Split posts and round posts

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Split posts and round posts
Series Title:
Technical note ;
Physical Description:
1 p. : ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory
Place of Publication:
Madison, Wis
Publication Date:
Edition:
Rev. 1952

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wood poles   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on the World Wide Web.
General Note:
Caption title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029721259
oclc - 60934777
Classification:
lcc - TA419 .U45 no.135 rev.1952
System ID:
AA00025017:00001

Full Text


TECHNICAL NOTE NU M BE R 135
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREST SERVICE
FOREST PRODUCTS LABORATORY
MADISON 5. WISCONSIN REVISED DECEMBER 1952






Is a split fence post as durable as a roiu-fiw jpst, This is a question frequently asked of the Forest Proucts Laboratory. The' fact is, either post will last about as long as the other if they are of the same species and contain the same amount of heartwood. But if the percentage of sapwood is increased by splitting, the split post will be less durable, and if the percentage of heartwood is increased, it will be more durable than a round one. Posts of spruce, hemlock, or any of the true firs are exceptions to this rule, because their heartwood and sapwood are about equally durable.

When posts are to be treated with creosote or other preservative, a round post is generally preferable to a split post, because the sapwood of most species can be treated more easily than the heartwood. The heart. faces on split posts do not, as a rule, absorb preservative well. Split red oak posts can be treated because the heartwood is very porous, but the heart faces of split posts of many other species, notably white oak and sweetgum, resist the penetration of preservative, even under heavy pressures.
ZK 92359 F
Agr ic u It u re-Mad Ison




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09216 7385