Water and sewer development plan, Alachua County, Florida

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Water and sewer development plan, Alachua County, Florida
Title from bibliographic data sheet :
Water and sewer development plan for Alachua County, Florida
Cover title:
Water & sewer 1974 development plan
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
Black, Crow, and Eidsness
North Central Florida Regional Planning Council
Publisher:
Black, Crow & Eidsness, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Water quality management -- Florida -- Alachua County   ( lcsh )
Water treatment plants -- Florida -- Alachua County   ( lcsh )
Sewage disposal plants -- Florida -- Alachua County   ( lcsh )
Genre:
local government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
prepared for the North Central Florida Regional Planning Council by Black, Crow & Eidsness, Inc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 027616899
oclc - 37193115
System ID:
AA00024915:00001

Full Text






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77



00*Afft AND SEWER DEVELOPMENT, PLAN
fA v jo
t ALACMA COUNTY, FLORHYA
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NO. .3. ReciPicnt's Accession No.
-74-001
'ride -i-OW-Siftwo 5. Report Date
WATZR AND SV 0%:VEL0PMENT PLAN FOR
January, 1974 ALAMUA-17-0tNTY, FLORIDA 6.

V;) Ukwik', Crow and Eidsness, Inc. 8. Performing Or iinizqtion Rept.
r@j Florid Regional Planning Council NCFRPC-74-001 10. Project /Tas k/Work Unit No.
_ftt 4,Vlarida Regional Planning Council ContractA4*xt No.
'f1w 32601
Gf 9 CPA-FL-04Z9-1036
13. Type of Report & Peridd
trAtirlrlban Development CoveredFinal

a ##y, 3ZZ04 14.

wit xs* L 'v
t*
pro'",nts a Joint effort between the consulting firm of Black, Crow
r r
I A jbg. Ae North Central Florida Regional Planning Council.
1414A aQ&
proo*uts waterr and sewer development plan to year 1990 for AlachuE '$%'0 iMWkgr0=d information, as recent as October 1,, 1973, has bee: the _rvcornmendation s made. The report contains three parts:
-jation; Part II is the water and sewer development plan; 'M :rn
P4krt II contains irdorrnation on the-most economical
**ter facilitie,4 arA sa tary facilitie s to the nine in co r por W'icationp are that by 1990 approximately 90 percent lox ikted'xn the maining 10
Gaiiiesville Urban Area. The re' ted are*s aad the eight r dral incorporated communiin Section 13. 0 of the report.



20 000*0* Xa'0W.QU4UtY" PWAiV1_UtWties,,' Development Plans



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41






PREFACE


At the Apg*, 15.7 1,973, meeting of the North Central Florida Regional Plarmi"
br an engineering study to formulate the Water and Sewer Ouow#Ua for, Maichua County was awarded to the engineering firm of Black,


T6a, oTsonted herein includes the nine incorporated communities and the
'Wwrpemu Artar of Alachua County. Preparatiory of this report has been financed in planning, rant from the Department of Housing and Urban


TWO* has Imen prepared to aW in the systematic and rational deve lopm ent of s in -Alachua Coun ty.' Many factors need to be considered when for I wAw, facilities on a regional basis. One of the more im portant
piroposod land use and its correlation to population Existing and planned facilities have been analyzed to and economical program for development of regional UdRks yftJ". North PentraiFlorlda Regional Planning Council has
d wmwd the preparation of this report. The information contained in
fs'Ai0mmary of atl background information wh ich m ight be 41 A""M 0 0 10 1W.Ai o afion of a water wW sewer development program fdr
A009i k-,Qlft, ,NVJM*Mains ft actual water and sewer development program for
A
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TABLE OF CONTEWS


page oil




LW 4W KAT"


PART I-BACKGROUND INFORMATION
4 7 o v




I #4W0W4WTldk 1-1
00WATION 1-1
Ut" *t"dkity, 1-2
44 -1
ffi#;P, WW",l) OBJECTIVES 1-3
1-3

2-1 2-1 2-1 t4
2-2 4 4f, 04 2-3
ve 2-4

2-6 2-6
2-8 2-9

CAPP ltmLlow 3-1
3-t 3-1




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7 i k y
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TA#LE OF CONTENTS-Continued


Page

f !jlptNTIAL DEVELOPMENT 3-1
"iocitl Dcvelopment Goals 3-2
qRICVLTURAL LAND USE 3 4
15 AKREATIONAL LAt4DAJSE 3.4
1$.I* $tate Parks in Alachua County 3-5
10 dairte vitle Urban Area 3-7
1, 3 Timber and Wildlife Managenfent Areas 3-7

4
4-1
_J4, A 'P60ufatlon Trend's in Florida 4-1
fopuUtion, Trends in Alachua County 4-1
4.2 ttAirioN imow" FActoRs 4-1
,' jFation 4-2
brStributi6n 4-2
450how, sin 4-2
4.1 L Atom armits 4-3
2
wqwaftd Asoas 4-3
4-4
t6an Area 4-4

% 4-4
5-1
5-1








5-3






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TX19tE Of CONTIENTS-ContInijed


Pitt

#AfLY I NCOM E 3
%b#'ikG CONDMONS 5-3
j Nu mber, Type-, wid Tenure 5-3
Persons Per Dwelling Units 5.4
Vwues'and Rents 5-4
Plumbing Facilities 5-5
5$5 Housing Conditions 5-5

1ftMLJ4',,Vff1UTtES AND SERVICES 6-1
10 UNERAL 6-1
J6 4 *kANSOORTATM 6-1
'Wiy system 6-1
R"Kftred VvJWdft 6-2
4, Ommercial Transportation 6-2
4.1 OtiLITY SYSTEMS 6-2
fi 1, f 6-2
Vx oWer
5.2, Tekphone and Telegrvh 6-3
Natural and BoUled Gas 6-3
4 r4ow, j **1J#,'W'AStvI3h*SPO5a1 6-3
SERVICES 6-4
6-4

ACES 7'- 1
7-1
go 7-1

7-2
7-2
7-4
Problems 7-4
7-7
7-8
0 -!Of


#L




1 -;4 y48 E OF CONTENTS-Continued


paw
'VOW


jPTION OF CURRENT DPAINAGE AND K066 PLAIN DESIGNAT16N STUDY FOR
iGAINESVILLE METROPOLITAN AREA 8-1
&I *XSENT STATUS OF DRAINAGE PLANNING
8-1

9 r U"'40ir SANITARY 1FACII-nnEs 9-1


"T Pumic systems 9-1
94.2 Private systems 9-2
WwNirmy OF EXISTING SYSTEMS 9-2
*tkw w wAsTEwATER ftEcLmAnm
9-3
t1A
04 41U 4'
7 -WATE.K ANO SIEWER DEVELOPMENT


TIES PLAN 10-1
10-1
G"Waphical Lwakm 10
"Ing Adequa-e q6 stwply 10-12
PROVIDING
ER SWWLY TO COUWY I T, 10 1*2
E 10-12
valuations

"vate and Publk Supplies 10-113 10-13
WER
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SAWTARYFACIITIE PLA
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,IIMS 4

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---ne toSre oeTanOeMuiia!t 11
i. COMPAISON _---1-




......... .. .. ... .. ... .... ....


11, rl




TABLE OF CONTENTS-Continued PART III-APPENDIXES AppmOxft Page

A-1

B-1

C-1

A 0 D-1

A E-1


















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LIST OF TABLES


Page
Toe

THLY TEMPERATURE AND RAINFALL
19AI 4 960 ALACUUA COUNTY 2-12
AJILACHUA COUNTY-ACkEAGE AND
2-13
ATION PENETRATED BY WATER 2-15

1-4 AGING STATIONS'TYPES OF SURFACE
Cql.,LECTED, AND PERIODS OF RECORDS
2-16
2's AOACHUA COUNTY 2-18

UA cx)uKlry 3-9
USE "tNtMLLE URBAN AREA 3-10
34 ICULTURAL LAND CAPABILITY ESwy 3-11

.9,CREATMN AREAS thl ALACHUA 3-12
PARKS GAINESVILLE 5-14

4-6

40
A:9K Tw VllQJowf'"*"1#70 14 i -7
% 4
Wff*X ALACMA 4-8



4,- 10

4-11
f MIME ftwl ob 4-12



J 6





36 MASI





VST OF TA81-ES-Contihurd


Pag'e

UrANVLATION LEVELS FOR SELECTED Ira& JrHIE PERt00 1975-1 "0 ALACHUA COUNTY 4-13 E-SJN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS FOR THE j")%-A97Q AL.4CHUA COUNTY 5-6
'.m.pr 91Y. M-A'JOR OCCUPATION GROUP FOR ALACAiUA COUNTY 5-7
Irv W,
NO W iNSTRIOUTION BY PERCENT FOR THE 1,969 US.A.pFLORIDA, AND ALACHUA 5-8
S4- iiiS- rRiBUTION BY NUMBER OF
#oklIft'PERM 19504970 ALACHUA 5-9
Wd, UMT5 LACKMG ALL OR SOME, ftbelytFS FOR'T"E YEAR 1970 ALACHUA
5-10
UMNO 0MMTK*6 SELECTEI) ALACHUA COUNTY fft T"IE

4044TH M, 90"MEL AtACHUA COUNTY 6-7
+ #
1 &TLIVES ALACHUA COUNTY 6-9
#*3# # Ct*Tfit ALACHUA
6 10
USE ALACHUA COUNTY 7-9
hA
WNIMUM VALUES,, OWARVED OISSOLVED IN STREAMS AND LAKES 7-10
AND TEMML KATURE OF l 7-12
DRY WtATHER WATER QUALITY FOR 54ftVMATM NXMCH 7-16
'AT 'tiTy
'w'w "-QUA
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LIST OF TABLES-Continued


page

.1ATJER SUPPLY ALACHUA COUNTY, 9-4
RAGE SYSTEMS ALACHUA COUNTY 9-24
Wt Aklt E t-REGI ONAL WATER TREATMENT
Ar "K 10-17
,ALACHUA COUNTY
*0-2 ALTE4W,,*U'ft-REGIONAL WATER TREATMENT
Aftifbft ALACHUA COUNTY 10-18

7WATERFACILITIES PLAN 10-19
TE I-AEGIONA I, WAST EWATE R FACI LIT I ES
*AL*4*ftC00NTY, 11-16
jj? !', AjL AL WASTEWATER FACILITIES
11-17
-A9GtQML WASTEWATER FAM,#'Ra IN ALACHUA COUNTY 11-19
"'I"GIONAL WASTEWATE R IN AILACHUA COVNTY 11-21
'cl # 0,
1 4 EGIONAL WASTEWATER FACILITIES
Tly 11-23
Vl -REGIONAL WASTEWATER ttA COUNTY 11-25
F 1' -27


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LIST OF PLATES




**OOA UcadwMap 06 10'0 AftA-Aiazhua County r Map

toftNIS01 Map Geokvir
at* ap

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i k-Abdwft 0"ty aod Sotmtod Commniffies



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SECTION I

INTRODUCTION
Thy.
W1


tof Hmsft aad Urlmn Development (HUD) requires all to be A;ertified in water and sewer planning in order to for. fuods under the WD Wamw and Sewer Facilities Grant ter tM *gram rpires the amwidc planning
I t$006 Coritral Florida Regionai Planning Counofl, to establish a
at ptamft PrQwm fbir water andsewer facifities throughout
49

Flork egimml ftwinz CourwA has an interim
.,oVwwxWarWUrban Development for waftr and sewer tbe padW January 1. 1973,,,tq laouary 1, 1974, (App",x JqW ps*cts dwvao HW programs is contingent u;xm 54
which are Intended to promote efficient and orderly growth


PreivOon, Avwy (FTA) fbw4y administered their 4r"*4nWW, t1w foONW WWrPo41v4ion Co"itrot Act.. PL 46, 7:4 bY sho Federal Water Pollution
1472 TL 92--S*' '*Wa provides f cderal assistance for the 0offution aWt piro*ts, such as wastewater treatment


W"Mwft pra44as fw the deV4D10PMCA4 Of

A000* ,,,nqwing tho A mcqPizo

A* tjoctsloch p4as are now required under
0sap two yowafftr ft designation of an areawide

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4 A
j
t rhT ;h m FEPA r"uIres tich planning agency to be certified in 'water and it*wl- ONO authorized N
prior to being eligible for EPA grants. Because
wdtvivaihidWe for planning grants under Section 208 of PL 92-5(Kk Agency prwently requires oWy that an areawide planning and sewer planning by the Department of Housing and Moot-, ired in order to be eligible to receive federal grant
'MOW Vookoimab*tement facilities as provided for in applicable federal


0, Nk Ph6 (k #4 *Ws(y both EPA and HUD plannirg requirements the North
ItImnin Cot= if made initial application for a 3 c) W ant under othmnsive Water Quatity Maaapmmt Study to the EPA in Coovopit lewv ed earlier U* year that no funds will be available, for Awqm
some in the future. Therefore because of the necessity for idift n *Aftr and sewer planning, the Council has utilized local funds to
"Attt"
41"PT"

-AW aWed in the complotion of this study by providing wherew pw.4fblee and conhibuting to the f, ,t is vWc4mted *4t this product will aid in
for both HUD and EPA grant monies for water pollution


itself primarily to water and sewer planning; however, Fh on water quality, hydrology, etc., will be summarized in
At pwpowd WaW QuAhy Management Plan that will hft
1001*0 Oroftctb3o AFMY at a later daw.


Ii3f t:

Of Sod& RegiorW Plartning Council was established in pookdWo of *o Abm*Aa Cbenty Commission and the is grantedby
4F"Q" Ths AWOoag Kmnft CQumid consk"

nhh
O, OM Citi and
OR4iUtOn ft
ft- NO W A-",o the
as the deain*#ouse for Atadma County. DoW, o( +kmm*t and U, d*n Development for
and for WaW and, Sewer 0( *091W OUWA* "keow* for grant Ph 0




.. ...... ....







0 OBJECTIVES

6* of this report is to present an areawide plan for the development 14cilitles in Alachua County, Florida. All existing facilities are bockground data, trends, and evaluations, the needs of the county A ]the year 1990, and a plan for the efficient and orderly development
4tks is outlined.
I low
information on water quality will be incorporated in this report to the development of a water and sewer plan and necessary a water quality management plan that eventually will be required,
*6tectfon Agency. 11iis supplementary water qtjafity data will 4 W- able 'material and references for additional data; no new data


'Abod and storm drainage certification for a planning agency this cAtegory of federal grants. This report will present a summary the comprehensive drainage planning efforts currently being ioc;d coosulunt, Sverdrup and ftecei and Associates, tnc.,for kefohal- Ptannitig, Coumil, Their report is scheduled for


1W


aVecft of arta economy and resources which are related N- and sewer facilities within the boundaries of Alachua
"A scUWo4i of Me ficil ities hinthe county, discussion A bw*1661 lstkt, e movtvjts,, public, utilities and servic'es land
reilbileces in oriler' to provide adequate background


I A J**We In this rePoft toformulate new data on drainage or
informfion oA the Comprehensive Drainage and Flood dat esvit ofitah' area
aft4may be o0trined at this firne, jj 74 Iit i the C044y. 'RoWever, all
'rehoidln order, to
QQ**naj6Me4't *ii% 6e Alachua
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at *"Mioctot *r I SECTION 2

ARJEA DESCRIPTION
4 moo.

23

tjmuevog i 140 ii4jr*4o ,Ay it lmatW in the n(n-th central section of the- Florida peninsu [is Vw Santa Fe River on the north separates Alachua County from apd, LW= counties. Putnam County I ios. along most of the eastern boo* $0WC40r&Y iua touching at the northeast corner. Marion County abuts
L South boundary. U" County borders Alachua Cou;nty to the
ilfii ILt, to the West. All of Alachua County's territory falls within
parWith of latitude north and the 82'00' an&82'40' meridians of 4,1011' 0, lit 42d
@
ttt, -A 000MY J0, om of the oldest in FlorWk having been established in 1824.
Vounty seat since 1854, and is presently a fast growing city with 1i *04 pea* (1972 July update). These figures represent 60 percent of
kkkh was ps0mted W, be 115*924 Jin # e 1970 4 ghc o"Ay Amut 55 miles from the Gulf of Mexico OW AttoWicloctArL TU county tws a UW area of 568,320 figums dq-not U*Wde thabo4ies of %%wr representing

ir
ttIPW sWies to all of Alachm County, including that part of the vWtin, Putnam CMy as **Vt as the cky of Gainesville arid m* oft the Aarmi" area,

t

#d
tir4m aar"''Wnperature of 52 LinCheS. Precipitation
pv* Wty in the summer months. Alternating wet and
*a* oUft"'rai"'o an t avtmr of About 00 046*4 fWsW,-*0ft the as
VW*hWW kW,"",tt4S- Vlow ralo of, ft 40"ORWood bya, *0p ia, ton

**,*o*, vwj Wle ftm year to
*06*4 t*,V4VW'W1*J4 icycionk Aorms freque R tl Y











"rth. frost ditpionds uport these storms. Killing feasts can be It 24r
6W all Mday period each year, from'December 4 to February 16W in the area. fogs occur during 30 to 40 days each year, in winter. Thearea has ne- ve r received serious damage from
A
VW a 1xffTicane within, any. one year are considered to be in the 3


-data itan be tbtaftwd from the U. S. Weathitr Bureau withlti the courtty. Two of these stations are in the W*t three are l6caed in Hh Springs, Melrose, and Island 01 at Gakwsvitk 3 WSW keeps records of prec'ipitation
7 tion and has both recording 'and nonrecording gages. This
Of S61 t6n peratures at various d6pths. Records cover a period Pteciphatfon and temperaturetecords for the area are -also I" tlwm 60 years up to and incJuding 1956, fi-tvm the old it Galfies"'fle, Tabite 2-1 Ovows the average monthly

Pro




4-4o6ated in Ote Wpographic diviAm of Florida known as the '0 Mo t*d nuior land reome amas each typified by
Tbe Wrth COOM F%" Rkl& area is described ashAving f1i tqftdist the Adtntk Coast Ftatwoods area is terrain havirig mtmerws swamps and large shallow lakes. geneWty range between 50 and 210 feet above sea level.

itobtvty owes It Atmter to two major fktors. The f irst iAW ftcesOond-of Ow su during each of the m4ot ytws up) jo. agm TOff am oir wave-cut beaehaseroded e6W4dVz*be "Maivtod ItiLtionary before uttimately 0 640mve! V W! !, INOPH'Aw at gil%- 4 rises* to lac at l4nd AWf Ices 1k4*1bft6 i4ft~ M FbrWa. At $ftft tw6 of kl M f4d 00",ffieo, wW the Wkom ico, at about
in Alachm Cmmty.
arW surfwe waters of the relatively by gftw,
OuOh of 4ho nea. The term karst topoWaphy is Mutt$ iloexte
such











wWnorthoastern portiom of Alachua County. isa neady tuvel okwoos from 150 to 200 feet. Relatively impermeable clayey!, #ffact, soils have caused stream dMinage to develop radially Pu;m*gaaearlier stage of development this plateau most likely divide between the Atlantic Ocean and the exico.
i1i reaches the Gulf by way of the Santa Fe River to the to Wf. Many swampy areas occur throughout the plateau.
these swampy areas primarily occur in depressions formed 4,ompaction of the Pleistocene surface material or by the solution of
-*WpkVvots roc4cs of the Hawthorn formation and Ocala limestone. These r4ftation capabilities to underlying impermeable clays beneath the


of AtachuaCounty is a plains region having elevations '50 to 100 feet a64 notably characterized by the lack of a n iagvely flat limestone plain area is an extermion of the of Cot pty and has been formed, primarily from the
ofttot Ocata arch and auxtified by subsequent Pleistocene w4ich probably overlaid this area in the geolog" past has wash. or, has been carried away in solution, leaving the 90a limestom often within a few feet of the surfac6, covered 0 A'4 or c ayey S Ying aa
0okrqP#Urkics ot the, limegoac sortace and often form sand PW,,of The solvent action of groundwaur
*;a aoy *Ow put 9f the county. Sir*.holes and other AID

VW southeaftrn portions of Alachua County are kkes, prakfes, and eroshmg remnants of the plateau. Paynes a, PrWo tam ox*%Pks of area. Thie kvel bottom of

Of U)m difforgnt types of ta"to AWQIOW Wi* *a *4 grouwww ["ej 3PW0W"W*W "",bo the WMPWAry base lev4 of VWAI Y V"Y tm s9m on Plate 2-3.



#
W& SC WxqA for*led lp 194(k and

ot f)arhU AViculture Experiment Station of i&R*$W svies irt the county and color





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77!!
0 'iti g" A OW
111 11" JtV sod map of Alachua County was published in 1967
ent of Aoriculture, Soil Conservation Service. The St. Johns it a by the Department of Agriculture 'Included their general soil ated on Plate 2-4. Th6 accompanying legend provides 's. In general, the Pleistocene terrace deposits, primarily 41- chief parent material for the soils in the area. Table 2-2 ity 4yty pe, Acreage, and location,




is undwUia by several hunilted feet of uncorksaWated to 9"W"I'l c ayo In MI, Iirn"orw, dolomite, and dolomitic limestone.
flormation penetrated by water wells, is the Lake City a T1* Okismiar lknestone whicb underlies the Lake City
blearim at least in part. The older rocks of Teritary to
*00W the Oadsaw, contain hj&Wy mimralized wator- Only the are d6cussed -in this report. The formations are grouped age4W Am

f",*M of F-ocvw aw, 0 the Of&m ar limestone which ties at AbcWa CqWn,, aad is notpene trated by water wel Is. The and foudiferous marine limestone which has been partially owtal Miw-, amounts, of the eworites, gypsurn and of Owt Worwtion ca ft r1aracter of the Oldsmar


0 4qvtdW& the Ot4ww Vmastoae is the okkst re *Otawd in the, coimty,. This fornxat on oyppH 4oow Wi #rW 4olomi tig, Woostone inc I uding vW seams Qf peat or lignite. The nearest this h In, sootheastem Alachua County where it has been Sp*, T* L*a,-City Woesume is aMoxim#1ely 400

r#. ritn,
aw4o the Lake City timestone, is chiefly a %-k-r-ft to porous 4Womfte. that in Places conWns a few

*nos 9f ak"t 200 f04 41 the







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overNes the Avon Park Ihnestone and, is the oldest rock Alachua County. The uipper partpf the Ocala firnestone is a ored coquina limestone. Lower portions consist of sak, tan, to brown crystalline to dolomitic limestone and wW kftgular masses of chert or flint are common near the top of the iAn be seen on the surface where the Ocala occurs at shallow depth. 00 0o 1 t4im, de* are com men and cavities as large as 404tet deep have Caw 04
*0 40* oj .Aivhua Cbimty b y we ft dritlers. Youn ge r m a teri aK, cons ist i ng of
ioa d, fvmils hwe filled many of these cavities, solution, pipes, "In thtOcala li mestone,
74 V
9")"W Wft ",,$roestanc is exposed at the surface in southern and western Alachua
'0' W, VOW tW 9 at the surface, a limestone plain has been formed which is.
awar haUrres typkA of karst topoffaphy, i.e., sinkholes, solution
Lifitgui _' etc, In western Alachua County, elongated solution depressions,
3ad other phys" features appear to reflect control by a WOWmtst-sou theW f rattErre, system in the Oc ala I i nwst one,

Womoone of Dflgoeene ap has been found to overlie the Ocala W*I,*'rt of Ahithba County. Due to their lithologksknifarity, it is A Ifid Sawamee and Ocata except by characteristic faunal of QinewffWk V* Suwunee teaches its maximum of 30 to 50 feet. The formation consists of hard to soft beds of
**Wtosftand'and dotem4tic Vwmtone. Cheft isusually present.

, tf,*- ir=W40 a rmrh*Atpo*,of'MIocene -age, evedies the ocata
Urmcoom exzepvlia parft of weslom and, southern AUchua 4j 4L rw absuit The ftvnhom for, mation, ownistsof thick beds of
cokor, *oft bkwwW Vey to green and, containing beds of 4, tSUAY fema a ten* r4ting virface, afthoush in, some Anol vabw tenao #*Yebftn formed. The clay beds of the MWci;af confloft strata which maintain water under


-*Posits of the Chmnah fomution are a nonfossiliferous soW wW dayty sand which occur only in the ThowsedlffiewtsArft a th"ness of itp to 22 feet


f6vofto'h fomd oOy "M roortheastem Alachua County.
*40 30 fftt, Ae 'fonwWw' h comprised of yetlow, to






Y*




Ation of Miocene to Pleistocene age forms low rolling
-county. This formation
$roup in the southwest part of the 10601 rial- white and grey sand' d6pasits, and is often found s and sandy clays. Thicknesses range from 2S to 35

W.
66nsisting of marine sediments which were formed during the the Pteistodene epoch comprise the older PIleistocene terrace
-etlow, and grey sands and range y of unconsolidated tan, y v the county. The general geologic map,'Plate 2-5, presents the of each formaticm at the earth's surface if the soil were
49 1#1

ure of the region is aptly described by Pirkle (19S6b) as


siruilture"of the area is the Ocala uptift, an anticlinal fold PR
Mst "9fti4ft swthweswn Alachua County. The folding has 4*04" of Utitary age and has brought limestone of the Ocala group to kffwe, along the crest and flank *of the uplift. The
%So" to tf*
'*Wr M*Ft Ilks wverg miks West of Alachua County and, in
-ft noftitsouth ixis'of the Florida Oninsula. #It
o( this structure is east-northeast and averages 6 feet per mile wft tioke fd& cr flult zonm 'the geologic: cross kve *!'*Mr fW& b* the ftank of 'the uplift which wen 'b*bVn!c* f *tft *At created the Ocala upfift. According to of'dwsi ksset'foldt IS one 'whose crest is in WTI a WArqft deffht& by Wd&, Metrose, and Hawthor"e.
the IWKwAOMIndizates that the structure is a dbubte 604*tsf kw so umeast.

I Wkik i2l!1- of the fariftmns dlscus edlm this report in bmAoxic fim of deposition and to each other in proper time

ls# q 4 V
4#0 vlu w r#- 4,
t, 4 4 -Lit

IV 1-1

,*O w fooft ot kwo W#tcr W the rumWwaW table.
Jotots 'W 'in A hua Cwnty; the actual











ace and kroundwaters depends upon the local geologic t<* of water 'having its own characteristics. Surface water levels Od Un P MEMO wWdy from season to wason and y ar to year depending on


-Ah)* : most useful figures expressing stream flow, as given in Florida
J k-pf irwes-tigations No. 35 (1964a), are the averagp, minimum, 00-00"mi,04 "oo-'00- 00 "N, w 4ow, values are 'Umpoma became they indicate the normal
000* daWmirting lom-term quantities, flowing through, the stream or provide the limiting factor in theuttimate use of a stream noA "o 40-11 4, 0i s"eryoirs. Maximum flow values are valuable for planning the
*W"Fefor bui4ing river appurtenances, In general, determining the kis in pilarming the full use of a stream.

2-7 it may be seen that Alachua County is divided between two As wtin ft soutkast Pottion ultimately travels through Ocean. To the aordwtest thedrainage system is part cxf the drains to the Guff of Ulexk"o.

u"wurn, Alarhua, Counw, incbAag the GainesviAlip, urban area Ls ly 300-square mks Which has no surface outflow. The few tgazWy #pgtownCreek, drain into sinkholes to recharge


,*er isthrw4htho Unta FeRiver which forms the ,t .,,Dr*jaaV. to the *. Johns River is through tip 0-04 ," chet wty. Hat ree ., the h"dwatersQf the
Ompto Qww LWo by way of. Pr*1e Creek, Camps LoWeosa Lake, then, by Cross Creck Cwk. 'Pw osoOkwd *ainage area of Ocange and' mites. The averw ftw from southeastern Al'achua County 97 mod. Tabte 2-4 Provi4es a summary of available data on YP% And PerW of mcord for some streams and springs in


44k" 14 owty,"(1v 44 nwntd Jakcs,,haye a
d71SX",R--TW'J"-4* "K*",t 3, 243 vres for a total 764,squm *W 2-5. contairts a listing of those
ap i"wtant for
yvxm" jM*W(WW* WXVAI 9f "Wk water
4r. 1r;K t #

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water in the zone in which all pore spaces are com ptetely filled
*wlfer is defined as a rock formation ormaterial in the zone of enough toyield usable quantities of water to wells or springsi..

ooky occur urWer water table (unconfmed) or artesian (confined) aquifer the water table is the upper surface of the zone of 0#90to W oo 4D *e or faH. In an artesian or confined aqtiftr the water is
VVIM''Alun atinospheric pressure, by ovedying, relatively imperffw.WWe drilled into an artesian aquifer will rise above the base of the W*W rises above the land surface it'will flow naturally and may be Won vftb-, The potentiometric surface of an artesian aquifer is the A* t'M' In a fiotly ca5ed welf that penetrates the aquifer.

or! ol 7 IMC '111WRI't" as concentrated discharges of ground water appearing at flowing %Qter (TOM, 1967). There are several general j"ur io Maclaia Ce4mty. Gravity sprkWs occur where the water sudke, as in a hillside or depression. Glen Springs, Boulware emeW from the Mde of tF* Devds MiHhopper are of this wbem the cwfti"g layer OvedYing an arteman aquifer is A" pot Sprk p am'Of this itype.

re Abahw C4unty WUW i% ftaWy wmUfoaal and aimthefik. Glen
Poe Springs and sewA srna#a springs furnish -or have ift ional areas. &Mwam SWings
*w swbnav, poWs or reoreat ?dty Qf4G W-MviHe WaW %M*yprior to 1913 and is still Oah& wAW, for *9W feet! m power gerwrating facuities.
f SPdW Mar Hilft WkMP wMCh no" at a rate Of Fe JUvor. T)w edwsprings in t1w county have Apos




No- 3St19"a), pirovides
Woft*ft -a" gwral hydrautir,, conditkm,


fm*a weV may be Umfte4,by any of

WM CW
wtitso fa k -Lowering,
!404 p" *W is nemsey to cause


Pi









1 7 Vp I

Into the well from surrounding formations. The amount of '*t drawdbw is approximatef pro ortional to the rate of


between the'rate of pumping and the drawdown in a well is 16sthtyate the drawdown in or the yield of a well. Thisrelationship
M
9066Nk capacity of a weft and is c6ntrofled by several factors, 19c with which the aquifer transmits water, the capacity of the s 'toft water, the well construction, the conditions under which water to the aquifer and discharged from the aquifer, and the length of
004M

4pwj* 04, *Wx T
"MM--taVQdty is the pumping rate divided by the drawdown. For
*&A pump#,d at the rate of 200, gpm (galibnsper mi6ute) and it lowered 20 feet, fm specific capacity is, 10 gpm per foot of 'jIIP7jW tdIh& if, the specilficcapacity of a Wetl is 10 gpm per foot of implication iswithin certain limits the yield of the well will be om, for each additional foot of drawdown.

146y, howmr, be fimited to the amount which, If exceeded, V&o or hift mineralized water to m6ve into the well. The 'Arawdo*n being limited by the intrusion of saline or highly U gyftftr in very deep weth that have penetrated relatively ih the'lower part of the aquifer than in shatlower wells.

lift a *a,,*tW WtV beft equal, depehds on how the ir
ts the 'recharge to the aquifer and the discharge from the UuraJ coWitions before withdrawal th recharge to an aquifer Owdisem from ftaquiftr, euept for te rary differences
10* ah*duot 'of wit6r stored ih the aquifer. After. pumping ufi" bd*ke'is upset. For a time after pumping A of the water is pumped from storage in the aquifer 46' wdl. 11* VU6*r*W 'water, ftem stor* flowers
tobt* #of doveW6n atouM the well. As
*Idw, v6s* W deV*W4* deepens arvd hraadwis untH
*fWftM* 'raft of, fetharge I's orwe
b*k'*Wt6W dbdmleo pkis the rate of withdrawals. The Ooqu** aa jn reoe in the rate, of recharge if

WWI*MWO ook* 4*fi't4UvM tti rgp, Pe Pwoobw oases, xW the water levris once
*Kaa*,M 4up to nat" c*aes such as

4,





4*











dhwdown in a well therefore is less where the conditions ar e
*;e t6he of dePression to induce additional recharge to the J
ttw co"ditions am favorable fof ffie cone of depression to VAI Izi
from the aquifer, or both.
cot* to Jq#0 I
Ai*.+ua Comty comes from two -major sources: the Floridan U.
The upper aquifer refer to those aquifer above the Consist of a water table aquifer and other secondary artesian
4
-if I n
low.
1AW'2b4uiftris comprised of the sands of the Pleistocene terrace maw VOW wwr ftktlfi"estone layers near the top of the Hawthorn formation. This TWwwrili"MOV! in a 306 square mite area in southwestern Alachua County.
Ji, tedWgod by rainfall percolating downward to the water table,
jg ,& CA-Lww tawt 10 ft*t below the surface. Water is discharged from the to streams and takes by downward seepage into lower
*'moo' *eft

aquifer occur principafty in the limestone and sand layers faftatidn aM In northeastern Alachua County 'in the The potentiometric surfaces of these secondary anesian the'water taWe Md the -potentlornetric. sufface of the Stftv**, *eport of Irrfestigattons No. 35 1964a). 0 ars is chiefly from the water. tabte aquifer and discharge is
Florbn Aquifer. The specific capacity of weM tapping these that have been tested ranges from 0.2 to 10 gpm per foot of


weNs tap these secondary artesian aquifer in this county than p*'m, Mwever, nekher the water taWe aquifer nor the minor t waftr for large suppliesOw LAe City lknwAone, the Avort Park limestone, and 0 Ow Hawthom formtjon conwis'e the Floridan Aquifer aft of ft most pr9ductive and extensive groundwater StaW,,, a d eaMy UvItntits and stores more water than OW FkwidA.

contow map of the county for the Floridan fkfts ag 40t an0ft la contour lines from higher to


# NO*" t4ow -*bw* dwm is no cmftnow bed, the
U 00 fta c m-aty the aqtdifer is under




............. . ... ............................ ......................... ............... ........ ............. ..... ....... ...................... .. ......... ........... . ... .. .............. ................... .... . ......... .







iifer is recharged by water leaking throuO, the overlying tajng direct ly into the aquifer where no confining beds are '1*,vogh sinkholes. Although the entire-cobnty is considered to be a interest are no(able areas of sinkhole recharge in the county, such Ink, Sweetwater Branch. and Payrtes Prairie to Alachua Sink, southwestern pan crfOF;mgeLake. Another area of hi h mawvt W4 W ,swle area in the southwestern portion of the county having no


Mont k#wO444AIw mcharge is discMrged in the. county; most of the water moves
a lbol," 16 direction of the hydraulic gradient. Some discharge takes place
west portions of the area and additional discharge Qccurs to the 0%,fitup also occur through wells used for domestic and irrigation '21" r *ftoog* 6 ftowing springs such as Poe Springs near High Springs which
ogd. The specif
as '519, r ic capacity of wells'i nto the Floridan Aquifer
'**4"* per foot, of drawdown and pumping rates may range up to


kwft and water production vary througbout the aquifer because the ,zo ,am wparated by beds of dense and nearly impermeable limestone 6;
O-WOU Cul 4*40G rltle area permeable beds occur between 300 and 350 feet, OW 9W to 1,020 feeL The city of Gainesville draws its water 0*0x*tvW#*,abk upper beds between 300 and 350 feet.

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FO H EIO 9116
ALCU CUT
Avrg emeaue vrg Rifl
rF inhs
58026
M -596 .2
4L















TABLE 2-2
*4,
QiI"'00-*U"UA COUNTY ACREAGE AND LOCAVON


Acres in
C""" AsIm md aft Location in County


4,036 Around Alachua, 91and, and Santa Fe
7,2W At" Santa Fe In N and NW of county
4,271 Southwest -around Ardmr
fte unlds 2,517 Western part of county
6
VAKS*id 27,430 Broad belts between Nficanopy and Bland
to
0 15's" Betwma Newnans Lake and Orange Lake
'0 3" Near Mand Grove, Levy, and Orange Lake
#
v '20,6" Entem pan of county
2,171 Eastern part of county
14,644 Western part of county


Wt "s Saw* of AUcbft

6#036 Nbrthwest mW West CeatrW parts of county
_0 8'%q SW, NW, and West Cerwal parts of county

7,%2, Ar*wW H10 Spring., Alachua, and Santa Fe
13X0 AmurW "iffi Springs and Alachua

2,572 Around Alachua
4'"1 Nm Alachua
41 "9 5W god West cam3f pan of county
3 15531 SW pan of commy
47,45,1 W6s*m part of county
4,M2 SoolhWesvern part of county
20AI4 SW of ammty Wraff am tim"ghout W of county

SW of county
S"Oftvd larpr amas N and'NW
#
Lacrosme" W", m4 SE of countj to 4"WeWom MW NO
0
"Mb"
RW twoo", Loomows, "Ofiw' 404 F*rNmks "U a" Mr*WW C
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m

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TABLE 2-3

io"ATIONS PENETRATED BY WATER WELLS
ALACHUA COUNTY


Estimated Thickness (feet) Water'Bearing
on in Alachua County Properties.

Surf*e soils and Water table its 5-50 aquifer

Citromfle

thwaffted coarse Water table
I oastks 0-20 aquifer
E
T4 0
0 w1hatchee UWater table tion 0-30
and secondary artesian
HOW010M
0-2W aqu ifers
41


0-50 Floridan Aquifer


Floridan Aquifer

up Priwpal source of
200 PoWic water supply

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The preparatio of this plate was financed in part through a Comprehensive planni nagn from the Department of Houssag and thban Development under the providons of Sectkmn 701 of the Housing Act of 1954, as amended. Prepared December, 1973, for North Centra Florkla Regional Planni CounciL





















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40 4












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iri



























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The preparation of this plate was financed in part PLANNING AREA ALACHUA COUNTY
through a Comprehensive planning prant from the
theproghn of MPn ne h f e aning gernt ro thde WATER AND SEWER DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR ALACHUA COUNTY
Department of Hiousi and Urban D~evelopment. under NOTCNRL. CLRWDAN REGIONAL PLINGOUI
the provisions (it Section 7/01 of the Housing Act of 19S4, NOT SLETACK CROWDAN RIONALS PINOUCI
as amended. Prepared December, 1973, for North Central NCOR ENRA FLOI N L PASNIN G N
Florida Regional Planning Council.


219-73-50 PLATE 2-2


































ABVT75FE







15-75FE














AB100-15 FEET






m 75 -100 FEET

7 BELOW 75 FEET



















thouhea Copevrei~J ti Pning wro f _~~ Infl(h GENERAL CONTOUR MAP
Dethrm n of Homg nd Utrbnn Devlopent u der WATER AND SEWER DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR ALACHUA COUNT'
a thene. Pmparl'fS~od oio thIeme 1913, lAc oIiCf 1954 NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

I lori R tVion I Planning CoUnL.II PLATE 2-3


21 9-73-50PLT 2










Faramtfs.- 9 the wed -of.. I.W.. a,. ...red of Z.
so .: -:-.d 4 :4,V7 ',*1.s a I pert. Odol QM tomo tafrac; deposits."'
UNION couixy asurim. th.t at. Hotels
dwo.114 btwk.1 tn. Wc :p th of
C, t
15 real. va.hod 11.4 hdicstax inferred 0014ti.. or f.rosti ... I 1- duJol.
by "d
pm d V 1952 Ith It.r
4F N



D/


















Alp



Ub
KNOW oP r a
Z

e



$Now* rs\1


V cavoly uAltay TV


4 2
mus


"I go In Dal'" CONTOUR REPRESENTS ME ELEVATION OLDER PLEISTOCENE
CUT11M AM AVAIL"LE Of THE TOP OF THE OCALA SNOOP, TERRACE DEPOSITS
14 FEET REFERRED TO MEAN SEA LEVEL. CONTOUR INTERVAL 40 FEET.. ALACHUA FORMATION
LL f9A 0 1 VII, 9#tL W
I"
HAWTHORN FORMATION 'A
LINE OF BEGLOGIC SECTION OCALA GROUP





RAL:GEOLOGI[C MAP
WATER ^r4p SEWER DEVELOPMOMT PLAN IfOR ALACHUA COUNTY NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA RZ61ONAL PLANNING COUNCIL &L"Itpem"Dw ^"m ztowm 1.

PLATE 2-5
























ir v f






9L IL


Jell


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ke


IL
m
0
A-NNW cm,

qr
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Ar
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he GEOLOGICAL CROSS SECTIONS
WATER AND SMSM Q6VKL0V"g*T PLAN rOR ALACHUA COUNTY NOVIVH, Cit"TRAL FLORIPA W96IONAL PLANNtNQ COUNCIL "ACX, allow AND 1119111411911 IFIC'.




PLATE 2-6






















AREAS DOMINATED BY NEARLY LEVEL SOILS WITH GROUND WATER

AREAS DOMINATED BY SLOPING SOILS WITH GROUND WATER BELOW TABLE THAT NORMALLY FLUCTUATES 0TO 1.0 INCHESRBELO" THE
BA INCHES oSUFC


WITIH SANDY SURFACEI LAlER. MORE.THANa40D INCHES~ t ICSRC
isoE~ BIsoop is ooA R.B is60400 IsRI .IT SAND SURAs LAYER MOR iHNs NCE HC
0006? IOI0100d 11.11A I. L.40001.0Moll0E0IN,0.I*S0I."00


..ay"d"th 's""""d-ha o. 0 ...... O 0 -Y vv nE 0that A0-0 aTOSI0, ,11, 1--1sA0000I U P0IA
,Ad00II take, 40 AA.L.T~f RoQ~d .604 1.44. ... I~ALBYII w ....
BOIB~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~hl -V10,,0Y 1111,91V01H0000010000 M1-~ -y~o~o,,o Aopallivo BloD odop All,106
jo,,o 0 1 01 ooa TO.01A00 00, w IyAs o f slgh tO ly011,no~BoondIO ~oLLo~~o



H,0nc 0011p paRlHOII 42ITIK 1jodo. It01to,0100000I *0111 .00.1

3 09 0,01,101 00 1 RL,A ait 9, o- I'll'. lootlOhl 10 lie, oons.,o 0406 fw od''.- A .. ..
AAd~A ctlW woS inMolA O0BOOOAO o0LBO.,Y -, 10 RAAA, od 0, 10U00





WITH 0 RIND SURFACE1101,000 Ay!R.LS. IRAflAD:0.L111 WIT SAND TUFCoAESLS TA AICE HC



"Aoaf00 law 1111111 1111111Y11100000I00I11VI4 ause,4RI00010AL Also plan h0oTI1oe01, 100HIH0HII -BbII 41001B00S011K01114 ooII00ATO
mO IO IOV R 1,A.. AY1.1C.1TAN41.sCEi "C
REAS ,dofMINA E BY. NEARL LoVEL SOILS WITH oBOAR WATERsdo ,is i
toIn I~oo.oit.1.aEA DOINATEDHY NA RL B l EVEL S lW h GROUN WATER
TABLE~~~ THA NOMLYAAE1ATOD NHSBLWTBETHTNRAL SWTI I NHSO HUFC
THE N.. RA CEool.A ls!od l. 1111,A ,T, ,lt IA ol Vodey- ,J
AND d REo E TL RISES,1- 1o o ABOV THE1 SURF1 .AE 11




IHA NOSRFACEY LUERUMTES TA 40 INCHES THCBIHSAELUFCELYROORWHN4 ICE RE
TABLE000. 00,o 0000~ BBO A000 0000 BLE H TH~ ATl N RAo ooLLYo LAWT0 15 INCHE0 S AOl H E SURFACE
OIBT H SURFACE ,PO0.00 060010000 01 IO004O01010010010004Y040A

T001001E0S0100TR040900010 0101H 0100I0010F Y0000004 C,01. L AY 010000,,010001 .1 001% H1.E C




T~~n0, Aooo*ooo .O, 100 ....ood "I01 Au0,10, It.000ad lps rR.Ol 100100 V0UsyI sto001000,004ta wilh 01001 ...,0 V. 100
AB y I o stA GadOO an -ty old Wa A od,0 that Bo a0n04.0 y404,ood 400f.. 04060 -- OY IA.L. Ad, and00 L-11 .
Was04.,10005000000 ,::I"he,00G, OTIII
ad0 an,4.~ theHOIO 1000101 A, oT,1 too0l0 0 0 1,it sooorn 4,0

9 .. 0erai0 ,1. 00 AsI0ro0on0I Bl I~oood O LAW 6 0000 CRp ORAI SURACoLAER



Bsoo "001 MIs o~ ooolo Is4. l is isg. lT 00.00..

00010of Los000 d 0000 001010 Sluwl 0000000, Blood0 low Ltodgsof A el l- d d h011I 1C

000410000 HOROIP 4,0,004 000400001,4,00000000000010011I.

1-otoo- L,,t, oAA-*00Law, 0ooT000001100 ,,dso


Uoh~~.00101 Which has.0.001100.1,041004000forml,00000o.,01

























TIER stiron PEPI I n! -ins ad01 P shR YoUlso aroxioloBpl 00
SIRROMIIE~a AASN Vob4Doo4soselz1000 ERROERERI 01001 ~ WATER AND SEWER DEVELPMETPANFRALCU CUT
NORTH~~~~~~~~ "ETA LRD EINLPANIGCONI
DDPMIOSED f iaooooogandUobno Dve~pmpt0 ioodr BACK CRW AN EOSP4S~oIN9



4 wson~oLP~@p~idP.Kmb.D '~O tOD N~lOuooosI NGIJIM




F~ao~a R4IHOSI Psoonoog oooo~so


PLTA













Th. 9-73i. fti paeisFnnedI at E EAOS I A
























IZJSUWANNEE RIVER BASIN
IN ST. JOHNS RIVER BASIN





























































he p~ep~raion if ihi, p~j lat finsnxd upart MAO DRAINAGE BASINS
the ogton u~ Sopehe y planin gr2~fteIllat fo the4 WATER AND SEWER DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR ALACHUA COUNTYf
De parlrncnt of H.iu~tny Andf Urban I)rvelujpmenl, ulnrjer NOT ETAULRID REGINA ALANIN COUNCIL
an. amended, IPreplnren I)enember, PI Y3, fojr Nrth I.entral INCI~e~



2 1 9 7 3 S OP L A T E 2 7


















































































































































































































































































































































. . ....... ..
......... .... ...... ...... .... .....
TM77 7 77 7 =E7













SECTION 3

LAND USE DEVELOPMENT
0 qx 0 J


XTERNS AND TRENDS

of Ove increase in population and -its changing characteristics, the used in the region has changed. The primary land use in Alachua
1900s wasagricultural. In 1973 however there are two basic
within the county. Agricultural land use has retained its
I Awe p I rimary land use category. Development of a major urban Rnaft geographic center of the county has occurred. Thus the
hi developed into a second major land us group. The land use
center are primarily residential and institutional in nature.
Akhough occupying a relatively smaller number of acres, have
agrkultural, residential, and institutional uses. Table 3-1
vAmd u e categories for Alaihua County in 1972 and Plate 3-1
use within the county in map form.




dW of GaintsWie being the major growth center, land use patterns bavt vvohed to a higher degree than those found in the
*4th4n the county. The snita,11,er towns of Alachua, Archer, #Upoopyt Newbqry, aW Waldo have retained their e*", 4M use paAwns vynonymous with agricultural the 6ther hand, bas devetoped land use patterns


W'64* a,(", in r*_oevt years h4 Uken place in the 4 i f ; I
the cowmmity. The northwestern sector has been Q"i de*,a ,so# apd, topographic features
4 4a" bioundarles to the sduth and east



IT

fouftW"W, JqW Vow d Gah ftvft bas bftn a Thistype of










voh c4m Ks U oviding public services and
we land arewand increases the cost of pr n *WAe ip g planted subdivisions
_es land has developed prematurely creatin
*A1** it few dwNings. This tends to degrade the total residential character afta- P consequently the community. Table 3.;2 shows the existing land use
tvtP wban area.

,*m les inAlachua County except the Gainesville urban area are 4 1.0 rtsidenfial development within, the urban area ranges from 1:5
r acre. Residential development within the urban area for k, rinwily of singlefamily dwelling units with multiplefamily
led only to'satisfy the demand generated by the University of Ate singlefamity market has continued to expand at a normal of multifamily units has increased at an above-average rate. muffifamily- units were constructed as compared to approximately ",are that the 1972multifamitly construction continued to


the bom of the University of Florida, institutional land use lownd to resident' land use in the urban area. In addition to the ffi"J *t*fe Community College and a state, vocational school, aing, law, land arm. Medic4l facifitiesassociated with te m W"M K Wital, AWdim General Hospital, and the Hospital also utilize some major urban Land


GO*

t rwa Pteviarw T'larming, Coun 9, in conjwiction with, ir tonwhocd the fo0owins goak to guide t1m planning
4 # J A

c"114", Ment, in pursuit of the optimum y of for mskients of the"North Central Florida region.

# low tO an, 9q*r1y, ppWwn, ically, and

AA ?W1U4W tin le 4VI "t #tt


of qmrjty of air, vater, and earth

^NOW OnAt to




'4, -1-, 'vOevelopment "of -an accessible, economical, and safe %WW4 #SA6 Art-ftsfavorution systeffl.

3pft*a ( ^, 4NOmprovanent aM augmentation of the provision of community
p4 iRp mn# *,hgAties and public services for all citizens.

Iti Ad& ion, objectives were defined which include the encouragement of the 1010i "I"Ilko 111010, P-1 and unffied, water and sewer systems to serve areas of existing AW *ft"OtAo-A t; to, assist in the development of plans to preserve adequate
ab----l re&ewi to continue effcwu for the conservation and
A. ,ApqHtyof air, water, and earth resources- and to continue to assist
1111010, 1 financial aistance to implement plans.
W" V1
140 1 ,Sc jft ",,objectives in mind, the Wowing bask concepts of


DftwkWment-Vowth occurs al mg the mai -t Woo,", OpWar 4mmloprnertt is shown on PLO 3-2.

pmkoft of 'growth oGcw thro t the ie"t utility wrvices aW adequat community facilities am 0040K ir"Wr"M is iWfW*ftt MW expensive. spot h I'm Od 111 W Point is *4*" on p4ft 3,

Pow/opwmat-existing cities act as growth centers with
*we opmertt either as, a 6,114n for ticdeveloped areas or new aCWmt to existift dew4opment. In addition, totally 10- of sufftient size to wamot a full complement of
existing Vowth cmtem. Qwnpact development mM*Ow*,us(xof A fwVWw md umtkKw to, atate, a sound #we 4-bfck Wtum expamion may be built This


AOW104"*VWhhad by the North Central Florida thj ,, ftWIW WvWgaps of "mWct de"Wpmmt over spot LAOMPOWL.t*Wr*PSWAMaVY for AAk dr apftspom
Js rowm"
-*tbin *wrent



WAt, bo. Womeft ;rito *Y. With



Al















mm

an ee xatinadaeut ulcplcmc











and rejeth cmpc
-- -l 00W reuaoydvcsfralgvrm naeniisith araw
mm ee'p e mm mi Im I cu iho eadfr ursit onais
-- 'mlm
mm "MA AN S
m!b




















a um ayo lmjm erai noensaeaesi
A$aaVa l0Uidifraino hstpcmyb on nterpr nOe
;"3,cmltdfrAahaCut yh ot eta mrd
4W0r 4AVr

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the sotofGievleadtenrt fMcnpPy rii

40 h popry s o ude hecotolofte ivsono
W Deateto atrlRsucs









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ofbeiynomto nalcut we erainaesI


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-II!
iptsaerceto ra eindt ev n rmr


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fv talsaimIrsimnIol.Teefcltisaenral
prvdinl-nuhiiciortesngeue

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-iJ IItnetoehnetenihoho etngadapanc
th plygoud ofeeetr col poie.h ra r








Curnl1hr sol n egoa aki lcu ony
IWN XAI widb h iyo aievle onnsd akmesti
prsn sm 7 ce n ain -vreyo ciiisan
SAW

Ga' rbnAe
kkfIT a 0prsi h ansileubnae hc alWti h
Jw bdo ;kcfgr-Tbe35povdsalsiqo ra eintda





7 1|*~wmWAeMngmn ra












One tract of land belonging to the University of Florida and managed by the Forest Resources aod Conservation School is the Austin Cary Memorial Forest which contains over 1,000 acres of tknberland. There are no developed recreation facilities other than a nature traH. The forest is open to the public every day. The'se areas are shown in Plate 34.







........ ... ... ..

0 k #Q,$W 4 40


















...... .. .. .....

fw

















Aft-














TABLE 3LAND USES IN ALACHUA COUNTY

Thousand Percen
Lm h Acres Of Total.


Public land 24,838 4.03
mkggA 4 n 61,000 9.91
Wate areas, 4-7j488 7.71
at r .133,326 21.65


Cropand680786 11.17
*(tstre1 28,1 1 6 20.81
Forst117,959 19.16
(Q er.167,493 27.20'.,
482,354 78.34

TOWt 615,680 100.00


AWpn for the Gainesville Urban Area, May 1970.












TABLE, 3-2.

EXISTING LAND USE
GAI-NESVILLE URBAN AREA,

Existing Percent of
Land Use Development
Land Use (acres) Area

Single famit 5,793 24.86

Mattiple family 48 8 2.09

370 1.59

Total Rt wtal 6.,651 28.54

Retal 2 2.23

Offce60 0.26

adutral301 1.29

A esal 90 0.39

and@e le 8,733 37.48
14tstitstt uses) (6,597) (28.31):

"it rtigh 6,945 298T71'46

TWal tsi d t 1i0 6,49 100.00

TO Ot oned or
P1110" -for Development 23,3 00

63,401











TABLE 3-3

ESIrl"TED AGRICULTURAL LAND CAPABILITIES. 1972 ALACHUA COUNTY

fill
Percent'
class AOU Agr. Description
... .. .....

-0- Su i tab I e for: cul tivation-few Ornitat! o ns to
restrict use.

G 12.SO08 Some limitations that reduce choice of plants
or require moderate conservation practices.

tu 25 9; 21 50.8885 Severe limitations in choice of plants, or.special
....... ......
::,conservation practices required, orboth.

4V 4 11 31.3371 Ve'ry sever limitations in choice of plants, or
very careful management required, or both.

20 4.b7S4 Use limited to pasture, range, woodland, wildlife
food and cover. Limitations pr&ent normal tiMage of cultivated crops.:: VI 2+ .5797 Unsuited f6r cultivafi n. AJ IIM
50 ited to pasture, range woodland', wildlife4bQ-d. an,&cover..
.... ... ...
.. ...... ....
..... .... ..
VII 55 Usie limited to grazing, wooditanol, or wildlife.
... .. .....
viol .7068 Unsuited for commercial plant production. Use
restricted to recreation, wildlife, water supply,, or aesthetic purposes.








not#*#" 7.

Area-We P01m, Water and Sewer DevOopment, Alachua


















CL a. E a aE
7.2 O

cc c 'E ccc 00 00 Q d op
CL. ~ ~ ~ IM- ELa mC L E E E E -E E E E E











- -- rd mCZ a







-- G o CD tnr g o
2~e N2 N 0ik .N


CLo











Ea












TABLE 3-5

EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS
GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA

Current .. Acres.Per. Service
Size, 1,)000 Pop.. Radius Population
Park (acres) (acre s) (miles) Served

bodfawn Park 5 -3.3 11/2.. 1,500
G A & Park ....20. 5.01 1/2 4,000

t.~ Qra sCub
atg11.0 1/4 1,000O
i alt 2.5 181/2 .3.000

b!eY Bea Prk 4 1 1/2 4,000O


5 2.S 1 /2 2,000

OWt Tetrace
Pk2.5 1 .5 1 /2 4,1000

co unilty
btAreation Centerv 1 1 1 /2 1, 000


pa1.5 .7 1 /2 2,000


3.5 2.3 1/4 1,500




.. . ......




......... .:: .. .... .
... .. .... .......... .. .. .......
..............















.. ... ....

TABLE 3-6


EXIISTIM DISTRICT PARKS GAINESVILLE URBAN AREA



Curreft Acres per ice

Si4e 'Ijowfop':
Radius Population

Park (acres) (acres) (miles) Served
... ..................

Onooln Park 36' 4.5 2 s'000

...............
..............
......................................
............
............ ...
Northeast Park 2.1k 9000
.. ..... ..........
........... .........
.................. .........
... ....... ...

*6"de NA 27 1.9 2 141500
.... .. ... .


Meadowbrook Park 13 1.7 1.5 8
A k POOO
I 1i iommo 11 "'1 i


Skkne,: Open Space And Ikecreation Study, 1973, ........ ......








N.





















AV A
A&





3-14






























575




707












80












75~
I h~ asI~,i u Ih~ p~ inV~ ~.i~L 1 2~r OTETIOETIC ONOURMA
Ihr'iu~~~~~~~~~~~h6 65 70mr~~N~i 1"i~po r~ AERADSWRDVLPET LNFRAANACUT







h peparlrntjn off th.,rn plat U wbu i numc Kp Iiii pdrt
e orm in n.mf ,,.I~ 0 1 117 I H - Y~ A ,1 min 1954 NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL
~I'- Jie d d P e s e 1) 7ml;er 19, 1 .r N m l e i u SLACK. CRO W A N D IN S ESS IN C i
Ilrids Regwnul I nnng Cinuncl ENGINEERS

219-73-50 PLATE 2-8
















UWON COUNTY







Sm




c OSSE
KIGH
SPRING

A PHU 21
to"he LDO


Will,
Ha ks

a
E riton 00





metro





Nownsins







ynes
P r a I r I a z
a




Ki
is Lake

0 41

Cop-ad LEVY COLINIT MARION COUNTY


4 f

MdES






















00A jin part from oe CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT
wk" WATUR AND SEWER DXVELOPIOLMY FI.AN FOR ALAcmuA COUNTY
N**TW CENTRAL. FPL0WLItY^ RtV16N[Al. PLANNING COUNCIL.
uI.^Clcl CROW 0^10 SIDANKIM, INC.



PLATE 3-2









ii







II
1 . . . . .












Pre r

Logo*
mo1

Wow1














UNION COLINTY






211





HIGH
SPRINGS





untit











ESVIL


Lake





asP y nes IdPra iriea





take




LEVY 0ITY minion COUNTY


4 2 0 4





















ascdin pars fi t COMPACT DEVELOPMENT
f ATgir AMD SEWER WWICLOPMENT PLAN FOR ALACHUA COUNTY
0 111400"WICWNTRAL n.GomDA ftoNAL PLANNING COUNCIL
gakAcat, CROW A^N uposMAges IC. gb a ~orm3n4




dol




-7
121 29- 28

29
329
26 Or li-W, In ca IV
p4e.0"al po'est
(U 0 F.)
35 36 31 Mflhkm L 33
spall

34 zu AAl 32 33 F 94
35

25 4 3
r
4 3 3
k
-IFAJRBANKS
iz ................. I
pual"
121 Buy
I[F 9to 11 12 225A 8 2Bay
EE INSE
u 2 5 24
f- A.Ad.f Ch 15
WUFT TV 3 16
T 10
- - - - - - /
INSET OL)NDARY
FAS Air ease . ................ .... .. ....
HydFO .4
IV 1 23
-1 1 "I ,, t 21
27 .24 20 21 22 INESVILLE
21 GA 20
A Nt WA
RP RT 26
A5 F 11 FAS
232

25 -- 8 27
329 26
232A 6,ff 5 A N T FE

-Z-4
CORR IONAL'
3S
M q
33 'AIN S tl

ft A LLE -0 Z&mr FARM
26 Pop 29,701 (31
A I -x.
4 M 24 PAP Zb
26A 2 -W
-.4 1
OW 225
331 3mB Lake

Tang 10
Newnan

Lo Estates 2
Lake
wie, 1 329
air 14 RiATNV0 I'm 13
ts t 15
I 329A
2 3 M ..........


93 121
23 3 2Z

2



23




33





No GRA T
LOT" LOT No. LAND RANT
1-0 NO.
I P"J"k
7 a

pr 10
AND GR
AND C) T uo
GRA14T
WT NO,
LAND GRANT
ILOT No. 1, :7 LAND GRANT
la u f Lim-man 7- LOT 11
0 12
LAND -pond 7
GRANT,
L OT No,:
10 Jtjr cj on
Like Gross (L2



444
-Amp- p
-W:71 28

TION OF MEW STATE PARK

W Z*W*WVkp *XWWpj pi fvKL 0PKZjqlr PLAN F0011 AL.ACKUA COUNTIOr
MONTjMfEWMAL FrtaNl*^ J610143"AL dQUMCIL.
to" "alln"N"WIT.



PLAtik 3-5















COMMERCIAL


m INSTITUTIONAL


TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION AND UTILITIES

I? INDUSTRIAL

RESIDENTIAL


...... J / MINING



RECREATIONAL


EIZ COMMERCIAL FORESTRY


Eli AGRICULTURAL


VACANT


SWAMPLAND















The preparation of thi plate ws financed in part LN USPL
through a Comprehenaive'-plannng grant from the LAND USE PLAN
Department of Housing and 'Urban Development, under WATER AND SEWER DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR ALACHUA COUNT'
the provisions of Section 01 of the Housing Act of 1954, NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCTY
as amended. Prepared December, 1973, for North Central NT ACK, CRODW AND IDINIAL INGC
Florida Regional Planning Council. A ANGININE
219-73-50 PLATE 3-1













SECTION 4

POPULATION


4.1 01EMERAL

The major determinant for ascertaining the demand and requirements for water and sewer facilities of-an area: is its demographic...characteristics. Not only: is the total mimpher of people important, .but also their, spatial, social, and economic distribution. Thisetion sumnetrizes owse: population charateistics pertinent to a general water and sewer systems study.

4-T.1 Population Trends in Florida

wBecatise the, population trends and characteistics. of a county are-to. a large 44get detemjined by similar trends atK the state. leve it -is necessary to not the abanaraphis ap#ti*is of Florida, Since 1 950, the State of Florida. has undergene
agesandussewtniereaingfrom a population of 2,771,305 in 1950 to 6,789,383 in
17,an increase of15percent.

4 ,wifgpopultion estimates indicate that this rapid growth is Continuing, if neot agg;sreO Pwaulatino estimates by the U. S. Bureau of the Census place the 1972
_>oppmglgo at7,259,00, an increase of 469,000 or 6.9 percent since 11970. This increase places Florda second only to California in the absolute number of new citizens
grylecon algp Alradain percentage increase.

4.1.2 itplTo a Alachua County

atta asoo Aipg e f~thesStae has ha a grepat many defects, both direct and indirect, pp pepoulatokf Alapin Counspsfrom 1969 to 1970, the population in Alachua.
ijd) ~ *q A'A2' AlsMen 9lp4t,8,64 or at galn of 83.7 Percent. While this increase
tefidh* santlet the samt penind,'it is worthy of note tha froml 1 O0antag emat b papalaoeaia Alachua County exceeded that of Abefea9euayN grwoh during that period places it among the 30 tWinWe nal The latest avaitable jestitnawe of the 115,824.











moobw of birft, 4nd the number of net: 0*903tidn:* the. differences: betwebn the
0
owoW O(VceVWtn4Mng into a givw.arei.artd-those iffievingout of a gtftn ama.

'Migr
.. ... .. ...
County kriet -irwreasing sipfficance as a
rnigmtlon bas bben of
AeotoxvhWwW oyer the past20 years. It is, obvious, frorn: Table 44: that rvat migratibn is aWoqg, population. shift in. Alachua:Gounty The-total effect of
pogtNwfocW on toW
on thomigratioo pattms iseven V%%W than mflectedin Tabie 4,4# This Js Aoe A* the fact that approxithaftir-one-fifth- of, tM studbnt body t married.
Also kWw*ed, stoOmt enrollments .:resW.t:::.in. addifionak: university emPloym. This d0*WwW popuUtlon not:W.u&d in the percentage
g a in pet r*gration at the Univem, ity of FROW&

4,22,1,; 40,-$px Wtribution

A*,,h1%Rq4$od in, Table 4-3,,Ase: aze1:.dkAr*mt#*omof:: the pwullflon of'Aladma
"sy. JW, WW""e som significant dWgm cWer tbe: pat 20 years. The percent of
pooWation under the age of five has dropped: from a high of 11.7 percent in 1960 to a low of *8A peroent in 1970. This drop is a direct result of the low birth rates which
pt*vafled *MMS ttW"a balf oF dve 1 960s.

Tls 1&.24, age, group increased 5.5 percentage points,' from 214:06r6eht. ID
2WpOOeq#1rWR A *0 W MO. This jump rOkcts both tfw Wx"ased enrofteht A the artd-Ow relatively high birth rate of the period in wtkh this age




"qq*h* km4hw is an iihpWW*iPAcation of the sootoecbae 'WWtuft
#,40 **P*44wWKs*,Aeq*oOmbo(d Pavwns dewndne, to a hwv, extenti dernwW, as hoqsing units, utilities, ;Lnd transportation needs. As po O pq ylWpwpowth, the twmber of hmwholds in Afaclum County.
pWcV, y"m .3w f4a, Om peoctntage increase of bousehokis 4"*0 W, '41"tp"Wa6w grovah im -both of the periods 1950 to, 1960 and 1960 4be, number of hoim*Ad& ina*aed, 31.5 percent 160 lost Oqpp4tion in, eased 29.9 pement. Likewise, during the latter period, the
ft"ii's- I -ent as compared to a 41.4 percent
ookakls ineteased by 59.4 Pam 'POP1644100100 ROW TA
4
1VwOww*'r"*a*s 4 Alavlon'.hOm", Rve ih4taufthokis, p"WWoW Nved in
I I'd MM, hft& 4wew&,, Of 'Ow hotfth(Ad
_j

*%A
'E"



SEMI=











peptativef in 1950; S83.4 percent livedin: multinber households, while 1.6 percent
wer (nsigleagddrhousehold-s. By. 1,970, the, multimember household population was
deet to 7M3, percent of the total while, singlememnber households. were up: to: 23.7 pmt The, inemase from 3,246 singlemnember houseolds in: 1.960 to: 7,386 in 1970 raenoags >127.5 perceet increase as compared: to only a 4'i.8 percent increase in multieember households during the same period. That household formations increased f66W thar, population growth, and that singlemember households have increased more rapidy than multimember households is reflected in the changes in average persons per household .er, !lee post 20 -years.: 4n 1950 the, county average was. 3141 persons per easehol; Io ~S6, 336; and in. 1970, 3.06. Within subsectors, of the. population there atsignifat variations in household. sizes. For example:, an. analysis of the 1970 heeleOdi sie do. the the*mPg househol sizessof communitiesin Alaaounty.


4,30?"* W OtAIN CENTERS

t*ift has the souety experienced conside rabl population growth, but also
ssagabouglai itsi, poputation distribution. Generally, Gainesville hasbeen the mao
genit~cteastaserinorp~orated -aras have expeienced some growthand the. farm


418i laoporaged Areas,

At howablea Tabb4-5 AlN loorporated area in the county: have. experienced
adM?. 4tdPAWr paste-20 years. On jonaey 1, 1962, the city of Gainesville annexed 17 square miles and increased the population with the corporate limits of Gainesville by almost 19, 0potsons. The fire of 46,146 is the 1960 population (as estimated by the ginssiOlkitablihef Ettpathtt*revelopment) wit 'hin the corporate limits as they O*his Adfter fth 1962 annexation. The population as reported by the U. S. Census for'
bAsedWe #0A0040t ^9708< 4 wr, the 46,W4 figure is the more meaningfulI ono


alling& a eh *asepo aema -apreseate 59.6 perent of the total A IM,74 percent in- 1960, and 71.5 percent in 1970. Gainesville's
stale4 whn population wat47.1 percent in 1950, 62.4 percent in 1960, and 61.5 t v P~9O4t$bl 1415Ara that only 12.$ percent, 11.9 percent, and 9,8 percent of the
apatil 91ndin, incorporatd areas other than Gainesville in 1,950, 1960, and











1970, resphetiteY. Mereove, that. this percenta is decre asing indicates that population growtl of al the interporated areas (note that Gaieville's share also decreased. from 19W9to 1970) ismot matching the growth rate of the. county as a whole, although. the population of each has increased.:A: graphical representation of growth in Alachua CoAeny au. the nine incorporated com munities is presented on Plate 4-1.

4.3.2 Faras

Whie the population of the incorporated areas has been increasing in absolute terms but decreasing as a percent of the total, the county farm population appears to have bottomed out during the 1960s and then experienced a slight increase. In 1950, 7,851 persons were identified as farm residents. By 1960, the. number of farm residents hadl dropped to 3,401-a decrease of 56.7 percent. This drop was due, at least in part, to a change in declassification, In 1970, 3,852 county residents were classified as living on famas- 113 percent increase over the 1960 figure. This slight increase in farm residents pilets a similar trend in agricultural employment and the number of farms in the county covered in the employment section of this study. While no solid conclusions can be drawn from this data, overall there is some indication that the farm population of the county is tending to stabilize.

4.313 The Gainesville Urban Area

With the fArm population stabilizing and the population growth of the incorporate area not matching the county growth rate, the major growth areas must be, And are, elsewhere within the Gainesville urban area. This area, shown on Plate 4-2, had an estiMated population of 53,111 in 1960 and 82,411 in 1970. This growth represents an icrase of 55 percet as compared with 35 percent for a]ll the incorporated areas and 40 percent for the city of Gainesville during the same time period. This total urban area
ppltion accounted for 71.7 percent of the total county population in 1960 and 78.8 percet in 1970. Moreve, the 29,300 increase between 1960 and 1970 accounted for 95.5 percet of the total county population increase during this period.


4 POPLATION PRODJECTIONS

Tb plan fRw future demands for water and sewer facilities, it is necessary to boo~ Some idea of futre populatio levels. The North Centrat Florida Regional Planning Counc hps pseddee a set of population projections for Alachua County. These are
00 0Tbf, n -.Fradinldtalo hs rjcin Pplto n


tOMOVO$4.)t 171







Th tt fFoia a siae ht h 92pmlton o ansil
anmlcu ony*ae6,8 n .586 rsetvl.Bt iue niaeta h


raeomm ~ t fec i uhta h ~du ouainpoetosfr17 ilb



excedd t tatdae.Simla tend aper o b dvelopnginseera o te male

















NEW MIGRATION
FOR THE PERIOD 1950-1970 ALACHUA COUNTY

19019019601970 1,970 R

Actual population 97,*026: 74,0O74 1 04,764

E ikd n atu ial inc 4re ase 11,532 .13,972

Tota expected population
'e in hditf increase 68,558 88,046

Aci"ne i'tion .b +5,1516 16,718



e ai aio -'-32% -54%... .. .......

Source: Population and Economic Study, July 1972.
I44



















TABLE 4-2

NET MIGRATION, AND UNIVERSITY. Y OF FLORIDA STUDENT ENROLLMENT FOR THE PERIOD 1950-1970
ALACHUA COUNTY

1950-1960 1.960-1970

Net mo 5,516 1 6,718

atpeat inrae3,023 9,153

tnrt Q t increase '9,percerit.. ..
ofanetha tio5S% 55%

Soura Popultian and Economic Study, July 1972.
I41







c

i k

IIL















r- %0 M 0 C4 C4
ai q Ci Li PIZ Cl ad ch 00 %Q .G od 96 c; M: 06 od %6 W;
rn






tn 90 tn 14t. 00 0 kn 0 00 00 0 00
go %a 4m P- coo M5, en
I- w C4 rmv!! wir rl-z, tn %0 r- ko C4 I-- Cl
pa 00 0 ON 00 %0 (3) kn r- "t It en C114







P- r!,- (n cn r- r- %G Ch mt
06 6 cf; 6 06 tr; te;
C'4
A





M Ch C 00 ON 00 R 00 Ln
P., r T. 00 %D INt r- C4 a c lil
r w %10 0: M 0 00 00 eq 00
rZ' M C-4 C4 PCn r 00 %0 qt ON







;a a% ON t. %D Go tn C4 rn
41 %D r- 06 W; tf
C4





kA
at
tn 0 C4 r- 00 xn 0 C14 r- 0 It O It F- fn Q Cn: C4
C'q W- en 'It %D tv E 9t Ilk fft
%a ai m 0% %a qd- cn "It r- cn 06 V cf Cq
wl









to C4 cn
tn 'A tA tn
m mr tA ko c,4 m --t kn Zo













AL ou 21,
















loo N- r:
AC


0


e o to o% m e e- r









G- r- %0 M ko--e







M o C t n <1 'It n a
%Al a 4*otrme-a ma to r- W fn s yt











tn ar% comm



to~t r-*0s







rL47 tn %n
to% s tn 4n









sp















TABLE 441

AVERAGEfHOUSEHOLD StZES: FOR THE YEAR 1970
FUORIDA, ALACHUA: COUNTY, AND SELECTED COMMUNITES

Persons per
Area Household

2.90

Italcounty 3.06

Oakodil 2.94

Alaeta ,3.60 fit 1!pri ng 3.20 3.21

mi 3.30: So t o u ao andF,.om ic Study, IJulIy 19721....................... ... ... .. ..
aiig













TABLE 4-5

POPULATION TRENDS
Id THE P ERIOD11 1950-1970
ICORPORAED AREAS OF ALACHUA COUNTY

Percent Percentfmopo~tedChae Chae






t~rrb" 1461165 .13.0 3 65 12:1.2

Wa~o 647735 13.6 .800 8.8

Newbrry8731)105 31.7 1,247 12.9

Arcer ,86707 20.7 898 27.0

Mk~apy 12,658 735 .759 1:5.4

fttkrft pM1167 103 126 -.




ve.,ftplatin ad Ecnomc Sudy, July 1972.
_tJ6




















TABLE46

PROJECTED POPULATION LEVELS
FOR THE PERIOD 1975-1990
ALACHUA COUNTY :



195117,903 119,730 126,780

1128,455 135,056 152,743

1951'391308 151,1951: 181,461 7T990 150,426 169,813 213P444

Set re: Populatkm and Ectatomic Study, Juy1972.
4mm"4



4m1
mmW











TABLE 4-7

PROJECTED POPULATION: LEVELS: FOR::SELECTED AREAS FOR THE PERIOD1:975-1990.
ALACHUA COUNTY

year Low Medium High:

1975 2,575 3,385 4,195
Aaka1980 2$850 35SSO 5,250
(22)1 985 3,1 10 4,100 51500
e.1990 .3,750 4,450 5,825

1975 908 990 1,013
Amher 1980 987 1,110 1,150
( ")195 7,075 1,220 1,290
1990 1,175 1,350 1,465

1975 1,140 1,250 1,P370
Hawthornm 1980 .1,200 1,I315 1,460
(I1,126)* 19&5 1,272 1,408 1,545
.1990 1 322 1,480 1,9639

1975 '27975 3,030 3,300
High Sprirqp 1980 3,190 3,300 3,610
(2,787)* .1985 3,425 3,600. 3,930
1990 3,1675 3,945 4,450

1975 385 430 465
Lahasse 1980 417 485 560
(3$* .1985 438 545 655
1990 460 600 750

1975 770 .804 822
kieoy1980 782 860 900
19895 822' 923 990
1990 865 895 1,097

1975 1,320 1,J365 1,S580
1901,400 1P490 1,780
i 04M1985 10477 1,6 25 2,000
1990, 1,:570W 1,775 2,250














.........


TABLE 4-7 Contimed



Year Low me dium High

.............
1975' 845

w4do
875 895

Or'41 W11 --1'985 913: 935 ifolo
1990 958 .995: 1)07-5


1975 1 7 101$700 107,763

Qf w Area, 1900, ........... 1 i:3,040 134P413

19,85 125)377 1361755 163)314

1990 1351393 152)831 1923099



ffce Population and Economic Siudy', July 1972.

*tid" Opulation cerfsus. ......... ........
..........
.. ... ..... ..... .... ... .. .. ..... ...
......... .. ...
.. .......
put# pn %t4nate. ..............
f 1472 Po .... .. .. ......... ..
...........



... ....... ... .. .. ............ .... ....
...........
.. ..... ..... ...... .....
... .. .....
... ...... .. ...... ...... .........


.. ........ ....... .
.... .. .. ..
.... .. .. .................. ..... ......
........ .. ..... .... ... ...

44,Lr ... ...















OWN*








Y E A A






4-14











_woe
loq000 1.000'



1 1 1 00 00"]

80000 op,




c
60000- PO
c
L -01'

4000
ONO
40,000 3P



20,000



z Im I S R Nc s
4--- ..mop
2,000
-mop'

pp" 7 '.w. wwl -T Irmo R FVY I I
0 won -sm
1' )00
wwwo -Nino
No
MIN mma
7;; moo
woo Now smomm Tm0600 -..m




4oo



I L ;,4

moo







YEA R
TI)w V"s fift;tnced in part
T grftt frorn the POPULATION GROWTH
under ALAC,14UA COUNTY AND SELECT COMMUNITIES NORTH ItEW AAL PLORIDA REGIONAL. PLANNI" COUNCIL BUACK, CROW AND JUDSNCSS, INC.
CORSULTMG ENGINEERS PLATE 4-1























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































.. .. .. .. .......












.. ...................... ............. ....... . .

.... ........... .. .. ......












SECTION. 5

-CNOMIC CONDITIONS




urba. aea, with approximately 80 percent of the county's
**ul~bn pfis adoiihan~rdein most economic aspects of the area. This role is
obvoinas rtaf trdecenter, an incrasingly important medical: center,. and.





Gahmill nt Wl sevesAlahua Counity as a retail. trade center, but also has i4Wm cW p~eie o inluene wichis roughy defined as the area boun ded by: the dW~wpki%,v Ocla, IN~ Ke, MyoLake City, Lawtey, Starke, Keystonie Heights,


'W~akost iy Ate veme tait trade in, Gainesville and Alachua County has
vdrmierabvv~t inrecet years. Total retail sales, as reported by Sales 'A~apmnt againe inreaed rom$76,168,000 in 1960 to $183,294,000 in WO-anftmw *f 10 vvent. A vaOw in Table 5-1, retail food stores experienced "4v oomain s~s wilegeneral merchandise had the largest percentage




W#"*~i4JvA mploer n Alachua County, the University of Florida is a M~t ~trinat ofOw conmicclimate of the Gainesville urban area and 19* the Un iversity's payroll empl oy ment was 13,360 with ,yaytfl m ece% f $ milio. The economic parameters of the importance of 4ce c ft~ iwi as4 m p e r ee It is also an attractor




4ft*V~i V ajea0rgional medical center. The catalyst for 'Oky A~m ~ac ities sootored around the 450-bed Shands
a 4ental o sw la t adtioJ6n to Shands, there is the relatively
*W.Aledat'a General Hosital, which will have










imately 400 beds when current expansion is completed, and the recently coffoeted '1874)ed -private h6spital, the North Florida Regio*nal Hospital. The total impact of the nv&cal community an the area's economy is tremendous and there is
qpnsWeqb[e potential f6r further growth.
r .. .... .. ....


AO'iculture 6 *one of the few economic activAties in Alachua- County not Oommiud by'thr, Gainewn"le urban area. The major impact of agricultural activity is not
4 4
aii-enipl6jei, b6t rather its (follar value to the county and its effect on land uses in the
am. The AUchua County Agent's office estimates that the total value received for farm WhuaCo4qt he 570,880
lucts in y is in excess of $30 million annually, and that of
w4es in ttw c&rity, over 1"70,000 acres are in agricultural uses.

rars 4'steady decline, the agricultural industry in Alachua County 4 e ,t6 bav k46kd A In 1959 there were according to the United States Census, in courilir in' 1964 there were 1,041; and in 1970, according to the
1 -' ,ty Ara"t's estimate, there were 1,172. The Agribusiness Institute of Florida figuie at 1,050 plus or minus. The difference is primarily one of definition.3he Census Bureau defines a farm as places of 10 acres or more from which
ft of farm products amounted to $50 or more in the previous calendar year or places Aft 1146- 6ao* I *M' from whicb sales of farm products amounted to $250 or more. The
coo, r iRffice 40knition is somewhat more liberal, a farm being an area on which
rA r o
Ofimary ly is amricufturally oriented.
ber ri Itural
00,44 wtiat j fpt be a sfigbt decline in the num of acres in.ag cu v" of'*icultt' w6i products in the county has increased. The County Agent's Wke esdMated that in 1,967 the farm produce value was in excess of $23,600,000 and to'
i -*Ab OW
"000


WV1 t*Li6*A&t;

t

e" f Om economk srowth in Alachua County over the past 20 years, iW ifi ati fome. Percentagewise, the growth of
WM* &'Population. From 1950 to 1960, the
the'total county population was increasing A9 1960 to 4970, the labor force rose by 50.2 percent
441 A vemm,
j
P
00"


4' 7,3











5.3.2 Emnployrsent of Occupaion .

Whenar twhaor force is broken down. by occupation, the results are as shown in Table5-2.-Thea single larest group-o0f employees is classified as professional, technical, 4o knred wasouptss with 25.4 percent: of' all. workers falling in this category. The A asiig ippvtb thp next most emploQyees is clerical and kindred workers. with 1:7.9
pasea>.e (se opty 44mpoyees.: The dominance of these two occupational groups is a o(ItiOn. of the importance of government employment in general and: the University of floqidacioVaarticular,in the county,.


5.4 fAAAALY INCOME

4 r ~pl all nmures of income, are useful tJools for comparisons and analyses of growth trends, many are nonrepresentative of actual income distribution in that money is pgither eageod nor spent on these bases. For this reason,. an examination of family income is essential since this is the most prevalent earning and spending unit. The U. S. Census Bureau PWIbhestantiy income levels as part -of its decennial census reports.
,, A playa~n Plte -1, faml inoe hsiceased significantly over the past
iRYom at #l levels. It is especially noteworthy that Alachua County has* made agiyd tigg pogrss gyp~j eac-hing the state and national levels. For example, in 1950,
ft). pereptf the farnilis in the county earned less than $3,000 a year as compared to 42,5 percent'at the national level-a difference of 24.4 percentage points. By 1969, this .differencesitdesrop 44pecentage points-9.3 percent for the nation. and 13.3 percent
fg~ettagolapth 5 siuates these trends.

paq ng o (ta.osus Bureau, hemedian family income for 1949% 1959,
99 194 A40lAgige(oqty was, $2,066 $4j471, and $8,329, respctively- This
igaagestall44 pereeoAbstwe 1949 and 1959, 86.3 percent between 1959 and 1901, and 303.1 percent between 1949 and 1969.




gg, peitipqiand location of housing units, form one of the igpgt~qe 4(qq tidg~eeak ema ),t. isr assetial that the existing and




1994 4 M97 the county's population increased from 57,026 to











Of, the,98 -total units in 1950, 12,251 or 76.6 percent were singlefamily units; 3,379 or 21.2 percent were multifamily units; and 353 or 2.2 percent were mobile homes. By '19-70, theie were 231273 si nglefamilty unlits,: 8;201 multifamily Units, and 2,4O46 moiritThewe figures represent 69.4 percent, 24.5 percent, and: 6.1 percent of the tobtal unks, faespecthrely. As is, evident from these data, muia ml unit sandmbl
hot1oitted a Wager sare: of the total unit*s :In 1970 than in 1950. :This -is a trend ephih Wat een nationwide. The risin -costs of singlefamily homes, the im proved teaklogy the mobile home industry, enhanced amenities In mobile homes and apartments, and changing consumer tastes have all interacted to produce this trend. Developments since 1970 indcafte that thisvtend is Continuing.

Of the 14,841 occupWed delin units in the county int 195O, 52.8 percent wecre owner-occupied and, 47.2 percent were renter- occupied.1By 197:0, 60.8 percent were owner-occupied, withT3 9.2percent. being occupied by renters.

5 5.2 Persons Pet Dwemllng Units

171 1950, the median number of persons per'dwelling unit Was 3.0. In 1:970, the median, had dropped to 17. There has been a rather consistent difference between the n*man of owner-occupied units and renter-occupied units. In 1950., the medians were
*.:rA '2A8 1et iner and ,ren ter, respe ctively. I n 1970,: the figu res. stood' at 3.0 :for OwWfss !Md 23 for reotem. Tabe 5.4 depicts the distribution of housing units by the n um ber of inhabitan ts since 195 0.

The down ward trend of median number of persons, per dwelling, unit is to be expected A, deblilig-mailer instaad at a faster rate than did, population growth. A"Oittely, lagg hw festyles an* earite family separaions have contributed: to this
t~austpisilt,.te increase wrotiment at the University of Florida has generated a greater demand for apartments and mobile homes-two dwelling units which consistently hOme feweftpealwarer tunistant do sta glfamily belines



*Mq00 es0 srastd40eMsaor produts and servies,4the-vatue of homes and rent sigigalatytasc~hepast 20 phers, fn 1950 the median value of onewpaptd odriefin ats was, $5,627, i~n 196 the median value had risen to
*W 19 b 1970Ma reached $14,100, This represents a 150 percent increase in the pil I20 Y"Op. Additionallyit Is meaningful to note that the number of sound housing salt ##girl- applieron fth onadet in the price range of $14,000 and under is extremely











5.5.4 Plumbing Facilities*

Because of its inherent- impact on water and sewer services, it is important to note the scope of the housing situation with regard to the provision of plumbing facilities. The U. S. Bureau of the Census, which is the primary source of data for this subject, provides the foflowitig definition: pluamng facilities include toilet facilities, bathing facilties, and water supply. Tabulations of plumbing facilities are considered a measure of "housing quality. Housing "nts are classified by plumbingt faciities As. follows:

1, With a// plumbly fiiies- housing urtits which have piped hot and cold water inside the structure, flush toilet, and bathtub or shower made& th stutr for use only Iby the occupant of the ui (including raorne rs, boarders,and other nonrelatives) are considered to-have all plumbingfailities.

2. Lackng sorn &rWIl plumbingfiities-housing units which tack one
or more plumbing facilities, Ii~e., which lack piped hot and/or cold 'water, lack toilet or bathtub, or have toilet or bathing facilities used also by occupants of another unit.

TAbW S 5 is basd on this set of definitions. As is evident from the table, the: problem is
46*kito in the smaller communities.

%59 Hobsing Conditions

*lle'the status of plumbing facil ities has often been used As a prime indicator of howing conditis, it does not provide a complete picture. Housing units without
hunhing may be substhetial.

*trtif Central FlRedda Regional Planning Council conduced a visual housi%, codioms survey of the incorporated areas within the county (except
4Wh 0e4* The results of that survey are indicated i~n Table 5-6,. 'For the Gainesville at see aMe a condition rating 'for residential structures using tax assessors' records was
400Base on ths evaluaticthethod it wag estimated, that approximately 10 percent iped, 18,,pe~ry) deeriorating, and 72 percent sound.




......... ...... ..... ........... .. ...
OEM












IT
..... .. .. ...

RETAIL SALES IN T USMDS OF DOLLARS
FOR THE PERIOD 1960-1970 ALACHUA COUNW
.... ... .. ............... ....... ............... ............. .... ......

Dollar Percent
1960 1970 Increase Increase

$20,W 44,1193 $ 23,257 114

F.Ating UW drinking 4,113 12S286 80173 199

n-urdtandise 7,204 23,708 16, 229

4,749 9,459 3,710 78

31680 7,341 3,667 99

15,215 33000 17785 117..

6,575 17,334 10,759 164.:

ardware 5,783 7,977 21194 38

2A73 5,840 2,967. 103

TIRW $76,168 $183,294, $107PI26 141


"k*filc t wdyl July I qi









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]EMPLOYMENT BY MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP
FOR THE YEAR 1970
ALACHU.A COUNTY

Occupation Group N4umber Percent

Professional, technical and
kidrqd workers 10,065 25.4

Manap an$ administtatos 3,374 8.5

sale vedpers 2,828 7.1

Clercal a~dkndred workifts 7,095 17.9

t efFren and
or4,071 10.3

Oper* t$ kinded workers 3,361. 8.5
LabpA t farm 1, 7984.



Seriq1wo rs4,935 12.5

Pri to be otod Iorkers 1102.8



e seatand Emadnick Study, July 1972.


















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