Water and flood plain management study

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Water and flood plain management study
Title from bibliographic data sheet:
water and flood plain management study for the Gainesville metropolitan area
Cover title:
1974 drainage
Physical Description:
180 p. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates
Publisher:
Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Floodplain management -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Water quality management -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Drainage -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre:
local government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council by Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates.
General Note:
"Project no. 4194."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028048798
oclc - 37758966
System ID:
AA00024931:00001

Full Text



Alachua .G142

1974 lai
























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COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP
1974

OFFICERS
Clayton C. Curtis, Chairman
Robert J. Spence, Vice-Chairman
Ralph W. Kluge, Secretary-Treasurer

ALACHUA COUNTY
Jack Durrance Ralph Kluge
CITY OF ALACHUA
Robert H. Cato Glenn DuBois
CITY OF GAINESVILLE
Clayton C. Curtis James G. Richardson
Samuel N. Holloway
CITY OF HAWTHORNE
Carnell C. Henderson Robert J. Spence
CITY OF HIGH SPRINGS
E. G. Cann E. H. Petteway
EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS
North Central Florida John M. Champion
Health Planning Council
Governor's Council on. Criminal Justice Region WC
Alachua County C. 0. Morgan
City of Gainesville Norman J. Bowman
G. Alan Hardin
Citizen Participation W. T. Coram
Committee

COUNCIL STAFF
1974
Charles F. Justice Executive Director
Philip J. Hughey Assistant Director
Alan L. Csontos Environmental Planner
Roy E. Brewer Regional Planner
Charles L. Kiester Regional Planner
Jan E. McGee Health Planning Coordinator
Tommie M. George Executive Secretary
Marilyn Crumley Secretary 11
Ruby Marshall Bookkeeper
Terry Trussell Graphics Coordinator
Trevor D. Splane Planning Technician
Mark Druash Planning Technician

14






BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA 1. Report No. 2.3. Recipient's Accession No.
SHEET INCFRPC 74 003__ _______4. Title and Subtitle 5. Renort Date
Water and Flood Plain Management Study for the September, 1974
Gainesville Metropolitan Area 6.

7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Re pt.
Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates, Inc. NoNCRC703
9. Performing Organization Name and Address 10. l1roject T'ask 'Work Unit No.
North Central Florida Regional Planning Council
5 Southwest Second Place 11. Contract /Grant No.
Gainesville, Florida 32601 CPA FL 04 29 1036

12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address 13. Type of Report & Period
Dept. of Housing and Urban Development C(Iovered
661 Riverside Drive FINAL
Jacksonville, Florida 32-204 14.

15. Supplementary Notes


16. Abstracts
Utilizing previously prepared topographic maps of the 1 35 square mile Gainesville Metropolitan Area
(GMA) and based upon field monitoring efforts and historical records the flood channel area for streams and flood plain areas for streams and depressions under bothi existing and proposed future development
conditions were defined on each map sheet. The text consists of a water management plan for the
GMA and includes recommendations for flood plain and flood channel management, preliminary designs
and cost estimates of facilities to alleviate major flooding of existing developed areas and recommendations appropriate to a comprehensive water management plan.






17. Key Words and Document Analysis. 170. Des riptor.,

Drainage, Water Management, Flood Plain Management









17b. Identifiers/Open-E~nded Terms







17c. COSATI Field/Group
18. Availability Statement 19. Security Class (This 21. -No. of Pages
Available from North Central Florida Regional PanningReot
Council, 5 S.W. Second Place, Gainesville, Florida 32601 UNCLASSFIED
20. Security Class (This 22. Price
Page
UNCLASSIFIED
FORM NTIS-35 IREV. 3-72) THIS FORM MAY BE REPRODUCED USCOMM-OC 14952.R72








INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING FORM NTIS-35 (10-70) (Bibliographic Data Sheet based on COSATI (11.tdelines to Format Standards for Scientific. and Technical Reports Prepared by or for the Federal Government, P) Ii- 1 80 60(0).I

1. Report N number, at. h Htin dxiIualII btiund re port shall carry a unique al Iphanumneric. des ignat ion selected by the performing o .Inizarion or prfov ided ,I ItteNpnst organiz'ati on. Ise upperc.ase lett ers and Arabit. numerals only. Examples

I \sI V *~anrd 1- VA- RI14o.)

2. I 1ank.

3. Recipient's Accession Number. Reserved tor use by each report recipient.I

4. Title and Subtitle. FIr It. should nd ictc ir l and hrieflIy tithe Nub jet r ov erag of the report, and be islt-dpoi nrf miI. r sUttP If OLt. inl snMall(r rxpe or otherwise subordinate it to main title. '.hcn a report is, pre paredi in more
I ~'t ~t A iflo t. i tin priniaif t il, al voluime ttumfb r and inc lude subtitle for the specific %olume.

5. Report Doate. I .. I prr Nhal Icarry a dare Iud ic atr n at Ileast month and year. Indicate the has is on which It was selected dteit of iNst..r, diai of approval, fatr( of preparation.

6. Performing Organization Code. Leax e blank.

7. Author(s). iv u iaito( ) in t onventional order (c.g., John R. D~oe, or J.Robert Doe). List author's affiliation if it ditters
If rim i bt. p)ettoriiit organizat ion.

8. Performing Organi zation Report Number. Insrtr it performing organization wishes to assign this number.

9. Performing Organi zation Name and Address. (ive name, street, city, state, and zip code. L~ist no more than two Itevel s of
J11 0 ittm1/,ii : t1. I 'fart by. Display the- nanie ot the organization exactly as it should appear in G;overnmnent indexes St
AsUSGRDR-l.

10. Project Task Work Unit Number. IUse tie(, projet, task and work unit numbers under which the report was prepared.

1 1. Contract Grant Num ber. In srrt t,on trait.t or grantu n umbr runmder w hith report was prr parr d 12. Spon soring Agency Name and Address. InII(l It. / ip ( 0(13. Type of Report and Period Covered. I nd it air Interim, final,. etc. and, if appl it.ablIe., dat r s covered. 14. Sponsoring Agency Code. Lcraxe blank.

15. Supplementary Notes. F iter mntorrtnattoi not t.t hided elserhrc rebut usetul, suc~h As: lPrc.parcd. in Coopttation with)
I iani~latiot ot .l'tr ntcd at on71t rrit C Of . 1To hr published in . Supc.rscdt-t. NupplIcmconts...

16 Abstract. hit lu It a bri, t Nt~m ortds or It.s) ( a<. tuatl summary ot the most signiif it.ant inormaition continue~ in thr re port.
]I 't. f I flt ttItif ai signit it.ant bibliograiphy or liieraiturr' srirvr mention it hr(rr.

17. Key Words and Document Analysis. (a). Descriptors. "cct fronm the IThesaurus of I ngin-r ting. aind St.icrntit it. ITerms thr,
I ,iuh tii r rn, thait ide tiit the mnaior cont ept of the, reseatrIi and are sutti. mentlx s.pecitfit. and prec.ise. to be usedt~
inlr t rrI(-r t or at AIog ing.
(b). Identifiers and Open.-Ended Terms. Vmilt ritit lets tot project t names, c ode namreN, equipment devsignators. ett.. Ust.
tic- idct te nis writr ii in dvs.riptor form for thosr sub jec.ts tor which i no desc.ripbor exists.
c). CO SAT I Field Group. F ielId a nd~ 6roup ass ip it. ivt s arr, to hr take kr tom thr I %' ( 0't AI Subj~ect ( at( eory List.
,i f itir inajority of dot.utients are multidist iplinary in nature., the( primary Field (troop aissignment(s) will bre thr' ptc irec di q t. ,nt areci of lmurnaii endecavor, or typ. of phyic~tal objet. T .Ihr applic at ion(s) will be c.ross-referen.ed with set. ondary
I it Id Gtroup m~~mtrn. thati will tollow thr. primary ptotstlingfs .

18. Distribution Statement. letiote i t .ialltxt tItr public. or limitat ton tot reasons rithet than security for cxample-1 "Re-'
Ir ,sc tuiniitntc'. ( itt. anry ax ,ilabihity to trobi, wtih at.lr ssAnt: pricr".I 19 & 20. Security Classification. Dot~ ntot submlit (1- itied reportt, to thr NAttionitl Terchnit.aln 21. Number of Pages. Int .rt tihr total nuiti! r of pages, mt.cluding tlis one- and unnuntbrtr Id pagr s, but v-,( iuin- dis"'t22. Price. Insrt thit ptrice set by the N atitonal ITechn ica .Ilnformnation Set vice or the (iox eminent Printing lit, ic, if known,




5, t 0 I'.0F uscomm-oc 14052-P72










WATER AND FLOOD PLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDY Prepared for the


NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL











By


Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates, Inc.
Consulting Engineers
Gainesville, Florida








PROJECT NO. 4194 NCFRPC NO. 74-003
HUD NO. CPA-FL-04-29-1036









The preparation of this report was financed in part through a comprehensive planning grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, under the provisions of Section 701 of the Housing Act of 1954, as
amended.


Prepared September, 1974, for the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council.











TABLE OF CONTENTS


Section No. Title Page No.

Foreword vii

I Introduction
A. Background
B. Method of Study
C. Sources of Background Data 1

2 Description of the Project Area 1)2
A. General 2
B. Physical Data 2
1. Hogtown Basin 5
2. Tumbling Basin 5
3. Sweetwater Basin 6
4. Lake Forest Basin 6
5. Calf Pond Basin 7
6. Little Hatchet Basin 7
C. Soil Description 7
D. Land Use 11

3 Hydrology of Project Area 14
A. General 14
B. Rainfall 14
C. Ground Water 14

4 Experimental Program For Determination of Runoff
Coefficient and Infiltration Rates 17
A. General 17
B. Selection of Test Basin 17
C. Runoff Test Basins 17
D. Infiltration Test Basins 19
E. Hydrological and Meteorological Data Collection
Program 19
F. Test Basin Data Collected 10

5 Design Criteria and Computer Programs 2 4
A. General 24
B. Frequency of Storm Events 24
C. Runoff Coefficient 24
D. Permeability Rates 27
E. Possible Changes in Runoff Coefficient and Permeability
Rates 27
F. Computer Program Stream Basin Analysis 27
Water Surface Profile 27
Stream Runoff Analysis 30
Flood Routing 31
Retention Basin Analysis 32
G. Computer Printout Sheets 33



i








TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Section No. Title Page No.

6 Depression Basins Evaluation and Preliminary Engineering 34
A. General 34
B. Evaluation Procedures 34
C. Depression Basins Omitted 36
D. Solution Caverns 36
E. Combined Basins 36
F. Identification of Existing Development Within
Flood Plain Limits 48

7 Stream Basins Evaluation and Preliminary Design 49
A. General 49
B. Hogtown Creek 51
Area (1) Clear Lake 73
Area (2) Station 150+00 to Station 219+00 (Downstream and Upstream of SR 26A) 77
Area (3) N. W. 8th Avenue 79
Area (4) Springstead Creek at Pine Forest Creek 80
Area (5) Possum Creek at N. W. 16th Avenue 81
Area (6) Three Lake Creek @ N. W. 34th Street 83
Other Areas of Concern 83
Comparison of Runoff Coefficients 85
C. Tumbling Creek 85
Other Areas of Concern 93
Comparison of Runoff Coefficients 93
D. Sweetwater Branch 94
Area (1) S. E. 4th Street 94
Area (2) S. E. 7th Avenue, Rosewood Lateral 106
Area (3) S. E. 2nd Avenue, Rosewood Lateral 106
Comparison of Runoff Coefficients 107
E. Lake Forest Creek 107
Area (1) S. E. 26th Terrace 107
Other Areas of Concern 123
Comparison of Runoff Coefficients 123
F. Calf Pond Creek 123
Comparison of Runoff Coefficients 129
G. Little Hatchet Creek 129
Area (I ) Little Hatchet Creek Station 125+00 to Station 128+00 140
Area (2) Little Hatchet Creek 6, Waldo Road 140
Other Areas of Concern 140
Comparison of Runoff Coefficient 141
H. Cost Summary 141
1. Flood Insurance Program 447
J. Use of In-Stream Detention Dams 147
K. Maintenance Program 147
L. Continual Monitoring Program of Stream Basins 148
M. Priority List 148


i i







TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Section No. Title Pa-ge No.

8 Environmental Considerations 149
A. Introduction 149
Environmental Assessments of Individual Alternates 1 49
B. No Construction 149
Environmental Impact and Adverse Effects 15 1
Environmental Cost Benefit, 151
Short-Term Use and Long --Term Productivity 151
Commitments of Resources 153
C. Channelization 153
Environmental Impact and Adverse Effects 1 53
Environmental Cost and Benefit 155
Short-Term Use and Long-Term Productivity 1 55
Commitments of Resources 155
D. Dike and Pump Facilities 1-55
Environmental Impact and Adverse Effects 1 56
Environmental Cost and Benefit 1 56
Short-Term Use and Long -Term Productivity 1 56
Commitment of Resources 158
E. Detention 158
Environmental Impact and Adverse Effects 1 58
Environmental Cost and Benefits 158
Short -Term Use and Long-Term Productivity 1 60
Commitment of Resources 160
F. Retention Basins 160
Environmental Impact and Adverse Effects 1 60
Cost Benefit 162
Short-Termn Use and Long-Term Productivity 162"
Commitment of Resources 162

9 Administrative Procedures and Project Funding 1 64
A. Administrative 164
B. Project Funding 164
(1) General 164
(2) General Obligation Bonds 165
(3) Revenue Bonds 165
(4) Assessment Bonds 165
(5) Pay-As-You-Go 165
C. Summary 166

10 Legal Considerations 1167
A. General 167
B. Legal Authority for a Water Management Program 167
(1) Alachua County 167
(2) City of Gainesville 168
C. Legal Considerations Pertaining to Flood Plain
Zoning and Water Management 168


iii








TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)

Section No. Title Page No.

11 Summary and Conclusions 170
A. General 170
Statement of Condition 170
Statement of Need 170
Solutions 170
B. Computer Program 171
C. Depression Basins 171
D. Stream Basins 171
1. Hogtown Creek 172
a) Clear Lake 172
b) Downstream from SR 26A West of 34th Street 1 73
c) N. W. 8th Avenue Area 173
d) Springstead Creek at Pine Forest Creek 1 73
e) Possum Creek at N. W. 1 6th Avenue 1 74
f) Three Lakes Creek W~ N. W. 34th Street 174
2. Tumblin Creek 174
a) U. S. 441 174
3. Sweetwater Branch 175
a) S. E. 4th Street 175
b) S. E. 7th Avenue 175
c) S. E. 2nd Avenue 175
4. Lake Forest Creek 176
a) S. E. 26th Terrace 1 76
5. Calf Pond Creek 176
6. Little Hatchet Creek 176
E. Environmental Consideration 177
F. Legal and Administrative 177

1 2 Recommendations 178
Gene ral 178
Hogtown Creek Basin 179
Turnblin Creek 180
Sweetwater Branch 180Lake Forest Creek 180
Little Hatchet Creek 180
Calf Pond Creek 180











iv








LIST OF PLATES

PLATE NO. TITLE PAGE NO.

I Study Area and Index of Topographic Maps 3
2 Stream Basin Location Map 4
3 Soil Classification Map 9
4 Proposed Land Use Map 12
5 Piezometric Surface Contour of Floridan Aquifer
in Study Area 15
6 Test Basins and Rainfall & Stream Gages Location Map 1 8
7 Rainfall Intensity vs. Duration for 1 0 Yrs.
25 Yr. 100 Yr. Frequency for 0.25 Hr. to 24 Hr.
Duration 2 5
8 Stream Basin Water Management Program Flow Diagram 2 8
9 Typical Depression Basin Flood Plain Designation 35
10 Typical Stream Basin Flood Channel and Flood 50
Plain Designation
11I Schematic Diagram of Hogtown Creek 52
1 2 Location Map of Areas of Flooding to Existing Development 72
13 Stage- Storage Curve Haile Sink Area 74
14 Hogtown Creek Hydraulic Gradients of Runoff of
August, 1972 75
1 5 Schematic Diagram of Tumblin Creek 86
16 Schematic Diagram of Sweetwater Branchi 95
1 7 Schematic Diagram of Lake Forest Creek 110
1 8 Schematic Diagram of Calf Pond Creek 124
1 9 Schematic Diagram of Little Hatchet Creek 130
20 Hydrologic Cycle 150
21 Natural Channels 152
22 Existing Channelizat ion 154
23 Dike and Pump Facilities 157
24 Detention Areas 159
25 Retention Areas 161
















v








LIST OF TABLES

Table No.- Title Page No.

I Summary of Rainfall in Gainesville Area
for July 1, 1973 to April, 1974 21
2 Summary of Ground Water Level in Gainesville Area
for July, 1973 to April, 1974 23
3 Basins Omitted 37
4 Solution Cavern Basins 39
5 Combined Basins 40
6 Hogtown Creek Stream Runoff Analysis Data 53
7 Hogtown Creek -- Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 58
8 Turnblin Creek Stream Runoff Analysis Data 87
9 Turnblin Creek Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 88
10 Sweetwater Branch Stream Runoff Analysis Data
11 Sweetwater Branch Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 98
12 Sweetwater Branch Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures With Implementation of Alt. No. I Plan 108 13 Lake Forest Creek Stream Runoff Analysis Data III
14 Lake Forest Creek Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 114
15 Calf Pond Stream Runoff Analysis Data 125
16 Calf Pond Creek Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 11-6
17 Little Hatchet Creek -- Stream Runoff Analysis Data 131
18 Little Hatchet Creek Summary of Existing Channel Hydraulics
& Structures 132
19 Cost Summary of Alternate Plans 142





















F







FOREWORD





This report is submitted in fulfillment of a contract between the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council (NCFRPC) and Sverdrup & Parcel and Associates, Inc., dated June 1, 1973.

The report presents a detailed study for the preparation of a Water and Flood Plain Management Program for the greater metropolitan area (135 sqtiare miles) of Gainesville, Florida and as defined by the topographic maps supplied by the NCFRPC. The flood channel and flood plain limits were determined for approximately 1200 depression basins and six major stream basins in the project area. Areas where flooding of existing development will occur were identified, and alternate plans were prepared, including cost estimates, to alleviate flooding of the identified areas. Environmental, administrative and legal considerations pertaining to the various types of alternate plans, funding, and implementation of a water and flood plain management plan are discussed in detail.






































vii











SECTION I

INTRODUCTION



A. BACKGROUND

The City of Gainesville and its urban area within the HUD limits has increased in population from approximately 50,000 in 1960 to over 80,000 in 1973. Most of the growth has occurred within the drainage basins of six streams. The area's growth pattern is now expanding outward from the City into the County jurisdiction where many areas are located in depression basins which have no positive drainage outlets.
Development in the past has been without flood control ordinances, Many houses were constructed within the flood plain limits and some buildings that were not previously in the flood plain areas are presently encompassed by the increase in
flood plain limits resulting from upstream development.

The population of the metropolitan area is expected to exceed 100,000 by the year 1980. The local governing authorities have realized the need for a water and flood plain management program to plan and regulate development in the area. This report
presents the preliminary details necessary for proper formulation of a program.

B. METHOD OF STUDY

The method of study may be divided into four major sections. The first section involved the collection of background data including soil classification and proposed land use plan within the project area. In the second section the basic criteria were developed for runoff coefficients and permeability rates of soils. Computer programs for determining flood channel and flood plain limits were prepared to permit routine up-dating to reflect variations in land use plans or differences in soil classifications.
The third section is the evaluation of depression and stream basins to determine the flood channel and flood plain limits. Existing developments that are located within the flood plain Emits were identified, and alternate plans to alleviate flooding were prepared including cost estimates therefor. The fourth section reviews the environmental, administrative, and legal considerations pertaining to the
development of a water and flood plain management plan.

C. SOURCES OF BACKGROUND DATA

We acknowledge the many individuals and agencies who supplied various background data for the preparation of this report. Individuals and agencies from whom information was obtained include: North Central Florida Regional Planning Council and staff; U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service; University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Soil Science Department, School of Forest Resources and Conservation and College of Engineering; City of Gainesville; Alachua County and its many departments; State of Florida Department of Natural Resources; U. S. Geological Survey; and Roy J. Miller (former Alachua County
Engineer).








SECTION 2

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT AREA



A. GENERAL

The project area consists of approximately 135 square miles of land and surface water commonly known as the Metropolitan Gainesville area and is located in the heart of Alachua County. The boundaries of the project area correspond to the Federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) limits established as a result of the Alachua County Land Use Plan for the Gainesville Urban Area. Plate I shows the
limits of the project area and an index to the NCFRPC topographic maps.

Not all areas within the project limits where included in this study. The Newnans Lake and Paynes Prairie basins were deleted because their associated watersheds were located mostly outside the project limits. The Lake Alice basin, which includes most of the University of Florida, was deleted since it disposes of excess runoff through two drainage wells. The State of Florida Department of Natural Resources (DNR) land located in the southeast comer of the project area and consisting of
numerous small sinkholes was also deleted.

The project area topography consists of land and surface elevations ranging from about 50 feet to 190 feet above mean sea level (msl). In the western part, the land is predominantly rolling in character. Numerous small depressions receive the entire surface runoff. The area is devoid of surface streams and is dotted with sinks and fimerock pits. The central part is dominated by the Hogtown Creek drainage system.
In the east and southeast, most surface drainage flows to streams tributary to Newnans Lake or Paynes Prairie. In general, however, none of the project area is
completely free of depressions which may accumulate surface water runoff.

B. PHYSICAL DATA

The project drainage area may be classified into two major basin types depression basins and stream basins. Depression basins are those watersheds which have no outlet for surface water runoff except by percolation into the ground water tables (shallow or deep) and evapotranspiration. Depression basins dominate the western, south central, and southeastern portions of the project area. In general, the western area includes the area to the west of N. W. 43rd Street; the south central area includes the area south of Lake Kanapha, N. W. 20th Avenue, and Biven's Arm and bounded by Paynes Prairie to the east; and, the southeastern area includes the area east of Paynes Prairie and south of Calf Pond and bounded by Newnans Lake to the
east.

The major stream basins in the project area are illustrated on Plate 2. Stream basins are those watersheds which drain accumulated surface water runoff via streams and channels which ultimately discharge into lakes, sinkholes, prairies or other types of depressions. Stream basins dominate the north central and northeastern portions of
the project area and constitute the remaining project area.




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For the purpose of this study, each major stream basin has been named to facilitate reference to the specific area included in that basin. The major stream basins are identified as follows: Hogtown, Tumblin, Sweetwater, Lake Forest, Calf Pond, and Little Hatchet. A physicaldescription of each basin is given below:

I. Hogtown Basin

Hogtown Basin is located in the center of the project area and encompasses most of the northwest and a portion of the extreme northeast Gainesville urban area as illustrated on Plate 2. It is the largest basin in the project area and contains approximately 12,500 acres within its boundaries. A description of the land use in the basin is given elsewhere
in this report.

The major stream in the basin is Hogtown Creek whose headwaters are located in the area west of U.S. Hwy. 441 and north of N. W. 53rd Avenue at a ground elevation of approximately 185 ft. above mean sea level (MSL). Hogtown Creek proceeds in a southwesterly direction through the basin and ultimately discharges into Haile Sink which is located west of 1-75 near Lake Kanapaha. The ground elevation in the vicinity of the Hogtown Creek outlet is approximately 55 feet above MSL, and the total drop in ground elevation from its headwaters to its outlet is
approximately 130 ft.

A major tributary of Hogtown Creek is Possum Creek which joins H.gtown Creek south of N. W. 8th Avenue and east of N. W. 34th Street a-. ground elevation of approximately 75 ft. above MSL. The headwaters ci Possum Creek are located in the area north of N. W. 53rd Avenue and lv.:st of U.S. 441 at a ground elevation of approximately 190 ft. above OISI. Possum Creek, with its numerous tributaries, drains much of the nor,,hwest Gainesville urban area. The total drop in ground elevation from he headwaters of Possum Creek to its junction with Hogtown Creek is
a'p:oximately 115 feet.

2. Tumblin Basin

T,nblin Basin is located in the south central portion of the project area LaId includes that part of the City of Gainesville situated between Archer Road and 13th Street to Main Street and south of N. W. 8th Avenue to Paynes Prairie as shown on Plate 2. It contains approximately 1,976 acres
within its boundaries. The major stream in the basin is Tumblin Creek.

The headwaters of Tumblin Creek are located in the area north of Alachua General Hospital at a ground elevation of approximately 125 ft. above MSL. From its headwaters, Tumblin Creek proceeds in a southwesterly 'iection into Bivens Arm located west of U.S. 441 at a ground elevation o" approximately 65 ft. above MSL and finally to Paynes Prairie. The total d&ep in ground elevation from the headwaters of Tumblin Creek to its
ov0det is approximately 60 feet.





5








3. Sweetwater Basin

Sweetwater Basin is located in the south central portion of the project area east of Tumblin Basin and includes that part of the City of Gainesville situated between Main Street to 15th Street and the Kincaid Road and south of N. E. I Oth Avenue to Paynes Prairie as shown on Plate 2. It contains approximately 1,690 acres within its boundaries. The major stream in the basin is Sweetwater Branch.

The headwaters of Sweetwater Branch are located in the Gainesville Shopping Center area on N. Main Street and N. W. I Oth Avenue at a ground elevation of approximately 185 ft. above MSL. Secondary drainage systems in the vicinity drain excess storm water to Sweetwater Branch. From its headwaters, Sweetwater Branch proceeds in a generally southerly direction to its outlet into Paynes Prairie located southeast of the junction of S.R. 329 and S.R. 331 at a ground elevation of approximately 59 ft. above MSL. The total drop in ground elevation from the headwaters of Sweetwater Branch to its outlet is approximately 126 feet.

A major tributary of Sweetwater Branch is the Rosewood Lateral channel which joins Sweetwater Branch east of S. E. 8th Street and north of S. E. I Oth Avenue at a ground elevation of approximately I 10 ft. above MSL. The headwaters of Rosewood Lateral are located west of the Waldo Road and north of N. E. 4th Avenue at a ground elevation of approximately 160 ft. above MSL. From its headwaters, Rosewood Lateral proceeds in a southwesterly direction to itsjunction with Sweetwater Branch. The total drop in ground elevation from the headwaters of Rosewood Lateral to its junction with Sweetwater Branch is approximately 50 ft.

4. Lake Forest Basin

Lake Forest Basin is located in the south central project area to the east of Sweetwater Basin and generally includes the area roughly bounded by the Waldo Road, the Kincaid Road, Newnan's Lake and the Hawthorne Road. It contains approximately 4,547 acres within its boundaries. The major stream in the basin is Lake Forest Creek.

The headwaters of Lake Forest Creek are located north of the drive-in theater on the Hawthorne Road. However, major laterals which join Lake Forest Creek in the vicinity of its headwaters add additional drainage to the creek from that point. The approximate ground elevation at the headwaters of Lake Forest Creek is 125 ft. above MSL. From its headwaters, Lake Forest Creek proceeds in an easterly direction to its outlet into Newnan's Lake immediately north of the Sunland Center State Park at an approximate ground elevation of 70 ft. above MSL. The total drop in ground elevation from the headwaters of Lake Forest Creek to its outlet is approximately 55 feet.






6








A major tributary to Lake Forest Creek is Sunnyland Creek whose headwaters are located at the Sunland Training Center. Sunnyland Creek joins Lake Forest Creek immediately west of the Sunland Center State
Park.

5. Calf Pond Basin

Calf Pond basin is in the south central portion of the project area contiguous to Sweetwater Basin and Lake Forest Basin as shown on Plate 2. It contains approximately 1 ,024 acres within its boundaries. The major
stream in the basin is Calf Pond Creek.

The headwaters of Calf Pond Creek are located in the Lincoln Estates Subdivsion at a ground elevation of approximately 1 25 ft. above MSL.
From its headwaters Calf Pond Creek proceeds in a generally southeasterly direction to its outlet into Calf Pond located east of S. E. 27th Street at an approximate ground elevation of 80 ft. above MSL. The total drop in ground elevation from the headwaters of Calf Pond Creek to its outlet is approximately 45 feet. Several minor tributaries flow to Calf Pond Creek
as shown on Plate 2.

6. Little Hatchet Basin

Little Hatchet Basin is located in the central portion of the project area and is contiguous to Hogtown Basin on the west and Lake Forest Basin on the south. The basin Includes a portion of the N. F. Gainesville urban area and all of the Gainesville Municipal Airport as shown on Plate 2. It contains approximately 2,884 acres within its boundaries. The major
stream in the basin is Little Hatchet Creek.

The headwaters of Little Hatchet Creek are located west of the Waldo Road and north of the municipal airport at an approximate ground elevation of 160 ft. above MSL. Other minor tributaries add additional flow to Little Hatchet Creek from the N. F. Gainesville area as shown InI Plate 2. From its headwaters, Little Hatchet Creek flows in an easterly direction, passing to the north of the municipal airport and ultimately discharging into the Gum Root Swamp north of S.R. S232 at an approximate ground elevation of 70 ft. above MSL, and finally into Lake Newnan's. The total drop in ground elevation from the headwaters of
Little Hatchet Creek to its outlet is approximately 90 feet.

C. SOIL DESCRIPTION

The basis for determining hydrologic characteristics of an area is identification of the soil types present. Two sources of soil maps for the project area were available:
(1) Soil Survey Alachua C'ounty, Florida, Series 1940, No. 10, issued February 1 954 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and, (2) General Soil Map, Alachua County, Florida, 1 967, published by the same agencies above. The general soil map shows the grouping of the soil identified by source (1) above, into associations. This map is very generalized and was not used. The soil map



7








and information of source (1) above provides more detail on the identification of each type of soil within the project area and was used as the basis of the soil evaluation.

Soil characteristics data pertaining to each type of soil in the project area are published in three forms: Soil Survey Alachua County from source (1) above; Soil Survey Interpretations by the USDA, Soil Conservation Service; and Florida Soil Identification Handbook prepared by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Soil Science Department in cooperation with USDA, Soil Conservation Service. Many of the soil names as shown on the soil map are being renamed by the agencies above. The renaming or reclassification is not completed, so the original name for the soil type in the project area was used to avoid confusion.

A comprehensive soil survey for Alachua County is currently under way. When the new soils data become available, such information should be compared with the soil map used for this study. If significant differences are observed, the computer analysis input data should be adju sted for future use of the computer program.

Each soil type was placed in a designated group ranging from Group I through 7 depending on the drainage and runoff characteristics with the best characteristics designated as Group 1. The poorest characteristics are placed in Group 7. Plate 3 shows the soil map with the location of each group within the project area. The soil type placed in each group and a general description of each group is as follows:

Gro up I Alachua, Arredondo, Blanbon, Fort Meade, Gainesvpille,
Jamison, Lakeland, Orlando, and St. Lucie:

0 to 6 inches, light grayish brown or pale brown to yellowish-gray loose fine sand containing some organic
matter;

6 to 60 inches, yellow to light yellowish-brown or grayish-yellow or light gray loose fine sand with spotches of
white fine sand;

60 inches +, mottled light gray, yellow, and yellowish-brown
friable fine sandy clay loam or fine sandy loam.

Group 2 ('hiefland, Hlernando, and Jonesville

0 to 5 inches, brownish-gray or dark gray to yellowish-gray
loose fine sand;

5 to 40-SO inches light yellowish-brown to pale-brown loose
fine sand;

40 to 44 or 50 to 53 inches, yellowish-brown friable but
slightly sticky fine sandy clay or heavy fine sandy loam;,

44 to 53+ inches, Ocala limestone.






8




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Group 3 Kanapaha, Leon and Scranton

0 to 4 inches, medium-gray nearly loose fine sand containing
some grass roots and long large roots of saw palmetto;

4 to 18 inches, white or yellowish-white loose fine sand;

18 to 21 inches, black or very dark-brown hardpan consisting of fine sand cemented with organic matter; hardens on exposure to air and becomes extremely hard but brittle when dry; firm to friable when moist; contains coarse vegetable
matter;

21 to 26 inches, dark-brown partly cemented fine sand; upper I or 2 inches is moderately hard but brittle, and the
rest is friable;

26 to 32 inches, yellowish-brown loose fine sand usually
saturated with water;

32 to 60 inches, light gray loose fine sand with streaks of
brown or dark gray, usually wet.

Group 4 Bladen and Fellowship

0 to 7 inches, gray to brownish-gray nearly loose loamy sand
containing a noticeable quantity of organic matter.

7 to 12 inches, yellowish-brown or fight-gray nearly loose
loamy sand;

12 to 51 inches, gray or light-gray plastic clay or plastic heavy fine sandy clay mottled or streaked with yellowish
brown.

52 inches +, medium gray plastic heavy clay with slight
mottlings of yellowish-brown;

or

0 to 6 inches, gray or dark-gray friable loamy fine sand
containing a small quantity of organic matter;

6 to 18 inches, yellowish-gray or light-gray friable loamy fine
sand;

18 to 42 inches, gray or light-gray, mottled with brown, heavy fine sandy clay or clay; very plastic when wet, firm when moist, very hard when dry; shrinks, cracks, and breaks
into large angular blocks when drying;

42 inches +, mottled light-gray and brown heavy clay with
some chert gravel, cobbles, and limestone fragments.





10







Group 5 Plummer and Rutledge

0 to 14 inches, gray to black fine sand;

14 to 60 inches, light-gray fine sand mottled with yellow to brown;

60 inches +, light gray friable sandy clay loam; very poorly drained soil with standing waters during rainy season.

Group 6 Peat, Peaty Muck, Alluvial Soils, Made Land, Pits and Mine

Peaty and Peaty Muck contains highly organic matter from I to 12 feet averaging 8 feet, generally with standing water. Alluvial soils, undifferentiated, are found on the flood plains or first bottoms along creeks and branches.

Group 7 Bayboro, Water, Marshes

Bayboro contains highly organic, black or very gray loamy fine sand in marshes with standing water. Most predominate in the prairie areas on Paynes Prairie.

Based on the evaluation of the information found in the three sources above, runoff coefficients were assigned for each group of soil to determine the weighted
coefficient for any area.

D. LAND USE

In addition to the effect of ground surface topography and soil type, the quantity and rate of surface water runoff resulting from a given rainfall is also a direct function of the land development character. For example, higher density developments tend to increase the amount of surface water runoff over low density developments. For this reason, the proper designation of flood plain areas requires a thorough analysis of the existing and future trends in land use patterns in each watershed area. Such patterns are normally governed, in large part, by the planning
and zoning activities of the local governmental agencies.

For the purpose of this study, the existing land use for each watershed or basin has been determined from the topographic and aerial maps supplied by the NCFRPC, checked and augmented by actual field survey. Areas which were under construction at the date of photography were considered as existing. Future land use considerations were based upon adopted land use plans for the Gainesville Urban
Area and Alachua County supplied by the NCFRPC.

Plate 4 illustrates the existing and proposed land use in the study area. In the preparation of this map, NCFRPC authorized that those areas indicated as undeveloped on the adopted land use plans would remain undeveloped, except that certain areas which have been designated for further study were assumed as
commerical development.








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Land use in the study area has been placed into nine major categories as follows: Single Family, Multiple Family, Planned Unit Development (PUD), Mobile Homes, Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, Recreation and Undeveloped. Each major land use category shown on Plate 4 is defined below:

Single Family: Includes all single family dwellings and low density 8
units/acre) multiple family dwellings.

Multiple Family: Includes all medium ( 14 units/acre) and high 1-0
units/acre) density multiple family dwellings; multiple family/offices and multiple family/commercial areas designated on the adopted land use plan
for the Gainesville Urban Area.

Planned Unit Development (PUD): A district which includes residential
units, two family and multiple family dwellings, churches, schools, community or club buildings and similar public and semi-public facilities; nonresidential uses, including commercial or retail uses, industrial uses and
offices, clinics and professional uses.

Mobile Homes: Includes all mobile homes; mobile homes/single family
and mobile homes/multiple family as designed or the adopted land use
plan for the Gainesville Urban Area.

Commercial: Includes all commercial establishments and offices.

Industrial: Includes all industrial and wh olesal e/ ware housing
establishments.

Institutional: Includes all public and senli-PUblic establishments.

Recreational: Includes all parks, recreational areas, open space and
buffers.

Undeveloped: Includes all areas not designated iii any of the above
categories and consists primarily of agricultural and natural land.

The results of this study are based upon the proposed land use plan shown on Plate 4. Any future changes to this plan may significantly alter the drainage characteristics within the watershed in question. Consequently, it is recommended that the results of this study be reevaluated routinely whenever changes in the land use plan are being considered.













13






SECTION 3

HYDROLOGY OF PROJECT AREA



A. GENERAL

Analysis of records on area rainfall, surface water flows and ground water elevations is essential to define the area's hydrology. This section presents the information
studied and describes some of the hydrologic characteristics of the study area.

B. RAINFALL

Rainfall in the Gainesville area is abundant, averaging about 54 inches per year.
Annual rainfall has ranged from as little as 35 inches to as much as 80 inches. In an average year about 60 percent of the annual rainfall occurs from June through September in tile form of afternoon or evening local showers or thunderstorms.
Rainfall during other seasons of the year is usually the result of large scale weather developments, such as hurricanes and frontal movements. Periods of deficient rainfall, particularly in November through May, occur during most years. The experimental program data shows a period of deficient rainfall for the months of July 1973 through April 1974. This "dry" period is typical of a drought period which can be expected to occur in the project area at infrequent intervals. Prolonged
wet periods may also be expected to occur.

C. GROUND WATER

The ground water characteristics of the study area include the shallow (ground water table) and the deep (Floridan) aquifers. The ground water table is very much dependent upon the quantity and frequency of rainfall. In the areas where an impervious layer of soil lies over the limestone formation of the Floridan aquifer, the ground water table level responds quickly to the amount of rainfall. This characteristic is revealed in the fluctuation of Test Basin No. 4 and 8 of the experimental program. Depth of soil to the impervious layer varies throughout the
project area and ranges from 18-24 inches to over 60 inches.

The ground water table at the bottom of the basins, located in the areas where the impervious layer is non-existent, is generally the same level as the piezometric surface of the deep aquifers. These areas are generally located where sink holes, solution caverns and depression basins with deep sand overlying the limestone
formation are found.

The deep water aquifer is the predominant source of fresh water supply for the Gainesville area. The deep water aquifer, if tapped, would normally rise to 55-60 feet above mean sea level in the study area. Plate 5 shows the level of the normal piezometric surface of the deep aquifer in the project area. Periods of excessive or deficient rainfall are reflected in the fluctuation of the piezometric surface. The data for Haile Sink, as shown in the experimental program, reflect the subnormal rainfall over the area during the period between July 1973 to April 1974. The deep water aquifer in the study area is recharged primarily through the numerous sink holes,



14







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solution caverns and depression basins void of impervious layers overlying the limestone formation. Some sinks of large capacity include Alachua Sink in Paynes Prairie, Haile Sink of the Hogtown Creek stream basin and Devil's Millhopper.
























































16








SECTION 4

EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR DETERMINATION OF RUNOFF

COEFFICIENT AND INFILTRATION RATES



A. GENERAL

The values assigned for runoff coefficients and infiltration rates are most important to a proper determination of the area hydrology. An experimental program was included as part of this study to provide the basic values for runoff coefficients and
permeability rates for the different types of soils in the study area.

As a supplement to the experimental program, a data gathering program was conducted to collect rainfall data from existing rain gages within the project area.
These data served to verify the actual rainfall in the test basins and the pattern of
rainfall over the project area.

B. SELECTION OF TEST BASINS

The experimental program provided for installation and monitoring of two runoff test basins and three infiltration test basins. Pre-selection of test basin sites was based on examination of the project area using NCFRPC topographic maps. Field investigations were performed on each pre-selected site to determine the suitability for test basin use. The land owners of the selected test basin sites were contacted and a formal request to use the owner's land as test basins was made by NCFRPC.
The final test basin sites are as shown on Plate 6.

C. RUNOFF TEST BASINS

Two runoff test basins were selected for the experimental program. These are designated as Test Basin No. I and No. 2. A description of these test basins is as
follows:

Test Basin No. I is located in the northwest part of the project area. The site is approximately 11/2 miles west of N.W. 43rd Street (Millhopper
Road) and 1/2 mile north of N. W. 39th Avenue.

Test Basin No. 2 is located in the northeast section of the project area approximately 1/2 mile east of Waldo Road and 1/2 mile south of N.E.
39th Avenue on the State of Florida, Division of Corrections Santa Fe
Community Correctional Center property.

The area of Test Basin No. I is approximately 12 acres and Test Basin No.
2 is approximately 25 acres.








17






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An existing stream originates within each of the test basins and flows through the basins. The best location for installation of a water measuring weir in each basin was selected and surveyed for weir design. Analysis of the basins physical and hydrological characteristics revealed that a 900 V-notcli weir and a rectangular weir, with weir length of 3.5 feet, would be best for Test Basins No. I and 2, respectively.

A self-recording water level instrument and other equipment were installed at eacl) basin to monitor the level of the water flowing over the measuring weir. The outflow hydrograph of any storm which produced runoff was measured to determine the
runoff coefficient from each runoff test basin.

D. INFILTRATION TEST BASINS

Six sites were selected as infiltration test basins and were designated as No. 3 through No. 8. Test Basin No. 5 was deleted because permission from the land
owner could not be obtained.

Test Basins No. 3 and 4 are located directly across from the new Santa Fe Community College campus on N.W. 83rd Street. Test Basin No. 6 is located approximately 1/2 mile east of N.W. 83rd Street on the south side of N.W. 23rd Avenue. Test Basin No. 7 is located in the southwest part of the project area approximately 1/2 mile off the Archer Road as shown on Plate 2. Test Basin No. 8 is located behind the State of Florida Division of Corrections Road Prison on SR '26
just north of junction with East University Avenue.

Test Basins No. 3 and 6 are depressions with no free standing water during dry periods. Test Basins No. 4 and 8 each have a pond located within the basin. Field survey shows that the water level in Basins No. 4 and 8 is inucli higher than the piezometric water level of the Floridan aquifer. Therefore, the ponds definitely are
perched water table ponds.

A staff gage was installed in each of the infiltration test basins to monitor the rise
and fall and depth of water in the basin.

Significant errors were found in the topographic maps prepared by the aerial surveyor for NCFRPC. As a result, field topographic surveys were conducted in the
test basins to provide the correct topography.

E. HYDROLOGICAL AND METEOROLOGICAL DATA COLLECTION PROGRAM

State, federal and locaj governmental agencies which have measuring stations within the project area were contacted and requested to furnish historical data. In addition, rain gages were installed at Test Basin No. 2, 3, 7 and 8 to monitor the exact rainfall in each of the above test basin areas. The following list shows the source, location
and type of data available.









19









Source Location Type of Data Available

1. Univ. of Florida Horticulture Unit, 7-day recording raingage
Dr. Jon F. Batholic, Millhopper Road
Asso. Prof. WFAS
Fruit Crop

2. Univ. of Florida Univ. of Florida 7-day recording raingage
Dr. Gordon M. Prine, Campus; Farm
WFAS Agronomy

3. Federal Gov't.; FAA Gainesville Municipal Daily rainfall
Airport 6-hour intervals

4. Alachua County Road Ala. Co. Rd. Dept. Daily rainfall
Dept.; County Engineer Co. Eng. Office
Office

5. John Kelly Power Plant John Kelly Power Plant Daily rainfall
8-hour intervals

6. Federal Gov't.; USGS Hogtown Creek
@SR 26A Stream gage
@SW 20th Ave. Stream gage
Haile Sink Staff gage
Lake Kanapaha Staff gage
Sweetwater Branch
@ S.E. 2nd Place Stream gage

7. Santa Fe Community Test Basin Nos. 2, Borrowed four manual
College Biology 3, 7 and 8 4" raingages
Laboratories

F. TEST BASIN DATA COLLECTED

The runoff and infiltration test basin monitoring program began July 27, 1973, and continued until April 30, 1974. The test basins were monitored on a weekly basis and during and after rainstorms. Meteorological data were collected from other stations on a weekly basis. The entire nine month period was a period of abnormally
low rainfall. Little useful information was collected.

Summary of the data collected for the total duration is presented in this section.

Table I shows a summary of the rainfall in the Gainesville area for the monitoring period. All data were collected from rainfall produced by isolated thunderstorms and "dry frontal systems." The project area was not subjected to a low depression
type rainstorm during of the experimental program.







20






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C-i C-i C-i C-; (-i r- C-i


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m tn tn tn tn
75 o '-010
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The months of October, November, January, March, and April were extremely dry as shown in the data collected. The normal amount of rainfall for the period July through April is 42.35 inches. The Gainesville area received a maximum of 35.50 inches at the Gainesville Airport and a minimum of 18.37 inches at Test Basin No. 1. The largest maximum daily rainfall ranged from 2.47 inches at the John Kelly Power Plant to 1.54 inches at Test Basin No. 1.

The shallow and deep ground water levels are sensitive to rainfall. The antecedent months of below normal rainfall caused a pronounced drop in ground water level throughout the Gainesville area and statewide. Table 2 shows the lowest monthly ground water level at Test Basins No. 4 and 8, Lake Kanapaha, and Haile Sink for the period July, 1973 to April, 1974.

The deficiency in rainfall prior to April, 1974 is reflected in the piezometric water level records of Haile Sink. The normal water level of the sink is approximately 50.52 feet above mean sea level (msl) which was the level of July, 1973. In April, 1974 the water level had fallen to 43.8 feet msl. This decrease in the piezometric level of the aquifer is indicative of the drought period which the Gainesville area and the State have experienced.

The experimental program for collection of basic data resulted in failure due to the abnormally low rainfall in the project area. The NCFRPC requested the Alachua County Engineering Department (ACED) to accept the responsibility for a continual monitoring program until such time that sufficient data is collected.



The engineers were authorized to estimate the values for runoff coefficients and infiltration rates and proceed with completion of the study.



























22







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23










SECTION 5

DESIGN CRITERIA AND COMPUTER PROGRAMS



A. GENERAL

The basic design criteria were established before determining the flood elevations in the stream and depression basins. Computer programs were prepared utilizing the basic criteria and data to expedite the laborious task involved in determining the flood elevations. The program will also permit the NCFRPC to update, alter or revise as necessary any part of the water management program. The design criteria and the
basic assumptions used are presented in this section.

A supplement to this report specifically outlines the mechanics of the computer program for continued usage by the NCFRPC. The variable names used in the program are identified. The method of supplying input data and setting up the program has been outlined, and the entire program has been submitted to the
NCFRPC as a tool ready to be put to use.

B. FREQUENCY OF STORM EVENTS

This study establishes the 10 year flood channel and 100 year flood plain elevations for stream basins and the 100 year flood plain elevation for depression basins. The basis for predicting the rainfall for the 10 year and 100 year events is Technical Paper No. 40, Rainfall Frequency Atlas of the United States as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce. The intensity versus duration curves of Plate 7 was
developed from the rainfall atlas above.

C. RUNOFF COEFFICIENT

The experimental program was initiated to provide sufficient basic data to determine the runoff coefficient for each soil group in the project area. Due to lack of excessive rainfall during the monitoring period of the experimental program, sufficient data were not obtained. The engineers were then authorized to proceed with the project utilizing the best judgment and background knowledge possible to
estimate the runoff coefficients.

The weighted runoff coefficients were computed from the following criteria:

Type of Land Use Percent Impervious Surface
(1) Single Family 35
(2) Multiple Family 55
(3) Planned Unit 45
(4) Mobile Home 45
(5) Commercial 80
(6) Industrial 55
(7) Institutional 10
(8) Recreational 5
(9) Undeveloped 0



24












4.0 10.0



3.0 '- 5.02.0 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1.0

DURA TION (HRS)







1.0__
0.9
- k 0.8;

0.7

06


0 .5 -------,-0.4 -_



0.3


0.25
0 2 4 6 8 0 12 14 16 18 20 22 24

DURA TION (HRS.)




NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL RAINFALL INTENSITY VS. DURATION FOR 10 YR. 25 YR. 100 YR. FREQ. FOR
0.25 HR. TO 24 HR. DURATION SVERDRUP & PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS GAINESVILLE, FLA.

DATE: PROJECT NO. PLATE 7
SEPT., 1974 4194


25








Impervious surfaces are defined as surfaces such as roofs, streets, and driveway pavement. A runoff coefficient of 0.90 has been established for these surfaces.

Generally, a flood-producing rainfall occurs following several days of intermittent rainfall. The antecedent moisture condition of the soil becomes high. Therefore, for the various soil groups as described in previous sections, the runoff coefficients assigned to each group are as follows:

Soil Group Runoff Coefficient

1 0.10
2 0.20
3 0.35
4 0.40
5 0.50
6 0.65
7 1.0

Weighted coefficients were calculated for each type of development corresponding to the soil groups. The weighted coefficient for any variation of development and soil group is as follows:

RUNOFF COEFFICIENTS
Type of Development

Soil Single Multiple Planned Mobile Commer- Indus- Institu- Recrea UndevelGroup Family Family Unit Home cial trial tonal tonal oped
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

1 0.38 0.54 0.45 0.45 0.74 0.54 0.18 0.15 0.10
2 0.44 0.61 0.54 0.54 0.77 0.61 0.32 0.28 0.25
3 0.54 0.65 0.59 0.60 0.79 0.65 0.40 0.38 0.35
4 0.61 0.70 0.65 0.65 0.81 0.70 0.50 0.43 0.45
5 0.64 0.72 0.67 0.68 0.82 0.72 0.54 0.53 0.50
6 0.74 0.79 0.76 0.76 0.85 0.79 0.68 0.66 0.65
7 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

The weighted runoff coefficient was determined as follows:

Weighted C Sum of AC's
Sum A's

Where A = area in acres and C = the corresponding coefficient.

The proposed land use map does not provide proposed land use for the entire project area. Where there is no proposed land use, the NCFRPC provided information on the type of development that has already taken place. These developments were incorporated in the study. The NCFRPC authorized the engineers to classify the remaining undeveloped areas as undeveloped for the stream and depression basins analyses.



26











D. PERMEABILITY RATES

Analysis of depression basins is accomplished by the Retention Basin Runoff Analysis computer program. Basic data requirements include the rainfall for various frequency storm to be analyzed, runoff coefficient, and permeability rates of the depression bottom. The permeability rates for various types of soils were obtained from published information in the Soil Survey Interpretations, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service for the types of soil in the project area. In conjunction with information obtained above, an assessment of the depression basins was made in the field, utilizing aerial maps as necessary to classify the depression basins. Each depression basin was placed in one of four major categories: (1) well drained; (2) poorly drained; (3) pounded depression; or (4) solution cavern.
The permeability rates for the various soil types were reduced to average rates based on the soil group designations. The average permeability rates assigned to individual basins were based on the soil group located at the basin bottom and on the basin
classification. The values assigned are as follows:

Permeability Rates
Basin Classification Soil Groups (ft/day)

Solution Cavern All 12.6 to 30.0
Poorly Drained All 1.0
Pounded Depression All 0.0
Well Drained 1 12.6
Well Drained 2,3,4,5,6,7 8.0

E. POSSIBLE CHANGES IN RUNOFF COEFFICIENT AND PERMEABILITY RATES


The values assigned for runoff coefficients and permeability may require modification if evaluation of the comprehensive soil survey and/or data from the experimental program show major differences than the assigned values. Modified flood plain elevations for depression basins may be generated by the Retention Basin Runoff Analysis computer program by inserting the modified runoff coefficient
and/or permeability rates.

F. COMPUTER PROGRAM STREAM BASIN ANALYSIS

Three separate computer programs were required to examine the stream basin hydraulic characteristics. These programs are: (1) water surface profile; (2) stream runoff analysis; and, (3) flood routing. The diagram as shown on Plate 8 outlines the
general process for hydrological evaluations of stream basins.

Water Surface Prorde

A review of water surface programs available was investigated and "A Computer Program for Determining Flood Elevations and Flood Areas for Curtain Flow Rates"
(WSP-2) prepared by Robert M. Pasley and Owen P. Lee of the USDA Soil
Conservation Service, was selected to identify this stream characteristic.




27














SJI WA TER SURFACE PROFILE STREAM RUNOFF A NA L YSIS
PROGRAM PROGRAM







o DA TA



FLOOD ROUTE PROGRAM
Se




EEATONS


UPDATrED FLo OD EL EVA TONS

NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL STREAM BASIN WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FLOW DIAGRAM
SVERDRUP 8 PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
G CONSULT NING ENGINEERS GAINESVILLE, FLA. DATE: PROJECT NO. PLATE 8 SEPT, 1974 4194

28








The computer program WSP2, when used within its limitations, can aid in the determination of flood characteristics for a given set of physical conditions. More specifically the program computes water surface profiles in open channels. This program necessitates the description of a large amount of physical data such as valley shape, roughness, restrictions, etc. The program requirements of core storage exceeded the Alachua County computer capacity, so the University of Florida Computer Center was used to run the WSP-2.

The method that WSP2 uses to extend profiles between valley sections is a version of the modified step method. All profiles are computed in an upstream direction. Therefore, only subcritical flow can be analyzed. Th-is step method requires a special technique for starting profiles. The program can start from either historical records or estimates, The program can start from given elevations, from given slopes, or from critical depths.

Once the starting downstream information is developed (all that is needed is elevation of the energy grade line), the following steps are used to extend the profile to the next upstream section. At the upstream section:

1. A set of elevations is determined for which a table of areas and
KDs is developed for each segment of the cross section. (KD is an abbreviation for conveyance and is equal to 1.486 AR 2/3, which
n
is extracted from Manning's equation for velocity of flow in an
open channel or uniform flow.)

2. The areas and KDs are computed by segment for the elevations
chosen in Step 1.

3. For each of the elevations chosen in Step 1, critical discharge and
velocity head is computed and saved.

4. The flow rate for the profile flow being considered is calculated,
and the elevation where critical flow occurs is found by
interpolation from the table developed in Step 3.

5. Energy is balanced when the trial elevation plus velocity head at
the upstream section is within 0.1 of a foot of the energy grade
line elevation at the downstream section plus losses.

6. If the upstream energy grade line (using critical elevation) is
greater than the downstream energy grade line plus friction loss, super critical flow is assumed and critical elevation is taken as the answer for the profile. If the reverse is true, a higher elevation is chosen and the energy balance is checked, and this continues until an elevation is found for which energy will balance within the 0.1
foot limit.

The analysis of a roadway restriction can be broken into three steps: (1) Find the water surface elevation at the downstream face of the opening through the road embankment; (2) Find the head less due to the restriction; (3) Find the water



29









surface elevation at the approach section. Steps I and 3 are the same for culvert and bridge type openings through the road embankment, and these steps are described in this section. Step 2 is different for culverts and bridges.

The value for tailwater is found by balancing energy between the exit valley section and a new section manufactured by the program at the downstream face of the bridge.

After the headwater elevation is determined energy is balanced from the upstream) face of the bridge to the approach section. In order to do this a velocity head milst be calculated and added to the headwater elevation to get an energy gra& Il'l)(, elevation at the upstream face of the bridge. Once this velocity head is found th water surface profile can be determined at the approach section.

The procedure that WSP2 uses to analyze flow through bridges was developed by the Bureau of Public Roads, an agency within the Department of Transportation, and is well documented in their bulletin entitled "Hydraulics of Bridge Waterways. "

WSP2 can analyze the losses through culvert openings in a road restriction. The computer solves the problems as follows: (1) it assumes a headwater elevation, (2) finds the flow capacity through each opening at that headwater elevation; (3) l'inds the flow capacity over the road at that headwater elevation; and, (4) sum the capacity through each opening and over the road. If a check indicated a higher profile is necessary, it is incremented upward and the cycle is started over at Step 2.

It should be noted that the water surface profile determination has inherent limitations. These limitations are due to a general program being applied to a specific situation. This situation puts the burden of obtaining accurate data for input to the program.

The results of the program are printed by the computer in the form of various tables and graphs for each cross section and road section analyzed.

Stream Runoff Analysis

Flow rates of peak discharges at points of interest for existing and future land use conditions of 10, 25 and 100 year frequency storms are generated by a stream runoff analysis (SRA) program. A computer program for this purpose should establish runoff coefficients and time of concentration of watershed runoff for the purpose of updating, altering or revising a water management program, including a generation of hydrographs for flood routing analysis of receiving waters and control structures. A computer program, "Drainage Runoff Analysis," written by John Pai of Consoer, Townsend & Assoc. of 360E Grand Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, was selected to fulfill the stated purposes. However, this computer program was inadequate for the demands of the water management program so major modifications were made. Basically, the program uses the Rational Method for computing peak flow rates. Equation for the Rational Method is:







30








Q =CiA

Where,

Q = Peak rate of runoff, cfs at point under design
C = Weighted runoff coefficient, expressing the ratio
of runoff to rainfall
i = Average intensity of rainfall, in inches per hour
(for the selected frequency storm and duration equal to the time of concentration)
NOTE: I cfs of runoff per acre equals 1 .008 in. per
hour of rainfall. Therefore, no correction required.
A = Drainage area, in acres.

This program was given to the Alachua County Data Processing Center for operation and will be kept at the computer center for use as required by NCFRPC.

The operation of the computer program requires certain input data. Runoff coefficients, which were established in previous sections of the report, relate the percentage of rainfall which will runoff to a stream and are dependent upon land use and soil type classification. This information, with equations developed from the rainfaU- intensity vs. duration curves and areas, provides the data needed to calculate peak flows.

Using subareas and runoff coefficients pertaiinig to soil groups and types of development for each watershed considered, a weighted runoff coefficient for the area is calculated. The Kirpich formula is applied to establish time of concentration which yields the rainfall intensity for selected return periods through a development equation. KD/Area values, obtained from the WSP2 results, are input to facilitate calculation of channel velocities and allow lag time between control sections to be determined. Hence, the discharge at a selected location is computed as the suim of individual hydrographs for the maximum time of concentration to that point. The resulting hydrograph, peak discharge and time of concentration are printed out by the computer.

The peak discharges obtained are used to enter the appropriate elevation vs. discharge plots from the WSP2 program to determine flood elevations. These data are also useful for designing adequate structures for the flood channel and determining increases in volume as well as rate of runoff from a proposed development. Finally, the generated hydrographs are used for input to the flood routing program for receiving lakes and prairies.

Flood Routing

Some of the stream basins studied discharge through or into impoundment areas. Therefore, flood routing is necessary to determine the flood elevations and maximum discharges of the outflow structure based on the inflow hydrographs and storage in the impoundment areas. Altering or revising the water management program is easily accomplished if the outlet structure and/or impoundment areas are altered. A flood routing program (FR) written by T. J. Campbell (URS/Forrest and Cotton, Inc.) is used to serve this purpose.

31









The flood routing program requires expected discharges and storage capacities for various elevations. These data coupled with the inflow hydrograph from the stream runoff analysis program are necessary for operation of the program. The program uses tile continuity equation as adapted for reservoir routing method and is based on conservation of mass. For a given time interval, the volume of inflow minus the volume of outflow equals the change in volume of storage. The equation is written as follows:

t ( I 0) = S

where, t = a time interval

I = average rate of inflow during the time interval

0 = average rate of outflow during the time interval
S = change in volume of storage during the time interval

The flood routing program, used in conjunction with the WSP2 and Stream Runoff Analysis programs, establish flood elevations, outflow hydrographs and aid in the analysis of flood detention characteristics. The three programs comprise the stream basin analysis for the water management program.

Retention Basin Analysis

Many smaller basins in the planning area receive runoff without the conveyance of stream channels for inflow or outflow. These basins require special analysis.

There are well over 1,200 depressions in the planning area receiving runoff from their respective watersheds. Each watershed has specific soil types and land uses (both existing and proposed). The combination of soil type and type of development determines the runoff coefficient for each appropriate subarea of a watershed. This factor is incorporated into the study of retention basins. The volume of flow received and stored by a retention basin determines the flood elevation within the basin. A coupling of rainfall and runoff for the watershed indicates the probable flood elevation for existing and future land use conditions. A review of available programs indicated that a suitable analytical technique for the basins of this area was not available. In order to provide an analysis method which could be updated, altered or revised, a retention basin runoff analysis computer program was written by the engineers.

The design criteria for flood planning depression basins is based on tile 100 year 24 hour rainfall. Additional storm frequencies, 10 and 25 year, were analyzed for durations to ten days as authorized by NCFRPC. The rainfall for durations greater than 24 hours was obtained from the U. S. Department of Commerce Weather Bureau Technical Paper No. 49 "Two to Teti Day Precipitation for Return Periods of 2 100 Years Contiguous U.S. Tile first day represents the rainfall of a 914 hour period for the given frequency and the remaining days are distributed rainfall totaling the 10 day precipitation records. The runoff coefficients are the same as used for the stream runoff analysis.





32








The program computes an average runoff coefficient from the outlined state of condition of the watershed. The volume of runoff is determined and weighed against factors of storage, discharge and infiltration. The maximum anticipated flood elevation and area is thus determined for 10, 1-5 and 100 year storm return
frequencies under any watershed characteristics outlined.

G. COMPUTER PRINTOUT SHEETS

A set of computer program cards, input data cards, and a copy of all computer
printout sheets were presented to NCFRPC.
















































33








SECTION 6

DEPRESSION BASINS EVALUATION AND PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING



A. GENERAL

The project area has many small areas formed by natural depressions. These depressions have no positive outlet for excessive runoff other than infiltration into the ground, sink holes with infiltration, or solution cav(,rns with direct connection to the deep water aquifer. Flood planning of the depression basin is essential as development takes place within the basin to prevent flood damage to new
construction.

B. EVALUATION PROCEDURES

The topogr ipldc maps furnished by NCFRPC were the '- ase maps used to delineate the drainage divides for all stream and depression drain t.;e basins. Each depression basin was given a number beginning with the nunr)er I and continuing in consecutive order for each section of land. Example: for Section 17, Township 10 South, Range 19 East, each depression is numbered beginning with number I then 2,
3, etc. and for any other section, the numbering began ag&n with number 1.

Flood plain criteria were presented in previous sections of the report. These criteria required flood plain elevations for the 100 year frequency storm based on existing land use conditions and proposed future land use conditions. The Retention Basin Analysis computer program generates the flood plain elevations based on the input data. In addition to the flood plain elevation required, the computer program is capable of generating the flood elevations produced by the 10 and 25 year frequency storms. The NCFRPC authorized the engineers to include this capability (10 and 25 year flood elevations) in the computer work and the information is
shown on the computer printout sheets.

Accuracy of the flood plain elevations is primarily based on the input data. One of the most important items is the configuration of the basin bottom. Discrepancies on the topographic maps have been found in many basins especially if the basins are
location in wooded areas. Caution should be used when examining flood pla
designation in these areas. Field surveys may be required to produce the actual
physical configuration of the basin.

Typical information placed on the NCFRPC mylar maps for depression basin flood plain elevations is shown on Plate 9. Explanation of symbols and elevation designations are shown on the legend of each map. The following are explanations of
information as shown on the plate above.



























































NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

TYPICAL DEPRESSION BASIN
FLOOD PLAIN DESIGNATION

SVERDRUP & PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS GAINESVILLE FLA.
DATE: PROJECT NO.
()WATERT TA9
























__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ SEPT, 1974 4194PL T 9
35








G Basin Number

2 9 Section Number
(Township and Range as shown on map)
F 168.5 Flood Plain Elevation Based on Future Land Use Conditions

F166.0 Flood Plain Elevation Based on Existing
Land Use Conditions

C. DEPRESSION BASINS OMITTED

Depression basins located in the perimeter areas of the mapping limits, including large basins such as Paynes Prairie and the area within the boundary of the State Department of Natural Resources and Lake Newnan, were not numbered for evaluation if a majority of the basin divide could not be determined from U. S.
Geological Survey Quadrangle map. Examination of the numbered basin shows that some basins are located in borrow pits and roadside ditches and other basins have been altered by development. These basins have been omitted from evaluation. The
basins omitted are listed on Table 3.

D. SOLUTION CAVERNS

Field assessment of the depression basins disclosed the presence of solution caverns in the bottom of some basins. Solution caverns provide a direct discharge into the deep water (Floridan) aquifer and are one of the sources of recharge to the aquifer.
Permeability rates assigned to these basins range from 12.6-30 ft/day for evaluation
purposes though the rate may be higher.

One of the largest solution caverns found is located in Basin No. 9, Section 6, T9S, R I 9E on maps F2H and G21-1. The flood plain elevations for Basin No. 9 is based on a permeability rate of 30 ft/day. Field observations of this solution cavern shows that the flood in the basin probably will not reach as high as computed data suggests due to the extremely large discharge capacity of the cavern, but the area leading to the cavern is located in wooded wetland hammock and should be included in the flood plain. Therefore, flood planning the basins with solution caverns should be based on the physical characteristics of the areas adjacent to the cavern in
conjunction with the result of the computer evaluation presented.

The basins classified with solution caverns are listed on Table 4.

E. COMBINED BASINS

An evaluation of the depression basins shows that the volume of runoff from some basins exceeds the storage capacity of the depression, and overflow into an adjacent basin will occur. Other basins may discharge all runoff through culverts or other drainage structures into adjacent basins. In order to determine the effect of the additional runoff to the receiving basin, all basins involved in each receiving basin were combined and the input data revised and re-evaluated by the Retention Basin Analysis computer program. All basins that were combined and evaluated as a unit were re-numbered for computer generation. The combined basins are as listed in
Table 5 and the basin numbering system should be self-explanator-y.

36








TABLE 3
BASINS OMITTED

Basin Map
Number Section Township Range Number Remarks

6-10 11 TIOS RI9E MM9 Roadside Ditch

7-11 14 TIOS R19E NNIO Basin Altered
13,14
15,16 14 TIOS R19E 0010 Roadside Ditch
1,2 27 T9S R19E DD7 Roadside Ditch
2 34 T9S RI9E FF7 Roadside Ditch
1,4 22 TO10S RI9E QQ8 Roadside Ditch
9 22 TIOS R19E QQ7 Roadside Ditch
16 22 TIOS RI9E RR7 Roadside Ditch
19,20 22 T10S R19E RR8 Borrow Pit
33,34,36 33 TIOS R I9E HH6 Basin Altered
40,41,43
2 D.L. Clinch Grant 2 QQI 1 Contours Incorrect
1 4 TIOS R19E 116 Basin Altered
3 4 TIOS RI9E II6 Contours Incorrect
13 4 TIOS R19E JJ5 Borrow Pit
19 4 TIOS R19E KK5 Roadside Ditch
16-20 21 TIOS R19E K4H Roadside Ditches
22-23 21 TIOS R19E SS6 Roadside Ditches
25 21 T10S RI9E SS6 Basin Altered
29 21 TIOS RI9E SS6 Borrow Pit
32 21 TIOS R19E SS6 Roadside Ditch
19 7 TIOS R19E H3H Borrow Pit
18 Napier Grant 1 QQ12 Basin Altered
8 9 TIOS R19E H4H Roadside Ditch
3 3 TIOS R20E KK19 Borrow Pit
1 10 TIOS R20E LLI9 Borrow Pit
2 15 TIOS R20E NN18 Borrow Pit
6 15 T9S RI 9E AS5H Devils Millhopper
1 & 2 27 T9S RI 9E DD6 Roadside Ditch
2 34 T9S RI 9E FF7 Roadside Ditch



37







TABLE 3
BASINS OMITTED
(Continued)

Basin Map
Number Section Township Range Number Remarks


11 22 T9S R19E QQ7 Borrow Pit

2 11 TI OS R20E LL19 Borrow Pit
1 26 TIOS R20E K 11H Roadside Ditch
1 24 T9S R20E B 12H Stream Basin

4 12 TIOS R20E H12H Roadside Ditch
2 19 TIOS R21E J12H Stream Basin
10 12 TIOS R19E NNI 1 Roadside Ditch
5 12 TIOS R19E NN 10- Roadside Ditch
MM10

26 11 TIOS R19E NNIO Roadside Ditch

6 11 TIOS R20E LL20 Roadside Ditch
2 7 TIOS R20E MM12 Roadside Ditch
14 Gary Grant 3 QQ10 Basin Altered

4 13 TIOS RI9E Basin Altered


























38








TABLE 4
SOLUTION CAVERN BASINS

Basin
Number Section Township Range Map Number

14 22 TIOS R20E Jl0H
6 Napier Grant 1 PP11
10 12 TIOS RI8E HIH
10 1 TIOS RI8E GIH &
G2H
6 36 T9S R18E ElH & F1H
30 33 T9S R19E HH6
22 22 TIOS R19E RR7 & RR8
5 21 TIOS R19E J4H
3 4 TIOS R19E 116
7 20 TIOS R19E K4H
5 18 TIOS R19E 12H
9 6 TIOS RI9E F2H & G2H
13 24 TIOS R18E KIH

6 7 TIOS RI9E G2H

3 13 T9S R18E AlH

























39







TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS

Basin

Number Section Township Range Remarks

807 24 T9S R18E No. 8 Discharge to No. 7

1302 25 T9S RI8E No. 13, Sec. 35, T9S, RI8E,
Discharge to No. 2

1110 25 T9S R18E No. 11 Discharge to No. 10

309 36 T9S R18E No. 3, Sec. 1, TIOS, RI8E,
Discharge to No. 9

208 36 T9S R18E No. 2, Sec. 1, T1OS, RI8E,
Discharge to No. 8
166 30 T9S R19E No. 1 & 6, Sec. 25, T9S, RI8E,
Discharge to No. 6

304 36 T9S R18E No. 3 Discharge to No. 4

1415 12 TIS R18E No. 14 Discharge to No. 15

356 12 TIOS R18E Nos. 3 & 5 Discharge to No. 6

9415 13 TIS R18F No. 9 Discharge to No. 14,
Discharge to No. 15

908 15 T9S R19E No. 9, Sec. 16, T9S, R I9E,
Discharge to No. 8

809 15 T9S R19E No. 8, Sec. 16, T9S, R 19E,
Discharge to No. 9

708 17 T9S R19E No. 7 Discharge to No. 8

1332 18 T9S R19E No. 3, Sec. 24, T9S, R18E &
Nos. 1 & 3, Sec. 18, T9S, RI9E, Discharge to No. 2

3702 20 T9S R19E No. 11, Sec. 16, T9S, RI9E;
Nos. 2,3,4,5, & 6, Sec. 17,
T9S, RI9E & No. 6, Sec. 20,
T9S, R19E, Discharge to No. 2 7654 20 T9S R19E Nos. 4,5,6 & 7, Sec. 21, T9S,
R1 9E, Discharge to No. 4







40









TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks

8923 21 T9S R19E Nos. 1,2,8 & 9 Discharge to No. 3
619 21 T9S R19E No. 6, Sec. 28, T9S, R I9E,
Discharge to No. 19

1012 21 T9S R19E No. 10 Discharge to No. 12

2324 21 T9S R19E No. 23 Discharge to No. 24

304 22 T9S R19E No. 3 Discharge to No. 4

503 23 T9S R19E No. 5 Discharge to No. 3

503 27 T9S R19E No. 5, Sec. 22, T9S, RI9E,
Discharge to No. 3

510 27 T9S R19E No. 5, Discharge to No. 10

3423 28 T9S R19E Nos. 13 & 14, Sec. 21, T9S,
R I9E, Discharge to No. 2,
Sec. 28, T9S, RI9E, and No. 8
Sec. 28, T9S, RI9E, Discharge
to No. 13

3015 29 T9S R19E No. 3 Discharge to No. 15

1105 29 T9S R19E Nos. 10 & 11 Discharge to No. 5

2334 29 T9S R19E No. 23 Discharge to No. 34

3624 29 T9S R19E No. 36 Discharge to No. 24

3837 29 T9S R19E No. 38 Discharge to No. 37

2310 30 T9S RI9E Nos. 2,3,9,11 & 12 Discharge
to No. 10

7631 31 T9S R19E Nos. 2,3,4,6 & 7 Discharge to
No. 1, Sec. 31

1235 32 T9S R19E Nos. 32, 33 & 35, Sec. 29, T9S,
RI9E, & No. 13, Sec. 30, T9S,
RI 9E and No. 4, Sec. 32, T9S,
R I 9E Discharge to No. 5






41








TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks

807 32 T9S R19E No. 8 Discharge to No. 7

415 32 T9S R19E No. 4, Sec. 5, TIOS, RI9E,
Discharge to No. 15

1213 33 T9S R19E No. 21, Sec. 28, T9S, RI9E,
Discharge to No. 1, Sec. 33,
T9S, RI9E which discharges to
No. 2 which discharges to No. 3

507 33 T9S RI9E No. 5 Discharge to No. 7

1921 33 T9S R19E No. 19 Discharge to No. 21

223 33 T9S RI9E No. 22 Discharge to No. 23

3230 33 T9S R19E No. 32 Discharge to No. 30

506 35 T9S RI9E No. 5 Discharge to No. 6

809 35 T9S R19E No. 8 Discharge to No. 9

403 3 TIOS R19F No. 4 Discharge to No. 3

110 4 TIOS RI9E No. 10 Discharge to No. 11

6718 4 TIOS R19E No. 6 Discharge to No. 7 which
discharges to No 8 and No. 1,
Sec. 5, TI OS, RI 9E Discharge
to No. 8

107 5 TIOS R19E No. 10 Discharge to No. 7

1109 5 TIOS R19E Nos. 9, 10& 11,Sec. 31,
T9S, R19E, Discharge to No. 9

504 6 TIOS R19E No. 5 Discharge to No. 4

407 7 TIOS R19E No. 4 Discharge to No. 7

1602 7 TIOS R19E No. 16 Discharge to No. 3

1315 7 TIOS R19E No. 13 Discharge to No. 15






42









TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks
8123 7 TIOS R19E Nos. 8 &12,Sec.6, T IOS,
R1I9E, Discharge to No. I and
is combined with Nos. 2,3 & 13
and Nos. 4 & 7, Sec. 8, T IOS,
R19E

910 8 TI OS R19E No. 9Discharge to No. 10

113 8 TIOS R19E No. 11, Sec. 5, T1IOS, R1I9E,
Discharge to No. 3

4611 8 TIOS R19E No. 14 & 6 Discharge to No. 11

405 9 TIOS R19E No. 4 Discharge to No. 5

817 11 TIOS R19E Nos. 18 & 19 Discharge to No. 17

2421 11 TIOS R19E No. 24 Discharge to No. 21

532 11 TI OS R19E Nos. 25, 23 &20 Discharge
No. 22

3412 11 TIOS R19E Nos. 13 & 14 Discharge to No. 12

701 12 TIOS R19E No. 7 Discharge to No. 1

3908 12 TIOS R19E No. 3, Sec. 13, T IOS, R1I9E,
Discharge to No. 9, Sec. 1 2,
T IOS, R1I9E, which Discharges to No. 8

8121 13 TIOS R19E No. 8 Clinch Grant 1 Disch. to
No. I Clinch Grant I Disch. to
No. 2 Discharges to No. 1

2625 14 TI OS R19E No. 26 Discharge to No. 25

1012 14 TIOS R19E No. I Discharge to No. 12

203 15 TIOS R19E No. 3 Discharge to No. 2.

1215 15 TIOS R19E No. 12 Discharge to No. 15

69 1 5 TI OS R 19E No. 6 Discharge to No. 9

405 16 TIOS R 19E No. 4 Discharge to No. 5





43 1








TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks
910 16 TI OS RI19E No. 9 Discharge to No. 10

1351 17 TIOS R19E Nos. 13 & 15 Discharge to No. 1

201 18 TICOS R19E No. 2 Discharge to No. 1
1411 18 TIOS R19E No. 14 Discharge to No. 11

1211 19 TIOS R19E No. 12 Discharge to No. 11

203 20 TI OS R19E No. 2 Discharge to No. 3

408 20) TI OS R 19E No. 4 Discharge to

1363 21 TIOS R19E No. 13, Sec. 16, T IOS, R I9E,
& No. 6, Sec. 21, TI OS. R1 9E,
Discharge to No. 3

9121 21 TICS R19E Nos. 9 & 10 Discharge to No. 21

5786 22 TIOS R19D Nos. 35, 38 & 37 Discharge
to No. 36

2323 22 TIOS R19E No. '23 Gary Grant 3 Discharges
to No. 23

8010 22 TIOS R19E No. 8 Discharge to No. 10

2322 22 TIOS R19E No. 29 & 30 Discharge to No. 22

2822 22TI OS R19E No. 28, Sec. 14, T IOS, R19 E,
& Nos. I & 24, Sec. 22, TICOS,
R I9E, Discharge to No. 2

605 26 TICS R19E No. 6 Discharge to No. 5

7015 27 TIOS R19E No. 7 Discharge to No. 15

9014 27 TIOS R19E Nos. 9 & 10 Discharge to No. 14

201 28 TICOS R19E No. 2 Discharge to No. 1

8214 28 TIOS R19E Nos. 8, 12, 18 & 14 Combined

809 29 TiOS R19E No. 8 Discharge to No. 9






44









TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks
1110 29 TIOS R19E No.11 Discharge to No. 10
501 30 TIOS R19E No. 5, Sec. 29, TIOS, R1I9E,
Discharge to No. 1

604 30 TIOS R19E No. 6 Discharge to No. 4

1211 30 TIOS R19E No. 12 Discharge to No. 11

1314 30 TIOS R19E No. 13 Discharge to No. 14

3301 Clark Grant 6 Nos. 20, 21, 36, 37, 38, 32, 39
47, 48 & 50 Gary Grant 3 Disch.
to No. 1 Clark Grant 5

6727 Gary Grant 3 Nos. 1, 6 & 7, Sec. 27. T IOS,
R1I9E, Disch. to No. 2 7 Gary Grant 3

7 824 Gary Grant 3 Nos. 27 & 28, Sec. 2 2, T IOS,
R I9E Discharge to No. 24
Gary Grant 3

8029 Gary Grant 3 No. 8, Sec. 27, T IOS, R1I9E
Discharge to No. 29 Gary Grant 3

201 Gary Grant 4 to Paynes Prairie No. 2 Discharge to No. 1

4678 McIntosh Grant 4 No. 4, 6, & 7 Discharge to No. 8

2327 Napier Grant I No. 23 Discharge to No. 2-7

1102 Napier Grant I No. I Gary Grant 3 & No. 10
Napier Grant I Discharge to
No. 2 Napier Grant 1

3534 Napier Grant 1 No. 35 Discharge to No. 34

1514 Napier Grant 2 No. 1 5 Discharge to No. 14

81 5 Clark Grant 5 No. 8 Discharge to No. 15

1311 Clinch Grant 2 No. 13 Discharge to No. 11

1210 Clinch Grant 2 No. 12 Discharge to No. 10

308 Clinch Grant 3 No. 3 Discharge to No. 8



45








TABLE 5
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)

Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks
911 Clinch Grant 3 No. 9 Discharge to No. 11

1114 Clark Grant 5 No. 11I Discharge to No. 14

2322 Clinch Grant 3 No. 23 Discharge to No. 22

1108 Gary Grant 3 No. I11 Discharge to No. 8

7303 McIntosh Grant 4 No. 24 & 25 Clinch Grant 3 &
Nos. 2, 19 & 23 McIntoshi Grant
4 Discharge to No. 3 McIntosh
Grant 4

2521 Clinch Grant 3 No. 20 Clinch Grant 3 & No. 5
McIntosh Grant 4 Discharge to
No. 2 1 Clinch Grant 3

374 Gary Grant 4 Nos. 3, 5, 6 & 7 Gary Grant 3
Discharge to No. 4

1741 Gary Grant 3 No. 17 Discharge to No. 41

23 31 Napier Grant I Nos. 1 2 & 13 Gary Grant 3
Discharge to No. 3 1 Napier Grant 1

203 1 TIOS R20E No. 2 Discharge to No. 3

1514 14 TIOS R2O0E No. 15 Discharge to No. 14

1939 14 TIOS R2O0E No. 19 & 3 Discharge to No. 9

1615 15 lbOS R20E No. 16 Discharge to No. 15

7645 15 TI OS R2OE No. 4,6 & 7 Discharge to No. 5

4812 15 TIOS R20E No. 14 & 8 Discharge to No. 12

6308 23 TI OS R20E No. 63, Sec. '22, T IOS, R2OE,
Discharge to No. 8

501 24 TIOS R20E No. 5, Sec. 19, T IOS, R2OE,
Discharge to No. 1

1402 26 TIOS R20E No. 1 & 4, Sec. 27, T IOS,
R2OE, Discharge to No. 2





46







TABLES
COMBINED BASINS
(Continued)


Basin
Number Section Township Range Remarks

503 20 TI OS R21E No. 5 Discharge to No. 3

406 24 T9S R19E No. 4, Sec. 19, T9S, R I 9E,
Discharge to No. 6 1512 21 TI OS R19E No. 15 Discharge to No. 12












































47








F. IDENTIFICATION OF EXISTING DEVELOPMENT WITHIN FLOOD PLAIN
LIMITS

Flood plain limits were placed on the NCFRPC mylar maps for each depression basin. Basins that have existing development, houses or structures within the flood
plain were tabulate d and are listed as follows:


BASINS WITH DEVELOPMENT WITHIN FLOOD PLAIN LIMITS

Basin Basin
No. Section Township Range No. Section Township Range

9 12 TIOS R18E 4 3 TIOS R19E
10 36 T19S R19E 23 11 TIOS R19E
3 36 T9S R19E 8 12 TIOS R19E
8 35 T9S R19E 1 21 TIOS R19E
10 35 T9S R19E 6 22 TIOS R19E
6 28 T9S R19E 2 14 TIOS R19E
133 T9S R19E 12 21 TIOS R19E
21 28 T9S R19E 13 3 Clinch Grant
7 21 TIOS R19E 8 5 Clark Grant
15 28 TIOS R19E 25 5 Clark Grant
1 23 TIOS R19E 8 2 Napier Grant
1 2 TIOS R19E 8 4 Gary Grant
1 27 TIOS R19E 2 1 Napier Grant
6 27 TIOS R19E 2 30 T9S R20E
3 2 TIOS R19E 8 11 TIOS R20E
10 14 TIOS R19E 10 11 TIOS R20E
15 8 T10S R19E 4 9 TIOS R20E
3 7 TIOS R19E 14 11 TIOS R20E
11 21 TLOS R19E 2 14 TIOS R20E
9 6 TIOS R19E 8 16 TIOS R20E
7 3 TIOS R19E 1 6 TIOS R2IE


Each basin should be treated on an individual basis and the floor elevation and type of structure determined to verify if flooding occurs and the significant effect to the structure. The permeability rates assigned to the basins should be verified with actual soil conditions in the basin bottoms and changed as necessary for re-evaluation by the computer program. Where it is possible to do so, reduction of flood plain limits and/or alleviating flooding of structures will require improvement
of the basin bottom to retain excessive runoff and/or increase permeability rates.

Alternate methods to determine if flooding is actually expected to occur and to alleviate flooding are: (1) verify all input data and re-evaluate by computer program, if necessary; (2) if flooding occurs, design improvement to basin bottom to improve retention and/or infiltration of excess runoff where possible; and, (3) combination
of (2) above with alteration of land use plan in basin to reduce runoff.


48









SECTION 7

STREAM BASINS EVALUATION AND PRELIMINARY DESIGN



A. GENERAL

The flow rate and hydraulic gradient for the 10 year flood channel, 100 year flood plain, wid 25 year frequency storm for existing and proposed future land use conditions were determined utilizing computer techniques. The hydraulic gradients for th, !1ood channel and plain were drafted on the topographic mylar maps (maps are property of NCFRPQ including the expected 25 year frequency storm flow rates at kev locations such as roadway crossings. Plate 10 shows a typical reach of a
stream basin with the pertinent information.

The main stream and each lateral were stationed with the 0+00 station beginning at the approximate outlet of the stream basin with increasing stations in the upstream direction. A junction with a lateral or another stream shares a common station and
the stations increase accordingly upstream.

Flow rate and elevation data for the flood channel and flood plain are shown on the NCFRPC maps at pertinent locations such as upstream and downstream from roadway crossings and intermediate reaches. Plate 10 shows typical data placed on
the NCFRPC maps for stream basin and an explanation for the data is as follows:

QE 1500
10 Year E 100.6

QF 1750
F 100.8

100 Year E 102.6
F 102.6
Q25 = 200 (located at roadway crossing)

Explanation of the above symbols is:

10 Year = Storm Frequency QE 1500 = 10 yr. flow rate for
existing land use conditions E 100.6 = 10 yr. flood stage (msl) for
the flood channel for existing land use conditions

QF 1750 = 10 yr. flow ratc for future
land use conditions
F 100.8 = 10 yr. flood stage (ms1) for
the flood channel for future land use conditions




49







/OO.5 x/OO.O6
xO ,o
10 2.8 0o205 x
E--A L N-AOx 100.2 NCW 14th AVENUE X /O/.





99E OA


P. 4 41944







F (


9 J9 4- 1--- ---s~~ x98 c.






















95130.2
xx













Nw xeIrth AVENUE

REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL
'TYPICAL STREAM BASIN b--- FLOOD CHANNEL AND FLOOD
10.PLAIN DESIGNATION

D SVERDRUP 8 PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS FGAINESVILLE FLA.

DATE: PROJECT NO. PLAEI
SEPT., 1974 4194
50








100 Year = Storm Frequency E 102.0 = 100 yr. flood stage (msl) for
the flood plain for existing
land use conditions
F 102.6 = 100 yr. flood stage (msl) for
the flood plain for future land
use conditions

Q25 2000 equals the 25 yr. frequency storm flow rate expected
at the road crossing

Examination of the plotted flood channel and flood plain data were made to locate existing buildings and other structures, including major roadways, in the flood areas.
Floor elevations of existing buildings were determined by field survey utilizing point elevations as shown on the maps for bench marks. Buildings were considered to be flooded if the flood elevation is higher than the floor elevation. After flooded buildings and major roadways were located, alternate plans to alleviate flooding were analyzed and cost estimates prepared. Tile stream basins that were evaluated and are presented in this section are: Hogtown Creek, TUmblin Creek, Sweetwater Branch,
Lake Forest Creek, Calf Pond Creek, and Little Hatchet Creek.

Cost comparisons for the various alternates, together with operation and
maintenance costs of structures, are summarized in Table 19.

A schematic diagram and two tables are included in each stream basin evaluation.
The schematic diagram shows the stream basin main and lateral strearns location and the station where peak flows were determined. One table Summarizes the runoff coefficients, time of concentration, and peak flows for each area upstream from a control section. The weighted runoff coefficient and time of concentration were accumulated in the downstream direction and are included in this table. The second table summarizes the hydraulics of existing channels and structures for the peak flow rates of the previous table. This table includes the stations where flood elevations are determined, existing drainage structures at roadway crossings (size & type) and the flood elevation for each peak flow rate analysis. The two tables described above show the data for the existing and proposed future land use
conditions.

B. HOGTOWN CREEK

Hogtown Creek stream basin is the largest and the most complex stream basin in the project area. Plate I I shows the schematic diagram of the stream basin. Table 6 shows the summary data for the stream runoff analysis and Table 7 shows the hydraulics of existing channels and structures including flood elevations. Plate 12 shows the locations of all areas of flooding to existing development and alternate
plans to alleviate flooding.

Flooding of buildings occurs at six (6) areas in the stream basin. The areas are listed
below:






51










coo P/NE FOREST CK
0, e
c1-) CS 20(45 AV)
469 +00

CS 541 (53 AV) C 62 0
485 + 75 420
xSPRINGSTEAp
CS 54 (9
-465 + 75 \ x
CS 531
m 455 + 75
reCS 27
1. 425 + 00 0 ,,
in+
W_ C S 171
(h. in 424 + 25
u5 CS64 C 53 430 + 75 4 6)
430 + 75
CK CS 521 423 + 75 O0" CS 17 (29 RD)
CS 52 (39 AV) l
k 406 + 75







ini
l' + CCS 16
Z+ o 355 + 75


(8m 6 6CO CS (6AV
u 0) ,043 4n5 + 7 5
S x ) CS 14 (16 AV)
0o ( O 327 + 75








O x A CS 13 315 + 75T)
k s.o RATTLESNAKE CK
Qh) C1 CS 25 315 + 75 CS 26 336 + 70
0~1 %px 5 (8 AV)















CO 0FO0
PRv 1E %p
6 xx









~es
S 4H1ZCS 4RI1
260 A 75 CS 7










24NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA 00














c (-7 )SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM OF
oHOGTOWN CREEK


SVERDRUP & PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
0 0 0 CS 8 (34 ST)
f- 216 + 00




ro css





















GAI NESVILLE, FLA,
SEP 19 PROJECT 00
sooAeRoor CK.









PRAREPLATE IIN
CS 4 (HOWZE RD)
93 + 00 NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA

REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL


CS 3 (1-75) SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM OF
60o+ co HOGTOWN CREEK

SVERDRUP 8& PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
GAINESVILLE, FLA.

o + 00 DATE: PROJECT NO. PAE1
HAILE S/N K SEPT., 1974 4194



52






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Area No. Location

1 Clear Lake
I Downstream SR26A to 34th Street
3 8th Avenue
4 Springstead & Pine Forest Creek
5 Possum Creek at 1 6th Avenue
6 Three Lakes Creek at 34th Street

Evaluations of the flooding problem and alternate plans for alleviating flooding at each area are presented below:

Area (1)~ Clear Lake

The flood stages at the Clear Lake area are in part affected by the stages in the Haile Sink area. Haile Sink provides the outlet for the Holgtown Creek basin and has limited discharge capacity to the deep water aquifer through a solution cavern. When the rate of inflow from excess basin runoff exceeds the discharge capacity of the sink, the flood water rises and overflows into Lake Kanapaha and Sugarfoot Prairie. Gage readings from staff gages at Haile Sink and Lake Kanapahia by the U. S. Geological Survey show that Lake Kanapaha is a perched water table type lake. Water levels in Haile Sink rise and fall with the piezometric surface of the deep water aquifer. Haile Sink overflows into Lake Kanapaha at approximately 52.0t feet above mean sea level (msl).

The discharge capacity of the Haile Sink solution cavity was estimated from observation data (U.S. Geological Survey data) produced by the storm of August 19712. The inflow hydrograph was reproduced and the Volume of inflow and volume of storage was estimated for various stages in the sink area. The discharge capacity was then computed from the time required for rise and fall of the stages. Plate 1 3 shows the stage-storage curve for the Haile Sink area. A discharge capacity of approximately 65 + cfs was estimated for Haile Sink for various stages ranging from 52.0 to 58.0 ft. msl.

The U. S. Geological Survey stream gage data for the water stage recorder located at Howze Road shows that the peak discharge from Hogtown Creek is reduced by the storage available in Sugarfoot Prairie. Plate 14 shows the hydraulic gradient and discharge for the storm of August i972. The peak discharge of 1420 cfs and 70.28 ft. msl on SR26A was reduced to 634 cfs at 60.0 ft. msl at Howze Road. The peak discharge was also delayed for approximately 24 hours. The stage-discharge at Howze Road is affected by the backwater effect of the water level in the Haile Sink area.

Flood routing of the storage available in the Sugarfoot Prairie area was necessary to determine the expected flood stage in the Clear Lake area. Water levels caused by the storage of runoff to the Haile Sink area were compared with the flood routed values to determine the effect from the stages in Haile Sink. Runoff coefficients for Hogtown Basin as shown on the summary table of the stream basin runoff analysis are 0.37 for existing land use conditions and 0.47 for future land use conditions. Analysis of the storm of August 1972 shows that the hydrograph produced at


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STAGE (MSL)

LEGEND

__,, TOTAL HAILE SINK
SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA
REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL HALE SINK LAKE
KANAPAHA TO I- 75 STAGE STORAGE CURVE
HAILE SINK AREA
--. __ SUGARFOOT PRAIRIE (UP
STREAM FROM HOWZE RD. SVERDRUP & PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS GAINESVILLE, FLA.

DATE: PROJECT NO. PLATE 13
SEPT, 1974 4194


74











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75








Howze Road has a runoff coefficient value of approximately 0.35. This value compares very closely to the computed existing runoff coefficient of 0.37. Flood routing was started with the Haile Sink water level of 57.0 ft. msl. The normal sink level ranges from 52.0 to 54.0 ft. msl, but the assumption that flood producing rainfall generally comes during a high antecedent moisture condition validates using the higher water level. The total watershed drainage area into Haile Sink including Hogtown Creek and the surrounding areas around Lake Kanapaha is approximately 12,500 acres.

Results of the evaluation for determining stages in the Haile Sink area and the flood routing at Howze Road are as follows:


10 Year (6.72" rainfall) 100 Year (9.60" rainfall)
Stage Flood Routing Stage Flood Routing
Land Use Volume Haile (a Howze Road Volume Haile (, lowze Road
Condition Runoff Sink Runoff Sink
(Ac-ft) (msl) Q(cfs) Stage(msl) (Ac-ft) (msl) Q(cfs) Stage (msl)

Existing 2695 59.5 908 60.0 3700 60.7 1613 61.5
Future 3290 60.5 1314 60.5 4750 62.0 2684 62.8

Extrapolating the hydraulic gradients upstream front ttowze Road to the area downstream of SR26A, the flood stage at the Clear Lake are estimated to be: 10 year, existing 0 61.5 ft. msl and future 61 62.0 ft. msl: and 100 year, existing (a 63.0 ft. msl and future 63.5 msl. The highest known flood stage was approximately 61.2 ft. msl measured by the Alachua County Engineering Department after hurricane Dora of 1964. Approximately forty-eight houses are located within the flood plain limits.

Alternate No. 1 plan is to construct a dike including interior rim canal surrounding the existing development and a pumping station to pump the interior flood waters into Sugarfoot Prairie. The proposed dike will be tied to high ground on til east bank of Beville Height Creek. A separate dike with small pump station is proposed to protect the home located at the end of West University Avenue. Plate 12 shows the location of Area (1) and Alternate No. 1 plan. Construction cost estimate for this Alternate plan is as follows:

Dike
Clearing & Grubbing
34 acres 0 $1,000/acre $ 34,00
Earthwork Including Excavation
& Dike Construction & Dike 0
House on W. University Ave. 2 32,400
Excavation-Rim Canal & Spoil
Placement 65,000 @ $500/Acre 195,000
Seeding & Mulching 34 Acres @
$500/Acre 17,000
Pumping Station including Bldg.,
Piping, Aux. Engine, etc., including
pump sta. @ house on W. Uni. Ave. 487,600
Total Alternate No. 1 $966,000
76









Alternate No. 2 plan is to construct a dike and pumping station downstream from 1-75 and pump the excess runoff into the Haile Sink-Lake Kanapaha area. This alternate requires major channelization from the pump station to the Clear Lake area to provide a very flat hydraulic gradient. The proposed maximum water level at pumip station is 57.0 ft. msl and at Clear Lake, 59.0 ft. msl. The total volume of excess runoff of approximately 4700 acre ft. will be stored in the Haile Sink and Lake Kanapahia area with the water level at approximately 64.5 ft. msl. It may be necessary to move a house located adjacent to the sink if the house is flooded. The pump station will have sufficient capacity to pump the maximum discharge from H-ogtown Creek. or approximately 4000 cfs. Channel right-of-way width varies from 500 feet without spoil removal to 350 feet with spoil removal. Construction cost estimate for Alternate No. 3 is as follows:


Dike, Pump Station & Channelization
without spoil removal $4,000,000

Dike, Pump Station & Channelization
with spoil removal $5,000,000

The extremely high cost in conjunction with great adverse environmental effect to the Kanapahia Prairie and Haile Sink areas makes this alternate plan very undesirable and should not be considered.

Alternate No. 3 plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase the houses that are located within the flood plain limits. The approximate forty-eight
(48) houses that are affected have a total gross assessed value as listed with Alachua County Tax Assessor office of $ 1,843,000.

Alternate No. 4 plan would require raising each house located within the flood plain limits such that the floor elevation is above the expected flood stage. Raising a house of masonry construction with concrete floor slab requires constructing pier supports for the concrete slab and a new wall support on the existing footing. This type of construction is specialized but may be successfully employed on structures of masonry construction. There are approximately forty-eight (48) houses located within the flood plain limits. Construction cost estimates for this plan are based on an average floor area, including garages, of 2400 square feet per house at a cost of five dollars per square foot. An estimate of $576,000 is required for this alternate.

Area (2) Station 150+00 to Station 219+00
(Downstream and Upstream of SR 26A)

The existing channel in this reach of Hogtown Creek is inadequate to carry the peak discharge. The channel bottom gradient rises sharply from an approximate elevation of 59.0+ ft. msl at station 160+00 to 55.0 ft. msl at station 180+00 (2000 ft. +. downstream from SR26A). The inadequate channel capacity causes the peak discharge to overflow the banks into existing developed areas around the houses at the cast part of Anglewood Subdivision, apartments around Village 34 (with possibilities of other complexes in the same area not shown on topographic maps), the area upstream from Newberry Road to N. W. 34th Street, and at the University of Florida animal laboratory on S. W. 34th Street.



77







Alternate No. 1 plan is to construct a dike with pump station to protect the University of Florida Animal Laboratory and channel improvements in Hogtown Creek from station 1 50+00 to the existing grade control structure at station 2 1 9+00 (upstream of 34th Street). Channel improvement requirements are as follows:

Right-of-Way Width

Side W/Spoil W/O Spoil Bottom Average Channel
Slope Removal Removal Width Depth Slope
150+00 to
102+00 (SR26A) 2:1 200 ft 300 ft 120 ft 8 ft 0.0002)

201 +00 (SR26A)
to 219+00 1:1 0 160Oft 90Oft 14 ft 0.0002


Channel protection such as rip-rap or concrete structures will be required at existing drainage culverts from the Royal Park shopping center, under each bridge, at curves of the new channel alignment, and at the downstream end of the existing grade control structure. Construction cost estimates for this alternate plan are as follows:

Channel Construction -- Without Spoil Removal
315,700 Cu. Yd. 0', SI1.50/Cu.Yd. S 473.,550

Channel Protection 36,450
Dike & Pump 0'i University of lorida
Animal Laboratory 84,000

Total Alternate No. 1
Without Spoil Removal S 594,000

Spoil Removal
31 5,700 C.Y. 01 S2.00/Cu.Yd. 631,000

Total Alternate No. 1 Plan With
Spoil Removal SI ,225,000

Alternate No. 2 plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase all existing buildings located with-in the flood plain limits, Approximately fifteen homes and five buildings not including possible apartments not shown on topographic maps are located within the flood limits. Gross assessed value of the buildings identified is approximately $1I,284,000 including the University of Florida Animal Laboratory and the store complex between the creek and Newberry Road.

Alternate No. 3 plan consists of raising ear.h of the houses and buildings that are located within the flood plain limits. There are approximately fifteen houses, one commercial building and the buildings a- the University of Florida, Animal Laboratory located in the flood plain. Construction cost estimate is based on an average house floor area of 2400 square feet per house. Apartments and commercial buildings, including University of Florida Animal Laboratory floor areas, were estimated from the building sizes as shown on the topographic maps. Cost estimates are as follows and do not include other possible apartments not shown on the topographic maps.




78








Raised Houses
Fifteen Houses 0., S5/sq.ft. $180,000

Raised Buildings
Approximately 60,000 sq. ft.
64 S8/sq.ft. 48~0O0

Total Alternate No. 3 Plan $660,000

Investigation should be performed to determine if additional apartment complexes were constructed in the flood plain after topographic maps were prepared. Cost estimates should be revised and evaluated before this alternate is considered.

Area (3) N. W. 8th Avenue

Area (3) includes the reach from station 2 19+00 to N. W. 22nd Street on Hogtown Creek and to station 273+75 on Possum Creek. Existing developments expected to be flooded in this area are: (1) several houses on the east side of N. W. 34th Street and south of N. W. 8th Avenue, (2) houses at the west end of N. W. 10th Avenue and N. WV. 25th Terrace; and, (5) houses at the west end of N. W. 11Ith Avenue and N. W. 9thi Avenue.

Alternate No. I plan is to construct a dike and pump station at each of the three locations to provide flood protection for the buildings. Construction cost estimates for each of the three locations, including the total for dike and pump station construction, are as follows:

Dike & PumIIp Station Oil N. W. 34th Street S 69,000
Dike & Pump Station 0( N. W. 10thi Avenue 50,000
Dike & Pump Station 0'N. W. I11th & 9th Avenue 64,000

Total Alternate No. I Plan $1 83,000

Alternate No). 2 plan is to construct major channels and alter existing structures and/or construct new structures as required to lower the flood stages in the three affected locations. This alternate requires the construction of Alternate No. I plan for Area (2) as an integral part of the total system. The following structures Would be required: replace the existing grade control structure as station 219+00 with a larger structure; add three more grade control structures (one on Possum Creek and two onl Hogtownl Creek); renovate the two existing structures on N. W. 8th Avenue and the structure onl N. WV. 22nd Street onl Hogtown Creek: and construct major canals with average channel depth of about ten feet and bottom width of 1120 feet between station 219+00 and 240+00, and 70 feet bottom width from station 240+00 to N. W. 22nd Street on Hogtown Creek and station 240+00 to station 273+74 onl Possum Creek. Construction cost estimates range from approximilately two million dollars Without spoil removal to four million dollars with spoil removal. Extremely highi construction cost and the great environmental affects onl the hardwood hammock areas around N. W. 8th Avenue makes this alternate very undesirable and should not be considered.




79








Alternate No. 3 plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase the buildings that are located within the flood plain limits. Approximately eight houses are located in the flood plain and the gross assessed value of all the houses total approximately $258,000. Gross property values for each of the three locations are as follows:

Purchase Houses C& N. W. 34th Street S 29,000
Purchase Houses (a) N. W. 10Oth Avenue 49,000
Purchase Houses (a N. W. I I & 9 Avenue 1 80.000

Total Alternate No. 3 Plan $258,000

Alternate No. 4 plan is to raise the houses in each of the three locations such that the floor elevation is above the expected flood stage. The construction cost estimate is based on an average floor area of 2400 square feet per house. as follows:

Raise House 0, N. W. 34th Street
One house 0 $5/sq. ft. $1 2,000

Raise Houses 0 N. W. I10th Avenue
Two houses~a 0 5/'sq. ft. 24, 00 0

Raise Houses I-, N. W. I I th Avenue
Five houses 0- $5/sq. ft. 60,000

Total Alternate No. 4 Plan $96,000

Area (4) Springstead Creek at Pine Forest Creek

Flooding occurs at the west half of the Varsity Mobile Home Park onl Pine Forest Creek and flood water rises into the yards of the houses located on Springstead Creek between N. W. 6th Street and the junction with Pine Forest Creek. The existing structure at N. W. 6th Street is inefficient in that approximately six feet of head is required to discharge the peak flow of 1 71 2 cfs. Pine Forest Creek under existing conditions is a narrow channel and is not adequate to carry the peak flow of 650 cfs.

Alternate No. 1 plan is to replace the existing structure at N. W. 6th Street with two 8 ft. (H) x 10 ft. (W) culverts to reduce the head loss and to enlarge the existing Pine Forest Creek channel from the junction with Springstead Creek to N. W. 39th Avenue. The west side of Varsity Mobile Home Park is located such that mobile homes are located very close to the existing drainage ditch, and any improvement to enlarge the Pine Forest Creek channel in this area would be very difficult. The proposed improvement to Pine Forest Creek is to route the discharge from N. W. 39th Avenue to the west side of the railroad track through a new structure (2 66" RCP) located approximately 200 feet south of N. W. 39th Avenue and to improve the drainage channel on the west side of the railroad track to the junction with Springstead Creek. The proposed new channel alignment and improvement will lower the flood stage to alleviate flooding of the mobile home park. Proposed channel requirements are as follows, including spoil removal:



80

9








Bottom Average Channel
Pine Forest Creek (2:1 Side Slope) Right-of-way Width Depth- Slope

485+20 (Junction w/Springstead) 90 ft. 20 ft. 10 ft. 0.003
to 497+60 (Downstream 39th Ave.)


Construction cost estimates for this alternate plan are as follows:

Proposed New Two 8 ft. (H) x 10 ft. (W)
Box Culverts at N. W. 6th St. &
Springstead Creek $75,000

Channel Improvement Pine Forest Creek
Excavation & Spoil Removal
15,428 C.Y. 6 ? S3.50/Cu.Yd. 54,000

Proposed New Two 66" RCP at
Railroad Crossing 2>0

Total Alternate No. 1 Plan $1 54,000

Alternate No. 2 plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase the buildings located within the flood plain limits. Approximately 85 mobile home trailers are located within the flood plain limits. The floor elevations of the homes in this area are higher than the flood stage. The Varsity Mobile Home Park has an assessed value of S 114,090 as shown oni the records of the Alachua County Tax Assessor's office. No assessed value on the mobile home trailers was listed.

Alternate No. 3 plan is to raise mobile homes located in the flood plain limits so that the flood elevations are above the expected flood stage. This alternate plan is not recommended because the existing Pine Forest Creek channel is inadequate to carry the flow produced by rainfalls of less than 10 year frequency. There are approximately ten houses and eighty mobile homes located within the flood plain limits.


Area (5) Possum Creek at N. W. 16th Avenue

Ridgeview Creek junctions with Possum Creek just upstream of N. W. 1 6th Avenue. The existing structure on Possum Creek under N. W. 1 6th Avenue consists of three 8 ft. (H) x 10 ft. (W) box culverts. The structure has poor hydraulic characteristics in that the tailwater condition o)n the structure for the 100 year storm is only 4-5 feet deep, therebyv causing the i- t of the structure to control the carry capacity of the structure. Flood stages upi1 am from the structure encompass several houses that are constructed in the flo-od iin.

Alternate No. I plan is to It v.. r the flood stage upstream from N. W. 1 6th Avenue to alleviate flooding of the existing buildings. Construction required includes: replacing the existing box culverts with three 8 ft. (H) x 1 2 ft. (W) box culverts with invert elevations at 84.0 ft. msl; channel improvement of Possum Creek from station 280+75 (500 feet downstream of N. W. 16th Avenue) to station 295+75 (1000 feet upstream from N. W. 16th Avenue); constructing grade control structure on Possum


81







Creek at station 295+75; constructing channel improvements on Ridgeview Creek from station 290+75 (junction with Possum Creek) to station 298+75 (700 feet upstream from N. W. 27th Terrace); replacing existing culverts at N. W. 27th Terrace with two 5 ft. (H) x 7 ft. (W) box culverts with invert elevations at 84.0 ft. msl: and, constructing a grade control on Ridgeview Creek at station 298+75.

Pertinent design information for the improvement is as follows:

CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT
Right-of-Way
W/Spoil W/O Spoil Bottom Average Removal Removal Width Depth Slope
Possum Creek (2:1 Slope)
280+75 to 295+75 100ft. 150 ft. 65 ft. 8ft. 0.0001
Ridgeview Creek (2:1 Slope) 80 ft. 100 ft. 20 ft. 8 ft. 0.0001
290+75 to 298+75

STRUCTURES
Grade Control

Possum Creek (a 295+75 50 ft. weir
Ridgeview Creek 0" 298+75 12 ft. weir

Drainage Structure 16th Avenue Three (3) 8 ft.(H) x 12 ft.(W) box culverts
Drainage Structure 27th Terrace Two (2) 5 ft.(H) x 7 ft.(W) box culverts

Construction cost estimate for this alternate plan is as follows:

Channel Improvement, Excavation, W/O Spoil
Removal, 22,000 C.Y. 0) $1.50/Cu.Yd. $ 33,000

Grade Control Structures (2) 115,000

Drainage Structures
3 8 ft.(H) x 12 ft.(W) Box Culverts 153,000
2 5 ft.(H) x 7 ft.(W) Box Culverts 29,000

Total Alternate No. 1 Plan
W/O Spoil Removal $333,000

Total Alternate No. 1 Plan
W/Spoil Removal @a) $2.00/Cu.Yd. $374,000

Alternate No. 2 Plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase the buildings that are located within the flood plain limits. Ten houses are located within the flood plain limits upstream of N. W. 16th Avenue. Gross assessed value of the houses is approximately $298,000.

Alternate No. 3 plan is to raise the houses located within the flood plain limits such that the floor elevation is above the expected flood stage. There are approximately ten houses located within the flood plain limits. Construction cost estimates are



82









based on an average floor area of 2400 square feet per house. The cost estimate is as follows:
Raise houses at Possum Creek
& N. W. 16th Avenue

Ten houses (q $5/sq. ft. $120,000

Area (6) Three Lake Creek ( N. W. 34th Street

One house is located in the flood plain just upstream of Three Lakes Creek at N. W. 34th Street. The 100 year flood stage is at approximately 128.2 feet msl and the floor elevation of the house is about 124.6 ft. msl. Six feet of head loss is required by the existing two 54" RCP to carry the 100 year peak flow of 590 cfs.

Alternate No. I Plan is to install two 54" RCP in addition to the existing drainage structures. The additional structures, combined with the existing pipes, will lower the flood stage upstream to approximately 124.5 ft. msl for a peak flow of 590 cfs. Construction cost estimates are as follows:

Three Lakes Creek P N. W. 34th Street
Two 54" RCP $34,000

Alternate No. 2 Plan provides for the local governing authority to purchase the one house in the flood plain limits. The assessed value of the house is $22,000 as listed in the Alachua County Tax Assessor's office.

Alternate No. 3 plan involves raising the house located within the flood plain such that the floor elevation is above the expected flood stage. Construction cost estimate is based on an average floor area of 2400 square feet per house. Cost estimate is as follows:

Raise House (& N. W. 34th Street
One house (& $5/sq. ft. $12,000

Other Areas of Concern

Possum Creek is expected to overflow N. W. 39th Avenue during the 10 year and greater frequency storm based on future land use conditions. The existing drainage structure is one 6'(H) x 6'(W) box culvert. No existing developments are located within the flood plain limits in this area. Alleviating flooding to the roadway may be accomplished by replacement of or addition to the existing culverts to produce a drainage structure with larger capacity.

The head waters of Possum Creek is the area of the Northwood Oaks and Pine Subdivision. Reference to the report of October 1973, "A Report on A Hood Plain and Water Control Program for the Ileadwaters of Little Hachet, Turkev. Blues and Ilogtown ('reeks, Alternate No. 2 Plan required the construction of grade control structures to reduce sedimentation being carried downstream and erosion to the existing channel. Although no existing buildings are located in the flood plain limits. construction of Alternate No. 2 Plan, Main Channel No. 2 should be considered.

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The topographic maps show the ground elevation at the Northwood Subdivision sewage treatment plan to be approximately the same elevation as the flood plain limits. The sewage treatment site was filled prior to construction of the maintenance building, so the area should be checked for possible flood problems.

Royal Park Creek flows through a depression just north and west of the Royal Park Mall on SR26 (Newberry Road). The depression outlet has been channelized to SR26 where the flow passes through two 5'(14) x 7'(W) box culverts which discharge into Hogtown Creek at the downstream side of SR26A. The NCFRPC topographic maps indicate that enough storage of storm water is provided by the depression to reduce the peak discharge of the Royal Park Creek significantly. The existing culverts under SR26 are adequate to carry the reduced peak discharge. Presently, the flood plain for this area is established by a backwater effect created from flow in Hogtown Creek which develops a higher flood elevation than the regulated flow from Royal Park Creek. This flood situation is not detrimental to any existing structures or roads. However. a loss of the depression's ability to act as a natural detention area (by filling, etc.) will cause a peak discharge from Royal Park Creek to develop flooding at a higher elevation than the flood plain presently developed by Hogtown Creek. A field investigation of the flood detention site indicated that the topography has been altered (by partial filling) relative to the NCFRPC topographic maps. The storage capacity of the detention site must be maintained or the culverts capacity under SR26 will probably have to be increased to prevent topping of the road and flooding of existing structures. Any changes in the topography of the depression warrants further investigation of the stream hydraulics.

A number of depression basins are shown (see Plate 12) to be located within the boundaries of the stream basin divides. In many cases, the excess runoff in these basins are stored in the bottom of the depression with a few discharging into streams when the depression becomes full. Flood plain limits were determined for these depression basins and are shown on the NCFRPC maps. These depression drainage areas were excluded from the stream basins. The runoff which is now retained within the depression basins should be retained to avoid addition of excess runoff to the stream basins.

The only outlet for the Hogtown Creek Basin at this time is Haile Sink. As described in previous parts of the report the capacity of Haile Sink to accept excess runoff is less than 100 cfs. There are two quarries located at the south end of Lake Kanapaha, one on the north side of Archer Road and one on the south side. As an alternate outlet for Haile Sink, the quarries should be investigated to determine the discharge capacity and the influence of such discharge on the water quality of the receiving aquifers. If the discharge capacity of either is found to be significant, and criteria of regulatory agencies are met, the quarries, especially the one on the north side of Archer Road, should be obtained by governing authority and modified to receive overflow from Lake Kanapaha.

The possibility of discharging excess runoff by constructing a channel from Lake Kanapaha to Paynes Prairie was investigated. Gravity flow from Lake Kanapaha to Paynes Prairie by open channel is not feasible unless the water level in the Lake Kanapaha area is allowed to increase higher than 62 feet above MSL. Consequently, flood protection to the Clear Lake area cannot be accomplished utilizing this concept. Gravity flow is not feasible since the water level in Paynes Prairie could rise above the leve in Lake Kanapaha. Discharge is possible by pumping from the Lake into a constructed channel to the prairie. This concept is not considered because of the adverse environmental effect on the prairie by the storm water quality and quantity and extremely high construction cost.



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Comparison of Runoff Coefficients

Runoff coefficients are summarized in Table 6 for each sub-basin and accumulated at selected control stations. The Hogtown Creek basin accumulative runoff coefficients at SR26A are 0.37 for existing land use conditions and 0.47 for future proposed land use conditions. The greatest increase is found for those sub-basins located at the head waters of the various lateral where the areas are predominately undeveloped. Such areas are Glenn Springs Creek (0.27 to 0.38), Three Lakes Creek (0.23 to 0.41), Monterey Creek (0.23 to 0.42) and Possum Creek (0.31 to 0.45) for
existing and future land uses respectively.

In most cases, continued development in accordance with the land use plan will increase the flood stage approximately 0.1 to 0.4 feet. This small range in increase of flood stages rarely warrants the use of retention and/or detention basins upstream.
The flood stage in the Clear Lake area is determined by the stage in the Haile Sink area and is caused by the total volume of runoff from the stream basin, not the peak flows. An increase of approximately 1 200 1 acre-feet of runoff may be expected from the basin to the Haile Sink area as development is increased according to the land use map. The increased volume will result from the increase in the runoff coefficient of the 1 2,500 +. acre basin. The additional volume of runoff ( 1200+.
acre-feet) will increase the flood stage about one-half foot in the Clear Lake area and will flood some 7 additional houses. If one of the alternate plans to alleviate flooding in the Clear Lake area is implemented, then the construction of upstreamn retention basins is not needed. Detention basins are of no value to flood prevention at Clear Lake since this type of facility does not decrease the total volume of water
reaching the Kanapahia Lake area.

If, however, none of the flood prevention plans described above is constructed, the use of upstream retention basins must be considered. Such consideration should be based upon the costs for retaining 1 200 acre-feet of runoff as opposed to the resulting flood damage to the seven additional houses in the Clear Lake area. The damage to buildings in the present flood plain will occur regardless of the
construction of retention basins.

C. TUMBLIN CREEK

Plate 1 5 shows the schematic diagram of the Tumblin Creek stream basin. Table 8 shows the summary data for the stream runoff analysis and Table 9 shows the existing channel hydraulics and structures including flood elevations. The location of
alternate plans to alleviate flooding is shown on Plate 1 2.

Flooding occurs at one location in this stream basin which is at the drainage structure on 1 3th Steet (U.S. 441 ). The existing drainage structure at I13th Street is composed of three 3.75 ft. (HI) x 8 ft. (W) box culverts with invert elevations at 68.3 _+ mean sea level (msl). The existing structure has a very poor hydraullic characteristics in alignment. Upon inspection the north barrel of the structure, was found to be almost half filled with sand. As shown by thie data on the existing channel hydraulics table, the 25 year peak flow will reach the top of the road and the 100 year peak flow will flood the road to a depth of approximately 1-1/2 feet dcep. Flooding will occur at the University Inn Motel and a house just south of the
University Inn.



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CS 10 (5 AV) 160 + 00





143 + 50 (DEPOT RO) CS 9
140 + 00












Cs 8
110 + 00



100 + 00 CS 4 (S MAIN ST)
107 + 50
CS 6
90 + 00













Cs 51CS 3 (S MAIN ST)
85 + 008





81 VEN 'S








CS 5 (13LITO RD)













PA YAES PRA IRIE




NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL



SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM OF
TUMBLIN CREEK


SVERDRUP & PARCEL AND ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS GAINESVILLE, FLA. DATE: PROJECT NO. PLATE 15

SEPT, 1974 4194


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