Electric and gas utility rate and fuel adjustment clause increases, 1977

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Title:
Electric and gas utility rate and fuel adjustment clause increases, 1977
Physical Description:
xiii, 162 p. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Library of Congress -- Economics Division
Jones, Douglas N., 1933-
Profozich, Russell J
United States -- Congress. -- Senate. -- Committee on Governmental Affairs. -- Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations
United States -- Congress. -- Senate. -- Committee on Governmental Affairs. -- Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation, and Federal Services
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U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
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Washington
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Edition:
Rev ed.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Electric utilities -- Rates -- United States   ( lcsh )
Gas companies -- Rates -- United States   ( lcsh )
Electric utilities -- Rates -- United States   ( lcsh )
Gas companies -- Rates -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations and the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and Federal Services of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate by the Economics Division, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress ; by Russell J. Profozich and Douglas N. Jones.
General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 79 S402-6
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Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions.
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At head of title: 95th Congress, 2d session. Committee print.
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from Congressional Information Service, Inc.
General Note:
Dec. 21, 1978.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 022651360
oclc - 04293272X
Classification:
lcc - KF49
System ID:
AA00025910:00001

Full Text

95th Congress COMMITTEE PRINT
2d Session



ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE AND FUEL

ADJUSTMENT CLAUSE INCREASES, 1977


PREPARED FOR THE


SUBCOMMITTEE ON INT:
RELATI(


SUBCOMMITTEE 0
PROLIFERATION AN


COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS
UNITED STATES SENATE
BY THE
ECONOMICS DIVISION
CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS


(Revised)
DECEMBER 21, 1978

Printed for the use of the Committee on Governmental Affairs


39-281 0


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1979


For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402


t A /






















COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS


ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut, Chairman


HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington
EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine
THOMAS F. EAGLETON, Missouri
LAWTON CHILES, Florida
SAM NUNN, Georgia
JOHN GLENN, Ohio
JIM SASSER, Tennessee


CHARLES H. PERCY, Illinois
JACOB JAVITS, New York
WILLIAM V. ROTH, JR., Delaware
TED STEVENS, Alaska
CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR., Maryland
JOHN C. DANFORTH, Missouri
H. JOHN HEINZ III, Pennsylvania


RICHARD A. WEGMAN, Chief Counsel and Staff Director
PAUL HOFF, Counsel
CONSTANCE PB. EVANS, Minority Staff Director
ELIZAtxETH A. PREAST, Chief Clerk
f -


SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS

EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine, Chairman


LAWTON CHILES, Florida
JOHN GLENN, Ohio
JIM SASSER, Tennessee
SAM NUNN, Georgia


WILLIAM V. ROTH, JR., Delaware
CHARLES H. PERCY, Illinois
JOHN C. DANFORTH, Missouri
H. JOHN HEINZ III, Pennsylvania


ALVIN FROM, Staff Director
DAVID JOHNSON, Counsel
JOAN MCENTEE, Minority Staff Director
LUCINDA T. DENNIS, Chief Clerk



SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY, NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION, AND FEDERAL SERVICES

JOHN GLENN, Ohio, Chairman


THOMAS F. EAGLETON, Missouri
EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine
HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington


JACOB JAVITS, New York
TED STEVENS, Alaska
CHARLES McC. MATHIAS, JR., Maryland


LEONARD WEISS, Staff Director
VIC REINEMER, Professional Staff Member
ALAN BENNETT, Legislative Assistant to the Minority
ANNE BONI, Legislative Assistant
(U)















4r'o The Library of Congress

^ ^ Congressional Research Service
',Washington, D.C. 20540




December 21, 1978



Honorable Edmund S. Muskie,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations
Honorable John Glenn,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation
and Federal Services
Committee on Government Affairs
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510

Dear Senators Muskie and Glenn:

For the fourth consecutive year we have completed at your
request an analysis of fuel adjustment clause increases and other
actions in the electric and gas utility industries, based on information
supplied to us in response to your questionnaire to State utility
commissions. The type of information supplied by the State utility
commissions for the analyses is identical with that for the earlier
reports. This text is essentially the same as that published by the
Committee under the same title in September, 1978; changes in
some of the presentations have been made to enhance clarity and prevent
misinterpretation.

I am pleased to transmit the final study product prepared
from the 1977 data by Russell J. Profozich of our Economics Division
and Douglas N. Jones, formerly of our Economics Division and presently
Director of the National Regulatory Research Institute at Ohio State
University.

We hope that this report will be of continued use to your
committee.


(III)























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INTRODUCTION


By Senator Edmund S. Muskie and Senator John Glenn


BACKGROUND


Early this year we asked State regulatory commissions to provide

our subcommittees with information on electric and gas utility fuel

adjustment clause (FAC) and rate increases in 197TT. The responses

have been analyzed by Russell J. Profozich and Dr. Douglas N. Jones

of the Economics Division of the Congressional Research Service of
(*)
the Library of Congress. The analysis is presented here as a

committee print, for convenient reference, inasmuch as the data is

not otherwise centrally available.

Participation by the state commissions was the best ever this

year. Responses came from 50 commissions in L6 states, the District

of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Nebraska was not

included in the survey because it has only public power systems,

which are subject to local rather than state regulation. Responses

were received from two Texas commissions because of split jurisdiction

in that state; one commission regulates electricity, the other gas.

Only Kentucky, New Mexico and Oklahoma did not join the survey.


(*) Dr. Jones is now director of the National Regulatory Research
Institute at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.










Similar studies vere published by the Committee on Governmental

Affairs in each 3f the three preceding years. CRS extrapolated data

received to estimate revenue changes in states whose commissions

did not report. The number of responding commissions has increased

:r=: the 37 and 35 which, respectively, provided 197L and 1975 data,

to the 47 ani now 5' commissions which provided 1976 and 1977 data.

-he utilities covered in this study are primarily investor-owned

utilities (jU'"s) which distribute approximately 50 percent of the

nratizns electricity and 94 percent of its natural gas. The rest

of the nation's gas and electricity is distributed by publicly-owned

systems (omnicipals and public utility districts) and privately-owned

c:-peratives. Some of them are subject to state commission regulation

but .-arn.y are not ani therefore are not included in this study.


FINDINGS


FueL adjustment chargess by electric and gas utilities amounted

to 1Il billion in 1977, according to the Library of Ccngress survey.

That represents an increase of *l.h billion in fuel adjustment

clause revenues over lQ6. In addition, utilities obtained *2.4 billion

in 1977 through general rate increases, for a total increase of $3.8 billion.

Te s r.ey found that while the amount cf rate increases actually

e'Qiei c'y .t7 'illizn from 197c to 19.?77, FAC revenues increased

over ta period nearly 13 percent, from it9.6 billion to 'll.0 billion.






VII


The survey found the largest increase in gas adjustment charges

(sometimes referred to as purchase gas adjustments), a 23.9 percent

increase over 1976.

During the four years the survey has been conducted, electric and

gas FAC charges have amounted to $35.6 billion, an average of $8.9

billion a year.

In 15 States fuel adjustment charges added more than $100 million

to electric revenues. In eight States FAC's added more than $100,000

to gas revenues. FAC's accounted for more than 20 percent of utility

gas and electric revenue in a dozen States.

The dollar amounts of rate case increases and FAC revenues

for the past four years were as follows:



Year FAC Revenues Rate Increases

1977 $11.0 $ 2.4

1976 9.6 3.1

1975 8.5 4.1

1974 6.5 3.1

Totals $35.6 $12.7


Increases due to fuel costs are even greater than they appear,

becuase many fuel adjustment charges have been rolled into basic

rates. Two-thirds of the commissions reported that some fuel costs

had been transferred from FAC's into the basic rate structure of

electric utilities. Half the commissions reported similar roll-ins

for gas utilities. These roll-ins contributed to the decrease in the

proportion of identifiable FAC revenue to total revenue for both

electric and gas utilities.







VIII


The survey also shows that:

(1) both the allowed rate of return and the actual rate of

return for gas and electric utilities increased in 1977;

(2) utilities received about 50 percent of what they requested

in formal rate cases. This compares with 46 percent in 1976, and

67 percent in previous years;

(3) half the commissions see regulatory problems in letting

power companies into the residential insulation business;

(4) one-third of the commissions do not have specific powers

to deal with energy emergencies;

(5) only one-third of the commissions have attempted to make

comparative evaluations of similar utilities, and

(6) only one-fourth of the commissions have looked into further

opportunities for interconnecting electric utility systems, which

could afford greater conservation and reliability.


CON C LUSI ONS


The survey shows that utilities fared well last year. The cost-

plus regulatory system under which utilities operate provides them

with operating and investment revenues plus profit. Fuel adjustment

clauses have facilitated the collection of more than $35 billion

in revenue in four years. As these fuel charges are rolled into the

basic rate structure, the identifiable FAC charge on utility bills

decreases, although the total bill often increases.








Many utility commissions have permitted use of fuel adjustment

clauses as an alternative to the more difficult and time-consuming

task of considering rate increase requests in formal hearings, where

intervenors and commission staff can challenge, question and counter

utility proposals. Commissions generally report that FAC's are

subject to periodic review. The authors of the Congressional Research

Service analysis make the point that "a periodic review is not the

same as an evidentiary hearing, and care must be taken to ensure

that such reviews do not simply 'rubber-stamp' the information provided

by the utility companies."

Utilities whose rate increase requests were subjected to formal

proceedings obtained only half of what they asked for in 1977. It

is possible that the $11 billion In revenues obtained through automatic

FAC's might have been similarly reduced had it been subjected to

evidentiary hearings.

There are some indications that the states are tightening up

on escalation of utility bills through use of FAC's. The number of

commissions which did not roll any FAC charges into basic rates increased

from seven in 1976 to 11 in 1977. Ten commissions--with Arizona

making the choice in mid-August, 1978--now partially or totally
(*)
prohibit use of FAC's.


(*) Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Nlevada, Washington and Utah commissions
do not use either electric or gas FAC's. Colorado and Kansas FAC's
apply to electricity only. The West Virginia legislature forbade
use of FAC's by electric utilities in 1975.










The Arizona commission based its decision on the sound premise that

abolition of the automatic devices would encourage utilities to

fight harder for lower fuel costs.

:ecision-making regarding retail electric and gas utility rates

properly rests with the states rather than the Federal government.

.1ne Federal government assists consumers in utility regulatory matters

through a grant program initiated through the Senate Committee on

Governmental Affairs. This is section 205 of Public Law 9h-385,

.he Ernergy, Conservation and Production Act. it provides grants for

establishment and operation of offices of consumer services to assist

consumers in their presentations before utility regulatory commissions.:

Congress appropriated the full $2 million authorized for Section

205 for both fiscal 1977 and fiscal 19T8. initial grants were made

to some states last fall and are being continued for the second year.






I *0P


THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Congressional Research Service


1 -* S


WASHINGTON, D.C. 20540


ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE AND FUEL

ADJUSTMENT CLAUSE INCREASES, 1977















Russell J. Profozich
Analyst in Energy and Utilities
Economics Division

and

Dr. Douglas N. Jones
Director
National Regulatory Research Institute


August 9, 1978

















ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE AND FUEL
ADJUSTMENT CLAUSE INCREASES, 1977


Table of Contents

Page

I. Introduction ..............**.... ..** ...****.**.. 1


II. Summary and Interpretation of Responses-
Ouestions I, II, III .............................. 4


III. Summary and Interpretation of Responses-
Ouestion IV and VIII ............................. 21

A. Fuel Adjustment Clauses Rolled
Into Basic Rates ........................ 21

B. Average Costs of Fuels Consumed In Generating
Power, December 1975, 1976 and 1977 ........... 25


IV. Summary and Interpretation of Responses--
Questions V, VI, VII, IX, and X ................... 27


V. Summary *******.................****........*.....*.**........** 32


Appendix A-Letter Sent to All Commission Chairmen ........ 36


Appendix B--Detailed Working Tables ...................... 41


Appendix C-Additional Responses .....................****. 146


XIII
















ELECTRIC AN) GAS TTILITY RATE AND FUFL
ADJUSTMENT CLAUSE INCREASES, 1077


I. Introduction

This report is the fourth in the series of annual studies done

on rate increases in the electric and gas utility industries for the

preceding year. These increases (or decreases) to ratepayers result

either from general rate changes or through the operation of fuel

adjustment clauses (FAC's) in utility tariffs. These latter changes

are viewed by some industry observers as not consistent with good

commission regulation in the public interest where they are automatic,

i.e., no full hearings are undertaken; they are supported by other

industry observers as necessary to the financial soundness of utility

companies where the alternative is lengthy delay in recovering changes

in the prices paid to fuel suppliers.

In gathering the necessary data for 1Q77, State-by-State and

utility-by-utility, the procedure this year as in previous years

employed a questionnaire sent to each State regulatory commission

(plus Puerto 'ico, the Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia).

The questionnaire and letter (Appendix A) signed jointly by Chairmen

Muskie and Glenn of the Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations

and Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and Federal Service,

respectively, of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee, included

(for comparability of data for previous years) questions concerning

CRS- 1







CRS 2


general rate increases requested, granted, and pending for gas and

electric utilities; revenues occasioned through the operation of FAC's;

and the amount of fuel-related increases which were "folded into"

the basic rates throughout 1977. New questions included in this

year's survey inquired into the proportion of State commission time

spent on the regulation of electric and gas companies; opportunities

for further system interconnections for wheeling or transmission of

electric power; difficulties which may arise from allowing power com-

panies into the residential insulation business; average costs of

the various fuels consumed in generating power; commission evaluation

of utility performance; and commission authority to deal with energy

emergency situations.

By the end of June responses were received from forty-eight

commissions, as compared with 46 commissions responding in 19777 35
1/
in q1976 and 37 in 1975. A response to this year's questionnaire

was also received from the Texas Public Utility Commission and the

Nevada Public Service Commission. However, these responses were

received too late to be included in the statistical analysis and are

therefore included as Appendix C to this report.



I/ The reason that the number of responses differs from table to
table is that State commissions often answered some questions
but not others, or answered them incompletely.







CRS 3


Taken together with the earlier studies, the present report.

provides a five-year analysis (1973-1977) of several aspects of the

regulatory process and its response to changes in energy (and other)

prices.

The 1976 report which analyzed 1975 data found that both general

rate increases granted and FAC charges rose significantly over 1974
1/
levels. The 1977 report, in its analysis of 1976 data, found that

both general rate increases granted and FAG charges for the year were
2/
below the levels for 1975. However, the tendency for commissions

to "roll-in" FAC charges into the basic rates for service increased

during 1976, i.e., while the FAC charges decreased, the amount of

fuel costs included in basic rates increased.

This year's survey shows a reduction in the amount of general
3/
rate increases granted in 1977 as compared with 1976 ($2.43 billion

versus 93.1 billion) and an increase in-FAC revenues($10.98 billion


I/ Electric and Gas Utility Rate and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increases,
1975: by Douglas N. Jones and Angela Lancaster, Senate Committee
on Government Operations, Committee print, dated September 1976.

2/ Electric and Gas Utility Rate and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increases,
1976; by Douglas N. Jones and Russell J. Profozich, Senate Com-
mittee on Government Operations, Committee print, dated July 1977.

3/ The figures presented here are those reported by the 48 responding
commissions (although the number of commissions responding to
specific questions varied) extrapolated to represent the total
52 jurisdictions.


39-281 0 79 2






CRS 4


versus Sq.6 billion) with the largest increase represented in gas

adjustment charges (a 23.89 percent increase over 1976). The amount

of rate increases pending in 1977 is the same as in 1976 (S3.R9 bil-
l/
lion versus S3.9 billion). Appendix B contains the detailed data

compiled from responses to this year's questionnaire.



II. Summary and Interpretation of Responses-
fuestions I, II, III

Summary Table I shows a summary of general rate increases

requested, granted, and pending for electric utilities as reported

by the 48 commissions responding. Approximately S3.79 billion in

general rate increases was requested, and Sl.92 billion was granted

in 1977. The ratio of granted to requested was therefore approximately

5n percent as compared to 46 percent in 1976 and about 67 percent

for the previous several years. The total amount of rate increases

vending is reported as S2.37 billion. Therefore, if the ratio of

Granted to requested were to be maintained for the pending cases,

the total amount of general increases attributable to 1977 would be

upwards of S3.1 billion (.l.92 + 1/2 x S2.37).


I/ See Summary Table V.







CRS 5


SUMMARY TABLE I


ELECTRIC UTILITY GENERAL RATE INCREASES GRANTED
SINCE DECEMBER 31, 1976, BY STATES
(in thousands of dollars)


AND PENDING


Amount Amount Amount
State .Requested Granted Pending


Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Virgin Islands
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Total


$205,300
2,351
70,652
59,306
108,695
57,992
_55,767
26,000

483,025
204,148
13,889
40,497
372,419
134,850
7,888
98,828
101,800
92
126,308
32,781
134
155,714

135,223
19,140
336
117,918
495,412
77,754
18,012
127,603
85,784
100,087

5,122
30,269
11,142


43,146
3,715
44,360

4,100
90,385
14,203
8,664
$3.790.811


$91,100
2,319
57,423
34,545
12,384
34,205
20,679
26,000

284,420
102,492
11,351
19,347
210,324
90,777
5,367
40,336
5,000
49
69,913
18,158
68
99,211

58,618
3,591
336
26,507
162,182
49,640
13,681
82,423
66,398
72,657

3,658
21,797
3,842


32,297
3,392
26,893

3,112
42,533
7,537
7,593
$1,924,156


5,073

5,081
564,010
3,186

33,653
45,501
13,500

5,866
26,602
64,383
127,091
56,409
56,835
42,900
25,253
27,169
88,889
314
3,898

30,963
47,713
29,170
430,851
183,511
293

109,056
771
228,588

6,997

967
2,401

7,968
14,261
7,423

19,827
12,679
55,995
618
$2.373.427


SOURCE: Appendix Tables B-V and B-VI.







CRS 6


Comparing these figures with the 1976 totals, we find that

with three additional commissions responding in 1Q77 over 1Q76 (48

versus 4S), the amount of rate increases requested declined by

approximately SR4&n million (.3.7Q billion versus 94.63 billion).

The amount granted also declined from ;2,.3 billion in 1976 to

Sl.Q? billion in 1Q77, as did the amount pending from q2.RQ billion

to A2.37 billion.

Summary Table II presents similar information for gas utilities.

During 1Q77, fsnn million in rate increases was requested and S293

(5R.6 percent) was granted by reDorting commissions, with S1.13 bil-

lion pending at the end of the year. If the ratio of granted to re-

quested continues, the final total of rate increases granted for gas

utilities occasioned by 1Q76 filings would be Sl.16?.billion (S50n

million + 5R.6% x 11.13 billion).

Again, comparing the 1q77 totals representing 4R jurisdictions

with 1976 data for 4S jurisdictions, we find that the amount of rate

increases requested declined from SQ7R million in 1q76 to S5nn million

in 1977. The amount granted declined from sn million to S2Q9 mil-

lion, but the amount pending increased from A4Qn million in lq76 to

Sl.13 billion in 1Q77. The ratio of granted to requested for gas

utilities increased to SR.6 percent in 1977 from 57 percent in 1q76.







CRS 7


SUMMARY TABLE II

GAS UTILITY GENERAL RATE INCREASES GRANTED AND PENDING
SINCE DECEMBER 31, 1976, BY STATES
(in thousands of dollars)

Amount Amount Amount
State Requested Granted Pending


Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Districtof Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Virgin Islands
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Total


$7,245
9,845
465
16,025
13,402
4,819
5,467

3,930
933

2,112
8,866
15,634
3,091
4,606
3,700

21,418
12,473
56,246
8,358

15,130
31,219
576
8,354
87,431
3,766
1,310
28,354
21,796
3,492

200

2,685
2,479
3,317
37,658

358

9,754
39,347
2,880
1,847
$500.588


$5,451-
15,264
5
1,655
8,492
1,958
4,666

2,950
674

1,550
5,826
15,251
2,579
2,176
1,400

20,918
5,290
6,269
6,261

9,496
27,636
523
3,347
53,887
1,514
1,297
14,502
16,063
2,696

65

645
910
1,782
24,658

358

8,129
15,621
630
476
$292,874


$757
486,374
2,444
17,679

10,959


2,600
5,288
17,154
16,772
16,531
9,384




119,363
17,432

30,963
44,669
717
106,844
79,491
16,475
771
11,271

67,376

2,610
4,392
2,821
4,428
4,021
265
99
8,543

5,940
6,885
3,314
7,046
$1,131,739


SOURCE: Appendix Tables B-V and B-VI.







CRS 8


Summing the electric and gas utility general rate increase

data for 1q77, the 4S responding commissions reported S4.29 billion

requested, S2.21 billion granted, and A3.5 billion pending. The com-

parable totals for 1976 with 45 jurisdictions responding are S5.6

billion requested, S2.7 billion granted, and S3.4 billion pending.

Summary Table III shows electric utility revenues through

the operation of fuel adjustment clauses for 1974, 1975, 1976 and

1977. Although the number of jurisdictions providing information

varies for the several years reported, this table shows a large

increase in FAC revenues from'1q74 to 1975 and a decline in FAC

revenues in 1976. FAC revenues for 1977, however, show a slight

increase over the 1976 totals. The pattern of rate increases

occasioned by FAC's varies dramatically among the various States.

California shows an increase in FAC revenues from S9R6 million'in

1974 to SR75 million in 1976, with a decline to $374 million in 1977.

New Jersey's reported FAC revenues reached a high of S605 million

in 1Q7% and declined to S511 million in 1976 and to S48R2 million in

1Q77. Virginia reported FAC revenues S245 million in 1975, S201

million in 1976, and S403 million in 1977.

For all of the jurisdictions responding, Summary Table III

reports that electric utility FAC revenues in 1977 were 13.3q per-

cent of total revenues and that these revenues increased by 2.43














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CRS 11


Footnotes Summary Table III

.!.



I/ Taken from data submitted in the earlier report, Electric and
Gas Utility Rate and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increase, 1976,
Committee on Government Operations, U.S. Senate, Committee
Print, Dated July 1977.

2/ No FAC.

3/ Under Massachusetts law any change in the fuel adjustment
changes of electric utilities must be approved by the Dept.
of Public Utilities.

4/ Five months ending December 1976.

5/ No State regulation.
/
6/ FAC included in tariffs of only 2 utilities and has never
been applied.

7/-Oregon has no electric FAC. A temporary surcharge was im-
plemented to offset excess power costs because of drought.

8/ None, all require semi-annual hearings.

9/ Fuel Adjustment Clauses were eliminated-for electric utilities
effective April 1, 1975.


Source: Appendix Table B-VII







CPS 12


percent over the previous year. In 1q76, FAC revenues represented

15.1 percent of total revenues, and in 1975 they were 16.5 percent

of total revenues. In 1976 FAC revenues declined by 18.3 percent

from the previous year, and in 1975 they showed a 23.4 percent increase
1/
over the year earlier figure. Although total FAC revenues in 1977

increased slightly over the previous year, they show a continued

decline as a percentage of total electric utility revenues. This

decline may represent a slower increase in fuel costs as compared

with other costs of providing service or an increase in the amount

of fuel charges rolled-in to basic electric utility rates. The sub-

ject of fuel adjustment charges rolled-in to basic rates will be taken

up in the following section of this report.

Of the 48 jurisdictions providing data for 1977, Summary Table

III shows that the range of FAC revenues as a percent of total -
2/
revenues varied from a low of -0.72 percent in Michigan to highs

of 32.27 percent in the District of Columbia and 5n.51 percent in

Purto Rico. Changes in 1977 FAC revenues over those in 1Q76 varied


I/ See the earlier report, Electric and Gas Utility Rate and Fuel
Adjustment Clause Increases, 1976, U.S. Senate, Committee on Gov-
ernment Operations, Committee print, dated July 1977, page 7 and
Summary Table III.

2/ FAC revenues as a percent of total revenues may be negative in
those jurisdictions where utilities made refunds to customers
due to a previous over-collection of revenues.






CRS 13


from -127.42 percent in Michigan to 2573.35 percent in Wisconsin.

Of the 36 jurisdictions reporting, 23 showed an increase in FAC

revenues over the previous year.

Summary Table IV displays similar FAC revenue data for natural

gas utilities. Again, with the number of jurisdictions providing

information for the various years showing considerable variation,

this table shows a general increase in FAC revenues from 1974 to 1977,

with some moderation in the. rate of increase between 1976 and 1977.

For example, New Jersey displays a slight decline in FAC revenues

in 1977 as compared with 1976 after reporting a substantial increase

in-FAC revenues for the previous several years. New York displays

a similar pattern, while West Virginia shows a continued increase

in FAC revenues from 1974 to 1977. For all the commissions responding,

Summary Table IV shows a 5.74 percent increase in FAC revenues for

1Q77 over 1976. The same table last year-reported a 17.92 percent
I/
increase in 1976 FAC revenues over 1975. For 1977, the percentage

change in FAC revenues from the previous year varied from -77.91

percent in North Dakota to 391.04 percent in North Carolina. FAC

revenues as a percent of total revenues for the jurisdictions



I/ See the earlier report. Electric and Gas Ultility Rate and Fuel
Adjustment Clause Increases, 1976, op. cit., page 10 and Summary
Table IV.













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CRS 16


Footnotes Summary Table IV



I/ Taken from data submitted in the earlier report, Electric and
Gas Tftilitv Rate and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increase, 1976, Committee
on Government Operations, U.S. Senate, Committee Print, dated July 1977.


2/ There are no automatic PGA Clauses in Colorado. All purchased gas
cost pass-ons are by application.


3/ No FAC.


4/ No State regulation.


5/ FAC included in tariffs of only 2 utilities and has never been applied.


6/ None, all require semi-annual hearing,


Source: Appendix Table B-VII






CRS 17


reporting averaged 16.50 percent with the range varying from 1.64

percent in Alaska to 47.99 percent in Georgia. In 1976, FAC revenues

were 23.04 percent of total revenues for all responding jurisdictions.

Summary Table V percent the actual and derived amounts of

rate increases and FAC revenues in the electric and gas utility industries

based on the 1977 data provided by the responding commissions. This

master table also contains national aggregate figures for the previous

two years so that certain comparisons can be made with the totals for

1976 and 1975.

Step 1 of Summary Table V merely records the actual totals

for rate increases requested, granted, and pending which result from

summing the data provided by the 48 commissions responding. Step 2

extrapolates these data to 52 jurisdictions. Note that the $4.73

billion (new) total requested is $1.77 billion less than the similar

figure for 1976, also $670 million less was granted in 1977 as com-

pared with 1976 while the total amount pending is vertically the

same ($3.89 billion versus $3.9 billion). If the ratio of granted

to requested for 1977 were to hold in resolving the pending rate

cases, then the grand total for general rate increases assignable

to 1977 filings would be $4.4l billion ($2.43 + 51 percent of $3.89

billion). This figure would compare with similarly calculated totals

of $5 billion for 1976 and $7.6 billion for 1975.





























































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CRS 19


Footnotes Summary Table V




I/ Assumes non-responses are proportional to actual response.



2/ Taken from data submitted for the earlier report, Electric and
Gas Utility Rate and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increase, 1976,
Committee on Government Operations, U.S. Senate Committee Print,
dated July'1977, Summary Table V, Page 13.



Source: Commission response to 1977 data request and data submitted for
the earlier report.


39-281 0 79 3






CRS 20


Step 3 presents the actual FAC electric and gas utility revenue

totals for the Jurisdictions responding, and step 4 extrapolates these

data to 52 Jurisdictions. The $5.65 billion of reported FAC increases

for electric utilities extrapolates to $6.52 billion; the $2.95 bil-

lion for gas utility FAC increases extrapolated to $4.46 billion;

the 1977 total thus becomes $10.98 billion. Comparing these figures

with those similarly calculated for 1976, we find that electric

utility FAC revenues have increased by $500 million ($6.5 billion

versus $6.0 billion) and gas utility FAC revenues have increased by

$863 million ($4.46 billion versus $3.6 billion). Thus, total FAC

increases for 1977 of $10.98 billion compare with $9.6 billion for

1976. The rather large increase in gas utility FAC revenues for 1977

is likely a reflection of the continued shortage of national gas

supplies and the recent price increases granted for interstate sales

of this commodity.

Finally, then, if the FAC revenue increases are added to the

actual and likely general rate increases, the national aggregate

resulting from electric and gas utility filings for 1977 would be $15.39

billion ($2.43 billion + $1.98 billion + $10.98 billion). This figure

compares with the similarly calculated figure of $14.6 billion for

1976 and $18.0 billion for 1975.

An examination of the detailed information contained in Appendix

Table B-V reveals that of 306 general rate increases







CRS 21


requested in the electric and gas industries, eight companies asked

for a percentage increase in excess of 50 percent, and five companies

requested a reduction in rates. The average percentage increase re-

quested was 15 percent, the comparable figure for 1976 was 18 percent,

and for 1975 20 percent.

The average allowed rate of return in 1977 for the 270 gas

and electric companies for which information was reported was 9 per-

cent, compared with 8.3 percent in 1976 and 8.24 percent in 1975.

The actual rate of return experienced by the 106 companies for which

data was provided was 7.7 percent in 1977 and for 105 companies in
1/
1976 the figure was 7.5 percent. Thirteen of the rate increase

requests reported for 1977 resulted in either no increase granted

or a reduction in rates to customers.



III. Summary and Interpretation of Responses--
Questions IV and VIII

A. Fuel Adjustment Clauses Rolled In to Basic Rates

As was the case in previous years, the commissions were asked

several questions relating to the operation of automatic fuel adjust-

ment clauses (FAC's). Question IV asked the commissions to indicate



I/ See the earlier report, Electric and Gas Utility Rate and Fuel
Adjustment Clause Increases, 1976, op. cit., p. 14.






CRS 22


the amount of fuel charges which had previously been included in the

FAC which during 1977 have been folded into basic rates. The purpose

of this question is to get some indication of the extent of the recovery

of fuel costs in the basic rates of utilities as opposed to recovering

these costs through the operation of FAC's. Also, in order to deter-

mine the total change in electric and gas utility revenues attributable

to changes in fuel costs, both FAC revenues and FAC roll-ins mist

be considered. Appendix Table B-VIII shows commission responses to

question IV for electric and gas utilities.

Of the commissions which allow FAC's within their jurisdic-

tion, 32 responded to question IV and provided usable data. Of these

32 responses, 2 commissions reported some electric utility roll-ins

but stated there were none for gas utilities, and 9 commissions

reported no roll-ins for either electric or gas utilities. Of the

total number of responses, 23 commissions reported some gas and/or

electric utility roll-ins for 71 utility companies.

For electric utilities, 21 commissions covering 44 companies

reported some roll-in of fuel charges for 1977. The highest roll-

ins reported were Alaska at 2.78 and 1.536 cents/kwh and Rhode Island

at 1.448 cents/kwh. The lowest roll-ins reported include reductions

of 0.170 cents/kwh in North Carolina, 0.022 cents/kwh in North Dakota,

and 0.128 cents/kwh in Michigan, and a 0.01 cent/kwh increase in Alaska.

Nine commissions reported no FAC roll-ins for 1977.






CRS 23


For gas utilities, 11 commissions covering 27 companies

reported some roll-ins of gas fuel adjustment charges.. The highest

roll-ins reported were in Illinois at 11.31 and 11.25 cents/therm

and North Dakota at 15.632 cents/therm. The lowest roll-in reported

was also in Illinois at 0.77 cents/therm. Eleven commissions reported

no gas FAC roll-ins for 1977.

Appendix Table B-IX was prepared from data supplied by the

commissions in response to question III, giving FAC's for December

1976 fnd December 1977, and question IV, giving the amount of FAC

roll-ins for 1977. Only those commissions responding to both question

IM and question IV are included in this table in an attempt to deter-

mine the total increase (or decrease) in fuel costs reflected in utility

rates in 1977. Appendix Table B-IX shows separately for electric

and gas utilities the amount of the roll-in in 1977 [Col. (1)1 and

the December 1976 and December 1977 FAC's [Col.- (2) and (3), respec-

tively]. From these data are calculated the percent that 1977 roll-

ins were of December 1977 fuel adjustment charges [Col (4)], and the

percentage increase (or decrease) in FAC's from December 1976 to

December 1977 [Col. (5)1. The sum of these data (shown in Col. (6)1

indicates the total increase (or decrease) in fuel charges for the

various utilities since December 1976, as reflected both in FAC's and

in the fuel portion of the basic tariffs. There are 30 commissions

representing 101 electric and 104 gas utilities included in this table.






CRS 24


The data contained in Appendix Table B-IX show a continuation

of the trend which was displayed in the same table in last year's

report: i.e., for the utilities which show an inclusion of fuel charges

in the basic tariffs, this increase in the fuel portion of utility

rates is offset (partially or totally) by a decrease in the fuel ad-

justment clause. A greater number of commissions, however, reported
no FAC roll-ins for 1977. (Commissions in 11 jurisdictions reported

no FAC roll-ins for 1977, whereas 7 commissions reported no FAC roll-

ions for 1976.) Also, a number of commissions reported that changes

in the fuel adjustment charges of the utilities within their juris-

diction are subject to periodic review. These two conditions may

indicate a closer review of utility fuel-related expenses on behalf

of commissions than has been the case in the past.

Of the 101 electric utility companies listed in Appendix Table

B-IX, 58 had no change in the rolled-in portion of fuel charges (i.e.,

the commission reported no roll-ins), and 3 companies had a decrease

in the amount of fuel charges included in basic rates. Of these 61

companies, 21 also had a negative percentage change in the December

1976 to December 1977 FAC, resulting in a negative (decrease) total

percentage change in fuel charges in lq77 (as reported in column 6

of the table). A total number of 33 electric utilities of those for

which data was tabulated show a decrease in the amount of fuel charges






CRS 25


for 1q77, thus total fuel charges are continuing to increase for about

two-thirds of the companies reported.

For the gas utilities, 77 of the 104 companies listed have

zero roll-ins for 1977. However, only 22 of the companies have a

negative total percentage changes in fuel charges for 1977, indicating

that even with the lower number of roll-ins total fuel charges con-

tinued to increase during 1977.


B. Average Costs of Fuels Consumed in Generating Power,
December 1975, 1976 and 1977

In an attempt to determine the percentage increase in the cost

of-fuels used in generating electricity with which to compare the

percentage increase in utility fuel adjustment changes, the commissions

this year were asked to supply data on the average costs of the various

fuels consumed in generating power for the utilities within their

jurisdiction as of December 1975, 1976 and 1977.- Eighteen commis-

sions responded to this question and provided data on the average

cost of fuels used in generating electric power. However, in most

instances the cost figures provided were not for individual utility

companies but rather an average cost figure for all the electric utility-

companies within a particular jurisdiction. Also, in most instances,

the cost figure provided -is not on a per kwh generated basis but rather

on a per million Btu basis (which is a measure of the heat content






CRS 26


of the fuel), or on a cost per ton (for coal), or per barrel (for oil),

or per therm (for gas). Thus a direct comparison of the percentage

increase in fuel costs with the percentage increase in FAC charges

is not possible. This is due to the fact that fuels consumed in

generating power are converted from a per Btu basis to a per kwh basis

at various levels of efficiency, depending on the efficiency of each

generating facility on a utility's system. The cost per kwh generated

for an entire system is the weighted average of the cost per kwh

generated at each power plant on the system.

The data supplied by the commissions in answering the question

on average fuel costs is contained in Appendix Table B-X. Although

a direct comparison with increases in fuel adjustment clauses cannot

be made, some useful comparisons of the data provided can still be

accomplished. The data in this table shows a wide variation in the

change in fuel costs among the various States and within the same

State. In Florida, for example, the combined cost of fuel on a per

kwh basis decreased by 16 percent for one utility between 1975 and

1977 but increased by 35 percent for another utility. With 11 juris-

dictions providing data, the average cost of nuclear fuel increased

by 26.42 percent from 1975 to 1977 with the largest increase of 95.23

percent reported in California and a reduction in cost of 44.47 per-

cent reported by Connecticut. Thirteen jurisdictions reported an







CRS 27


average increase in the cost of oil used to generate power of 16.57

percent, with the largest increase of 39.32 percent occurring in Illi-

nois and a reduction in cost of 39.55 percent reported in Louisiana.

The average increase in the cost of gas for 1975-1977, with 13 juris-

dictions reporting, was 66.66 percent with Mississippi reporting both

the largest increase; 148.24 percent, and the lowest; a 5.73 percent

reduction. Coal averaged a 13.29 percent increase for 21 jurisdictions,

the highest increase of 54.34 percent reported by Utah, and the

lowest,. a negative 30.27 percent, reported by South Carolina.



IV. Summary and Interpretation of Responses--
O questions V, VI, VII, IX and X

With each annual survey, questions in addition to FAC infor-

mation are asked of the commissions treating several current or con-

tinuing issues. Answers to five questions (numbers V, VI, VII, IX

and X on this year's questionnaire) are displayed in Summary Table

B-XI and are discussed below.

In this year's survey, a question was asked about the relative

amount of commission time devoted to the regulation of electric and

gas companies where a commission has jurisdiction over the transport

and/or communications sectors as well (Question V). The answers to
this question appear in Column of Appendix Table B-XI.
this question appear in Column 1 of Appendix Table B-XI.






CRS 28


With 44 jurisdictions replying, the average time spent on

electric and gas utility regulation by commissions with multiple

jurisdiction was 50 percent. The range of responses varied from 10

percent (Tennessee) to 85 percent (Wyoming). Of note also is that

19 commissions spent 60 percent or more of their time on this aspect

of their regulatory authority. Footnotes to the table indicate that

the basis for estimation varied somewhat in these responses--one State

using relative budgets, another reporting according to time spent

by the functional divisions within the commission (e.g., Engineering,

Accounting, etc.), and another estimating by number of hearing days

attributable.

Question VI asked if commissions had looked into further

opportunities for system interconnection for the purpose of pooling

or wheeling of electric power. The summary of replies to this ques-

tion appears in Column 2 of the table.

Of the 46 States responding, only 11 said that they had

examined such opportunities during 1977. In answering in the negative,

some commissions indicated that they largely left the issue up to

utilities to determine; others felt that all opportunities have

already been exhausted; and one (Wisconsin) reported that the excep-

tion is where the commission looks for potential for joint owner-

ship of new generating capacity by municipal or other small utilities;







CRS 29


Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands concluded that the question doesn't

apply to their circumstances.

It would seem fair to say that passage of the National Energy

Act with its emphasis on power interties might well see a larger per-

centage of commissions active in this aspect of their regulatory

authority. Admittedly, however, it is a difficult undertaking in

that interconnects, pooling and wheeling arrangements are often fought

with substantial technical, legal and institutional obstacles for

individual State commissions.

Question VII asked if the commissions foresaw any regulatory

difficulties arising out of placing the power companies into the

residential insulation business. Answers from the 46 commissions

replying to this question appear in Column (3), with 18 saying "yes",

18 saying "no", and 7 stating that they are currently studying the
J
matter.

The actual or presumed difficulties, as seen by the regulator,

were several in number. Some cited the problems of raising capital

in an industry already worried-about its substantial capital needs

(Delaware, Hawaii, Wyoming): some said.that the utility companies

lacked expertise in the field (South Carolina, Texas); most worried

About the problems posed directly for ratemaking (Georgia, Iowa) and

for cost-of-service separations and accounting (Louisiana, Maine,






CRS 30


New Jersey, Oregon, Tennessee, Washington). While some said it was

too early to tell CNew York) or that its relation to ratemaking was

yet to be determined (Massachusetts), others were adamant that insula-

tion-related costs and assets not get mixed up with allowable utility

expenses or rate base (Maine). The Indiana response was, perhaps,

most vehement in stating

... it would take an entire volume ... to explain the problems ...
from allowing power companies into the insulation business.
[I] can see very little good and much potential difficulty
with regulated electric and gas utilities becoming involved....
We've only recently been successful with getting them out of
the appliance sales business....

The status of the several programs varies a great deal. Two

States have experimental programs (Virginia, New Jersey); the issue

is pending before the Arkansas Commission: the Idaho Commission opposed

the power company's application to promote and guarantee loans for

insulation (not to make loans), but required that loan guarantees

be available to all customers--not only electric heating customers

as requested by the company.

Question IX inquired of the commissions to acknowledge if they

make any attempt to evaluate explicitly, one against another, the

performance of utilities similarly circumstanced. As presented in

Column (4) of the Appendix Table B-XI, of the 42 jurisdictions re-

plying only 14 answered in the affirmative, with 23 answering in the

negative and 5 saying "not explicitly."







CRS 31


Methods of comparison included rate level comparisons (Iowa)

and efficiency audits (Michigan and Missouri). Some felt that the

question was not applicable to their commission because there is only

one generating utility within its jurisdiction (Delaware, Puerto Rico,

Virgin Islands). This is to take a very limited view of possible

comparabilities, however, in that there may be utilities similarly

circumstanced against which efficiency and other comparisons might

be made, though this is somewhat more difficult when they are located

in other jurisdictions. In any event, this area of State commission

regulation--the setting and measuring of standards of utility company

performance, one against another--has long been viewed by academics

and other professionals in the public utility field as holding great

potential for improving regulation in the public interest. The major

resistance-has come, not surprisingly, from the utilities which argue
J
the uniqueness of each utility system.

The matter of extraordinary authority for dealing with declared

or undeclared energy emergency situations was the subject of Question

X. As indicated in Column (5), the results show that 29 commissions

feel that they have such authority and 16 reported that such powers

were not specifically provided them. Most of the emergency authori-
I
ties (in addition to rate relief) have to do with curtailment and

allocation plans, either filed by the utility companies for commission







CRS 32


approval or initiated by the commissions. The Missouri Commission

has authority to order the sharing of fuel and power inventories:

New York has electric load shedding procedures: Texas can order aug-

mentation of natural gas supplies: the Georgia Commission must approve

emergency purchases of natural gas.

A number of State commissions look to the Governor's Office

in energy emergencies. In Iowa, the commission chairman is energy

adviser to the Governor: the Maryland Commisioner may administer the

Governor's executive orders; Massachusetts counts on "voluntarism

and the Governor"; the Michigan Energy Administration has the respon-

sibility in that State: in North Carolina, the Governor's emergency

powers are said to "take care of it": and in Virginia, the Governor

with the commission allocates emergency natural gas supplies.

Considering the information supplied, it appears that a good

deal more could be done before one could conclude that the State

regulatory commissions taken as a whole have comprehensive contingency

plans able to be quickly implemented should the need arise.



V. Summary

The data supplied by the various regulatory commissions and

summarized in the preceding sections of this report show that sub-

stantial general rate increases and fuel cost adjustment charge revenues are






CRS 33


continuing to impact upon the ratepayer. General rate increases of

S2.4 billion and FAC revenues of Sll billion during 1977, as extra-

polated to 52 jurisdictions from those reporting, are ample evidence

of a continued increase in the rates of charge for electric and gas

utility service. The figures obtained in this year's report, however,

represent some interesting variations from those obtained in the

previous two years.

Total general rate increases requested in 1977 were reported

to be $4.7 billion, as opposed to $6.5 billion in 1976 and $6.0 bil-

lion in 1975. This substantial reduction in the amount of rate relief

requested by the Nation's electric and gas utilities may reflect the

gradually improving financial health of the industry and the fact

that some $11-12 billion in general rate increases was granted during
i/
the previous two-year period. The amount of rate relief granted

during 1977, some $2.4 billion, is ilso below the 1976 figure of $3.1

billion, while the amount pending is identical ($3.9 billion). These

figures may indicate a lengthening of the time taken to resolve a

formal rate request since the percentagee of rate increases pending
to requested is higher than ic has been in the past two years.




I/ As reported in last year's report, Electric and Gas Utility Rate
and Fuel Adjustment Clause Increases, 1976, op. cit., p. 12.






CRS 34


Although the amount of rate increases requested and granted

has declined during 19q77, the amount of fuel adjustment charge

revenues has increased. The total amount of fuel adjustment charge

revenues reported in 1975 was S11.5 billion (as extrapolated to 52

jurisdictions). The same figure for 1976 was $9.6 billion, and for

1977 it is Sll billion. The largest increase in the FAC revenues

occurred among the gas utilities, as recent price increases seem to

have worked their way through the system. The latest figures for

fuel cost adjustments offer little reason for optimism in the hope

that the fuel portion of a consumer's utility bill will cease its

recent precipitous increase.

The practice of "rolling-in"-changes in fuel supply cost into

the basic rate schedules of utility company tariffs continued this

year, although at what appears to be a somewhat slower rate than during

1q76. This year (1977) the number of commissions reporting no FAC

roll-ins increased to 11, from a reported 7 commissions in 1976. Also,

a number of commissions this year reported a periodic review of FAC

charges, an occurrence which may become a trend in future years. How-

ever, it is important to remember that a periodic review is not the

same as an evidentiary hearing, and care must be taken to ensure that

such reviews do not simply "rubber-stamp" the information provided

by the utility companies,.







CRS 35












APPENDIX A


39-281 0- 79 4







.* AM 1mMCoF ImrL. COM ApM MCCMMIVYC
, I i. C CL V.LAI. ARK. CA*ULI* H. PtCT. IL. .U-ftc M ICI MMt. CNAI*UMa
.CMIV M. JC.MM. .Sm. JAC6 H. -.T. LICE .MT. --UMI V V, M i. OiEl,
1[0-0 S. AIMED WILLIAM V. NIYH. JR.. GW. LWO M.K.FA ,1 .FEC.IL
B W ."CL.wT. STE".SVK CRS 36 Hom" o"4101 Hm _DAPcH. &KIL
-At V CAGAETLC .W. cmAUCSMM s-c C MArTmA. GSS .ER S. MC-- cms Il. Ph-
AWm C.ILES. PLA. la" IC.AM OOaTH. MI1L
GA MU.m GA. mL- 1Mm H-m at A. AVUI F ?V'WBA. OINWT A C
1'CMN GLCIG. 06"0
JIM JASSCR. TAOt.
CHIEF VD&ONSCL *540 SAff V OIGCTOf
IoNA MKBM Ji~n~gu $ {ales S nt
COMMITTEE ON
GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS
SUBCOMMITTEE ON
INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS
(Z02)2714'71
(rummaaUsv TON. *ac. Am. 16 ase IS, *T% coGagcm)
WASHINGTON. D.C. M0D

Letter sent to all state commission chairman

March 14, 1978

Dear :

Each of the past three years Senate Governmental Affairs
subcommittees have jointly surveyed State utility commissions
regarding fuel adjustment clauses and other matters related to
utility rates. The information collected, and published
after tabulation and analysis by the Congressional Research
Service of the Library of Congress, has proven useful to
regulators, other Federal and State offlcals and the energy
industry.
E
Last year 45 State Commisslons--the most ever--cooperated
in this survey. So that all affected parties can better gauge
the impact of rate and automatic adjustment clause changes
and update information collected previously, we would appreciate
your completion of the enclosed questionnaire, as it applies
to electric and gas utilities regulated by your commission.

This survey has been discussed with the National Associa-
tion of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, which verified that
this questionnaire would not duplicate data which it or others
collect, and that your and other commissions' responses will
be useful to NARUC and Its constituent commissions. In
addition, the data will be helpful to the Department of Energy
and the Congress, whose energy conferees have called for studies
of the operation of automatic adjustment clauses.

The questionnaire is designed for reporting information
for calendar year 1977. It will be most helpful if youcom-
plete and return it no later than April 21, 1978. If you
have any questions or difficulties regarding the questionnaire,
please call Russell J. Profozich at the Library of Congress






CRS 37


Page 2


lease call Russell J. Profozich at the Library of Congress
202) 426-6408, David Johnson, counsel to the Subcommittee
on Intergovernmental Relations (202) 224-4718 or Vie Reinemer
of the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and
Federal Services (202) 224-1474.

The completed questionnaire should be sent to Mr. Profozich,
Economics Division, Congressional Research Service, Library of
Congress, Washington, D.C. 20450.-

Your cooperation will be deeply appreciated.

Enclosed for convenient reference is last years's
committee print, "Electric and Gas Utility Rate and Fuel
Adjustment Clause Increases 1976."


pemQGlenn, Chairman
gacommlttee on Energy, Nuclear
Proliferation and Federal
Services
A


EMdmund S. Muskle, Chairman
Subcommittee on
Intergovernmental Relations


Enclosure










CRS 38


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CRS 39


Questionnaire to State Commission Chairmen (Cont.)



IV. If during 1977 fuel charges previously handled through FACs have been folded into
basic rates, please give date and total dollar amount folded in.



V. Where your commission has jurisdiction over several public utility sectors (e.g.,
power, communications, transportation) what proportion of commission time would
you estimate is spent on the regulation of the electric and gas companies?



VI. Has your commission in 1977 examined any opportunities for further system inter-
connections for the wheeling or transmission of electric power? If so, what are
the results?
*


VII. Does your commission foresee any regulatory difficulties arising from allowing
the power companies into the residential insulation business as proposed in
various legislative initiatives? Please elaborate.



VIII. For utilities under your jurisdiction, what were the average costs for the
various fuels consumed in generating power as of December 1975, December 1976,*
and December 1977?


/
IX. Does your commission make any attempt to evaluate explicitly, one against
another, the performance of utilities similarly circumstanced?



X. hnac x=:aordiary auzLoriries aoes your commission possess to deal with energy
emergency situations, whether formally declared or not? If exercised in 1977,
please give details.







CRS 40

















APPENDIX B










CRS 41


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4..p.. In


00' Oi 0i I It.
on In o 0> i
% In a. 0 -41
In '0.0 N> o41
r4 2k Cc Cc1 h


V44




In In 0 I" I
*MI C V

0 In 0 Nf 9%


'0 OS Fo n
W%
-4
N^


00 O9 f
0 In 0o
I n U%'
0.0o-'
In a. 4
'0 ~ c0
In In
N<


4 g W% .0 1

C 0! 1 0 -.*4 0 I%

'0 0449%3 ri

0 4000i3t
0 n go MM
I C; : ---


t4 CC040'-
i0 In0'.-1r^In



10 n. 47 UN w


a- r4 10 en 0


'i va in Cto
P. In co. .

< c0 c 0 w%
In i 4 4nD -a0
*41- -.0B00
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0 NNMo N


In CM C 0 4

<0 In>


ar. -0o
In N 4
0o4 In


N- n 0o
CM In'0
In Nt


04~~~r N tnN n0
c In-O ct 0 o N

m aO I .% -4 Vo -4

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In 0 In N -nAtI


000 I
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I In 01 00C
0 9% -4 In
'0 InCw
CM NM In 4%
In


0 0n'0
0M .1 CM
o en 1a


NA 0'-4
N '4
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In0m


CM M. C0 M
.0 '00'


N N V%N
Imn In o
-4 In In In
0n N 9% 9%
4




In 004

4- N N-
I In In0..*-
M n 0 'n0
In 0' .C;


-4 104r-.Wi
0 .4. I -.
004 M % 010

In 4%I 00]o o
cr> 0'> NM
en


00 NM 0
In In 0'
0' 00*
In In 0'
I ( 4-4In*

In In 4
4 4


00 40 "1
0co n n
00 9% Inj
-i In CM ]
.1 0400
o. -


-S ..# I ..a 4A 0 'v14
a e o S.
--Q u 1 ..< I. 40 4 C
S U v. 0. a. 0u0 0 C, 0 '0. <
(< U 40 60 4J 4..444.MWl^Ni *0 Mnrs

a a 04uis U-0,--I 0 0 00 r4 445 36 v46 0 5. 1 2. r. a
S e eo s o c B -0 5 46 a o x o- a a i. o *a* C o* .
-j '..4. M- -.-64UU-. 506404 ....64 64, 0 Bo ,0, *46...e.64-> .'
3 C 0 0_ a u a 0 3 .t w u C 0 3 C a
*<-<44,3i.xx:xia: o0a03 u0iiJ>>>.4


In 00 %D 0 -400 N a4 N*
04 N %In C% In 00 p.1 0-
Ni 0' ItItn 4 N t at In 0 I. -4 C
"-4In m n %I %mn0 m '. N w-

00~I' 4 0%40 0%




In4 0 00 w 0 0 In 0NInnIn%

o0n 0% co. 0. Nt 0 -An 00 Ow .4
0 0 m-4 04 0 40- In In 0o 4W.-4
wM00000% In 0'com N In 9 9%

O'0 *-4IOO n^ 0 -o 0t
C04 en-4 -N 4


c
f

'<








CBS 61


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Colum


State Co-ission and CorDanv


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Gas) S Change crease


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5) (6)
Fair
Re- Value
quested or Orig.
Rate of Cost
Return Basis


Alabama Public Service Commission

Alaska Public Utilities Commission
Alaska Village Elec. Coop.
Chugach Elec. Assoc.
Northern Pvr. & Engineering


Arizona Corporation Commission

Arkansas Public Service Commission
Oklahoma Gas & Elec.
N. Arkansas Elec. Coop.
Riceland Elec. Coop.


Ark.-Okla. Gas


757,140 5.80


10.97 OC 8/3/77


California Public Utilities Comaissionft
Pacific Gas & Elec. E
San Diego Gas & Elec.
Sierra Pacific Pwr.
Southern Cal. Edison


Pacific Gas &
San Diego Gas
Southern Cal.


Elec.
& Elec.
Gas


lec. 161,400,000
83,550,000
S 3,260,000
S 315,800,000
564,010,000

as 130,000,000
22,274,000
S 334,100,000
486,374,000


None


(7)



Date
Filed


21.81
24.60


Klec.
n
11


Elec.
11
n


2.87
6.88
RA


NA
6.88
13.00


749,448
4,253,844
69,820
5,073,112

None


4,284,000
616,142
S180,473
5,080,615


1/28/77
8/29/77
10/14/7.7


17.30
6.40
12.80


9.30
6.73
3.23


6/1/77
1/10/77
1/16/77


7.30
16.87
21.70
14.50


8.80
19.64
33.50


9.20
9.50
8.84
8.80


9.20
9.50
8.80


10.33
10.43
9.82
10.17


10.33
10.43
10.20


5/5/77
1/26/78
2/15/77
10/7/77


5/5/77
1/26/78
10/28/77


State. Comsso an a -


Ga








CRS 62


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Commission and Company


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Gas) $ Chante create


Colorado Public Utilities Commission
Colo.-Ute Elec. Assn.
Grand Valley REA
Kit Carson Elec. Assn.
Noon Lake Elec. Assn.


Peoples Nat'l Gas--S. West
Central
"t --N. East
--S. West
--Durango
f "'--Ute Pass
o ."--Gunnison
Rocky Ntn. Nat'l Gas--West
i I --Dove


Area
Area
Area
Area
Area
Area
Area
Slope
Creek


Connecticut Public Utilities
Control Authority
Connecticut Nat'l Gas
Southern Conn. Gas


Delaware Public Service Commission
Delaware Pwr. & Lt.

District of Columbia Public
Service Commission
Potomac Elec. Pvr.
Washington Gas Lt.


Gas 11,271,903
6,406,695
17,678,598


Elec. 33,653,291



Elec. 45,501,000
Gas 10,959,152


4.08
9.84
23.50
20.13


9.53
5.17
5.31
6.34
10.25
28.90
32.40
14.51
3.14


14.50
8.47



17.57


15.90 NA
12.56 NA


9.2 11.0 OC
9.85 10.6 OC


9.09 9.6 OC 2/28/77


10.25 OC
9.85 OC


(4)

Al loved
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


Elec.


II


Gas
n
n
it

ato
tI
i,
It
91
11
n
I,
n
n,


2,291,848
205,837
1,194
686,944
3,185,823

452,426
201,714
174,962
94,004
175,981
20,861
23,343
1,296,093
4,845
2,444,229


8.32
5.70

6.19


10.006
10.006
10.006
10.006
10.006
10.006
10.006
10.49
10.49


7.71
6.17

6.38


11.25
11.25
11.25
11.25
11.25
11.25
11.25
11.10
10.849


11/10/77
12/5/77
12/3/77
10/28/77


7/5/77
7/5/77
7/5/77
7/5/77
7/5/77
7/5/77
7/5/77
10/21/77
11/15/77


10/3/77
8/29/77


7/26/77
9/1/77


State Commission and Companv








CBS 63
**

APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Coat.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Cola


State Coamission and ComDanv


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Gas) $ Change crease


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5) (6)
Fair
Re- Value
quested or Orig.
Rate of Coat
Return Basis


Florida Public Service Com-ission
Gulf Pwr. Co.

Georgia Public Service Commission

Hawaii Public Utilities Commission
Citizens Utilities Co.
Hilo Elec. Lt.


GASCO Inc.


Idaho Public Utilities Comission
Utah Pwr. & Lt.
Pacific Pwr. & Lt.


Interuountain Gas

Illinois Commerce Commission
Central 111. Lt.
Central 111. Pub. Serv.
S. Beloit Utr. Gas & Elec.


Elec. 13,500,000


None


Elec. 3,412,000
" 2,454,000
5,866,000

Gas 2,600,000


Elec. 26,068,000
" 534,000
26,602,000

Gas 5,287,963


Elec.
U,
11


Central 111. Lt.
Central 111. Pub. Serv.
Consimers Gas Co.
Eastern 111. Gas

Illinois Gas Co.


24,000,000
40,000,000
383,211
64,383,211

4,110,000
3,400,000
220,584
21,315
160,000
18,650


8.40


29.73
9.20


10.10


52.49
21.18


5.60


13.00
17.00
10.20


4.10
6.00
9.95
1.50

1.50


8.39 8.39 OC 12/13/77


8.94 10.53 OC 12/30/76
8.95 10.72 OC 11/17/76


9.93 10.68 OC 5/31/77


9.67 10.21 OC 4/14/78
8.40 9.82 OC 4/21/78


9.77


-


-- OC 2/17/78


9/27/ 77
3/14/77
1/30/77


9/27/77
5/19/77
2/23/77
4/12/77
6/2/77
4/12/77


(7)



Date
Filed







CPS 6k


APPENDIX TABLE 5-VI (Coat.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENMDIG BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DCEER 1977


Col mn


State Commission and Company


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Amount Requested
Z In-
S Change crease


Illinois Co-erce Comission (Cont.)
Illinois Gas Co.
Kaskaskia
Monarch
North Shore Gas
S. Beloit Wtr. Gas & Elec.
United Cities Gas


Indiana Public Service Coission
IPALCO
PSI


Terre Haute
Citizens Gas & Coke


aIova State Co-erce Comission
Interstate Pwr. Co.
lowva Elec. Lt. & Pvr.
Iowa-Ill. Gas & Elc.
Iowa Pub. Serv. Co.
91 of f nf
lowa Southern Util.


Interstate Pvr.
Iova Elec. Lt. & Pwr.
Iowa Pvr. & Lt.
Iowa Pub. Serv. Co.


180,000
66,000
169,501
8,000,000
362,537
445,502
17,154,089


Elec. 51,790,954
if 75,300,000
127,090,954

Gas 1,050,063
" 15,721,985
16,772,048


Elec.
iff







Gas
M
if
if


15,763,291
11,417,327
8,602,634
6,996,466
7,515,345
6,113,775
56,408,838

963,124
2,938,895
1,846,470
5,367,615


12.0

9.40
16.51
10.10


7.25 9.47 FV
7.10 7.50 Fy


6.00


23.00
10.30
16.80
9.37
8.00
16.70


4.90
5.17
3.61
12.25


7.0 -
NA NA


8.26
8.45
9.01
8.61
8.61
IA


8.26
8.45
8.79
8.61


9.31
9.60
9.94
9.85
10.23
10.32


8.70
9.21
10.36
10.18


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
-quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Coat
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


6/2/77
9/16/77
10/31/77
5/20/77
11130/77
4/28/77



10/5/77
- 12/9/77


10/27/77
8/23/77



7/28/77
5/28/76
2/20/76
9/12/75
1/4/77
3/30/76


6/25/76
8/1/77
8/2/77
3/30/76








CRS 65


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)'

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS. DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Commission and Company


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Amount Requested
Z In-
$ Change crease


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5) (6)
Fair
Re- Value
quested or Orig.
Rate of Cost
Return Basis


Iowa State Commerce Commission (Cont.)
Iowa Southern Util. Gas 752,621
N. Central Pub. Serv. 543,310
N I ir 463,978
Peoples Nat'l Gas 3,014,214
640,920
16,531,147


Kansas State Corporation Commission
Central Kansas Pwr.
Kansas Pwr. & Lt.


Elec. 1,630,912
" 55,204,298
56,835,210


Ark.-Louisiana Gas Gas 2,601,829
Central Kansas Pwr. 282,223
Peoples Div. of Northern Nat'l Gas 1,162,085
Kansas-Nebraska Gas 5,338,503
9,384,640


5.20
10.00
6.25
5.56
0.94



9.13
28.00


42.369
NA
3.08
32.53


NA
10.644
10.644
9.819
9.819


10.32
11.484
11.342
10.34
12.083


10.12 OC
9.55 OC


10.28
9.0


12.28

9.285
11.41


Louisiana Public Service Commission
Gulf States Util.

Maine Public Utilities Commission
Eastern Maine Elec.
Fox Island Elec.
Central Maine Pwr.
Houlton

Maryland Public Service Commission
Potomac Elec. Pwr. Co.


Elec. 42,900,000


Elec.
11
.'.


484,898
174
24,700,000
67,875
25,252,947


20.00


17.90
0.05
12.50
6.00


9.72 OC 12/19/77


1.15
3.02
9.33
6.0


5.99
3.02
10.13
7.33


12/8/77
10/26/77
1/16/78
4/14/77


9.16 10.0 FV 10/31/77


(7)



Date
Filed


3/30/76
9/3/76
5/31/77
7/29/76
6/24/77



9/1/77
11/10/77


7/27/77
9/1/77
12/2/77
12/20/77


Elec. 27,169,000 7.60








CRs 66


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cout.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Co uman


State Cosmission and Company

Massachusetts Department of
Public Utilities
Brocton Edison
Boston Edison
Masa. lec. Co.

Michigan Public Service Comission
Consumers Power
Detroit Edison
Indiana & Michigan
Cooperatives
Other Private Utilities


Mich. Consolidated Gas
Mich. Gas Utilities
Southeastern Mich. Gas


Minnesota Public Service Commission
Otter Tail Pwr.
Rainy River


Montana-Dakota Util.
Northern States Pwr.
Minnesota Gas Co.
W


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Else.




Elec.
19

U
9.


Amount Requested
Z In-
$ Change crease


4,006,430
69,500,000
15,383,000
88,889,430

164,200
122,285
21,179
1,269
4,909
313,842


Gas 110,000,000
5,171,913
4,191,397
119,363,310


Elec. 3,625,192
272,313
3,897,505

Gas 283,430
to 288,600
16,860,000
17,432,030


6.90
15.60
2.98


18.00
9.00
30.00
Various
Various


13.28
7.32
14.90


(4)

Al lowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)



9.86
9.49
8.13


8.38
8.97
8.8
Various
Various


NA
8.9
7.71


11.40 --
21.00 --


18.20
6.00
8.20


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return



10.5
10.3
8.86


9.38
8.97
10.0
Various
Various


10.12
9.57
8.57


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


9.6 OC
9.23 OC


9.25
9.65
10.88


Mississippi Public Service Cos-issibn


(7)



Date
Filed


7/15/77
8/17/77
11/16/77


1/31/77
7/20/77
11/4/77
Various
Various


3/11/77
6/10/77
6/8/77



7/27/77
1/13/78


6/6/77
8/9/77
10/3/77


None








CS- 6T


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Commission and Comnanv


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Amount Requested
Z In-
S Change crease


Missouri Public Service Commission
Missouri Pub. Serv. Co.
Bowling Green Gas Co. :
Gas Service Co.
Great River Gas Co.
Laclede Gas Co.
Missouri Pwr. & Lt. Co.
Missouri Pub. Serv. Co.
People's Nat'l Gas Co.
Rich Hill Home Gas


Montana Public Service Commission
Montana-Dakota Util.
Montana Pwr. Co.


Montana-Dakota Util.
Montana Pwr. Co.


Elec.
Gas
11
'I
'I
SI
'S
'S


18,723,097
32,841
9,371,497
195,000
17,750,000
1,340,000
2,167,137
86,268
20,487
30,963,230


Elec. 2,312,816
#" 45,400,000
47,712,816

-Gas 10,159,773
S 34,508,803
44,668,576


New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission
Concord Elec. Co. Elec.
Granite State Elec.
N. Hampshire Elec. Coop. "
Pub. Serv. Co. of N.H. "


Gas Service Inc.
Southern N.H. Gas Co.


714,000
749,850
689,042
27,017,520
29,170,412


694,182
23,269
717,451


24.10
4.30
5.60
4.30
6.10
9.80
13.60
7.20
9.10



18.20
49.00


77.00
44.90



6.20
4.94
4.74
17.10


9.20
10.00


9.75 10.4 OC
10.70 10Q.3 OC


9.75 10.4 OC
11.6 10.9 OC


10.0
11.3
3.85
9.68


11.95
11.60
5.15
10.45


9.8 10.5 OC
6.4 6.4 OC


39-281 0 79 6


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


3/20/78
9/30/76


3/20/78
9/30/76



9/30/77
4/22/77
2/24/78
4/27/77


6/9/77
12/1/77


State .. Comsso an V "





CRS 68


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Commnission and Company


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Gas) $ Change crease


New Jersey Board of Public Utilities
Atlantic City Elec.
Jersey Central Pwr. & Lt.
Pub. Serv.-Elec. & Gas


Pub. Serv. Elec. & Gas
South Jersey Gas


New York Public Service Commission
Long Island Lighting
Niagara Mohawk--General
--Street Lighting
Penn. Elec. Co.
Rochester Gas & Elec.


Bath Elec. Gas & Wtr.
Brooklyn Union Gas
National Fuel Gas
Niagara Mohawk Pwr.


North Carolina-Utilities Commission
Laurel Hill Elec.
## 11 of
Pinehurst Inc.


N. Carolina Nat'l Gas
Piedmont Nat'l Gas
Pub. Serv. Gas


Elec.

It


16,500,000
110,000,000
304,351,000
430,851,000


Gas 90,644,000
S 16,200,000
106,844,000


Elec.
of


Gs!
lt

It



Gas
'I
'i
H
11




Elec.
n
||



Gas
It
n,


100,573,000
78,402,000
3,562,000
498,000
476,000
183,511,000

47,800
51,500,000
6,685,000
21,258,000
79,490,800


13,000
37,000
243,000
293,000

4,622,000
5,984,000
5,869,000
16,475,000


15.00
20.00
10.72


15.00
23.00



15.70
8.10
14.30
28.10
8.20


3.70
14.30
2.00
8.60



6.01
14.59
33.66


11.59
8.75
8.84


8.88
9.70
8.83


8.83
9.86


14.60



8.75
9.23
8.63


9.11
10.20
9.19


9.19 OC
10.44 OC


10.23
9.72
9.72
9.37



8.0
10.78
5.54
9.72



10.17

4.13


9.87
9.73
9.72


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


2/11/77

11/21/77


11/21/77
9/28/76



2/8/77
8/577
8/5/77
9/14/77
1/21/77


12/19/77
12/16/77
7/1/77
8/5/77



11/17/76
9/28/77
4/13/76


11/22/77
12/30/77
12/15/77





CBS 69


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Coimission and Company

North Dakota Public Service
Coiassion
Northern States Pwr.

Ohio Public Utilities Comission
Columbia & Southern
Ohio Edison
Toledo Edison


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Elec.
U,
I,


National Fuel Gas
Pike Nat. Gas
Ohio Gas
Columbia Gas of Ohio 1/


Oregon Public Utility Commissioner
California-Pacific Util.


Pennsylvania Public Utility
Commission
Philadelphia Elec.
Penn. Elec. Co.
Penn Pvr. Co.
U.G.I. Luzerne
Windber


Elec.


Elec.
if
It
g,
U,


Equitable
National Fuel Gas
Peoples
U.G.I.


Amount Requested
I In-
$ Change crease



771,000 4.60


45,491,000
7,989,000
55,576,000
109,056,000
182,000
297,000
1,161,000
9,631,000
11,271,000


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


8.33 9.64 OC 8/19/77


14.72
27.77
23.00

13.50
32.86
6.63
19.31


771,488 6.89


115,823,018
75,400,000
35,455,132
.1,817,000
92,829
228,587,979

27,518,000
12,970,000
14,287,797
12,600,000
67,375,797


9.06
10.28
8.93

6.60
21.87
10.18
11.06


9.38


6/30/77
7/1/77
9/1/77

6/21/77
7/17/77
8/24/77
7/1/77
through
12/8/77


9.49 OC 11/7/77


10.80
20.90
38.00
6.40
10.00


16.00
8.20
6.17
9.50


8/5/77
4/28/78
11/28/77
3/31/78
3/31/78


4/28/78
5/1/78
1/27/78
11/28/77


1/ The data for Columbia Gas of Ohio reflect twenty-four rate cases effecting varied portions
of operating areas and do not reflect total company operation.








CRS 70TO


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Coant.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Comission and Company


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Gas) $ Change crease


(4)
Al loved
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)
Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6) (7)
Fair Value
or Orig.
Cost Date
Basia Filed


Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority


Rhode Island Public Utilities
Co-ission
Narragansett Elec.
Valley Gas Co.
South County Gas


South Carolina Public Service
Commission
Carolina Pwr. & Lt.
Carolina Pipeline

South Dakota Public Utilities
Comission
Montana-Dakota Util.
M tl II

Tennessee Public Service Commissiou
Kingsport Pvr. Co.
Nashville Gas Co.


Texas Railroad Comaission


Utah Public
Moon Lake
Utah Pvr.


Service Comuission
Elec. Assoc.
& Lt.


Elec.
Gas
w


6,997,000
2,382,392
227,270
2,609,662


Elec. Awaiting
Gas 4,391,679



Elec. 967,142
Gas 2,820,667


Elec. 2,401,000
Gas 4,428,000

Gas 4,021,261


Elec. 6,909,352
" 1,059,072
7,968,424


4.50
15.80


14.5
14.0


updated filing
11.44


23.03


5/27/77
7/1/77
7/6/77


- 11/30/77


- 14.5 4/14/78
-- 15.25 4/14/78


8.00
10.00


8.5 11.0
12.14 12.04


- 3/17/78
- 2/15/78


3.30
19.53


Utah Gas Service


Vermont Public Service Board
Central Vermont Pub. Serv.
Green Mtn. Pvr.
Village of Hardvick
Village of Morrisville
Village of Swanton
Washington Elec. Coop.


Gas Co. of Vt.--Barre
H --St. Johunsbury
o f "- --Springfield
Rutland Gas Util.
Vermont Gas Corp.


Elec.
lt
n
I,
n




Gas
M
n
if
n
11


9,882,324
3,535,713
148,310
143,809
153,519
397,012
14.260,687

20,160
16,797
12,916
32,309
16,562


none


265,412


9.50
9.77
5.00
4.56
4.45
4.2723


18.684
11.760
21.96
13.00
19.33
21.01


10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00


10.60
9.77
5.70
6.6116
4.45
5.956


(5.49)
(8.20)
(3.37)
2.81
1.30


8/15/77
6/1/77
6/1/77
8/1/77
5/1/77
6/20/77


1/3/77
1/3/77
1/3/77
1/3/77
1/3/77


"--" -*s* *








CRS 71


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Cocmission and Company


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Amount Requested
Z In-
S Change crease


Virginia State Corporation Comission
Accomack--Northampton Elec.
Potomac Edison "
Delmarva Pwr. & Lt. "
Potomac Elec. PFr. Co. "


Suffolk Gas
Washington Gas Lt.


Virgin Islands Public Services
Commission

Washington Utilities and
Transportation Commission
Pacific Pwr. & Lt.
Washington Wtr. Pwr.


Cascade Nat'l Gas


87,181
3,825,380
1,932,199
1,578,000
7,422.760
1/
75,000
8,468,000
8,543,000


2.25
13.11
21.58
10.36


5.90
11.52


5.50
8.75
9.10
9.25


4.75
9.75
9.609
9.91


9.65 7.67 OC
8.50 9.70 OC


9/26/77
1/10/77
12/15/77
9/12/77


8/29/77
5/14/76


None


Elec. 5,887,000
13,940,000
19,827,000


5,940,000


West Virginia Public Service Commission
Appalachian Pwr. Co. Elec. 84,668,203
Honogahela Pwr. Co. 40,869,644
Potomac Edison 7,049,015
Wheeling Elec. 2,545,428
3,200,000
6,933,642
12,679,070


1/ Temporary surcharge to cover required maintenance.


15.00
31.00
U

5.80


40.00
28.00
24.00
6.00
7.00
16-31


9.33
9.25


9.20 OC
9.40 OC


9.73 10.16 OC 11/18/77


10.06
9.67
9.76
8.81


9/12/77
11/30/76
11/18/77
3/21/77
10/20/77


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


3/31/77
7/15/77


State Commission and Companv








CRS 72


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Coot.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Col umn


State Coimmission and Company


Type Amount Requested
(Electric Z In-
or Ga.) $ Chasne crease


West Virginia Public Service
Commission (Cont.)
Columbia Gas of W. Va.


Pennzoil
Southern
-


Pub. Serv.--Holden
I --Montgomery
. H --Logan
S--Man
--Hilton
--Madison


Wisconsin Public Service Com-ission
Dahlberg Lt. & Plr.
Elkhorn Lt. & Wtr.
Marshfield Wtr. & Elec.
Northern States Pwr.
Oconoumovoc Util.
Wisc. Elec. Pvr .
Wisc. Pvr. & Lt.
Wisc. Pub. Serv. Corp.


Gas
Ig
'9
'i

'I
-

11
*il




Elec.
U1
I1
11
'1
(i
11
I,


North Central Pub. Serv.
Northern States Pwr.
Wisc. Pub. Serv.


6,217,894
608,461
11,440
5.647
7,373
2,722
21,975
9,615
6,885,127


404,574
71,353
305,000
9,806,000
84,545
11,244,000
26,784,000
7,296,000
55,995,472

214,248
946,000
2,154,000
3,314,248


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


11/28/77
8/8/77
8/17/77
8/17/77
8/17/77
8/17/77
8/17/77
8/17/77



7/15/77
9/22/76
4/15/77
7/16/76
9/16/76
4/26/77
9/1/76
6/13/77


3/14/77
7/16/76
6/13/77


4.00
67.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
0.50
2.00
2.00



16.34
6.19
4.90
9.92
2.70
2.70
15.16
4.02


14.78
4.87
4.96


10.69
10.27










10.28
7.00

10.93
7.00
10.22
11.08
10.59


12.34
9.87
9.81








C1S 73


APPENDIX TABLE B-VI (Cont.)

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY RATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Column


State Comission and Company


Type
(Electric
or Gas)


Amount Requested
Z In-
$ Change crease


Wyoming Public Service Comnission
Cheyenne Lt. & Fuel & Pwr.
II go 11 11


Cody Gas
Northern
Northern
Northern
Northern


Co.
Gas Co.
Gas Division
Utilities Inc.
Utilities Division


(4)

Allowed
Rate of
Return
(1977)


(5)

Re-
quested
Rate of
Return


(6)
Fair
Value
or Orig.
Cost
Basis


(7)



Date
Filed


Elec.
Gas
n
I'
,9
'I
n


9.23
8.35
18.17


618,442
507,964
192,640
1,872,818
1,919,580
1,214,586
1,338,884
7,046,472


9.32
9.32
9.78
9.00
9.00
9.00
9.00


10.39
10.39
10.15
10.99
10.99
10.99
10.99


1/13/78
1/13/78
3/16/78
10/29/77
10/29/77
10/29/77
10/29/77










SUMMARY OF APPENDIX TABLE B-VI

ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITY BATE INCREASES PENDING BEFORE
STATE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSIONS, DECEMBER 1977


Electric


Gas


Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columb
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Virgin Islands
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Total


S 5,073.112

5,080,615
564,010,000
3,185,823

33,653,291
ia 45,501,000
13,500,000

5,866,000
26,602,000
64,383,211
127,090,954
56,408 ,R38
56,835,210
42,900,000
25,252,947
27,169,000
88,889,430
313,842
3,897,505

18,723,097
47,712,816
29,170,412
430,851,000
183,511,000
293,000

109,056,000
771,488
228,587,979

6,997,000
--1/
967,142
2,401,000

7,968,424
14,260,687
7,422,760

19,827,000
12,679,070
55,995,472
618r442
S2,373.426,567


$ 757,140
486,374,000
2,444,229
17,678,598

10,959,152


2,600,000
5,287,963
17,154,089
16,772,048
16,531,147
9,384,640




119,363,310
17,432,030

30,963,230
44,668,576
717,451
106,844,000
79,490,800
16,475,000
771,000
11,271,000

67,375,797

2,609,662
4,391,679
2,820,667
4,428,000
4,021,261
265,412
98,744
8,543,000

5,940,000
6,885,127
3,314,248
7 046 472
S,131.739,472


S 5,073,112

5,837,755
1,050,384,000
5,630,052
17,678,598
33,653,291
56,460,152
13,500,000

8,526,000
31,889,963
81,537,300
143,863,002
72,939,985
66,219,850
42,900,000
25,252,947
27,169,000
88,889,430
119,677,152
21,329,535

49,686,327
92,381,392
29,887,863
537,695,000
263,001,800
16,768,000
771,000
120,327,000
771,488
295,963,776

9,606,662
4,391,679
3,787,809
6,829,000
4,021,261
8,233.836
14,359,431
15,965,760

25,767,000
19,564.197
59,309,720
7,664,914
T$3.505 166039


I/ Awaiting updated filing.


State


Total


CRS TL










CS 75


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