Veneered and solid furniture

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Material Information

Title:
Veneered and solid furniture
Series Title:
Technical note ;
Physical Description:
2 p. : ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory
Place of Publication:
Madison, Wis
Publication Date:
Edition:
Rev. Dec. 1952.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Furniture   ( lcsh )
Veneers and veneering   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on the World Wide Web.
General Note:
Caption title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029722134
oclc - 61231784
Classification:
lcc - TA419 .U45 no.197 rev.1952
System ID:
AA00025029:00001

Full Text




TECH ICA NOT N M BE R 197
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREST SERVICE
FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY




VENEERED AND SOLID FURNITURE


Large proportion of all the furniture ma tt~~i~ -'rX4~ veneered construction in it. The hih-grae_4it Wosaeused almost entirely as veneers. More table tops, drawer fronts, doors, and side and end panels of all kinds of furniture are built up of three or five layers of wood than are made of single solid pieces.

Veneered construction has several advantages over solid wood, besides permitting the use of cheaper material in the core or on hidden surfaces. These advantages should be borne in mind by the purchaser who thinks tht veneering cheapens the product.

Adaent plies in practically all plywood and veneered panels are laid with their grain directions at right angles to each other; that is, in a tee-ply panel the face veneers are glued with their grain at a rigkt age to that of the core, and in a five-ply panel the grain of the face. veneers is parallel to that of the core and at right angles to that of the intervening layers or crossbands. A panel of this construction has the advantages that it is more nearly of the same strength in all directions, and that as it absorbs or gives up moisture it shrinks and swells in width much less than solid wood. Splitting along the grain in one set of plies is made impossible by the cross grain of the adjacent plies, and rapid shrinking across the grain in the face veneers is offset by slow shrinkage along the grain in the core.

The change in dimension with change in moisture content of veneered panels is almost equal with and across the grain of the face, but is much less than that of solid wood across the grain.

More care can be taken in the selection of surface wood in veneered furniture than can be taken in solid furniture. The manufacturer can dry veneer stock very quickly and cheaply, and he can utilize all of his wood to the best advantage.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 09216 7872
Veneered furniture, if properly cared for, wui iast as cng as soii furniture. The glued joints when correctly made are as strong as the wood under ordinary service conditions. Long exposure to very damp air or direct contact with water, of course, will decrease the joint strength of interior-type glues commonly used for furniture. Such service conditions would also be detrimental to solid furniture, because even in solid furniture the members are joined together with glue.









































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AgrIculture-Madison