,
and Sudan)



BANANA PLANTS (Musa spp.): To prevent the introduction of Panama
wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.), banana plants
may be imported into French West Africa only through the ports of Dakar, Conakry, Port Bouet, Sassandra, and Cotonou, to the
exclusion of all points on the land frontiers. (Order of June 13, 1935, modifying that of Mar. 14, 1927, under the provisions
of the Order of Dec. 7, 1926, which see, p. 25.)

COCOA PLANTS (Theobroma cacao L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 26.

COFFEE (Coffea spp.) plants, berries, or seeds, and any product capable
of distributing coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.):
See Order of May 19, 1924, page 30.

COTTON (Gossyyium spp.) plants or parts thereof in the dry or green
state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost,
packing or containers that have served to transport these products, and any seeds, plants, or parts thereof capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially plants of Hibiscus cannabinus,
H. esculentus, and B ahinia: See Order of February 22, 1926, page 32.

SUGARCANE (Saccharum officinarum L.): See Order of December 3, 1929,
page 34.







-25


GEYP L QWUATINES

APPLYING TO DESIGNATED COLONIES



BANANA PLANTS (Musa spp.)

(Order of Dec. 7, 1926, as amended by that of Feb. 9, 1935)


Importation Prohibited from Countries Infected by Panama Disease

Article 1. The importation into, distribution and storage in, and transit through the French colonies named in article 6 of the present Order, are prohibited of banana plants proceeding from countries in which the presence of the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. ,;:.) has been determined, or from those into which the importation of the said plants is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control.


Entry from Other Sources Permitted under Certification

Art. 2. The movements of banana plants from any source indicated in article 1 in the French colonies named in article 6 may be authorized only on presentation of a certificate issued by the competent authority of the country of origin, attesting that the said plants were neither collected in a region where the Panama wilt disease had been determined nor in a country into which the importation of the said plants is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control.


Irregular Shipments Denied Entry

Art. 3. Any of the above-mentioned plants offered for importation into the French colonies named in article 6 not meeting the provisions of articles 1 and 2 will be reladen immediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.

This applies also to shipments for which the importer does not furnish a valid certificate of origin.


Entry Permitted at Designated Ports Only

Art. 4. For plants offered for entry under one of the forms
indicated. in article 1 and accompanied by the certificate prescribed by article 2, the authorization for importation, distribution, storage,











or transit in the French colonies named in article 6 may be granted only in one of the points of entry designated for each colony by an order of the local administration, granted only after an inspection by the authority designated by the Governor, showing the products to be apparently healthy and free from the parasite referred to in the
present Order.


Suspected Lots Denied Entry

Art. 4. contd. Any suspected lot will be reladen immediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.


Importations from Infected Countries Exceptionally Permitted

Art. 5. Provides for derogations from the preceding provisions from prescribed sources, for material of a real technical or economic interest, through administrative channels.


Colonies Concerned

Art. 6. The provisions of this Order are applicable to banana plants for importation into and transit through the following French colonies: Cameroons, Equatorial Africa, Guadeloupe, Guiana, Indo-China, Madagascar, Martinique, New Caledonia, Oceania (Settlements of), Togoland, and Test Africa.


Infected Countries

The provisions of article 1 are applicable to the designated
products proceeding from the American Continent, Canary Islands, French Guiana, Gold Coast, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Sierra Leone.



COCOA PUNTS (Theobroma cacao L.)

(Order of Dec. 3, 1929, as amended by that of Feb. 13, 1932)


Importation from Certain Countries Prohibited on Account of Witches'-broom

Article 1. The importation into, distribution and storage in, and transit through the French colonies named in article 7 of cacao plants (Theobroma cacao L.) proceeding from a country in which the presence of








-27-


witches'-broom (Marasmius perniciosus Stahel) has been determined or from any country into which the importation of the said plants is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control, are prohibited.


Importation from Other Sources Restricted

Art. 2. The importation, distribution, storage, and transit
in the French colonies named in article 7 paragraph 1 of cacao plants from any source other than those named in article 7 paragraph 2, may be authorized, but only on presentation of a certificate issued by competent authority of the country of origin that the said plants have neither been collected in a region in which the disease called "witchest-broom" has been determined, nor in a country into which the importation of the said plants has not been prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control. The certificate is not valid unless visaed by the consuls, vice-consuls, or consular agents of the French Republic in foreign countries.


Irregular Shipm-ents Denied Entry

Art. 3. Any cacao plants offered for importation into the
French colonies named. in article 7 of the present Order that do not meet the provisions of articles 1 and 2 will be reladen -jnimediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.

The same applies if the importer fails to furnish a, valid certificate.


Importation Permitted Through Designated Ports Only

Art. 4. Authorization for the importation, distribution, storage, and transit in the French colonies named in article 7 can be granted only for cacao plants accompanied by the certificate prescribed in article 2 of the present Order and through a customs office designated by an order of the local administration; the authorization will not be definitely granted until an inspection by the designated authority shows the products to be apparently healthy and free from the parasite
mentioned.

Any suspected lot will be reladen immediately at the expense of the holder, or seized and destroyed by fire.








-28


Importation from Contaminated Countries Exceptionally Permitted

Art. 5. For the introduction into .French colonies of cacao plants originating in one of the contaminated countries named in article 7 or in a region into which the importation of the said plants is not prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control, derogations may be exceptionally granted by decision of the Minister of Colonies establishing therein the conditions under which the i-mportation may be effected and indicating the quantities and varieties of plants whose importation is authorized.

Such derogations may be granted only for plants whose introduction is believed to present a real economic and technical interest, and may be Lnported through diplomatic channels alone, and when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate attesting the freedom
of the plants from disease.

Art. 6. The same provisions are applicable to fresh cacao pods and seeds.


French Colonies Concerned

Art. 7. The provisions of the present Order are applicable to
plants, pods, and seeds of Theobroma cacao offered for importation into
and transit through Equatorial Africa, Guadeloupe, Guiana, Madagascar, Martinique, New Caledonia, New Hebrides, Oceania (Settlements of), Reunion, and West Africa.


Countries Affected

The prohibitions of article 1 are applicable to the designated products proceeding from South and Central America and Trinidad.



RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COFFEE

(Order of Feb. 27, 1922, as amended)


Importation Prohibited
On Account of the Coffee-Berry Borer

Article 1. Importation into, movement and storage in, and transit through French colonies that are free from the coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hagedorn) are prohibited of any products capable of dis-










tributing that insect, ?nd such products rroc-.eding either from countries in which the presence of that pest has been demonstrated. or from those into which the importation of those products is not prohibited or subjected to a phytosanitary control.


Products Affected

This prohibition applies to coffee plants ond parts thereof,
to dry or fresh coffee berries, to coffee beans in parchment, hulled coffee beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, and to sacks, cases, and packing that have served to transport the aforesaid products, as well as to all plants or parts thereof and seeds capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer, especially Hibiscus and Rubus.


Importation under Certification

Art. 2. The movements indicated in article 1 of the said
products proceeding from sources other than those indicated in that article may be authorized only on the presentation of a certificate, issued by the competent authority of the country of origin, attesting that the said products had not been gathered in a region where the presence of Stephanoderes had been determined, nor in a country into which the importation of the said products is not prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control. The certificate must be visaed by the consulax or other authorized official of the French Republic.


Importation into Nonproducing Colonies

Art. 2. contd. In colonies that do not produce coffee, a derogation of the presentation of the certificate required by paragraph 1 of this article may be granted by Ministerial decision for coffees proceeding direct from warehouses of the metropolis (European France) or from countries declared contaminated, on condition that they are intended for consumption only.

In all other colonies, that derogation may be granted only when it is shown on entry into their territory that a technical inspection of imported plant products has been established and completed by the necessary equipment for quarantine and disinfection.


Disposal of Irregular Shipments

Art. 3. Such products, offered for importation into the
French colonies named in article 5, as do not meet the provisions of articles and 2 will be reladen immediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.







-30


The same applies to those for which the importer does not furnish a certificate of origin recognized as valid.


Entry Limited to Designated Ports

Art. 4. Prescribes that the said products may enter only
through the ports designated for each colony and subject to inspection on arrival.

Any suspected lot will be reladen immediately or seized and
destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.


Colonies Concerned

Art. 5. The provisions of this order are applicable to the products named in article 1 and offered for importation into or transit through ud.loupe, uiana, Indo-China, Mladagascar, M[artinique, New Caledonia, and Reunion.


Countries of Origin Concerned

Art. 5 contd. The above prohibitions are applicable to the designated products proceeding from Belgian Congo, Brazil, British West Indies, French Equatorial Africa, French West Africa, and Netherlands Indies, as well as from countries into which the importation of the said products is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control.



,ESTRICTIONS OIT THB ITPORTATION OF COFFEE

(Order of ,May 19, 1924)


Importation from Certain Countries Prohibited on Account of Coffee Rust

Article I. The importation into, distribution and storage in, and transit through the French colonies named in article 6 that are free from coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. & Br.) of any product capable of distributing that disease, proceeding from any country in which the presence of Hemileia vastatrix has been determined, or from those into which the importation of the said products is not prohibited cr subjected to phytosanitary control, are prohibited.







-31


Entry from Other Sources under Certification

Art. 2. The importation; distribution, storage, and transit in the French colonies named in article 6 of the products referred to in article 1, proceeding from sources other than those mentioned in that article, may be authorized on presentation of a certificate issued by competent authority of the country of origin. The certificate shall affirm that the said products were not collected in a locality in which Hemileia vastatrix has been determined, nor in a. country into which the importation of the said products is not prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control. The certificate must be visaed by a French consul, vice-consul, or consular agent in foreign countries.


Irreguldar Shipments Denied Entry

Art. 3. Any of the above-mentioned products presented for
importation into the French colonies named in article 6 that d~o not meet the provisions of articles 1 and 2 will be reladen immediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder. The same applies to shipments for which the importer fails to furnish a valid certificate as prescribed in article 2.


Entry of Coffee Seeds Exceptionally Permitted from Infected Countries

Art. 4. Coffee seeds intended for sowing proceeding either from a country declared contaminated by Hemileia, vastatrix or from one into which the products mentioned in article 1 are neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control may, exceptionally, be introduced into the French colonies named in article 6 under a special authorization of the Governor-General or Governor after disinfection.


Entry Limited to Designated Ports

Art. 5. Prescribes that the products concerned shall enter the
designated French colonies only through ports authorized by the respective local administrations, subject to inspection on arrival.


Colonies Concerned

Art. ~.The provisions of this .Order are applicable to the following French colonies which are declared free from IHemileia vastatrix: Equatoria. Africa, G~uadeloupe, Guiana, Martinique, Oceania, Togoland, and West Africa.






-32


Infected Countries

Art. 6 contd. The prohibitions prescribed in article 1 of the present Order are applicable to the designated products proceeding from any country of Africa, Asia, or Oceania, as well as from any country into which the importation of the said products is neither prohibited nor subjected to phytosanitary control.



COTTOIT IMIORT RESTICTIOITS

(Order of Feb. 22, 1926, as amended)


Importation of Cotton and Cottonseed Prohibited from
Countries Infested by the Pink Bollworm

Article 1. The importation into, movement or storage in,
and transit through French colonies that are free from pink bollworm ((Gelechia) Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) of all products capable of distributing that insect, proceeding either from countries in which the presence of the pink bollworm has been determined, or from countries that do not prohibit the importation of the said products or subject them to phytosanitary control, are prohibited.


Products Affected

This prohibition applies to entire cotton plants or parts thereof in the green or the dry state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil, composts, sacks, cases, or packing that have served to transport the articles just mentioned, as well as to any seeds, entire plants or parts thereof, capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially Hibiscus cannabinus, H. esculentus, and Bauhinia.


Importation from Other Sources Restricted

Certificate Required

Art. 2. The importation into, movement or storage in, and transit through the French colonies named in article 6 of the products referred to in article 1, of other origins than those indicated in that article, may be authorized only on presentation of a certificate issued by the competent authority of the country of origin attesting that the said products were not gathered in a region where the presence of the pink bollworm had been determined, or in any country into







-33


which the importation of the said products is not prohibited or subjected to a phytosanitary control.

The certificate will not be valid unless it bears the visa of the Governor-General, the Governor, the Resident Superior, or their delegates, in matters pertaining to the French colonies; of the Governor-General, Residents-General, or their delegates in Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco, and that of the consuls, vice-consuls, or consular events of the French Republic in foreign countries.


Irregular Shipments Reladen or Destroyed

Art. 3. Any of the above products offered for importation
into the French colonies named in article 6 that do not meet the conditions prescribed in articles 1 and 2 above, will be reladen immediately or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.

The same applies to the said products for which the importer does not furnish a certificate of origin recognized as valid.


Entry Through Designated Ports

Inspection on Arrival

Art. 4. Prescribes that the said products shall enter the
respective French colonies only through designated ports and subject to inspection on arrival at those ports.

Suspected shipments will be reladen at once, or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.


Small Lots of Cottonseed Excepted Subject to Disinfection

Art. 5. For the introduction into the French colonies of very small lots of cottonseed originating in any of the contaminated countries named in article 6 or in a region into which the importation of cottonseed is not prohibited or subjected to phytosanitary control, derogations may be granted, exception-lly, by decision of the Minister of Colonies, indicating the quantities and varieties of seeds for which the importation is authorized. Such derogations may be granted only for seeds whose introduction is deemed to present a real technical
or economic interest and after a disinfection made and guaranteed by the service qualified for that purpose, either in Fr ance or on arrival in the Colony. Each such shipment :ust be accompanied by a disinfection certificate expressly mentioning the Ministerial decision, the quantity of seeds disinfected, and the method of disinfection employed.









Colonies Concerned

Art. 6, The provisions of the present Order are applicable to the products named in article 1 offered for importation into or transit through all French colonies except Equatorial Africa, Guadeloup,, Indo-China (Cambodia and Cochin China only), Madagascar, New Caledonia, and New Hebrides. In other words, they are applicable to: Cameroons, Guiana, India (Settlements in), Martinique, Oceania (Settlements in), Rounion, Somaliland, Togoland, and West Africa.


Countries to Which the Prohibition is Applicable

Art. 6. contd. The prohibitions of article 1 are applicable to the designated products proceeding from Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, Angola, Asia (except Indo-China, Tonkin, and Annam), Australia, Belgian Congo, Brezil, Fritish East Africa, British Wost Indies, Egypt, French Equatorial Africa, German East Africa (old colonies of), Greece, Guadeloupe, Lawaii, Italian Somaliland, Lagos, Madagascar, Mexico, LMorocco, Newv Caledonia, HeiHobrides, Nigeria, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Tunisia, United States (Louisiana, New Mexico, and Texas only), and Zanzibar.



SUG.ARCAIE (Saccharum officinarum L.)

(Order of Dec. 3, 1929)


Importation Prohibited from All French Colonies except Indo-China

Article 1. The importation into, distribution and storage in, and transit through the French colonies of plants, cuttings, or seeds of sugarcane from whatever source, are prohibited. This does not apply to Indo-China.


Entry of Small Lots Exceptionally Permitted

Art. 2. For the introduction into the French colonies of a small number of plants or cuttings stripped of their leaves and leaf sheaths, as well as seeds of sugarcane,originating in any country whatever, derogation may exceptionally be granted, by decision of the Minister of Colonies, establishing the conditions. under which importation may be effected and indicating the quantities and varieties of plants, cuttings, and seeds of which importation is authorized.

Derogations may be granted only for plants or cuttings whose
introduction is deemed of real economic or technical interest. Such






-35


plants may be shipped through administrative channels only and at the importer's expense. Entry may be made only through customs offices designated by each colony and only when inspection on arrival shows that the products are apparently healthy and free from any parasite.


Entry of Suspected Lots Denied

Each suspected lot will be at once reladen or seized and destroyed by fire at the expense of the holder.


Admitted Sugarcane Kupt under Observation

Any lot of' sugarcane that is admitted will be taken in charge by the local a agricultural service, which will grow the plants and keep them under observation for tho necessary time, namely, a minimal period of 3 months. Plants then found healthy will be delivered; any plant found to be diseased will be destroyed by fire without indemnity to the importers.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09245 5871