Statistical materials on the electric utility industry

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Statistical materials on the electric utility industry
Physical Description:
vii, 201 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Library of Congress -- Congressional Research Service
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. -- Subcommittee on Energy and Power
Publisher:
U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Electric utilities -- Statistics   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographies.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the use of the Subcommittee on Energy and Power and the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, U.S. House of Representatives, March 1976.
General Note:
At head of title: 94th Congress, 2d session. Subcommittee print.
General Note:
Includes index.
General Note:
12 cds

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 025786405
oclc - 02837219
System ID:
AA00025939:00001

Full Text


94th Congress SUBCOMMITTEE PRINT 2d Session







STATISTICAL MATERIALS
ON THE

ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY





PRFARED FOR THE USE OF THE
SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER AND THE~

COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND
FOREIGN COMMERCE

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES










MARCH 1976 =0
I o-% ..

;r04
.... '




U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 6-a 0 WASHINGTON: 1976





COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE
HARLEY 0. STAGGERS, West Virginia, Chairman
TORBERT H. MACDONALD, Massachusetts SAMUEL L. DEVINE, Ohio JOHN E. MOSS, California JAMES T. BROYHILL, North Carolina
JOHN D. DINGELL, Michigan TIM LEE CARTER, Kentucky
PAUL G. ROGERS, Florida CLARENCE J. BROWN, Ohio
LIONEL VAN DEERLIN, California JOE SKUBITZ, Kansas
FRED B. ROONEY, Pennsylvania JAMES M. COLLINS, Texas
JOHN M. MURPHY, New York LOUIS FREY, JR., Florida
DAVID E. SATTERFIELD III, Virginia JOHN Y. McCOLLISTER, Nebraska BROCK ADAMS, Washington NORMAN F. LENT, New York
W. S. (BILL) STUCKEY, Ja., Georgia H. JOHN HEINZ III, Pennsylvania BOB ECKHARDT, Texas EDWARD R. MADIGAN, Illinois
RICHARDSON PREYER, North Carolina CARLOS J. MOORHEAD, California JAMES W. SYMINGTON, Missouri MATTHEW J. RINALDO, New Jersey
CHARLES J. CARNEY, Ohio W. HENSON MOORE, Louisiana
RALPH H. METCALFE, Illinois GOODLOE E. BYRON, Maryland JAMES H. SCHEUER, New York RICHARD L. OTTINGER, New York HENRY A. WAXMAN, California ROBERT (BOB) KRUEGER, Texas TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado PHILIP R. SHARP, Indiana WILLIAM M. BRODHEAD, Michigan W. G. (BILL) HEFNER, North Carolina JAMES J. FLORIO, New Jersey ANTHONY TOBY MOFFETT, Connecticut JIM SANTINI, Nevada
ANDREW MAGUIRE, New Jersey W. E. WILLIAMSON, 0Crk KENNETH J. PAINTER, Ae#eitant Clerk
Professional Staff
CHARLES B. CURTIS WILLIAM P. ADAMS
LEE S. HYDE ROBERT R. NORDHAUS
ELIZABETH HARRISON BRIAN R. MOIR
JEFFREY H. SCHWARTZ WILLIAM G. PHILLIPS
JAMES M. MENGER, Jr. KAREN NELSON
MARGOT DINNEEN
JAN B. VLCEK, Associate Minority Counsel



SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER JOHN D. DINGELL, Michigan, Chairman TIMOTHY H. WIRTH, Colorado CLARNCE J. BROWN, Ohio
PHILIP R. SHARP, Indiana CARLOS J. MOORHEAD, California
WILLIAM M. BRODHEAD, Michigan JAMES T. BROYHILL, North Carolina
JOHN M. MURPHY, New York H. JOHN HEINZ III, ftmsylvania
BOB ECKHARDT, Texas SAMUEL L. DEVINE, Ohio
RICHARD L. OTTINGER, New York (ex officio)
RQBjRT (BOB) KRUEGER, Texas ANTHONY TOBY MOFFETT, Connecticut ANDREW MAGUIRE, New Jersey HARLEY 0. STAGGERS, West Virginia
(ex officio)
FRANK M. POTTER, Staff Director andJ Counsel
(II)









Tn. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS,
CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE, Washington, D.C.
Hon. Joun D. DINGELLJ,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Energy and Power, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
DEAR CONGasSMAN DINGErL: Pursuant to your request of February 1976, we are submitting selected statistical materials on the electric utility industry in the United States. We have also included a bibliography of suggested reading on utility rate regulation and restructuring. We understand that these materials are to be used by the Subcommittee members and staff as reference and background for hearings on the "Electric Utility Rate Reform and Regulatory Improvement Act."
Both the statistical materials and the bibliography were compiled and prepared by Ms. Angela Lancaster of the Economics Division, CongressionaJ Research Service. We trust that the materials will be helpful to your needs.
Sincerely yours,
NORMAN BECKMAN,
Acting Director.











CONTENTS

Page
Letter of submittal ....- -m
Introduction ----- ---------------------------------------1
Sources -------------------------------------------------------- 1
I. STRUCTURE OF THE ELECTRIC POWIR INDUSTRY The electric power industry 1970-Chart ----------------------------- 5
Structure of the electric power industry------- ---------------------- 6
II. ELECTRIC CAPACITY AND GENERATION
Figure 1-Installed Generating Capaoity-Total Industry (1920-74 ) 19 Table 1-Installed generating capacity-by ownership (1956-74) ........ -----20
Table 2-Installed generating capacity-by ownership and prime mover
(1956-74) -------------------------------------------21
Table 3-Installed generating capacity--by iState and prime mover
(1973, 1974) -----------------------------------------23
Table 4-Privately owned utilities: Number and capacity of generating
plants (1972, 1973) ------------------------------------24
Table 5---Privately owned utilities: Electric energy account (1972, 1973) 24 Table 6--Privately owned utilities: Number and capacity of generating
plants (1963-73) --------------------------------25
Table 7-Municipal utilities: Number and capacity of generating plants
(1972, 1973)-------------------- ----- --------------26
Table 8-Municipal utilities: Electric energy account (1972, 1973)---- 26 Table 9--Municipal utilities: Number and capacity of generating plants
(1963-73) ----------------------------- --------------27
Table 10-Municipal utilities: Electric energy account (1963-73) -------- 28 Table 11-Electricity generation-by source (1960-74) --------------- 29
Table 12---Electricity generation---by ownership and prime mover (95674) ------------------------------------ --- 30
Table 13-Electricity generation-by State and prime mover (1973, 1974) 32 Table 14---Electricity generation---by State and kinds of fuel (1974) ------ 33
Table 15---Electricity generationper kilowatt of installed capacity--by
ownership and prime mover (1963-74) ------------------ 34
Table 16---Percent of total generation--by ownership and prime mover
(1963-74) -------------------- ------ --------- 35
Table 17---Capability, peak load, reserve margins and load factor-total
industry (1960-74) .....-----... .. --------------------- 36
Table 18--Capacity factors-by ownership and prime mover (19~0-74) 37 Table 19---Primary energy purchase data-by State and kinds of fuel
(12-month period October 1974-September 1975) ----------- 38
Table 20-Consumption of fossil fuel--by kinds of fuel (1951-74)-------- 39
III. ELECTRICITY SALES, CUSTOMERS AND REVENUES
A. TOTAL INDUSTRY
Figure --Electrical Energy Sales (1926-74) -----------------------43
Table 21-Historical growth of peak load and total electric demand (196075) ------------------------------------------------44
Table 22-Percent increase (decrease) in demand for electricity by constuming sector (1964-75) .._---------_. 44
Table 23---Electric energy sales-by customer class (1959-74)--------- 45
Table 24-Percent of total electric energy sales-by customer class (195974) --------------------- ------------------------- 46
Table 25--Electric energy sales---by State and customer class (1974) ----... 74
Table 26---Yearend customers-by customer class (1959-74) -------------- 48
Table 27-Yearend customers-by States and customer class (1974) ----- 49
(V)





VI

Table 28-Average customers-by State and certain customer classes Page
(197 ) --------------------------------------------------- 50
Figure 3-Electric Revenues (1926-74) --------------------------- 51
Table 29-Electric revenues--by customer class (1959-74) -------------- 52
Table 30-Percent of total electric revenues-by customer class (195974) ---------------------------------------------------- 53
Table 31-Electric revenues-by State and customer class (1974) -------- 54 Table 32-Average revenues per kwh sold-by customer class (1956-74).. 55
Figure 3-A-All customers---average use per customer and average
revenue per kwh (1926-75) --------------------------------- 56
Table 33--Average use per customer and average annual bill-by certain
customer classes (1956-74) -----------------------------57
Figure 8-B-Residential customers--average use per customer and
average revenue per kwh (1926-75) ----------------------------- 58
Table 34---Average revenues and percent change-by customer class (196574) ---------------------------------------------------- 59
B. PRIVATELY OWNED UTILITIES
Table 35-Electric operating revenues, customers, and sales-by customer
class (1972-73) ----------------------------------.... 68
Figure 4-Residential customers, sales, and revenues (19638-7) .... 69 Figure 5-Commercial customers, sales, and revenues (1963-78) ..... 70 Figure 6-Industrial customers, sales, and revenues (1968-73) ..... 71 Table 36-Average use, revenues, and annual bill-by customer class (12
months ending November 30; 1973-75) -------------------- 72
Table 37-Average annual bill and average cost to consumer-by customer
class (1965-74). -------------------------- ------------ 73
Table 38---Electric customers, sales, and revenues-by customer class
(1937-73) -.-------------------------------------------74
Table 39-Electric operating revenue relationships(1963-73) ...--------75
C. PUBLICLY OWNED UTILITIES
Table 40-Total publicly owned utilities: electric operating revenues, customers, and sales-by customer class (1972-73) ---------- 76
Table 41-Municipal utilities: Electric operating revenues, customers, and
sales-by customer class (1972-73) ..... ....... ......--------------.-- 77
Figure 7-Residential customers, sales, and revenues (1965-78) .... 78
Figure 8-Commercial and industrial customers, sales, and revenues
(1965-78) .......... ------------- -------------------------------- 79
Table 42-Electric operating revenues, customers, and sales--by customer
class (1963-7) .... .------------------- ------------------ 80
Table 43--Electric operating revenue relationships (1963-73) ------------ 81
Table 44--Electric customers, sales, and revenues--by customer class
(1946-73) -------------------------------------------82
Table 45--Tennessee Valley, Pacific Northwest, and other areas: sales and
revenues per customer and average revenues (1946-76) .. 83
D. REA ELECTRIC BORROWERS
Table 46-Number of REA borrowers, employees, miles energized, and custowers served (1935-74) ..-----... --- 84
Figure 9-Number of customers served by REA borrowers (1985-74) 85
Table 47-Energy statistics and revenues (1941-74) ------ --------------86
Table 48-REA distribution systems: Revenues, patronage capital, number of customers and sales-by customer class (1970--74) 87
Table 49-REA distribution systems: Average use and average revenues
for residential customers (1948-74) -----.... ---------- ---88
Table 50-REA distribution systems: Electric customers, sales, and revenues-by State and customer class (1974) ---------------89
Table 51-REA cooperative distribution systems: Electric customers,
sales, and revenues--by customer class (1974) --- --------------91
IV. FINANCIAL DATA FOR THE INDUSTRY
A. PRIVATELY OWNED UTILITIES
Table 52-The revenue dollar-source and disposition (I97, 1974) ,, 95
Table 53-Coimpsite balance #be.t (1972, 1973)..,... .,- ... .6.,.
Table 54--4p0nposite balance Ahet (1. 3). ,,,..;,t,;k" .
j4.0opite, e





VII
Page
Table 55---Changes in financial position (1972, 1973) ------------------100
Figure 10-Capitalization (1963-78) ----------------------------101
Figure 11--Interest on long-term debt, preferred dividends, common
dividends (1963-7) ------------ ,--------------------------- 102
Table 56--Capitalization ratios and returns on common equity (1972,
1973) ---- ------------------------------------------103
Table 57-Selected financial data (1968-73) -------------------------104
Table 58-Moody's average yields on utility bonds and stocks (1967-74) 105
Figure 12-Electric plant in service-by function (1963-73) 106
Table 59-Electric plant account (1963-73) --------------------------107
Table 60--Composite income account (1972, 1973) ---------------------109
Figure 13-Electric operating expenses and operating income as percent of operating revenues (1963-73) -------------------------111
Table 61-Composite electric operation and maintenance expenses (1972,
1973) .----------------.. ...... ---------------------112
Table 62-Composite electric operation and maintenance expenses (196373) ----------------------------------------------113
Table 63---Electric operation and maintenance expense relationships
(1963-73) ------------------------------------------116
Table 64-Total industry: Analysis of cost of fuel for electric generation
-by region (1971-74) ---------- ----------------------117
Table 65-Total industry: Analysis of cost of fuel for electric generationby States (1974) -------------------------------------118
B. PUBLICLY OWNED UTILITIES: MUNICIPALS
Table 66-Composite balance sheet (1974) --------------------------119
Table 67---Composite balance sheet (1963-73) -----------------------120
Table 68---Balance sheet relationships (1963-73) ---------------------121
Table 69---Selected balance sheet items (1946-73) ---------------------122
Figure 14-Utility plant accumulated depreciation and long-term debt
(1965-73) ------------------------------------------------123
Figure 15-Capitalization (1965-73) ----------------------------124
Table 70--Composite income account (1972, 1973) --------------------125
Table 71--Composite income account (1963-73) -----------------------125
Table 72-Income account relationships (1963-73) --------------------126
Figure 16-Electric operating expenses and operating income as a
percent of operating revenues (1965-78) ------------------ 127
Table 73-Composite electric operation and maintenance expenses (1972,
1973) ---------------------------------------------128
Table 74--Composite electric operation and maintenance expenses (196373) --------------------- -------------------------- 129
Table 75-Electric operation and maintenance expense relationships
(1968-73) .----------------------------....--...------------...... 130
Table 76--Electric operating expenses (1946-73) ---------------------- 131
C. REA ELECTRIC BORROWERS
Figure 17-REA distribution systems: Source of revenues and distribution of cost and margins (1974) ----------- ..----------------- 132
Figure 18---Payments of principal and interest on REA loans (194174) ------------- ------------------- -------- 183
Table 77-Summary of rural electrification financing (1970-74) ------ 134 Table 78-Composite balance sheet (1974) ---------------------------136
Table 79-Composite balance sheet (1970-74) ........------------ .-------- 187
Table 80--Composite investment in electric plant in service (1974)------ 138 Table 81--Composite revenues, expenses, and patronage capital (1974)- 189 Table 82-Composite revenues, expenses, and patronage capital (1970-74) 140 Table 83-REA cooperative borrowers: Composite balance sheet (1974) 141 Table 84-REA cooperative borrowers: Composite revenues, expenses,
and patronage capital (1974) ----------...------------------------- 142
V. GLOSSARY OF IMPORTANT POWER AND RATE TERMS, ABBREVIATIONS AND UNITS OF MEASURE ------------------- 143
VI. A SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE ECONOMICS OF UTILITY RATE MAKING AND RATE REFORMK......... 189























Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2013

















http://archive.org/detaiIs/statisticalmaterOOIibr









STATISTICALMATERIALS ON THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY


INTRODUCTION
This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service under the supervision of the staff of the Subcommittee on Energy and Power in preparation for hearings on electric utility rate reform and regulatory improvement.
The statistics on the electric industry which follow have been extracted from secondary sources and reflect the most current data available at the time of printing.
In addition to the tabular material, a glossary of basic terms has been included along with a bibliography of further sources of information on electric utilities beyond the scope of this Committee Print.
The staff of the subcommittee would particularly like to thank Ms. Angela Lancaster of the Congressional Research Service for her fine work in locating and collecting the following statistical material.

SOURCES
Edison Electric Institute, Statistical Year Book of the Electric Utility
Industry for 1974, New York, November 1975. (EEI, Statistical
Year Book, 1974.)
,Federal Energy Administration, National Energy Outlook, 1976,
(FEA, National Energy Outlook, 1976.)
Federal Power Commission, FPO News, various issues. (FPC News.) Federal Power Commission, The 1970 National Power Survey, Part I,
December 1971. (FPC, National Power Survey, 1970.)
Federal Power Commission, Statistics of Privately Owned Electric
Utilities in the United State8 for 1973. (FPC, Privately Owned,
1973.)
Federal Power Commission, Statitics of Publicly Owned Electric
Utilities in the United States for 1973. (FPC, Publicly Owned,
1973.)
Rural Electrification Administration, Annual Statistical Report for
Rural Electric Borrowers for 1974, U.S. Department of Agriculture, June 1975. (REA, Annual Statistical Report, 1974.)
(1)




















STRUCTURE OF THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY EXCERPTS FROM THE FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION,
1970 National Power Supply









5



THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY 1970





250*
INVESTOR OWNED 2. 700*
SYSTEMS FEDERAL PUBLIC u4
CD-0
262.668 MW 38,718 MW NON-FED
1,182,855,000 MWH
34,245 MW 4,722 MWi
185,755,000 MWH
139,204,000 MWH 21,767,000 MWH


GENERATING SYSTEMS





f NON-GENERATING SYSTEMS .
2=


150 w 4p. a:
.
INVESTOR 3
OWNED FEDERAL ,
cc C)
SYSTEMS 0



2J1
-I- I
co
INa





ULTIMATE CONSUMERS


64,017,662 7,865,073 352,993
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
CUSTOMERS CUSTOMERS CUSTOMERS
447,795,000 MWH 312,750,000 MWH 572,522,000 MWH

NOTE: Power generated at other Federal facilities is marketed by the 5 majim Federals shown. 249,250 OTHER
SEstimated 58,292,000 MWH






6



STRUCTURE OF THE ELECTRIC, POWER INDUSTRY

The electric power industry in the contiguous mnent of motor loads in industrial, commercial, United States includes nearly 3500 systems 1 and transportation ventures. Conversely, some which vary greatly in size, type of ownership, electric systems initially established to supply and range of functions. It .is made up of four 'street railways or interurban lines, or manufacdistinct ownership segments-investor-owned turing or mining businesses, later expanded to companies, non-Federal public agencies, cooper-, carry the evening load of household and street atives, and Federal agencies-and is unique l ighting. among world systems in the diversity and corn-. The need to use direct current at comparaplexity of its organization. Most systems serving tively low voltages restricted the territory that large, population centers are vertically inte- could, be served by the distribution network of grated, i.e., they perform the functions of gener- any given electric power plant. Coupled with a ation, transmission, iand distribution. In con- limited demand for power, this resulted in, the trast, there are many systems which provide establishment of many small local companies. distribution exclusively, and* others that gener- Frequently, two, three, or more noninterconate some power while relying on firm purchases nected lants, operating under different patents to meet part of their requirements. These are atid owned by different concerns, were estabmostly smaller systems and are largely in the lished in the same city. municipal and cooperative segments. The extent Introduction of the transformer in 1886 led to to which the smaller generating systems can re- the use of alternating current, higher distribumain viable will depend in part on their obtain- tion voltages, and an expansion of the distribuing additional supplies of power at costs which tion area that-could be served by an individual reflect the economies of large-scale generating plant. Improvements in generators made possiplants now being constructed. ble larger outputs at lower unit costs, while
other. technical improvements made 'it possible
Historical Background of the Industry to supply incandescent and arc lights as well as
Fromitssmal beinnigs t Edsons stam- direct and alternating current motor loads from electric station in New York City, the electric' theso sam e power ourc.uThe inan eo industry has experienced rapid growth and misosclinpwrrdutnadth development. The American response to the standardization of' equipment 'led to ma .ny concontnuoslyexpadin ned fr elctrc pwer solidations of the small electric companies servhas been reflected in an intermingled pattern of iggvncmuiiso ra.Tedmnto
public and private ownership of power systems. of competition resulting from these consolidaIn the early 1880's, local groups generally built tions of power production plants and.
elecricpowr plntsto rovde eerg eiher distribution .systems was one of the factors leadfor incandescent lighting of small interiors or inig *to government regulation of public, utilities.
arcligtin ofoutooran lage nteiorares, In a number of cases the local government acboth essentially night loads. The desire to uti- qurd towerhipoeh electric ss toem inan f-r lize available generating capacity during day- fotoprvdelcicoertlwrrasfr
ligh hors ftenlen imetu to he eveop- local consumers.
lihthurftnletimeusttedeeop_ During the 1920's the holding* company form
1There were 3445 systems as of the end of 1968. of business organization gained popularity






7



among investor-owned companies; In part this interconnection and coordination. Although exwas because it accommodated expansion of sys- 'pressly recognizing that Federal regulation in tern size; in part it was because it improved the these matters was necessary in the public interability of operating companies whose securities est, Congress carefully preserved the states' lacked investment stature to meet their growing rights over intrastate matters. needs for new capital. Holding companies provided investors with territorial diversification Ownership and Strucfure and an opportunity for earnings' growth which
While the present patterns of electric power
was not -always available in the common stock industry ownership and structure date from the
of the small, local'firm. "1930's, the composition of the industry is in a
Absorption of operating companies by large reflecting the interacholding-compa'ny systems became more wid .e- perpetual state of change, r~lcigteitrc
spreduring tha e s btion of technology, market growth, and instituspread during the latter part of the 1920's. Even' tional relationships. The historical and current among holding companies, there were consolida9 ownership patterns in terms of numbers of
tions, reorganizations, and realignments of var- s ious .sorts. As a consequence, the proportion of systems are shown in table 2.1. the industry's total capacity owned by independent operating companies was markedly reduced. TABLE I
By 1932, systems in eight large holding company Number of Electric Utility Systems by
groups generated about three-fourths of the out- Ownership Classification
put of all privately owned systems.
The depression period had a drastic impact Ownership 1927 1937 1947 1957 '1968
on the utility holding companies and their operations. Electric generation fell 20 percent be- Public tween 1929 and 1933. Because utility holding Non-Federal... 2,198 1,878 2,107 1,890 2,075
companies. were financed in large part by debt REA obligations, a drop in the earnings of the oper- Cooperatives .......... 192 887 1,026 960
ating companies had a magnified impact upon Federal I........ 3 4 5 5
the earnings of the 'holding companies. In some Total.......4,334 3,474 3,856 3,386 3,445
cases, they' were unable to meet fixed interest
obligations to their bondholders, and bank- I Excludes military and other installations where the
ruptcy and reorganization proceedings became electric business is not the primary function.
necessary.
In an effort to correct the financial and ac- As shown in table 2.2, ownership patterns counting abuses that had occurred in some of vary among the different areas of the country,
the holding company operations, Congress and ownership categories tend to be grouped in
passed the Public Utility Act of 1935. Title I of certain areas. For example, about one-fourth of the Act authorized the Securities and Exchange the investor-owned utilities in the United States Commission to simplify the corporate structures are in the Northeast Region, while nearly oneof the electric and gas industries, and thus facil- third of the public non-Federal utilities and itate state and Federal commission regulation of cooperatives are in the West Central Region. these companies. The Securities and Exchange The types and sizes of electric systems constiCommission was also authorized to make studies tuting the power industry of the United States and recommendations as to the type and size of vary from state to state and from- region to regeographically and economically integrated pub- gion, but most states are served by several types lic -utility systems, and was given certain regula- of power suppliers.-The State of Kentucky is iltory authority with respect to public utility lustrative. Most customers in the State are
holding company systems. Title II authorized served by three major investor-owned utilities.
the Federal Power Commission to 'regulate There are also a number of municipal and cowholesale electric rates in interstate commerce, operative systems, including two generating coto regulate some aspects of corporate manage- operatives. The Tennessee Valley Authority
meant, finance and accounting, and to encourage (TVA) sells power at wholesale to .several of




n




these municipalities and. cooperatives. In addi. Table 2.2 shows that about'70. percent of the
tion, a special, generating firm, Electric Energy utility .systems in the United States are engaged Inc., which is owned by participating investor- in distribution onuly. These systems include owned companies, provides part of the genera- about 90 percent of the cooperatives, about 66
uion for the large Atomic Energy Commission percent of the non-Federal government utilities
load in Paducah, Kentucky from its plant located and about 38 percent of the investor-owned in southern Illinois. utilities.



TABLE, 2

Number of Electric Utility Systems by Ownership Classification, Region, and Furictlon-1968

Investor- Public Federal REA Total
Owned. Non-Federal Coops

Northeast
Distribution only.. .........................38 123 .................26 187
All other.................................... 64 53 ...... 4 121

Total ................ ........... 216.............10 7 30 308

East Central
Distribution only.............................. 18 171.............. 100 289
All other.............................75............ 6 113

'Total.................... ............. '!50 246 .............106 402

Southeast
Distribution only .............................15 301 0 182 498
All other........................... ........ 2 28 12 8 63

Total..................................... 4 329 2 190 561

South Cental
Distribution only........................... 16 228 0 190 434
All other........................ ............ 32 160 2'1 13' 206

Total .............................48 388 1 203 640

West Central
Distribution only.............................. 26 386............... 252 664All other.................................... 51 297 (2) 19 367

Total................................... 7 683............... 271 1,031

West
Distribution only............................. 41 160 0 143 344
All other.................................... 47 93 2 17- 159

Total..................................... 88 253 2 160 503

Contiguous U. S.
Distribution only............................. 154 1,369' 0 893 2,416
All other................................... 251 706 .5 67 '1,029

Total............................... 405 2,075 5 960 3,445

Includes Southeastern Power Administration although it does not own any generating or transmission facilities.
The Bureau of Reclamation has projects inthe West Central, West and South Central Regions but, in order to avoid duplication, it is shown in the West Region where most of its projects arc located.










Investor-Owned Systems : has formed nine regional reliability councils and
The. investor-owned segment of the electric the National Electric Reliability Council as well
power industry consists of approximately 400 as a number of planning organizations and coorsystems. This is less than 12" percent of the dinating groups. These are described in chapter
nearly 3500 systems that comprise the total in- 17. dustry. In terms of any index of size, however,
such as kilowatt-hours generated, kilowatts of Federal Systems generating capacity, or number of customers, Five large Federal agencies market federallythe investor-owned systems clearly constitute the generated power in the 48 contiguous states: the dominant segment of the industry. Tennessee Valley Authority, Bonneville Power
The sizes- of. jnvestor-owned systems range Administration (BPA), Southwestern Power Adfrom the largest in the nation- (apart 'from ministration (SWPA), Southeastern Power AdTVA) with annual sales in excess of 90 million ministration (SEPA), and Bureau of Reclamamegawatt-hours to some of the very smallest. tion; They are important contributors to the
The 200 largest systems own and operate more electric power supply of this country. In 1968 the
than 75 percent o[ the generating capacity and Federal systems had about 12 percent of total serve about 80 percent of the customers of the generating capacity and generated about 13 pertotal electric power industry. The other slightly cent of the total electric energy. In these respects more than 200 systems have annual sales of less they are second only to the investor-owned than 100,000 megawatt-hours each. systems.
These large investor-owned systems are for the The Federal Government's role in the electric most part vertically integrated. The majority are utility .field reflects a broad range of objectives. independently owned and operated although 48 The TVA, established in 1933 to develop the reare subsidiaries of companies registered as hold- sources of the Tennessee River Basin, was auing companies under the Public Utility Holding thorized to develop *hydroelectric power reCompany Act of 1935, and an additional 32 are sources in conjunction with navigation and
subsidiaries of companies which for various rea- flood control. Following essentially full developsons are exempt from the provisions of that Act. ment of the hydroelectric power potential of the These 80 subsidiaries are grouped into 32 hold-- basin, TVA developed a comprehensive power ing company systems controlled by 18 companies, production system by adding fossil-fueled and which are also operating electric utilities, and 14 nuclear generating plants. nonoperating holding companies. The subsidiar- It is now the 'nation's largest electric system,
ies of the 14 nonoperating holding companies having approximately twice the generating caprovide 22 percent of the generating capacity of pacity of the next largest, and is the only Fedthe investor-owned segment of the industry. The eral agency with full responsibility to supply all 18 operating parent companies along with their the electric power requirements of a large geosubsidiaries provide an additional 17 percent. graphical area. More than half of its power
The investor-owned systems generally serve production is sold at. wholesale to municipal
prescribed areas pursuant to territorial fran- and cooperative systems, with most of the balchises granted by state or local government ance going to industrial customers and Federal
agencies. These franchises are often not exclu- agencies. sive in the technical sense, but under most state Except for $65 million borrowed at long term laws a second investor-owned company, cannot from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation
be franchised in a given territory without dem- and the Treasury Department in fiscal years onstrating that additional service is required by 1939-41, the TVA received all of its construcpublic convenience and necessity. tion funds from Congressional appropriations
During recent years the electric power indus- prior to 1959. In 1959, the TVA Act was try has been characterized by an increase in amended to permit the TVA to sell debt obligajoint or coordinated actions and institutional ar- tions in the open market and to require TVA to rangements. In addition to formal power pools pay interest to the Federal Government on the
and joint, ownership arrangements; the industry net appropriation investment in power facilities.













68-353 0 76 2






10



This amendment also required repayment to the Far West and the Colorado River Basin; these
United States Treasury of such investment in projects are generally interconnected with one
annual installments of not .less than $10 million another, as well as with other neighboring per year for the first five years, $15 million pei systems. year for the next five years, and $20 million for Several Congressional Acts require the Secreeach year thereafter until a total of $1 billion tary of the Interior, like the TVA, to give prefhas been repaid. erence to public bodies and cooperatives in the
The TVA Act gives preference to states, coun- sale of electric power. The idea of preference infties, municipalities, and cooperatives in purchas- tially appeared in the Reclamation Act of 1906, ing power for distribution, and includes'a provi- which provided preference "to municipal pursion specifying that any contract signed with an poses." Preference was made more specific in the investor-owned electric company for purchase of TVA Act of 1933 and the Bonneville Project TVA power can be cancelled on five years' Act'of 1937 which explicitly direct that prefernotice if the power is needed by a preference ence be given to public bodies and cooperatives
customer. in the sale of the power. The Flood Control Act
Power marketed by the four large Federal of 1944 contains a similar specification with repower agencies other than the TVA is'hydroelec- spect. to power generated at Corps of Engineers' trically generated. and generally supplements projects and marketed by the Secretary of the
the- electric power supplies of other systems in Interior. Since public agencies and cooperative the areas in which they operate. The Secretary systems are given a statutory preference to buy of the Interior is the marketing agent for power the output of Federal projects, the extent of produced by all Federal power projects other Federal system development has had a signifithan TVA. Except for sales to a number of cant impact on the number, and power costs, of
large industrial customers, nearly all of the preference customers. Such costs reflect the
power is sold at wholesale to other electric lower fixed charges on capital investments in
systems. Federal projects by virtue of their lower interest
Bonneville Power Administration is the mar- costs and the absence. of Federal income and
keting agent for power from 33 Federal hydro- other taxes.
electric projects of the Bureau of Reclamation
and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the
Pacific Northwest (26 of these are operating, 5 P
are under construction and 2 are authorized but Public non-Federal electric systems generate
not yet under construction). It has designed approximately 9 percent of total industry proand built the nation's largest network, of long duction and sell.about 13 percent of the total distance, high-voltage transmission lines which electric energy, These systems, which include serves as the main grid for all interconnected towns and cities, a small number of counties, utilities in the Pacific Northwest. special utility districts, and various kinds of
The Southwestern Power Administratibn and state authorities, purchase approximately 35 perthe Southeastern Power Administration market cent of their requirements from the Federal systhe power produced at Corps of Engineers hy- teams and an additional I I percent of their redroelectric plants in the south central and quirements from investor-owned systems. The
southeastern states, respectively. SWPA has con- number of systems tnder public non-Federal structed some transmission facilities, but SEPA ownership reached its peak in the mid-1920's relies exclusively on transmission arrangements with nearly 3100 electric systems. The number with other systems to market its power. declined rapidly to about 2200 by 1927. In 1968,
The Bureau of Reclamation operates several there were 2075 such systems, of which. 1369
electric power systems, which include hydroelec- purchased all of their energy requirements. trick power plants built in widely separated areas Municipal utilities are by far the most comin the Western States and. Alaska. It has con- mon form of the public non-Federal power enstructed transmission facilities to interconnect a tity. In the early stages of the industry's developnumber of its own plants, as well as those of ment, many towns and cities constructed electric
others, in the Missouri Basin, the Southwest, the systems to provide electric power for street










lighting and other public uses. Most of them, less than a hundred members to as many as
subsequently constructed distribution facilities 35,000. Though they have a total membership to permit retail sales. Municipal utilities vary in representing 10 percent of all electric power cussize from very small systems, serving only a few tomers in the country, their total sales of energy hundred customers, to the Los Angeles Depart- are only about 4V2 percent of the national ttal,
ment of Water and Power which serves over a and their generating capacity is about 1 percent
million customers. In a relatively few instances of the total. Their distribution costs- per cus(e.g. Clevtland, Ohio), a municipal system and tomer have been relatively high because they an investor-owned system serve within the same serve an average density of only about four cusmunicipality. However, territorial competition* tomers per mile of line. On the other hand, between municipalities and other systems often they have generally avoided the relatively high occurs upon expansion of municipal boundaries costs associated with inner-city congestion. TIey
into fringe areas previously served by coopera- purchase 77 percent of their wholesale power re-. tives or investor-owned systems. quirements-45 percent from the government
During the 1930's and 1940's other govern- segment (including Federal systems) and 32
ment entities such as Public Utility Districts percent from investor-owned utilities; the rewere established to produce. and sell electric' maining 23 percent is self-generated. In 1940, power. Some irrigation districts have included about 92 percent was purchased-41 percent electric power supply among their activities for from. the government segment and 51 -percent many years. Also, some states have entered the from the investor-owned segment; about 8 perpower supply field via special authorities such as cent was self-generated. A large part of the govthe Arizona Power Authority and the Power Au- ernment produced power comes from Federal
thority of the State of New York; the State of hydroelectric projects over Federal transmission Nebraska is served entirely by public power lines, or via transmission arrangements with
entities and cooperatives. neighboring utilities.
Local government power agencies are exempt The REA program -promoted the formation
from Federal income tax and generally are not of small distribution systems purchasing their
subject to state income tax. They are generally power at wholesale from- existing electric utiliexempt from other state and local taxes but ties in their areas. As the distribution cooperamany of them make payments in lieu of taxes to tives grew in size, some of them organized genertheir own local governments and provide power ation and transmission -(G&T) cooperatives for
free or at reduced rates for street lighting, water the construction of facilities to supply their own pumping, and other municipal uses. Many of power. REA's stated policy is to make loans for
them- also make. other contributions to their G&T facilities only (1) where no adequate and
local governments. dependable source of power is available to meet
the consumers' needs, or (2) where the rates ofCooperative Systems fered by. existing power sources would result in
The rural electrification program was initi- a higher cost of power to consumers than the acted by Presidential Executive Order in 1935, cost from facilities financed by REA, and where
and in 1936 lthe power cost savings that would result from the Rural Elegtilation wApdm istaisig the REA-financed facilities bear a significant rethe uralElectrification Administration -asa
lending agency. The REA has financed thecon- lationship to the amount of the proposed REA
struction of about a thousand rural electric serv- loan. The G&T cooperatives have gradually beice cooperatives in 46. states,2 Puerto Rico, and come an important power source; they now genthe Virgin Islands 3. They range in size from erate over 20 percent of REA-borrowers' total
_____wholesale power requirements. There are about 2There are no cooperatives in Massachusetts, Connecti- 50 such G&T's, some having as much as several cut, Rhode Island or Hawaii. hundred megawatts of generating capacity and
aThere are 32 electric service cooperatives which have participating as full members in regional power repaid their loans from REA in full and are under no p poolso further obligations-to that Agency. There are also about pools. a dozen small cooperatives which were originally orga- Competition between cooperatives and invesnized without REA loans, tor-owned utilities,, and between cooperatives






12



and municipally-owned systems, is reflected in REA program and the 2 percent interest rate
attempts to attract new customers into their re- charged, the scope of Federal power projects spective service areas and to acquire new service which are the main-source of energy purchased areas. Competition has become acute in some by cooperatives, and the tax provisions pertainplaces with the movement of industry into sub- ing to, the REA cooperatives: Although the REA
urban and farm areas. In some cases, where a cooperatives, like other consumer cooperative
city is expanding its boundaries, the system serv- ventures, do not operate forprofit and therefore ing within the city has taken the position that pay no Federal income tax, they are liable in the newly acquired citizens are its customers. most instances for state and local property taxes.
But if the new citizens are already served by a In some. states they also pay gross revenue taxes, cooperative, the cooperative has been reluctant,
to give them up, arguing that it took the risk of sales taxcs, and other state and local taxes. initiating service at a time when no other system an
was willing to serve. Changes in Industry Size, Strcture, and
Competition is even more evident in the at- Ownership
tempts of each type of utility to attract large, Table 2.3 shows the relative sizes of electric
profitable industrial loads. In the past, some of' systems, segregated by type of ownership, for the investor-owned suppliers restricted, through 1962 and 1968. provisions in their wholesale power contracts, Table 2.3 shows that the number of electric
the resale of power by municipals and coopera- systems in all segments'of the industry decreased
tives to large-use customers. In the Georgia between 1962 and 1968. The investor-owned segPower Company case 4 and the Mississippi, ment showed the greatest change with a decline Power Company case,5 the Commission has of 75 systems, or about 15 percent. Next in sigruled such provisions to be unlawful.
- At the Federal level, controversy has centered nificance was the reduction of 49 systems, or 2.3 on legislation. dealing with the scope of the percent, in the public non-Federal segment. The
change in the number of systems in the coopera4 35, FPC 436, 35 FPC 818 (1966), Docket Nos. E-7099 tive segment was relatively minor, and the num-. and E-7193. The Commission's decision in this case was ber of Federal systems did not change. Undoubtupheld by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in 373,
F.2d 484 (CA 5, 1967). edly, technological advances in generation and
5Docket No. E-7112, Opinion No. 593, issued February transmission, resulting in rapidly increasing sizes 18,- 1971. of new generating units and substantial inTABLE 3
Number of Electric Utility Systems in the Contiguous U.S. by Size and Ownership *Classifications

Annual Sales Investor- Public Federal REA Total
(millions of MWh) Owned Non-Federal Cooperatives

1962
O ver 10 .......................... 18 0 3 0 21
1-10 ........................... 88 20 2 1 111
0.1-1........................... 85 .136 0. 64 285
Under 0.1 ....................... . 289 .1,968 0 904 3,161

Total ......................... 480 2,124 5 969 3,578

1968
Over 10 ......................... 35 2 3 0 40
1-10............................. 100 34 2 5 141
01-1 .... ................. 61 234 0 150 445
Under 0.1 ....................... 209 1,805 0 805 2,819

Total .................. ....... 405 2,075 5 960 3,445






13



creases in transmission voltages, have provided a centrally owned and operated large systems can significant impetus to these changes. be obtained by means of power pools, joint
There has also been an important, although ownership and other coordination arrangements
gradual, change in industry composition with among smaller, individually owned- systems.
respect to functions performed. In 1962, 2315 of Still others feel that we can have the best of the 3578 systems (approximately 64%) were en- two worlds-larger, more efficient generating and
gaged in distribution only. In 1968, 2416 systems transmission facilities, coordinated and conof 3445 (or approximately 70%) were engaged trolled by a(tight centralized structure, and at
in distribution only. In -general, two factors the same time continued local customer service have contributed to this trend. First, the decline through small and autonomous marketing comof 75 systems in the investor-owned segment panies, public agencies or cooperatives, or
matched closely the decline in the number of through highly individualized and decentralized
investcr-owned systems that had been generating 'divisions of a larger authority. their own power. Second, over 100 of the sys- The extent to which the trend toward greater
tems in the non-Federal government segment concentration in the electric power industry can
withdrew from production of electric power and be expected to continue will depend in large became "all-requirements" purchasers of power measure upon the relative weight given by the
from others. These trends can be expected to industry, the regulatory agencies, and the gencontinue as the growing scale of generation and eral public to these points of view. transmission facilities requires increasingly large
capital investments. Combination Electric and Gas Utilities
The changes in the electric power industry
structtire described above lead directly to the The 78 investor-owned utilities, Classes A and
qesctire dftecrib e boe adicty tovher B,6 which sell both gas and electricity play an question of the changes to be anticipated over
the next several decades. Some have suggested important role in the United States energy marthat technological and economic forces are likely ket. In 1967, these combination companies acto cause the industry gradually to group itself counted for 43 percent of total kilowatt-hour into as few as 15 to 20 large integrated systems, sales and 50 percent of total electric operating in part because of economies of scale and im- revenues in the investor-owned segment.
proved reliability attainable when systems are In general, the electric portion of these complanned and operated on a coordinated single bination utilities is larger in terms of revenues
system basis. Generally, those who take this posi- and investment in plant than the gas portion. tion feel that it is very much in the public in- in 1967 the gas plant owned by combination terest that this occur. They, -therefore, tend to 'companies was only 14.9 percent of the value of favor acquisition of small systems by their larger the combined electric and gas plant, although neighbors and to favor most mergers among gas revenues were 25 percent of total revenues.
contiguous larger systems, This relationship is primarily due to the large
Others take the view that one of the major investment in production and transmission facilstrengths of the electric power industry lies in ities required for the electric service provided by the diverse and pluralistic nature .of its owner- combination companies, in contrast to the ship. Those taking this view believe that it is smaller investment in distribution facilities for desirable for the industry to continue to consist the gas service they typical provide. of many systems of various sizes and various
types of ownership, partly'because competition In table 2.4, combination utilities are divided
among systems is maintained, and partly be, into three size categories '(according to sales in
cause consumers can deal with a more localized MXWh) to distinguish their operating charactermanagement that may be more responsive to istics. Companies in the "large" category include
their needs. In addition it is argued that when nine out of the ten largest investor-owned elecsystems become very large they may become tric utility operating companies in the United
more difficult to regulate, especially at the state 6 Class A utilities have annual electric operating revelevel. Proponents of a diverse and pluralistic in- nue of $2,500,000 or more; Class'B utilities have annual dustry believe that most of the advantages of electric operating revenue of $1,000,000 or more.






14



TABLE 4
Selected Characteristics of Classes A and B Investor-Own#4 Combination Utilities-1968

Electric % Gas
Annual Sales No. of Revenues of All Revenues of All
(millions of MWHl) Companies Combination Combination
Companies Companies

Over 10 (large) ............................................... 13 63.4 48.9
1-10 (medium) ...................... ........... .... 47 34.8 44.1
Under I (small) ............................................... 19 1.8 7.0

Total .................................................... 79 100.0 100.0

States measured by total assets. These nine larg- almost since its inception in the late 19th Cen*est companies provide about 55 percent of the tury, the scope and tempo of regulatory activity
electric revenues and about 44 percent of the has increased during the last few years. This has
gas revenues of all combination companies. resulted in large part from: (1) concern for the
There is a variance of views concerning the preservation and protection of the environment,
claimed benefits or detriments associated with (2) concern for the reliability of electricpower
combination gas-electric companies. Those favor- supply, '(0) the growing importance of nuclear ing separation of gas and electric services main- power in the total power supply, and (4) the tain that the public interest is served best when rapidly rising cost of fossil fuel and capital in gas and electric utilities actively compete for the context of a generally inflationary economy.
household, commercial, and industrial markets. Since the early part of this century, major reThese markets include space heating, water sponsibility for the regulation of the electric inheating, cooking, air conditioning, refrigeration, dustry, especially the investor-owned segment;
-lothes drying, and outdoor lighting, as well as has rested with the state utility commissions. At steel furnaces, industrial process heating, pipe- the present time nearly all of the states 7 haveline pumping and the like, This line of analysis established regulatory commissions having some contends that greater competition stimulates authority for regulation of the investor owned
more effective management and leads to lower electric utility systems. However, less than half
prices, expanded output, improved service, of the state regulatory commissions have authorgreater operating efficiency, and more intensive ity to regulate publicly owned and cooperatively research and promotional activities, all giving owned systems. The scope of the authority of
the consumer greater freedom of choice. state commissions to regulate electric utility sysThe advocates of combination companies con- tems varies considerably among the states, but
tend that they have lower costs than single en- many state commissions have rather broad powergy utilities. The proponents point to econo- ers including the regulation of rates, accounting,
mies of joint operations such as meter reading, security issues, safety a~nd adequacy of service, as appliance inspection, service departments, sales
and administrative staffs, and use of a single ell as authority for certification of major proptrench for underground distribution. In addi- erty additions, initiation and abandonment of
tion, they claim flexibility in solving peaking service and allocation of territory."
problems and greater revenue stability, and At the Federal level several agencies have impoint to advantages of dealing with only one portant responsibilities for regulating specific acutility where a customer can obtain comparative 7 The exceptions are Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas and
information concerning the preferable form of Sowih Dakota. various forms of local regulation are auenergy for specific needs. thorized in these states as well as in a number of other
states which do have state commissions.
Regulation a For details'see Federal Power commission, Federal
and Slate Commission Jurisdiction and Regulation, ElecWhile the electric power industry has been trick, (as, and Telephone utilities, FPC S-184, Washingibject to regulation of various of its activities ton, D. C., 1967.






15



tivities of electric power systems. These include Commission which are likely to have an imporamong others the Federal Power Commission, tant bearing upon the future ownership structhe Securities and Exchange Commission, and ture of the electric power industry.
the United States Atomic Energy Commission. The Atomic Energy Commission, has authorThe Federal-Power Commission has authority ity to regulate construction and operation of all
to provide certain types of economic regulation nuclear reactors regardless of their ownershipof investor owned electric utilities. It is directed public, private, or cooperative. Its regulatory to encourage the most efficient and productive responsibilities and activities are discussed at
utilization of all of the nation's electric energy some length in chapter 6. Recently, there has resources. Its responsibilities include the licens- been increasing, controversy concerning the ening of virtually all non-Federal hydroelectric vironmental effects of the operation of nuclear
projects, the regulation of interstate wholesale power reactors. Disagreement has .arisen concernrates and services and the regulation of corpo- ing appropriate radiation levels associated with rate activities, accounts and reports of systems' plant operation. There have also been questions subject to its jurisdiction, concerning possible adverse thermal effects reThe Federal Power Act makes the Commis- suiting from cooling requirements of the nuclear
sion's responsibility that of ". . assuring' an projects. A further source of controversy relates abundant supply of electric energy throughout to the requirement of the Atomic Energy Act of
the. United States with the greatest possible 1954 as amended involving antitrust aspects of
economy and with regard to the proper utiliza- proposed nuclear projects.
tion and conservation of natural resources...." At the Federal level, 'concern with environThis National Power Survey represents one part mental factors has taken tangible form in the
of the Commission's total effort to carry out creation of the Environmental Protection
that responsibility. An equally important part Agency 9. Also, the increased attention has deof that effort has been the implementation by rived in part from the enactment of the Nathe Commission of a program for adequacy and tional Environmental Policy Act of 1969 10.
reliability of electric power resources, Order No. This legislation requires the preparation and 383-2, Policy Statement-Reliability and Ade- distribution of an environmental statement in
quacy of Electric Service, issued April 10, 1970, connection with any major Federal action signifi43 FPC 515. This order provides 'for: (1) the cantly affecting the quality of the human enviannual reporting of data by the nine regional ronment, including thorough evaluation of
reliability councils bearing upon future reliabil- alternative courses of action." The Federal ity ard adequacy of service, in each council re- Power Commission had employed substantially gion including projections and bulk power sup- equivalent..procedures in regard to its hydroply expansion plans reaching ten years into the electric licensing responsibilities prior to the
future, and' (2), participation of state and Fed- passage of the National Environmental Policy eral regulatory personnel in the deliberations Act. However, to effect implementation of the
and work of the nine councils including various requirements of that Act the Commission issued
committees established by participants in these
-councils. o The responsibilities and activities of this agency and
The Securities and Exchange Commission reg- predecessor agencies with respect to air and water quality
ulates certain phases of the activities of public control are described in detail in chapters 10 and 11. utility holding companies and their subsidiaries 0 42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.
engageyhding h ctrpaies utilty, i b usinssidingi11 Section i02 (2J (C) of the statute prescribes an analy. engagedof five essential ots as part of the detailed state.accounting, security- issuances, mergers, service ioffvcsetapinssprtfthdtildttment. They are: (i) the environmental 'impact of the
company arrangements and intercompany trans- proposed action; (ii) any adverse environmental effects
actions. The holding company device has been which cannot be avoided should the proposal be implereceiving considerable attention in recent years mented; (iii) alternatives to the proposed action; (iv) as a method of corporate realignment and con- the relationship between local short-term uses of man's
environment and the maintenance and enhancement of
solidation ini the electric utility industry. Cr
Cur- long-term productivity; and (v) any irreversible and irrerently there are several proposed consolidations tricval)lc commitments of resources which would be inpending before the Securities and Exchange volved in the proposed action should it'be implemented.






16



its Order No. 415 on December 4, 1970 --which Already heavy expenditures by electric utiliwas later revised in Order No. 415B issued ties for environmental pollution control faciliNov'cmber 19, 1971. ties, higher fuel costs relating to environmental
At the state level, increasing public concern standards and higher interest costs in the confor the quality of the environment is evident in text of a generally inflationary economy have rethe actions of state legislatures in recent years to suited in an unprecedented number of applicastrengthen the, role of the state regulatory corn- tions to state and Federal regulatory agencies missions and other state agencies in controlling for rate increases. During the year ended June environmental effects of electric power 30, 1971, about $1 billion of annual electric rate
facilities.12 Of the approximately 30 state com- increases were put into effect. Although the reg-missions which require the issuance of certificates ulatory burden of dealing with a workload of for the construction of power plant and trans- this magnitude has been severe, it is apparent
mission lines, at least two-thirds* now give con- that tile more difficult problems facing the regusideration to the impact of the proposed facilities latory agencies for the future transcend the traon various environmental factors. In at least 9 ditional problems of rate and economic regulastates, utilities must obtain separate authoriza- tion. In general, these problems encompass the tion from other state agencies as well as the need to assure an adequate and reliable power
regulatory commissions, supply without undue adverse impact upon the
environment. It is apparent that .the interests of
1'2.\ state by state summary of the authorities and ac- the consumer, ,the utility supplier and the gentivitics relating to environmental controls affecting eral public in a healthy economy served by adeelectric utilities may be found in Electric Power and the y a r
Environment, a report sponsored by the Energy Policy equate and reliable power resources depend upon Staff, Office of Science and Technology, Washington D. C., the timely and effective resolution of these probAugust 1970. lems.





















ELECTRIC CAPACITY AND GENERATION










19



FIGURE 1 GENERATING CAPACITY







Millions of IKlmwtts
500


480


460


440


420


400

-380


-360 X340 INSTALLED GENERATING CAPACITY 3520
(Including Alaska and Hawaii Since 1963) Based on Name Plate Ratings at December 31. 1920-1974 300

280


-260


240


220

TOTAL UNITED STATES NOWUTILITY PLANTS (Includes capaci- 200
ties of industrial, mine and railway electric power plants.) TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY X I 80
OTHER UTILITIES (Includes cooperafives and governmentowe Utilities) INVESTOR.OWNEO .. 160
UTILITIES 140


120


.100














102 102 1030 1035 1040 104 1050 1055 106 1905 1970 1074



SOURCE: E I, Statislical year Book, 1974.






20





0


z 2 1m; 9 0-04 -04 L14 VW4 9-4 U)
f" P-4 v-4
21-4
"0%8 m N N N C4








us
0
Nt'.2M RSONRO 0,-4
to co C4 9-4 co cc oo to 0 0 to
00)wm moomw wwwNt- N t- 0 t" 0
s=4 v-4 v-4 rot V-4 P-4 P-4 V-4 V-4 r-4 V-4 V-4 vm4 V-4 V-4 V--4 V-4 V-4 V-4
cl us


0



00 tog co 00 eq m t- 2 05 t- 00 04 t,-. 00
oo t- (M k") Ul) eq Itr to w 0
OOOWM m C) Cq 00 V-4 N U') 0 0 in w r Iz
Z t- M v-4 0 No O"OV-42 w 0!41 m R
C-. m 0 0 V-4 "W m N V-4 0 ui N
4 V-4 7-4 r-4 P-4 V-4

4A 0
u
Us
00 0
Wo
0
z M
eml-t- U l t-ft V-4 V-4 m eq N U) I,.. C4 .61
to Mt".r -4 -4 to 00 C V-4 utl qdo 0 qqr U*
00 10 N N w U) ko P-4 ui 00 C* t- to
Z t: &.q
d 00 CIO U* N 00 10 N to M N'W V-4 C > .
0 t** to 0 Ul) U* ho m M m N
0 0 13.
M4 0 4.;,
39 r
LU E;. j $4
z L5 CUI
vio


C r
M (m U* 00 co (D V-4 F"Oot-m s m C4 k"j V-4
us '0'.4 W) ko % I,-- t- co 00 t- C'.r t- 0) a t- qtr
A o 00 0 0 V- LO CD U" t to r- I" F.. _0
.10 ...4
m 2 t.. t. 00 -f cc 00 00 00 g --4 Ei';i 7.2A
C. 0 1". co C,4 t- to to m C4 V-4 0 0) 0)
...8 -A
45 !2 w 9 4j z v 0 co
EE Q 41 0 cn
0
0
04
0
C,
03 4)
ok

0 Im 00
; 9 8 ot mko
C'* 04 1-4 9-4 V-4 V-4 9-4 1-4 r-4 V-4
4 C)
En






21




TABLE 2
INSTALLED GENERATING CAPACITY-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY*
BY OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR KILOWAm IN MOUSANDS (NAME PLATE)
Total Electric Investor- Power
At Utility Owned Subtotal Municipal Districts, State
Dee. 31 Industry Utilities Cooperatives Government Utilities Federal Projects
TOTAL (Capacify of Generato Driven by ARl ftyp of Prime Mowe)
1974p ............. 475 988 376 052 7 531 92 405 27 323 45 846 19236
1973r ............ 439875 346 476 7 288 86 111 24956 44 520 16 635
1972p ............ 399 606 314 859 6 700 78 047 23 167 40 645 14 235
1971p........... 367396 286879 5418 75099 21 788 39 654 13657
1970 ............ 341 090 262 675 5 162 73253 20 941 38 718 13 594
19 ............. 313 349 240078 4318 68 953 20 035 36 130 12788
1968 ............. 291 058 220 766 3434 66 858 19 429 34956 12473
1967 ............. 269252 203 580 3019 62 653 18049 33 640 10 964
19 ............ 247843 185 671 2758 59414 16 548 32 608 10258
1965 ............. 236 127 177570 2 309 56248 15 407 31 690 9 151
1964 ............. 222 285 167704 2017 52 564 15 199 28 343 9 022
1963 ............. 210549 158448 1 873 50 228 14 222 27 315 8691
1962 ............. 191 067 144577 1 537 44 953 12929 24 315 7 709
1961 ............. 180 668 136749 1 446 42473 12 205 23 257 7011
1960 ............. 168 002 128450 1 390 38 162 11 499 22 350 4313
1959 ............. 156 841 118999 1 136 36706 10914 21 874 3918
1958 ............. 142597 108202 977 33 418 9817 20 436 3 165
1957 ............. 129 123 97376 924 30 823 8 640 19 649 2 534
1956 ............. 120697 91 145 795 28 757 8325 18336 2096
HYDRO (CagWit of Genrator Driven by Wae Wheel. and Turbine)
1974pt ........... 63 58
1973r ............ 61 782 21770 39"ii4 3"ii 25 i l6i6
1972p ............ r 566 19 303 56 37207 3330 24 333 9 544
1971p ............ 55 898 19 055 56 30 787 3 267 24 053 9 467
1970 ............. 55 056 18850 56 36 150 3 195 23 499 9 456
196 ............. 52 753 18 444 56 34 253 3 195 22 054 9004
1968 ............. 51 168 18337 57 32774 3 177 20905 8692
4167 .......... 8 4112 18 134 57 29921 2623 19589 7709
1966 ............. 44 977 16381 57 28539 2005 19531 7 003
1965 ............. 43 782 16096 58 27 628 2005 18717 6906
1964 ............. 42 188 15296 58 26834 1979 17947 6 908
1963 ............. 40214 14620 58 25 56 1 982 16 923 6 631
1962 ............. 37342 13629 47 23666 1651 16 149 5 866
1961 ............. 35481 13 522 50 21 909 1 584 15091 5 234
1960 ............. 32 367 13359 46 18 962 1 521 14837 2 804
1959............. 31074 13 110 43 17 921 1 385 14 125 2 411
198............. 29359 12458 44 16857 1 385 13697 1 775
1957 ............. 27036 11327 40 15 669 1 382 13043 1 244
1956 ............. 25654 10948 40 14 666 1 384 12 135 1 147
CONVENTIONAL STEAM (Capaciy of G actor. Drven by Skam Engine and Turbmie)
1974pt ........... 375 736
1973r ............ 352072 303536i 6836k 41700ii 18 i51 18i 427n
1972p ............ 322 944 279 520 6 247 37 177 17 020 16 290 3 867
1971p ............ 298 345 258633 4 959 34 753 15 823 15 576 3 354
1970 ............ 275 191 236 792 4761 33638 15 141 15 194 3303
1969............. 252411 217 196 3 925 31 290 14291 14051 2 948
1968 ............. 233095 199285 3 031 30 779 13 807 14026 2946
1967 ............. 214 435 182 340 2 608 29 487 13 046 14 026 2 415
1966 ............. 197415 167370 2348 27 697 12230 13052 2415
1965 ............. 188 054 159800 1 902 26352 11 197 12 948 2 207
1964 ............. 175871 150753 1 617 23501 I 056 10 371 2074
1963 ............. 166 229 142 235 1 477 22 517 10 120 10 367 2 030
1962 ............. 149 943 129556 1 169 19218 9 265 8 141 1 812
1961 ............. 141 784 122095 1 075 18 614 8 72$ 8 141 1 745
1960 ............. 132521 114 148 1032 17 341 8 176 7689 1476
195 ............. 122 980 105 193 785 17002 7 816 7714 1 472
1958 ............. 110 528 95060 645 14 823 6 771 6 697 1355
1957 ............. 99 437 85 348 604 13 485 5 666 6 564 1 255
1956 ............. 92 591 79597 484 12510 5 438 6 159 913






22




TABLE 2 (Continued)

KISTALM GENERATING CAPACiTY-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY*
BY OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR KILOWATTS IN THOUSANDS (NAME PLATE)
Total Electrico Investor- Power
At Utility Owned Subtotal Municipal Districts, State
Dec. 31 Industry Utilities Cooperatives Government Utilities Federal Projects
NUCLEAR STEAM (Capacity of Ge umrator Drie by Ndar Reactor)
1974p ........... 31 662 28397 SS 3210 -- 1 152 2058
1973r ............ 21 118 19766 53 1 299 1299
1972p............ 15 300 14448 52 800 800
1971p............ 8687 7 832 56 800 800
1970 ............ 6 493 5693 800 800
1969 ............ 3980 3 180 800 800
1968 ............ 2817 2017 800 800
1967............ 2887 2087 ** 80000 800
1966 ............ 1942 1 142" ** 800 -- 800
1965 ............. 926 926** ** ** ** ee
1964 ............. 906 006* 0* -- *
1963 ............. 861 86100 ** -- -1962............. 734 734
1961 ............. 442 442
1960 ............. 297 297 -1959 ............. 105 105
1958 ............. 105 105
1957 ............. 105 105
1956 .............
INTERNAL COMBUSTION (Capacity of Generators Drien by Inmternal Combustion Engines)
1974pt ........... 5 001 ...
1973r........... 4903 1404 343 3i56 3Ill 21
1972p ........... 4796 1588 345 2 863 2 817 22 24
1971p ........... 4466 1 359 348 2759 2698 25 36
1970 ............ 4350 1 340 345 2 665 2605 25 35
1969 ............ 4205 1 258 337 2 610 2 549 25 36
1968 ............ 3 978 1 127 346 2 505 2445 25 35
1967 ............ 3818 1019 354 2445 2380 25 40
1966 ............. 3 509 778 353 2 378 2 313 25 40
1965 ............ 3 365 748 349 2 268 2 205 25 38
1964 ............ 3 320 749 342 2 229 2 164 25 40
1963 ............ 3 245 732 338 2 175 2 120 25 30
1962 ............ 3 048 658 321 2 060 2 013 25 31
1961 ............ 2 961 690 321 1 950 1 893 25 32
1960 ............ 2817 646 312 1 859 1 802 24 33
1959 ............ 2 682 591 308 1 783 1 713 35 35
1958 ............ 2605 579 288 1 738 1 661 42 35
1957............. 2545 596 280 1 669 1 592 42 35
1956 ............ 2452 600 271 1 581 1 503 42 36
Alaska and Hawaii included since 1963.
Generator capacity of the following plants is included in Conventional Steam: Piqua-Piqua Municipal Power Plant, Ohio
Elk River-Rural Cooperative Power Assoc., Minnesota
Sheldon-Consumer's Public Power District, Nebraska
Parr--South CaroLina Electric & Gas Co. South Carolina
t Completedata not available at time ofprinting.
p Preliminary. r Revised. Source: Federal PowerCommission.
SOURCE: EEl, Statistical Year Book, 1974.







23




TABLE 3
INSTALLED GENERATING CAPACITY-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY
BY STATES AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR AT DECEMBER 31st, 1973 AND 1974-KILOWATTS IN THOUSANDS (NAME PLATE)
Total Electric Conventional Nuclear Internal
SUtility Industry Hydro Steam Steam Combustion
1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r
Total United States..... 475 988 439 875 63S 589 61 782 375 736 352 072 31 662 21 118 5 001 4903
Maine................. 1 710 1 707 309 304" 505 507 830 830 66 66
New Hampshire........ 1 560 1 146 380 380 1 177 763 3 3
Vermont ............... 906 906 186 186 163 163 537 537 20 20
Massacmhusetts.......... 8841 7776 1 639 1 014 6 211 5777 840 840 161 145
Rhode Island.......... 322 360 2 2 290 330 30 28
Conanectieut ............ 5 189 5 189 134 134 3773 3 773 1 262 1 282 20 20
New Engan ........ 18 6528 17 084 2 650 S 020 1.119 11 313 3 469 34 200 2S
NewYork............. 27 716 25 959 4 967 4 717 20 140 18 634 2 503 2 503 10S 105
Now Jersey............ 11 141 11 353 341 341 10 247 10 456 550 550 3 6
Pennsylvania ......:.... 27 184 23 726 1 651 1 651 22 113 21 812 3 321 156 99 107
Middle Atantl ...... 66 041 61 038 6 959 6 709 52 500 50 902 6 874 8 09 M 8
Ohio ................. 23 375 21 490 2 2 23 181 21290 192 198
Indiana............... 13021 12502 93 93 12864 12341 64 68
Illinois................ 24 830 23985 32 32 18 831 19 103 6 717 4 607 250 243
Michigan.............. 17 060 15 962 2 322 1 993 13 506 12 746 887 887 345 336
Wiscons nm ............. 8356 7 664 366 366 6260 6102 1 638 1101 92 95
East North CentraL... 886642 8I 608 2 815 2 486 74 642 71 582 824 6 5695 943 40
Minnesota ............. 6 707 5 918 136 136 4 498 4305 1 755 1 162 318 315
Iow a.................. 4830 4 107 130 131 3 682 3526 550 468 450
Missoumi .............. 11 023 10473 846 846 9826 9351 -- -- 351 276
North Dakota .......... 1 297 1 297 400 400 854 854 43 43
South Dakota.......... 1 697 1 693 1 383 1 383 223 222 91 88
Nebraska .............. 3834 3033 236 236 2094 2094 1258 457 246 246
Kansas................ 5798 5449 2 2 5 313 4970 483 477
West North Cea ral... 35 186 81 970 S 13 3 184 26 490 25 3 8563 1 10 000 1 89
Delaware.............. 1 511 1455 1 500 1 444 11 11
Maryland.............. 6 692 6731 494 494 6145 618 53 53
Districtof Columbia.... 1 279 1 279 3 3 1 276 1 276
Virginias............... 9 127 8 244 842 842 6 566 5684 1 695 1 696 24 23
West Virg n .......... 12 370 12301 101 101 12 269 12 20
NorthCarolina......... 13 025 11 960 1 834 1 834 11 171 10 106 20 20
South Carolina......... 10 153 7 713 1 446 1 446 5 276 4612 3429 1 663 2 2
Geo*' ............... 10 895 9 144 1 056 1 056 0 837 8086 2 2
Florida................ 21 373 19 064 30 30 19 579 17 278 1 520 1 520 244 236
South Atlantit ........ 86 426 77 891 6 806 5 806 78 619 66870 644 4 88 350 847
Kentucky.............. 12043 10 745 686 686 11 343 10051 14 8
Tennemmee............. 12 863 12 826 2 175 2 138 10688 10688 -- -- --
Alabama .............. 13 928 11 824 2 506 2 508 10 268 9316 1 152
Mina ppi............. 3268 3269 3264 3264 4 5
East South Central... 4- 102 88 64 5 89 5 32 85 568 38 319 1152 18 13
Arkansas.............. 4528 3606 1075 1056 2500 2500 903 50 50
LoGuidean .............. 1098 1010 421 10727 10219 -- -- 201 202
Oklahomas............. 7 085 6496 963 963 5962 5 370 160 163
Texas................. 37 580 33 965 517 517 36814 33 199 249 249
West South Central... 60 121 54 488 2 655 56 66 00 51 288 90 -- 660 64
Montana.... .......... 1 881 1 881 1 512 1512 365 365 4 4
Idaho................. 1 697 1 656 1 635 1 646 50 12 10
Wyoming .............. 2340 1 835 220 220 2 105 598 15 17
Colorado.............. 3 613 3 384 743 743 2 775 2549 95 92
New Mexico........... 4 070 3 943 24 24 4003 3 876 43 43
Arizons ............... 6 349 5 044 2 079 2079 4 256 2 951 14 14
Utah.................. 1 225 780 197 198 993 546 35 36
Nevada............... 3 514 3 328 682 682 2764 2577 68
Mountain............ 4 689 21 851 7 092 7 104 17 811 14 40 8 SAS
Washington............ 15 426 15422 13 041 12911 1 580 1662 800 843 5 6
Oregon............... 6501 6091 5638 5638 857 447 6 6
Californias ............. 32 514 31 999 8 404 7979 23 551 23 433 515 515 44 72
Pach ............... 4441 58 51 27 0oS 2 528 25 9S8 25 542 1 815 1858 55 84
Alaska ................ 592 586 124 124 349 349 119 113
Hawaii ................ 1221 1 188 3 3 1 152 1 123 66 62
Alaskal & BHa ..... I 818 1 774 I27 127 1 501 1 47 185 175
p Preliminary. r Revised. Source: Federal Power Commimion.


SOTURCE: EEl, Statistical Year Book, 1974.








C)A
















a oil -a m



C410 40 0 M o. 'c! Ic C,
C; ti ti 1; 4; w of -to w ri
Mint- 4 4 NO .4 in v
N

14

fn 01
0 0 0 P%
CD 0 44
w cc -Z V, 4 0
r, 0 r, rN 01 cc
a 0 .2
41:1 10

st4






JS

41 4j


B.. cn
Q C, '-Z
>1
z 45
a S
w Fzo v-4




Q Q6 4 Im --V a

Ln

z Z
crzx tic
-0


00 65:4










w to C4 M ka oc ka w to
o N Ch to m m -0

Z.0 0.


0)
-0 >to ON Sr, 8 9 2 40 ad IV
w kR r! m O
4 0; C r: C4 06 Ii 06 ai, r: M o t- 00 60 %ft t- v: to
m 00 0 0 w t- 0 0 t- 0 v o N v cc -W N -W M t- N M to
446) N w tz mr- Oot060
cc do d; v; tc 0; N o
N V 04
N
I H




0 0, 'o ^,o w -4 P, f4 cc
40




cc
01 7 'T 10 a,
'T 01
OD L'i
4:
01 CC 7 7 un 0, 0 4 6M cc cc V, 10
e4 eq 0 UN
060 w N
47-- -111, 11 01 C; :a;, 1;
- C4 '? P # C4
z 0-4






C-4 m r Z
Ir
"o 00 0
C-L

cd -dc;

C;L dIA
4, f- do
<









25







Nt-r-r-60040P I sm"PS1 40 CID
In
suativis jo jaqwnN am m


to

5.000T 'All 014
c4c4-cq-= t-:t :C; C4 v 00
1 -,4 "'0 0"0

ruoilvv jo j9qujnN cc -t-v -r V3 to m 2 tP ttlIc V


to)
m N r- 0 0 C 111:) w w I t2 11 'IF v C14 -el m 40 C%1
-.r t C. I III I- C4";
.0001 'Alpwd'ej C, t 6
C4 W O C14 m
C', M

N LO W Cb t- CD 0 cc
tuoilvis jowqtunN cc 0 2 000 P LO t-. v m m Ir c-1 I- -v N
m I- C4

A
oll ni
10F 12C



eq t- ml 2400 a QQ
vuotme jo jaqtunN -pt-100=11110 vic" o m va rCQ


10 n v
C1 siivAknpj 0 !:C>mf
QO C -V =,v -V


j r 04 C*
0
f ac r3 0 V -r N Cb 2t-,;% M
fW fruollule J() jaqwnN vt-0113=r wc4N -0 I= = c*clv m qO A
a Ito


fa -C4 -r It- to t- In 1:10 ac
Cb t cclocb N r. .0 n ", -2:: ro C4 ab
43 .4 16 3 2 G 1 I 'D 2 E
c4t*kt fcr It, OD


c4
m Go I AD to r, co cb W v twe 94 V) 0 r.
suoijule jo jaqtunN cl. t r- co to N -,j to MI- t.


aD to

v,0001 'Ai!jvdvj r, D -r c4
Cl -r, E LO cb.A r- 0 01
M, N cb
I Cq
M 04 -r,:; 40
iruo!ms jo jaquunN me- 4.5=t- -,vc 4-r 'I




22 G
9,0001 'Al!3vdw3 Go cIl . . .
c4 -r ji
c4
c4 c4 cn

"OlVel" 10 Jaqwl'N I
In m IV 0 T
clt t-4
it
ac ;I c4 e4 m i t- C4 Cb
n -r OD M C4 -M 2 CID CIO _r
p c! 1 1111 "t c4
c4 QO c4
c4I 1i cq .-,c
cc 11 :2 cc 1") cq 14 t- I's I a, -V!
soot 0 w:1 -r t- -0 v I- 'Ir v 2 c. 81 0
.1"s jo jaqw nN M..


or. on
cc,) -4 volt,"
c4 m m d
91 "11 11 0! SS3
113itivo eN c> 00 v; t- CID
DO
c4- I is
t-0411111 wav ; 11 g I cb I m 0 d7 c4 Io
"owCm"v >
m"j-prle jo jaKAtunN *v4
ast, 14

o
611 v.%,D I I "Scawt-An-ov m a 'ID .0 ID -,,M> 4-4


suo"Ine jo j aq Lu n N c r4



to
owl 'Alljodva Tat -w





C -a 4-j

E

ad r>

C6 06 = A4
44


ggg;6R : W
45 6 2
c. c., '06

0
v so -C

C6 gsSSF88- .5 -.:
a 93 a
E >
12 -e.19999999 I- I 8
t4
c4 0
m ,c
or z 0.

















68-353 0 76 3








26






t- too t- Vat, 0 Cq Go t- N 00
on Go v -4 0 M IV M
V d clt lr IV: N C4 M
IV 0 00 m m t4 ( C4 ; V
.4 C) .4 00 r- N aO IV r. m m 0 a)
a) V 0, m 10 OD 0 r- Go 0
m cl; f4 V; coo aj r- W; C; lw
N 0 04

v4


w Ln P. do %n en &A
C% cn r" co r 0 4 aw rk. in fn 0 %D 'I
r% r 10 co ul UN m ID r4 r ON co %D fn
fn
m rl %0 1,, .1 wl 00 a% r LM
co wl T a en 0 f" CD r. M'O ca
z
rl 4n fn 0 0^ Q^ co 0 0
m M
-4 .4
0
40
z
ce


tS











00 ej
tke IV tc

ca
to a
Lo ce
E-4

w
60
3 be tho
0 low 0. 0 1 a 41
a- al; P,

z C
c let
d





fA
a C4 In cc
Ac'2 w CA




m 0
0 10
ct t C* qr
il 0 Ln tco)

0 C4
>1
so
.
0 en C4 0 c" co 0 V-4
z





40
v C
Ili C I% C ll
C14 rl &M 00 c" >)
0%0.-4 00 0
0
do= : V 44
1 C4 cn
0


<










ild

Ol 0
f


z








27







S IS
0 .z

C4 t Cb ce
Cb C4


4p





.0
t- C*a



Cb
to 00 to r- cc
lw cm C* cm
c
00
w Q cc; tM C4
CA C* 00 : 't :
z

CA Cb
Cb C*

qD CD
C4
Cb
Xd Go



ea
=I Cb
Z
CQ Ob t
r- 4M 2
ap
a :
YX W3
Mi CIQ c M W: t- 40
id
CtIM too




C4
E S
= st .8 a
Z a co :"a M

90 U21 Z
Cb 40
to


03,4
Ob
C4 C03

c
COR
94 "0 co :.g cc
cr)



r4
M
E-4 0 40 No V to
C. C!,

Jd Oi :cq OD
cl -2 C* 100 C4
C4 M Cq blv

ao
OD 06 CD CD at;
r4 C)


>)



V-4 v 0
;s


0 V-4 cq
4,-4 r:c, cl;
C4 cr)

10 0
6 a 6 : : :. S #
4SY GO PL4,

rz 4











z= CQZ=,








28








P m 1
t C4 %0
00





2 c4
V C4 C4
40 "Mo x


m to" cot cc m t4 C34, r.- &fl 0) ell to
4c eq rl_ &f5 m 40 -V OC C4
-,! -1 L-a
4 C4 C4 co too Cq eq m


m eq 00 C% 0 0 Ln Wl.
eq 0 Or_ W C, V- cb
to w ol
Ct Cl-I .
C4 W.) &,:I co
V- *a C4


C% C4
co p- C4
op :a
C% tll mrr.- fm co eq C4 -W 00 cc
C%


C^ eq -r 5 04 f to
Go r ace r r- -V vz
w -r ItE r- m V .0.
-41
C% 00 -V r- M C* WID 00 0;
C*


C: ac V3 C%% w M 02, Q
CD m

go P
ao


co C4 -V SID vo r- rCD in ap cc m 44 m tm ". C 04 Vb -r CW M *r 10 W,
Cb . .
C C4 C% cla 00
C4


00 m cq C M
S= 2 co m
to mm





Cq 00 r.,m 0 0 %a
V ct 1.. 94 0 J CO a
at It Ct
C;



-4 CM
C.) t- m 00 cq
t- UO CIQ M 000 04 -T v cli V C;. cli
v-4 11 m t- V
E-4










r-4



0 r--4


1=6
0



ds

be
>*
tic
5 :
40

w
W.C >. r a
c
4) 79
.69 3 IV"
6 tic ZE0 ol c to- 0 W.!: 0
dl- & z Co
r :$ w m I
-- %- PS
CO z 4 0


cr






29






6.0 wo Om

a C 00 00 Go t. r.. to 0 so to la to




0 m t- to eq m
00.
1-1 00 M U'3 t- M r0 0-0 Cp 00 co m V-4 C t- 10 m --4 00 ult eq
oo 9.4-0
"= Cl a com=c 0 C 00 00 00 to cq cq Cq C4 "4 P-4 "-4 "-4 "-4 P-4 V-4 "-4

ce
Cie 04 0
m col t 1-4 1-4 0 00 Cq to 10 00 0 M
ic C4 m 10 mc4m 't 3 .4.4 cq
-4 1- 00 M CD U* 0 t- t- 0
4-D = 00
CS 03::
0 46 00 t- cn cq dq %0 m V-4 UO ka 00 -4
E-4 P- 0 o C'. 00 t, 0 U5 m cq "00000 00
v4 r-.4 .4 v.4 v.4 v-4 v.4 P-4 P-4 v-4 P-4 P-4



P" >
LU w 94 bb,
." lD C= 04 4 M N 1-4 U' 00 CC 10
.6a S. C U 1 -- -Wt CO to r... co = 0 ko = m W o W in Ol Ill. LO =OCONO 0) 10 N
z z t,, M r4 Y-4
0 rZ r
0
LU ...4
X ul 044
g
z Ck L" 0 V-4 V-4 t 4M 10 -4 t. C4 um 00
0 -V = eq t- MI) cq -4 00 m 00
"0 st-M&O t- t'.. 0 co t- "
ca 0 0
4a 4.90 4a 4-4
r4 0 "P.4 cs N OC -#3 1, M Cq tot, M t, Sa -4 4 -4
SZ &a NO UD A 9-4 Cy'. lf C4D V-4 Utl -'* 00 r4 ;D CC C C'. 00 1-- C-'D in ce N V-4 0 0 C) 00
Lu Z 44 Q
9-4 V-4 P-4 v-4 v--f v-4 P-4 P-4 P4 1-4 P4 "4 ...#
mi I.-I el
Lu go CC
wa 0 07
go 4
40. go
00 C11. t- LO Cj ko to to v-4 --4 M Cq : 00 ,,j ic 00 ED t, 00 m m co U,3 cq ck C,% V-4 0 4)
> WE 0 AO 0 LO --4 U5 U5 C5 0 cd t"ic t- cq 00 P.
.0 0
4-4 :3 r4 Cl to m 00 0 to cq U3 eq CD -4 r. 00 W
000c) 5-000 C) di 0 c 00 00 9-4 4)
0 0 P-4 V-4 r-4 F-4 V-4 >
LU cd 0 0
"44 tO 0
>444 4)
,O m C cli m 10 0 "mm -10 pq
2 9 R F,
C: C4 m o 00 -.14 CO 10 LO
Oclimm co V--4 C#3 m C4 C t*- t- cq CO
o 1.4 -44 *4
.6a...4 (A
lu = -W -- t, m 4 -,d' cs 0 w .0 O O k-0 -r -4 M It' Cq --4 'W LO 00 1-4 LO M 0
&4 r 00 GO I-- O kf) 'Rl' M Cq -4 0 M 0) 00 t-' t- 0
4)
NNW '.4 V-4 "'4 r.4 v-4 P-4 v-4 r-4 0 0
u
V-4
el
bl)
4)
u Pllt- 0 f.0 V-4 00 V4
.,4 V U" Nt m Cq m N
-4-2 Ok ^D f 0. (M 'It 0 V-4 C' 10 C) cd d) 4J
UA 1... 0 U) F 2 00 9
t .4
lu Le) t, to -4 t- LO ".5
o 00 co eq P-4 0 00 t", w 02 .14
> 0 10 -0 m m CYD co cq cq cq cq cq cq r,4 0 4J
-0 t) '45 *5! co
0 0 ZEE w 4) o
.,.4 0
4-4
0 0; 0
0 0.0
w t LO 0 N C45 0 t- "Mcol N 0 w cd 0:
00 .." :3
0"0 (D m I* P-4 m t- 00 0 t- co 0
V-4 cq C I- cq 0 4
00 cq m 00 CD M to V-4 m o C) 0
L* ko 00 a -.4 C4 00 C) U-j 0 to 4)-s-, > d
s 00 :$ 16q
w m Z4 c) ci 00 00 f- i- to (D V Cd cd (D
bOE 0 =-O
04 v--4 P-4 V-4 V-4 w S-4-4 4)
4) 0 C- 44
10 elm
cl Ld w
LO
C'I c C 00 r, to LO -,r m t4 0 0
I I -* CD C D C.0 1 0 CO to
1: C. C. I= --- (m C'. C C --. m C
P-4 P" V" V-4 V-4 V-4 V-4 V-4






30




TABLE 12
GENERATION-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY*
BY OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR KILOWATT-HOULRS IN MILIONS
STotal Electric Investor. Power
Utility Owned Subtotal Municipal Districts, State
Year Industry Utilities Cooperatives Government Utilities Federal Projects
TOTAL (Geinration by AU Type of Prime Moer)
IW4p ..... 1 864 961 1 441 014 33 845 390 102 78 500 219 622 91 980
1973r .. 1 86 216 1 448 80 35 127 372 229 80 872 211 715 79 642
1972p..... 1 747 323 1 356 677 31 610 359 036 78 922 206 736 73 378
1971p..... 1 613 936 1 250 005 27 228 338 703 72 535 194 490 69 678
1970 ...... 1 531 609 1 183 190 23 459 324 960 71 394 185 753 67813
1969 ...... 1 442 182 1 102 162 17 513 322 507 69 614 183 245 69 648
1968....... 1 329 443 1 019 313 14 140 295 990 63 804 170 834 61 352
1967...... 1 214 365 928 439 12389 273 537 57 788 162 399 53 350
1966...... 1 144350 880 837 11 175 252 338 52 627 153 067 46644
1965...... 055 252 800 474 8 571 237 207 49940 145 231 42 036O
1964...... 983 990 756 183 7 934 219873 50263 129936 39 674
1963...... 916 793 701 253 6949 208 591 46293 124340 37 958
1962 ...... 852314 651 016 6063 195 235 41 688 115 776 37771
1961...... 792 039 604 883 5 241 181 915 38753 112177 30so 95
1960...... 753 350 578 600 4962 16 788 36924 112321 20 543
1959 ...... 710006 544 234 4404 161 368 34 618 109052 176 9
1958...... 645 098 400 402 3422 151 274 28329 110437 12 508
1957...... 631 507 480 943 3029 147 535 27 851 109 175 10 509
1956...... 600 668 459 015 3 413 138 240 28 005 100 711 9 S4
HYDRO (Ge, ton of Game raors Drin Water Whob and Tar&im)
1974p..... 300 447 80919 196 219 332 17217 137 085 6 430
1973r. ... 271 634 77451 229 103 954 13439 123 148 57367
1972p..... 272 734 76 838 222 195 674 15 148 126 424 54 102
1971p ..... 266 320 765 18 240 189 562 14 769 121 600 53 193
1970....... 247 456 70587 214 176655 14453 110 605 51 507
1969 ...... 250 193 74 833 216 175 145 15 494 105 687 53 94
1968 ...... 222 491 67 201 239 165 051 13043 94874 47 134
1967...... 221 518 72072 223 149 223 10 602 95 228 42 893
1966 ....... 194 76 62827 214 131716 8 106 86 200 3740
1965...... 193 851 67366 281 12 2048 580 82769 34 856
1964...... 177073 60323 219 116531 8 460 75771 323 800
1963 ...... 165 755 59439 213 108 108 7477 68494 30 132
1962 ...... 168 283 62 786 225 105 272 6215 68 276 30 781
1961...... 151 850 56012 224 95 614 6229 6 089 24 84
1960...... 145516 60 447 234 84835 5 814 64 74 1427
1959 ...... 137 782 57 468 215 80099 6113 62268 11718
1958 ...... 140262 59211 175 80 876 5360 67705 7811
1957 ...... 130 232 53 03 169 78 970 5 431 65 721 5 818
1956 ...... 122029 54 980 163 66 886 6140 55 857 4879
CONVENTIONAL STEAM (Generation of Generator Driven by Siteam inesm and Tubin.)
1974p..... 1 445 785 1 260 987 32 886 151 912 56 10 75638 19664
1973r . . 1 494 901 1 292 888 34 108 167905 62422 88240 17243
197 p..... 1 413 882 1 227 847 30609 155426 58774 80296 16 366
1971p..... 1 303 465 1 137276 26249 139940 53 141 72867 13 982
1970...... 1 256 294 1 092 564 22610 141 120 52380 75048 13 0602
1969 ...... 1 172481 1 016361 16760 139360 49 800 77544 12018
1968...... 1 089 239 942927 13332 132 980 46744 75927 1030
1967 ...... 980 336 850 541 11 434 118361 43292 66 136 8 on
1966...... 938910 813329 10104 115 477 40405 6 769 8 308
1965...... 852655 738319 7401 106935 37333 62419 7 183
1964...... 798 564 692416 6 855 99293 37891 54123 T 279
1963 ..... 742 780 638 431 5 915 98 434 34893 55 794 7 747
1962...... 676 956 585 724 5101 86 131 31 685 47 458 6 8
1961...... 633 872 546 954 4313 82 605 2 871 47096 M 68
1960 ...... 602 824 517373 4073 81 378 27 582 47 512 6 284
1959...... 567 651 486 345 3 552 77 754 25 041 46735 5 978
1958...... 500 599 430 765 2724 67 110 19749 42 665 406
1957...... 497 208 427 490 2358 67355 19279 43 393 48
1956 ...... 474 652 408 660 2 600 68202 18789 44 773 4640






31




TABLE 12 (Continved)

GENERATION-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY*
BY OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR KILOWATT-HOURS IN MILuONS
Total Electric Investor- Power
Utility Owned Subtotal Municipal Districts, State
Year Industry Utilities Cooperatives Government Utilities Federal Projects
NUCLEAR STEAM (Generation of Gawtos Driven by Nuclasr Reader)

1974p ..... 112 740 98252 314 14 174 6289 7 885
1973r ..... 83 334 77790 199 5 345 314 5 031
1972p..... 4 031 50873 239 2919 2919
1971p..... 37899 35 151 196 2552 25 52
1970...... 21 797 19063 120 2614 2614
1969...... 13 928 10 261 3 667 3667
1968 ...... 12528 8611 15 3 902 3902
1967...... 7655 5499 141 2015 2015
1966...... 5 520 4400 129 991 2 989
1965...... 3 657 3497 143 17 22 (5)
1964 ...... 3 343 3 179 56 106 17 91
1963...... 3212 3 136 1 75 75
1962...... 2270 2270 -19061...... I 692 1 692
1960...... B18 518
190 ...... 188 188
1958...... 165 165
1957 ...... 10 10
1956......
INTERNAL COMBUSTION (Genaration of Generator Dries by Internal Combustion naea)

1974p ..... 5 989 856 449 4 684 4673 10 1
1973r. .... 6 347 731 591 5 025 5011 13 1
1972p..... 6 676 1 119 540 5 017 5 000 16 1
1971p..... 6252 100 54 4649 4625 23 1
1970...... 6 062 976 515 4 571 4 561 10
1969...... 5 580 707 5s 4335 4 320 14 1
'1968 ...... 5 185 574 54 4057 4017 33 7
1967...... 4 856 327 591 3 93 8 3894 35 9
1966...... 5164 281 728 4 155 4 114 3s 3
1965...... 5 089 292 746 4 051 4 005S 43 8
1964...... 5010 265 80 3941 3 895 42 4
1963...... 5046 247 820 3 979 3 92 52 4
1962 ...... 4 805 236 737 3 832 3 788 42 2
1961...... 4625 225 704 3696 3653 42 1
1960...... 4492 262 55 3575 3528 45 2
1959...... 4 385 233 637 3 515 3 464 49 2
1958...... 4 072 261 52 3 288 3220 67 1
1957...... 4 062 350 502 3210 3 141 61 8
1956...... 4087 375 60 3 152 3076 71 5
Alaska and Hawaii included since 1963.
p Preliminary. r Revised. ( ) Denotes negative figure. Source: Federal Power Commission.




SOURCE: EEl, Statistical Year Book, 1974.






32




TAUS 13

GENERATION-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY
BY STATES AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER DRIVING THE GENERATOR
1973 AND 1974-CILOWATT-4IOURS IN MILLIONS
Total Electric Conventioal Nuclear Internal
Utility Industry Hydro steam Steam Combustion
1974p 197'3r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r 1974p 1973r
Total United States ...... 1 864 061 856 216 300 447 271 0 34 1 445 785 1 494 901 112 740 83 334 5 989 6347
Maine .............. 7557 7853 175 1853 2201 2 10 3 574 3351 26 39
NewHanmpshire ......... 4 637 5 245 1 292 1 435 3 345 3 810
Vermont............. 3605 2771 M 994 193 167 2482 1598 10 12
Masawsetts ........... 28 816 33 874 359 489 25 359 28 039 2 885 5 120 213 226
Rhode Island ........... 1 231 1 204 4 5 1 202 1 177 25 22
Connecticut ............. 23 391 21 129 422 440 14 983 16 373 7 970 4 303 16 13
New England ......... 69 237 7 076 4753 5Ts 216 47 283 62 176 16 9i 14 372 2 si
New York .............. 103 750 105 778 28 639 29 154 65 584 69 126 9 273 7 226 254 272
New Jesey ............. 32 940 36 261 (285) (337) 29 572 33 013 3 673 3 585
Pennsylvania ............ 98 884 103 841 1 391 1 371 90 451 102 060 6998 362 44 48
Middle Atlantic ....... 235 694 '245 880 29 745 s018 18 607 204 199 is 94 11 1-7 59e2
Ohio ................... 98 191 99920 10 8 98033 99699 148 213
Indians ................ 56 862 59 524 445 480 56 366 58 996 51 48
Illinois................. 91 453 92 514 106 113 71 342 71 906 19 592 20 051 413 444
Michigan ............... 61 452 62 561 1 050 890 59 350 58 286 416 2 834 636 551
Wisconsin .............. 32 559 28 734 1 706 2 107 22 536 20 604 8256 5952 61 71
East North Central .... 340 517 34363 3317 3 698 307 627 309491 28 64 58837 1 809 1537
Minnesota .............. 22 171 21 435 736 872 16 834 16 937 4,363 3 270 238 356
Iowa ................... 15 545 15587 890 905 13 283 14 194 931 441 48
Missouri ................ 38 025 38 931 1 713 2007 38 022 36 529 290 395
North Dakota ........... 8475 7 776 2 729 2382 5 746 5 392 - 2
South Dakota ........... 6 324 5 539 5 624 4 795 684 722 16 22
Nebraska ............... 12 302 9648 1 293 1 370 6659 7 321 3 996 600 354 357
Kanss ................. 18 200 17 521 7 3 17 438 16 686 755 832
West North Central .... 121 042 1168 7 12992 12384 96666 97 781 9290 3870 2 094 2465
Delaware ............... 6 741 5801 6741 5 794 7
Maryland............... 28 542 27 646 1 690 2 164 26 752 25 375 100 107
Distt of Columbia 2 405 3 264 1 1 2 404 3263
V i .............. .. 33 781 35 716 1 045 1 270 26758 27501 5903 6858 25 27
WestV a. ........... 61 505 56 530 477 497 61 028 560 -...
North Carolina .......... 58 520 62 178 6 887 7 107 51 625 55067 8 4
South C4 lin .......... 31 159 28 029 3413 3 862 16 689 18001 11 057 6 166
Georvi. ... ........ 37611 35916 3 606 4 178 33 962 31 738 43
Florida ........... 75881 76280 252 234 67 348 71 094 7877 4681 404 271
South Atlantic ......... 336 145 331 360 17 371 19 13 293 307 293 926 24930 17 705 537 416
Kentucky ............... 53 543 52949 3398 3 823 50 145 49 126
Tennessee .............. 52 705 59 524 11 767 11 452 40 938 48 072
Alabama ............... 58046 56 060 10 344 11 778 41 413 43968 6 289 314
Missisippi .............. 11 462 11 060 11 462 I1 060 -..
East South Centra .... 175 756 178 583 2 509 57 053 143 958 i 226 6 28 314
Arkansas ............... 12 172 12964 4263 4 236 7 542 8 715 361 6 13
Louisiana ............... 39 506 41 474 39 138 41 133 368 341
Oklahoma .............. 33 129 30 497 3 590 3 761 29 347 26 502 192 234
Texas .................. 142 263 135 000 1 631 1 700 140311 132963 321 337
West South Central .... 227070 219 935 9 484 9 697 216 38 20931 361 887 95
Montana ............... 11 055 9 136 9 725 7 520 1 330 1 616
Idaho .................. 9 694 8 223 9 686 8 222 8 -1
Wyoming ............... 10 803 10 395 1 411 1 140 9 391 9252 1 a
Colorado ............... 15 650 14 526 1 414 1 281 14 099 13093 137 152
New Mexico ............ 20 122 19 420 74 65 19971 19238 77 117
Arizona ................ 20 528 17 540 7 393 7 187 13 124 10338 11 15
Utah ................... 3 999 3 626 941 1 111 3047 2500 11 15
Nevada ................ 13 771 13 845 1 601 1 669 12 159 12 162 it 14
Mountain ............. 105 622 L6 711 32 245 28 195 73 129 68 199 548 317
Washington ............. 90 407 78 565 82 304 68 844 4 213 5290 3 890 4431
Oreon ............. 36 049 28 441 359 4 2S 139 85 302
Calforni............. 120 363 137 134 46 420 38 751 71 071 95 736 2861 2 632 11 15
Pacific.............. 246 819 244 140 164 688 1,6 734 75 369 101 828 6 751 7 08 II 15
Alaska ................. 1 871 1 744 326 286 1 383 1 306 162 152
Hawaii ................. 5 288 5 087 17 20 5 118 4956 153 111
Alaka& Hawaii ...... 7 159 6831 343 306 6 501 656 -W 1i 56
Source: Federal Power Commission. p Preiminary. r Revsed. ( ) Denotes negative figure.


SOURCE: EEI, Statistical YearBook, 1974.






33



TABLj 14

GENERATION BY FUEL-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY
BY STATES AND KINDS OF FUEL
YEAR 1974p--ILOWATT-HOUS IN MILLIONS
Total Fuel Nuclear
Theral* Coal Oil Gas Fuel
Total United States ....... 1 561 810 829 839 299 296 319 935 112 740
Maine ................... 5801 2227 3574
New Hampshire .......... 3346 2 338 980 28
Vermont ................. 2 685 59 56 88 2482
Massachusetts ............ 28 457 2 279 22 739 554 2 885
Rhode Island ............. 1 227 63 1 010 154
Connecticut .............. 22 969 408 14 553 38 7970
New England ........... 448 5 147 565 862 16911
New York... 75 111 14 808 48095 2 935 9273
NwJersey ............. 33245 7389 20 894 1 289 3673
Pennsylvania ............. 97 492 78 323 11 629 542 6 998
Middle Atlantic ......... 205 848 1006 20 80 618 4 766 19 944
Ohio.................... 98179 94456 2330 1 393
Indiana.................. 56417 53791 1475 1 151
Illinois.................. 91 347 62740 5359 3656 19592
Michigan ................ 60401 48394 7433 4 158 416
Wisconsin ................ 30 853 19 768 357 2 472 8 256
ast North Centrl ...... .387 197 279 149 16954 12 880 28 264
Minnesota ............... 21 430 13 383 679 3 005 4 363
Iowa................. 14621 8633 197 4860 931
Missouri................ 36313 32 142 270 3901
North Dakota ............. 5746 5733 11 2
South Dakota ............ 700 421 37 242
Nebraska................ 11 008 2532 379 4101 3996
Kans.................. 18 193 2 948 988 14 257
West North Central..... 108 011 65 792 2.561 80 868 9290
Delaware. ................ 6740 2346 4309 85
Maryland ................ 26 852 10 001 15 989 862
District of Columbia ...... 2 404 479 1 925
Virginia................. 32 736 10 666 15 865 252 5 953
WaitVirgii ............ 61028 60363 643 22
North Carolina ........... 51 633 48 798 2 747 88
South Carolina ........... 27 746 11 508 3395 1 786 11057
G 34005 26564 3893 3505 43
................. 75 630 13874 39894 13985 7877
South Atlantic .......... 818 774 184 599 88 660 -0 585 24980
Kentucky ................ 50 145 49 554 111 480
Tennessee ................ 40 937 40 816 121
Alabama ................. 47702 40724 265 424 6289
Miuuissippi................ 11 462 3327 4640 3495
East South Central ...... 150246 184421 51 7 48 9 6289
Arkana................ 7909 148 3400 361
Louisiana................ 39506 5034 34472
Oklahoma .............. .. 29 540 1 111 29 428
Teas ................... 140536 6867 3152 130517
West South Central ..... 17 491 6 868 12 445 197 817 361
Montana ................ 1 314 1 210 6 98
Idaho ................... 9 4 5
Wyoming ................ 9392 9208 77 107
Colorado ................. 14 236 8723 325 5 188
New Mexico ............. 20 048 13485 544 6019
Arizona .................. 13 134 4681 4734 3719
Utah .................... 3 058 2 793 36 229
Nevada .................. 12 170 8 750 419 3 001
Mountain .............. 78 361 48 850 6 145 18 66
Washington .............. 8 103 4 188 25 3890
Ore on .................... 38 22 16
California ................ 71 471 39 733 28 877 2 861
Pacific ................. 79612 4188 89 780 28893 6751
Alaska ................... 1 545 305 191 1 049
HAWai .................. 5240 5240 --Alasa& Hawaii ........ 6 785 805 5 431 1 049
Ex ludes generation by geothermal, wood and waste.
pAn Prelizno
Lur.V=edeal Power Commission.

SOURCE: EEI, Statistical Year Book, 1974.






CS A
SLL



N 0 O."(D t- co



Miss, 95R :P2, M ill IFI
&0 60 ka to SO qv ho .0 VVIO 4 P-4 "0 4 9-4 W-4 P4 VIO V-4 04 VO



0
00
Cq a M.-4 0
00 m t- t- 00 to COD V
.0 C45 V m C,* C,* m VMCO V4 "4 0-4 0 C4 N N
cc
a)
0 >4



Ul 10 LO u
lu us -rq
m -P COw C,* V V 40
us H
IL *z
cd
lu ASNO t1ft"CORM
P4 4 40 to L*
44 40 V V Do n co
4A :3 OR 00 t C'S A* A C4 m
49 P-4 V" V-4 P-4 W4 W4 W4 P-4 0-4 1-4
z > vqd4lw"v VVV
E-4
Im Z 0 UA 99
=A Us
>
Ln Om 8 00 ISO
:E 0 r r. 0 to tv V C* CO) rq ca 9 8 "M "'U 0 A co P4
*VVv v p V V '0 q. V -w VV V VVV 40 MP V 10 V
sy 0
:E Q
CW 0
616 eq t- t- 0400CM -4 200 --4 V 0) 4 to anto C4 P-4 V 0 r"00 W-4 -, R-4 A *0 0
us 4) W) 0 C-A r4 U: co N 10 088 00
A Im um v cov'r U,4 UD L* 40V qrV V VV V
IL
0 0

be 0 z
ISAM; !Zia%
09 cc 14 a MOD 2 k"a g 2 tt-- a tosto t-t,.co
LU IL "VV VVVVV
IL x W
4A
z ad
Au 0
0 z gm
8:E oft to 40 04 U* t- V t- m Coll Cvq
0- N Got-vor, 8"is t- to 10 1 SIR
o W z t r- V. go 2"4010 t- 00 00 tl co ;0
UA v VV VV V v qO "'0,
z . . . . . . . .
ku





*Q. CL A . . . .
V M N M 00 t V C43
o Ct C M8883. 388 CK m (3 =c"M
"q -4 "s V-4 V-4 0-4 P4 V,4 V-4 1-4






35




.. . . . . . . 460 1"to
ca 0 00 OD 0a,000 z 00006 coo
ool 1 .4 a 9-4 C; 6 6 C;

Ig M4 000,0040 to CSI 0 as C* 't- t- 40 C'C 00 000,4,4
at 4,.4 .4 coo 46 C; 6 C; 6 C;,6 ci 6 ci C; 6
0 04 0
Z it 1 0
z
0 Of-eqla co,* m V4..4 Ov t. coo
a; C; C;
to z coo
ul
P,
z z
o W) to (m 00 Ommt ,-4 00 cq V-4 'do
Au . . . . on m qp qr qw qf co
09 F c4-V42N a-00 a 000000 00 0000 C;C;O*C; c;60*0(n C; C;

z
us > I..,w C-4 00 t ca %* Coco aomcq" c4COC001.4 a C
cq*.4 C414 4:4.4 1; 6666 66666 600
UA Flo


OCDOO 00000 coo COQO 00000 000 va 0"
> . . . . .
0 0 0 0 Coco 00000 006 6666 66666 66c;
0 04
10 V-4 U* 4 in N 0 0 M t t%. %* qp Iw cq q1t t- t- C4 V-4 CYJ %a 1 ca
Cli V
*4 *,v qw .0 to,* agi 6 C6 fg; W; 4 04' ci -; 6 C; ci C; 000 a
> 0 z

ka c4COOONO V (:0 W4 '4101-4co "Cot%%* mcam Cd
0 -4 a- 46 ti t ci a6 t : a6a6a6 64vici -;.4,;c;6 666 > 4
um -4 V-4 V-4 V-4 4 P4 V-4 V-4 V-4 V-4 9-4
0 NU
IL

z H
LU +D
el C-; CID4 9 Cq CN9 ccqq cc,44
0
ul
C* 00 cc 00 00 1
us IL) to" C;
19 0 1-4
LU . . . . F-4
z >
z C'j "d! t-. -1 C
0 t, 00 b, t tco CO 0
o


LU

LU

qv m eq V-4 0 q4w mf M a. m 00 04
V-4 V-4 V-4 V4 V-4






36



00

-W a 75
cvl 04 0 to eq o m t.- 0 C4 Cq o w U.) 0 0

9: 01
a's IF
, :j





C5 a:$ co n V,4 VW4 V-4 v"4 VM4 "4 VW4 V-4


z

tio 4-D ,v Z


00
MM to >0 to

ix u z
za ti LU .0
MA
r-4 0 v to to t- t-ft V-4 cf3 C4 J ft
x 0
us 10 00 W-5 Q.
uo 0 e4 eq C,4 A A CR R a -.4 V-4 vmq IP-04 vW4 w*q to
ma 9


4A a
tu 1 .0 CS 42
CL
z
03
m 0
mc* Cq Cq
08 v rC-4


P4
44 .6a
S
ce
u 4,J
lu M W,
=a 0
zm 0
q. >
40 W0 0
&
4v
4-D W

svi4 cn as v 10 t.. N Moot- m t- e%441
0 r
0-04 t04 2oft 00,010
0




V M N a M St-8 HON1.4 0
Big$





37


TABLE 18

_/
CAPACITY FACTORS FOR THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY BY OWNERSHIP AND BY FUEL TYPE 1960, 1970, 1973, and 1974

Total Fuel Steam Hydro- Nuclear Internal
Types Generation Electric Steam Combustion
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

Total industry: 1960 51.1% 51.9% 51.3% 19.9% 18.2%
1970 51.3 52.1 51.3 38.3 15.9
1973 48.2 48.5 50.2 45.0 14.8
1974p 44.7 43.9 53.9 40.6 13.7

Investor owned: 1960 51.4 51.7 51.7 19.9 4.6
1970 51.4 52.7 42.7 38.2 8.3
1973 47.7 46.7 45.8 44.9 5.9
1974p 43.7 n.a. n.a. 39.4 n.a.

Cooperatively
owned: 1960 40.8 45.5 58.1 -- 24.0
1970 51.9 54.2 43.6 -- 17.0
1973 55.0 57.0 46.7 42.9 19.7
1974p 51.3 n.a. n.a. 65.2 n.a.

Municipal: 1960 36.7 38.5 43.6 -- 22.3
1970 38.9 39.5 51.6 -- 20.0
1973 37.0 38.5 46.0 -- 18.4
1974p 32.8 n.a. n.a. -- n.a.

Federal
projects: 1960 57.4 70.5 50.5 -- 21.4
1970 54.8 56.4 53.8 -- 4.6
1973 56.9 53.2 55.0 -- 7.1
1974p 54.7 n.a. n.a. 62.3 n.a.

Power districts,
State projects : 1960 54.4 48.6 58.0 -- *
1970 56.9 47.3 62.2 37.3 *
1973 54.7 46.1 59.3 44.2 *
1974p 54.6 n.a. n.a. 43.7 n.a.

1/ Capacity factor is defined as: Generation
Capacity X hours in the year

p preliminary
* Less than one percent.
n.a. Not available.

Source: Based on data in EEl, Statistical Year Book, 1974.








38






TABLE 19-Primary energy purchase data during the past 12 months A

(October 1974 through September 1975) for steam electric plants










I OA 4 TTA CAEa



MEASSYACHUSETTS,4. 4,0. 1461., 7400 09.4 104 0.0 924.4 232.0 .5 1
.ETOTALSH 1 45 ,60 504.49. 60,27 101.0 1620.0 54.. 4.4 1.0 113.9 20.:T.1 1

ILLIN ANS 19 4,20.0 S1.444. 14.0 19.111,.4 06.0 ".6 4.4 2.1 1644.2 '10.1 1
vNo"N 20 415.8 120.0 10,20.9 423,11.5 40.5 1.9 4. 4 5 0.0 0 .4 743 0
.........b. 21TA 44436.2 4 1.3, 53,419.9 *02.34.0 1 0 1 45.4 19.1 201.$ 111.1 21

ON.I E 22 94,591.5 12,7560.1 4,545.0 904,650.1 91.2 1o.5 0 991.5, 224.1 112.5 22
NWSYORKI 23 25144.1 25,011.0 11,141.0 254,211 9.0 0o.01 4.7 0q.9 114.3 751.9 25

...... TOTAL 25 2#.6942. 11,16.5,62. t*11.0 1297.0. 91.04 5.4 5.0 102.7 16,1 100.3, 35

EAST NORTH CENTRAL
INDINA 20 61,004 0124S8 1 9.0 1,02.5 1400.0 S2.4 0.7 24.1 5.02 102.1 44.5 20
KNSA 29 539,621 1,26.1 116,19. 9 1.9 2140.0 7.5 11.5 61.2 45.5 0. 14.6 45. 2
0INSOT 20 144,422.95 507S1.1 11,56S0 144,120.79 06.4 5.0 10.5 59.0 206.1 402.1 20
WISCSIN 23 34,530.2 4,91.2 24.15, 515,14.9 91.5 1.9 6.4.4 153.1 1902 5.0 5
.......... TTA 2 394234 4,4.1 31,059.1 49,557.4 49.2 4006.1 44 .6 61.3 114.1 6 0 .5 5
WENORTH CTRAL 5 24200. 23 4,6. 91 01 01 2. 9. 44 3

S OTA 34 15,41:, 1,01.1 1,941o.2 16,140,9 84.2 5.4 10.5 41-.2 222.1 42.1 34


...... TOTAL 34 714204.0 40,330.0 234,590.4 1#041,124.? 13.4 5.9 22.5 56.1 179.9 55.0 34

SOUTH ATLANTIC
DELAWARE 39 25.001.0 40.203.0 444.4 43,149.2 54.1 43.2 0.1 L16.6 213.0 90.0 3
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 40 3,741.5 15,314.9 0.0 19,002.4 19.1 60.3 0.0 111.1 205.4 0.0 40
FLORIDA 41 1259224.2 4090710.8 139,332.2 64121.3 16.6 60.6 20.7 94.1 191,1 61.6 41
GEORGIA 42 33$,523.2 24,542.2 41,400.5 401335.6 65.1 4.4 10.3 95.9 165,5 41.6 42
MARYLAND 43 92176O.4 121,544.4 0.0 214.324.9 43.3 96.1 0.0 11.0 167.7 0.0 43
MNTH CAROLINA 44 499540.? 12.441.1 24 472,029.0 91.4 2.4 0.0 114.15 195.1 136.2 *4
SOUTH CAROLINA 45 104,445.5 26,014.9 2,017.3 1360999.1 11.7 so.5 1.8 124.3 It?.5 49.4 45
vIRGINIA 44 17,222.5 114,233.4 441.2 251923.2 30.1 49.2 0.2 121.0 1651.5 99.4 44
WEST VIRGINIA 41 545,402.0 2,111.5 145.3 540316.7 99.5 0.5 0.0 91.4 227.1 41.4 47
...... TOTAL 49 1,146,124,.9 630,941.9 164,435.4 2.704,120.2 43.5 29.0 4.4 104.6 146.2 4.0 49

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL
ALABAMA 52 432,911.0 26602., 6463.6 442,344.9 91.9 0.4 1.5 92.1 215.5 105.3 12
KENTUCKY 53 513,431.1 44.1 940.4 515044.2 99.1 0.1 0.2 45.1 224.2 60.5 53
MISSISSIPPI 54 35,410,1 43,51.1 24994.9 121,752.3 21.4 52.1 20.5 14.2 111.4 61.1 54
TENNESSe 55 401,519,1 1,253.4 0.0 482,112. 99.1 0.5 0.0 81.9 234.1 6.0 55
...... .TOTAL 51 1,441,211.9 67,095,3 33,742.1 1,591.939. .4 4.3 2.1 76,9 160.4 65.1 S1

w1ST SOUTH CENTRAL
AKANSAS 40 0.0 29,49.4 50,094.9 59,144.5 0.0 49.4 50.4 0.0 162.4 54.0 40
LOUISIANIA 41 0.0 54,502.4 53,629.3 390#331.1 0.0 9.4 190.4 0.0 100.9 56.4 44
OKLAHOMA 42 0.0 3,074.0 30,080.4 306.154.4 0.0 1.0 99.0 0.0 119.10 55.5 42
TEXAS 63 9 9,917.0 31,11,4 1,345,541.3 1,471209.7 4.6 2.2 91.1 21 .9 190.4 49.9 43
...... TOTAL 45 9,911.0 100951.2 2#0309S66.1 29216440.3 4.S 4.5 91.0 21.9 104.5 44.9 6S

NOUNT AIN
AftI OMA 4 165.1 36,466@.6 14#772. 1 13,913.4 16.1 20.1 12.5 11.61 201,7 10.1 A6
COLORADO 49 108,105.4 4,406 49,443.6 14154.0 45.9 4.0 50.1 45.9 191.5 54.0 49
IOAMO 70 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7*
MONTANA 11 14,414.0 0.0 103.6 17,319.6 95.9 0.0 4.1 29.2 0.0 38.1 It
NEVADA 72 91,011.4 6,200.2 29,485.6 134,497.5 72.0 4.1 21.9 32.0 195.9 95.4 12
NEW MEXICO 73 151,049.1 109730,3 6IV404.s 21,9403.9 63.6 5.2 51.0 21.9 213.6 43.1 13
UTAH 14 41,033.0 1,49.2 2,414.0 45,194.2 90.6 3.3 5.9 45.6 194.9 54.,714
WYOMING 75 114,959.0 44.1 2.5 111,024.1 99.9 0.1 0.0 25.2 235.3 110.8 35
...... TOTAL TV 561,524,5 "45,40.7 1462,104.4 611,491.1 12.0 6.0 19.9 29.4 202.4 47.4 7?

PAC IFIC
CAL IFORNIA D0 0.0 494.455,1 2 991.9 192430.9 0.0 42.4 57.4 0.0 241.2 69.1 60
O4E44" $1 0.0 673.1 164.5 1,040.2 0.0 52,4 41.4 0.0 214.5 106.4 61
WASHINGTON 62 46,0.0 0.0 0.0 48000 100.0 0.0 0.0 51.4 0.0 0.0 02
...... .TOTAL 64 66.040.0 491,324.6 294,144.4 042*131.2 1.9 57.1 34.4 51.4 241.2 69.2 84

UNITED STATES TOTAL "4 6,16,954.6 3,014,545.9 3,011,594.2 14,191,092.9 56.9 20.4 20.7 82.5 202.2 68.1 6

SOURCE: FC NEWS,.January 26, 1976, No.22092.







39




0 W 00
a R 12 to,
00 W W 00 wwwa 00 . -% 00 9-4
ci 6 c*

"t-mm" ."0 F to


la-3 00 l t U0 t- m wom=uo 0 1- C 06 00 to






C9
u ko NN-wao Ag2mt, m w g
lu W "cr 0 &0 to N &ON -W"ov t-mcc
mi 4, R 0000000 -.4 t M 4 t- to r".4 W t -4 ..4 W M"t gR
.;Cm
su 20vwm cl-sst- f
Vtvm WNCC C U* V M M N N





t.- Uj Lo "Utictom of .V-4"w
um ca CJ 0 V-4 M t- co Lo to 00 0 "4 804mr-co 04 to 0 t- m
z 0- OH -Cmmr V-4 = V-4 00 Lo 0 00 Lo Lo U "It go t- =MIWOOIV
o U.
in 00 co 0 co N -.0 R m tw m 9 to to 00 N M 82?!c"
g3. t 0 to ".4 t- co U13
0 sco M m N N 44 N N N R
co cr, .4
IWO
Z
C,4 us
Z

z ocm 4 to Lm 0 N 0) co M qr N
M U'D t- W @ N t V-4
0 Nt-CM =COMM V-4 V 0 V-4 N WV-4M N -4 00 04 CIN
4A aow" V-4 t N 0 0 N ko ko "WNW= mum"om
Im L-OMMN 0 0 t
ot MMMNN NNN-V-4 9-4 V" V-4 V-4 V" 9.4'.4 V.;q
ul ui 0
0



U.
W) N r- 00 vtNnO a w 00 co omoom.-q p to 00 00 to c"RA s N w q* to 62 WAS=,-q r -w M v
'cl cc t- t M to t- NNNNO IV
LU ou N [- M 9%
PAM m US m m m U.5 0 v "O=Ww W Nt t N 0 00 C W co 0
LAW
C3


79 0 cd
9 r. M to to 00 -4 0 Lo t,- 28 lt N 00 m cb 0 LI) f- 00 4-1
L16 0 lw c. cli 1,- 00 V. N M m N COD N N p t- U4 00 m t- co : 3
ca W Ft 0 = oo co I- V" t- V4 M 04 "4 W mr t- t- N Nmooot- C)
SL o :3 r.
04-2 44 00 t- Q 0 t- 10 P-4 M, N 0 00 to 0 uo? 4 00 10 t- r. F-i
o .4 S" 04 00 U',D N 04 = r- CD N = 00 t- to 10 C V-4 0
0 mmmm co N N N N N N V-4 "K "4 r" V-4 V-4 P-4 V-4
.4 93 4)
cc i;.a
z 4a
0





M ot- to M N asoota 124
z wwwso SMAOLM
=== 0 0=0 0
0 V"
u








41









ELECTRICITY SALES, CUSTOMERS AND
REVENUES







































68-353 0 76 4










43





FIGURE 2



ENERGY SALES











Billions of Kilowatt-Hours
700


1600


1500



1 400
TOTAL SALES TO ULTIMATE CUSTOMERS 130


1 20


1100
ENERGY SALES
Total Electric Utility Industry
(Including Alaska and Hawaii Since 1960) 1000
By Major Classes 1926-1974


900

NOTE: "Small light and power" refers to those customers which demand less than 1000 kw, or eo
which otherwise are defined by the utility as commercial customers.
"Large light and power" refers to those customers which demand 1000 kw or more, or which are otherwise defined as industrial Wo
customers.





400


300



200


ALL mnxl100




leas 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 105 1950 1965 1970 1975


SOURCE: EEI, Statistical Year Book, 1974.





44


TABLE 21

HIS TORICAL GROWTH: PEAK LOAD AND TOTAL ELECTRIC DEMAND


Non-Coincident Suimmer Delivered -- Total Electric
Peak Load Utility Industry
Load Thousand Percent Percent
Year Factor Megawatts Increase Billion kWh Increase

1960 65.5 132.8 5.99 683.2 9.02
1961 64.8 141.0 6.17 720.7 5.49
1962 64.9 149.1 5.71 776.1 7.69
1963 65.2 159.5 6.98 830.8 7.05
1964 64.2 175.0 9.75 890.4 7.17
1965 65.0 186.3 6.46 953.4 7.08
1966 64.7 203.4 9.51,039.0 8.98
1967 65.3 213.5 4.97 1,107.0 6.54
1968 63.5 238.0 11.50 1,202.3 8.61
1969 64.1 257.7 8.26 1,307.2 8.72
1970 63.9 274.7 6.60 1,391.4 6.44
1971 63.2 292.1 6.35 19466.4 5.39
1972 62.5 319.2 9.26 1,577.7 7.59
1973 62.0 343.9 7.75 19703.2 7
1974 61.2 349.3 1.56 1,700.8 (
1975 61.OE 356.2 2.00 1,734.OE 2.OOE

E =estimated

Compounded growth rate
for the period: 7.6 7.2
Compounded growth rate,
1970-1974:- 6.7 5.7

Source: Edison Electric Institute



TABLE 22

PERCENT INCREASE (DECREASE) IN DEMAND FOR ELECTRICITY BY CONSLUMING SECTOR

1964-69 1970 1971 1972 1'973 1974 1975
Residential 9.3 9.8 7.0 6.8 8.4 0.1 6.2
Small Light & Power 9.3 9.1 6.7 8.4 9.7 (1.1) 7.0
Large Light & Power 6.4 2.8 3.5 7.9 7.5 0.3 (4.7)

Total Consumption 8.0 6.4 5.4 7.6 8.0 (0.1) 2.0


Source: Edison Electric Institute (derived)


FEA,Nlational Energy Outlook, 1976.







45






v v. :v 00 ccw Or- Lcw=- rm to 101il
r M Lo cc w r- 0:1 C4 0

rn
W
to
Cl
to oc vt C'T cl m
o.. rq 4 Lo L6 Xm lo v3 cc r- t- --4 0
It -14 ,tll "tJ4 14 -q:r qJ4 -14 -r -t
0

CD N,= N -14 C M C14 -4
w C4 N cq I- ko In -tq
C) 00 00 00 "-.4 r c:t CZ .o COD -il F o N

cl 00 z ul 1"4
C'i


C)
m :,t m N N Ct N w C'I C) z
:7. C'. r- vc t- = = 4 00 -n --v Lo Zo Cq tC9 m oc 1 C,-, 00 C'I t- N t--Cl t- --400 rn
C! hD bb
CC .- m :,I C 1= IM C w w t- t- Lo
cs


in L11: t- N -il cll l t-- UID CZ "I r- w
a) -m 1, liD 05 --4 cit -.1
ju 00 0 -,D C .t t- co
0
0, 1 C- -.I t- 00 C--y Lo C^- c- 00 1, -V C'I u oo or- C,'., 00 tD C^. C 00 -r
> k V., lf UD nm --tv -V -,I, m m m m cs
mi us
on..* IA cs
Z w N tD ln tz 0
&L 0 LM Ln 00 Ll C CeD .Z C) 1 0
e. r- c. 00 t- t- I= t-" -I:r 00 U-.) Lt 00 00
X CII N C,4 m Cn vr qd4
u 60, iz 1- 00
An
UA 4 cq L3
N 4A Z 0
u Ln u
4 gn
us LAJ J Lo' C x N Le 0 C) N '"1" -4 C) to 0
ma MJ U I-- ^.I C Cl t-- --4 C'. -.4 N 00
i ca LM Lo Lo C) 0 crw, .!r 0
0 cli cl tD
U) Lt C CZ M C) 00 CO -tl C-1 a) 00
N N N C14 C4 >1
-6'A
ril T-T 'Rt C X m N 41,q 00 00 M 0
4A

t- cq
w COD c Ct to 0 m 0
LU rn 8 m Lo (:. F- cq 00 N
>- 1- &6 Ic, cl l cq 0 C 00 00 r t- C.0
LU 0
0
ca 0
rn co
cq C, C to C) CD. vo ..4 t- 00 CD 1-1
0 :e 00 00 Lo r- cn U5 cc cz --q 00 00
C: 0) 00 Ic t- L* C11 00 cli m ZB C4 C5 to c) rZ r,
N Cl N C -V C^ Vt 'kr M CfD qd4 r-4 "-4 v-4

LLI co
z tc ut wwczmw m C CZ> M Lo I- (M *r4
UA Lo ) IZZ C 0 r- lf:t 00 C'I
I- Cl. L0 = tc m -14 T-4 C.ID I- t- = to
0
= LO --4 tn --4 eq r- 1114 C14 t- M Voc ZZ "-4 0 V--4 -'r to (=. m i, N x N C3 >
k- Ln
V4 M Cll C14 "-4 0 C 00 Po t- t- cz to W co








ca
ct
e Ei
W


dq Ct Cq T;.o 0 C. 00 t- to U" qrt m CII V- I- I- t- t- CZ cz
r-4 "-4 v-4 "-4 v-4 P-4 P" P-w P-4 "-4 "-4






46








N "-4 Cq V-4 ".4 eq V-4 P-4 W4










z m m v qr '04 um U.), to to t'. t- t0. C; 0* C* 0, C; C; 0* C* C* 0, 0* 0* 0, 0to

L U- U')
.
N N tIq N N N C4 Cq N cq C4 Cq N m
ui > ..j W.
LU LU

Ll.
0


C14 F- UA
C O C! O Ci Ci U (71
0 C> C> 0 CII M Mt4 to cc I= 00 00 0 C
r '4t '%4, V ld4'V NP
Cd

CD


LA.
0

uj M;--) 00 lll C 1-4 m t- C-1 cc C> tl ; 00,11,
>. "I o
z E
LLA c M cl' M Cl I C14 -4 0 C) 00 00 to t14
U

uj >4
CL

z
bF V4
Ln ui

N Cq co
bo 41
rn


Cie H
ui z ui

E3
.
V co: N -4 C 00 t- co LO -JO ^M C14 -4 o m
C, r.. I- r- r- t-,"> to V)
c" c) cs =C C C) M==(== C) r_







47




TABLE 25

ENERGY SALES-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY
BY STATES AND CLASSES OF SERVICE
YEAR 1974-AILOWATT-OURS IN MILLIONS

Total to Commercial and Industrial Street and Other Railroads InterUltimate Small Light Large Light Highway Public and departCustomers :Residential and Power and Power Lighting Authorities Railways mental
Total United States.. 1 700 769 554 960 392 716 689 435 13 313 40 721 4 258 5 366
Maine ........... 6 232 2 405 1 287 2,317 60 163
New Hlampshire.i.. 4 860 2 112 813 1 867 36 32
Vermont.... ....... 3 095 1 486 553 884 19 140 13
Massachusetts ....... 29 356 10 974 9 420 8 176 315 261 26 184
Rhode Island ....... 4 551 1 642. 1 359 1 421 59 70
Connecticut ......... 18 800 7 475 5 472 5 611 217 19 6
New England .. .66 89.1 26 094 18 90/ 20 276 706 685 26 203
New York .......... 95 814 27 899 29 033 29 725 1 224 5 409 2 487 37
New Jersey ........ 43 995 14 248 12 904 16 391 398 16 6 32
Pennsylvania ....... .89621 26 673 16 338 44 786 517 3k7 916 74
Middle Atlantic.... 2-9 4.30 88 820 58 275 90 902 2 139 5 7-02 3 409 1,3
Ohio ............... 105 703 26 717 i8 178 57 559 654 2 517 39 39
Indiana ............ 46 823 14 61 7 972 23 64.2 329 157 17 45
Illinois ............. .2 485 24 055 20 567 32 289 747 4 490 320 17
Michigan........... ( 63 CG9 20 218 12 648 '29 036 58-1 1 115 68
Wisconsin .......... -.30 288 l1 298 6 867 11 Z27- 458 369 69
EastNorth Central. 328 968 96 949 66 i32 153 753 2 772 8 64,8 376 238
Minnesota .......... 25 276 9-396 4 150 10 969 219 489 53
Iowa .............. 19 076 7 635 4 208 6 716 212 276 29
Missouri............. 3) 8:37 11 706 6 917 11 242 297 630 12 33
North Dakota ....... 3 365 1 661 1 033 490 44 132 5
South Dakota... -. 3 488 1 8-17 965 451 38 176 1
Nebraska ........... 10 654 4 255 3 542 2 296 125 384 7 45
Kansas............. 16 974 5 839 5 165 5 581 157 180. 52
West North Central 109 670 42 3.9 25 980 37 745 1 092 2 267 19 228
Delaware ..... ..... 5.154) 1 412 1 122 2 870 30 7 9
Maryland and D.C... 32 537 10 020 9 900 12 041 299 22 203 52
Virginia ............ 37 025 14 559 9 544 9 007 193 3 667 55
West Virginia ....... 17 216 4 542 2 643 9 9.50 54 26 1
North Carolina ...... 49 746 18 250 10 444 19 676 216 972 188
South Carolina ...... 29 128 9 073 5 305 14 010 84 646 10
Georgia ............ 40 55-4 15 471 10 625 14 093 248 104 13
Florida ............. 67 434 33 329 18 918 13 370 481 1 281 55
South Atlantic ..... 279 090 106 656 68 501 95017 1 605 6 725 ;03 38.3
Kentucky ........... 43 526 9 433 7 540 25 192 182 1 148 31
Tennessee ........... 64 917 21 693 3 618 :38 945 610 16 35
Alabama ............ 42 273 13 121 5 747 23 044 227 27 107
Mississippi ........... 18 530 7 363 4 034 6 698 151 278 6
East South Central. 169 2,46 51 610 20 939 93 879 1 170 1 469 179
Arkansas ........... 16 630 5 725 3 389 7 063 89 339 16 9
Louisiana ........... 38 583 11 649 6 845 17 360 244 983 1 502.
Oklahoma.......... 21 454 8 016 5 729 6 463 133 1 101 12
Texas.............. 124 068 37 849 .30 108 52 448 737 2 779 147
West South Central 200 735 63 239 46 071 83 334j 1 203 5 202 16 1 670
Montana........... 9 540 .1 877 1 488 5 93 57 113 23 19
Idaho ............. 12 431) 3 393 3 218 5 556 39 210 15
Wyoming ............ 4 145 785 1 443 1 835 18 54 10
Colorado ........... 14 637 4 749 5 864 3 109 129 712 74
New Mexico ........ 6 372 1 795 2 552 1' 547 49 398 31
Arizona ............ 19 732 6 651 6 300 5 788 113 141 2-3)
Utah ............... 7 122 2-420 2 0.54 2 187 56 397 8
Nevada............ 7 691 2 794 2 524 2 108 59 133 73
Mountain.......... 81 670 24 46j4 25 443 28 09,3 520 2 658 23 469
Washington ......... 57 612 19 417 9 256 27 243 298 93-4 1I 453
Oregon ............. 31 592 11 565 6 760 12 959 174 104 30
California ........... 139 039 41 408 44 739 43 646 1. 549 6 157 17.1 1 366
Pacii. ......... 228 243 72 390- 80 755 83 8148 2 021 7 195 185 1 849
Alaska ............. 1 713 765 6-14 153 16 130 1 4
Hawaii ............. 5 110 1 634 972 2 435 69
Alaska& Hawaii.. 6 823 2 399 1 616 2 588 85 130 1 4



SOURCE: EEl, Statistical Year Book, 1974.







48





c U") N r, m C4 0
rr C- N 00 C") C -T Cl) cr LO N




cs
E a tz 0 00 t, --r L-) tt to C. t- 00 -r co a)
ct (14 -1 t CD tz 00 C
C. C3



0 eq c f-:
C M C f- U-_ t,_ C> M -'!- OC k- L.-j co.
c c) Cq 00 f, Lo co:
Z- CK C*: t- U Cj Lt t:-, co -4 C Lr f- Lo Lf
M

4A

>-. to
z C: Cl cl
awmw e Cl OC v k6 t-. C, tz V: C U' qtv e
uj r- I- CII -,:q = CII) C11 I- L: fl- L.
V :: -, = C. rl 00 ^=D ltr tooo
('4 OC Ct ZD ^1 = c- cq uj C^ t 00
1 .

uj
m
'-N r- oc C -l 00 lt 00 C'I C cl ^.,I
u m OC ;-." c') ci cr C"L C 00 00 Oo
6. C5 6 6 tz M
7 C, I or-, -1" tz C. 00 a) m
C; --4 L6. -r Q

cs
ILU &.
C%4 j CLO LIS
W LU cl
kn
&. I- t- N. C
uj mj .- S. r -4 = C.-> to tD r- U-) 1= 4 on C4 0
Q; C) r- C'4 CD U- -n
c) oc t- tz 25 c. c-. 0 c, -:r.
oo oc C-^0 c 'n Nt
lr tD ill cq C m C
e- cd -4 r- c = tz 0 r, m --i v. w -r ei
r_ "d, :,-- N oc t- t- U-D IrS Fi Cq c. 00 1, -,r
1 00 x 00 00 v- t, t, t- tD to Cc) tz
Jul ci
CA 0


ui cs 0
d N c:> 't m an m vj N 0 tm w 0
IE 0 => tz C5 00 !6 U-) r- r- w
0
r-- C40 Cl-I vt C;D tD f- COI-% c, C to. -M 0 c, N C) t-,- tc vr o
ezr 6 W o tz to -tr -zr ca
D ce. t- V: 00 0: -It n
t- tp L >4
u t') tz tz C-0 Lo in. L-) U5 Lo in La U5 CIS
UA i
LAj >go V4
W 0. Cj C N m lf-D SO C5 c-,> 41
now* cs M 7.4 CNI C) ct u-) F- U- im -W t0 L' tD -t or4
z e: 00 C l tD C) LO -,If* U"i tl-l m CD
'N 'ir C'. v- -4 ci U5 -( w m cs Cd
0 Qc t= -!4 C,3 C oo tD U- -V C,3 cc too I- t- r- V-
i- cz tB to fB cr S z C--5 ZZ U5
0
1-4


-641


.
cl w

a) 0, 0
v :17 ON C 00 r- to u) mtr N --4 C: cn
i- t5 C3 to to cc to ic Zo c) Cz Lo
C C C: = C (7 C>mc mm = M 0
V-4 "" ".4 V-4 -.4 V-4 ".4 ".4 V-4 V-4 V-4 V-4 V" .6-2







49





TABLE 27

ULTIMATE CUSTOMERS--TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY

BY STATES AND CLASSES OF SERVICE AT DECEMBER 31, 1974

Total Cormereini and Indastrial Street and Other Railroads InterUltimate Small Light Large Light Highway Public and departCustomers Residential and Power and lower Lighting Authorities Railways mental
Total United States.. so 102 390 70 949 607 8 472 817 422 736 112 477 139-480 29 5 244
Maine.............. 462 810 4(05 -4I 52 .168 I 21-8 3 1943 185 2
New THampshire..... 3(i -1(17 311 219 4i4 274) 1 356 I 017 -15
Vermont............ I 2I4 .143 185 213 241 915 828 31 4 2 133 -- 10
Massachusetts....... 2 ViM 830 1 857 707 197 295 93 213 I 525 2 9IR' I I741
Rhode Island....:.. 3.16 3s65 309 514 34 23G 2 109 4192 :1 -- I
Connecticut......... 1 143 720 1 031 575 10:3 777 5 409 2 718 215 26
New England ...... 4 87 575 4 10X 702 .4 .91 2y) 1.93 9 559 6 )44 i I 1
New York...........6i 1I (317 5 582 091 ti3 732 43 197 61 104 15 932 7 :1-3
New Jersey......... 2 (69 207 2 357 908 292 829 12 3.44 6; 033 91 1 3
Pennsylvania........ 4 337 05) 3 870 631 426 682 30 302 6( 004 3 422 4 14
Middle Atlantic.... 13 317 .1.; 11 810 610 1 38.? 243f 85 843 Is 1:.0 i.9 457 11 rt
Ohio............... 3 984 -1693 3 590 920 357 176 20 1)83 5 322 9 1H2 2 74
Indiana............ 1 9135 8443 1 782 588 134 K;8 I5 538 1 889 955 I 33
Illinois............. 4 134 142 3 7.16 105 mil (-4.-1 6 721 2 577 9 6(68 2 22
Michigan............ 3 396 795 3 091 194 291 121 II 6!9. 1 807 1 -:13 41
Wisconsin .......... 1 754 272 1 57( 434 175 970 3 276 3 250 1 227 I35
East North Central. 15 2j /18 13 781 J.3 I 387 !49 48 220 14 845 2? 47.1 6 3n3
Minnesota......... 1 456 80)I 1 309.315 134 9il 1 5 588 3 2(47 3 318 --- 72
Iowa............... 1 147 1!2 1 ("11 115 137 628 1 -412 929 4 066 I 41
Missouri............ 13 41 387 1 (147 81 200 288 8 226; 1 08-1 3 8035 I IR2
North Dakota....... 210 076 205 201 32 833 118; 5315 513 8
South Dakota. ........ 210 875 228 A 96 3.1 676 (;4r2 30-I 389 Is
Nebraska........... Q.23 214 526 36(3 819 274 I 363 -.475 3 76 1 1 Of
Kansas............. 931 (31) 81: .41 112 00(2 6 587 I 029 972 45
West North Central V 575 6 5 f82 /61*2 74/1 665 26 764 7 (4.1 17 00)4 3 4-6
Delaware........... 212 128 iV -157 243 753 71-1 1-32 58 4
Maryland and D.C., I 511 275 355 736 151.512 3 192 7-10 85 2 8
Virginia............ I 737 707 1 533 43744 156; 703 3 325 1 175 13 421 10
West Virginia ....... 276 628 482 73 -132 f6 4I4 M4 413 I
North Carolina...... 2 119 04 I 8413 388 253 r25 104 758 41 363 2 231 373
South Carolina...... 1 051 41.3 923 749 124 181 3 12 1 850 1 491 29
Georgia............ 1 852 923 1 G50 671 134 1334 .5 077 1 3917 832 32
Florida.............. 1 55-3 158 3 174 (61 35i 8693 22 377 3 082 2 5419 67
South Atlantic..... 12 71.9 457 11 305 917 1 313 28.9 54 .98 1. 49.! 2 141 2 430
Kentucky........ 1 273 511 I 1343 668 126 998 7 086; 2 956 5 810 23
Tennessee........... I (7 134 49:1:3 335 159 713 I (0131 1 731 60 20
Alahama........... I 438 770 1 247 817 163 282 6 518 178 152 23
Mississippi.......... 877 1168 767 481 101 903 6 033 7:39 1 795 11
East South Central. 5 2rI 227 4 f5.9 29t 551 902 35 728 6 407 7 817 77
Arkansas........... 84-1 225 7-40 -10 81 389 11 1- 419 2 273 3 9
Louisiana........... I :8; !314 1 231 514 134 362 13 446 I :339 22t 41
Oklahoma.......... 1 14 (154 1 007 410 1214 1113 11 075 I 120 5 140 24
Texas............... 4 365 618 3 75t; 738 5.1i 371 42 272 2 306; 17 941 190
West South Central 7 74; 428 6 7:6 102 896 t41 76 407 5 2,0' 3m 343 1 2(4
Montana............ 3135 153 2(1 587 41 5 13 2 54(1 881 144 279
Idaho................ 327 870 282 527 43 235 1 719 339 38 12
Wyoming.... .......I.Il -438 133 184 25 33 2 4338 123 6li 14
Colorado........... I 425 050 894 818 118 687 9 -I1 .10 4 529 107
New Mexico.. 3117 1387 33413 5t 61 :1 237 87 787 716
Arizona............ ) 373 7t 333 89 -383 :134 1 137 3 (38-I 140
Utah............... 391 977 351 521; 31 4 24, 5 %to I 0I 1 231 17
Nevada............ 23 26i4i 201 8619 31, 313 10 146 51 2
Mountain......... 3 646 .94 3 15 535 442 804 28 .94 4 450 4 61 1 647
Washington......... I 413i 487 I 274 741 151) 770 -1 1-12 3 4193 31 321 1 21
Oregon............. .13 237 821 4!12 115 155 1 3693 I 038 1 178 105
California........... 8 251 259 7 205 428 984 6413 28 R2:1 2(; 367 4 334 3 1 GUI
Pacific ............ .t 6310 98. 9 304 6t1 1'250 4.38 34 34 30 896 8 8.1.3 4 1 817
Alaska...........- 96 564 83 8135 32 1761 1-48 53 367 1 14
Hawaii............... 255 21-1 210 (374 33 :41 I 168 1 623
Alaska & Hawaii.. 361 778 :102 87,9 A 5 5 I1f 1 6176 36 1 14


SOURCE: EEI, Statistical Year Book, 1974.






50




TABLE 28

AVERAGE NUMBER OF CUSTOMERS-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY

BY STATES AND CERTAIN CLASSES OF SERVICE-YEAR 1974

Total Commercial
Ulti mate (Small Light
Custoners Residential ajid Power)
Total United States .............. 79 295 937 70 185 133 8 435 244
Maine............... .........4166 853 408 7619 5: 193
New llampshire .................... 351 820 308 881 _10 040
Vermont. ........ ............... 208 728 183 823 21 630
Anass:ichnsetts..... ............ 2 074 617 1 8112 112 197 (068
thode Island ..... I ................ 34 5 3 8 .18 :4 321
Connecticut ................. 1 136 )03 1 021 985 103 567
New England .................... 4 .584 506 1 o) im 450 419
New York ......................... (1; 2 5 410 5 566 0 (0 1 6(14 462
New Jersey........................ 2 662 36 1 2 350 461l 293 19)
Vennsylv nia............. ...... .- 309 2:1(6 3 8-13 162 .1261 398
Middle Atlantic ................... 13 26;" 010 I I;9 ,I I 38 (.50
Ohio ............................... 3 1153 3 15 562 010 356 230
Incliand ........................... 1 976 (122 I 76-1 138 192 819
Illinois ............................. 4 11)7 061 :1 721 178 368 124
Michigan .......................... : 3(14 757 3 062 127 287 728
Wisconsin ............. ............. i 736 197 1 553 25.1 171 592
East North Central .......... 5 (37 3.52 Id 662 207 1 37( 4.93
Minnesota: ......................... 1 439 88- 1 293:, 675 133 890
Iowa........ .... : ......... ......... I 1:37 53-1 991 7310 1:17 390
NIissouri ........................... I 8961 106 t 182 945 199 921
North Dakota..................... 237 1(12 202 488 32 675
South Dakota ....................... 212 588 221 438 34 873
Nebraska ........................... 612 82) 518 971 88 :171
Kansas ............................. 925 315 805 99.1 110 831
West North Central ................. 6 i 358 5 722 2.;6 737 951
Delaware ............................. 211 183 189 ,1941 20 78.1
Maryland and D.C................. I 494 307 1 :140 1261 151 111
Virginia .................... ...... . i 4181) 9!:1 1 5(18 "; 1-1 155 095
,West Virginia...... 198 275 619 820 70 984
Norti Carolina...... 2 1193 928 i 826 19 251 869)
South Carolina ...................... 1 1)41 406 910 494 124 474
'Georgia ............................. 1 825 211) 1 (;21 11 I 193 7-13
Florida... ......................... .3 460 19)9 3 086 477. :148 221
South Atlantic .................... 12 505 411 /1 1"05 5.12 1 314 366
Kentucky........................... 1 255 939 1 114 807 125 515
Tennessee .......................... I 1646 8(18 1 .171) 26(6 158 865
Alabama ........................... ..1 27 42. 1 256 853 1113 002
MIississippi ..................... .......... 865 711 756 027 1(1 306
East South Central.......... .5 195 9)42 4 597 953 .548 718
Arkansas........................... 833 575 721) 528 89 2613
Louisiana .......................... ... 1 373 4911 1 2111 152 13:3 221
Oklahoma ........................... 1 1:15 521 914 839 125 158
Texas ............................. 4 318 5(17 3 71:1 020 5.43 315
West South Central ............... 7 '(1 159 6 656 539 890 957
Montana ........................... 301 1.t 256 586 40 913
Idaho ............................. 32.1 5163 275 982 45 6156
Wyoming ............................ 151 155 12) 873 25 050
Colorado ........................... 1 001) 788 871 905 117 427
New Mexico ....................... 392 278 331 52.1 51 612
Arizona ........................... 777 8:39 683 802 87 451)
U7tah ............................... 388 108 315 17(i 35 497
Nevada ........................... 229 612 198 177 31 172
Mountain ........................ 3 .572 167 :1 093 0215 439 786
Washington......................... 1 4241 605 1. 262 824 151) 80.
Oregon ............................. 931 9142 811 824 1161 524
California .......................... 8 158 3:11 7 118 212 980 199
Pacific ....................... 10 514 87? 9- 192 860 1 247 527
Alaska ............................ 4.1 480' 82 051 II 8.18
Hawaii........................... '251 175 215 8:15 33 121)
Alaska & Hawaii ................. 3...3 15 "297 886 44 977

SOURCE: EEI, StSatistical Year Book, 1974.















FIGURE 3




REVENUES



Billions of Dollars 40 39 38 37 36 35

34

-33 32 31 30 429

-- 28

27 26

________________ -25


REVENUES -24.

Total Electtnc Utdity lrrdistry -- 23,
(Includirig Alaskazind Hawaii Since 1960) By Clastes of Service 1926-1974 22
___________________________________TOTAL..
21

--20

19 18 17 16




14

13

t 2




10

9












4 .3

-2





1926 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1060 1985 1970 1975





SOURCE: EEI, Statistical Year Book, 1974.







52




C,4 r-'-D 0 -'1- w m, N w toi w 'tt, -4 a
w f.- C F5 x t:) m w V) z C% C m eq N 0
Cl 00 x C r, to w
-*-J
M U* r- tD
fie

e4 tv C N m 'n
40

tZ to r-1) U')
0

f- C'I C.)
tc ZZ: I- 1 0 C, 00
N M C> w .11: 0 w :01) wm
00 N N
00 Z, in I
V u- -VMMM CI4 1:14 :1 C4 N


:,T CZ C4,414 C j V. W V) m tz t- 00 t:" C4 Ir"
00 U* LP t) rz t.tr- (n CO
Ct L : N C) 00 t -.t N 0 C 00
--r 'tr M ^D M N C, I C, 3 '.*,1 N


p CII f- tz
-r tz> N 15
C, to xf Lt V M 00
N t- 0 t- M 0 t-- 00 to
cr u cs 1, 00
CD ce
m C N 'to -V "Wr M
cid CS =
04 i r, 1 00 t- 6 m 00 -n -n cp vt 5 P1%
uj o C, 00 t- U1) 11 m Ln D
cs
0 OC tc CZ ut),11 I r cl': M cm M.0:1 1:
LL 0
0

4A 0 cr N 0 N:r C COD tz P,-j U-j CD cq*
o OC U 1, C11 I-= .4 00 LM W Ln
UJ a-c= W
cq 4A
-I- ",t-- C, C4 00 Cq t-,) N S
0 t-4 0.
uj 0 CL)
U 00 t- Lt L-j -V m m m cq .q
LU
z
W Z
m C, cpo 00 cz -t C t- I>
t--,m cq m = U': C 0
00 1- 00 U-j t- 0 t- tz) L01) z 0
0
U) CII N M m 00 c. C4 r, U-j U-) 0
0 =t C4 00 :11 0 00 co N N u. -4 ul:
L- t- -,t tr) 00 V-4 t-- M C) t- -W 00 kn
1. 00 t- r- to tz tz U,: Lo U.) L. 141

0 4)
Lu 10 C.: C) N C = C> CD Cj W tD -r m to N
0 2 I- LO -r tI- N M t- Lo: 0 -,r 0 Lt,:k LO
M w
z 0 S o C11 1-4 Uj UID m cq cz 40 00 t- -V C tf) eq cs
o CII N t- cq LO a) Cl. C4 cc
uj U) cq to 0
> CI U") m
uj C4 C-4
ce 6e

X 0 cs 0 0. S,
4-a -!= t) en :.I c^ tD Lo "tr C 0 IN V3 LO LO Ln
",:' - 00 C-) tD N 1 00 0 kt' 00 t- -r 00 t4 4J
r Q 00 IRr LO (D C)
,.. 'c 0 -r C5 CC Cal
0 cs 4) >
&. *-4 'o L- t.,) U) M M 0 CM w t- t04 6e (2)

0
9:6 11
00 -.4 CIA LOJ V* 00 ul C) 00 00 00 C 00 J Q 00 00 00 C4 00 N CD m m c,. r- 00 00 t- 1- 0
oo C4 tD 00 C11 m N LO m Lf C4 C!
Z P i 7) C3
0- m 00 r- U-j C.= -V uIj to C) N vj 00 P11) r- cIt W
> es en -r, C-4 m 1- 00 ^.1 C) CD 0 -5 r- C4 w c I- o N U") to o
tn =. p
(L)
0 vt N Cq N C4 7
C$

. . . 004
rn eq 0 C 00 t- QD UM I'd$ m eq ".4 <= m =
r- r- = to TO = (Z = C11> = o U,:l
=,m C) 5 ai. mmm== c.)







53









101-OOX 00 Ct C, 00 00 00 00 00 0000











Ct "m -r L
cl
Z








C>
u Lu o
U 0
C'j -,4 cq C j C4
Cie

Cie
L&j LU
AA
LU
LL
.0
4A
us tx
cn 00 cq :1 L ;z c!
I,- -"?,( -r e: 0000
ko Lr V* 11* C*4 N C-4 N. C'4 N C4 N ICN ckl CA C14
LLA
-1 U
C3 ami cl

ca OIA


U. _U
0
uj Lo 0 1- C4 to 0

o 00 0000 0000000000 00 00 t1 N N t 4 N C1.1 N N C11 C14 cl N CA C4
z >w 04
7 $4
cc :r
es

LU A.

z

t- -r r- fD 00 00 o C,4 t.- >-,
ca
ui N :p
C'I 04
tr

LU
> En
uj cs







Ct OC t- z U") N
C--) "o Lo
C, CS







54




TABLE 31

REVENUES-TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY

BY STATES AND CLASSES OF SERVICE
YEAR 1974-THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS

'otal front Commercial and -ndus ria Street and Othec I ilroads InterUltimate Small Light Large Light Highway Putblic and departCustomers residential and Power and Power Lighting Authorities Railways mental
Total United States.. $39 126 805 $15 702 853 $11 196 960 $10 673 464. $573 164 $780 010 $146 112 $54 242
Maine ....... ..... 10 50 75 107 t.11 512 13 421 I 396 3, 60 11
New llanmlirc ..... 15(; 12 77 211 31 755 .1 038 2 773 I 185
Vermont ............ 89 110 -15 7110 18 2111 19 917 1 235 3 K17 121)
Massachsetts...... .. I 158 411 .176 691 388 (-13 255 558 23 12) 8 9l I 155 4 241
Rhode Island ....... 182 033 74 744 54 556 4f11 61, : 1123 4115 5
Connecticut- 696 1816 312 127 208 354 16 11.) 14 758 593 124
New England ... 2 439 912 1 o51 920 74A- .41 569 76/ 49 9N4 20 577 1 155 4 501
New York .......... 3 751 188 I 301 456 1 410 262 628 83* 71 738 232 862 105 242 796
New Jersey ........ 1 667 181 629 397 5.12 0160 462 088 31 690 568 175 1 197
Pennsylvania ........ "2 474 762. 941 108 1 520 521 942 239 34 165 11 748 23 443 1 538
Middle Atlantic .... 7 893 131 2 871 961 2 472 843 2 033 159 137 5.99 21,5 178 1,8 860 3 531
Ohio ............... 2 19116 253 776 485 503 296 834. 10l 29 258 51 556 941 616
Indiana....... ... 90-1 005 356 366 193 221 337 177 13 263 2 954 430 585
Illinois. ......... 2 (144 729 7811 899 620 123 528 018 20 325 88 723 6-294 347
Michigan ........... 1 586; 3-18 599 613 3711) 628 552 9601 31 417 21 245 1 455
Wisconsin .......... 721 713 308 401 197 629 192 491 15 176 6 807 1 200
East North Central, 7 45-1 48 ;2 821 79, 1 893 897 2 444 747 109 439 171 285, 7 674, 4 212
Minnesota .......... 596 211 261 555 126 429 1911 771) 8 55) 8 291 677
Iowa ........... 460 848 219 739 121 328 105 692 7 754 5 871 3 458
Missouri ............ 734 822 334 19Ito 188 692 190 984 !9 915 !0 286 166 58)
North Dakota ....... 82 343 43 83. 2-1 775 10 701 l 372 I 51) 66
South Dakota-....... 86 752 48 505 27 422 7 885 1 420 1. 338 182
Nebraska ........... 2)2 760 95 674 68 472 30 258 2 881 4 903 76 497
Kansas.' .............. 341 402 .144 373 113 736 74 911) 4 882 2 7311 762
West North Central 2 505 217 1 147 875 670 854, 11 218 36 782. 34 012 2.45 3 231
)elaware ........... 174 758 57 633 41 (664 73 4(16 1 551) 216 289
Maryland and D.C.. 1 0:23 041 351) 139 355 (177 281 227 21 2(18 123 5 21 566
Virginia ........... : 887 676 4141 7491 260 36)( 164 320 7 516 44 1-17 638
West Virginia ...... 346 II 123 686 (17 91)02 151 665 2 293 555 it)
North Carolina ...... 1 021 057 451 580 2311 )-b17 301 833 7 7,31) 16 351 2 546
South Carolina ...... 561) 91)03 2I 5610 125 .473 197 317 3 218 9 121 214
Georgia ............ 878 418 356 146 285 053 226 571) 8 368 2 124 228
Florida ............. 1 827 617 9t47 084 578 263 252 551 111 841 28 539 1 339
South Atlantic. (1 731 61 2 9;5 577 1 952 765 1 648 898 71 72. 101 676" 5 201 5 830
Kentucky ......... 598 812 203 707 1(17 114 262 307 5 1117 11 3613 4(14
Tennessee .......... 826 141 339 -168 71 :330 397 375 18 060(1} 310 398
Alabama ........... 702 780 27- 01;0 '138 657 281 035 7 -101 436 1 191
Mississippi .......... 393 82) 170 120 10V2 800 109 75-1 4 964;3 6 0111) -- 10:2
-----_East South Central. 2 522 362 987"355 419 901 1 050 471 m6 31 26 199 095
Arkansas ........... ...351 252 151) 850 85 902 11) 0111 2 (139 6 414) 345 97
Louisiana ............ 7103 551) 286 735 163 575 216; (63 7 1I6 17 521) 2 II 930
Oklahoma.......... ;1!11 6) 191 ((0:1 115 21:3 72 41!) 2 911:1 14 956 195
Texas .............. 2 2113 248 910 91) 624 661) 606(( 477 17 215 41 988 1 930
West South Central 3 659 74,9 1 539 507 98Y 359 1 105 569 29 933 80 882 347 14 1562
Montana ........... 1(15 137 41 853 31o 435 21 965 1 841 655 121 267
Idaho .............. 1:18 7111 53 157 45 2:1( 38 353 1 275 593 108
Wyoming ........... 64 0il 18 677 24 381) 19 636 (88 527 -- 94
Colorado ........... 321 737 130 734 131 413 44 153 5 49)0 1) 363 554
New Mexico ........ 141 0-12 52 14-1 57 372 22 :141 681 7 004)6 498
Arizona ............. 473 31)4 192 (;11 157 (94 102 031) 4 511 13 171) 3 16-1
Utah ............... 134 193 55 5:1( 41 499 1) 2483 2 2861 3 W-24 165
Nevada ............ 1:37 245 52 506 53 127 28 251) 1 571 1 544 238
Mountain ......... 1 515 385 597 25. 541 189 315 529 19 423 36 782 121 5 088
Washington .......... 4:17 181 2L (152 116 364 9(f 60(0 5 25:1 7 1141 105 312
Oregon .............. 331 041) 168 )85 111)1 15(1 64 177 5 128 857 252
California........... 3 429 5-11; 1 275 025 1 235 154 785 868 68 (P8I 50 733 2 329 10 957
- Pacific ............"/ 205 781 1 659 762 1 452 968 940 545 79 ( (1 59 490 2 434 11 521
Alaska ............. 51 338 23 4(0; 21 019 3 107 721 2 2t 75 81
Hawaii ............. 14..I9 221 51 113 41) 1I1) 51 .157 2 227 .
Alaska & Hawaii.. 200 559 79 849 (1 ]13 5-3 64 2 948 0 929 75 81

SOURCE: EEl, Statistical Year Book, ,1974.






55






Oda set,-.4t;3
-0.0




cl
z 0 N N C m bl M, V-4 1-4 V-4 N w 9-4 00 to N t.
0 v Nc t- "Mmmco Coco
cl -Cic cici"Cil"! Cd V-4 V" V-4 V.4 "4 r-4 P4 V-4 P-4
low "a mom



Z 0 .4.- Z.0
04444
u

us

to
r- gogg" Wswu*g
*z
0 ad I C C
m mmmm No mm mmmmm
0 U-1
C*4
cn J
0
M
0 I-q
MA a
wad 4.0 W) 0 C 00 0000 C m
zi 6 66 C; 6 6666c; 66666 rl
su
1--o 46
on z
Cl
J m u 0
0
0 InCNN V-4c Mmwt-Lo (goom"4
N CD C Wmv" pq
(4 cl N N C") N 04 N N N N N N N N N C C
0 E cd



UA Cd
U
CL 0 fn x N I-. Lo V-4 t-. V-4 U13 I,. V-4 %H
00 m N Nmmv" "U,3u,:lo
4-J
t-i C4 C Cl Ci oi C4 C4 C'i C'i C'i C N oi C14 N C4 Co Uh
M 4-J
z co
ui 4-)
>
LU

UA



ku >
14 00 U'3 114
>4 .4 V04 V-4 V-4 9-4

I







56




Kilowatt-Hours Us
22000

21 000


FIGURE 3-A 20000
19 000
AVERAGE USE AND AVERAGE REVENUE
18000

ULTIMATE CUSTOMER 17 000oo
Total Electric Utility Industry ie oo
(Including Alaska and Hawail Since 1960)
Average Use per Customer and
Average Revenue per Kilowatt-Hour 1926-.1974 5 000

14 000

13000

12 000

i11000 10 000





7O0
v* 7 000 Cents pet Kilowatt-Houir
3 8 000



2 Lc Vf.uJE r p 4 000
004 0%f TS PER KWwR
"Wll 3 0 00

1 2000


_, 1000

e
192 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1l 1970 1975






SOURCE: FEI, Statistical Year Book, 1974.






57






es is f" m 0 ci -4 00

X-rmm M N Ci N C14 NNNNR



U,
3E be a)
4A
0-00 1--POO= N 0
Vk 0 N;?Wa 2
04 M,5 cc LouliuOv" mm
-zs
zi
ku


sow
cm 0 N to V-4 00 0 00 0 06 G 9i C; 06 -4 -406
z z
U 4c 9
ku

U eke
LU k"
> . . . .
LU



164 0=00t-s Ull Id4 2 0; 06 tas p4), LO
cn v-4 P-4 P-4 r-4 V-4 r.-q V-4 r-4 V14

UA ce
.j LU
as
0 w Le tp Rmu,3"W "toom=
v U5 = it) W t- = P" = C = N
o CO
E" -4-4 0 m 00 t, co 10 ""MNN V-4 0 0 m
u N 04 N
at
0
0
ui pq
0 o t4D w
W.0" N I",
to : '- wi QZ C5. Lm to -V co C4 m o 0 co ca
cc W 0 W) Ln F = C-. (D m N r- t- m ho to
U-D >-4
mmmmm N N N
LU
Cd
Z ci

4-j
ui 1- J w 0 m m C-1 00 00
S 0 La 0 Lo R to_ "" No tD m V-4 0
4J
W t- I- c 0 Lo v . MMMMN cd
LU 41


be . . . .
UA
>

>

v .O cq -4 00 t. to to C4 V-4 00 t..
I. I Z F-- 1, tz f.0 z Cl c". = = 0
V4 =oq rA4 P" V.4 P" V-4 V-4 V-4 9-4 P-4





68-353 0 76 5







58




Kilwlt4ours per Customemr a 500

8 000

7 500

FIGURE 3-B 7000

AVERAGE USE AND AVERAGE REVENUE


RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 00
Total Electric Utility Industry
(Including Alaska and Hawaii Since 1960) 5 500
Average Use per Customer and
Average Revenue per Kilowatt-Hour- 1926-1974
5000

4 500

.....4 00@

Cents per Kilowatt-Hour
7


7 3 500




4 -I 2000


2 2 ,00







192 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1935 1970 19 e





SOURCE: EEl, StatisticalYear Book, 1974.






59





TABLE 34
TOTAL ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANGE
BY CUSTOMER CLASS 1965 1974
65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74

RESIDENTIAL (Cents per Kwh)

ALASKA 3.53 3.48 3.37 3,36 3.13 .3.01 3.01 3.33 3.05 3.06
% *.1S *3.1 *0.5 *6,8 -3.7 -0.2 10.8 *8.4 0.3

ALABAMA 1.47 1.43 1,43 1.42 1.44 1.50 1.58 1,67 1.83 2.09
*2.6 0.0 *I.0 1.4 4.3 5.4 5.5 9.9 14.0
ARKANSAS 2.63 2.53 2.47 2.36 2.29 2.21 2,23 2.29 2.25 2.63
% *4,0 -2.2 -4,3 -3.1 -3.4 1.0 2.7 *2.0 17.1
ARIZONA 2.40 2,32 2.32 2.30 2.24 2.27 2.23 238 2.49 2.99
-3.4 0.0 -0,6 *2.7 1.3 *1.6 6.5 4,6 16.4

CALIFORNIA 2.25 2.17 2.14 Z.11 2,07 2.12 2.19 2.34 2.47 3.08
4 *3.6 *1,5 -1.2 *1.7 2.2 3.3 6.8 5.7 24.6

COLORADO 2.68 2.68 2.61 2.58 2.55 2.51 2.51 2.60 2.58 2.75
4 *0.2 -2.5 *1.2 -0.9 -1.7 0.1 3.6 -0.7 6.6

CONNECTICUT 2,65 2.57 2.48 2.43 2.38 2.34 2.52 2,79 3.02 4.04
x *2,9 -3.7 -1.9 -1.8 -1.8 7.7 10.8 8.1 33.9
DELA4ARE 2.58 2.52 2.49 2.45 2.47 2.44 2.62 3.04 3.13 4,08
2 -.6 -1.1 -1.4 0.6 *0.9 7.1 15.9 3.2 30.3
FLORIDA 2.27 2.20 2.16 2.09 2.03 1.98 2,02 .2.12 2.22 2.84
% -3.0 *1.9 -3.5 -2,7 -2.5 2.1 4.8 5.0 27.8
GEORGIA 1,81 1.74 1,72 1,69 1.68 1,68 1.77 1,91 1.98 2.30
2 -3.6 -1.3 -1.7 -0.5 0.0 5.0 8.1 3.S 16.4

HAWAII 2.76 2.73 2.70 2.69 2.66 2.67 2.79 2.84 3.07 3,45
% *1.1 -0.9 -0.7 -1.1 0.4 4.7 1.7 8.1 12,6
IOAA 2.70 2.67 2.59 2.55 2.52 2.51 2.56 2.68 2.71 2.88
% *1.3 -3.0 -1,4 -1.1 -0.4 1,9 4.5 1,2 6.2

IDAD 1.66 1.65 1.63 1.62 1,59 1.56 1.59 1.60 1.57 1.57
% -0.3 *1.7 -0,6 -1.6 -1.9 1.9 0,6 *1.9 -0.3

ILLINOIS 2,73 2.67 2.64 2.59 2,56 2.59 2.68 2.84 2.94 3.25
2 -2.1 -1.2 *1.8 *11 0.9 3.6 6.0 3,6 10.3
INDIANA 2.33 2.28 2.24 2.21 2.17 2.13 2.12 2.28 2.31 2,43
% -2.3 -1.6 -1.5 -2.0 -1.7 -0.2 7.3 1.4 5,2
KANSAS 2.53 2.52 .2.49 2.42 2.37 2.33 2.37 2,37 2.34 2.47
S*0.3' -1.0 -2.9 *2.1 -1.9 1.7 0.1 -1,4 5.9



SOJRCFE-EEISTATISTICAL YEARBOOK,1965*19741CRS ECONOMICS






60




TABLE 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANGE Cont.


RESIDERIAL Cont. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
(Cents per Kwh)
KENTUCKY 2.07 2,05 2.02 1.89 1,95 1.90 1,74 1.76 1.99 2.16
x *181 *1.8 *6.0 2.7 -2.3 *8.6 1.5 13.0 8.4

LOUISIANA 2.37 2.31 2.27 2.21 2.16 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.22 2.46
2 -2.7 *1.5 *2.8 -2.0 *1.3 0.5 1.5 1.8 11.0
MASSACHUSETTS 3.16 3,07 2.98 2.90 2.82 2.79 2.96 3.09 3.21 4.34
% 02.8 *3.0 *2.6 *2.9 *1.0 6.1 4.3 4.0 35.3
MARYLAND 2.51 2.41 2.35 2,28 2.24 2.28 2.49 2.62 2.73 3.58
% *4.0 -2.3 *2.9 *1,9 1.7 9.3 5.0 4.3 31.4
MAINE 3.02 2,99 2.86 2.75 2.71 2.64 2,61 2.73 21.77 3.14
0 -1.0 -4.3 *3.9 *.16 *2.6 .0.9 4.5 1,4 13.3
MICHIGAN 2,41 2.35 2.32 2.27 2.24 2.27 2.32 2.42 2.54 2.97
% *2.2 -1,5 -1.8 -1.4 1.2 2.3 4.2 5.0 16.7
MIN4ESOTA 2.50 2.44 2.39 2.38 2.39 2.37 2.43 2.55 2.55 2.76
% -2.1 *2.4 *0.4 0.4 *0.8 2.7 4.6 0.1 9.2
MISSOURI 2.65 2.60 2.55 2.50 2.49 2.55 2.54 2.61 2.65 2.85
% *1.9 -1.9 -2.1 *0.4 2.5 -0.6 2.8 1.5 7.9
MISSISSIPPI 1.86 1.77 1.76 1.69 1.70 1.64 1.78 1.97 1,89 2.31
% *4.7 *0.9 *3.5 0.4 *3.5 8.6 10.3 *4.1 22.6
MONTA4A 2.11 2.10 2.04 2,00 2.11 2.13 2.12 2.16 2.20 2.23
% -0.7 -2.8 *1.9 5.3 1.2 -0.5 1.7 2.2 1.2
NEBRASKA 2.20 2.14 2.13 2.08 2,03 2.02 2.11 2.24 2.11 2.2S
2 *2,8 *0.7 -2,4 *2.4 -0.6 4.5 6.4 *S.8 6.5
NORTH CAROLINA 1.90 1.87 1,84 1.81 1.78 1.77 1.89 2.04 2,09 2.50
% *1.9 -1.4 -1.8 *1.4 -0.7 7,1 7.5 2.6 19.8
NORTH DAKOTA 2,68 2,61 2,54 2.58 2.56 2.53 2.53 2.60 2.58 2.64
2 *2.4 -2.7 1.4 -0.7 -1,1 *0.3 2.9 *0.7 2.3
NEW HAMPSHIRE 3.08 3.01 2.92 2.83 2.75 2.69 2.61 2.67 2.80 3.66
% *2.4 -3.0 -3.2 -2#7 -2.2 *2.9 2.2 4.8 30.7
NEW JERSEY 2.70 2,64 2.60 2.57 2.53 2,54 2,88 3.06 3.25 4.42
% -2.2 -1.5 -t.5 -1.5 0.6 13.3 '6.4 6.0 36.0
NEW MEXICO 2.69 2.68 2.66 2.65 2,67 2.64 2.64 2.73 2.73 2.90
% -0.6 *0,6 -0.3 0.5 -0.9 -0.2 3.3 0.3 6.3
NEVADA 1,47 1.45 1.46 1.47 1,43 1.45 1.45 1.56 1.56 1.88
2 *1.3 1.1 0.8 -2.8 1.0 0.3 7.4 0.2 20.8



SO'RECF-EETSTATISTICAL YEAROOK,1965-19743CRS ECONOMICS






61




TAB.E 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUE AND PERCENT CHANGE Cont.


65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
RESIDENTIAL Cont. (Cents per Kwh)
NEW YORK 3.0? 2,95 2.98 2.91 2.84 2.87 3.07 3.26 5.S1 4.66
-2.1 1.0 -2.4 -2.3 0.8 7.0 6.3 7.9 32,7
OHIO 2.45 2.40 2.37 2.32 2.27 2.27 2.33 2.38 2.42 2.91
*2.0 -1.1 -2.0 *2.2 -0.1 2.7 2.0 2.0 19.9
OKLAHOMA 2.68 2.61 2159 2.53 2.47 2.41 2.41 2.40 2.32 2.30
e 2.7 *0.9 -2.2 -2.4 *2.5 -0.0 -0.2 -3.4 .2,7
OREGON 1.23 1.21 1.19 1.19 1.18 1.19 1.26 1.28 1.33 1.45
% *10 -1.6 -0.6 *0.4 0.4 6.0 1.7 3.8 9.6
PENNSYLVANIA 2,39 2.33 2,28 2.23 2.21 2.32 2.61 2.77 2.89 3.53
x *2.3 *2.2 -2.4 -1.0 5.3 12.6 6.0 4.4 22.0
RHODE ISLAND 3.16 3.10 3.03 2.87 2.80 2.74 2.77 3.12 3.25 4.55
2 *2.0 -2.1 .5.4 -2.2 -2.3 1.3 12.4 4.3 39.9
SOUTH CAROLINA 1.98 1.94 1,92 1.86 1.83 1.83 1.96 2.11 2.14 2.9
2 *2.0 1.1 -3.0 -1.6 -0.0 7.3 7.4 1.5 20.9
SOUTH DAKOTA 2.65 2.61 2.56 2.53 2.54 2.52 2.50 2.54 2.51 2.63
2 -1.5 -1.8 *10 0.4 -0.9 *0.6 1.5 -1.2 4.6
TENNESSEE 0.92 0.90 0.91 0.93 0.99 1.08 1.26 1.26 1.33 1.S6
0 *2.6 1.8 2.3 6.7 8.9 1618 -0.1 5.5 17.5

TEXAS 2.29 2.24 2.19 2.15 2.09 2.05 2.04 2.07 2.11 2.41
2 -2.0 *2.5 -1.6 -3.0 -2.0 -0.2 1.5 1.9 13.8
UTAH 2.28 2.25 2.25 2.23 2.20 2.17 2.23 2.24 2.23 2.29
% -1.2 -0.1 -0.7 -1.5 -1.2 2.6 0.6 -0.6 3.0
VIRGINA 2.16 2.09 2.05 1.98 1.93 1.98 2.02 2.10 2.21 2.82
% -2.8 -2.3 -3.1 -2.5 2.5 2.1 4.0 4.8 27.9

VERMOT 2.49 2.33 2.26 2.25 2.21 2.17 2.22 2.45 2.59 3.08
W *6.6 -2.7 -0.6 -1.6 -2.0 2.3 10.5 6.0 16.6

WASHINGTON 1.08 1.05 1.03 1.02 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.05 1.07 1.12
2 *3.0 -1.6 -1.0 -0.8 0.1 0.5 3.4 2.1 3.9
WISCONSON 2.25 2,19 2.15 2.13 2.16 2.19 2.23 2.39 2.52 2.73
-2.5 -2.1 -0.8 1.0 1.6 1.7 7.3 5.6 8.1

WEST VIRGINIA 2.37 2.28 2.23 2.17 2.12 2.08 2,18 2.32 2.33 2.72
2 -3.6 .-2.5 -2.6 -2.3 -1.9 5.0 6,1 0.5 17.0
WYolvG 2.59 2.54 2,49 2,49 2,47 2,44 ?.43 2.48 2.34 2.38
-2.1 *1.7 -0.2 -0.7 -1.3 -0.3 2.1 -6.0 1.9


SI1IRCr-EFIrSTATISTICAL YFARBOOK.1965-19740CRS ECONOMICS






62

J6


. ....TABLE 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHARGE Cont.

65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74

COMM4ERCI AL (Cents per Kvh)
ALASKA 3.59 3.51 3,39 3.35 3.10 3.12 3.22 3.55 3.27 3.26
x -2.3 -3.3 *1.3 o7*4 0.6 3.1 10.3 .7.9 -04l
ALABiAMA 1.76 1.74 1,73 1.69 1.68 1.70 1.76 1.s8 2.1? 2.41
0 1.6 -0.4 02.1 0.6 0.9 5.0 5.6 12.8 1307
ARKANSAS 2.26 .2.19 215 2.09 2.04 2.02 2.08 2.15 2.17 '2.53
2 -3.2 -1.6 -3.0 02.5 -0.9 3.0 3.5 0.9 16.7
ARIZONA 1.99 1.85 1.81 1.86 1.65 1.09 1.90 2.07 2.14 2.59.
x *6.6 02.5 3.2 .0.6 to9 0.8 6.8 3.2 17.2
CALIFORNIA 1.62 .1.72 1.74 1.70 1.73 1.75 1.84 1.95 2.12 2.76'
% 5,3 0.9 -2.1 1.3 1.3 5.1 6.2 8.7 30.2
COL0RADO 2.10 2.07 2.07 2.04 2.02 1.99 2000 2.07 2.07 2.24
2 -1.3 -0,4 01.2 -1.1 -1.6 0'8 3.5 -0.? 8.3
CONNECTICUT 2.53 2.45 2.37 2.30 122 2.21 2.33 2.56 2,73 3.61
% -3.3 -3.2 -2.7 -2.3 .1.8 5.3 11*0 so7 39.5
OELAiJARE 2.07 2.07 2.,08 1.05 2.05S 2.07 2.23 2.55 2.70 3.71
mol0l 0.6 -1.6 0.4 0.6 7,9 14,6 SIT 37.5
FLORIDA 2.49 2.36 2.25 2.20 2.17 2.14 2.18 2.26 2.37 3.06
z -5.2 .4.s -2.5 -1.1 .1.4 2.0 3,4 5.0 28.9
GFORGIA 1.99 .1.98 1.96 1.91 1.88 1.87 1.95 2.08 2.20 2.68
% -0.6 .-1.0 -2,9 -1.3 -0.6 4.1 6.9 5.8 21.8
HAw'AII 3,28 3.24 3.22 3.19 3.20 3.27 3,47 3.50 3o69 4.12
% -1.2 -0.6 01110 0.5 2.2 6.0 1.1 5.2 1199
IOWA 2.69 2,63 2.58 2.53 2.50 2.49 2.56 2.66 2.69 26
2-2.3 .1l8 -2.1 -1.1 0.4 2.6 4.1 .1.1 7,3

IDAHO 1.54 1.41 1.42 1.41 1.38 1.39 1.44 1.45 1.41 1.41
2 8.2 0,4 -1.0 -2.1 1.2 3.0 1.0 -1.4 -1*7

ILLINOIS 2.33 2.28 a22 2.25 2.24 2.29 2,39 2.55 2.62 3.02
% 02.2 .008 -0.4 -0.6 2.1 4.7 6.7 2,5 15.2

INDIANA 2.27 2.22 2.17 2.12 2.10 2.08 2.06 2.25 2,31 2,42
% -2.2 .2.3 -1.9 -1,4 -0.8 -0.1 8.5 2.7 4.8

KANSAS 2.14 2,13 2.09 2.04 2.00 1.96 1o98 2.00 2,04 2.20
1.'0.1 -1.9 w2.7 -2.0 -1.8 1.0 1.1 1.9 7,.



SOUIRCEEISTATISTICALYEARBOOK#196S-1974;CRS ECONOMICS







63




TABLE 34 (Continued)

AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANGE Cont.


COMMERCIAL ont. 65 66 67 68 b9 70 71 72 73 74
(Cents per Kwh)
KENTUCKY 2.09 2,06 1.97 1,89 1.86 to85 1.61 1.65 1.31 1.42
196 -4.2 -4.4 -1,2 -0.9 -12.9 2.4 w20.2 8.1t
LOUISIANA 2.20 2.14 2.10 2,04 2.02 1.99 1.99 2.02 2.14 2.39
0 2.6 -202 -2.9 -0.9 .1.6 0.2 1.5s 5.7 11.9

MASSACHUSETTS 1.96 2.85 2'.75 2,56 2,53 '2.52 2.70 2.78 2,87 4.13
0 3.6 w394 .6,9 .14-0.5 7.2 3.1 3.0 44.0

MARYL AND 2.12 2.97 2.06 294 2.02' 2.14 2.32 2.44 2.56 3.59
02*2.4.096 w1.2 .0.4 5.9 8.3 4.9 Se1 40.0

MAINE 3.06 2,94 2.77, 2470 2.65 2.S8 2.54 2.69 2.72 L.15
2 .3.7 .56.9 v2.5, .2.1 -2.3 *1*$ 6.0 1.2 15.6
MICKIGAN 2.38 2134 2.29 2.25 2.25 .2.32 2.37 2.44 2.5$ 3.00
al .16 -2.0 .01.7 -0.1 3.0 2.4 2.7 49S 17.8

MINNESOTA 2.75 2170 2.65 2964 2.63 2.59 2.64 2.74 2.76 3.05
% 6'. -1.7' -0.3 .0.4 -1.6 2.0 3.8 0.6 10.5
MISSOURI 2.43 2.138 2.33 2.28 2.29 2.30 2,38 2.44 2.50 2.73
% a1.8 '02,2 -2,1 0 ; .4 3.5 2.4 2.7 9*0
MISSISSIPPI 1,81 1.77 -1.76 1.78 1.78 1.79 1.91 2.08 2.06 2.55
0 2.3 0.2 1.0 -0.2 0.,9 6.7 8.5 -0.6 a3#4

MON4TANA 1.1 94 1.92 1.89 1,84 1.93 1.94 1.94 1.98 2.05 2.05
S00,8 -1.8 "2.9 5.2 0.5 -0.1 2.3 3.1 .0.0

NEBRASKA 1.80 1.78$ I'71 1.65 1.61 1.61 1.88 1.80 1.78 t.93
1 -14 -4.0 03A1 02.7 0.0 4.7 6.7 00,9 61.

NOR~TH CAROLINA 1969 1,66 1.62 1.57 1.54 1.53 1.63 1.75 1.81 2.29
% -2.0 -2.1 -3.2 -2.1 -0.6 6.6 7.3 3.6 26.3

NORTH DAKOTA 2.75 2.63 2.35 2,28 2.26 2.26 2,24 2.33 2,33 2.40
% .4.1 -10.9 --2.8 .099 0.1 .0.9 3.6 -0.0 3.1

NEW~ HAMPSHIRE 3.25 3.17 3.10 2.90 2,85 2.80 2.74 2.85 2.95 3.91
2 2.4 "2.2 -6,4 -1.8 .1.6 -2.1 3.8 3.7 32.3
NEW JERSEY 2.44 2.41 2,39 2.36 2.33 2.36 2.66 2.79 2,95 4,20
% *.. *0.9 -1.0 *1.4 1.1 13.0 4.7 5.9 42.4
NEW %EXICO 2.10 2.08 2.03 2.03 2.03 2.00 2.00 2.11 2.09 2.25
-1 .11 -2.0 00,4 0.1 -1.3 .1 5.0 009 7.7
NEVADA 1.67 1.61 1.59 1.57 1.56 1.57 1.62 1.75 1.79 2.10
% w3.4 .1,3 -0.9 .1.2 0.8 3,2 8.2 2.1 17.8



SOURCE-EEI#ITAT13TICAL YEARS02K#1965-1974#CRS ECONOMICS






64


TABLE 34 (Continued)

AVERAGE REVUES AND PERCENT CHANCE Cont.

65KRCA on.b 66 67 6e 69 T0 71 7? 73 74
COMMRCIA Cnt.(Cents per Kvh)
NEA YORK 2.58 2.52 2.55 2.54 2.50 2.61 3.02 3.?5 3.40 4.86
% '2.1 1.1 -0.7 -1.4 4,6 15.6 7.7 4,3 43.0
OHIO ?024 2.20 2.17 2.13 2.10 2.07 2417 2.21 2.26 2.77
% -2.0 -1.1 w2.0 .1.3 -1.3 4.5 2.2 2.1, 22,4
OKLAHOMA 2.11 2.06 2.01t 1,97 1.94 1.92 1.94 1.99 1.93 2.11
% -2.4 -2.,4 *2.1 -1.4 -1.4 1.5 2.4 '3.2 4.3
OREGON 1.w35 1.30 1.27 1.26 1.25 1.14 1,031 1.31 1.35 1. ,49
2 .402 -2.1 -0.4 .1.3 -0.7 6.3 -0.3 2.7 10.6
'PENNSYLVANIA 216, 2.11. 2.07 2.02 1.94 2.09 2.34 2.46 2.56 3.19
3.S a1.6 -2.6 -1.7 5.4 12.2 4.6 4.3 24.4
RHODE ISLAND 3.20 3.12 3105 2.34 2.14 2.22 2.26 2.56 2.6? 4.01I
x 02.4 62.4 .233 '4.2 w1.1 2.0 13.2 4.5 S~o.
SOUTHI CAROLINA 1.82 1.74 1.64 1.62 1.,63 1.63 1.74 1.60 1.66 2.37
m 4.3 .5.7 -1.*4 0.7 0.1 6.6 3.4 3.3 27.2
SOUTH. OAKOTA 2.8S '2.78 2.69 2.67 2.b8 2.67 2,65S 2.63 2.*67 2.84
% '2.2 w3,4 0.,6 0.2 -0.4 '00.5 .0.48 146 6,2
TENNESSEE 1.27 1.24 1.27 1.28 1.37 1.48 1.65 1.65 1.73 1.97
t ..9 2.0 1.1 6.6 8,2 11.6 0.0 4.9 13.7
TEXAS 1.88 1.82 1.79 1.77 1.75 1.72 1.73 1.77 1.860 2.07
% -3,0 .201 -1.1 '1.1 -1.4 0.2 2.5 1.6 15.5
UiTAH 2,04 2.01 2.00 1.95 1.91 1.87 1.90 1.95 1.96 2.02
2-1.1 -1.0 '2.5 '1.7? -2.5 2.0 2.7 0.5 2.9
VI#RGINA 1.79 1.74 1,81 1.80 1.75 1.79 1.08 1.97 2.02 2.713
%-2.5 4.0 -0.8 '2.5 2.2 5.0 4.9 2.4 34.9
VERM4ONT 2.45 2.37 2,33 2,32 2.29 2.25 2.28 2.0O 2.68 3.*30
2-3.4 -19 -0.3 .1.0 -2.1 1,4 9.7 7.4 23. 1
WASHINGTON 1,30 1.15 1.12 1I17 1.16 1.16 1.17 1,20 1.20 1.26
x -11.2 -3.2 5.0 -0.9 -0.6 111 2.7 0.3 4,4
WISCONSON 2.40 2.31 2.27 2.24 2.30 2.39 2.43 2.59 2.73 28
2 3,9 -1.8 -1.0 2.6 3.8 1.7 6,4 5.5 5.5
WEST VIRGINIA 2.08 1.99 1.g5 1.88 1.84 1.84 1.99 2.12 2.15 2.57
% -4.4 -j2.1 -3,4 '2.1 -0.2 7.9 6.6 1.7 1904
WdY04ING 1.83 1.79 1.78 1.74 1.73 1.71 1.74 1.64 1.71 1.69,
% -2.3 -0.7 '2.4 -0.3 -1.5 2.0 5.4 -6.8 '1.2


SOURCE-EEISTATtRTIfCAL VEARaSafl,9bS-19741CRS ECONOMICS






65


TABLE 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANGE Cont.

65 66 6? 6e 69 70 71 72 73 74

IINRUSTRIAL (Cenrts per Kwh)

ALASKA 1190. 10.5 1, 1.76 1,68 1.71 1.74 1.84 1.99 2.03
o 79 4.7 -4.7 2.3 i19 5.6 6.3 1.8

ALABAMA 0.63. 0.63 0.64- 0.66 0.66' 0.72 0.82 0.6 096 12
0, 0.5soi 3.4 00 8.1 14.5 5.0 12.0 126.5

ASKANSAS 0164 01 0.86 0.688 0.86 0.89 0,94 1.01 1.14 1.56
M 3.2 5.4 2.5 0.2 lot 6.0 7.3 13.1 36.1
ARIZONA A,1 112 1.16 1.14 1.013 1.14 1o18 1.21 1.42 1.76
206 3W,7 -205 "0.8 1.0 303 2.7 16.0 23.8

CALIFORNIA 0*95 Q,.go 0.92' 0.91 0,92 0,93 0.98 1.07 1.21 1960
% .o 2,9 "1.0 0.4 192 5#6 8.8 13.3 49.2

COLORADO 11.22 1.0 1.16 1o15 1.15 1.12 1.12 1.20 1.32 1.42
% -1.7 "3.2 "0.9 0.1 -2.9 0.3 7,0 9,7 7.6

CONNECTICUT 1.4 137 1.36 1.3S 1.34 1.36 1.52 1.74 1.92 2l8s
% Wal "2.7 .9 ;0.2 "0.7 1ob 11.4 14,6 10.1 48.9
OEILAIAARE 10.6*7 0. 84 0.686 0.87 0.91 0.99 1,23 1.51t 1.73 2,56
% "2.9 2.3 0.9 4.5 6.9 23.8 22.9 14.6 46.1

FLORIDA 1.16 1l12 1910 1.10 1.14 1.14 1.17 1.26 1.39 1.69
2 -3.4 "2#0 -0.3 3'5 0.1 2.7 10.0 8.1 36.0

GEORGIA 0,89-98 0.6708 0.88 0.89 0.93- 1.01 1.08 1l18 1.61
2"2.3 0.8 0.1 2.1 4.2 8.8 6.9 9,2 35.9

H4AWAII 1484 1.417 1.46 1.48 1,46 1.47 1,59 1,63 1.80 2.07
% 0.6 0.7 0.0 "1,2 0,3 8.1 2.6 10.6 15.2

IOWA -1.22 1.20 1.22 1,25 1.22 1.24 1,30 1.35 1,41 1.57
S1i.3' 1,9 2.2 "2.2 1.1 5.2 4.1 3.8 1200
IDAHO 0.58 0157 0.58 0.58 0.58 0.59 0,61 0.62 0.65 0.69
2-1.2 1.7 -0.9 0.86 0,9 3.2 2.3 4.5 6.17
ILLINOIS 1.08 1.,06 1,0b, 1,07 1,08 1.14 1,22 1.31 1.36 1.64
% .01.9 0.7 0,3 lei 5.ti 7.0 7,4- 4,0 20.3
INDIANA 1.14 1.12 1'l1 I'll 1,09 1.12 1.16 1.25 1.26 1.43
2 1,9 "0.2 -0.6 "1.5 3.2 3.3 7,9 2.4 11.a
KANSAS 1.10 1.10 '.1109 1.10 1.10 1.12 1.13 1.15 1,21 1.34
% 0.0 -098 1.0 0.2 1.3 1.4, 1.5 4.9 11,2



$SURCEEEXSTATIICALYEARBOOK1965-1974;CR$ ECONOMICS





66



TABLE 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANGE Cont.


65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
INDUSTRIAL Cont. (Cents per Kwh)
KENTUCKY 0954 0,56 0.58 0.60 0.63 0.69 0.77 0.80 0,85 1.04
% 4.3 3.8 1.9 4.9 10.2 11.3 4.4 6.2 22.4
LOUISIANA 0.86 0.81 0.81 0.80 0.80 0.50 0.81 0.84 0.98 1.25
*6.0 0.4 *2.1 *0.2 *0.7 2.4 2.9 16.8 27.7

MASSACHUSETTS 1.63 1.59 1.59 1.53 .1.53 1.56 1.74 1.88 2.01 3.13
x *2.2 -0.2 *3.7 *0.4 2.1 11.7 8.2 6.8 55.5

MARYLAND 1.18 1.16 1.16 1.16 1.18 1.21 1.34 1.42 1.54 2.34
x *2.1 0.3 0,3 1.1 3.1 10.8 5.8 8.0 51.9
MAINE 1.26 1.23 1,22 1.15 1.15 1.14 1.16 1.26 1.31 1.87
x *2.2 .0.8 *5.7 -0.2 *2.2 3.7 8.4 4.1 42.5
MICHIGAN 1.13 1.08 1.09 1.08 1.09 1.19 1.29 1.35 1,44 1.90
x w4,0 1.3 -1.1 0.8 9.4 7.8 4.5 7.1 3a.2
MINNESOTA 1.41 1,38 1.34 1.31 1.31 1.33 1.40 1.47 1.49 1.74
x *2.3 -2.7 *2.8 0.4 1.6 5.2 4.9 1.0 17.0
MISSOURI 1.21 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.20 1.28 1.34 1.41 1.50 1.70
% *1.4 -0.0 *0.0 1.1 6,4 4.9 5.0 6.3 13.4
MISSISSIPPI 0.88 0.86 0.87 0.90 0.92 0.94 1.02 1.09 1.20 1.64
0 *2,0 1.0 3.0 2.1 2.3 8.7 6.7 9.7 37.1

MONTANA 0.44 0,43 0.42 0.40 0.41 0.42 0.43 0.44 0.53 0.50
% *3.4 *0,5 -4.5 0.4 4.6 0.7 4.1 19.1 -5.1

NEBRASKA 1.08 1.05 1.07 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.16 1.21 1.27 1.32
% *2.8 2.0 *0.0 0.9 1.2 5.7 4.9 4.9 3.7
NORTH CAROLINA 0.84 0.85 0.85 0.84 0.85 0.88 0.94 1.01 1.09 1.53
% 0.8 0.1 -0.6 0.2 4.0 6.9 6.9 8.5 40.5
NORTH DAKOTA 2.00 1.99 1,98 1,97 1.93 1.90 1.93 2.02 2.05 2.18
% -0.4 *0.8 -0.6 -1.9 *1.4 1.6 4.9 1.1 6.7
NEW HAMPSHIRE 1.40 1,40 1.39 1.34 1.33 1.34 1,32 1.37 1.52 2.36
x *0.1 *0,8 -4.0 -0.1 0.0 -1.0 3.7 10.7 55.5

NEW JERSEY 1.17 1.16 1.17 1.20 1.20 1.24 1.50 1.61 1.76 2.82
% -1.3 1.3 2.2 0.0 3.9 20.8 6,9 9.4 60,4

NEW 4EXICO 1.16 1.12 1.09 1.09 1.09 1.10 1.10 1.15 1.21 1,44
w -2.9 *3.3 0.1 0.3 0.9 0.2 4.7 4.5 19.8

NEVADA 0.45 0.54 0.61 0.64 0.65 0.68 0.73 0,78 0.94 1.34
% 17.7 13.7 519 0.5 5.8 6.9 6.6 20e4 42.8



SOURCEEEISTATISTICAL YEARSOOK,1965*19741CRS ECONOMICS






67



TABLE 34 (Continued)
AVERAGE REVENUES AND PERCENT CHANCE Cont.


INUTIL Cn.65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74
INDUTRIA Cnt.(Cents per Kwh)
NEA YORK 1.04 1.03 1.04 1.07 1.,06 1.12 1,26 1.34 1.43 2.12
x -0.9 1.3 2.6 -1.0 6.0 12.4 6.5 6.'4 48.3

OHIO 0,80 0.84 0.85 0.86 0.88 0.93 1.00 1.01 1.05 1.45
2 54 1.2 1.2 2.0 5.1 7.9 1.1 3.9 37.9

OKLA"0OMA 1.01 1.01 1.00 1.,01, 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.01 1.03 1,12
% -0.6 -0.1 0.2 -0,3 -0.6 0.0 1.2 1.8s 8.9

OREGON 0.40 0.40 0,39 0.38 0.39 0.40 0.44 0.46. 0.46 0.49
20.6 02,9 -1,2 1,4 3e6 8.1 5S7 -0.4 7.9

PENNSYLVANIA 1.08 1.05 1.06 1.04 1.04 1.13 1.34 1.42 1.49 2.10
2 -2.9 0.7 -1.8 0.1 8.8 18.2 6.2 4.9 40,9

RHODE ISLAN D 1.64 1.60 3,59 1.52 1.50 1.54 1.69 1087 1,98 3.28
2.3 -0.6 -4.2 -1.8 3,3 9'5 10'8 5.4 66.2

SOUTH-CAROLINA 0.74 0. 74 0,74 0,74 0,73 0.,77 0.85 0.88 0,99 1,41
20.2 0.4 -0.5 -0.3 5.0 9.6 3.7 12.5 42.9

SOUTH DAKOTA 1.40 1.,41 1.1143 1.44 1.45 1.51 1.59 1.65 1.64 1.75
1 0,3 1.9 0.6 0.5 3.9 5.6 3,5 00.2 6.3

TENNESSEE 0.50 *0.50 0.52 0,54 0.58 0.65 0.79 0.79 0.83 1.02
x 0.2 3.4 4.8 7.3 12.3 21.6 -0.6 5.7 22.2

TEXAS 0.88 0.85 0.83 0.82 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.84 0.92 1.16
2 3.8 a2.4 -1.4 .2.0 0.1 0.1 41.6 9,4 25.9

UTAH 1.23 1.-20 1.26 1.26 1.22 1020 1.26 1.3? 1,31 1.41
2 -1.7 4,4 0.0 -3.2 -1.6 5.A 4.5 -.. 7.2

VIRGIN1A 0.96 0.95 0,96 0.95 0095 0.98 1.07 1.16 1.21 1.82
2 .0.7 1.0 -1.5 0.4 3,5 9.1 8.3 4.1 50.7

VERMiONT' 1.42 1.38 1.44 1,46 1.45 1.44 1.49 1.67 1.78 2.25
2-2.S 4.0 1.6 -0.9 -0.2 3,5 11.6 6.5 26.8

WASHINGTON 0.31 0.31 0.31 0.31 0.30 0.31 0.32 0,32 0,34 0.33
0.07 -0.3 1.3 -4.? 3,3 2.8 0.5 4.4 -0.8

vEISC04SON 1.29 1.25 1.25 1.24 1.28 1.35 1,42 1.49 1,57 1.71
2 -3.0 -0.2 -0.6 3,3 5.5 5.2 4.7 5.8 8*9

WEST VIRGINIA 0.81 0.80 0.81 0.80 0.80 0.84 0.96 1.05 1.09 1.52 1 40,6 1.40 -1.4 0.5 4.2 14.0 10.0 3,7 39.8

WYOMING 0.92 0.91 1.00 1,02 1.03 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.05 1.07
% 0.4 9.1 ?.8 0.2 0.5 0.6 0.,9 0.2 1.9


SOURHCEEEITATISTICAL YEARQflOK,196S-19743CRS *ECONOMICS






lao
uo





C Iq q
00 so 8 w cl f-ft"" a
V4 N 00

4)


v 90 a
t4 MM Ws I- 4p m ko I- cq .0 w
A& v to at let
(A 0-0 C P7 0 a 0 a 0 00
4D 4D IM 04 o"Mam" 0 V c- c- N 0 w 1 Ito 000340 .0 0 fo
0 d; a; 4 44..; 0; 4i wi
E A v CA 40 C4
vi 0 eq V



%ON 1^ 0 fm to clo cc
z 4D C4




CPI a, kn C4 t^ 40 C4 I^
Q t ri cl at Ci ct lc "t It C ri ri
CF. m V ,L" do o 1* 01 C-4 O c- a, in 4 m 0 D -4 Lol
In eq m co 0 GO ? ID C4 co en 0 C4 10 4 t, ft
O Ci ll Ct C ll It 4 a t 'T An Oi 1% lt4
cm do
en 1, 44 t4
Qo on 'A Vi 14 Wi






to



cc














bd


r.L


4J
r
te m tt
tn :.5 E

10
:A -i
v d d
E E c
E
d :-6 : = V rv. d 0, Cc d
c c c =X 0 0 igc R i
F.-O 'T S. -d P4
E-4 Cl- d F."a C
C; S. c :0 P4
40 d r 4, E
d d V
7. E WCE E o
Z. '. > >
Jj r r 6. M'V 26
-i of -i 0 E d 40 -i = 'i 0
.1.2 IN El 0 o 0
o"o Exltl. E x cco E 'o n .0 ,
Wh :5 0 40
E :B 0 0 E E
0 ='Z
0' 0







69




FIGURE 4




RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS, SALES, AND REVENUES (Classes A and B Privately Owned Electric Utilities)
II111
10 REVENUES 10



66
S 5





2 2


193 164 195 1966 1%7 168 199 1970 1971 1972 1973



450 0
400 KILOWATT-HOURS SALE 400
350 350
300 300

~200 200 ,
150 150
100 100
50 50
0 0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


60 60

50 NUMBER Of CUSTOMERS ...-* 50

40 40
e
30
30

20 20

10 10

0 0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


320 8000


20 SALES PEt CUSTOMER (KWH) 7000

240 (Right ISdale)6.0
240 -e* 6,000

20 5,000

**""REVENUES PER CUSTOMER (Dollars)
E O 4,
5160-W (Lelt Scale)




BU0 2.000
iRtVtNUE PER KILOWATT-HOURS (Cents)
(Left Scale)
40 -1
0. '&.0 1




163 164 195 1966 1967 1968 19 1970 1971 1972 1973



SOURCE: FPC, Privately Owned., 1973







70




FIGURE 5


COMMERCIAL CUSTOMERS, SALES, AND REVENUES

(Classes A and 8 Privately Owned Electric Utilities)
88 7 REVENUES 1

6 6





0 0
964 1964 4 7
c
3 3
2



0 0
1963 1964 1965 196 7 9? 16 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


36036 300 KILOWATT HOURS SALES 300

240 240

IO 1.180

120 120

60 60

0 _0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


10 10'
NUMBER Of CUSTOMERS
8

? 6 6

4 -4

2 2

0 0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1912 1973


1200 60
1100 el-00 55
1000 --50 E S900 45

800 -- REVENUE PER CUSTOMER (DOLLARS) -SALES PER CUSTOMER 40
700 -_Left Scale),. THOUSANDS Of KILOWATT HOURS 35
E
0 0,,.. (Right Scale

500 2

REVENUE PER KILOWATT HOURS (CENTS) -0
300 32 5 (Lef Scale) .15

200 CL2 0"""" "" """ "" "" """"* """""""" 1
100 1_5 5
Of____ 1_____ _____ 0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973




SOURCE: FPC, Privately Owned, 197







71




FIGRE 6



INDUSTRIAL CUSTOMERS, SALES, AND REVENUES (Classes A and B Privately Owned Electric Utilities)







7, i
RENUEI
66











1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973
6000


500._ ,,,... 500

400 400-o 300 300
200 200

100 100
0 F 0
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


500 500
KMOWE OURS E'S
400 __ 400

40 ... 300

200 200
too 1001



1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


24 2.5



4_-REVENUE PER CUSTOMER (DOLLARS) 000



12 --1- --SALES PER CUSTOMER IMILONS Of KWHI -1V5 'a;





-o REVENUE PER KILOWATT-HOURS (CENTS)
cc (Left Scale)
o0, 05
1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


SOURCE: P EC, Privately Owned, 1O973.






72



TABLE 36

AVERAGE USE,* REVENUES AND ANNUAL BILL
PRIVATELY OWNED CLASS A AND B ELECTRIC UTILITIES IN THE U.S.
12-MONTHS ENDING NOVEMBER 30


1.975 1974 1973

Average Annual Kwh Used
Residential 79795 7,480 7,701
Commercial 49,229 46,604 479906
Industrial 1,5769694 1,660,271 1,713,821
Other 214$864 211,237 236,597
Combined 219206 21,181 219793

Average Cost (O/Kwh
Residential 3.49o 3.0k. 2.52,C
Commercial 3.44 2.99 2.40
Industrial 2.05 1.64 1.23
Other 3.07 2.70 2.08
Combined 2.91 2.44 1.95

Average Annual Bill
Residential $ 272.20 $ 227.37 $194.01
Commercial 1,691.79 1,393.38 1,148.51
Industrial 32,390.56 27,236.91 21,130.13
Other 6,593.87 5,713.37 49930.56
Combined 616.55 516.70 424.40


Source: FPC, Privately Owned, 1973, and conversations with the FPC.







73




14 :j
4) 0
4) 0 04 :z
to 41 1 mm In %0 0 Oo r- 00 co 0
co 4 4J 4J %0 04 V--4 V-4 0 ON ON aN ON 0
-CO 0 -4 -4 4
> 0 : ()
u U) 0


-r4




V-4 44 co C> r-- r- ON 00 ON v-4 00 00 Ul)
1-4 r-4 0 (1) 0 0 0 0 a 0 a
(1) -4 4 **T CN C) C) Ln kn %.D C*4 a m
40 pq Cl
Cf) Cd
pq $4 r-I 1-4
E-i 4) Cd
1.4 v-4 V-4 C*4 C*4 Ln r- r- "-4
E-f N (n r- 'T op Ln cn CV) 01%
CN C14 r- -:T (311 00 % o Ln
0 C*4 Cl r- C14 Ln .9-4 ON r C4 o
0 C14 V-4 r-4 04 CV) Cf) Lr) V-4 00
Co
E-4
1-4 OD CV) Lf
;4 CA C*4 C4 V-4 v-4 V--4 74 V-4 v-4 "-I


0
0 a) 0 P4 :z
E-i
ba 41 1 U) r-4 o o 00 1%0 CY) 00
P! Cd w 4j 4j -zr cn 0 0 C) r-4
1-4 ca 4 4J (1) 4J 0 0 0 0 0
(1) w ra co 4) cn C-4 C14 C%4 C*4 CN C14 C4 C4
C/) 0
p 0 9> 0 :3 :3: u
q U -ie. u w o,--,
f--l V
E-1 0
H bo Cd u 4
4 rd
4
:4. 14 U
> Qj rT4
w
0 4-4 Cd Cf) r- cn r, NO m 00 4)
0 r-I 0 (1) 0
L) r-4 $4 Cn 4
E-4 Cd 4J w -H a.-e u C-4 -4 V-4 r-4
41 to pq
co cc
: : 1. 4
0 (3)
f-4 > cn C*4 cn r.. 04 0 "T C14
pq H 4j (4 V--4 r- -zt Lf) oq* CY) m 00 rV-4 4 0
Cd S 0; o r*-* c4 c4 u a c cn* "4
cn :J -d 0 64 W) -zr CY)- Nt r- N rl_ -41 r-4 41
C4 9: (1) 'T 0 00 r- I- so IND %D
W r P-4 A ^

W 4) to rz
co :3 :j 0
4 CO 0
0 r 4) 0 pw p= e-,
> 0 bo 41 1 M a -T C14 C14 C14 V-4 Ln V-4 r VO
Cd W 4j 4j Lf) cy) C114 C4r) Cn 0
co
4) U) El -co (1) cn C4 C14 C14 C4 Clq C14 C4
0 :1$ : : u
w 0
0 r-4
r-4 0 -f-4
co u
V4
EA

U)
;r4 44 Cd C) 00 t- Lr) 01% CY)
PL4 W r-I 0 4) o 0 0
0) r-4 w Ch m ON ON r- fl- cn >
4) -H b-* U v-4 r4
bo pq 4)
co 41
p to
4) co >
> -r4
Ln %D Oo C14 m cn 00 r- m
000 Ln m 0 a*$ m NT CV) cn Ln
0 cn %0 00 C4 0 9 0 C; L C;
cn M r- %0 -.t CY) 04 r-4 V-4
r-4 P-4 r-q P-4 V-4 r-4 V-4 P-4




-4 C> m %0 Ln
co fl- r- %0 %0 %0 %0 -o
a% 0% (n m cn; m 0
--4 r-4 "4








74






. . . -u .









m6w N ~ -J

R. 5"-v W








C-- M ra m. ".A .*


JigAN =FEN= e e4& 0 ",C

el m -W c M
A 9, '.Z; i ..dm

R&. ,--' ,,*; A 1 -PV


---- - -~ - -:q~ia 4


V. -W




N Si,. Cr ,-




I ~C4C CC4


N N cNRNcr I N l -- ,o


VO
~ I 00~- '
~.' pd I'~-C N .4ic' ~t N;



N N
4
rZ tt Cl S.. C4
N N N N 0



A b1 C: t-. r
P 5- 00.. r
14i "! 90 0 0 0 0









75









00 w ut, C% ft CO

ac C* C% 6 C4 A
C6 r cl





0000 Cl 00 C4


ct
0S,



'0 C w m 0.1 1- fie.* P- C4 00 wj C- C4
go t,
4 C i C4 C4 m





^.4 00
Cb
ac m C-i C,4 M m





r C5 t- 00

6 C4 m
ell or,




CO f= C4 I- c r Mi Cb f- tCD
CC at, tn C4 a6 ci W e4 C03
2: C4 *n -4
Go



w Im st 0 w ut x C4 w
A- . & C'. C,4 CC
r- "i 6 m 10 r
-1-D C4 C4 m 0
M rwo,

46,

m an m C4, t4 C4 C4 w Ul- N C4
Cb N Zo e. IV C)
.4
oo m C4 06 ci ft C4 m C7*N
e ut,
Ob C C4




M C M f- &e. m r- wt rd
m
C4 rI m rC4
to
0

""A
CC w

eq r- "7
C4 N N m



Cd


M -C U 0 w 0 0
-4 r- 0 m 6 8; C C P4
r- cq m N ,
i 'r 11: 1
lw ci

60 Ow






00


ILI
C6
es
Gr, .4



ee Cl)
q tc:t c m
ooze.= d-A
ca 2 03 1
= -= !2 s- 0 L.
w w w








76







U '44



1-tl 1-1 r- 44' ~

a6 0 W -. -q *-i *
a- G .4 k 00 so. r- 0i ta 0
(.4-4 a-t 0 fi. t0. V-40


%D I- A- in 400 t- r
4i~~~ 4%. 6




0 Sol
a~ Ct a- a -.4 4~m



% on 4 all
%- ,* It 01i

401



v- 4 c n'
a-0 a0 lowQut .1, S
II Vt '5"






.'A lb a- ccW0 m 0 00 -44 1-%
C4 -% cc in- 0



0.



;0 00 so 0 du


Int 01. It at %4 Ilt 4) 0,444 W- 040
C4 al0i f .4 0~
-.l t'4 ('4 loi -o so I I


E-44



444 .4 4 4*54 0. 4) I*4 5 4 44-. $
a-*~~- "4 0 (4






a-vt...lu a.1 4 WO 54*


@*0*.4~~~~~.4 0 I (44 4 .45 1
-1A' 0A 09 1-0. $40 "4 4-il -0 410
lee*~;


~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ $ Wo 4.
0~ We,





77


TABLE 41 -Municipal electric utilities'

COMPOSITE ELECTRIC OPERATING -REVENUES, CUSTOMERS
AND SALES


1973 1972

Item Percent Percent
Amount of total Amount of total


Number of customers:
Residential--------6,963,632 86.4 6,908.045 86.3
Commercial and
industrial------------- 971,601 12.1 983,458 12.3
Other ultimate
consumers --------------121,924 1.5, 112.450 1.4


Total ultimate
consumers---------- 8,057,157 100.0 '8.003.953 100.0
Resale ------------ -- 553 ---- 543----Total customers ---- 8,057,710 100.0 8.004.496 100.0


Kilowatt-hour sales
(thousands):
Residential ----------- 70,191,817 32.0. 66.526.875 30.8
Commercial and
industrial------------- 100,837,433 46.0 96.756,192 44.9
Other ultimate
consumers------------ 7,734,502,' 3.6 7.489,106 3.5


Total sales to ultimate
consumers ----------178,763,752 81.6 170.772.173 79.2
For resale -------------- 40,398,938 18.4 44.895,238 20.8


Total kilowatt-hour
sales ------------ 219,162,690 100.0 215,667.411 100.0


Revenues:
Residential-----------..1,190,*657,466 39.1 1.084.1 8b.341 39.2
Commercial and
industrial------------ 1,408,125,327 46.2 1.272.303,436 46.0
Other ultimate
consumers----------- 134,752.080 4.4 125.430.376 4.5


Total revenues from
ultimate consumers.. 2,733, 534,873 89.7 2.481.920.153 89.7
From sales for resale. 267,758,702 8,.8 249.499.474 9.0


Total revenues from
sales of electric
energy----------- 3,001,293,575 98.5 2.731,419.627 98.7
Other electric revenues..- 45,725,004 1.5 35.484.13T 1.3


Total electric operating
revenues----------- 3,047,018,579 100.0 2.766.903.764 100.0


1Exclusive of the Power Authority of the State of New York.
SOURCE: FPC, Publicly Owned, 1973.






78




FIGURE 7


RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS, SALES, AND REVENUES
MuniciplIy Owned Electric Utilities
1200 1200

1000 1000

800 600.
1800 4
S600 600500

~400 FE0

200 200
00


75 { _owafttHo,, SalesI 75

60 60

45 45

is 30 0 30i

15 .--- -- 15

0 .0

10 10
10Number of Customers 1




6 6
o o
4 4


22

0 0
1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 197z 1973

220 11

180 0
200 Sales Per Customer (KWH)
ISO0 (Right Scale) 9
160 .""

1 Revenue Per Customer (Dollars)7



40 -- 2(Left scale)_2
E~ 120

80 4
60 ~ 3 -~3


20
0 0 0

SOURCE: FPC,' Publicly Owned, 1973.






79




FIGURE 8


COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CUSTOMERS, SALES, AND REVENUES
Municipally Owned Electric Utilities

1600 1600
1400 1400
1200 1200
.1000 10
o 0
800 800oo0
600 600
400 =

200 200

00


140 ___140
140 Kilowatt-Hours Salesi 140
120 120
100 100
o 0
60 ,0 d
40 40
20 20
0 0

1400 1400
1300 Number of Customers 1
130-1300 1200 1200
1000 l-ow__ - 10
00 00
0- 600 ___600
Soo 600,
400 400
200 200
0 _ 0
1449
1400 140
1300 1 00 130
90







_600 60 0
500 ..50
4- 00 2. 40e e utme KHo


= 400 -- 2.0 Revenue Per Kilowatt-Hours 40
3030
300- _t 1.5 (Left Scale) 30

200 1.0 20
100 0.5 10
0 '0 0
1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973


SOURCE: FPC, Publicly Owned, 1973.







C) A







r.2 a I "g C-4
C:b
4r qp 00 431:2 5m c; at;
M:2 -Cb
40

M a* 61ft r 240 Ws 40
r- qc
11 1 t 1-2 -2
cr
Go s'o

co)
w av -P m OD
GID
Ct r q r-4
Lo 4e4

ro


Oise* q9;



L4 ream to- r
0.02
-r v I -L
at Ict
4c; -0 ca
ast t a
40 a9t
CC
W r a* 40 2 qp Oo W
00 22 a a 04 Cb
am elo
lotctct
Qc; t: oo W to M 1 QO
10 C4 0% 0-2 Cb
:;a*

0004
'w'M
Cb 419;
4t Z ga's stle
Ct


cr Cb CDC 440 WO Go o Iv
04 C4 M 94 r
ab A Iw clo am
"t
w 1w goo- 4" C4 2
cm Cb ""i
X in
Sam 2 do os" a ft mc, -0 cc 40
qrM r, Ir
-cli .-t vil;;M rlj a;;
o tz v4xr Vi 9% t wb -r c V;a
oo!!- M ;; ft i
a cb ot
$*- 04
cc
co .4
'M
0
t- 94 fe 'M
C4.4
C4
04 04 z




I BE
Go
Cq M



lr- .. I 'w 3
:% E d



52 2 10 1.; o.
d Vc d
r
Z LIZ:!
c w


71 13


C4 x F-











81








r- C> I", cm e4
to . a*


uo






m 00 M. 1w
C4





col.
eq M
Cb 00 m
Ic;
to rm 06






C- Nr U'A M lw


W4.


z
0
0-4 mr






Ulb to

Cb 00 C113 C4
Go C% cc
cc cx to
>
on .0 ft
= w o fo
C to W C C4 .; C4 -r f'o Ci .4
t co M,
Z
0-4 1.;


CIS co! lw
mr so
C


00,
40



too C4 li 4 i
wo ti 4 '" v .0 ;
to
r4



0 toP4








lit it w

::Z
C6 -W
%; ',a


so - w
E 1, w-a
'Z I.S.3 : = 0 >
'to a w = W.E*-%- -%- :p
lss 's "c :- -, E -0-0000 2 1




tic $-







82





2:1

Wr- REV! CP mu ME R ai -P 91 =V-W4"Wm
a &)

C% C% "m
"4
...29 is-na- ma-gig- 2 -4i R! i 4J

z t,.* R29 0

cm =,Ogg =2MU 20

C% co 0% V2, V% IF 'r so 40 ."c- - - - - *r4

- - - - -44
a sm Aa C*g


z .0 -C avlxu go


2:1 HIM
.9 f"! ?D ft- a x IWO x


lo
L Cov t

z
8 cd
Man X R 2 Ira- i lp i IOF "loom so cn
P-
Ju
a r4
Or4

94 It
g Zw a
z

m 24 X a a 3 4j
A . . J
m lp
$4
4) 0
14-1
4) r4

c
IF01303 a "till 44
it *f4
r
a C% OD ab C% tag
122321 a c*M .0's -,: OD 4)
-a".22.0mm
04 to v;vie.;

Z Pr4


Cab Cal. 4104" as. Va t,








83






TABLz 4 -Sale MWd reoene Per autoWse, reeem'asII pr klaWMaUo MMl, TeWUvww VaUey area, Pagifs
.Nargwo area *0We armsTumamm Valuy som ?wlle Northwast vasrt Wo

AmpAvwn Avomp
Awu.m I doa A=p forum Awu,.
Yes, a". per Awing. Per .pr Avw. pe lWpr m, e
earoof uuwmm kilow65 eotmo u= 'iwi.~ TWM WW. amiyw
(1ww pur bow (kilowatt- Per bowr (hiot. PW hour
ba") aw ~ to*hom w.m) micuer (os)





3 8 4 5 ..........3..... 1.72 3.118 511 1.3.4 654 25
3647 ----------2 .532 40.54 1.61 4.25 54.24 1.27 1,515 41.41 2.73
it3 0 45----------------- 2.904 44. 251 3.6 4.745 67."2 1.2 1.610 43,44 2.0
1090------------------- 3,248 47.46 1.40 4,912 50.7 1.2 1 70 48.36 2.651
1950 ------------------- 3,728 51-33 1.30 5.2 63-02 1.36 37& 47T.42 2.54
305 ------------------- 4,388 1.3 130 .3 6 5.9 2.05 3.35 1.057 49.25 2.0
-- ------------ 4.505 H6.5 11 .2? ,37 "A.15. 1.34 2.027 53.72 2.55
"*-------505 412.113 1.24 6.4U 71.o& 1.I "140 $.14i 2.511
10 5 4 ------------------ a:623 315 .36 7.222 .75.04 3.07 221311 517.24 2.45
low55................................-- 5a333 70.47 1.15 7.02 N2.43 1.04 2.453 0.74 2.41
1056................................----- 6751 74.3 1.31 5,443 1111.602 3.02 2.6311 52.43 2.38
1957................................--- 7.032 75.63 3.06 B'727 57.52 1.0 2.760 U.63 2.38
1M055............................ ...5215 54.75 3.0 5.837 85.5 3F .00 2.955 70.26 2.37
3050................................80 IM5.It 3.01 6.73 05.53 W0 3.06 72.10 2.34
3050...............................--- 9.440 101.02 1.03 10.309 100.53 .07 3,27 751.04 2.32

3053 mew wmies.............. 0. 705 31.44 .00 10.515 303.051 .07 2.80 53.85 2,30

3062 new au ......................... 1018 05.22 .97 31.252 307.31 .05 2.3 n3.3 2.20
1063...............................-----30,051 103,011 .06 13.63 110.35 .05 4.153 02.47 2.33
30964................................. 33.353 304.05 .03 12,412 135.80 .1 4,373 03.17 2.22
306.................................. 1350 303.42 .0 132,43 11.57 .02 4'"a 05.72 2.35
306...............................---- 2.221 105.3 .5 M2at1 33.0 .03 4,0 103.03 2.10
1057...............................---- 32,424 306I.0 .57 33.055 135.65 .8,5342 107.03 2.02
199..................................132.575 123.35 .03 13.091 123.3 .65 5.705 113.30 3.05
1050...............................---- 34. 51 336.10 .31 15,438 13.35 .57 5.000 339.43 1.017
1970...............................----- 15,481 157.70 1.02 158551 135.75 .87 5.515 325.5 3.84
3071................15.265 153.37 130 16.460 147.05 All 6.018 137.60 3."
I02 65.002 197.05 1.25 17.005 158.72 .90 7.323 150.43 2.06
iurM 15,tolb 204.22 1.28 16.5w0 149.77 .9D 7,785 11. 32 2.14


W9fUMEIAM. AM3 UtNW11h INAL

1045...............................---- 32,134 3130.65 0."5 37,3117 0310.70 0.53 1900 213.310 3.45
1047...............................---- 4.050 327.57 .94 .311.300 323.36 .84 10.351 203.50 1.52
3845...............................---- 37.50? 347.66 .92 3.483 330.51 .54 30.517 206.00 134
1940 ................................ 39.225 355.75 .93 37.055o 342.82 .01 30.326 313.52 3.53
1050.................................. 3.,315 345. 77 .04 41.731 352.07 .07 IND,351 325.33 3.53
1951 ---..................................45,13 401.40 .80 41.445 373.70 .88 21.0M 347.6 1.50
3052..............................----- 48.238 420.33 .65G M.00 4.26 .07 23 700 357.8H 1.56
30W3............................---- ... M.3 46.4.52 .80 61111 403.44 .72 25.657 204.34 3.54
134-.-.---------------.-.----.-.--- 5 4.082 4%44 .30 70.07 505.31 .73 26,624 432.0 1.55
305.-.-------.0.-.--------------------- 0.737 515.34 .117 75.264 5140.74 .72 2,486 432,05 3.3
19545...........------- 6,8 l.35 .3 a ~ s $2 11".114 .71 31.444 405.54 1.4
197....................0 72.14 .81 11'41 W l .73 32ol484.00 1.50
1055 ................................60.10% 52.17 .0' 92.34 613.83 .74 33:M7 533.75 3.8
1050............................. ---- 70.553 60.317 .111 5.036 61315. 40 .72 35.788 540.6 353

19W0 .................................71.3117 071.84 .0 92.432 56.23 .72 3.31 513.04 3.8

1061" Mew ----.....................7-- 50 Wal 53.531 .111 .4 15M.00) .0 4321115 645.W3 3.6
I62 new IrmV ........................ 77.030 673.53 .07 1313.216 733.3 .63 44.345 6.23 3.4
3063.................... ......5-------- 0,017 fos.Gs .6 110,270 752.14 .65 47.0M 715.47 3.521
3061...............................----- 514.075 70. 75 .34 126,655s 805.07 .54 50,1352 750.54 30
306................................. 01.532 807.531 .75 13.103 704.20 .6 a 4.MA4 800.22 3.46
1956.......................------ ... .66.54 737.20 J75 138.045 837.27 .54 57.036 US, 35 1.44
3067............................3:----- 04,421 73.03 .75 131.022 545.83 .65 62.002 66.5 3.43
130..................................3100.02 55.00 .75 133.250 572.56 .64. 67.37 033.53 1.30
M3060..............................33011.461 047.03 .70 341 .730 014 05 .64 720l7 0053 3.30
1970--..............................3127,405 3.306.38 .5 3 42.163 027.44 .65 7335m 1.057.2t 1341
1073 ................ ................3127.035 3.313. 30 1.03 '143.25 0706 .60 70.518 Will42 1.46
1172...... ....... . ..... 137.516 1.486.72 1.04 1.U422 1.037.1 .49 54,445 1.2411491 1.43
13 -144.756 1.571.W11 1.09 15,03 1, 0"0. 29 .419 89.18w 1,466.74 164



*New series refers to an increase in the nuber of companies reporting to the FPC.


SOURCE: FPC, Publicly Owned, 1973.









84







0 0 0 o o 0% f-11 &N fv &%'.0 "1 0 rl 11-1 ci O'g, 0 0 0 N N 0 'O'D
C, 0 1C' C', a, ".N
0 , r, NJN (0) 0 C',
t : I
-Z 0 ('J Cy -Z7 0 GZ) CA C)
- C4 CY N o o
41 t
t 0





0 go go I'D cr, f- CI) Ic U* U-1 10 -7 ol .I Lr\ r\ r- (14 (14 %0 OD OD 1-4 w o
9 V'- 4 1 0 (30 tt, 10 0 a:) -7 a, N 0 .% -;I -Z C\j 00 U % a., JN cp,
54 Q a, c oc U.
O cl 11: 1 : t .
(A > P: V't\D LA..j a, CO r- Cli r 3 co U.\ - 0 -Z Go 0, N (7, "N
0 coopo,,gvg -4,0 ;; 0
ta 2 -7 4 0 CI& VIN 10 0 -Z 0 "110 02 k cy, (" a, 0,
0 14 -j a r- co CIA -7 V\ %0 co rl 'N o



0

W ocom ,,,o "'D -Z..O(E oo-zro 0 C. N -,C. a:) cojl-ot--, Co a' "N
4J w cc D CN 10 co 0 a, CD a, -r% 0 a a% (14 tA C\ --::, r- -3 ^ ; 90 1- o 4 o a,\ -Z C 4
3 i '": Ll \ -i "! 1 ll ": 1 ci -i 0 Ci mi -i ll C I Ct C "I Ili % -: cl
r.. MID U' -7 li t- 2 Go ON 10 a 0 1*0% "\ = -Z -4 'D 'D g !:."a N 'D 'o 'a tv t- Q e- rta r-- 0 M) o CO -7 --1 10 V\ %-rN 10 a a, r,),, Cr\
W E p C. as 4
0 --7 \10 0% Ci C C -i Cli (wi I C\t 17.1 -i L ;: l3i 'i M -i 11: 1E- 4 f l CJ 1010 r- r- r:





o o o y N N --tcu VJ\D o -7v N ZNq "4,4 tl '%MNOD N 04%0 "D
a% C l as N OD )X\ -A "IN 0 00 o 04 aN C14 10 0 0 CO cl -7 -Z, 0\
I a, 9 .31 J, 1 0
14 1- CN ffN 10 f.- co %0 -0 D CD -Z t^ m rl -.;t ON co C\j N C- IN LA 0 0 CY f14 a, 11\ -Z -j
A Aa w:? U U U; 0; 0 1; UN -4 ILA V r-: t-: _: C\7 U; U; Is I.; L; %A
44 0 4 4 4 4 4 C%) CIJ N CIJ CY CIJ C\J N N N
0 MS.
0




0 0 0 t- t- co -7 (PI 13 r-%Qo -3 -1 01 --10 C l *D a,\ cu ID "X\ 10 -4 co U' as t92 0 0 -4 10 UN M -r\ -1 ID 10 -'D rN 'N 14 10 0 -4 0 N :3 r.- U-\ r-- -r\,-n 0 -7 -7 -a -4: 0 ev
54 0 V\ roN N T- &N 0 a co o 10 -1 G ol fl- Go C\i 0 1 --i C llc o. -i I't C Ci li 1 Ci
0 . . . . . . . . .
> A C \\a t-- 4 (-- r- t,- I.- v U N fy -a.- -, 4 10 r- CN 0 0 1.0 Cr\ ly\ -'1 4 M CS
0 4 D cD I D -Z t-:0 0 o *N Go CY U\ 0 LC% lo;;o 0 cli -Z \0 00 0 N _:r ZF4 Nfe-NMIn %DID E.CII) t) k
.4 0 1.7 1:



0 P
C) 0 ljl _:r ID Lr% r- %D m OD f.- 14 -T a ON 0 fl% CJ -.1 ON C*i cli 14 .2 P.- 0 slgo= z
Ci III -i 112 O Ci Ci lz -ij C Ci -i 1 -- xl ll "! C "i 11: 3 Ci ll ct U I Ci 9'*\,D -. ?'-CO o cy%,D -Nc -Nco co -=.- C4 C\1 %^-ZtUN .Mm--7,0 C-o 'o 'D t- a a m,.o
0 m 'D At- 0 0 t- -= M &N o N,-ZD to 0 cq -2\0 cc 0 N tf'% 10 11\
&O o
v E- -3 -r\ 10 1- 0% Ci -i ot C 112 1,2 -i --: - - - - - - -
Q) f -4 4 1 14 4 -4 4 4 -4 4 1 14 11 4
P4 5" ri
0
4-4 p 4
0 0 a 03 1 9 V I I I J 8 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 11 1 111 1 -7\0 ,O Q\N r-t- ff\ 4 ('\r--C NCO m
9 Z $ cD -= q ON 0 0% r- C t-- 4 0 H
94 0 0 0 -0 co t- t--.A -7 1^ r- 0 r- -z -W > > I . . . . . . .
wo f 0 0 co (3% aN cj tn t-- co ol
$4 'N ^4 CY M fn &N "N ff\ (d
C; 64



r-i
0 0 0 U'\ 10 o 0 -Z -7 M 0 ID o C'- r- 0 a, fn xn o 10 10 10 Cd
0 (1) co CIA r4 1^ VN UN \0 VN In ID \0 o \0 10 \0 10 a 10 ID
.4 ;4 CL



,vt C14 C"D O\C- -j 0 co U\V\LA t-lo 1- 1.- Cli CU 14 C\j CO 0 T\o CY r- CO 0 1,- rn &N- -4 0
1\1 --I-:1= 11110 1-1= (J4 1-,'= CO 1= 1-1. CO= CO ICIC.=.. =..
rl,% In 10 r- :2D co co Go 0% m cr .;N C\ cr a m all m a m a, C a\ cs m ON 0\ C 0% cy, a, CN C%



C14 M o 0 CO U'\ Nfn %0 CO C, (V I^t-,D 0 -7,0 10 0 N 0 (V M 0 CO r-'o t0 V\ -2 10 r- 0 N -Z 10 V\ CIS 0 N N N N CIN M 11\ 'IN -7 -a UN IJN UN U*\ VN : 1-1\ __r 9 -Z :
0000000000000 .00
0
1: -7 ; 1: IZ




0 1.^ \JD I'- OD Cr% 0 IN C'k -4 UN O t- OD CTN 0 4 N 11\ -Z UN 10 co ON 0 (Ij M -4 Ul\ o t-- Go as 0 cu (-N -Z
f N rll rIN 'IN -7 -Z : -Z -7 --t --I -Z -j -1 U'l WN U*\ ul vl UN J\ Lr\ U'\ %^ a 10 10 D 10 %0 o NO 10 %0 r-- f- t.- ca, (71 a\ m m CY, 97N aN as a, a, 0 cl ON a, a, 0% as (r, a% a (r, C% a\ all C a, CN a, 0\ as m as O k a, a% a, a% 0 a, 14

to







85





3- o -o -l - m

01--2- --
0 co
-1 -CD
----
0




>-- -l
W O

wo



S00- -


1Z Cc

w- L,



'U =3 CLg4

zn I.-m m C2

U-r 0





zl C*aom
0 2C







86




TABLE 47- Energy statistics and revenues- Active REA borrowers'



KIOtATT-EOUR SALE (IN THOWANZ)
Calender PCUER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION Total
To To Total To JO ultiate sale2
REA bor are others REA borrowers conumers
1941 41,857 662,528 724,385
1943 410,489 85,274 325,215 1,268,892 21,641 1,247,251 1,572,466
19.5 424,927 151,648 273,279 1,711,397 33,947 1,677,450 1,950,729
1947 341,812 261,065 80,747 3,056,478 61,.25 2,975,353 3,056,100
1949 741,997 542,745 199,252 5,485,474 120,403 5,365,071 5,564,323
1950 899,117 778,794 120,323 6,879,618 116,002 6,763,616 6.883,939
1952 1.513,881 1,258,192 255,689 10,020,477 148,303 9,872,174 10,127,063
1954 2,949,806 2,40,001 469,605- 13,558,371 199,045 13,359,326 13,829,131
1956 4,773,486 3,616,281 1, 157,207 17,133,743 93,536 17,040,207 18,197,414
1958 5,41,590 4,491,053 1,050,537 20,923,566 72,334 20,851,232 21,901,769
1960 7,148,723 5,940,50 1,208,215 26,187,701 127,291 26,060,410 27,268,625
1962 9,306,877 8,122.536 1,186,341 30,834,561 14.0,769 30,693,792 31,660,133
1964 12,986,152 11,062,462 1,903,690 38,277,307 314,143 37,933,16A 39,836,854
1966 19,285,286 16,467,837 ?,817,451 45,926,845 305,240 45,621,605 48,439.056
1966 25,820,433 22,565,324 3,255,109 55,4.47,120 398,296 55,04.8,824 58,303,933
1969 30,632,172 25,575,295 5,056,677 61,628,906 464,76. 61,364,,1. 66,421,021
1970 36,146,136 30,699,764 7,448,374 69,104,503 543,588 68,560,915 76,009,289
1971 45,679,237 37,99,121 6,600,116 76,142,518 659,796 75,482,720 64,262,836
1972 50,298,9D7 42,323,796 7,975,109 65,307,486 748,432 84,559,054 92,534,163
1973 55,U9,727 47,961,209 7,188,516 94,208,026 708,246 93,499,780 100,688,296
1971 61.891.191 5 1 761,5 100,839,785 688,632 100,151,153 105,690,807
ELECTRIC OPERATING REVENUES AND PTECHAAB CAPITAL

calendar POWER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION
YeaTotal FTotal From REA From Ultimate Total
borrovers other. borrowers consumers
1941 $ 516,142 $ -' $ 34,505,929 $ $ $ 35,022,071
1943 2.902,503 993.03 1,908,700 52,685,111, 241,030 52,444,081 54,352,781
1945 3,752,563 1.779,286 1,973,277 69,854,720 362,447 69,492.273 71,465,550
1947 4,355,379 3,606,440 746,939 110,642,727 668,481 109,774,246 110,521,185
1949 9,605,221 7,859,490 1,745,731 187,423,372 1,385,119 166,038,253 167,783,964
1950 11,936,193 10,845,616 1,090,577 229,437,034 1,330,679 228,106,355 229,196,932
1952 17,893,955 16,073,929 1,820,026 305,660,838 1,615,549 304,065,269 305,885,315
1954 31,224,961 27,725,286 3,499,675 381,.617,376 1,972,579 379,644,797 383,144,4772
1956 46,52?,011 36.735,780 9,793,231 451,130,686 736,126 450,394,560 460,167,791
1958 55,969,936 45,754,371 10,215,567 515,322,748 567,328 5U,755,420 524.970,987
1960 68,329,327 56,476,526 11,852,601 604,459,115 1,079,621 603.379,494 615.232,295
1962 79,900,318 69,667,178 10,213,140 688,405,700 -1,312,939 667,092,761 697,305,901
1964 94,567,921 64,561,017 10,006,904 793,961,288 1,556,723 792,424.565 802,431,469
1966. 138,131,236 121,644,790 16,486,446 897,076,447 2,017,538 895,056,909 911,545,355
1968 177,669,247 157,958,560 19,710,687 1,042,687,941 2,712,448 1,039,975,493 1,059,686,160
1969 201,169,446 176,457,868 24,711,578 1,146,446,011 2,851,090 1,143,594,921 1,168,306,499
1970 280,466,856 235,686,730 44,780,126 1,267,945,441 3,261,341 1,264,684,100 1,309,464,226
1971 351,170,156 297,689,338 53,480,818 1,432,430,234 3,657,523 1,428,172,711 1,482,253,529
1972 419,812,399 361,289,697 58,522,702 1,626,375,488 4,180,038 1,622,195,450 1,60,718,152
1973 496,613,469 438,99,985 57,843,484 1,858,609,785 3,951,217 1,85,658,568 1,912,502,052
1974 671,272,044 610,102,575 61,169,469 2,259,483,305 4,216,672 2,255,266,633 2.316,436,102
1. Beginning 1965, includes kWh interchange (net) and kWh wheeling (net).
2. Encludem erarg sales and revenues of power sold by one REA borrower to another, except for 1941, for which year sach ale. amd
revenues ae included.


SOURCE: REA, Annual Statistical Report, 1974.









87








.4 so r4 UN .4 ev 0 0 W% I- V% a 0 -4 V .4 t- %a CP. 10 -10
u 4. .4 4
03 cm '0



rM $00 C-N.0 IV
01

I4

14

Im 40

93 14 r4
10 0 1.4 fV Cq
0 0 14


to 4 4 rcv. .4 140% 81 NT N 4
-, ff N .4'* I EW 0' U lf
Ci .14 n ., t . "i . .
0 0 0. rN UN 4 14 9 a 10 r4 10 cll c V% V% N 10 W%
-.4 so
Ctl%%P: lll n I li Ili 0 4t
L_ 0 N r4 r4 P%
cm cp stC. %D ON m 1-4 C4
cv r4 N W





W 4_40%_4* 0 -4.-4 V% t- WNW 0 W acv


Ol N 8 N W
"N m 14 9 10 1 "" 1^ !4 !%
cc 4A 01 8 .110

ev to W% CY W
em .5
It Ot ri -"in .
cm 1.4 tv Q &. -0 -.4 -1 W%
z I.- r4 m m tv -4 cc tv
0 :OP I r-4 q cv

U. ce 4r

w C.
so

tv

IT 4=. 03 cm Ol
It

; V w r- t- %a w C_ W% CP- 4
ID .2 tv Is P-4 r4 P%
n lei rt
W rog 0 WW W e% ev
u a .4 .0 W N W C. V% W W .4 0 W% 10 f r's -4 WN
Lu w tv 4
ctn't
UN 'D 0 %D W% ev 04 0-4 V% W W 14 UN r4 -I
wc" M% a, m (v cl, ev
-00 w




ca
W MO O V% t- 0 m 0 N 10 cl, 0

0 0 10
Or4


E4 .94 W V% m 0% cv cw -4 4 &-S ry a. 14 V% a -_4
'0, R 13% IS f %,.1 0 le- 0 W% r- rr4 01A 1098 V 10 10 2 1%:1
4 W% W% I r- clog Nalw% v 0 41
It, cv r- W N 00 cw W
804, c cd
N 1-4 14 8 V% 0 0 0 ff 0 ev
r-1 'D V% cv -4 r-, UN 41
Ln It
rq
40

r4





fa

Ile 04 4 ro- .4
t *a Z 1: '.. I r 1.4 . .
0 4 16
4 2.4 1 2 C.V % : : : : V f : : :



0 d 0
0 0 0
.2 40, t 4
0 :1 U :03 :00 0 2 0 so. to
so
I. : 0 t V V 16
0 .4 .4 a
04
4101 '1* 4 .4.q. 0
a t 0
.04 "0 so. 10 ; r -4 0
0 0 0 11 V Z, "
0 v S. 1. A 0 J. S. .43 S.-S
as. .0 e
&.4 a a 0


0 0 00 *01 12 0 0
A






88




All
z
44
> C 0 0 CrN Cr% 0 0 -4
0 0 0 a * 0 4) -P Cd (1) C\j C\j C\j C\j cli C\j C\1 #-4 r-f C*j N N cm
> co 0 P4



cd

:>
0
P-4 A^ \.Q CYN LN M C"N C'"\ t- r-4 fv'\ M p cm j^ i r-i H i^ a\ o
0 t

z z
0 E--4 0





C\l CV*\ --I in \.D r- co 0\ 0 r-4 cm fn _::t %D \.O \D \.O \0 \ O \JD \0 t- E"- t- t"- tr- 4) a\ a,\ cr\ m cN o,\ cN o,\ bN a\ m cy\ a\
al r-i r-q r-4 r-q rq r-I rq rq r-4 r-4 r-4 r-4 r-4 CrN



00
-tr C)
u (n
4) p CM r-- Cr\ _:I IA C\l ON 00 tl%- t- I^ t%- m
cd $4 :3 0 -r4 CN t- \10 ---T (n C\j 0 CN 00 r- \D Ir\ -.IT __r
W 4) 0 k .k 0 1* 0 10 0 0 0 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cd
>
C) P4 pq
z $4
E-4 <
Cd0041

r-4
r-- \.O CM r-4 en CM (n Cr\ r-q t- IA
4 4-3 Cj C#I\ -.Zt \10 00 0 C\j -.Zt \0 00 r-i M I-f\ tl- Cd
0 M
0







co 0\ 0 r-4 .Ij m ---I xA \-O t- co cr\ 0 r-4 UN I^ Ir\ IA I^ IA V\ V\ I^ xr\ %0 % o
ri >% r-4* r-4 r-4 H r-4 r-4 r-4 H r-I r-4 r-4. r-4 r-4 r-4
C.) 0








89






70-60
4 0 OW
N!^A*
A ","m 4ZA WNW
0 ftm NAN -*N Af A N N

0 -0 A" 0 .00
W A
A' ft A:! 0 :
-I -! V:
*04
44 W A 10


4 A.- A A J- 4X .01 21 maA-'
tt gg ... .
lit' N 0 0 00 00 -0
. : t 01;
Wki :t ti
00
0 A AS


04. A .0 ftN .C v A
11 MOO AW C ft A A
t tip 0 A^
a W .11 .,:
Am Ma
A a


IWO 124 .0 WAM-N 0.04A A 0. 4 C^^A
't ttttl 1 -:tt :-:!ft A A N 0 g ft,!,v
tt t t 1: t I cl,
Am. WN&ft AWNN oft: ="A, :A
ft4t 0, 0
A



AN Z ft*4 4,-- ;:.' A a N ft A A
#00#1 ft, W AS ft A W N
a, go 4 W !:;*
1: 0 Z 0 *A. Vt .-: v . t % %tt E iv:
: n:o 4 01-Wvt. Z W, Ap. ow N
N

C, A
Vftw, ;:0 0 4 W-2
1
ttt vt t !t it t
*- 4fto;* SO#A ; Zo- ft"A- ZIP a W A. mp- 0 A 0 o"M 2 00 v X 7 : A 4 1" ft P." '00 0., 0 0:
-0-0 -Di it W,7:i, M a 'D o 9 4 W 0
A

t;
M-AOA 4440 y
IV # WA* a A,* Nr
00 A A Av O'D -AM
Vt 1! :,! 't t 1 S N 4 04-7.
t t tt,: t It
vttl It t
*.4 go 1 .0 0 *ZvWm 40go- N#4
04--- V Mo


A44 N 44N, 0.

abd

am 0
*- o -4 CA I,N*o *-me *,ft4-^ VMO4 pw 04
4000 :ODZ77 !*ON 0.40:z tg;:
0, ft



0 mofte moo" 0 a A
VA- Do
E Z t It I
14 "A

W ; r *.Mo. 4*p. 0- ft 4-0
":gr4 N 4A. 4 4, '"CW* 0: -0 -Oft4P t4eft$ M*Aw #g2o- 0 po_ Ming -9- Am IP-S V! it. A&


&A W ..0 NN, 0 0
JAM'D C :A:4, 'o.
all" 't 'W4 z S. z 1 ft 4 -*20P N At. a,
t! .1! .,- t H t -v: .1- v! r- I
4 A. ::'2 '# A 2! An IP 4r, A


eom a V m 4-a ,t : 4 :; a 0 N Oft 0 ftomc ANONn
tt aft.
It 1: t -IV: t
:wMa
4M o A4POA 40a- N4C 4 OA*
4 WNW !CON 0 A N 4 0



=W,7 No-" !4.z zjw 0 N, m nn-V4


ZO 0


40!
4L T 3.
A; S
19 M .... .... ..... ..
w .4 Its x W- 4. x I Z !!O O V3.0 4. c z zr zo
CAN gz.*;u -0
.4 q- 40
orz a nz 1 G;
zz a v X.-VI z W o
0ow wwoo -ww:o
zzw 0, wow
u4jouo x---- xxsxr urr z rzzz IL
t





























68-353 0 76 7










90








1.:: 11 ., 0 .04:0 :70 OM ft g
a W. I
014




f 0%0 0 ft- M





0.4 mIft= 400.4 --- W044: .02:v NS: v0:0W
ft_ :0 : ^
4 .1 1 .1! .
04 4; 0-00, r4ome 00-0- 44.v:
0^:;.N O OZ
ft 4 Okm AIz



A#* 04* a #4 m Mfts
It
cc OiA ftAwo NI 2 3 _04 _ft4c -00;0 Sam I ow,
=2 t .': I It It It It .1%1: lM Vt
:;-Oft 4 WCA 0: 4 ;ftftft4 ftoO I *W ;4*;,:z Zoe JAZ 4; 4; 4;
fto OftA -ft 4 ftit




0 a
-0
It t

16 .^t li




ftcM 410 4 ft 4. #0
ftw Z. 4NO 0 UA
wo X a lawft: v = :04, t ;:^:V! Vt v: tlt ., It 1 1: It . t t
4. 0 0 t :44, i4as N:i4 SA"00, ft"A 4 "-Am. J-0;
07UM a woo 4*ft^ ^v P. G oft*; 0 4 a***- 4
I ft

03 Ar


4 4 V rw N N,4 0 10 'a ft a 0 Z w z fto :oft
ro z -4 : I t I I. w
U., ^s:2 vftvl 4 A 0-2 .04 v A w 0
It I: tt . .
1:4 V-0 VM fta- a A 0 ft
'I *ft. t
eta it I.
-4 r.4

42

w .aa I a.; 0. .
0OA0
:00 ftoft# 4-'A
-4000 VOI 0 wv^ft 0= 1:
a w Oft 0 4 0-0 A ft.m aftoft4, M ,Awo ;Mc 4 ft^*VN oofto-Z
9 it ":it! titi t il:t It'! i ll i ft t. t. EQ
ft4om ft- w





1-o ft'a a. M;; :14Iz 0 .0 0 V *M. a
Me
at: 7-e

00604Z N^ aIt ftl 0 l.i t ft t I! t t





a 0 r Z. ftop= "004. oft. oc:A ZOO-&
'a 0. 0046C
a
tt.tt
V I
-JI a M^440 .:ft.ap ao &&.0 cc W= _V Mft 4 &ftl ft 90-0 ft =^; 2 T t ftv T t ttttl :Vtt% Mt 1: ItIt t





0-1

00 l=:O-* _nft 0... .0 4 4 M :04ft 4fto-- looz- ft 0 ft* .f ft MX. 0 00 0 r
w %
nz-t
X'O_' raOz Z Owz-c Oz zz
X zx X -or
_10 43;t! ,,z4zx 5
0






91



ABLE 51

COPOSITE REVENUES' AND PATRONAGE CAPITAL, NUMBER OF CdNSUMEP.S, AND MEGAWATT-HOUR SALES REPORTED BY REA
COOPERATIVE BORROWERS OPERATING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS CALENDAR YEAR 1974

Per
cent
Item Amount of
total

Number of borrowers reporting ................. 872


Averae number of consumers served
Residential service (farm & nonfar)m) ........ 6,399,471 91.0
Commercial & industrial, small .............. 426,211 6.1
Commercial & industrial, large .............. 31,880 0.4
Irrigation ...................... ........... 81,7 38 1.2
Othpr electric service ...................... 87,877 1.3
To others for resale ............... 175 *
Total ............... .. ........ 7,027,352 100.0

Kilowatt-hour sales .(thousands)
Residential service (farm & nonfarm) ....... 60,949,432 64.2
Commercial & industrial, small .............. 7,202,481 7.6
Commercial & industrial, large...,.......... 21,451,471 22.6
Irrigation ........... 2,853,356 3.0
Other electric service ....... .... 1,277,104 1.3
To others for resale ........................ 1,257,248 1.3
Total ..*......94,991,092 100.0

Revenues and patronage capital
Residential service (farm & nonfarm) ........ $ 1,500,631,193 70.0 Commercial & industrial, small ............ 192,563,704 9.0
Commercial & industrial, large.............. 320,458,327 15.0
Irrigation ..... ............ 50,574,483 2.3
Other electric service ............. .... 34,251,109 1.6
To others for resale ........................ 15,793,424 0.7
Total from sales of electric energy ..... 2,114,272,240 98.6
Other operating revenue ................... 29,175,534 l.4
Totaloperatingrevenue................. 8 2,143,447,774 100.0


*Less than O.O percent.

SOURCE: REA, Annual Statistical Report, 1974..