Hogtown Creek greenway : master development and management plan report

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Material Information

Title:
Hogtown Creek greenway : master development and management plan report
Portion of title:
Master development and management plan report
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Gainesville (Fla.)
Publisher:
Buffington Associates
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Greenways -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Greenbelts -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
City planning -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre:
local government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
"Approved ... 1993; revised as of March, 1994."
Statement of Responsibility:
<prepared for City of Gainesville, Florida ; by Buffington Associates, et al.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028290614
oclc - 38057981
System ID:
AA00024942:00001

Full Text
FL3
Alachua
G142
106
1994
c 2
c2HOGTOWN



CREEK


GREEN WAY

MASTER DEVELOPMENT
& .^ 1 PLX
MANAGEMENT PLAN REPORT /.-
0 F
'.?-
.. f
Prepared for:
CITY OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


Prepared by:
BUFFINGTON ASSOCIATES
GREENWAYS INCORPORATED
G.L. MARQUEZ AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
ANDREW KAPLAN, ARCHITECT
A. F. CLEWELL, INC.
WILD THINGS, INC.
SOUTHARC, INC.

Revised As Of
March, 1994




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MASTER DEVELOPMENT
and
MANAGEMENT PLAN REPORT



As Approved In Concept By:

City of Gainesville
City Commission

July 7 & 26, 1993


As Approved By:

Alachua County
Board of County Commissioners

July 27, 1993


With Modifications As Requested By:

Florida Communities Trust

December 22, 1993




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Page No
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................. 1

PROJECT PURPOSE .......................................................................... 5

EXISTING CONDITIONS..................................................................... 7
ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES........................... 7
TOPOGRAPHY............................................................................ 7
GEOLOGY, SOILS AND GROUND WATER................................... 7
SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY................................................. 10
FLORA WITHIN STUDY AREA...................................................... 12
THREATENED SPECIES............................................................. 17
INVASIVE OR NON-NATIVE VEGETATION................................... 18
FAUNA WITHIN STUDY AREA...................................................... 18
CULTURAL RESOURCES................................................................... 21
CULTURAL EVALUATION OF THE PROJECT STUDY AREA............ 21
Methodology......................................................................... 26
Preliminary Evaluation Results ............................................. 26
Recommendations ............................................................... 27
CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS.......................... 28
Ring Park ............................................................................ 28
Loblolly Environmental Education Facility............................ 28
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens............................................... 28
MAN-MADE FACILITIES/LAND USE EVALUATION............................... 28
POTENTIAL & KNOWN POLLUTION SITES/DEGRADED LANDS.... 29
Cabot Carbon/Koppers Superfund Site ................................. 29
Farmer's Mutual Exchange.................................................... 29
Bailey's Branch/Gainesville Mall.......................................... 29
Shands Swamp.................................................................... 29
Westgate Shopping Center Area............................................. 31
Sugarfoot Prairie.................................................................. 31
University of Florida Landfill................................................. 31
Interstate 75........................................................................ 31
Dam on Lake Kanapaha........................................................ 31
Split Rock ............................................................................ 31
Kanapaha Water Reclamation Plant..................................... 32

PROJECT GOALS ............................................................................... 33
ENVIRONMENTAL GOAL................................................................... 33
TRANSPORTATION GOAL................................................................... 33
RECREATION GOAL .......................................................................... 33
HEALTH AND FITNESS GOAL ........................................................... 33
QUALITY OF LIFE GOAL................................................................... 33
PUBLIC ACCESS/PRIVACY GOAL...................................................... 34
SAFETY AND SECURITY GOAL........................................................... 34
EDUCATION GOAL ............................................................................ 34
OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT GOAL ........................................... 34







FINA N C IA L G O A L ............................................................................... 34
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GOAL.................................................... 34
CULTURAL RESOURCE GOAL........................................................... 34

PROPERTY ACQUISITION................................................................. 35

RECOMMENDED GREENWAY FACILITIES .................................... 39
NW 23RD AVENUE, AT GAINESVILLE MALL, TO ELKS CLUB LODGE. 39
GHS TO ELKS CLUB LODGE VIA NW 23RD AVENUE......................... 41
GAINESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL TO ALFRED A. RING PARK................... 41
ALFRED A. RING PARK ...................................................................... 41
ELKS CLUB LODGE TO NW 22ND ST. VIA NW 23RD AVE. R.O.W. ..... 41
NW 16TH AVENUE TO NW 8TH AVENUE............................................ 41
ALONG NW 8TH AVENUE TO NW 34TH STREET................................ 47
NW 34TH ST. TO LOBLOLLY ENVIRONMENTAL ED. FACILITY............. 49
BLACK ACRES BIKE PATH................................................................. 51
LOBLOLLY ENVIRONMENTAL ED. FACILITY TO WESTGATE S. C. ..... 51
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER TO CREEKSIDE MALL...................... 54
CREEKSIDE MALL TO NW 34TH ST. @ UNIV. OF FLORIDA................. 54
CREEKSIDE MALL TO GREEN ACRES PARK..................................... 57
GREEN ACRES PARK TO SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE................................ 57
GREEN ACRES PARK TO OAKS MALL............................................... 57
SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE TO FOREST PARK.......................................... 59
SW 20TH AVENUE TO 1-75................................................................ 61
SW 20TH AVENUE TO OAKS MALL..................................................... 61
1-75 TO KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARDENS........................................ 61
GREENWAY IMPROVEMENTS WEST OF KANAPAHA BOT. GARDENS.. 64
KANAPAHA BOT. GARDENS & WEST SIDE OF LAKE KANAPAHA ........ 66
STAGECOACH ROAD TO SW 75TH STREET ....................................... 66
ALONG TOWER ROAD TO ARCHER ROAD......................................... 66
SW 75TH STREET TO 1-75 ALONG SW 24TH AVENUE........................ 66

OTHER RECOMMENDED FACILITIES............................................ 69
GREENW AY SIGNAGE...................................................................... 69
LIGHTING OF GREENWAY FACILITIES............................................... 70
BATHROOM & POTABLE WATER FACILITIES ..................................... 71
PICNIC, SCENIC VIEW SHED AND REST AREAS ................................ 71
USE OF RECYCLED WASTE MATERIALS........................................... 72

IMPACTS OF GREENWAY DEVELOPMENT .................................. 73
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS............................................................... 73
PROJECTIONS OF USE/LANDSCAPE CARRYING CAPACITY ......... 73
INFLUENCES OF PROPER TRAIL TREAD DEVELOPMENT................... 76
IMPACTS ON ADJACENT PROPERTIES............................................... 76
BUFFERING AND SCREENING................................................... 77
MITIGATING VISUAL BLIGHT....................................................... 77
PERMITS REQUIRED FOR GREENWAY DEVELOPMENT..................... 78







ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN .......................................... 81
WATER QUALITY AND QUANTITY..................................................... 82
SOIL MOISTURE, COMPACTION AND LOSS LEVELS........................... 88
PLANTS: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE, COMPOSITION & DYNAMICS ..... 88
MAMMALS: OCCURRENCES AND DENSITIES................................... 89
BIRDS: OCCURRENCES, DENSITIES, NESTING & REPRODUCTION... 89
REPTILES, AMPHIBIANS, FISH AND OTHER ORGANISMS.................. 90

FACILITY MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE ............................ 91
FACILITY MAINTENANCE .................................................................. 91
LANDSCAPE RESTORATION.............................................................. 92
ASSIGNMENT OF MAINTENANCE RESPONSIBILITIES........................ 94
GAINESVILLE NATURE OPERATIONS DIVISION ........................... 94
GAINESVILLE PARKS DIVISION................................................... 94
GAINESVILLE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT.............................. 94
VOLUNTEER TRAIL OFFICERS.................................................... 95
ALACHUA COUNTY ..................................................................... 95
FACILITY MAINTENANCE AND MANAGEMENT COSTS....................... 95
DESCRIPTION OF MAINTENANCE/MANAGEMENT ACTIVITY ........ 97

GREENWAY SAFETY AND SECURITY ................................ ........... 98
GREENWAY HOURS OF OPERATION................................................. 99
GREENWAY USER RULES AND REGULATIONS.................................. 99
POLICE/PARK OFFICER PATROL & EMERGENCY RESPONSE............ 101
MAJOR ROADWAY CROSSINGS ................................................. 101

RISK MANAGEMENT AND LIABILITY............................................. 104
POTENTIAL IMPACT ON MUNICIPAL INSURANCE................................ 104

PILOT PROJECT DEVELOPMENT COSTS ....................................... 105
POSSIBLE PILOT PROJECT FACILITIES............................................. 105
PILOT PROJECT COST ESTIMATES ........................................... ...... 106

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR DEVELOPMENT ............................... 107
GREENSPACE TRUST FUND............................................................ 107
STORMWATER UTILITY FUND............................................................ 107
M UNICIPAL BOND ISSUE................................................................... 107
SW AP/DONATION OF LAND............................................................... 107
ALACHUA COUNTY FINANCIAL PARTICIPATION.................................. 108
INTERMODAL SURFACE TRANS. EFFICIENCY ACT (ISTEA) FUNDS ... 108
ADDITIONAL POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCES ................................... 108

PHASING PLAN FOR IMPLEMENTATION........................................ 109
TH E PILOT PROJECT ......................................................................... 109
PHASE II DEVELOPM ENT................................................................... 109
PHASE III DEVELOPM ENT ................................................................. 109
PHASE IV DEVELOPM ENT.................................................................. 110







APPENDIX A:


APPENDIX B:


APPENDIX C:


ECOLOGICAL SURVEY & MANAGEMENT
RECOMMENDATIONS

FLORIDA COMMUNITIES TRUST ANNUAL
REPORTING PROCEDURES

INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE
CITY OF GAINESVILLE & ALACHUA COUNTY










LIST OF TABLES


TABLE 1.
TABLE 2.
TABLE 3.
TABLE 4.

TABLE 5.
TABLE 6.

TABLE 7.


Page No.
KEYNOTE SPECIES OR FEATURES ............................... 22
LISTED ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES IN HOGTOWN CREEK GREENWAY .... 24
INTENSITY OF TRAIL USE .... ..................................... 74
ENVIRONMENTAL SUITABILITY OF TRAIL USE WITHIN SENSITIVE
ENVIRONM ENTS ............................................ 75
NORMAL MONTHLY RAINFALL DATA ............................. .83
AGENCIES AND INDIVIDUALS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE HOGTOWN CREEK
GREENWAY SYSTEM .......................................... 96
INTERSECTION ANALYSIS ..................................... 103


LIST OF MAPS


MAP 1.
MAP 2.
MAP 3.
MAP 4.
MAP 5.
MAP 6.
MAP 7.
MAP 8.
MAP 9.
MAP 10.
MAP 11.
MAP 12.
MAP 13.


Page No.
GREENWAY SEGMENTS .......................................... 4
REGIONALLY SIGNIFICANT FACILITIES .............................. 6
S O ILS (2) .. .. ... .. . .. ... .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 8
CREEKS, LAKES, WETLANDS .................................... 11
100-YEAR FLOOD PLAIN (2) ..................................... 13
ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITY TYPES ................................ 15
ECOLOGICAL SURVEY SITES .................................... 23
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY ................................. 25
POTENTIAL AND KNOWN POLLUTION SITES ....................... 30
PUBLIC PARCEL ACQUISTIONS .................................. 36
PRIORITY PARCEL ACQUISTIONS ................................. 37


PROPOSED STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PROJECTS
PREFERRED DESIGN CONCEPT ................


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LIST OF FIGURES


FIGURE 1.
FIGURE 2.
FIGURE 3.
FIGURE 4.
FIGURE 5.
FIGURE 6.
FIGURE 7.
FIGURE 8.
FIGURE 9.
FIGURE 10.
FIGURE 11.
FIGURE 12.
FIGURE 13.
FIGURE 14.
FIGURE 15.
FIGURE 16.
FIGURE 17.
FIGURE 18.
FIGURE 19.
FIGURE 20.
FIGURE 21.


Page No.
TYPICAL SIGNAGE DEVELOPMENT ............................... 40
TYPICAL SOIL CEMENT PEDESTRIAN TRAIL ........................ 42
TYPICAL PEDESTRIAN BOARDWALK .............................. 43
TYPICAL PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE .................................. 44
TYPICAL MULTI-USE TRAIL ..................................... 45
TYPICAL MULTI-USE BOARDWALK ............................... 46
N.W. 8TH AVENUE TWO-WAY MULTI-USE TRAIL .................... 48
PREFERRED SITE PLAN FOR LOBLOLLY AREA ..................... 50
BLACK ACRES NEIGHBORHOOD MULTI-USE TRAILS ................ 52
TYPICAL BRIDGE DETAILS ...................................... 53
TYPICAL BRIDGE UNDERPASS FOR MULTI-USE TRAIL ............... 55
MULTI-USE TRAIL BETWEEN CREEKSIDE MALL AND APARTMENTS ..... .56
UTILIZATION OF SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE STORMWATER MGMT BERM ..... 58
TRAILS AT THE S.W. 20TH AVE. BRIDGE ......................... 60
INTERSTATE-75 OVERPASS AT HOGTOWN CREEK .................. 62
TYPICAL BOARDWALK FACILITY AT LAKE KANAPAHA ................ 63
TRAIL HEAD FACILITIES AT KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARDENS ......... 65
OBSERVATION PLATFORM AT LAKE KANAPHA ..................... 67
TYPICAL PARALLEL EQUESTRIAN AND PEDESTRIAN TRAILS ........... 68
TYPICAL GREENWAY FENCING ................................... 79
DESIGN STORM RAINFALL DATA ................................. 85





























INTRODUCTION





























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Master Development & Management Plan
Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville, Florida



INTRODUCTION

In 1967, the Gainesville Department of Community Development first
identified the Hogtown Creek flood plain as a potential open space system
worthy of protection from urban encroachment and for the future enjoyment of
residents. A 1970 study by Smith and Sanderson proposed that the Hogtown
Creek flood plain should become a linear open space system that provides
stormwater runoff control, protects water quality, and serves as a vegetative
buffer between land uses. The study envisioned a network of trails for hiking,
biking and canoeing that linked neighborhoods to parks and places for
shopping and employment. The study also recommended that the flood plain
be preserved as a refuge for wildlife.

Over the years numerous studies have been completed for the Hogtown Creek
flood plain, all of which reached the same conclusion as the Smith and
Sanderson study. For example:

In 1973, the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council identified
Hogtown Creek as over-developed and recommended a multi-use
recreational land use concept that would protect the natural resources of
the creek and flood plain lands.
In 1974, a study by Christensen called for the establishment of a
greenbelt system for the Hogtown Creek drainage basin.
In 1978, a study of the Hogtown Creek flood plain by the University of
Florida, Department of Landscape Architecture (Cooper) cites the lack of
recreational facilities west of 13th Street, and recommends a
"greenspace" system of trails that would link parks and schools to
neighborhoods.

In 1982, the City of Gainesville adopted a creek protection ordinance
prohibiting development within 35 feet of the centerline of Hogtown Creek, and
restricting or prohibiting some forms of urban development 35 to 150 feet of
the creek. This action began a process of further protection by the City,
including the acquisition of property and adoption of the Comprehensive Plan
(1991) which called for the establishment of greenways throughout the city and
surrounding areas. Since 1984, the City has acquired 191 acres of land
adjacent to the creek in an effort to comply with the recommendations of these
planning studies.



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 1 Management Plan







In 1992, the City applied for a Florida Communities Trust (FCT) Preservation
2000 Program grant, to fund the acquisition of lands for the proposed Hogtown
Creek Greenway, a 6-mile, 1,786 acre multi-objective study corridor. FCT
grants are provided to improve the quality of life in Florida communities
through recreation and conservation oriented projects. Out of 50 project
applications state-wide, the Hogtown Creek Greenway was ranked # 1 by FCT
and received its top financial award.

In March 1993, the Consulting Team of Buffington Associates of Gainesville,
FL and Greenways Incorporated of Cary, NC were employed by the City of
Gainesville to prepare a Master Development and Management Plan for the
Hogtown Creek Greenway to satisfy guidelines set forth by the FCT grant, and
provide direction to the City for future project implementation. This Master
Development and Management Plan report is intended to provide resolution to
the acquisition of lands for the greenway, development recommendations for
greenway facilities, and operation, management and maintenance guidelines to
ensure that the project protects the public health, safety and welfare of
community residents. This document serves as a complement to the graphic
plan maps, design sketches and other planning materials prepared by the
Consulting Team.

Citizen participation in the planning and design of the Hogtown Creek
Greenway has been and continues to be of prime importance to the City of
Gainesville. Through an extensive national review of similar greenway projects,
the City has learned that many successful greenways are designed,
implemented and managed through public-private partnerships with local
residents. This project has been organized and administered to include the
participation of local citizens. On April 23, 24 and 25, 1993, a citizens-
oriented Hogtown Creek Greenway Design Charette was conducted by the
Consulting Team and City and Alachua County staffs to solicit concerns, ideas
and recommendations from the community regarding future design
development of the project. The conclusions from this charette form the basis
for recommendations within this report. These recommendations are
supplemented with the expertise of the Consulting Team, and professional
staffs from the City and County, to satisfy the planning and design
requirements of the project.

Most importantly, this Development and Management Plan addresses and
satisfies requirements of the Florida Communities Trust Program 2000 grant,
defining:
the purpose of the greenway and activities that will be promoted through
project implementation.
physical improvements that will be made to greenway lands, including
access and alterations to land use or landscape character, size/type of
facilities, easement, concessions and leases that will be granted, and
permits that are required for development.
key management issues related to maintenance, security, staffing,
natural resource protection, archaeological and historical protection,
and how management will be coordinated with adjacent land uses.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 2 Management Plan







resource enhancement, including restoration of plant and animal
habitat, wetlands and surface water quality.
cost estimates and funding sources for land acquisition, facility design
development, maintenance, restoration and enhancement activities.
priority schedule for funding and implementation of project activities.
a monitoring plan for development and management of project lands and
activities.

During the development of the Master Development and Management Plan it
was discovered that sixteen parcels, FCT-1 through FCT-16, all of which are
located between NW 39th Avenue and NW 23rd Boulevard, were inadvertently
not designated on the Recreational Greenways map in the data and analysis
report of the City's newly adopted Comprehensive Plan. As a result, these
parcels could not legally be included as part of the Hogtown Creek Greenway
Project site or its Master Development and Management Plan. The loss of
these parcels reduced the Project Site to a 6-mile, 1,786-acre study corridor
(See Map 1). Consequently, the City of Gainesville's City Commission has
gone on record stating that in 1994, the Land Development Code will include
these sixteen parcels as designated greenway lands within the City's Greenway
District, as originally intended.

The Comprehensive Plan gives the City the authority to modify the
Recreational Greenways Map through Policy 2.1.3 of the Recreation Element,
which states that: by 1994, the City shall develop public access trails or
boardwalks along publicly-owned segments of Hogtown Creek. The City
Commission will adopt by resolution an amendment to the Recreational
Greenways Map to include the sixteen parcels. This amendment action and
changes to the Land Development code will be reflected in the Hogtown Creek
Greenway Project 1994 Annual Report to be presented to the Florida
Communities Trust.




















Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 3 Management Plan





Greenway Segments
Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ________________________________


LEGEND
- Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


lLS
MILES


Ridgewood


Sugarfoot


Lake a
Kanapaha


D


MAP 1


P'4pawed by the
D Apatmn n o Cormwrty ODe*Opmen


*trt S1199





























PROJECT PURPOSE










PROJECT PURPOSE

It is the primary objective of the proposed Hogtown Creek Greenway is to
protect, restore and preserve the remaining ecologically sensitive and important
landscape features within the Project Site, and secondarily, to provide
structured and controlled access to these lands through a comprehensive
network of trails and other public facilities.

The proposed Hogtown Creek Greenway is a 1,786 acre, 6-mile multi-objective
study corridor that extends from NW 23rd Boulevard to Lake Kanapaha in the
City of Gainesville and portions of Alachua County, Florida. This unique
community project offers local residents with an opportunity to protect
important open space lands for biological diversity, improve water quality,
mitigate stormwater flows and enhance aesthetic beauty of the landscape. The
greenway will provide residents with access and use of some protected lands
through a system of designated off-road, multi-purpose trails for environmental
education, resource-based passive recreation and alternative transportation,
serving to link community resources together (See Map 2). Finally, this project
will make highest and best use of certain lands that serve important ecological
functions, and revitalize, through redevelopment, some existing land uses so
that they are better able to function as community resources.


Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville, FL


Master Development &
Management Plan








Regionally Significant Facilities

Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


LEGEND

-i Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


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MAP 2


Pepafod by ihe
ODepaewnot of Coernmuty Deftvtpmu
August 1992


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1. OGalnesvllle Mall
2. Glen Springs/Elks Club
3. Ring Park
4. Galnesvllle High School
5. JJ. Finley Elem. School
6. Weslwood Middle School
7. Weslslde Park
8. Llttlewood Elem. School
9. Loblolly Environmental Education Centrder
10. Stephen Foster Elem. School
11. Glen Springs Elem. School
12. Westgate Shopping Center
13. Creekslde Mall
14. University of Florida
15. Green Acre Park
16. Terwillliger Elem. School
17. Forest Park
18. Performing Arts Center and Museum
19. 34th Street Shopping Center
20. Water Reclamation Plant
21. Kanapaha Park
22. Kanapaha Botanical Gardens





























EXISTING CONDITIONS




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EXISTING CONDITIONS

ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES
The City of Gainesville, Alachua Conservation Trust and Consulting Team
members Wild Things, Inc. and A. F. Clewell conducted an extensive evaluation
of the Hogtown Creek flood plain and landscapes within the Project Site. The
results of these evaluations are summarized in the following text. A more in-
depth evaluation of ecological communities authored by Wild Things and A. F.
Clewell is provided in Appendix A of this report. The Project Site is comprised
primarily of bottomland forests, flood plain landscapes and upland mixed
forests, most of which are densely vegetated, and provide excellent habitat for a
variety of plants and animals. The Project Site is one of the most biologically
unique environments in North Central Florida, supporting a broad diversity of
ecological communities.

TOPOGRAPHY
The Hogtown Creek drainage basin is characterized by gentle to flat slopes
through much of the middle portion of the Project Site. In the northern
sections, steep slopes border the creek, and around Lake Kanapaha, elevated
limestone bluffs border the southeastern edge of the lake.

Much of the natural topography along the Project Site has been altered by man
through the years. Significant changes include roadway beds, cut and fill
slopes that support urban development, berms to guide the flow of stormwater,
and channelized sections of the creek.

GEOLOGY. SOILS AND GROUND WATER
Alachua County is underlain by marine and non-marine deposits of sand, clay,
marl, gravel, limestone, dolomite and dolomitic limestone. The Hawthorn
Group clays are located northeast of the Interstate 75 corridor, within areas
known as the Northern Highlands Marginal Zone. Creeks and streams in this
zone flow into sinkholes either before or after they enter the Western Valley
limestone plain, and continue to cut headward into the Highlands Plateau to
the northeast. Karst features are particularly well developed along the linear
cross-country fracture zone which runs in a northwest to southeast direction
through the zone. Both the Hawthorn and underlying limestone are
extensively fractured in the zone. The Western Valley lies southwest of the 1-75
corridor, and includes the Lake Kanapaha area. In the Valley, the clay layer is
absent, and the Ocala Group limestones are at the surface, contributing to the
unique bluffs that surround the southeastern edge of the Lake. See soil types
represented in the Project Site shown on Map 3. (Source: Gainesville
Department of Community Development 1991)

The Project Site is underlain by three aquifer systems: the surficial aquifer
(water table), the intermediate aquifer, and the Floridan aquifer. Southwest of
1-75, only the Floridan is present. The surficial ground water zone consists of
a sequence of undifferentiated, relatively porous sands and clayey sands which
are typically 10 to 30 feet thick in the Gainesville urban area. Where present,

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 7 Management Plan








Soils (NE 1/2)

Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA



LEGEND

- Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line



7%
02i
0M.les
o0.29 0.50


MAP 3


Prepared by th
Depa1rr0i of Conm.Milty Owevelopment
August 1992


2B Candler Fine Sand 0-5% Slopes
3B Arredondo Fine Sand 0-5% Slopes
3C Anredondo Fine Sand 5-8% Slopes
48 Arredondo-Urban Land Complex 0-5% Slopes
58 Fort Meade Fine Sand 0-5% Slopes
78 Kanapaha Sand 0-5% Slopes
69 Millhopper Sand 0-5% Slopes
1C Millhopper Sand 5-8% Slopes
99 Millhopper.Urban Land Complex 0-5% Slopes
1 1 Riviera Sand
1 3 Pelham Sand
1 4 Pomona Sand
I 5 Pomona Sand
1 6 Surrency Sand
I S Wauchula-Usban Land Complex
1 9 Monleocha Loamy Sand
20B Tavares Sand 0-5% Slopes
2 6 Samsula Muck
2 7 Urban Land
208 Lochloosa Fine Sand 2-5% Slopes
29C Lochloosa Fine Sand 5-6% Slopes
309 Kendrick Sand 2-5% Slopes
31 Blichlon Sand 2-5% Slopes
31C Blichlon Sand S.5% Slopes
328 Bivans Sand 2-5% Slopes
32C Blvans Sand 58% Slopes
34 Placid Sand. Depresslonal
35S Gainesville Sand 0-5% Slopes
36 Arents 0-5% Slopes
37 Zollo Sand
3 8 Pits and Dumps
399 Bonneau Fine Sand 2-5% Slopes
449 Blichlon-Urban Land Complex 0-5% Slopes
469 Jonesville-Cadillac Bonneau Complex 0-5% Slopes
479 Candler-Apopka Complex 0-5% Slopes
W Waler


MATC14 LIM


) 6 48


SlII Legend







Soils (SW 1/2)

Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


LEGEND


-1- iHoglown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


Milea
I0 0I 050
00.2S 0.50


MAP 3 cont.


Prppwed by "he
0epanmmn( of Coimmn, Devopnmemn
Augus 992?







the surficial aquifer in this zone operates under mainly confined, water table
conditions. The Hawthorn Formation is the intermediate zone, and the aquifer
in this zone is contained under confined conditions. In the urban area, water
withdrawn from both the surficial and intermediate aquifers is used for
domestic and landscape irrigation purposes.(Source: Gainesville Department of
Community Development 1991)

In the Project Site, the Hawthorn Formation is variable in thickness and
perforated by sinkholes, leaving the Floridan semi-confined. Ground water
flow within the Floridan is to the west/northwest. However, in the
northeastern portions of the Project Site, flow movement is to the northeast
due to the municipal well field. (Source: Gainesville Department of
Community Development 1991)

SURFACE WATER HYDROLOGY
The Project Site is wholly contained by the Hogtown Creek watershed basin,
which is approximately 13,700 acres in size. Annual rainfall averages 52
inches, with about half occurring during the months of June through
September. Major surface waters within the Project Site include Hogtown
Creek, Lake Kanapaha, Hogtown Prairie, Haile Sink and Sugarfoot Hammock
and Prairie (refer to Map 4). Surface water flow is from northeast to southwest.

Hogtown Creek is a stream-to-sink system, originating at several spring heads
and eventually draining into Haile Sink, which discharges into the lower part
of the Ocala Group limestone. This 180-foot sinkhole has recorded flows that
vary from a low of 1.2 cubic feet per second to a high of 671 cubic feet per
second. Recharge is to the upper zone of the Floridan aquifer, and together
with Alachua Sink and Lake Alice, accounts for 75 percent of the recharge in
the greater Gainesville urban area. (Source: Alachua Conservation Trust
1992, Gainesville Department of Community Development 1991)

Hogtown Creek itself represents elements of three unique riverine communities:
Spring-run Stream, Seepage Stream and Blackwater Stream. While the creek
originates north of Gainesville in the Buck Bay and Potato Patch areas, the
upstream portion of the creek receives year-round flow from Glen Springs at
23rd Avenue and Seepage along the creek banks from south of 39th Avenue.
For the most part the creek waters are typically clear coming from the springs
and seepage, in periods of high flow the water is perceptibly blackened due to
the high level of tannins present from decomposing needles and leaves. Mid-
valley areas of Hogtown Creek are subject to sheet-flow during periods of storm
runoff. After reaching base level, streams shift their positions in their wide
valleys with each flood water event. Former channels are abandoned and the
character of the creek takes on a braided appearance. Following flooding,
former channels remain filled with standing water, a condition that not only
contributes to occasional increases inthe "blackwater" color, but also
promotes the breeding of amphibians and insects. (Source: Wild Things and A.
F. Clewell 1993)



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 10 Management Plan







Creeks, Lakes, Wetlands
Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


LEGEND

Wetlands
SLakes

i% Creeks
"-6- Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


*0
II
* 1 o.n *o
MInES


L


MAP 4


Pepared by ne
DOpaunm~w of CxownArvity DO opmens
August 1992








Please refer to Map 5 which illustrates the general location of flood plains
within the Project Site. Most of the proposed greenway lies within the flood
plain of Hogtown Creek.

FLORA WITHIN STUDY AREA
The Hogtown Creek drainage basin represents a variety of mesic upland, wet
flatwoods, flood plain and basin wetlands, lacustrine, riverine, and xeric
communities. Recognized community types closely parallel those defined by
the Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI) classification system. Many of
these habitats are remarkably well represented and despite a long history of
human impacts in and around the area, have maintained a high level of
ecological integrity. The habitats encountered, though sometimes distinct, are
frequently observed as ecological gradations amongst the more purely described
"types." This point is particularly important to the project, where a long history
of human occupation of, and interaction with the areas natural resources is
evident (See Map 6).

Descriptions of general types of habitats are important to the processes of
design and broad scale management. The plant list (Please see Appendix A)
consists of 531 taxa, of which 473 are identified to species and 58 are known
only to genus. Seventeen of the species encountered are state or federally
listed or proposed for listing as species of special concern, threatened or
endangered. Many more of the species are considered by local experts rare or
uncommon. Several species were encountered that had not previously been
documented from Alachua County and thus, a range extension was
established. At least 17 species of exotic plants were identified, although it is
believed that many more exotics exist. The plant list provided in Appendix A of
this report is the most complete for Hogtown Creek.

The evaluation of flora throughout the Project Site defines the presence of
thirteen distinct vegetative communities. A brief description of each
community follows:

Upland Mixed Forest Found primarily in the northern and southern portions
of the Project Site, this dominant habitat is found from NW 23rd Avenue to
NW 16th Avenue and within uncleared lands around Lake Kanapaha. These
landscapes are characterized by closed-canopy forests of upland hardwoods.
Sugarfoot Hammock is an example of this type of forest within the Project Site
and is home to the extremely rare and unique Sugarfoot Fly (Neopalpus
nearcticus).

Upland Mixed Forest habitats have been reduced dramatically by residential
and silvicultural development. Most of these forests seem to be increasingly
invaded by exotic plants, a cause for serious concern if ecological integrity is to
be protected.





Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 12 Management Plan







100 Year Flood Plain (NE 1/2)
Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


LEGEND
- Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


II
, 02Miles ,
a 0.25 0.50


NW 39TH AVENUE


NW INTH AVENUE


MiW 9 UNIVERSE hI Etmx
S13sw Mr JWEIlJ.


SW 20TH AVENUE i


MAP 5


Pt*pwod by tihe
OD*peilmni of Commnwly DevwopnWnml
Auousil t992


In







100 Year Flood Plain (SW 1/2)
Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE., FLORIDA


LEGEND


- Hogtown Creek Greenway
Boundary Line


Ie
00l.es
0 0.... 0.-
a 0.2S O.9O


MAP 5 cont.


Pmpwfd by hth
0*p.OmmwA4 of CArimwntyJ D0v*4wn
Augusg 1992





- HOGTOWN CREEK GREENWAY
Gainesville, Florida
0.


Community Types


s15 MAP 6


Bottomland Forest
Basin Marsh
L' Basin Swamp
Floodplain Forest
Floodplain Marsh
Floodplain Swamp
UgR Marsh Lake
E^1 Spring
[ Sinkhole Lake
1" Seepage'Stream
^ Upland Mixed Forest
Xeric HFmmock
Sand Hill
--S Developed Areas

miles
0 1 2








Bottomland Forest Occurs south of 16th Avenue in large patches frequently
grading into areas of Flood plain Forest and other, wetter habitats. These
forests are characterized by low-lying, closed-canopy, tall, straight trees with
either dense shrubby understory and little ground cover, or an open understory
and ground cover of ferns, herbs and grasses. While typical bottomlands are
subject to annual or semi-annual flood events, the Hogtown Creek
bottomlands are more frequently flooded. In addition, the volume of drainage
through these bottomlands has been increasing steadily due to urbanization of
the watershed. Consequently, it is likely that species diversity has been
reduced and levels of exotics increased.

Flood plain Forest These forests overlap throughout the Hogtown Creek flood
plain with Bottomland Forests. In the southern portion of the creek system,
they grade into Flood plain Swamp. The hydroperiod of this forest type is the
principal defining character. The forests are flooded for up to half the growing
season. While these forests are usually without standing water during the dry
season, the seasonal flooding experienced in the summer is critical to the
health of the forests themselves as well as the communities downstream.
Species composition of this community could be severely impacted by changes
in the levels and course of the creek.

Flood plain Marsh At least two pockets of Flood plain Marsh were identified.
Both are associated with the Flood plain Forest south of NW 8th Avenue and
one of the sites is just outside the study area. The habitat is characterized by
herbaceous vegetation (typically grasses and sedges) with some small shrubs.
According to FNAI, these areas experience regular and frequent flooding (250
days/year), as well as occasional low intensity burns (every 1-5 years). These
conditions keep invasive shrubs and trees from expanding into the marsh and,
eventually, excluding the grasses. This area, however, may now be encroached
upon so heavily by residential development that future safe burning is not
possible. Succession to Flood plain Forest is probable.

Flood plain Swamp An extensive area of Flood plain Swamp extends from the
southern edge of the Sugarfoot Prairie to just west of SW 34th Street. The
abundance of buttressed trees and high lichen lines in this habitat attest to
the high frequency of flooded conditions. Many small areas within this habitat
hold isolated ponds of water for long periods of time, releasing them only as
floodwaters return to flush them out. This release of leaf-litter steeped water is
partly responsible for the blackwater aspects of the creek. These isolated ponds
are also critical for the reproductive cycle of many amphibians.

Basin Marsh Also called Wet Prairie, this habitat dominates Sugarfoot Prairie
and extends south around Lake Kanapaha. The area probably developed in a
solution depression and is fire- and hydroperiod-maintained. Flooding at least
200 days per year and burning every 1-10 years has kept this area from more
serious encroachment by arboreal species.




Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 16 Management Plan








Basin Swamp Beginning just east of 1-75 and continuing west at the lower
portion of the Project Site, Bottomland Forests grade into Basin Swamp, and
Hogtown Creek becomes highly divided, even in times of very dry weather. To
the north is the upland mixed forest habitat of Sugarfoot Hammock and to the
south is Lake Kanapaha. It is characterized by periodic dry periods and
occasional fire. Hydroperiods are critical, as in other wetland communities, in
maintaining species diversity and preventing catastrophic fires.

Marsh Lake Lake Kanapaha is a large shallow depression lake surrounded by
bands of aquatic vegetation but it is open in the middle. Lake water is derived
mostly of runoff from surrounding uplands, and the lake functions as an
aquifer recharge source in times of drought (FNAI). However, the lake's water
level can fluctuate in response to ground water levels and water volume in the
Creek. Even though water levels change significantly in the lake, it is
permanent home to many species.

Sinkhole Lake These deep inverted cone-shaped depressions occur on
limestone formations, where subsurface solution erosion reduces the layer
above, resulting in collapse of the surface. As a result, these depressions fill
with runoff water or ground water. This habitat is considered endangered in
Florida, and should be protected from erosion-causing uses, including high
intensity unpaved trails. There are two sinkhole lakes at the south end of Lake
Kanapaha.

Xeric Hammock An isolated area of this unique habitat occurs in Green Acres
Park, where it abuts Flood plain Swamp with almost no ecotone transition. It
is common to find young xeric hammock, but very rarely do you find mature
xeric hammock. This habitat is an artifact of more extensive Sandhill areas of
the ancient past, and is becoming increasingly rare because of its suitability for
urban development.

SandhilU Characterized by open sand on rolling hills with longleaf pine,
wiregrass, and gopher tortoises, this type of community was once common
within the Gainesville City limits, but is rarely found today. Fire is a
dominant ecological factor in this community type. Frequent fire (every 2-5
years) helps to maintain this habitat and the plants within. Gopher tortoises
are abundant in this area. This area is also extremely fragile and should be
protected from high-intensity passive recreation activities.

THREATENED SPECIES
The following is a listing of rare, uncommon, threatened or endangered species
that are known to exist within the Project Site:

Coontie Zamiafloridana
Needle Palm Rhapidophyllum histrix
Jackson Vine Smilax smallii
Godfrey's Privet Forestiera godfreyi



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 17 Management Plan








INVASIVE OR NON-NATIVE VEGETATION
The most significant invasive, non-native vegetation found within the Project
Site includes:


TREES
Mimosa
Japanese Paper Mulberry
Camphor Tree
Chinaberry
Chinese Tallow
Green Ligustrum
Variegated Ligustrum


Albizziajulibrissin
Broussonetia papyrifera
Cinnamomum camphora
Melia azedarach
Sapium sebiferum
Ligustrum lucidum
Ligustrum sinense


VINES


Coral Vine
Air Potato
Japanese Honeysuckle


Antigonon leptopus
Dioscorea bulbifera
Lonicerajaponica


HERBACEOUS ANNUALS & PERENNIALS


Mexican Clover
Wandering Jew


Richardia scabra
Tradescantia fluminensis


(Source: Alachua Conservation Trust)

FAUNA WITHIN STUDY AREA
The landscapes evaluated as part of the Project Site contain an abundant
variety of wildlife. Due to the fact that the Project Site is narrow in parts, and
linear by purpose, a comprehensive evaluation of all species is not possible, as
many animals may only be passing through the corridor on their way to other
destinations. The Consulting Team has generated a list of fauna from
fieldwork, personal communications with authorities in this area of study, and
literature review. Lists of most common types of wildlife are provided in
Appendix A of this report.

The evaluation of fauna throughout the Project Site defines four distinct
groups. A brief description of each group follows:

Mammals Numerous small rodents and insectivores are common in each of
the habitats previously described. Other large mammals, such as armadillos
and opossums are common, while spotted skunks, striped skunks, and gray
foxes are infrequently observed. Three species of rabbit are known to exist, and
are common to the grassy areas of the corridor. Coyotes are increasingly found
in rural areas surrounding the City, so the possibility exists that they are
passing through the Project Site corridor. River otters have been observed in
Hogtown Creek within the past decade. Although they have not been visually
observed, abundant otter signs have been observed as recent as June 1993.


Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville, FL


Master Development &
Management Plan








Raccoons are very common throughout the corridor, but may be rarely seen
because they are nocturnal and tend to avoid interaction with humans. Larger
mammals such as deer, bear and panther will not tend to use many portions of
the corridor due to human habitation. However, the Lake Kanapaha region
offers opportunity for some connection to the San Felasco Hammock and
Paynes Prairie. Although the benefits of the "corridor theory" (Noss and Harris
1986) to mammals is disputed, the presence of larger mammals, especially deer,
may depend on how the greenway system is developed.

Birds A diverse group of wintering migratory and breeding songbirds
passeriness) and birds of prey (raptors) are supported by the variety of
community types found in the study area. The Lake Kanapaha region provides
excellent habitat for a variety of waterfowl, herons, and waterbirds. Over 100
species were identified by the preliminary field survey -- this should be
considered a "short list" of birds for the area. Among the more significant finds
are a pair of bald eagles, wood stork and the loggerhead shrike, a species which
is declining throughout its range. Given the extensive conversion of forested
and wetland habitats to agriculture and residential land use, this area should
be regarded as critical to the continued viability of these species.

Many migratory songbirds currently breed and nest in the mixed and
bottomland hardwood forests of the study area. The selection of nesting sites
are probably explained in part by the absence of human occupation and active
use in the area. The lack of human presence is probably also a factor in the
high incidence of nesting in the larger interior woodland zones such as the
Sugarfoot Prairie and Sugarfoot Hammock areas. The riparian woodlands are
important for insectivorous birds, such as swallows, robins, thrushes, and
warblers, while the prairie and lake areas are critical for raptors dependent on
small mammals, lizards, snakes and frogs. This area is also close enough to
the nesting habitats of Paynes Prairie that the open prairie species such as
bittens and meadowlarks utilize the lake area.

Songbirds often increase in species diversity with suburban development. This
effect is largely due to an increase in the variety of micro habitats (exotic fruit
and flowering ornamentals) and frequently provided feeders. In some cases,
native bird species could be reduced due to the success of other exotic species.
One goal of the greenway should be to minimize this effect by preserving
contiguous natural forest, where native passerines will be less threatened by
crowding (Stouffer and Best 1990). Studies are ongoing as to the minimum
critical size of habitat fragments for each species.

Reptiles, Amphibians and Fish The herpetofauna of headwater areas in
Hogtown Creek basin probably includes creek-side salamanders. There is also
a chance that certain upland and flatwoods species intrude into these narrow
valleys from adjoining habitats. There is nothing unique about midvalley
amphibian and reptile faunas. The herpetofauna includes species that are
adapted to variable water levels. Impoundment by road embankments on the
upgrade side of midstream areas (NW 8th Avenue) impacts vegetative cover and
probably disrupts terrestrial and wetland invertebrates, and, to a lesser extent,
vertebrates.
Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 19 Management Plan








Herpetological communities in the Kanapaha basin include species that favor
aquatic sites. Herpetological species from this area include the rusty mud
salamander. Described by Goin and Netting (1942 Ann. Carnegie Mus., 29:175-
196), this salamander was initially collected in the Hogtown Creek basin. Two
of the species, defined from the Consulting Team's investigations, are proposed
for federal listing as Threatened species. Although not previously collected in
the Project Site, these species could use ephemeral pools in the Kanapaha
basin.

The gopher tortoise is a "species of special concern" in Florida, and declining in
Gainesville due to habitat loss. According to the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission (FGFWFC) the respiratory bacterial disease that is
reaching epidemic proportions in other areas of the state has not affected local
gopher tortoise populations. Active gopher tortoise colonies exist west of the
University's Behavior Research Lab and in small sandy upland patches around
Sugarfoot Prairie. Over 20 burrows were located at the Behavior Lab site alone.
This area is rather isolated and does not allow natural escape should
conditions change. If their burrow locations cannot be protected translocation
to other suitable sandhill sites is suggested.

The fish fauna includes approximately 16 native species and an undetermined
number of exotics. Notropis chalybaeus is the only representative of a
traditional creek fauna; other fish inventoried are typical of ponds, lakes and
sluggish streams. Dissolved oxygen levels are critical to native fish
communities, which in turn supports a variety of species including raccoons,
osprey, eagles and otters. Constant flow rates in designated streams are
required during the hottest periods of the year in order to ensure minimum
oxygen requirements for fish. Native species have less tolerance of low oxygen
levels than some exotic fish. A complete fish survey was not performed as part
of the field investigations by the Team. It is suggested that the public be
encouraged to work with a local agency to develop baseline information on fish
populations, by recording their catches and other sampling programs.

Crustaceans, Mollusks and Insects Large crayfish (Pennsylvanius clarktc, related
to the Louisiana crayfish, were observed in Glen Springs, and probably occur at
other locations. An unusual crayfish was reported in the late 1930's from a
creek-side seepage area in the upper portion of Hogtown Creek. Other than
this observation, the known range of the species is considerably north of
Gainesville. The Hogtown population represents the most southern known site
of occurrence. The presence of this unusual crustacean should be confirmed
through more detailed investigations. Numerous species of clams and snails,
as well as exotics have been recorded from Hogtown Creek, but unfortunately
their status is undetermined at this time.

No comprehensive inventory of invertebrates exists for Hogtown Creek or
adjacent areas. Noteworthy species include the gomphid dragonfly and the
nymph, which is an extensive creek bank burrowing species and a good
indicator of water quality. Some creek damselfly nymphs are also good water
quality indicators. The latter species was observed extensively on the creek
bottom in the NW 8th Avenue bottomlands.
Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 20 Management Plan








Perhaps the best known insect species of the Project Site is Say's Spiketail, a
large species of dragonfly that occurs in adjacent Possum Branch, and has
attracted the attention of entomologists from around the world. (Bill Maufrey,
Personal Communication). According to the International Odonata Research
Institute, it is very likely that the Possum Branch population (the largest in
the world) is not the only one in the Project Site, and that seepage dependent
species may occur in the Project Site north and south of Glen Springs. The
species is currently a candidate for listing by the FGFWFC and is considered
vulnerable. Two additional species dependent on this seepage community are
the Gray Petatail and Furtive Forktail, two rare species of damselfly that have
been seen in the Glen Springs area.

Probably the best locally known of all invertebrates in the Project Site is the
Sugarfoot Fly. This unique fly is the only member of its subfamily known to
occur in North America (Amoroso 1991) and the Sugarfoot Hammock location
is one of only two sites from which it is known. All that is known of this
species is that adults are most active during the wettest part of the year --
June to October. The fly is active during the night and rests in the bark of
trees during the day. The dominant tree species at the fly site are Sweetgum,
Hophombean, Sugarberry, Redbay, and Swamp Chestnut Oak. Without
accurate field data, there is little that can be done to protect the species other
than to leave its habitat undisturbed. The species is a candidate for listing by
FGFWFC and is considered vulnerable.

Several Keynote Features of the Project Site deserve special mention, and do
not conveniently fit into the description of flora and fauna. These are listed
within the following Table 1 and illustrated on the enclosed Map 7, entitled
Ecological Survey Sites.

CULTURAL RESOURCES
The Hogtown Creek basin was populated by native Americans for approximately
10,000 years. Several archaeological sites have been documented by the
Department of State, Division of Historical Resources (DHR). The Florida
Master Site File contains 15 archaeological sites within the proposed Project
Site, as illustrated in Table 2. Additional sites have been cataloged in the
vicinity of Lake Kanapaha and Sugarfoot Hammock. There are no known
buildings of historical interest within the Project Site.

CULTURAL EVALUATION OF THE PROJECT STUDY AREA
A preliminary cultural resources evaluation of the Hogtown Creek Greenway
project was conducted by SouthArc Incorporated of Gainesville, in April 1993,
to identify areas of high, medium and low potential for archaeological or
historical resources (See Map 8). This study defined sensitive areas within the
Project Site as well as a scope of work that will be required for more intensive
survey and site assessment once specific facility development projects are
determined to be implemented




Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 21 Management Plan














Sitc Keynote Species or Features

I Species in this wetland area include water shrew, marsh rat, osprey, ducks, coots and
many migratory bird species.
2 Remarkably large sabal palms and live oaks
3 Population of aquatic plant, Nuphar hiea: birds include Terns, Great Blue Herons,
galinule, coots. Other animals include alligators and gar fish (some over 2ft long)
4 Species include abundant nesting Osprey
5 Area contains unique limestone fault line in Mcsic Hammock bordering remnant Sand
~____ Hill habitat.
6 Area is remnant Sand Hill, an ecological succession to hammock. Species include
Gopher Tortoise and one of the tortoises favorite foods, the cactus mOpuntia humifusa
7 Large individuals of Gum and Elm trees and perhaps the best seasonal population of
____ Lobelia cardinalis occur where the creek becomes highly dissected.
9 Species include remarkably large examples of red bay tree, i'ersea barhonia
II Species include Carex intumescens, Bumelia reclinala var. reclinala, Arundinaria
gigantea, Aesculus pavia, Hymenocallis rotata
12 Area of rolling topography, dry hammock grading down to more swampy conditions
near the creek
15 Most dense concentration of poison ivy observed. Occurring in the ecotone, Paw Paw
~____ (Asimina pan'iflora)
16 Gayli.ssachia sp and other species of Xeric Hammock are well represented. The XH
is considered the climax community, originally a Scrub area, fire has been excluded
____ here for many years
17 Extensive Osprey habitat. Plant species include; Spirantfhes cernua, E*pidendrum
________ conol)sium (both orchids), Arisaema frilphl/um, large Quercus virginiana
18 This "pine island" or isolated Sand Hill habitat is unique in the grccn\ka) Area, and is
perhaps one of the most fragile. It is presently home to a very dense population of
____ Gopher Tortoise which have lately been heavily predated (dug up and killed) by dogs.
19 Species incl: Trillium recurvata, Arundinaria gigantea, Aesculus pavia, Arisacema
_______triloha. ,ahal minor; and very large specimens of Planera aqualica (Water Elm)
20 Marsh is dominated by Zizaniopsis milliacea (wild rice)
21 Species include Aesculus pavia, Spiranthes cernua (orchid), Acer floridana,
i'orestiera (native privet), Cralaegus uniflora, Arundinaria giganlea, Zizaniopsis
____ milliacea (wild rice)
22 Species include swamp chestnut oak; Arisaema triphyllum, Spruce Pine (P'inus
____ glabra): clubtail dragonfly (indicator species for water quality)
24 Ring Park species include native Rhododendron, Haw, Bumelia and numerous other
planted natives.
25 Species include the Needle Palm (Rhaphidophyllum histrix), Hornwort (P'haeoceros
sp.), Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphylluTm)
26 Pair of Bald Eagles nesting just northeast of dike area. Nest is in one of only two tall
~____ pine trees available.
NOTE NOT ALL SITES HAVE KEYNOTE SPECIES OR FEATURES


TABLE 1





HOGTOWN CREEK GREENWAY'
Ch6nesvffle, Rod&
Ec'ological Survey Sites
and
NW 39ch Avmuc Community Types

bNWW,A.
ftrft Bottomland Forest
Basin Marsh


................. 25 Basin Swamp
23) Floodplm*n Forest
22 Floodplain Marsh
20'
21,
Floodplain Swamp
Annuc
13" Marsh Lake
Spring

Sinkhole'Lake
ftwwle Seepage Stream
10) M 20-th Avcn
7
Upland Mixed Forest
6
26
4 Xeric H mock

MWPh Lokn Sand Hi r,
r I LOU
Develo eas
&nkhok jft 1 21

miles
0
"Mill

AWVE ARE Q94EM LOCATIONS OF LARGER AREAS s-rumw- 23 NUP 7
............











LISTED ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES
IN THE
HOGTOWN CREEK GREENWAY


Site # Parcel Site Name Culture Type

8AL02333 FCT-17 Glen Springs Indeterminate Artifact
scatter
8AL02497 FCT-18 Colony Park Alachua; Artifact
Early Archaic scatter

8AL00070 FCT-20 Watkins Deptford Artifact
scatter
8AL00390 FCT-41 Un-named Prehistoric- Burial mounds
ceramic

8AL00388 FCT-41 Un-named Prehistoric- Middens
______________ ~unspecified ________
8AL00463 FCT-49 Henderson Prehistoric- Prehistoric
Mound unspecified mounds

8AL00465 FCT-51 Un-named Archaic; Habitation
Deptford
8AL00387 FCT-52 Un-named Prehistoric- Midden
ceramic
8AL00389 FCT-53 Un-named Prehistoric- Midden
_______________ unspecified

8AL00258 FCT-54 Un-named Prehistoric- Artifact
ceramic scatter
8AL00172 FCT-60 Un-named Prehistoric- Artifact
_____________ unspecified scatter
8AL00160 FCT-62 Proctor Farm Hickory Pond Artifact
scatter
8AL00173 FCT-62 Proctor North Prehistoric- Artifact
Field ceramic scatter
8AL00174 FCT-62 Sam Harrell Prehistoric-non Lithic quarry
ceramic
8AL00451 FCT-62 Proctor Farm Prehistoric-non Artifact
ceramic-archaic scatter
8AL00159 FCT-69 B.F. Williams Deptford Artifact-
scatter
8AL00157 FCT-71 Damron Prehistoric- Lithic scatter/
unspecified quarry
8AL00158 FCT-72 Arrowhead Fish Prehistoric- Artifact
Camp ceramic scatter

8AL00443 Westgate Hogtown Creek Prehistoric- Artifact
Shopping archaic scatter
Center


TABLE 2





Archaeological mnd Historical Bensitivity Areas
I HIGH SENSITIVITY
MEDIUM SENSITIVITY
Low lm:"Ty


Terwilliger Pond


HOGTOWN CREEK GREENWAY
PROJECT SITE


CITY OF OMNESVUZZ. FLORIDA
DEFT. OF CULTURAL AND NATURE OPERATIONS
WmiwMarAom0c=
C WMVJUS IHCORPGRM3Z
GWAIUXSI AcnD SOCITSm I
Ii. UBi~uui. amhaanizcrE
8nrHAil. A XcT8
mpwKPA.ARCMT=
L. o3 3LM Ew
ooWU1Wt3 U ,


Loblolly
Environmental
* Education
eFacility
Westside Park-


Kanapaha Park--I


If

L *


Green Acres Park


t a L N.W. 29th
B ARoad Bridge
', --Galnesville Mali



-Alfred A. Ring Park


- Westgate Shopping Center


SUniversity of Florida


Creekside Mall


25


MAP 8


P~


Westwood


is MOBI
nrVOTm *


1 +

N^


4ftewot


m lol aens tJ









Methodology
SouthArc employed a broad reconnaissance method for evaluating the Project
Site. Project tasks included:

1) Background research to identify known sites and the environmental
characteristics of the tracts proposed for greenway acquisition. This
information was utilized to define the sensitive areas. The data was obtained
from the record of the Florida Master Site File office, the original Federal land
survey maps and notes, historic materials on file at P. K. Yonge Library of
Florida History and Alachua County archives, previous cultural resource
studies within the county, topographic maps, soil surveys, and historic and
modem aerial photography.

2) Preparation of a brief report outlining the results of this task and the
development of a map showing the levels of sensitivity within the greenway
corridor. The report and this level of effort are not designed to satisfy the
DHR requirements for cultural resource surveys. In order to meet those
requirements, subsurface testing will be required.

Preliminary Evaluation Results
SouthArc's evaluation of archaeological and historical resources is general and
has limited application as a planning and management tool. The final
resource documentation will have to be prepared at a future date, based on
more intensive site investigations.

High potential areas are those areas which contain known archaeological sites,
or could contain such sites. Parameters for these areas include: 1) locations of
known archaeological sites; 2) reasonably well drained soils and soils
associated with known sites: 3) areas within 150 meters of the 66 foot contour
line around Lake Kanapaha basin; and 4) level areas above the floodplain and
isolated knolls within the Hogtown Creek basin.

Medium potential areas are defined as: 1) well drained high potential soils 150
meters to 200 meters above the 66 foot contour interval; 2) higher ground in
proximity to isolated water sources or sinks; 3) areas of moderate slope
between the 62 and 66 foot contour levels around Lake Kanapaha; and 4) areas
of moderate slope within the creek basin north of the NW 22nd Street. Again,
these parameters are based on the distribution of the known sites in the area.

All other areas are presently considered to have low potential for cultural
resources based on the presence of wetlands, steep slopes, distance of over 200
meters from the 66 foot contour, and flatwoods areas.

There are at least 23 known archaeological sites in proximity to the Project
Site. These have primarily been identified as a result of surface inspection. No
formal surveys have been completed in the area of concern, so a survey would
undoubtedly reveal additional sites, particularly in proximity to Lake
Kanapaha and the prairie south of Oaks Mall.


Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 26 Management Plan









Recommendations
The DHR guidelines recommend an intensive systematic subsurface survey
prior to developments which utilize state funding. Subsurface testing will be
required at 25 meter intervals in high potential areas, 50 meter intervals in
medium potential areas, and a ten percent sample of low potential areas. An
assessment of significant sites will also have to be completed. Significant sites
will require mitigation of impacts through preservation or data recovery
excavations. Since this project is partially funded by a state grant, DHR will
request compliance with these guidelines in order to obtain permitting for the
project. In addition, any cultural resources assessment surveys of the Project
Site will be submitted to DHR for comment and review prior to any land
clearing or ground disturbing activities.

Additionally, where properties within the proposed greenway are identified as
containing a high potential for archaeological or paleontological significance,
development of greenway facilities will proceed in a manner that is consistent
with City and County Comprehensive Plan policies and land development
regulations for protection of these resources.

Once an area of the project site has been identified as potentially having
archaeological resources, a cost-effective scientific investigation to evaluate the
extent and significance of the archaeological resources must be completed,
before an irreversible action, such as looting, is allowed to take place.

Public disclosure of archaeological sites prior to the establishment of protective
measures leads to the pilferation and destruction of the site and possibly the
only information about its history. Therefore, when valuable archaeological
resources are identified or suspected prior to or during an investigation, the
information shall be handled with appropriate protection of its confidentiality,
and provided only on a need-to-know basis to the state archaeologist, property
owner, project sponsor, or public agency official responsible for project
approval. In addition, the site's specific location and other pertinent
information shall be omitted in public documents until protective measures are
in effect.

This Master Development and Management Plan supports the provision of
protective measures for cultural resources by requiring that the collection of
artifacts or the disturbance of archaeological and historic sites on the Project
Site is prohibited unless prior authorization has been obtained from the
Department of State, Division of Historical Resources.

In addition to, and notwithstanding, the above protective measures, all
applicable policies contained in the respective City and County Comprehensive
Plans and all applicable land development regulations of the City and County,
respectively, shall be followed, as required by law.





Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesvllle, FL 27 Management Plan








CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
Several cultural and environmental programs are already in existence within
the Project Site. It is anticipated that these existing programs will be expanded
and improved, and new programs initiated to take advantage of the unique
resources within the Hogtown Creek basin. The existing programs include:

Ring Park: A 20-acre linear park located in the northern portion of the Project
Site, and acquired by the City in the mid 1980's. This facility parallels the
creek just downstream from Glen Springs. The City Department of Cultural
and Nature Operations offers environmental education programs for adults and
children, as well as passive resource-based recreation activities for park
visitors.

Loblolly Environmental Education Facility: An 11-acre community facility
located in the middle of the Project Site, and acquired by the City in 1990. The
Facility is currently being renovated by the City and is scheduled by the City
Department of Cultural and Nature Operations, and will offer environmental
education programs and interactive learning exhibits for families and children.

Kanapaha Botanical Gardens: A 40-acre facility located in the southern
portions of the Project Site, this facility was opened in 1978. The Gardens are
operated by the non-profit North Florida Botanical Society, which offers
education programs in cooperation with the Santa Fe Community College. It
is the second largest botanical garden in the state, and the most varied garden
in Florida.

MAN-MADE FACILITIES/LAND USE EVALUATION
Land use and zoning in and around the greenway corridor is predominantly
residential, conservation and agricultural, with areas of mixed use commercial,
high density residential and institutional. The Project Site corridor is bisected
and bordered by several arterial and collector roadways, which provide access to
local neighborhoods, shopping centers and schools.

The most significant negative impacts experienced by environmental features in
the Project Site, have been and will most likely continue to be: roadways,
parking lots, illegal dumping of trash, leaks from underground hazardous
materials and storage tanks, leaks and spills from industrial and commercial
hazardous material sites and hazardous material handling activities.
Residential homes near the Project Site also result in significant impacts,
including the clearing of riparian vegetation; pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer
runoff; erosion and sedimentation; uncontrolled cats and dogs; noise;
introduction of exotic species of flora and fauna; septic tank releases and
sewage pipe leaks. (Source: Gainesville Department of Community
Development, 1991; Cooper 1978) In the past 15 years, the corridor has
become more popular with both pedestrians and bicyclists. Because of this
increased popularity, and the inability to control the use and access, these
users have caused significant impact and degradation in various areas along
the corridor.



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 28 Management Plan








POTENTIAL AND KNOWN POLLUTION SITES/DEGRADED LANDSCAPES
The Project Site contains several sites that have been degraded by poor
management of manufacturing processes, leakage of toxic waste, disposal of
trash and debris, or have been altered by human activity to the degree that
natural ecosystems are impacted. These site locations are identified on Map 9.

Cabot Carbon/Koppers Superfund Site
This site is 1.5 miles east of the Project Site. Activity at the site has
contaminated the surficial aquifer and soil. Compounds found in the
groundwater and soils include phenols, terpines, creosote, copper, chromium,
and arsenic. Pentachlorophenol was also found in the soils.

Pollution, including elevated phenol levels, is apparent in the northern
stretches of Hogtown Creek, with the water exhibiting an odor, slight color,
and foam. Cabot Corporation and Beazer East, Inc. are currently designing
EPA-approved methods for cleaning up the site. Within the coming year, it is
anticipated that soil and groundwater remediation will begin. Further study is
necessary to determine the downstream extent of contamination within
Hogtown Creek, and the expected degree and timing of improvements to the
creek due to the site remediation. (Source: Alachua Conservation Trust, 1992;
Gainesville Department of Community Development, 1991; Beazer East, Inc.,
1992)

Farmer's Mutual Exchange
A warehouse fire in 1984 contaminated soils and the surficial aquifer.
Monitoring is currently underway to determine the condition of the aquifer in
the area. (Source: Gainesville Department of Community Development, 1991)

Bailey's Branch/Gainesville Mall
This tributary of Hogtown Creek flows in a culvert under the parking lot of the
Gainesville Mall, emptying into Hogtown Creek at Tax Parcel 9003-004-001.
Bailey's Branch has been contaminated by a leaking underground storage tank
from a gasoline station approximately 1/4 mile southeast of the Project Site.
The source of the contamination has been terminated. A clean-up plan for the
contamination has not yet been completed. (Source: Alachua Conservation
Trust, 1992).

The Consulting Team also notes that a sizable amount of trash and debris has
been discarded and washed from the Gainesville Mall parking lot, through a
metal fence, and into Hogtown Creek. This trash includes more than 100
shopping carts, tires, and other assorted debris.

Shands Swamp
A field investigation in 1991 discovered the presence of a large accumulation of
trash and debris just south of Raintree Subdivision on a City-owned Greenway
property (Tax Parcel 6439-001-0000). The accumulation appears to be the
result of deposition from upstream sources, and is probably non-hazardous.
(Source: Gainesville Department of Community Development, 1992).



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 29 Management Plan







Potential and Known Pollution Sites

Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville, Florida


LEGEND
--. Hogtown Creek Greenway Boundary Une


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Westgate Shopping Center Area
This shopping center is located in a filled section of the Hogtown Creek
floodplain. The creek has been channelized and is in need of restoration. The
City's stormwater management master plan for the creek proposes
modifications for this area. (Source: Alachua Conservation Trust, 1992)

Sugarfoot Prairie
Sporadic dumping of trash has occurred at various locations near and within
Hogtown Prairie. (Source: Gainesville Department of Community
Development, 1992)

University of Florida Landfill
The University formerly operated a landfill west of the main campus.
Contamination by several organic compounds (benzene, chlorobenzene, vinyl
chloride, clomethane, and dichlorobenzene) has been detected at an upgradient
off-site well. The Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER)
plans to conduct an investigation to determine the source of the
contamination, and will then begin enforcement action against the responsible
parties for remediation. A consultant retained by UF is implementing a
groundwater monitoring plan (Source: Gainesville Department of Community
Development, 1991)

Interstate 75
The interstate bisects Sugarfoot Hammock and crosses Hogtown Creek. It is a
source of noise and air pollution, results in the death of thousands of animals
each year by road kills, represents a visual eyesore, and contributes to
degradation of water quality from surface runoff. The interstate is presently
being widened from four to six lanes. (Alachua Conservation Trust, 1992)

Dam on Lake Kanapaha
In 1911, Hogtown Prairie was diked off from Lake Kanapaha. The stonework
dam, which runs roughly east to west, is about five feet high at its highest
point. Although much of the dam has fallen, the higher land under the dike
still separates the two water bodies during low water periods. During high
water periods, the dike does not impede water flow. There are no plans to alter
or remove the dike. (Source: Dickinson and Wayne 1990)

Split Rock
There are a number of concrete and flint rock structures located around an
active sink hole near Hogtown Prairie. They consist of steps, foundations, and
walls which were apparently built in the early 20th century for recreational
use. Their future and significance has not been determined. (Source:
Dickinson and Wayne 1990)







Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 31 Management Plan









Kanapaha Water Reclamation Plant
Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) operates the Kanapaha Plant on the
western side of Lake Kanapaha. The Plant provides tertiary treatment to meet
drinking water quality standards, and injects the treated effluent into the deep
aquifer. The Plant has a permit to discharge excess effluent to Lake Kanapaha,
which has occurred periodically in the past (Source: Alachua Conservation
Trust, 1992). GRU has recently approved plans to divert a portion of the
effluent to provide irrigation.


Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville. FL


Master Development &
Management Plan






























PROJECT GOALS




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PROJECT GOALS

Based on the thorough evaluation of environmental and cultural features of
the Project Site, the Consulting Team and Gainesville City staff worked with an
appointed citizens advisory group, through a planning and design charette to
define appropriate goals and objectives for the proposed Hogtown Creek
Greenway. The following mission statement for the proposed greenway was
developed by the Consulting Team and the citizens advisory group:

To preserve and protect the riparian lands and waters of Hogtown Creek through
the development of a multi-objective community greenway system. The greenway
will protect lands adjacent to the primary creek channel and on selected tributaries
from further urban encroachment and development, will provide areas for
stormwater management and flood control, will offer improved access to the
unique environs of Hogtown Creek so that local residents and tourists can
participate in passive recreation, environmental education and other appropriate
social activities, will offer the community with a non-motorized north-south linkage
that can serve alternative transportation purposes, and will promote economic
redevelopment and revitalization of areas throughout west Gainesville.

The following goal statements, all of which were developed at the design
charette with the exception of the Cultural Resource Goal which was suggested
by the Division of Historical Resources, more clearly articulate the mission
statement and vision for the Hogtown Creek Greenway.

ENVIRONMENTAL GOAL
To protect and improve the Hogtown Creek creek channel, her tributaries and
flood prone areas from encroachment of incompatible uses and urban
development. To establish policies and programs that preserve, restore and
protect the ecological functions and sensitive species of the Hogtown Creek and
its environment.

TRANSPORTATION GOAL
To establish an effective, continuous, multi-modal, non-motorized alternative
transportation network for the Hogtown Creek Greenway and surrounding
community.

RECREATION GOAL
To provide ecologically sound, accessible and appropriate recreation.

HEALTH AND FITNESS GOAL
To provide ecologically sound, accessible and appropriate opportunities for
pursuit of health and fitness.

QUALITY OF LIFE GOAL
To provide a community commons where people can interact peacefully with
each other and with nature.


Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 33 Management Plan









PUBLIC ACCESS/PRIVACY GOAL
To provide the maximum public access possible to Hogtown Creek and its
environs while maintaining appropriate protection for privacy and the
environment.

SAFETY AND SECURITY GOAL
To provide a safe and secure recreation and transportation network for the
people who use and live along the greenway, and the wildlife that inhabit
greenway lands.

EDUCATION GOAL
To increase public awareness of the natural environment and the responsible
use of such resources through public access and educational programming.

OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT GOAL
To ensure efficient and ecologically sound long term operations and
management practices consistent with community greenway goals.

FINANCIAL GOAL
To ensure adequate on-going financial support in order to meet the goals and
objectives of the greenway.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GOAL
To capitalize on and celebrate the quantitative and non-quantitative economic
benefits of the greenway for the entire community.

CULTURAL RESOURCE GOAL
To protect and ensure professional interpretation of significant cultural
resources.


Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville. FL


Master Development &
Management Plan






























PROPERTY ACQUISITION












PROPERTY ACQUISITION

The Hogtown Creek Greenway project is comprised of 64 parcels of land, forty-
four of which remain to be acquired (See Map 10 and 11). According to the
Alachua Conservation Trust (1992), there are three categories of properties that
are to be acquired within the project study area: 1) vacant, developed land; 2)
vacant land of marginal development value due to flood elevations or poor
access; and 3) developed land that needs to be acquired to provide greenway
connectivity.

The City of Gainesville and Alachua County have structured a "Multi-Party
Acquisition Agreement" to pursue the land acquisition of required parcels of
land. The Alachua Conservation Trust is under contract to provide certain
services to the City and County to assist with acquisition. It is the objective of
this project to acquire sufficient properties to ensure connectivity throughout
the greenway. It is recognized, however, that not all properties will be acquired
through this program due to the possibility of unwilling sellers, title problems,
lack of sufficient funds, environmental problems, or other reasons. Some
properties are crucial to acquire for the viability of the project, while others are
less essential (See Map 11).

Some parcels are proposed to be acquired in fee simple, while a less than fee
interest, such as an easement, may be acquired on other parcels. The FCT
grant application recommends an "interest to be acquired" for each parcel.
However, the ownership of these properties may change in the process of
negotiating for each parcel.

The value of some parcels to the greenway project may not adequately be
reflected using the appraisal requirements of 18-1.006, F. A. C. Therefore,
certain parcels may be acquired using alternative valuation methods, and will
be donated to the State consistent with Section 253.025, F. S. after they have
been acquired by ACT or the City.

The following criteria have been generally used to establish priorities for
greenway parcel acquisition:

Willing Seller These persons increase the likelihood that a parcel can be
acquired under terms that are favorable to the greenway manager. Unwilling
sellers typically extract exorbitant concessions or selling prices for their
property.

Outstanding Feature(s) Parcels which possess outstanding features such as
significant natural areas or important historical structures can play an
important role in giving a greenway an identity, and increase the popularity of
the greenway. Also, acquiring such parcels increases the likelihood that the
significant features on the parcel will be restored and/or preserved for future
generations.



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 35 Management Plan








Publicly-Owned Parcels

Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


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---- Hoglown Creek Greenway
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Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


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Linkage Parcels that physically link existing greenway segments, or provide
lateral links to important sites such as schools, residential and commercial
areas, and environmentally significant areas, are extremely important in
achieving the continuity objective of greenways. Continuity enhances wildlife
habitat (by providing wildlife corridors linking larger habitats) and trail
establishment (by allowing the greenway trail to avoid relatively dangerous and
inconvenient road by-passes).

Development Threat Parcels that are threatened by development incompatible
with the greenway (or are a threat to general environmental conservation
objectives) should be prioritized.

Multiple Use Parcels that potentially provide multiple public benefits without
causing such problems as environmental degradation or negative impacts to a
neighborhood, should be prioritized.

Following acquisition, the property will be subject to a detailed environmental
survey (including plant, animal, and habitat inventories) to establish baseline
conditions and additional information to determine the appropriate use of the
property. In addition, a surveyor will be employed to establish property
boundaries and other features such as flood elevations, and utility and road
rights-of-way and easements.

This Master Development and Management Plan offers a listing of those
properties prioritized for acquisition by the Multi-Party Acquisition Agreement
and subsequent Acquisition Plan.


Hogtown Creek Greenway
Gainesville, FL


Master Development &
Management Plan





























RECOMMENDED GREENWAY
FACILITIES












RECOMMENDED GREENWAY FACILITIES

In order to develop the Hogtown Creek Greenway in a manner that meets the
goals and needs of the community, the City will proceed with development of
the following facilities. These facilities represent a compilation of the
"Preferred Design Concept" that was generated by design charette participants
in April 1993 (See Map 13, page 111).

NW 23RD AVE., AT GAINESVILLE MALL, TO ELKS CLUB LODGE
This segment of the greenway is proposed to extend westerly along NW 23rd
Avenue from the Gainesvillle Mall Activity Center, across the bridge at
Hogtown Creek to the Elks Club Lodge. Currently, this road does not have
proper signage, appropriate improvements for cycling, or contiguous sidewalk
facilities on the south side of NW 23rd Avenue that interlinks with the Elks
Club Lodge. On-street bicycle facilities will be a long term objective for the
County along this segment of the road. In the short term, the bike route and
greenway logo signs, as well as the extension of sidewalks, will be installed
from the Elks Club Lodge to the Gainesville Mall Activity Center in order to
provide safe passage between these two destination points of the proposed
greenway corridor.

As the intersection of NW 23rd Avenue and NW 16th Street is a controlled
intersection, it is the most logical point to cross the roads for accessing the
Elks Club Lodge or the Gainesville Mall.

One of the most challenging aspects of this segment of the proposed greenway
will be the needed acquisition of the Elks Club Lodge. This facility offers the
City an opportunity to establish one of the greenway's trail heads that could
provide cultural and environmental education programs, as was suggested
during the Design Charette. The City is presently researching the structural
condition of the buildings, demolition of the concrete pools surrounding Glen
Springs, restoration of Glen Springs to its natural landscape, and the potential
uses that the facilities could accommodate. These forms of improvements will
require a financial commitment that is beyond the immediate scope of this
project, and will be a long term objective for the City.

In the interim, the Lodge will provide the City with parking, restrooms,
pedestrian access to Alfred A. Ring Park and possibly serve as a greenway
information center and/or headquarters for greenway maintenance personnel.
The Lodge presently has approximately 80 parking spaces that will offer
community residents, who do not live close enough to bike or walk to the
greenway, with a northern point of access to the greenway system and Alfred A.
Ring Park. Signs will be utilized at all trail heads and throughout the
greenway for directional, regulatory and informative purposes (See Figure 1).

Environmental restoration of the Elks Club Lodge landscape and the historic
Glen Springs is required, irrespective of the decision to leave the buildings and
structures intact.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 39 Management Plan











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GHS TO ELKS CLUB LODGE VIA NW 23RD AVENUE
The Team notes that proposed greenway facilities along NW 23rd Avenue will
establish a proposed connection to the Gainesville High School, via the
existing facilities located along NW 16th Avenue. The greenway trail system
will then offer students with a choice in travel from their neighborhood to
school, serving a transportation function. Signs will be needed to direct
students from the high school to greenway facilities. Additional greenway
parking might also be available at the high school, and the Team recommends
that the City negotiate necessary agreements to obtain access and use of
appropriate parking spaces.

GAINESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL TO ALFRED A. RING PARK
From the High School to Ring Park, the Team notes that although sidewalks
are provided along the north side of NW 16th Avenue to Ring Park, signs will be
provided to direct students to the park and greenway system.

ALFRED A. RING PARK
The preferred design development approach for Ring Park includes a pedestrian
only trail system through the park (See Figure 2, 3 and 4), as is presently
developed. All connections to the park will support the pedestrian only
designation, especially at NW 16th Avenue, where children on mountain bikes
tend to access the park for recreational pursuits. A pedestrian/bicycle
connection will need to be made to the Elks Club Lodge via the existing bridge
spanning Glen Springs Run, to link travel and activities between these
facilities.

ELKS CLUB LODGE TO NW 22ND ST. VIA NW 23RD AVE. R.O.W.
In order to interlink the Elks Club Lodge with Alfred A. Ring Park and the
neighborhoods to the west, several improvements will have to be made for
safety, security and access management purposes. From the Elks Club Lodge
parking facilities a combination of multi-use trail (See Figure 5) and boardwalk
(See Figure 6) facilities will have to be provided to connect with the existing
Glen Springs Run bridge. At this point, railings will be required for the bridge.
These railings will also need to be extended approximately 25 feet to the north
and south of the bridge to provide safety and access control to the Glen
Springs Run. From the south side of the bridge to the pedestrian entrance of
Alfred A. Ring Park and to the park's NW 22nd Street entrance, via NW 23rd
Avenue right-of-way, the existing mulch trails will be improved to the 10-foot
wide, multi-use, off-road asphalt trail.

This will enable trail users to utilize existing on-road and sidewalk facilities to
interlink the Elks Club Lodge and Ring Park to those greenway parcels to the
south and southwest.

NW 16TH AVENUE TO NW 8TH AVENUE
The segment of the proposed trail that begins at the intersection of NW 16th
Avenue and Possum Creek will be accessed by the existing sidewalk facility
located on NW 16th Avenue. Both the City and County Departments' of Public
Works will require trail users to access this portion of the trail by utilizing the
Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 41 Management Plan








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existing sidewalk on the south side of NW 16th Avenue, via the at-grade
crossings at the signalized intersections of NW 22nd Street and NW 34th
Street. Once the trail is accessed from NW 16th Avenue, the trail system once
again becomes a 10-foot wide, multi-use off-road asphalt trail, and meanders
through the Possum Creek Open Space. This trail will follow the existing
sanitary sewer easement, which is already cleared and is presently used by local
residents. At the intersection of the sewer line and tributary streams of
Possum Creek, the trail surface will need to be elevated either on a series of 12-
foot wide, multi-use boardwalks, or if permitted, on earthen fill (See Figure 6).

Continuing south, the multi-user trail will incorporate neighborhood trail
connections to the Tanglewood Subdivision to the east and eventually intersect
with the existing sidewalk facility located on the north side of NW 8th Avenue.
At this intersection the existing sidewalk offers east/west travel along NW 8th
Avenue (See Figure 7).

Greenway facility development within the Possum Creek Open Space provides
an opportunity to implement extensive environmental restoration of the
floodplain landscape. This landscape is presently degraded by uncontrolled
access and public use. Additionally, upstream urbanization of the Possum
Creek watershed has resulted in deterioration and pollution of the main
channel. The riverine configuration through this open space is braided as a
result of constant flooding. Drainage culverts under NW 8th Avenue serve to
impound stormwater in the open space, and downstream neighbors, south of
NW 8th Avenue, are not supportive of an expansion of these culverts to permit
improved stormwater flows.

The City, along with its Public Works Department, will work extensively with
the University of Florida and state agencies to define a design and management
strategy for making improvements to this open space landscape. Stormwater
detention facilities, in conjunction with habitat restoration, and greenway trail
development could result in a re-ordering of public use and eventual
restoration of this landscape.

ALONG NW 8TH AVENUE TO NW 34TH STREET
The Team has carefully considered all of the design options that are available
for this segment of the greenway corridor. We are proposing that a two-way,
off-road multi-use trail be constructed on the north side of NW 8th Avenue
from Hogtown Creek to NW 34th Street (See Figure 7). This will require the
extension of the box culverts under NW 8th Avenue to span Possum and
Hogtown Creeks. This facility will intersect with the following proposed multi-
use trails that extend northward to NW 16th Avenue and NW 22nd Street:
1) the trail extending into the Tanglewood subdivision neighborhood at NW
25th Terrace which extends to NW 16th Avenue, and 2) the combined
boardwalk and trail system that extends through the Possum Creek Open
Space to NW 16th Avenue. In addition, the City will examine the possibility of
installing a wildlife-only underpass beneath NW 8th Avenue to facilitate safe
passage of small mammals and other floodplain wildlife from the Possum Creek
Open Space to destinations south of NW 8th Avenue.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 47 Management Plan














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Since the completion of the Design Charette, an alternative design option to
the NW 8th Avenue connection has been discussed for the purpose of
enhancing the trail user's experience. This option primarily involves
maintaining the existing sidewalk along NW 8th Avenue, but includes linking
it to a multi-use boardwalk trail facility that will be located in the forest
vegetation, approximately 100 to 200 feet north of NW 8th Avenue. This
facility will, also, intersect with the three northbound trails as described in the
preceding paragraph. Further analysis of this option could be developed during
the implementation phase of this area.

In order to continue south along the greenway, trail users will need to cross
NW 8th Avenue at NW 34th Street intersection (See Figure 8). This is presently
a controlled intersection, which also offers convenient access to Littlewood
Elementary School. A potential crossing was evaluated at NW 31st Street, but
due to lack of signalization at this time, it does not provide the safety benefits
of the NW 34th Street intersection, even though that intersection has one of
the highest accident rates in the City. Although it is recommended that people
use the signalized intersection to cross NW 8th Avenue, there will still be the
problem of people making mid-block crossings in non-designated crossing
areas, primarily east of NW 31st Street. Because of the long "gap" time
required to cross the road, and the characteristic high speed of automobiles
using the road, crossing NW 8th Avenue at non-designated areas creates a
potentially dangerous situation for trail users and motorists. Failure to offer
the best crossing could increase the liability associated with this intersection
and unnecessarily expose the City to additional risks. Currently, the City
staff is researching the possibility of providing additional traffic signalization
for NW 8th Avenue, other alternative means of providing access across NW 8th
Avenue and controlling the speed of traffic.

A potential underpass or overpass was evaluated for the NW 31st Street
intersection; however, the at-grade option is being pursued until trail use
increases to the point that conflicts warrant a re-evaluation of the crossing. It
may then be easier to justify the expense of an overpass or underpass. This
area also provides the opportunity for additional public parking for potential
users who do not live close to the trail. Westside Park will serve as a trail head
for the greenway. It currently provides enough parking to accommodate the
greenway's projected demand. Overflow parking will be available on the
weekends at Littlewood Elementary School. Clear signage will be installed
throughout this area to guide movement and inform users of the hazards of
illegal crossing of NW 8th Avenue.

NW 34TH ST. TO LOBLOLLY ENVIRONMENTAL ED. FACILITY
From the intersection of NW 34th Street and NW 8th Avenue, the trail system
will continue south as an off-road, multi-use asphalt trail and boardwalk
system, between the western bank of Possum Creek and rear property lines of
homes that front on NW 34th Street. This is a challenging landscape for trail
development for a number of reasons. First, stormwater is normally
impounded in a sizable wetland area, making it difficult to achieve a surface
trail system. Second, private properties are relatively close to western bank of
Possum Creek, meaning that routing options are limited. Finally,
Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 49 Management Plan




II PREFERRED SITE PLAN FOR LOBLOLLY AREA
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GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
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environmental sensitivity requires that trail development be balanced with
restoration to ensure successful greenway implementation.

As a result of the Design Charette, local property owners in this section
(Hankins and Delaino) are currently negotiating with the Alachua
Conservation Trust to sell their property to the City for greenway purposes.
This sale would greatly improve the ability to achieve multiple objectives in this
area. It allows the trail to be routed west of the creek channel, toward higher
ground. The sale would enable the City to develop a proposed stormwater
detention facility south of NW 8th Avenue and west of Possum Creek, which
may result in a reduction in the size and location of detention berms along
Hogtown Creek. Finally, the Team feels that this sale would permit a better
connection to the Loblolly Environmental Education Facility, the next public
facility along the proposed greenway route.

As a major component of greenway facility development, a comprehensive
program of environmental restoration will need to accompany facility
development through this segment. This area has been degraded by abundant
off-trail use, and it is expected that the designated greenway trail will
encourage the majority of users to stay on the multi-user trail tread.

At the Loblolly Environmental Education Facility, the trail will be routed so
that it provides appropriate access to and through the facility. Some public
parking, approximately 5 spaces, will be made available to serve the Center. In
addition, the Gainesville Regional Transit System will be encouraged to provide
a connection with the greenway at the regular stop near the Center.

BLACK ACRES BIKE PATH
An existing bicycle/pedestrian path links local residents with the existing
sidewalks along the south side of NW 8th Avenue. A formal trail connection
will need to be developed along NW 8th Avenue to improve this linkage.
Additionally, improvements will be made to the trail surface and drainage
structures along this pathway (See Figure 9). These improvements will be
provided through the development of a multi-use trail which will reduce trail
maintenance and increase the pathways tread life.

LOBLOLLY ENVIRONMENTAL ED. FACILITY TO WESTGATE S. C.
From the Loblolly Environmental Education Facility, the trail continues south
to Westgate Shopping Center. The Alachua Conservation Trust is currently
working with owners of the Creekside Apartments to acquire land for the
greenway trail. Trail development will require the installation of a 12-foot wide
by 60-foot long bridge across a stormwater detention weir (See Figure 8 and
10). Trail development will then be located on the southeast side of Hogtown
Creek and connect with NW 34th Street.

In addition, a comprehensive program of restoration will be required for the
Hogtown Creek channel through this segment. Prior channelization of the
creek bed has resulted in siltation and overgrowth of weeds and aquatic
vegetation. The City has proposed restoration as part of the stormwater
management plan for this area.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 51 Management Plan








































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FENCING AND/OR VEGETATIVE BUFFER USED FOR
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BLACK ACRES NEIGHBORHOOD
MULTI-USE TRAILS
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WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER TO CREEKSIDE MALL
At the intersection of NW 34th Street and Hogtown Creek, the trail will be
routed beneath the existing roadway bridge, and up onto the south side of the
channel, behind the commercial establishments in the Westgate Shopping
Center (See Figure 11). Utilizing bridge underpasses as part of the trail system
will require the establishment of additional security measures, such as
installation of vandal-proof lighting and paint, provision of visual clear zones
and elimination of any potential hiding or transient living spaces. Signs will
be posted to indicate that the underpasses will be closed during heavy rains
and to instruct users to use the controlled intersections to cross University
Avenue, NW and SW 34th Street and SW 2nd Avenue. However, when heavy
rains are not occurring the users will be discouraged from using the at-grade
crossings. There are several available parking areas within the Center for
greenway users. Due to the ease of access to the Project Site, it is probably
unnecessary to designate specific areas for greenway parking within this
segment of the proposed trail.

From NW 34th Street, the trail will become a pedestrian/bicycle promenade,
and it is hoped that re-development of the Westgate Shopping Center would
occur so that buildings could be oriented toward Hogtown Creek. The
promenade remains on the south and east side of the creek through the
shopping center, under the University Avenue and SW 2nd Avenue bridges. At
this point the trail will extend southerly along the east side of the Creek to
provide access to the existing apartment complexes adjacent to the Creek and
to establish a linkage to the University of Florida. In addition, the trail will
cross Hogtown Creek over to Creekside Mall where the trail will continue
southwest to Green Acres Park along a 10-foot wide multi-use trail (See Figure
12).

The concept of linking the trail system with Westgate Shopping Center provides
an opportunity for economic re-development of the shopping center, and could
create a popular destination point for local residents.

CREEKSIDE MALL TO NW 34TH ST. @ UNIV. OF FLORIDA
South of Creekside Mall, the trail forks, with one leg heading south to Green
Acres Park, and the other heading east to the University of Florida Campus.
The latter is an important connection for students who live west of the
campus, by offering opportunities for non- motorized, safe alternative
transportation.
This trail will be a 10-foot wide multi-use asphalt tread that extends south and
intersect with a 12-foot by 50-foot long bridge that spans the Hogtown Creek
channel to the west, thereby, providing a linkage to the University. The Team
also recognizes that the presence of wetland landscape along this route means
that a boardwalk system may be required to provide this connection in an
ecologically sensitive manner (See Figure 6, page 46).

This spur trail will terminate on SW 34th Street, either at Radio (Farm) Road,
if appropriate, or simply at its connection with the sidewalks on SW 34th
Street.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 54 Management Plan


























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FOR MULTI-USE TRAIL
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The Team expresses a great amount of concern over the long term fate of the
Gopher Tortoise that is known to nest in landscapes south of Creekside Mall
and southeast of Green Acres Park. Therefore, the City's greenway facility
development objectives will adhere to the advice provided by the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Wild Things, and A. F. Clewell regarding
protection of these nesting sites and education of the public.

CREEKSIDE MALL TO GREEN ACRES PARK
From Creekside Mall south, the trail remains a multi-use, 10-foot wide asphalt
trail, and will meander through an open space landscape to the existing Green
Acres Park. Currently, this park is naturalized and has limited access. There
are no public parking facilities provided at this City facility. The trail will be
routed through the park in a manner that is most appropriate, given the
existing activities, and continue south to Sugarfoot Prairie.

GREEN ACRES PARK TO SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE
From Green Acres Park, the trail tread will most likely change from an on-grade
multi-use asphalt surface to a multi-use boardwalk trail. This determination
will have to be made in the field, and will be based on the presence of wetlands
and sensitivity of the local environment to greenway trail development
activities.

Two separate trail routes will be created at this point: one that heads south to
Forest Park, and the second which will head west to the Oaks Mall. These are
more thoroughly described in the following sections.

Because Sugarfoot Prairie is so isolated and unique within the context of an
urban landscape, this boardwalk, while providing controlled access to most of
this area, will provide frequent pull over areas for observation of the
surrounding landscape, coupled with a series of wayside exhibits.
Furthermore, this section of the greenway will provide a special self-education
opportunity for environmentally curious greenway users.

GREEN ACRES PARK TO OAKS MALL
From Green Acres Park, and heading west to the Oaks Mall, the multi-use trail
will turn from on-surface asphalt to boardwalk and then back to on-surface
asphalt. It may be possible to bench the trail into existing berms which were
built to protect adjacent residential neighborhoods from flooding. Locating the
trail facilities on the south and west sides of the berms utilizes the berm as a
privacy and noise buffer for the adjacent neighborhoods (See Figure 13).
However, an evaluation of proposed boardwalk locations in relation to adjacent
neighborhoods should be developed prior to their final location. Charette
participants recommended that a long boardwalk with observation platform be
extended into the prairie landscape so that users might have an opportunity to
view the interior landscape. Before this is accomplished, the City will conduct
a thorough environmental evaluation of the impacts such a boardwalk would
have on interior species wildlife. In addition, the survival of Clear Lake
depends upon the free-flow of water between the Sugarfoot Prairie and the
Lake. This flow currently and historically has taken place through the culvert

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 57 Management Plan








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and pump housing under Clear Lake Drive. Therefore, the appropriate trail
facilities will be planned and utilized so as not to adversely affect this water
flow and the survival of Clear Lake.

North and west of the prairie, the trail system will be linked to existing gravel
and unimproved roads, in order to parallel the western edge of the prairie.
Eventually, these roads connect to SW 62nd Boulevard, where a small trail
head will be built. From this location, a short walk or bike ride will link the
greenway user to the Oaks Mall or the unique community resource of
Terwilliger Park, across SW 62nd Boulevard from the proposed trail head.

SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE TO FOREST PARK
From Green Acres Park heading south, along the southeastern edge of the
prairie, the greenway trail will be primarily a multi-use boardwalk through the
wetland areas, and an on-surface multi-use asphalt trail on higher land. At
SW 20th Avenue, the Alachua County Department of Public Works would not
support an at-grade crossing within the guardrails at the SW 20th Avenue
bridge. Due to the heavy volume of traffic that exists on SW 20th Avenue,
there would be very few gaps provided for crossing the road. Therefore, an on-
grade crossing anywhere other than signalized intersections could not be
justified. The Department of Public Works will require the trail to extend east,
parallel to SW 20th Avenue, to the SW 43rd Street signalized intersection.
After crossing the intersection, the trail will enter Forest Park and continue
through to a mid-point of the park's west property line where the trail will
cross Hogtown Creek by bridge into the Project Site.

Another alternative to be considered, in addition to the at-grade crossing at
signalized intersections, is an overpass. The expense of such a facility may be
justified due to the danger and potential liability of trail users attempting on-
grade crossings at unauthorized points along SW 20th Avenue. Because of the
bridge's low clearance and the creek's consistently high water levels, it was
determined that an underpass at the bridge would not be feasible.

Presently, Forest Park does not provide public parking. However with future
park development, the park could potentially serve as a trail head and provide
vehicular parking for trail users.

Trail users to the west of the Project Site, along SW 20th Avenue or SW 62nd
Boulevard, will use the at-grade crossing at the SW 62nd Street signalized
intersection and the existing on-road bicycle facilities to access the Project
Site. For the safety of the trail users, facilities will be provided to
accommodate pedestrians and bicyclist along both sides of SW 20th Avenue
between the SW 62nd Boulevard and SW 43rd Street intersections (See Figure
14). These proposed facilities will include improvements to the existing bridge.
A thorough study of these SW 20th Avenue facilities will have to be conducted
by the City to determine the safest and most efficient route for the trail.




Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 59 Management Plan





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SW 20TH AVENUE TO 1-75
From SW 20th Avenue the multi-use off-road trail continues south where it
intersects with Interstate 75. Despite the fact that additional widening is
occurring along this stretch of the interstate highway, no provisions have been
made to accommodate potential pedestrian access. Several options exist for
crossing the interstate: 1) build an overpass across the highway; 2) terminate
the trail north of the interstate bridges and provide a closed loop trail that will
direct trail users back toward SW 20th Avenue, where parallel facilities will
then direct users over the existing interstate roadway bridge; 3) build a multi-
user trail parallel along the east side of the interstate within the powerline
right-of-way, coordinate the trail with the planned roadway extension of SW
62nd Boulevard to SW 40th Boulevard (identified in the Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization's 2015 Needs Plan), and make use of the
existing SW 20th Avenue roadway bridge that crosses the interstate highway.
All of these options will be further explored to determine appropriate costs,
efficiency of connections and desire of greenway users (See Figure 15).

Currently, the SW 20th Avenue (Humpback Road) interstate bridge is too
narrow to permit safe, shared crossing of the interstate. If the preferred option
is to use this bridge, it will be necessary either to upgrade the structure or
build a parallel facility for bicycle and pedestrian use. The Alachua County
Public Works Department supports widening of this overpass to accommodate
pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

A tract of land that borders this area north of the designated greenway parcels
(used as a borrow pit and fill site during the construction of 1-75) currently
supports a series of dirt bike trails. The City is currently considering to open
discussions with this landowner and local dirt bike clubs to designate this
piece of land for this use, and design sufficient dirt bike courses so that this
use will occur at this location and not in the more environmentally sensitive
areas throughout the greenway corridor.

SW 20TH AVENUE TO OAKS MALL
From SW 20th Avenue, on-road bike facilities, in the form of a two-way bike
route or bike lanes, should be added to the existing sidewalk facility along SW
62nd Avenue, to improve access between Forest Park and the Oaks Mall and
Terwilliger School. The intersection of SW 20th Avenue and SW 62nd Avenue
is currently controlled by a traffic signal.

1-75 TO KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARDENS
Depending on how 1-75 is crossed, the off-road trail is envisioned as continuing
south, along the southeast side of Lake Kanapaha and Hogtown Prairie, to the
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens. This is a vast, environmentally sensitive,
unique and spectacular landscape. Greenway facility development through this
landscape will need to be carefully routed to avoid impacting this ecosystem
(See Figure 16). Strategically placed loop trails will be designed to offer the
user an opportunity to get closer to certain landscape features.



Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 61 Management Plan














































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Because of the possible limited use of horse trails within this area of the
greenway parallel trail treads are proposed for bikers, hikers and horseback
riders that are kept within a well defined corridor of travel. These separated
treads should alleviate multi-user conflicts, and allow different user groups to
experience the landscape at a measurable pace. without increasing erosion.

This area of the project offers a tremendous opportunity for eco-tourism
activity through coordinated wayside exhibits, group-led interpretive programs,
and other special events designed to extoll the virtues of this landscape. The
Kanapaha Botanical Gardens should be an integral component of this eco-
tourism effort, as it is already a regionally significant attraction.

The Botanical Gardens currently provide some public parking to accommodate
greenway users. However, additional parking facilities will be provided to serve
user needs when the gardens are closed (See Figure 17). It is anticipated by the
County Department of Public Works, the Botanical Gardens and the Team that
a new entrance road and parking facility, that is accessed via Archer Road, will
be located to complement the garden's existing access and parking area. In
addition, it will serve as the southern terminus of the greenway while
minimizing environmental and aesthetic impacts. The proposed access from
Archer Road to the Botanical Gardens will also provide an excellent linkage
opportunity with the Archer to Gainesville Rails Trail project, which has been
proposed to utilize the existing power line easements and an abandoned
railway corridor along SW Archer Road.

GREENWAY IMPROVEMENTS WEST OF KANAPAHA BOT. GARD.
Proposed greenway improvements west of the Kanapaha Botanical Gardens will
provide enhancements to the greenway system as well as linkages with SW
75th Street and SW 24th Avenue. These proposed improvements consist of:
1) a linkage through the Botanical Gardens from the southern terminus of the
greenway to SW 63rd Boulevard; 2) a linkage from SW 63rd Boulevard at its
entrance to the Botanical Gardens north along Stagecoach Road to SW 24th
Avenue; 3) trails into the Lake Kanapaha area from SW 63rd Boulevard, or
Stagecoach Road to SW 75th Street and Kanapaha Park via utility easements
and/or SW 41st Place.

While not part of the original Project Site as approved by the Florida
Communities Trust, these improvements will provide desirable linkages and
enhancements to the overall project once the primary improvements are
installed on the Project Site from the east side of Lake Kanapaha to the
Botanical Gardens, as shown in this Master Plan report. Following or
concurrent with the construction of these improvements, the County will work
with the City to provide optimal linkages to SW 75th Street and SW 24th
Avenue utilizing the recommended or other alternate routes.






Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville. FL 64 Management Plan









































TRAIL HEAD FACILITIES AT KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARDENS

Hogtown Creek Greenway
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

LEGEND
- MULTI-USE TRAIL
,,i MULTI-USE BOARDWALK FIGURE 17

65









KANAPAHA BOT. GARDENS & WEST SIDE OF LAKE KANAPAHA
This area, Kanapaha Botanical Gardens and the west side of Lake Kanapaha,
was discussed by the Team as being possible good locations for incorporating
an observation tower amongst the live oaks, enabling visitors to view the
ecosystem of the lake without disturbing the wildlife (See Figure 18). However,
the location of an observation tower will require additional analysis of the
entire Lake Kanapaha area to determine the most qualified site for such a
structure.

STAGECOACH ROAD TO SW 75TH STREET
Charette participants advocated a connection from Stagecoach Road to SW
75th Street and Lake Kanapaha Park via SW 41st Place. This is likely an
overland connection through available utility easements and publicly owned
park lands. Kanapaha Park could also serve as a trail head for the southern
terminus of the Project Site, and once completed will offer ample parking for
greenway users.

ALONG TOWER ROAD TO ARCHER ROAD
The neighboring subdivisions of Haile Plantation, Kenwood, Valwood, Green
Leaf, etc., offer an excellent source of greenway users for the Hogtown Creek
Greenway. Therefore, the Team recommends a formal connection be made
along SW 41st Place between SW 63rd Boulevard and SW 75th Street.

Sidewalks and bike lanes along SW 75th Street will also provide linkage to
Kimball Wiles School and the proposed Middle School. An existing trails
system already exists behind the elementary school which may provide some
linkage opportunities with Kanapaha Park and the Project Site.

Finally, the concept of Park and Bike, or Bike and Ride was thoroughly
discussed during the charette. The City is considering providing facilities that
allow cyclists to store their bikes in lockers at certain transit stops, or provide
an opportunity to load their bikes onto busses. This will increase the efficiency
of transportation within the community and offer local residents a choice in
travel.

SW 75TH STREET TO 1-75 ALONG SW 24TH AVENUE
In completing the final loop of the greenway system, consideration will be given
to adding sidewalks and bike lanes along SW 24th Avenue (Humpback Road) so
that greenway users can effectively loop back north to Forest Park and other
destinations in the community.

Charette participants also discussed a possible connection off of SW 24th
Avenue to Hogtown Prairie and Haile Sink. This is the only area of the
greenway that was considered by charette participants for possible equestrian
trails (See Figure 19). The Team recommends that if this is desired, it could be
best accomplished though a program group-led tour that will be sponsored by
the City or another agency.


Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 66 Management Plan







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OTHER RECOMMENDED FACILITIES

Throughout the development of the Hogtown Creek Greenway, a number of
other facilities, in addition to trails, will be developed to maximize safe and
compatible use of the environment and to enhance the interrelationships
between the public greenway corridor and adjacent private properties.

GREENWAY SIGNAGE
The City of Gainesville will need to install a comprehensive system of signage
throughout the proposed greenway. This will include the following types of
signs:

Informational: orients users to their position within the trail system (i.e. "You
are here") provides an overview of the types of facilities within the greenway
that are open to the public, programs and activities available, and describes
routes or mode of travel required to reach these facilities. Also, these signs will
include approximate distances and time of travel anticipated to reach certain
destinations. Because these signs will be located at all major entrances to the
greenway, they will also be used to recognize those parcels that were purchased
with funds from the Florida Communities Trust, the City of Gainesville and,
or, Alachua County.

Directional: provides users with instructions regarding their bearing and route
of travel. Most directional signage is in the form of graphic symbols
(pictographs) and brief descriptions or listings. For example, directional
signage will include arrows that indicate a heading (direction of travel), and
descriptive text such as "this way," "keep to the right," or "south, one-mile."

Regulatory: describes the governing laws and regulations that apply within the
trail, such as permitted uses, hours of operation/accessibility, speed limit,
allowable activities, and legal requirements for use. Regulatory signs must be
uniform and standard in terms of size, location and information. All
regulatory signs should have black lettering on white reflective background.
Regulatory information should not conflict in any way with other components
of the signage program, or vice-versa.

Warning: used to caution trail users of various hazardous conditions, such as
sharp curves in the trail, slippery bridges, roadway crossings, steep downhill or
uphill conditions, blind intersections, changes in trail surface condition, and
other related warnings about environmental conditions of the greenway. All
warning signage will be signs of uniform size and shape, located a minimum of
50 feet in advance of the condition that the trail user is approaching, and
labeled with black lettering on a reflective yellow background.

Educational: also termed interpretive signage, it is used to describe the unique
qualities or significance of natural or cultural features along the greenway.
Educational signage provides the user with specific information about the
features, such as age, habitat, historical relevance or specific relation to
humankind.
Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 69 Management Plan









Festival: specialized type of trail signage that is used to commemorate special
events and holidays, or to add accent, color and decoration. Festival signage
usually offers limited information about a specific event. This type comes in
many different forms, from cloth banners, to flags, to specially created pole-
mounted hard surface signs.

Because much of the Hogtown Creek Greenway will be designed and built to
support bicycle usage, and due to the fact the City anticipates using
transportation funds to build portions of the project, the City will be using
AASHTO standards, and the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices
(MUTCD) as the specifications for signage throughout the project. These
standards can be supplemented with a specially created signage system for the
greenway, as illustrated in Figure 1.

Greenway Logo: A greenway logo will be created for the Hogtown Creek
Greenway. This could by achieved by the City sponsoring a community-wide
competition to develop an appropriate logo for the greenway. This has been
successfully accomplished in cities like Raleigh, High Point and Charlotte,
North Carolina, and most recently in Knoxville, Tennessee. A logo design
competition offers an opportunity to have local citizens involved in
establishing the greenway, and will further serve to publicize the project to
those citizens who have not yet heard of the project. The Team will agree to
assist the City with the execution of the competition.

LIGHTING OF GREENWAY FACILITIES
As a general rule, and in compliance with the Hours of Operation for the
greenway, as described in the Greenway Safety and Security section of this
report, the greenway will not be lighted with the exception of a few select
locations. Portions of the greenway that would be appropriate for pedestrian
scale lighting include:

Westgate Shopping Center due to the nighttime activities in this area,
additional pedestrian scale lighting will be needed for the proposed trail from
NW 34th Street to Creekside Mall. This will include lighting the underpasses
or bridges in this area of the project.

Creekside Mall to University of Florida again, after dark, if 24-hour usage is
anticipated along this segment of the greenway, pedestrian scale lighting will
be needed. This greenway segment also links several apartment complexes that
will benefit from having lighted access to the University, and Creekside Mall.

The lighting of greenway trails and facilities, comes additional responsibilities
for maintenance, police/park officer patrol and emergency response. Lighted
areas will also be equipped with emergency (911) phone systems, to promote
safety and enable better response by law enforcement personnel. Specific types
of lighting fixtures, and the location of these fixtures throughout the greenway
is a site plan issue, and will be determined by the City at a later date.



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BATHROOM & POTABLE WATER FACILITIES
Public restrooms and water fountains will be provided at key points throughout
the greenway system. These should be cited in conjunction with existing park
sites, and other public facilities capable of supporting greenway users.
Generally, these facilities are normally provided within typical greenways on an
"as-needed" basis. The following locations will be specifically defined within
maps and brochures for the greenway, and on signage systems throughout the
greenway, designating where restrooms and drinking fountains are available.
Some of these sites will require the installation of new restrooms and drinking
fountains.

Gainesville Mall
Ring Park/Elks Lodge
Westside Park
Loblolly Environmental Education Facility
SGreen Acres Park
SForest Park
SOaks Mall
SKanapaha Botanical Gardens

PICNIC, SCENIC VIEW SHED AND REST AREAS
The Preferred Design Concept Plan map denotes areas throughout the greenway
that offer ideal areas for picnicking, scenic views and appropriate rest stops.
The type and amount of facilities at each of these locations is best left to
decisions that will be made during the preparation of site plans. As a general
rule, these areas should be designed to be low maintenance, accessible to
maintenance vehicles, and appropriately signed with User Rules and
Regulations. For large group activities and popular destinations, the City and
County may want to consider implementing a reservation system to manage
use. The ideal sites for locating picnic facilities are as follows:

SRing Park
SWestside Park
SGreen Acres Park
SForest Park
SKanapaha Botanical Gardens

Scenic areas throughout the greenway should be emphasized by overlook
platforms, boardwalks that extend into native landscapes or observation
towers, where appropriate. Again, these facilities are best determined through
a more detailed site design for each scenic overlook. The areas within the
Project Site that have scenic view sheds that may be considered for locating
observation facilities are as follows:

Loblolly Environmental Education Area
Sugarfoot Prairie
Hogtown Prairie
Lake Kanapaha


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Rest areas are located frequently throughout the project area. For example,
rest areas can be the park sites, public schools, shopping malls, and
destinations within the University of Florida. Additionally, some greenway
users will most likely travel to neighbors homes, offices, or other commercial
establishments along the greenway.

USE OF RECYCLED WASTE MATERIALS
The Town of Cary, North Carolina and Greenways Incorporated pioneered the
use of recycled waste products in developing the Swift Creek Recycled
Greenway. In doing so, the level of awareness has been raised, nationally,
regarding the use of recycled plastic lumber for building greenway bridges, sign
posts, benches and boardwalks; bottom ash from coal fire electrical generation
plants as a substitution for aggregate base course; recycled aluminum for
information, educational, festival and directional signage; and recycled
asphalt for paved multi-use trails. As the City considers design development
strategies for specific facilities, recycled waste materials and products will be
strongly considered for use in construction. The Regional Transit System is
currently exploring the use of recycled materials in the improvement of bus
shelters and other amenities. The Team recommends that as the City
considers design development strategies for specific facilities, recycled waste
materials and products be strongly considered for use in construction. Some
recycled waste products have been demonstrated in Cary, NC to have saved the
town money, in comparison with traditional raw materials. Specific
applications depend on regional considerations, most importantly the
cooperation of local industries, product manufacturers and sales
representatives in the development and delivery of these products at a cost
effective price.


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IMPACTS OF GREENWAY
DEVELOPMENT











IMPACTS OF GREENWAY DEVELOPMENT

Greenway facility development is not without impacts, both to the natural
environment and to adjacent land uses. However, through proper planning
and appropriate design, most of these impacts can be mitigated, and a
successful public-use facility can be developed. Therefore, before undertaking
any site alterations or physical improvements that are not addressed in the
approved Master Development and Management Plan, the City shall request
written approval for the proposed modifications from the Florida Communities
Trust.

The Consulting Team and the City will develop this greenway facility in a
manner that exemplifies the best in environmental sensitivity and land
development, and strives to minimize negative public impacts on adjacent
private properties. Based on our analysis of the Hogtown Creek greenway
corridor, we feel that the following areas will receive the most impact from
greenway facility development.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Of primary concern to the City and the Consulting Team is the protection of
sensitive landscapes, including steep slopes, habitat of rare or threatened
plants and animals, wetlands, the natural creek channel and tributaries of
Hogtown Creek and certain portions of the floodplain which are easily scarred
by public access and use.

The project will be consistent with Federal, State, Water Management District
and Local Regulations to protect wetland sites from facility development
encroachment. It is the goal of the City's and the Team's design to avoid, or
minimize disturbance to all jurisdictional wetland areas of the project.

PROJECTIONS OF USE/LANDSCAPE CARRYING CAPACITY
One of the greatest impacts to the ecological systems of the study corridor
landscape will come from the permitted public access and use by trail
enthusiasts, commuters and recreationists. Given the current status of
disorganized and unstructured recreational use, the Consulting Team believes
that the study corridor landscape is suffering its greatest use-related impact. A
clearly defined network of trail treads, along with a structured public access
and use management program will offer delineated corridors for these activities,
and thus reduce wide spread impacts.

In order to better understand the limits of carrying capacity, the level of use
must first be defined throughout the corridor. The Consulting Team predicts
that usage levels will vary throughout the corridor, based largely on
origin/destination and usage generators, and on user profiles that have been
generated from other greenway systems throughout the United States.




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Between NW 23rd Boulevard and NW 16th Avenue, the Team projects that the
usage will be of medium intensity (See Table 3); however, the preferred route for
the greenway, the size and types of greenway lands proposed for use, and the
land's environmental sensitivity, offer greater carrying capacity in the
landscape to absorb higher levels of future use.


TABLE 3
Intensity of Trail Use
User TypMe Low Intensity Use Medium Intensity Use High Intensity Use
Pedestrian/Walker 2 PFM (l or Less 10-15 PFM 25 PFM
Bicyclists 50 ADBT (2) or Less 200 ADBT 1000 ADBT
Equestrians 4 HTD (3) or Less 20 HTD 100 HTD
1) PFM = pedestrians per foot width of walkway/minute: Source Timesaver Standards for Landscape Architecture
2) ADBT = average daily bicycle trip: Source: Greenways Incorporated
3) HTD = horses per 6 foot trail/day: Source: American Horse Council


Between NW 16th Avenue and Green Acre Park, the geographic center of the
project, the Team believes that the level of usage will be high intensity. This
intensity will vary depending on the type of facilities developed and the
connections that are made with different land uses. For example, usage by 350
persons per day during the week might occur between NW 16th Avenue and
Loblolly Environmental Education Center. On the weekend this could rise to
500 or even as high as 750 users on a sunny and mild day. Around Westgate
Shopping Center and Creekside Mall, use is likely to extend into the evening,
and therefore exceed these usage estimates. If a trail system is extended from
these commercial areas to the University of Florida campus, it would not be
unusual to see average usage at 1000 users/day.

Between NW 16th Avenue and Green Acre Park the environment has been
modified by man, and, with the exception of the Loblolly Environmental
Education Center, it is not considered to be highly sensitive landscape to
further encroachment. The current conceptual plan for the greenway contains
ideas for restoration of this landscape, to improve ecological function,
aesthetics and biological diversity.

From Green Acre Park to 1-75, and Sugarfoot Prairie, the ecological sensitivity
of the landscape gains greater value, and the concern over public access and
use is of greater importance. Due to the origins and destinations in this area,
and the distances between other community resources, we estimate that usage
will be of low intensity. Event programming may boost infrequent medium
intensity use, but for the most part the Team estimates that during the
weekdays, usage will remain around 75 persons per day through this area,
rising to 250 users per day on weekends. The area around Forest Park may
receive higher levels of usage, especially on weekends. The Team feels that
these landscapes are sensitive to human use, and carrying capacity is limited
through this area. Much of the use in this area is proposed to be restricted to
upland areas, or confined within boardwalk trails.

Hogtown Creek Greenway Master Development &
Gainesville, FL 74 Management Plan