Space Oddity

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Space Oddity
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Creator:
Burgermeister, Paul J
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( M.A.)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Committee Chair:
Barmpoutis, Angelos
Committee Members:
Suvajdzic, Marko

Notes

General Note:
Digital Arts and Sciences terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Paul Burgermeister. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
System ID:
AA00025538:00001

Full Text

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1 Game Design Document for: Space Oddity Written by Paul Burgermeister Version # 1.00 Monday, August 18, 2014

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2 Table of Contents TABLE OF CON TENTS _______________________________________________________________ 2GAME OVERVIEW __________________________________________________________________ 6PHILOSOPHY ________________________________________________________________________ 6Philosophical point #1 ______________________________________________________________ 6COMMON QUESTIONS _________________________________________________________________ 6What is th e game? __________________________________________________________________ 6Why create this game? ______________________________________________________________ 6Where does the game take pla ce? ______________________________________________________ 6What do I control? _________________________________________________________________ 6How many characters do I control? ____________________________________________________ 7What is the main focus? _____________________________________________________________ 7What’s diffe rent? __________________________________________________________________ 7FEATURE SET ______________________________________________________________________ 8GENERAL FEATURES __________________________________________________________________ 8MULTIPLAYER FEATURES ______________________________________________________________ 8GAMEPLAY _________________________________________________________________________ 8THE GAME WORLD _________________________________________________________________ 9OVERVIEW _________________________________________________________________________ 9THE PHYSICAL WORLD ________________________________________________________________ 9Travel ___________________________________________________________________________ 9Object Class ifications _______________________________________________________________ 9RENDERING SYSTEM _________________________________________________________________ 102D Rendering ____________________________________________________________________ 10Character _______________________________________________________________________ 10Parallaxing Level Backgr ounds ______________________________________________________ 10CAMERA __________________________________________________________________________ 10Overview ________________________________________________________________________ 10GAME ENGINE ______________________________________________________________________ 11Overview ________________________________________________________________________ 11Collision Dete ction ________________________________________________________________ 11Projectile s _______________________________________________________________________ 11Extended Firing Effects ____________________________________________________________ 12Data Management ________________________________________________________________ 12Particle Engine ___________________________________________________________________ 12Object Management _______________________________________________________________ 13AI _____________________________________________________________________________ 14Enemies _________________________________________________________________________ 14Fairies __________________________________________________________________________ 14Goblin Looter ____________________________________________________________________ 14Goblin Medic ____________________________________________________________________ 14THE WORLD LAYOUT ______________________________________________________________ 15OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 15ARENA LAYOUT DETAIL #1 ____________________________________________________________ 15FIRST PERSON DETAIL #2 _____________________________________________________________ 15OVERWORLD LAYOUT DETAIL #3 _______________________________________________________ 15GAME CHARACTERS _______________________________________________________________ 16

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3 OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 16CREATING A CHARACTER _____________________________________________________________ 16NON-PLAYABLE CHARACTERS (NPCS) ___________________________________________________ 16USER INTERFACE __________________________________________________________________ 17OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 17ARENA USER INTERFACE #1 ___________________________________________________________ 17OVERWORLD USER INTERFACE #2 ______________________________________________________ 17SHOP USER INTERFACE #2 _____________________________________________________________ 17INVENTORY USER INTERFACE #3 _______________________________________________________ 17SCOREBOARD USER INTERFACE #4 ______________________________________________________ 18Fun Random Stats _________________________________________________________________ 18LOAD SCREEN #5 ___________________________________________________________________ 18WEAPONS _________________________________________________________________________ 20OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 20SHOTGUN (S) DETAILS #1 _____________________________________________________________ 20GATLING GUN (G) DETAILS #2 _________________________________________________________ 20FLAME THROWER (F) DETAILS #3 _______________________________________________________ 20LASER GUN (L) DETAILS #4 ___________________________________________________________ 21ROCKET LAUNCHER (R) DETAILS #5 _____________________________________________________ 21AXE DETAILS (A) #6 _________________________________________________________________ 21GADGETS __________________________________________________________________________ 22OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 22STOPWATCH DETAILS #1 ______________________________________________________________ 22GRAPPLE SHOT DETAILS #2 ___________________________________________________________ 22PERSONAL SHIELD GENERATOR DETAILS #3 _______________________________________________ 22TELEPORTER DETAILS #4 _____________________________________________________________ 23IMMOVABLE BOOTS DETAILS #5 ________________________________________________________ 23CONSUMABLES ____________________________________________________________________ 24OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 24CAKE DETAILS #1 ___________________________________________________________________ 24BURGER DETAILS #2 _________________________________________________________________ 24BACON DETAILS #3 __________________________________________________________________ 24CANDY DETAILS #4 __________________________________________________________________ 24CRYONADE DETAILS #5 ______________________________________________________________ 24MOLOTOV COCKTAIL DETAILS #6 _______________________________________________________ 24STATUS EFFECTS __________________________________________________________________ 25OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 25IMMOBILIZED #1 ____________________________________________________________________ 25BURN #2 __________________________________________________________________________ 25PANIC #3 __________________________________________________________________________ 25COLD #4 __________________________________________________________________________ 25FROZEN #5 ________________________________________________________________________ 25ENEMY NON-PLAYABLE CHARACTERS _____________________________________________ 27OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN MELEE #1 ___________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN RANGED #2 _________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN ELITE #3 ____________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN HEAVY #4 __________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN PILOT #5 ___________________________________________________________________ 27GOBLIN ENGINEER #6 ________________________________________________________________ 27

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4 GOBLIN DEMOLITIONIST #7 ____________________________________________________________ 28GOBLIN KAMIKAZE #8 _______________________________________________________________ 28GOBLIN MEDIC #9 ___________________________________________________________________ 28GOBLIN LOOTER #10 _________________________________________________________________ 28OGRE #11 _________________________________________________________________________ 28GOBLIN BOSS #12 ___________________________________________________________________ 28NEUTRAL NON-PLAYABLE CHARACTER ____________________________________________ 31OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 31UNICORN #1 _______________________________________________________________________ 31LEPRECHAUN #2 ____________________________________________________________________ 31LIGHT FAIRY #3 ____________________________________________________________________ 31FAIRY (DARK) #4 ___________________________________________________________________ 31ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTS ________________________________________________________ 32OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 32MOON ROCK #1 _____________________________________________________________________ 32CRYO-BARREL #2 ___________________________________________________________________ 32FLAMMABLE BARREL #3 ______________________________________________________________ 32CRATE #4 _________________________________________________________________________ 32TABLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTS: ___________________________________________________ 33SPECIALIZATION SYSTEM _________________________________________________________ 34OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 34ITEM UPGRADE SYSTEM ___________________________________________________________ 41OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 41WEAPONS _________________________________________________________________________ 41AXE ______________________________________________________________________________ 41LASER GUN ________________________________________________________________________ 42GATLING GUN ______________________________________________________________________ 42ROCKET LAUNCHER _________________________________________________________________ 43SHOTGUN _________________________________________________________________________ 44FLAMETHROWER ____________________________________________________________________ 44GADGETS __________________________________________________________________________ 45STOPWATCH _______________________________________________________________________ 45IMMOVABLE BOOTS _________________________________________________________________ 45TELEPORTER _______________________________________________________________________ 45PERSONAL SHIELD GENERATOR ________________________________________________________ 46GRAPPLE SHOT _____________________________________________________________________ 46MISCELLANEOUS __________________________________________________________________ 48OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 48COIN #1 ___________________________________________________________________________ 48MUSICAL SCORES AND SOUND EFFECTS ____________________________________________ 49OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 49SOUNDTRACK ______________________________________________________________________ 49SOUND EFFECTS ____________________________________________________________________ 49SINGLE-PLAYER GAME ____________________________________________________________ 50OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 50STORY ____________________________________________________________________________ 50HOURS OF GAMEPLAY ________________________________________________________________ 50VICTORY CONDITIONS ________________________________________________________________ 50

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5 DEFEAT CONDITIONS AND CONSEQUENCES _______________________________________________ 50MULTIPLAYER GAME ______________________________________________________________ 52OVERVIEW ________________________________________________________________________ 52MAX PLAYERS______________________________________________________________________ 52ADJUSTMENTS FOR MULTIPLAYER ______________________________________________________ 52SERVERS __________________________________________________________________________ 52CUSTOMIZATION ____________________________________________________________________ 52INTERNET CONNECTION ______________________________________________________________ 52

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6 Game Overview Philosophy Philosophical point #1 My game is trying to mesh two very popular ga me genres together to see if the combination of the two is successful. Common Questions What is the game? The game is a mixture between a top down arena shooter and a rogue-like set in space. You play as an adventurous space scientist investigating the su dden appearance of void zones within an extremely remote and uninhabited part of space, or so you thought. The game is punishing and difficult yet constantly rewarding. Why create this game? I enjoy small arcade games that at first glance s eem very simple and easy but underneath are very complex and involved. I love customization in games, especially when it affects the players play style. Where does the game take place? The game is set in a remote part of space that was originally thought to be uninhabited. The location is experiencing extraordinary spatial anom alies; void zones continue to pop up in the region without and explanation. The player quickly finds out that it is teeming full of life in the form of mystical creatures from the fey wild. What do I control? The player plays as an adventurous space scientis t while in the arena and while shopping for new equipment. While traveling throug h the Overworld the player contro ls the space scientists spaceship to navigate to new objectives.

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7 How many characters do I control? The player only has control of a single char acter, the main protagonist, the space scientist. What is the main focus? The main focus of the game it to find out the source of the void zones and put a stop to them all while trying to survive the hostile encounters with the locals. What’s different? The game is unique to the market because no one is paring the two genres, Rogue-like and Arena Shooter together in this way. The game also includes a very involved character load out system that allows the player to create interesting and creative weapon, gadget, consumable combinations to better suit their play style and upcoming battles. The game h as a special system for calculating the players score. The player can achieve a higher point value for killin g enemies with the use of more difficult and unique techniques, these extra points gained are referred to as style points. The player also is constantly struggling with the mechanics of the nearby void zone, the void zone allows for some very interesting in game physics within the closed environment.

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8 Feature Set General Features 100+ Different enemies 100+ Different item combination options 2D graphics Very in depth character customization system Customizable Weapons and Gadgets Multiplayer Features Play with friend via Blue Tooth Play with up to 4 friends Highscore leaderboards Gameplay Each play through is a new experience Funny and exciting art style Exciting weapons, gadgets and consumables

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9 The Game World Overview The game world is set in a remote part of space that was thought to be uninhabited. This region is now taken over by warring factions of Fae creatures w ho have mysteriously stumbled into the player’s plane of existence. The region the player plays in is absent of most human life aside from the random wanderer or lost traveler. The Fae creatures have begun to build cities and military compounds to increase their presence and power within the region. The Physical World Overworld The player has access to the Overworld, whic h they may us to freely fly around in a 2d space where they can move onto the next level, stop at a town for supplies or accept missions and quests from some of the locals. Arena The arena is the name of the mode the player enters when they start each level, they stay in this mode until the level is completed. It is refe rred to as the arena because it is a small enclosed area in which the player fights their enemies. Shops, Mission Hubs, Vendors, ect. The player will have access to other areas in the game via the Overworld where they may interact with friendly NPCs. Through these interac tions they may sell and buy new items and gain missions and quests. Travel The player travels the Overworld from within their spaceship where they may navigate to any location they currently have access to Within the arena the player hovers around using their jetpack. Object Classifications Enemy NPCs Neutral NPC

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10 Spaceman PC Consumables Weapons Gadgets Destructible Environmental Objects Coins Units Mods See the “Objects Appendix” for a full list of the objects found in the world. Rendering System 2D Rendering Character We will use sprite images that are specifically aligned together and chaining of images to create multi limbed and layered sprites. Parallaxing Level Backgrounds All level background images will be mu ltilayered images with alpha channels. The player’s movement will cause the displacement of th e background layers based on the player’s current position and the depth of the specific layer in the background image. The effect is made to give the player the illusion of significant depth to the levels background iamge. Camera Overview Within the arena the cameras view is from the side and all characters are viewed from a three quarter perspective. The camera in the Overworld stay s in a top down view fixed to the player’s spaceship

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11 as it navigates the region of space that the Overworld is set in. The camera while at screens like the Shop, Inventory, and Talent screens us a first pers on view, this view is fixed and cannot move. Game Engine Overview MonoGame is the game engine to be used. Mo noGame is an open source implementation of the Microsoft XNA 4.x Framework. Using MonoGame will a llow us to port to multiple platforms such as Xbox 360, Windows & Windows Phone to port their games to the iOS, Android, Mac OS X, Linux and Windows 8 Metro. Collision Detection The game currently relies on what I would ca ll a "dumb" or "naive" collision detection implementation. Every update (once per frame at an ideal fps of 60), the game checks if any two units collision rects are intersecting (by checking if any of the sides intersect or if one rect contains the other). If so, it modifies the units’ velocities according to the principle of conservation of momentum. The next update, the units will be moving w ith these new velocities, hopefully away from one another so it looks like they bounced. The reason I call this dumb is that although our game renders at discrete intervals (60 per second), collision detection should really be c ontinuous. Consider the s ituation where two units (rectangles) are moving towards each other quickly. On e frame they may be slightly separated and not colliding and the next frame they are intersecting, that is, one is "inside" the other. If they are moving fast enough, one might even pass through the other in the am ount of time that passes between updates. Units generally have small enough hit r ects and move slow enough that they do not pass through one another, but the situation can arise where units get stuck toge ther because the velocities they are given after the collision are not enough to get the rects to stop inte rsecting after one update. Then the units are stuck colliding at very low speeds every frame and it is di fficult to disengage the two. A smarter collision detection system would recognize that if units are not colliding in one frame and are intersecting in the next that a collision must have occurred some time in between frames. Running at 60fps, or .0166sec/update, maybe two units should have collided at a point .0100sec between updates. A smart system would recognize this and try to "roll back time" to identify the exact time and place of collision by interpolating with the units current velocities a nd positions. Collision forces would be calculated and applied at this "mid-frame" time and then time woul d be rolled forward back to the current "end-offrame" time, giving the units the positions and velociti es they should have had if the collision occurred in continuous time (or close to it). As you can see, the smart system is more complicated to implement, so we've been going with the dumb one because it’s mo stly been "good enough" for the time being. Projectiles Projectile collision detection is similar to that for units, but has a few more details. For one, projectiles are generally smaller and faster than uni ts, so it is plausible that one would pass entirely through a unit in one frame. For this reason, projectile paths are interpolated if moving fast enough, and this path is checked for intersection with unit rects. In addition, detection is needed for AOE weapons like rockets. Upon collision, a rocket projectile changes a flag to indicate that it is exploding and stops moving. On subsequent update calls (until the explosi on dissipates) a circle with a given radius for the explosion is checked for intersection with every units hitrect. Melee weapons generate an arc of some

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12 radius and length (0 to 2 ) which is checked for collision with hitrects during a single frame. The laser uses a raycasting method to detect collision. This invo lves generating a start and end point, creating a line segment, and checking if that segment intersects any rect s. To account for the fact that the laser has some width when charged, three rays are used: one at each e dge of the beam and one in the center. This is not a perfectly reliable method as a unit could have a hitr ect small enough to fit between the center and one edge of the beam. I'm just counting on this not ha ppening because a perfectly reliable method would be more difficult. Extended Firing Effects When firing automatic weapons like the gatling gun or flamethrower, the weapon becomes less effective over time. For the flamethrower, this means decreasing the range of the flames as the trigger is held. For the gatling gun, the rate of fire decreases as the trigger is held. When the weapon is not being fired, the affected attribute gra dually returns to its normal state. Data Management I wanted a way to define configurable gameplay-affecting stats (unit attributes such as health/speed, weapon/item stats, app earance of sprites, much much more...) in a human-readable format that could be tweaked without having to touch source code and recompile. These attributes are stored in a set of XML _les which are loaded into the game by the DataManager. The DataManager surfaces a GetData(key) call that retrieves data from these XML _les and makes it available in game. The data is located via a two-stage dictionary lookup using the type T, then the key (a string unique for data of that type). The type determines which XML _le to load and what kinds of elements to look at, and the key uniquely identifies the elemen t within that set. It then uses reaction to match the elements and attributes in the xml element to public fields of a C# class designed to hold that data and populate an instance of that data type with values found in the xml element. This process is recursive, so a complex object within the main object can be defined by a subelement with its own set of attributes. In addition, custom parse functions can be defined for non-primitiv e data types such as Color, Texture2D, Vector2, and Rectangle. Once constructed, this data object is returned so it can be used to instantiate in-game objects (for example, a ProjectileWeaponData might be fetched to populate the fields of a Gatling Gun). The data object is also cached, so if another call is made to fetch the ProjectileWeaponData for a Gatling Gun, the DataManager can return the cached object w ithout re-opening the xml _le. This process seems to take significant time (around 5s, long load time for a game like this) while running in debug mode, but seems to be fine (around 1s) when running the executable outside of a debugging environment. Particle Engine The Particle Engine has three main components: Particles Graphical objects representing particles Position location of particle Velocity speed and direction Angle Rotation around center Scale Size relative to base texture size Lifetime Time left to exist Generators Objects that produce particles based on number of parameters Speed/SpeedVariance Range of speeds for spawned particles

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13 ParticleLife/LifeVariance Range of durations for spawned particles ParticleRotation How much particles rotate during their life Start/End Color Range of color through which particles transition SpawnRate How quickly to spawn particles while active Reversed If true, spawn particles at end of life (see below) DecelerationFactor factor of particle speed reduction over time SpawnArc Angle through which to spawn particles UniqueParticle Texture to render for particle Effects Collections of Generators Particle Effects Are the top level components in the particle engine. A particle effect is a collection of one or more generators it was designe d this way to provide an easy way to compose more complicated effects by combining mu ltiple simpler effects. For example, the gatling gun firing particle effect is composed of two generato rs: one generator sprays sparks out of the muzzle while another sprays empty casings. The properties of particle generators ar e loaded from an XML file as described in the Data Management section. The XML files also specify Partic le Effects as collections of Particle Generators. When an effects Spawn method is called, it passes the spawn request down to each of its contained generators. Each generator produces a numbe r of particles based on the time elapsed since the last update multiplied by the spawn rate (w hich is given in particles per second). During the update cycle, a particle effect updat es each generator. Each generator updates each of its particles to modify its position, rotation, and scale. During the draw cycle, each particle is rendered to the screen. Its color (including transparency) is determined as a linear interpolation between its start and end colors based on its remaining lifetime. Many particles define their end color as completely transparent to create a "fading" effect. Most particle generators spawn pa rticle for a central point that spread out. However, some effects like the black hole spawn particles within a radius, and all of the particles move towards a central location. This is the use of the reverse option, which causes particles to start at the "end" of their life and behave as though time were reversed for them. The default particle texture is a single white pixe l (which is tinted based on the color interpolated between the StartColor and EndColor) but particl es may optionally use a "UniqueParticle" (such as a circle or hollow square) instead. The generator stores a reference to this texture and renders it to each particle position (using the scale, co lor, and rotation of each particle) Object Management C# is a managed language that uses a mark-andsweep garbage collector to free programmers from the burden of manual memory management (and the risk of memory leaks). In general, the garbage collection process should not noticeably impact the performance of a program. However, for real-time programs like this game, the time required for a collec tion could be longer than the frame time (1 / FPS). A collection occurs every time a certain amount of me mory is allocated, and if the collection takes too long, the framerate will stutter. In order to avoid this, I took the approach of object pooling. Instead of allocating objects on demand, objects are pre-allocated before a real-time gameplay segment begins. Each pre-allocated object has a ag determining its "active" status, and when a new object is needed, an "inactive" object is provided

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14 from the pool. When the object is done being used (e.g a projectile has exploded) it is labeled as inactive so it can be recycled. This avoids allocations during real-time gameplay. AI Enemies An enemy has a preferred distance representing th e ideal distance they would like to maintain from the player. During each update an enemy compares th eir current distance from th e player to the ideal and moves closer or farther accordingly. Each enemy also has a preferred distance from the black hole. If an enemy finds that their current di stance to the black hole is less than this, they prioritize moving away from the black hole over moving towards/away from the player. Fairies A fairy in light mode's only priority is to avoid the black hole. Other than that it moves randomly. A fairy in dark mode moves towards the player. Goblin Looter The looter prioritized coins as targets while avoiding the black hole. Once a looter obtains enough coins it will attempt to exit the level. Goblin Medic Medics prioritize enemies that are missing the most health. This is calculated as an absolute rather than a percentage, so enemies that have more health (e.g Ogres) have more possibility to be prioritized

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15 The World Layout Overview The world layout is broken up into three diffe rent modes, the arena, first person and the Overworld. Arena Layout Detail #1 The Arena is the portion of the game where the pl ayer fights the antagonists. The player is forced to survive against waves of enemies, neutral npc who may or may not be of help to the player, void zones that are constantly causing changes to the physics in side the arena, and random space junk! The arena is a closed environment where the player loads into u pon starting a level and may not leave it until the void zone is filled. The void zone is filled by incapacita ting enemies which causes them to float helplessly into the void zone, increasing its capacity. Once the void zone is filled the level is over and the player is rewarded with in game currency and a score for the level. First Person Detail #2 The First Person portion is a blanketing term for when ever the player is at a screen that is made to look like you are viewing the work from their eyes. For example when a player goes to view their inventory or look at what’s in stock at the nearby vendor they are in First Person. There is no movement involved, only game options, such as equipping an item or buying a gadget. Overworld Layout Detail #3 The Overworld is a large 2D environment in which the player may explore. The Overworld initially is covered by a layer of black fog concealing areas of the zone until the player travels to it; this is often times referred to as fog of war. Uncovering the zone allows the player to see new locations of levels, cities, shop and quest giving npcs. The player may traverse the Overworld by following predetermined paths that lead from one area of inte rest to the next, these paths branch off in many directions giving the player options on where to travel.

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16 Game Characters Overview There is one Playable Character, the Spaceman, the space scientist that is exploring and studying the region the game is set in. There are Neutral and Hostile Non-Playable Characters, the majority of them are made of up the creatures from the Fae Wild, th e plane of existence where they come from. There are a few other Neutral Non-Playable Characters that aren’t from the Fae Wild who are either lost wandering salesmen. Creating a Character When you start a new game you may name your ch aracter and adjust the color of their space suit. Additional character customization comes in the form of character loadout options. The player has a large arsenal of items to choose from when preparing for each level. The player is only allowed to carry a specific amount of items with them into the arena, be cause of this limitation the player is forced to pick and choose which items they would prefer to wield while in combat during the following encounter. These items may be bought with in game currency or earned as rewards for completing missions and quests. Each item has a special property that helps the player in combat. The items are separated into three different categories: Weapon, Gadget and Consumable. Character customization also comes in the form of a specialization system. The specialization system allows the player may spend their collected points earned after each arena battle, to gain additional m odifiers to their character. Within the specialization system there is a myriad of different talents to c hoose from, all with different modifiers the player can benefit from. The specializations the player decides to invest their specialization points on is up to them, allowing the player to further customize their character. Non-Playable Characters (NPCs) The enemies and monsters found in the game ar e from a different plane of existence, known as the Fae Wild. The Fae Wild is inha bited by both friendly and evil ch aracters, as a whole these characters are known as Fae creatures. The Fae creatures are mysteriously appearing in the players’ universe and causing all sorts of chaos in the region they’re app earing. They are separated into multiple, currently warring factions, the elves, goblins, orcs, dwarves and a few other smaller groups. Each faction has multiple different units all with their ow n unique abilities, attributes and art.

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17 User Interface Overview The overall theme of the user interface is to look like a hodgepodge of scrap space parts and holographic displays. The user interface changes de pending on the game setting the player is in. Arena User Interface #1 The user interface set for the arena is intended to be very clean and minimal. It is designed this way to maximize the view the player has of the curre nt level. Many of the user interface assets are designed to have a transparency level to assist with th e players overall awareness of the level. Some of the user interface options will remain hidden until the pl ayer needs access to that portion of the user interface, for example the consumable item buttons. Overworld User Interface #2 The user interface for the Overworld is also very clean and minimal. The reason for this design is to provide a smooth transition for the player from location to location while navigating the Overworld. Shop User Interface #2 The user interface for the shop is made to be co mical and engaging. The shop is set within an old dingy food truck that has been repurposed to sell items that the player may need. There is an area in the shop user interface that displays the objects for sale, wh en an item is selected there is a portion of the user interface that displays the specific attributes that bel ong to that item. Here a player can browse the shops inventory, the inventory of the shop changes after a sp ecific duration of time based on an in game timer. Inventory User Interface #3 The user interface for the inventory screen displays the player’s current character in the center, along with different menus that are brought up by sel ecting tabs that are labeled and correspond with the different classes of items the character can equip: Weapons, Gadgets and Consumables. The player may browse through a list of items they have obtained a nd inspect the item and its attributes buy clicking on the specific item. The player may drag the icon of an item they want to use from their list of items onto a portion of the user interface that depicts the items the character is currently using, called character slots. The character slots can only hold two weapons, two gadge ts and six consumables at a time. The items the player has placed into their character slots when en tering an arena are the only items they have access to for the duration of the arena. If the player wishes to make adjustments to the items they have in their

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18 character slots they must do it through the inventor y user interface which is only accessible through the Overworld screen. Scoreboard User Interface #4 The user interface for the Scoreboard appears at th e end of a completed arena. It displays a large amount of statistics based on the previous arena comp leted. The Scoreboard always displays the number of enemies the player destroyed, the amount of co ins the player collected during the arena, the new current total amount of coins the player has and the to tal score the player earned. There is a portion of the Scoreboard that displays Fun Random Stats, the subj ect of the statistics are randomly pulled from a large table of options and only 6 of these options are displayed on the Scoreboard at a time. The stats for the subjects however aren’t random; they are kept track of by the game and then displayed if the subject of the stat is randomly chosen to be displayed on the Scoreboard once the arena is completed. Fun Random Stats Scoreboard Display: Fun Random Stats Enemies Set on Fire Fire Damage done to Enemies Enemies Frozen Ice Damage done to Enemies Enemies Shattered Over All Damage Unicorn did to You & Enemies Consumables Used Health Restored Shots fired that didn’t hit anything Load Screen #5 The temporary user interface for the load scr een is an image that overlays the previous background and displays a load bar with a helpful tip for the game and a humorous reason for why the loading bar has appeared. Load Bar Sayings: Cleaning up space junk Loading humorous message... Fueling jet pack Tightening straps

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19 Reloading Weapons Lacing up boots Patching holes with space tape Parking spaceship Defrosting Suiting up Reticulating splines Loading Screen Tips: Hitting a frozen enemy causes them to shatter, instantly killing them! Activating Immovable Boots while pulling something toward you with the Grapple Shot keeps you in one place. You can use the Grapple Shot to pick up coins from afar. Standing near a Light Fairy heals you. Standing near a Dark Fairy hurts you. Shoot the Goblin Heavy in the back for maximum damage. Protect the Leprechaun and he may reward you. Lead enemies into an oncoming Unicorn for much damage, such wow! Escape Menu #6 The escape menu is an image that overlays the previo us background and displays a small menu with options for the player to choose from. This menu is accessible at any point in the game by pressing the ESC key on the keyboard. While this menu is active the game progress is halted until the escape menu is turned off. To turn o ff the escape menu the player only has to pr ess the ESC key while the escape menu is active or press the resume button on the escape menu.

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20 Weapons Overview Within the arena the player may use the weapons they have equipped in their character slots. Within the arena the character wields two weapons at once, one in each arm. The player may wield two of the same weapon. To shoot a wielded weapon while the pl ayer is in the arena the player will use the left mouse button (M1) and the right mouse button (M2) to use the corresponding weapon, which is determined by the placement of the weapon in the ch aracter slots on the inventory user interface screen. Only one weapon may be used at a time. The aiming of the weapon is based on the coordinates of the player’s mouse cursor and where the player controlled character is while they are using the weapon. Each weapon has a separate set of attributes: Accuracy, Da mage, Range, Rate of Fire and Special Abilities. All weapons can be found at the shop, however not all of th em may be in stock while the player is there, all weapons cost 400 gold to purchase. Shotgun (S) Details #1 The shotgun shoots a spread of 5 projectiles in a cone-like fashion from the character, spreading out from the location of the player. Each projectile on impact does its own set of damage. Holding the fire button for the gun causes it to store up shots, for every second the button is held 2 extra projectiles will be fired once the button is released. This may stack up to 3 times, allowing for a maximum of 11 projectiles fired for a single shot. Gatling Gun (G) Details #2 The gatling gun shoots individual bullets with an extremely high rate of fire. On impact the bullet does low damage. When firing the gatling gun th e weapon becomes less effective over consistent uninterrupted use. The rate of fire decreases as the tr igger is held. When the weapon is not being fired, the affected attribute gradually returns to its normal state. Flame Thrower (F) Details #3 The flame thrower shoots a steady stream of fire, th e range of the fire being shot is affected by how long the player has been firing the flame throwe r and how recently the flame thrower has been fired.

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21 When firing the flamethrower the weapon becomes less effective over consistent uninterrupted use. This means decreasing the range of the flames as the trigge r is held. When the weapon is not being fired, the affected attribute gradually returns to its normal state. Laser Gun (L) Details #4 The laser gun fires a single laser beam, this beam spans the entire map for a very brief second. Holding the fire button for the gun causes it to store up power and unleash it when the button is let go doing more damage than a normal shot based off of the length the player held the button down before releasing. There will be a set cap for the amount of extra damage holding the button down causes. Rocket Launcher (R) Details #5 The rocket launcher fires a single projectile, a rock et that when it hits and object explodes dealing damage to what it collided with and other nearby obj ects that are within a certa in distance from the initial place of impact. Holding the fire button for the gun cau ses a mark to be placed on the object that the cross hair is currently over, releasing the button while there is a mark active causes the rocket launcher to fire a homing rocket. A homing rocket tracks the target to a certain degree and time, after a duration of not making contact with an object the rocket explodes, dealing damage as usual. Axe Details (A) #6 The axe is a melee weapon and does not have a projectile. Clicking the corresponding button to use the axe causes the player to sw ing the axe in an arc in front of the player in a downward motion starting at 12 o’clock and continuing for about 140 degrees. The axe has a limited range. Here is a table to help layout the attributes of each weapon: Weapons Damage Rate of Fire Accuracy Range Shotgun 5 1 High 6 shot at once Conal Gatling Gun 1 2.5 High-Low Full Screen Flamethrower 0 .5 Low (x distance out) diminishes over constant use to right in front of player Laser Gun 3 4 High Full Screen Rocket Launcher 7 Medium Full Screen Axe 6 1 sec High Conal

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22 Gadgets Overview Within the arena the player may use the gadgets they have equipped in their character slots. To use a gadget while the player is in the arena the player will use the left shift button (L Shift) and the space bar (Space Bar) to use the corresponding gadgets, which is determined by the placement of the gadget in the character slots on the inventory user interface sc reen. Only one gadget may be used at a time. The aiming of the gadget, if needed, is based on the coor dinates of the player’s mouse cursor and where the player controlled character is while they are using the gadget. Each gadget has a separate attribute then weapons: Energy Consumption. Each gadget has a pool of energy assigned to it which is represented on the arena user interface by a bright blue bar. Each pool of energy may store up to 100 points of energy. On use of a gadget the pool of energy that is linked w ith the gadget is reduced by a specific cost, this cost is unique to the gadget. A gadget may be used until us ing the gadget would reduce the energy pool to less than 0. The energy in the energy pools replenished over time, at a rate of 2 energy every second. All gadgets can be found at the shop, however not all of th em may be in stock while the player is there, all gadgets cost 400 gold to purchase. Stopwatch Details #1 Using the Stopwatch causes every enemy projectile enemy movement speed, enemy rate of fire, neutral movement speed and object movement speed to become slowed by 80% for duration seconds. The players movement speed, rate of fire and proj ectile speed becomes slowed by 30% for duration. Grapple Shot Details #2 Using the Grapple Shot causes a claw extends from player in a straight line to the edge of screen, first object hit by claw is grappled and pulled towa rds the player, the player is also pulled towards grappled target unless they are immobilized, if claw doesn’t hit an object the claw returns to player without grappling any targets on return. Re clicking the Grapple Shot while outgoing, the grapple shot starts retracting. Re clicking the Grapple Shot while retracting causes the grappled target to bet let go and the space man kicks. Kicking is a melee attack target ed only on the previously grappled target. If you have a melee weapon equipped you use it in place of th e kicking, dealing more damage and a conal attack that can hit multiple enemies Personal Shield Generator Details #3 On use the player creates a force field that preven ts (x damage) to the player for a duration based off of a static decay rate and for every (x damage) prevented (y energy ) is used from the energy pool. If

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23 the player doesn’t have enough energy to maintain the effect of the force field, the force field is deactivated. Teleporter Details #4 On use the players current position becomes the position of where their cursor was located during the use of the teleporter. Immovable Boots Details #5 On use the player creates an area of effect (AoE ) that spans (x distance) from player, knocking back all enemies within the AoE by (y distance). All enemies hit by the AoE have their movement speed, projectile and rate of fire, slowed by 40% for 5 sec. Also on use player becomes immobilized for 3 seconds.

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24 Consumables Overview Within the game the player has access to items th at they may use that have a onetime use ability on them that causes them to be destroyed after their use. Cake Details #1 On use the cake restores the player’s health to 100% however it also decreases the player’s movement speed by 20% for 3 seconds. Burger Details #2 One use the burger restores the player’s health by 50. Bacon Details #3 One use the bacon restores the player’s health by 25. Candy Details #4 On use the candy restores the player’s health 10 and it also increases the player’s movement speed by 50% for 6 seconds. Cryonade Details #5 On use the player throws the cr yonade to the coordinates of where the player’s crosshair was when the cryonade was used. Once the cryonade r eaches the designated coordinates it explodes causing an area of effect (AoE) with a (x radius). Any ne utral or enemy character caught in the AoE gains the status effect of burning. Molotov Cocktail Details #6 On use the player throws the mo lotov cocktail to the coordinates of where the player’s crosshair was when the molotov cocktail was used. Once the mo lotov cocktail reaches the designated coordinates it explodes causing an area of effect (AoE) with a (x ra dius). Any neutral or enemy character caught in the AoE gains the status effect of burning.

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25 Status Effects Overview Units can be affected by different status effects, these status effects aren’t just binary but some of them have varying degrees of severity represented on a scale of 0 to 100. The higher the severity the more pronounced the effects are. The severity of the effect decreases over time, based on the units resistance to the specific effect. Immobilized #1 The effected character cannot move for the duration of the immobilizing effect however the effected character may use weapons, gadgets and consumables. Burn #2 An Effect that has the Burn ability will appl y Burn Points to the target. Burn Point can accumulate up to 100 starting at 0, the rate of Burn Point accumulation on the Unit is regulated by the Units Resistance to the specific E ffect. While a unit has >0 Burn Points they take damage per second based on the number of Burn Points they currently ha ve. Burn Points diminish over time based on Unite Resistance. If the Burn Points on a Unit reaches a specific set threshold the unit gains the Panic Status Effect. Panic #3 This effect causes units to move randomly for several seconds and neglect attacking the player. Cold #4 An Effect that has the Cold ability will apply Cold Points to the target. Cold Point can accumulate up to 100 starting at 0, the rate of Cold Poin t accumulation on the Unit is regulated by the Units Resistance to the specific Effect. Wh ile a unit has >0 Cold Points th eir movement speed is decreased based on the number of Cold Points they currently ha ve. Cold Points diminish over time based on Units Resistance. If the Cold Points on a Unit reaches a specific set threshol d the unit gains the Frozen Status Effect. Frozen #5

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26 A Frozen Unit cannot perform any action however is affected by gravity, and if a Frozen Unit takes (x damage) it will Shatter. Shatter is the effect that happens when a frozen unit takes (x damage) and is destroyed killing the unit immediately. Upon Shatteri ng the units sprite is divided into the 9 separated pieces that are effected by gravity.

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27 Enemy Non-Playable Characters Overview Within the game the player ends up having to battle for survival within arena mode against enemies of various strengths and weaknesses. The firs t race of enemies the player encounters on their travels are the Goblins. Goblin Melee #1 This unit is one of the two most very basic units that Goblin race has, they solely wield melee weapons. Goblin Ranged #2 This unit is one of the two most very basic un its that Goblin race has, they solely wield the shotgun or the laser gun weapons. Goblin Elite #3 This unit is one of the strongest units among the Goblin race, with a large health pool and access to the axe, shotgun and flamethrower Goblin Heavy #4 This basic unit has the largest health pool of the Goblin race aside from boss level npcs. It wields a very heavy tower shield that reduces all damage ta ke from the front of the Goblin Heavy by 90%. The tower shield has its own health pool of 100 health poin ts. If the tower shield’s health pool is reduces to 0 it is destroyed and the Goblin Heavy loses the 90% damage reduction from the front buff that the tower shield was granting it. The Goblin Heavy has acce ss to the axe, rocket launcher and gatling gun. Goblin Pilot #5 This basic unit spawns immediately after a G oblin Mech has been destroyed, right where it happened. The Goblin Pilot has access to the axe, laser gun and shotgun. Goblin Engineer #6 This basic unit is one of the few among the Gob lin race that can use consumables, it may throw cryonades, it also has access to the laser gun and the gatling gun.

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28 Goblin Demolitionist #7 This basic unit is one of the few among the Gob lin race that can use consumables, it may throw molotov cocktails, it also has access to th e flamethrower and the rocket launcher. Goblin Kamikaze #8 This basic unit is unique in the sense that it do esn’t wield a weapon, it instead charges onto the map and towards the player strapped to a rocket. If th e Goblin Kamikaze makes contact with the player it explodes dealing damage to all units within (x ra dius) of the impact including itself. The Goblin Kamikaze will explode after one 1 of not making cont act with the player or any environmental objects, dealing damage to all units within (x radius) of the impact including itself. Goblin Medic #9 This basic unit is unique because it can heal and re vive other injured or dead goblins. The Goblin Medic may shoot a green energy beam at an injured Gob lin within (x distance) and heal it for (x health), the Goblin Medic may only do this once every (x seconds). The Goblin Medic may also revive dead Goblin while floating their way to the void zone. The dead Goblin must be within (x distance) bringing it back to life at (x% of total health), the Goblin Me dic may only do this once every (x seconds). The Goblin Medic has access to the laser gun. Goblin Looter #10 This basic unit is unique because it doesn’t attack the player, but instead it flies around the map collecting as many coins as it can without falling into the void zone and avoiding the player. The Goblin Loot must be within (x distance) to collect a co in. The Goblin Looter will despawn after 1 minute of being in the arena. If the Goblin Looter is killed an y coins it has collected during its current spawn time are dropped where it died. For every 10% health lost the Goblin Looter drops 1 coin, these coins are separate from the coins collected during th e current Goblin Spawn spawn duration. Ogre #11 This basic unit isn’t a Goblin but is a part of th is faction. The Ogres as a race are not a part of any one faction and are found fighting a log side all fact ions in the Fae Wild. This Ogre does not wield any weapons but instead punches his foes for a large amou nt of damage and has a large health pool; he however has a very slow movement speed. Goblin Boss #12

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29 This is the first boss unit the player encounter s in the game. The Goblin Boss has a very large health pool, does not use any weapons instead he punches his foes for a large amount of damage. The Goblin Boss can also throw cr yonades and molotov cocktails. Enemies Health Weapons Movement Damage Special Goblin Melee 20 A Fast n/a Goblin Ranged 15 L,S Medium n/a Goblin Elite 50 A,S,F Medium n/a Goblin Heavy 80 A,R,F Very Slow n/a Buff: Tower Shield = 90% reduced damage from the front Goblin Pilot 15 A,L,S Fast n/a Goblin Engineer 20 L,G Medium n/a Can Throw: Cryonades Goblin Demolitionist 20 F,R Medium n/a Can Throw: Molotov Cocktail Goblin Kamikaze 2 n/a Very Fast 25 Runs to player position and explodes dealing (x damage) to both player and enemies Goblin Medic 40 L Medium n/a Heals and Revives dead goblins, player may intercept heal Goblin Looter 100 n/a Very Fast n/a Random movement, tries to avoid player. Can pick up coins, despawns after 1 minute. If it dies it drops all gathered coins and a sack of gold (x value). For every 10% hp lost it drops (x gold) Ogre 70 n/a Slow 35 Strong Melee attack, doesn’t use weapons Goblin Boss 1000 n/a Slow 35 Strong Melee attack, doesn’t

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30 use weapons. Can Throw: Cryonades and Molotov Cocktails

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31 Neutral Non-Playable Character Overview Within the game there are non-playable charact ers, these characters can provide advantages and or disadvantages for the player. Unicorn #1 When the unicorn spawns, it specifically spawns on either the left or right border of the screen, stays in place for 3 seconds and then charges in strai ght line to where player was during the first second of the unicorn spawning and continues off screen as a very fast movement speed. Any unit hit by the unicorn is dealt 50 points of damage. Leprechaun #2 When the leprechaun spawns it maintains random movements, avoids any void zones and tries to avoid enemies. The leprechaun may be damaged by the player, enemies and neutral characters. If the leprechaun is still alive after 2 minutes after spawn, he drops his pot of gold for the player at its current position and then runs off screen. Collecting the pot of gold rewards the player with (x gold). The pot of gold is affected by the pull of void zones. The leprechaun has 100 health points. Light Fairy #3 When the light fairy spawns it maintains random movements, avoids any void zones and tries to avoid enemies. The light fairy may be damaged by th e player, enemies and other neutral characters. The light fairy heals the player while the player is within (x distance) of the light fairy, the player is healed for 5 health points every 2 seconds. If the light fairy dies it floats to the void and returns as the dark fairy. Light fairy flies off screen after staying alive fo r 1 minute. The light fairy has 50 health points. Fairy (Dark) #4 When the dark fairy spawns it maintains random movements, avoids any void zones and tries to avoid enemies. The dark fairy only spawns if a light fairy dies and comes in contact with a void zone, the deceased light fairy is replaced by the dark fairy. Th e dark fairy is not affected by void zones. The dark fairy may be damaged by the player and neutral characters. The dark fairy damages the player while the player is within (x distance) of the dark fairy, th e player is damaged for 5 health points every 2 seconds. When the dark fairy dies it explodes and deals 30 damage to player, enemies and neutral characters within (x distance). The dark fairy has 50 health points.

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32 Environmental Objects Overview Within the game there are object s that will spawn in the arena for the sole purpose of being an obstacle for all units. These obstacles have health points and may be destroyed. Upon being destroyed some of the objects have an effect. Moon Rock #1 The moon rock has a very slow movement speed, 100 health points and it deals 0 points of damage when destroyed. However when destroyed the moon rock has a 5% chance to leave behind a random item. Moon Rock Random Item Table Chance to Drop Random Weapon 2.5% Random Gadget 2.5% Random Coin Amount (5-10) 50% Cake 5% Candy 10% Burger 10% Bacon 15% Cryonade 5% Molotov Cocktail 5% Cryo-Barrel #2 The cryo-barrel has a slow movement speed, 10 health points and it deals 20 points of damage when destroyed. When destroyed the cryo-barrel fr eezes all units within (x radius) of the place of destruction. Flammable Barrel #3 The flammable barrel has a slow movement speed, 10 health points and it deals 40 points of damage when destroyed. When destroyed the flammabl e barrel burns all units within (x radius) of the place of destruction. Crate #4 The crate has a slow movement speed, 60 health points and it deals 0 points of damage when destroyed. However when destroyed th e crate leaves behind a random item.

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33 Crate Random Item Table Chance to Drop Random Weapon 2.5% Random Gadget 2.5% Random Coin Amount (5-10) 50% Cake 5% Candy 10% Burger 10% Bacon 15% Cryonade 5% Molotov Cocktail 5% Table of Environmental Objects: Environmental Objects Damage Upon Destruction Movement Speed Health Points Moon Rock 0 Very Slow 100 Cryo-Berrel 20 Slow 10 Flammable Barrel 40 Slow 10 Crate 0 Slow 60

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34 Specialization System Overview The Specialization System is another way to personalize your character. The reason for the Specialization system is so that every player may play their character slightly different from another person and to build their character to fit their speci fic play style. The way the Specialization System works is, at the end of every completed Arena the pl ayer is rewarded a certain amount of Specialization Points (SP) after the scoreboard is done calculating their score for the level. The SP rewarded correlates directly with the score earned for the level. On the Specialization System user interface the player may spend their collected SP to unlock new abilities and attr ibutes called Specialties, for their character. Some Specialties are available to purchase with SP immediatel y, and some are grayed out. This is because the player must first unlock a specific Specialty that is linked to the desired Specialty before being able to unlock it. When a player dies and is forced to star t the game over, any previous purchased Specialties remain unlocked, but any unspent SP is lost. Critical Hit I Increases Critical Hit chance by 2% Critical Hit II Increases Critical Hit chance by 2% Critical Hit III Increases Critical Hit chance by 2% Critical Force Increases Critical Hit severity by 2% Brutality I Increases Damage done by 1% Brutality II Increases Damage done by 1% Brutality III Increases Damage done by 1% Brutality Master While below 35% health gain Empower Empower : Increases Damage done by 5% of your current maximum.

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35 Physical Damage I Increases Physical Damage done by 2% Physical Damage II Increases Physical Damage done by 2% Physical Damage III Increases Physical Damage done by 2% Physical Damage Mastery Increases Physical Damage done by 4% Lifesteal I Increases Lifesteal by 2% Lifesteal II Increases Lifesteal by 2% Lifesteal III Increases Lifesteal by 2% Lifesteal Mastery Increases Lifesteal by 4% Devastate Your Critical Hits deal 25% extra Physical Damage to units below 25% health. Fueled Up I Increases Movement Speed by 5% Fueled Up II Increases Movement Speed by 5% Fueled Up III Increases Movement Speed by 5% Fueled To The Brim Increases Movement Speed by 10% after not losing any health for 1 minute.

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36 Back Up Thrusters After being Immobilized you gain a 30% Movement Speed increase for 3 seconds. Deflect I Increases Deflect Chance by 1% Deflect II Increases Deflect Chance by 1% Deflect III Increases Deflect Chance by 1% Deflect Mastery Increases Deflect Chance by 1% and Deflect Critical Hit Chance by 2% Rift Walker After using the Teleporter gadget you gain a 30% Movement Speed increase for 3 seconds. Healthy I Increases Health Pool by 1% Healthy II Increases Health Pool by 1% Healthy III Increases Health Pool by 1% Sucker Punch I Increases Melee Damage done to Immobilized units by 5% Sucker Punch II Increases Melee Damage done to Immobilized units by 5% Sucker Punch III Increases Melee Damage done to Immobilized units by 10% Battery Backup I Increases total Energy by 5

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37 Battery Backup II Increases total Energy by 5 Battery Backup III Increases total Energy by 5 Crit Severity I Increases Critical Severity by 4% Crit Severity II Increases Critical Severity by 4% Crit Severity III Increases Critical Severity by 10% My Turn Taking direct damage grants 1 stack of my turn Upon reaching 10 stacks all nearby units are Stunned for 2.5 seconds. This effect can only occur once every 25 seconds. Keep Up Landing a Critical Hit has a 15% chance to grant Swiftness. Swiftness: Increase Movement Speed by 20% for 5 seconds. Fatal Wounds Critical hits deal 2.5% damage every 2 seconds for 10 seconds. Much Needed Sustenance Taking a Critical Hit grants Hunger for 5 seconds Hunger: Increases Healing received by 15%. Stacks 3 times. Commanding Presence I Grants Vitality to you and allies within 30 meters. Defense: Increases your Health Pool by 2% of your current maximum. Commanding Presence II Grants Vitality to you and allies within 30 meters. Defense: Increases your Health Pool by 2% of your current maximum.

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38 Commanding Presence III Grants Vitality to you and allies within 30 meters. Defense: Increases your Health Pool by 2% of your current maximum. Fully Charged I While both Energy Pools are at full capacity your damage is increased by 5% Fully Charged II While both Energy Pools are at full capacity your damage is increased by 5% Fully Charged III While both Energy Pools are at full capacity your damage is increased by 5% Radioactive While both Energy Pools are at full capacity your deal 5% of your total Energy Pool Maximum Capacity in Damage to any unit that hits the player with a melee attack. Strikethrough I Increases your Striketh rough chance by 1% Strikethrough II Increases your Striketh rough chance by 1% Strikethrough III Increases your Striketh rough chance by 1% Sure Shot When your attacks are Deflected you have a 35% chance to gain Bullseye for 5 seconds. Bullseye: Your next attack cannot be Deflected. Can only occur every 5 seconds. ADHD Grants a bonus to Energy regeneration, howev er the player uncontrollably switches weapons every 5 seconds. Fast Metabolism Heal over time effects on the player happen faster and the player is no longer slowed from food.

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39 Lead Trigger Finger The players rate of fire is increased but they can't stop firing. Hot Blooded The player regenerates health while burning instead of taking damage Cold Blooded The player moves faster while cold Insurance Fraud Enemy medics have a chance to randomly heal you as well Stone Skin The players defense is increased but the players sp eed is slowed for (x time) after taking damage COD Bod The player regenerates health after not taking damage for (x time) Transient The player randomly teleports after taking significant damage YOLT After the first time the player dies they are revived with 50 health. You only live twice! Defiant You refuse to accept physics, and are less affected by gravity High Strung The players speed is increased but they never stop moving Inconspicuous Enemies don't turn as fast to aim at the player Rock Market Space Rocks often drop coins. Sorry for the pun. No I'm not Luck Does nothing

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40 Greater Luck Really, we're not joking Ultimate Luck Fine, whatever. You're really lucky.

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41 Item Upgrade System Overview Within the game the player has the option to m odify the weapons and gadgets they are carrying. When a weapon or gadget is dropped in the arena or ge nerated randomly at the in-game store to be sold, the weapon or gadget may come with 0 to 2 sockets in on it. The sockets are used for modifying the properties, attributes and function of the item. The spec ific modification that is placed into the weapons and gadgets to modify them is called a Mod. Mods co me in various types; each type of Mod affects each item it’s placed into differently. There is a specific user interface that is dedicated to modifying items and is the only place where item modify ing may be done; this user interface is accessible through the inventory screen. Once a Mod has been placed into an item it cannot be removed. A Mod may be placed in a socket that has a preexisting Mod in it, the new Mod replaces the old Mod and the old Mod is lost forever. Only one of each type may be placed into an item. There are X types of Mods, each different type of Mod is represented by a color. Weapons Axe Red – Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange – Increase damage done and knocks b ack the target (x distance) Yellow – Increase attack speed Green – Life Leach You have a 20% chance wh en hitting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max health pool back. Blue – Adds a cold effect to the attack Purple – Energy Steal – You have a 20% chance when h itting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max energy pool back. White Whirlwind Holding down the attack butt on causes your player to spin once in a circle hitting everything in an AoE around him at a max distance of (x). Cannot be socketed while there is a Yellow Mod in the Axe. Black Axe Toss – Holding down the attack butt on causes the player to throw their Axe to where their crosshair was when they clicked the button. Once the Ax e reaches that position, it returns to the player, dealing damage to any unit hit along the way. Cannot be socketed while there is a White Mod in the Axe. Additional Mod Concepts:

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42 1: Hitting a unit with the axe applies a debuff that causes the units Movement Speed to be reduced by 50% for 3 seconds. Laser Gun Red Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange Increase damage done Yellow – Holding down the attack button causes the weapon to charge faster. Green – Life Leach You have a 20% chance wh en hitting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max health pool back. Blue – Adds a cold effect to the attack Purple Energy Steal – You have a 20% chance when h itting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max energy pool back. White Holding down the attack button causes the player to fire a multiple projectiles Black Holding down the attack button causes the pl ayer to fire a high damage but very focused [projectile Additional Mod Concepts: 1: Double Tap 20% chance to fire additional shot, immediately after the triggering shot is fired. 2: Oversized Capacitor You may charge the Laser Gun for twice as long and do twice the damage then a fully ch arged shot currently does. 3: Piercing your Laser Gun shots pierce through your targets hitting others behind them Gatling Gun Red Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange Increase damage done Yellow – Increases the accuracy of the weapon

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43 Green Life Leach You have a 20% chance wh en hitting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max health pool back. Blue Adds a cold effect to the attack Purple Energy Steal – You have a 20% chance when h itting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max energy pool back. White Firing the weapon causes less overheat Black – Increases the weapons rate of fire Additional Mod Concepts: 1: Rocket Launcher Red – Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange Yellow – Increases the rate of fire of the weapon Green Life Leach You have a 20% chance wh en hitting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max health pool back. Blue Adds a cold effect to the attack Purple Energy Steal – You have a 20% chance when h itting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max energy pool back. White – Holding down the attack button causes the play er to lock on to the target and fire multiple rockets Black Holding down the attack button causes the player to fire a spread of rockets Additional Mod Concepts: 1: Your shots have a 10% chance to apply a Do T to units hit by the Rocket Launcher. The DoT deals 1 damage every 2 seconds for 10 seco nds. This effect may stack up to 3 times. 2: Smoke Screen – Enemies hit by the Rocket Projectile suffer a 25% decrease in accuracy for (x duration)

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44 Shotgun Red – Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange Knocks back the target (x distance) Yellow – Increases the accuracy of the weapon Green Life Leach You have a 20% chance when hitting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max health pool back. Blue Adds a cold effect to the attack Purple Energy Steal – You have a 20% chance when h itting a unit with the weapon to gain 5% of your max energy pool back. White Holding down the attack button causes th e player to spin in place and fire multiple shots Black Holding down the attack button causes the player to fire more projectiles in a single shot Additional Mod Concepts: 1: Slug only shoots one projectile now but does massive damage and knocks back target 2: Dragons Breath random chance to shoot out a Flamethrower projectile for .5 seconds. 3: Rubber Bullets Projectiles shot from the Shotgun have a 25% chance of after doing damage on contact with a unit, will bounce off in a nother direction dealing a second set of damage if it makes contact with a unit. Flamethrower Red Adds a burning effect to the attack Orange Knocks back the target (x distance) Yellow Decreases the accuracy of the weapon but creates a wider spread that it fires. Green Blue Adds a cold effect to the attack and replaces the burn effect. Purple

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45 White – Firing the weapon causes less overheat Black – Increases the distance the weapons projects travel Gadgets Stopwatch Red – Burning doesn’t extinguish while time is slowed Orange – Projectiles are lowed even more than normal Yellow – The energy using the gadget is reduced Green – The player regenerates while using the gadget Blue – Cold doesn’t extinguish while time is slowed Purple – Increases the players energy regeneration White – You are less affected by the slow Black – Enemies are more affected by the slow Immovable Boots Red Orange Yellow The energy using the gadget is reduced Green The player regenerates while using the gadget Blue Purple Increases the players energy regeneration White Black Teleporter

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46 Red – After using the Teleporter units next to the player are set aflame Orange After using the Teleporter any negative status effects on the player are removed Yellow The energy using the gadget is reduced Green The player regenerates health after using the gadget Blue After using the Teleporter units next to the player are frozen Purple Increases the players energy regeneration White Black After using the Teleporter units next to the player are knocked back Personal Shield Generator Red – If an enemy comes in contact with the sh ield the enemy is affected by fire Orange If an enemy comes in contact with the shield the enemy is knocked back Yellow The energy using the gadget is reduced Green The player regenerates while using the gadget Blue If an enemy comes in contact with the shield the enemy is affected by cold Purple Increases the players energy regeneration White – Black – While the shield is activated it reflects projectiles Additional Mod Concepts: 1: While using the Personal Shie ld Generator and the Energy Pool designated for the Personal Shield Generator reaches 0 due to negating received damage you d eal (x Fire) to units within (x distance) of you. This effect can only happen once every 1.5 minutes. Grapple Shot Red – Kicking the enemy sets the enemy on fire Orange – Increases weapon damage dealt to a target grabbed

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47 Yellow – Increases the speed the hook travels Green – Drains health from the grabbed enemy Blue Kicking the enemy freezes the enemy Purple – Increases the force the Grappl e Shot has when it pulls a unit White – You can now grab fairies with the Grapple Shot Black – The Grapple Shot can now grab projectiles

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48 Miscellaneous Overview This is where we put all the things we don’t have places for. Coin #1 A form of currency that can be dropped by k illing enemy units, destroying crates, and given as rewards for completing missions. Coins are used to purchase consumables, weapons, and gadgets form shops within the game.

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49 Musical Scores and Sound Effects Overview The soundtracks and sound effects created for this game are to have a throwback feel to the time of 8-but audio. The genre of music that is to be emulated is referred to as Chiptune. Soundtrack All soundtracks are created and composed with in the mobile application Nanoloop for iOS. Sound Effects All sound effects are created using an online application called as3sfxr based on sfxr by Tomas Pettersson. The program is used to randomly gene rate and custom create retro game sound effects.

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50 Single-Player Game Overview In single player mode the player takes control of a single character that travels from battle to battle trying to survive against waves of enemies, defending himself with a multitude of different weapons, gadgets and consumables that the player has either purchased or found though out their adventures. Story A rarely traversed sector of space, known as HB-12 has recently shown some unusual gravitational activity, void zones have randomly been appearing throughout the sector. The protagonist controlled by the player is an adventurous Space Meteorologist who sets out to go explore the region of space to discover what is causing the strange anomalies. Upon arrival to HB-12 the player discovers that the region is not as barren as initially thought. The HB-12 has become home and battle field to many strange and foreign creatures. The new HB-12 inhabita nts have mysteriously appeared in the region and they don’t seem to be from the Space Meteorologist plane of existence. The new “neighbors” are from an astral plane called The Fae Wild, a harsh and unforgiv ing environment. The Fae Wild is home to many exotic races and species such as the Elves, Dwarves, G oblins, Orcs, Ogres and many more. Their world is in constant chaos caused by many of the more prom inent factions warring against each other over often time’s trivial reasons. The Space Meteorologist finds him self stuck in the middle of this incredible event and is determined to figure out why The Fae W ild is spilling into his realm and how to stop it. Hours of Gameplay Talk about how long the single-player game experience is supposed to last or what your thoughts are at this point. Victory Conditions The player wins by beating the final boss of them game. Defeat Conditions and Consequences

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51 The player loses by having their health brought to 0 and not having any reviving effects. If the player’s health reaches 0 and they do not have any re viving effects they are dead. When a player dies, they lose all equipped Weapons, Consumables, and Gadgets, all Weapons, Cons umables, Gadgets and Mods in their inventory, all of their coins and an y unspent Specialization Po ints. They also lose any uncovered areas of the Overworld, any Quest progress the have achieved, any unlocked paths in the Overworld. They are forced to start their game progr ess over. When they die they are brought to the main start screen where they may play their previous char acter but starting from the beginning of the game. The only thing that remains with the player when th ey die is any unlocked Specializations in the Specialization System.

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52 Multiplayer Game Overview Players may join game sessions with their friend’ s, the only time their friend’s presence is seen is within the Arena. Players may leave and join a friend’s session at any point in the games progression. Starting a multiplayer session does not require the player ’s progress to be lost. To start a multiplayer session the players select a host and then they join th at host’s current game at its current progress but maintaining any current customizations to their charact er in their own single player game. When leaving a multiplayer session any changes made to a player’s character are carried over to their single player progression, including but not limited to, death. Max Players The maximum amount of players is 4. Adjustments for Multiplayer For every additional player added to a session the difficulty of the enemies is increased and the arena size is increased as well to better fit the chaos. Servers Peer-to-peer. Customization All customization settings are the same fo r multiplayer as they are for single player. Internet Connection Blue Tooth





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1 PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS : SPACE ODDITY Written by Paul Burgermeister University of Florida Digital Worlds Institute Monday, April 07, 2014

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2 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express the deepest appreciation to my committee chair, Professor Ang elos Barmpoutis who has provided me with the opportunity to conduct such an enjoyable study I would li ke to thank my committee member Marko Suvajdzic for his feedback and dedication to ensuring this project was a success. In addition, I also would like to gi ve a special thank you to the two brilliant programmers and friends Ryan Roden Corrent and Christian Brewer, who helped me make my vision come to life Through their consistent hard work, support, and knowl edge of programming they have broadened my unde rstand ing of how truly grueling creating a video game from start to finish can be.

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3 TABLE OF CONTENTS PROJECT IN LIEU OF T HESIS: ................................ ................................ ..................... 1 SPACE ODDITY ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 1 ACKNOWLEDG E MENTS ................................ .. ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED. TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 3 LIST OF FIGURES ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 4 LIST OF ABBREVIATION S 5 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 7 INITIAL THOUGHTS ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 7 RECRU I TMENT ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 9 THE DESIGNER ................................ ................................ ................................ .......... 10 Genre ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 10 Roguelike ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 10 Arena Shooter 11 Game World 12 Game Design 12 Game Characters 14 User interface 15 Shop User Interface 17 Game Items 22 Status Effects 25 Specialization System 25 Item Upgrade System 26 Dynamic Level Content Generator 27 THE ARTIST 30 Art Style /Tools Used 30 Animation Solution 31 THE SOUND ENGINEER ................................ ................................ ............................. 32 Musical Style 32 Sound Engineer Tools Used 33 THE TESTER ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 36 THE PROGRAMMER ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 39 PROJECT MANAG E MENT ................................ ................................ ........................... 40 Programs Used 40 CONCLUSION ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 42 LIST OF REF E RENCES ................................ ................................ ............................... 43

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4 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 VISUAL OF T HE UI WHILE IN ARENA MODE. ................................ ................................ ....... 16 FIGURE 2 VISUAL OF T HE UI WHILE IN FIRST PERSON MODE WHEN VIS ITING THE GAME SHOP. ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 17 FIGURE 3 VISUAL OF T HE UI WHILE IN FIRST PERSON MODE WHEN VIE WING THE INVENTORY SCREEN. ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 19 FIGURE 4 VISUAL OF T HE SCOREBOARD UI THA T IS DISPLAYED WHEN THE PLAYER SUCCESSFULLY COMPLET ES A LEVEL. ................................ ................................ ....................... 20 FIGURE 5 VISUAL OF T HE LOADING SCREEN UI THAT IS DISPLAYED WH EN THE GAME NEEDS TO LOAD CONTENT. ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 21 FIGURE 6 VISUAL OF T HE ESC MENU UI THAT IS DISPLAYED WHEN THE P LAYER SUCCESSFULLY COMPLET ES A LEVEL. ................................ ................................ ....................... 22 FIGURE 7 VISUAL OF T HE DIFFERENT WEAPONS THE PLA YER HAS ACCESS TO IN THE GAME. 23 FIGURE 8 VISUAL OF T HE DIFFERENT GADGETS THE PLAYER HAS ACCES S TO IN THE GAME. 24 FIGURE 9 VISUAL OF T HE DIFFERENT CONSUMA BLES THE PLAYER HAS ACCESS TO IN THE GAME. ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 25 FIGURE 10 THIS IS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW THE D YNAMIC LEVEL CONTENT GENERATOR SYSTEM WORKS ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 29 FIGURE 11 IMAGE OF N ANOLOOP'S UI FOR THE IPHONE ................................ ................................ .. 35 FIGURE 12 IMAGE OF T HE AS3SFXR UI ................................ ................................ ................................ 36

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5 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS RPG Role Playing Game FPS First Person Shooter GDC Game Developers Conference UI User Interface IDEA Interactive Digital Entertainment Association NPCs Non Playable Characters 2D Two Dimensional 3D Three Dimensional M1 Left Mouse Button M2 Right Mouse Button SP Specialization Points

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6 Abstract of Project in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts SPACE ODDITY By Paul Burgermeister April 2014 Chair: Ang elos Barmpoutis Committee Members: Marko Suvajdzic Major: Digital Arts and Scien ces The purpose of my project is to better understand the process a small indie game development company would undergo when they develop a game title from a concept to a finished shippable product. The best way I figured to understand and to learn about t he process was to make a shippable game title throughout the duration of my graduate studies. With the help of two programmers I was able to create an incredibly enjoyable game and understand the efforts required to make a video game; this was my process and what I found.

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7 INTRODUCTION A game can be an extremely powerful tool ; it can be used to tap into many types of positive physical mental and emotional states of engaged individuals. A ch ieving these positive states can be a challenge one that tries incredibly hard to create a feeling of accomplishment and avoid causing boredom. Large companies that have a large supply of funds and a small nation of workers often masterfully achieve these attributes Small parties r arely achieve strong at tributes but when they are able to portray these emotions on a high scale, the game content peaks my interest With the growing desire for compact, light weight games to be played on hand held device s such as mobile phone s the rise of small indie game dev elopment companies comprised of very few workers positioned to create this type of content has recently seen an increase In one survey, State of the Industry, taken at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) during March of 2013 one of the key findings show ed that the number of independent game developers and small scale game development groups are steadily rising The survey showed that 53% of the 2,500 contributors identified 51% had been an indie developer for less tha n two years. In addition 46% of the respondents worked for companies that had ten or less people employed and only 24% of them worked with a publisher when releasing their last game. I wanted to experience indie game develo pment firsthand by creating a single player role playing game (RPG ). INITIAL THOUGHTS

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8 I quickly realized that creating a game was an enormous task, so I broke the process up in to a list of the necessities I needed to complete it. The list of job positions at a large scale game development company can reach into the hundreds; I did not have that luxury. I needed to design a game that would meet my desired level of enjoyment and do it with a small group of unpaid volunteers, not a very easy task. To minimize the amount of help I would need I decided that I would fill many of the needed roles. The basic roles that go into making a game can be broken down into designer, artist, programmer, sound en gineer and tester. The designer is the person who designs the way the game plays; the y conceive the entire structure of the game and the rules that define it Often a development team will have a lead designer who coordinates the work of other game designers. The designers are the primary visionaries of the game. One of the many roles of a designer is b eing all narrative, commentary, journals, cut scene narrative, and dialogue. Writers also contribute to game mechanics, the user interface, and character development as needed The artist produces the art for the game A lead artist, or art director, generally oversees the production of the games art, to ensure that th followed differs based on what type of visual dimension they w ill be working with. If the artist is a 2D artist their tasks can include creating, concept art, sprites for animation, textures, environmental back drops or terrain images and the imation s, 3D environments lighting, rigging, and cinematics

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9 The programmer is a software engineer who develops the game or any software that is needed to create the game. The programmer is responsible for creating the games codebase Often times there a re a number of programmers th at are led by a lead programmer. The lead programmer s initial codebase, oversees the remaining tasks to be completed and allocates projects to other programmers as needed until the game development is complete Some of the different programming disciplines include game physics, AI, graphics, sound, gameplay, UI, network communications, scripting, game tools, and input processing. The sound engineer is a technical professional who is responsible for al l of the sound effects used within the game. Sound engineers also may be tasked with creating sound assets, oversee ing voice acting and music compositions. The tester fills the role of quality assurance. They analyze the game and document the games defec ts so that they may be corrected by the other m embers of the development te am. Testing can be very expensive and is primarily done near the completion of the project. I utilized my personal skill set to fill the roles of designer, artist, sound engineer and tester. I reached out to others to complete the programming for my game. RECRU I TMENT When I decided to start this project I wa s a member of the UF club IDE A (Interactive Digital Entertainment Association), a club focused on working as a team to create small video games. The club had many members with various backgrounds that

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10 were all applicable to the creation process of game development. During my time with IDEA I spoke with many UF students who were skille d in programming and eventually found two willi ng individuals who offered to help by taking on the task of the programmer. THE DESIGNER My first task as the designer was to come up with a n achievable project for three g and would complement our individual skill sets. Genre I decided to experiment with two different game genres: a hybrid of a roguelike and an arena shooter that was displayed in a third person view from the side. Roguelike Roguelike is a sub genre of role playing games (RPG) that are generally characterized by random level generation and punishing game mechanics such as permanent death. Roguelikes descend from the game Rogue created in 1980 that mimic the games, turn based gameplay that provides time for the player to plan their move, extreme fantasy settings, mechanical difficulty and sprite based graphics. Many games that include all of these are often times considered to be classical or B erlin versions of the genre I n more recent years with m ore powerful computers and gaming systems the g enre has shifted away from tile based movement and turn based gameplay to instead have their game play supplement ed with other genres such as

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11 platformers and action games. There have been some recent very pop ular and famous games that use the modern rendition of roguelike such as the Diablo series and the Torchlight series B oth series have had a number of published sequels and copycat games. Arena Shooter The arena s hooter is a sub genre of the first person shooter (FPS) genre The description for the arena shooter genre is hazy at best but some of the more common trends found in the genre are a fixed first person view and some type of combat between the player and either other players or n on playable characters that is confined to a small enclosed area that the player cannot leave. These games are also often times based on a point system to tally scores, rounds of game play that are ended after a spe cific duration or a reached goal, and som e limited amount of character customization in way of the players weaponry and abilities that they can use Hybrid Design I decided to create a ro le playing game, set in a high fantasy setting, where each level played by the player is within an enclosed arena, viewed in third person at a profile angle Within each level the player would fight waves of non playable characters (NPCs) with a large variety of weapons they would choose from before entering each level The way in which the pl ayer dispatched the ir enemies would reward varying points based on a dynamic point system that rew ards more points for creativity, each round of game play ends when a specific amount of enemies have been destroyed.

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12 Game World For the game world I wanted to create an environment that would allow for humorous game play and exciting encounter s that were only enhanced by its goofy themes The game story involves a rarely traversed sector of space, known as HB 12 that has recently shown some unusual gravitational activity V oid zones randomly appear throughout the sector and must be filled by the space traveler The protagonist controlled by the player is an adventurous Space Meteorologist who sets out to explore th e region of space to discover what is causing the strange anomalies. Upon arrival to HB 12 the player discovers that the region is not as b arren as initially thought. H B 12 has become home and battle field to many strange and foreign creatures. The new HB 12 inhabitants have mysteriously ap plane called The Fae Wild, a harsh and unforgiving environment. The Fae Wild is home to many exotic races and species suc h as the Elves, Dwarves, Goblins, Orcs, Ogres and many more. Their world is in constant chaos caused by many of the more prominent factions warring against each other over trivial reasons. The Space Meteorologist finds himself stuck in the middle of this i ncredible event and is determined to figure out why The Fae Wild is spilling into his realm and how to stop it Game Design World Layout The game is broken up into three different modes : the arena, first person and the Overworld.

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13 Arena The Arena is the p ortion of the game where the player fights the antagonists. The player is forced to survive again st waves of enemies, neutral characters who may or may not be of help to the player, void zones that are constantly causing changes to the physics inside t he a rena, and random space junk. The arena is a closed environment ( where ) the player loads into upon starting a level and may not leave it until the void zone is filled. The void zone is filled by incapacitating enemies which causes them to float helplessly i nto the void zone, increasing its capacity. Once the void zone is filled the level is over and the player is rewarded with in game currency and a score for the level. First Person The First Person portion is a blanketing term for whenever the player is at a screen that is made to lo ok like you are viewing the world from their eyes. For example vendor they are in First Person. There is no movement involved, only game op tions, such as equipping an item or buying a gadget. Overworld The Overworld is a large 2D environment in which the player may explore. The Overworld initially is covered by a layer of black fog that conceal s areas of the Overworld. These areas of black fog are not uncovered until the play er travels to them;

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14 this is often times referred to as fog of war. Uncovering the zone allows the player to see new locations of levels, ci ties, shop and quest giving non playable character s (NPCs) The player may traverse the Overworld by following predetermined paths that lead from one area of interest to the next T hese paths branch off in many directions giving the player options on where to travel. Game Characters There is only one pla yable c haracter, the Space Meteorologist that is exploring and studying the region the game is set in. There are neutral and hostile non playable c haracters. T he majority of them are made of up the creatures from the Fae Wild, the plane of existence where they co me from. Creating a Character When you start a new game you may name your character and adjust the color of their space suit. Additional character customization comes from the different items the player has to pick from when deciding what to car rying into the next level The player has a large arsenal of items to choose from when preparing for each level. The player is only allowed to carry a specific amount of items with them into a level, also known as the arena B ecause of this limitation the player is forced to pick and choose which items they would prefer to wield while in combat during the following encounter. Th ese items may be bought with in game currency or earned as rewards for completing missions and quests. Each item has a special pro perty that helps the player in combat.

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15 The items are separated into three different categories: Weapon, Gadget and Consumable. Character customization also comes in the form of a specialization system. The specialization system allows the player to spend t heir collected points earned after each arena battle These points can be used to gain additional modifiers to their character. Within the specialization system there is a myriad of different talents to choose from, all with different modifiers the player can benefit from. The player, allowing for further customization of their character, decides upon their specializations Non Playable Characters (NPCs) Non playable characters are the enemies, monsters and creatures found in the game E very character in the game aside from the character the player controls is considered a non playable character. The non playable characters are from a different plane of existence, known as the Fae Wild. Both friendly and evil characters, collectively known as Fae creatu res, inhabit the Fae Wild The Fae creatures are mysteriously appearing. They are separated into multiple, currently warring factions, the elves, goblins, orcs, dwarves and a few other smaller groups. Each faction has multiple different units all with their own unique abilities, attributes and art. User interface The overall theme of the user interface is to look like a hodgepodge of scrap space parts and holographic di splays. The user interface changes depending on the game setting the player is in.

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16 Arena User Interface The user interface (UI) for the arena is intended to be clean and minimal. It is designed this way to maximize the view the player has of the current level to helping them to see content as soon as it appears, allowing them more time to react Many of the user interfac e assets are designed to have some level of transparency to them to enhance the players overall awareness of the level. Some user interfa ce options will remain hidden until the player needs access to that portion of the interface, for example the consumable item buttons. Figure 1 Visual of the UI while in arena mode. Overworld User Interface

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17 The user interface for the Overworld is also straightforward and simplistic The reason for this design is to provide a smooth transition for the player when navigating from location to location throughout the Overworld. Shop User Interface The design for shop user interf ace is to be comical and engaging. The shop is set within an old dingy food truck that has been repurposed to sell items that the player may need. There is an area in the shop user interface that displays the objects for sale W hen an item is selected a portion of the user interface displays the specific attributes that belong to that item. A player can browse the shops inventory, which fluctuates after a specific duration of time based on an in game timer. Figure 2 Visual o f the UI while in first person mode when visiting the game shop.

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18 Inventory User Interface in the center, along with different menus that are brought up by selecting tabs t hat are labeled and correspond with the different classes of items the character can equip: Weapons, Gadgets and Consumables. The player may browse through a list of items they have obtained and inspec t the item and its attributes b y clicking on the specif ic item. The player may drag the icon of an item they want to use from their list of items onto a portion of the user interface that depicts the items the character is currently using, called character slots. The character slots can only hold two weapons, two gadgets and six consumables at a time. The items the player has placed into their character slots when entering an arena are the only items they have access to for the duration of the arena. If the player wishes to make adjustments to the items they ha ve in their character slots they must do it to the inventory user interface which is only accessible through the Overworld screen.

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19 Figure 3 Visual of the UI while in first person mode when viewing the inventory screen. Scoreboa rd User Interface The user interface for the Scoreboard appears at the end of a completed arena. It displays a large amount of statistics based on the previous arena completed. The Scoreboard always displays the number of enemies the player destroyed, the amount of coins the player collected during the arena, the new current total amount of coins the player has and the total score the player earned. There is a portion of the Scoreboard that displays Fun Random Stats, the subject of the stat could be somet hing like the and the number of enemies frozen T he subject is randomly pulled from a large table of options and only six of these options are displayed on the Scoreboard at a time. The particular statistics fo random; they are continually tracked and recorded by the game and then displayed if

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20 the subject of the stat is randomly chosen to be displayed on the Scoreboard once the arena is completed. Figure 4 Visual of the Scoreboard UI that is displayed when the player successfully completes a level. Load Screen The user interface for the load screen is an image that overlays the previous background and displays a load bar with a helpful tip for game play an d a humorous reason for why the loading bar is replenishing

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21 Figure 5 Visual of the Loading Screen UI that is displayed when the game needs to load content. ESC Menu The ESC menu is an image that overlays the previous background and displays a small menu with options for the player to choose from. This menu is accessible at any point in the game by pressing the ESC key on the keyboard. While this menu is active the game prog ress is halted until the escape menu is turned off. To turn off the escape menu the player only has to pr ess the ESC key while the ESC menu is active or press the resume button on the ESC menu

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22 Figure 6 Visual of the ESC Menu U I that is displayed when the player successfully completes a level. Game Items Within the game the player will collect and use a number of different items to help advance their progress in the game E ach item is broken up into separate categories : weapons, gadgets and consumables. Weapons Inside the arena the player may use the weapons they have equipped in their character slots. T he character may wield two weapons at once, one in each arm. The player may choose to carry two of the same weapon s To shoot a held weapon while the player is in the arena the player will use the left mouse button (M1) and the right mouse button (M2) to use the corresponding weapon, which is determined by the

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23 placement of the weapon in the character slots on the inv entory user interface screen. Only one weapon may be used at a time. The aiming of the weapon is based on the while they are using the weapon. Each weapon has a separate set of attributes: Accuracy, Damage, Range, Rate of Fire and Special Abilities. All weapons can be found at the shop, however not all of them may be in stock while the player is there. Figure 7 Visual of the different weapons the player has access to in the game. Gadgets While in the arena the player may use the gadgets they have equipped in their character slots. To use a gadget while the player is in the arena the player will use the left shift button (L Shift) and the sp ace bar (Space Bar) to use the corresponding gadgets, which is determined by the placement of the gadget in the character slots on the inventory user interface screen. Only one gadget may be used at a time. The aiming of the gadget, if needed, is based on where the player controlled character is while they are using the gadget. Each gadget

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24 has an additional a ttribute, this attribute is called Energy Consumption. Each gadget has a pool of energy assigned to it which is represented on the arena user interface by a bright blue bar. Each pool of energy may store up to 100 points of energy. On use of a gadget the pool of energy that is linked with the gadget is reduced by a specific cost, unique to the gadget. The amount that the pool of energy is reduced by for each use of the gadget is based on the Energy Consumption attribute. A gadget may be used until using the gadget would reduce the energy pool to less than 0. The energy in the energy pools replenishe s over time, at a rate of 2 energy points per second. All gadgets can be found at the shop, however not all of them may be in stock while the player is there. Figure 8 Visual of the different gadgets the player has access to in the game. Consumables

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25 In the game the player has access to items that they may use that have a one time use ability on them that causes them to vanish after each use. Figure 9 Visual of the different consumables the player h as access to in the game. Status Effects Units can be affected but some of them have varying degrees of severity rep resented on a scale of 0 to 100. The higher the severity the more prono unced the effects are. The severity of the effect decreases over time, based on the resistance to the specific effect. Specialization System The Specialization System is another way to personalize your character. The reason for the Specialization s ystem is so that every player may play their character

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26 slightly different from another person and to build their character to fit their specific play style. A t the end of every completed Arena the player is rewarded a certain amount of Specialization Poin ts (SP) after the scoreboard is done calculating their score for the level. The SP rewarded correlates directly with the score earned for the level. On the Specialization System user interface the player may spend their collected SP to unlock new abilitie s and attributes called Specialties, for their character. Some Specialties are available to purchase with SP immediately, and some are grayed out. This is because the player must first unlock a specific Specialty that is linked to the desired Specialty bef ore being able to unlock it. When a player dies and is forced to start the game over, any previous purchased Specialties remain unlocked, but any unspent SP is lost. Item Upgrade System At any point in time, a player has the option to modify the weapons and gadgets they are carrying. When a weapon or gadget is dropped in the arena or generated randomly at the in game store t o be sold, the weapon or gadget may come with 0 to 2 sockets on it. The sockets are used for modifying the properties, attributes and function s of the item. The specific modification that is placed into the weapons and gadgets to modify them is called a Mod. Mods come in various types E ach type of Mod affects each item differently. A specifi c user interface is dedicated to modifying items and is the only place where item modifying may be done T his user interface is accessible through the invent ory screen. Once a Mod has been into an item it cannot be removed. A Mod may be placed in a socket that has a preexisting Mod in it, the new Mod replaces the old Mod and the old Mod is lost forever. Only one of each type may be placed into an

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27 item. There are 8 types of Mods, each represented by a different color red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purpl e, black and white Dynamic Level Content Generator Each level in the game has content for it generated by a system designed to provide a new and exciting experience that allow s the designer to introduce events to the player at any specific time of their choosing. The system is called a Dynamic Level Content Generator Each level has a number of waves each wave brings new enemies to the arena and each wave appears in the game at a specific defined interval. Each wave has two different attributes that it references when spawning its content, threat level and static enemies. Each enemy in the game has a certain threat level assigned to it based off of its intended difficulty. When creating the content of the waves for the level the designer may assign a nu is a number that represents the amount of points total that may be randomly spent on enemies chosen from a preset table of possible enemies it may spawn. This preset table that may be chosen from can b e adjusted per wave to have different content each time The preset table allows the designer to define the different types of enemies they wa nt to have the computer spawn during a wave but maintain the difficulty of the wave each play through of the game. I n addition to a defined threat level number the designer may also set a static number and type of enemy to be spawned at a specific wave every play t hrough in case they want to introduce something to the player at a very specific moment in the game. An e xample of this system would be:

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28 Wave 5 is given the allowance of 10 points to spend on enemies to spawn and 1 static enemy. The table of enemies that the 10 points may be spent on is set to only have the Goblin Melee, Goblin Elite and Goblin Ogre. The Gob lin Melee costs 1 point, the Goblin Elite costs 5 points and the Ogre costs 8 points. The static enemy is set to be an Ogre. When the wave spawns it randomizes the points spent on enemies that will be spawned the points spent must equal the total allowanc e set, which is 10. In addition to ran domized enemies that will spawn, an Ogre will spawn as well, because it was designated as a static spawn for this wave. This gives the outcome of the wave 4 different possibilities. These 4 different possibilities can be seen in the example image below.

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29 Figure 10 This is an example of how the dynamic level content generator system works

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30 The randomness that this system provides continues to hold true to the roguelike genre and to keep each pla y through of the game new and fresh. THE ARTIST Art Style When choosing the direction of the art style for the game I had to take into account the abilities of the artist, myself. I being the artist for the project made the decision very easy. The majority of my artistic abilities are in 2D, so that is what the game is in. I really enjoy the 2D art work done by Dan Paladin for the games Alien Hominid Castle Crashers and Battle Block Theater so that is where I drew my inspiration from for the style of the game. The art work created for these games are very iconic and recognizable they focus on a cartoony theme This seemed like a great fit for my specific skillset, it would mesh well with the fantasy setting and the humor that I wanted to be displayed in the game. I would use thick outlines for the images created to give an illustrated feeling along with sold shapes of color for shading and showing depth. The use of bold colors and avo iding using predominantly dark colors would help the objects stand out from the dark b ackground the player will often times be playing in. Artist Tools Used

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31 Due to the enormous amount of work needed to create this game I wanted to use a program that I w as very skilled with, something that I could quickly create visuals Illustrator I decided to create all of my art assets in a program by Adobe Systems called Adobe Illustrator. Adobe Illustrato r is a vector based graphics editor program which allows me to scale any image I make within the program to any size and avoid any distortion that may happen when using a program that is pixel based. This will help cut down production time spent on any ima ge size editing if testing shows that different scale images would be optimal. Spriter animating where, instead of each frame being a single complete image, it is constructed from m any small, re useable images (such as body parts). Each of these images that are used to construct a full frame can be scaled and rotated to further increase the use an artist gains from the assets created. This modular method of animating offers many benefits for several aspects of game development, s uch as time conservation, iteration edits, saving fil e space, and it helps tremendously for character variations. Animation Solution I designed a system for attaching limbs to specified anchor points on sprites that can rotate within certain bounds based on the velocity of the sprite that gi ves the

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32 appearan ce of animation This system was implemented to save time when creating art assets. Traditionally artists would have to create separate images for every motion a sprite made. With this system it allows us to make one sprite and still have the illusion of a nimation. The specific limbs on a character that hold weapons rotate towards the direction that the character is aiming and have anchor points for the weapon located at the hand. The hand that the weapon will be j oined to is connected to the limb of the ch aracter through anchor points this is to make it look like the weapon is being pointed in the direction that the character is aiming. THE SOUND ENGINEER Musical Style I had no previous musical experience, so I needed to come up with a style of music that would be easy for me to emulate and work. I chos e to use the musical genre Chip tune after seeing the success of the Bit.Trip game serie s that features an amazing mix of 80s aesthetics and modern game design. The game series is primarily known for its great chiptune inspired soundtrack. Chipt u ne Chiptune, also known as 8 bit music, is synthesized electronic music that is created or emula ted through the use of sound chips of vintage computers, arcade machines and video game consoles. The game technologies initially used in chiptune music were created for consumers in the 1980s and 90s. Some of the more popular gaming consoles that used suc h technology were the Nintendo Entertainment System,

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33 Sega Genesis and Game Boy. After many years of only being seen in retro gaming consoles the genre is making a comeback with the release of many different chiptune music creators including LittleSoundDJ for the Game Boy and Milky Tracker for Windows. Sound E ngineer Tools Used To create the different types of sounds I would need for the game I se ttled on two different programs one for soundtrack creation and another for sound effect creation. Soundtrack For soundtrack creation I chose the program Nanoloop. Nanoloop 1.6 is a sequencer for the Game Boy. Sound that is generated by Nanoloop 1.6 uses the Game bit w ave form. Nanoloop 2.5 is a version for the Game Boy Advance, which can produce filtered waves, filtered noise and simple FM. The iPhone version of Nanoloop, the version I used for this project shares the same sound engine, file format and a similar interf synthesizer with a simple sampler. It also allows the user to record audio onto their mobile device and then may import it to a PC. Nanoloop uses a sequencer that displays its pattern as a grid of 4 x 4 rectangles. Notes can be set, removed and edited just by tapping and swiping. This editing without mode allows for changes on the fly coupled with its gorgeous layout provide a great

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34 environment for a smooth workflow. Unlike the Game Boy versions, Nanoloop for iPhone only allows the user to set pitch and one additional value step in the sequencer. All other sound parameters use controlled channels through the synth panel. The simple but powerful synthesizer allows the user to cre ate a great bandwidth of sounds, including beats, noises, basses and pads. Available synthesis types are: rectangular wave with filter, FM, and LFSR noise generator. Rectangular wave and ut offer more fine control and additional effects. The FM synth is the simple type with two sine wave oscillators, with fixed base frequency and variable modulator frequency. An envelope / LFO can be applied to modulation amplitude or frequency. For a swee ping spatial effect, the modulator can be slightly detuned, with inverted phase for left/right. Each synth channel is two voice polyphonic and a stereo effect can be applied. Samples of one second length @ 44 kHz, mono cannot just be used in a drum machine style, but also be pitched and played as notes. Nanoloop allows for multiple recording sources for samples such as the built in microphone (iPhone only), a headset microphone (iPhone, iPod touch 2nd gen only) llows the user to create new samples from scratch, using up to five chan nels to create one single sound.

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35 Figure 11 Image of Nanoloop's UI for the iPhone Sound Effects For sound effect creation I chose the program A s3sfxr. As3sf xr is a modified version of S fxr. Usage of A s3 sfxr involve s pressing a randomize button or manipulating any of the other numerous sliders that the user may adjust to manipulate sound attributes to create a specific sound. The sounds created with this application have the same chiptune style that is desired for the games over all sounds aesthetics. When a desired sound is created the user may save the soun d and export it to be used else where.

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36 Figure 12 Image of the as3sfxr U I THE TESTER While the game development process is underway every 2 weeks we update our current build of the game with the new content we have created. We do this so that I can play the game for a short time to test the newly applied content before workin g on next sprint During these test phase s I record any found issues if I find an issue with the programming I report it to the programmers to correct any other found issue s are my problem to solve. In addition to our own personal beta testing I r eached out to

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37 bers test our game and give me feedback The alpha testing of Space Oddity with the Game Makers Guild took place on April 1 st 2014. Nine guild members volunteered to test the game and to fill out a small survey afterwards about their experience. These are the questions they were asked: 1) In a single week how many hours do you spend play ing video games? _____ 2) If this game was offered on a tablet, circle the likeliness you would want to play it on a tablet versus on a desktop computer (Strong disinterested) (Disinterested) (Neither) (Interested) (Strongly Interested) 3) If this game could be 4 player, circle how interested you would be in this feature (Strong disinterested) (Disinterested) (Neither) (Interested) (Strongly Interested) 4) (Very Difficult) (Difficult) (Mild) (Easy) (Very Easy) 5) Circle the difficulty of play (Very Difficult) (Difficult) (Mild) (Easy) (Very Easy) 6) Circle the enjoyment you had playing the game (Very Unenjoyable) (Unenjoyable) (Neutral) (Enjoyable) (Very Enjoyable) 7) Circle how engaging the game was (Very Unengaging) (Unengaging) (Neutral) (Enga ging) (Very Engaging) 8) Circle how you felt about the graphics (Very Unenjoyable) (Unenjoyable) (Neutral) (Enjoyable) (Very Enjoyable) 9) Circle how you felt the speed of play was (Too Slow) (Slow) (Just Right) (Fast) (Very Fast) 10) Circle how you felt about t he soundtrack (Very Unenjoyable) (Unenjoyable) (Neutral) (Enjoyable) (Very Enjoyable)

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38 11) Rate the chances of you wanting to play this game again (Strong disinterested) (Disinterested) (Neither) (Interested) (Strongly Interested) Here are my findings: Question # 1) Mean : 12.8 Median: 12.5 Mode: N/A Highest: 30 Lowest: 2 2) Strong Disinterest: 1 Disinterest: 3 Neither: 0 Interested: 4 Strongly Interested: 1 3) Strong Disinterest: 1 Disinterest: 1 Neither: 0 Interested: 3 Strongly Interested: 4 4) Very Difficult: 0 Difficult: 2 Mild: 3 Easy: 3 Very Easy: 1 5) Very Difficult: 0 Difficult: 6 Mild: 2 Easy: 1 Very Easy: 0 6) Very Unenjoyable: 0 Unenjoyable: 0 Neutral: 0 Enjoyable: 4 Very Enjoyable: 5 7) Very Unengaging: 0 Unengaging: 1 Neutral: 1 Engaging: 7 Very Engaging: 0 8) Very Unenjoyable: 0 Unenjoyable: 0 Neutral: 1 Enjoyable: 5 Very Enjoyable: 3 9) Too Slow: 0 Slow: 0 Just Right: 3 Fast: 4 Very Fast: 2 10) Very Unenjoyable: 0 Unenjoyable: 0 Neutral: 2 Enjoyable: 3 Very Enjoyable: 1 11) Strongly Disinterested: 0 Disinterested: 0 Neither: 0 Interested: 8 Strongly Interested: 1

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39 Based on the response s gathered for survey question 7, 7 out of 9 respondents stated that they found the game engaging. 8 out of 9 surveyors are interested in p laying the game again. 6 of 9 players felt the game was difficult. Based on the information gathered by the survey responses and the feedback given during the testing of the game it would appear that the game is enjoyable and meeting all of the desired cha racteristics. We strove to create a fun and exciting but difficult game, it would seem like we are on the right path to achieve this. THE PROGRAMMER The game engine used to create Space Oddity is MonoGame. MonoGame is an open source implementation of the Microsoft XNA 4.x Framework. Using MonoGame will allow us to port to multiple platforms such as Xbox 360, Windows & Windows Phone to port their games to the iOS, Android, Mac OS X, Linux and Windows 8 Metro. Although I did have two programmers create the code for the game, I did help with the coding as much as I could. Despite not knowing how to program, I was able to help by an operating principle of a computer program or algorithm. It uses the typical conventional structure of programming languages but is created for the purpose of reading rather than to be interpreted by a machine. An example of this would be what happens wh en the player uses the in game g adget, Person al Shield Generator: On use: Item creates a force field static to player s position that prevents (x damage) to player for duration based off a static decay rate of (x per second) and

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40 for every (x damage) prevented (x energy energy pool reaches 0 the force field is turned off Other examples of pseudocode I used can be found in the Game Design Document: Space Oddity. PROJECT MANAG E MENT Organizing the creation of an entire game is quite a daunting task, especially if portions of the game creation process are regularly meet in an office. T h e difficulty of organizing the production of this project required me to use a few programs to help facilitated the development process of the game. Progra ms Used The programs I used to help maintain the development process of the game are web based this was intentional, it made monitoring development easy and allowed for quick updates Trello Trello is a free web based project management application made by Fog Creek Software. Trello uses a very specific patt as kanban, which means signboard or billboard. Projects on Trello are represented by boards that contain task lists called lists for short, these lists contain ca rds. On these c ards project goals or milestones can by written and they are intended to be moved from list to list, displaying their current progression. Users can be assigned to specific

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41 cards along with due dates and check lists for them. I used this to h elp organize my personal weekly goals and group sprint sessions. A sprint is a term we used to define a set period of time during which specific work has to be c ompleted to stay on track with our project deadline S print durations usually spanned two weeks. Dropbox Dropbox is a file hosting service that is operated b y Dropbox Inc. Dropbox offers clou d storage and file synchronization for its users. Dropbox allows users to install their program and with it create special folders on their computers; the se special folders then will synchronize via the internet. This means anything that goes into this special folder or is adjusted while in the folder is updated to have the same changes made to it across any other computer that the Dropbox account is linked to. Any file placed in the folders can also be access ed from the Dropbox website or with the mobile application. Access multiple people to modify the contents of the fold ers. I used this application to share all of the art and sound assets I created for the game with the programmers to implement into the game. Google Docs Google Docs is a free web based office suite offered by Google. It allows users to creat e and edit do cuments online while collaborating in real time with other users. Google Docs includes features similar to word processing programs and spreadsheet programs. I used this program for its online spreadsheet capabilities. I used the spreadsheet program to cre ate and share a working game design document with the

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42 programmers. It was used to house tables of gam e world assets joined with pseudocode to help define their attributes and design. Facebook Facebook is an online social networking service. Faceb ook allow s users to message one another directly in real time. Users can create messages to be sent out to entire groups of people. I used the messaging system on Facebook to create a group message for the project to allow constant communication between myself and the programmers, allowing any discrepancy or question to be resolved or responded to immediately. It was also used to schedule video chat meeting sessions that we used for group brain storming or game based discussions. Facebook conveniently allows video c alling services as well throu gh the technology partner Skype which we took advantage of to maximize out time and to receive faster feedback. CONCLUSION This project was immensely involved and extremely time consuming, but I enjoyed every bit of it. I have gained an invaluable wealth of knowledge in regards to creating a game with a small team. I better understand the tasks that come with the divisions of labor when working on a project like a game. From this experience I am able to apply many of the organizational skills and tools I used to better myself and other future projects. I now have a b etter understanding of the amount of time and effort that goes into the many phases a game undertakes throughout its development. This project has better prepared me both in skill and understanding for the work I would like to do in the future. The overwhe lmingly positive feedback I received in regards to the

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43 design, soundtrack and art style I developed for the game has not only encouraged me to peruse a possible carrier in game development but has left me want ing to hone these skills even more. LIST OF REF E RENCES Skillz Admin. March 15, 2013. Not Just Hype: The Rise of Indie Game Developers. Retrieved March 15 th 2014. From http://skillz.com/blog/2013/03/15 /not just hype the rise of indie game developers/