An improved curculio jarring sheet

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
An improved curculio jarring sheet
Physical Description:
2 p., 1 plate : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Snapp, Oliver I
Hollon, Julius P
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plum curculio -- Control   ( lcsh )
Peach -- Diseases and pests -- Control   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Oliver I. Snapp and Julius P. Hollon.
General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
Typescript.
General Note:
"December 1943 ; E-608."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030289043
oclc - 779843814
System ID:
AA00025104:00001

Full Text
LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

December 1943 -,


United States Department of Agriculture
Agricultural Research Administration
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine


AN IMPROVED CURCULIO JARRI, G SH=

Ey Oliver I. Snapp and Julius P. Hollon,
Division of Fruit Insect Investigations


The curculio jarring sheet described in Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine Circular E-355, issued June 25, 1935, has been adopted
by many peach growers for collecting the plum curculio beetles jarred
from the trees as a supplementary control measure. This sheet is satis-
factory, except that the curculios have to be removed at frequent
intervals, usually by sweeping them off into a bucket of kerosene. An
improved jarring sheet, which will accelerate the operation and help
retain more of the dislodged beetles than the sheet previously described,
has been developed.

The essential feature of the new jarring sheet is an opening in
the center, with a canvas bag attached underneath to receive and hold
the curculios as they drop through. This sheet (see accompanying draw-
ing, figure 1, for details of construction) is made by sewing together
three pieces of unbleached cotton sheeting 36 inches wide and 18 feet
long, after which an obtuse triangular piece of cloth (A) 16 feet lone
and 6 inches high at the center, plus a 1-inch allowance on the lono.
side for a seam, is sewed to each long side of the sheet. Then the
sheet is folded lengthwise and crosswise, and a triangular strip (B),
6 inches wide from the crosswise folds diagonally to a point in the
center, is cut out, the sheet being thereby cut in half. The two pieces
of the sheet are then placed one on top of the other and sewed together
along the cut edges (0) to within 5 inches from the center. This creates
necessary bagging of the sheet. The center opening (D) is iaae by cut-
ting eight sectors, each radiating out 4t, inches from the center point
of the sheet. The opening is reenforced with a piece of old 1/2- or
3/4-inch rubber hose held in a circle 10 inches in diameter by a wire
core. This circular hose is attached on the under side of the sheet at
the center by sewing the eight sectors of cloth around it. A canvas
bag closed at both ends by means of draw strinz-s is tied in lace over
the bottom of the reenforced opening to receive and hold the curculios.
A 1l-inch by 1l-inch by 10-foot wooden strip (E) is run throu-h a hem at
each 9-foot end of the sheet to serve as a handle. A hem (F) is ziade
along each 18-foot side, through which cotton rone is -assed and tied
around the wooden strips at each end. The finished sheet has an area
of approximately 9 feet by 18 feet. It is not necessary to use a chain
across the middle of the improved sheet to hold it dow, as the reen-
forced onening is sufficiently heavy to make it bag towp-r-d the center,
which causes the curculios to roll to that point and dro- thrcu-h the
opening into the canvas bag underneath.








The improved sheet can be rolled up into a convenient bundle when
not in use and therefore can be transported easily. Two of the sheets
are placed under a -)each tree, and the tree is then jarred with a pole
having on one end a block padded with a pie-ce of old automobile tire.
These sheets are as easy to handle in orchards as those formerly used,
and the curculios, petals, leaves, and trash which collect in the canvas
bag are easily and quickly removed whe. necessary by loosening the bot-
tom draw string and allowing the contents to drop into a bucket of
kerosene.

Tests in commercial peach orchards with the improved sheets used
by laborers familiar with jarring operations have shown them to be very
satisfactory. With a sharp shake or two of the sheets after each tree
is jarred, all curculios readily slide down into the opening, and this
prevents any of them from flying off. With these improved sheets
jarring can thus be continued throughout the day, which is a distinct
advantage over the old sheets, from which a number of curculios are lost
by flight when jarring is continued throughout a clear, warm day. Fur-
thermore, time is not lost in frequent stops to remove beetles, as is
the case with the old sheets. In comparative tests from two to three
times as many curculios per tree have been caught in the improved sheets
as in the type of sheet formerly used.
































CUT OUT





FOLD LENGTH
CROSSWISE M
A STRIP 6 IN
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Figure 1.--Method of making
improved jarring sheet.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 09227 9917