Identification of physiologic races of Puccinia graminis tritici

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Title:
Identification of physiologic races of Puccinia graminis tritici
Physical Description:
26 p., 1 plate : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Stakman, E. C ( Elvin Charles ), 1885-1979
Levine, M. N ( Moses Naphtali ), 1886-1962
Loegering, W. Q ( William Quenn ), 1912-
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Puccinia graminis -- Identification   ( lcsh )
Rust fungi -- Identification   ( lcsh )
Phytopathogenic fungi   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
"May 1944 ; E-617."
Statement of Responsibility:
by E.C. Stakman, M.N. Levine, and W.Q. Loegering.

Record Information

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026196944
oclc - 779854608
System ID:
AA00024889:00001

Full Text

STATE PLANT BOARD

May 191.4 E-617



United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Administration Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine





IDENTIFICATION OF PHYSIOLOGIC RACES

OF PUCCINIA GRAMINIS TRITICI /



By E. C. Stakman, M. N. Levine, Sand Wi. Q. Loegering 2/


The last key for identifying physiologic races of Puccinia
r-raminis tritici was issued January 1, 1938. It listed 162 races;
the present key includes 189, as of January, 1p 1944. The list
easily could be expanded to more than 200 if minor but consistent
characters were used for differentiation between races.






V/ Cooperative investigations between the United States Department of Agriculture and the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station. Paper No. 2148 of the Scientific Journal Series of the
Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station.


V/ E. C. Stakman, Chief, Division of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, and Agent, Division of Plant Disease Control,
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Agricultural Research
Administration, U.* S. Department of Agriculture; M. N. Levine,
Pathologist, Division of Cereal Crops and Diseases, Bureau of Plant
Industry, Soils, and Agricultural Engineering; Wi. Q. Loegering,
Agent, Division of Plant Disease Control, Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine.









The Concept of Races and Biotypes

It is becoming increasingly evident that the biotype must be used as a basis for concepts regarding races. Although it is known that there are many blotypes, it would be impraetioable to attempt to distinguish all of them as it would be necessary in many cases to campare closely related ones repeatedly, side by side, in order to distinguish between them. As determination of races is made in different places and at different times in the same place, there may be considerable variation in the infection types produced by a single biotype. Likewise, the effects of different environmental conditions may obscure minor differences between closely related biotyps. Therefore it seems best to group very closely related biotypes under the same race and recognizs races only on the basis of major differences.

There appear to be almost imperceptible differences between same biotypes and perfectly obvious and consistent differences between others. For example, Reliance is considered immune from races 17 and 49; when inoculated with most isolates of these races, there is no externally visible effect. Occasional isolates, however, produce pronounced necratio fleoks. There is a somewhat greater difference between biotypes of race 59; they are essentially alike on all the differentials except Marquis, Reliance, and Kota, on which they differ as follows:

Marquis Reliance Kota

Raoe 59 2 0 0;
Rce 59L 2 2 0;
Race 59B 2+ 2 2

In the key (table 3), race 59 is found as follows: Little Club, susceptible; Marquis. resistant; Reliance, resistant Kota, resistant; Arnaut-%, resistant; Kubanka, mssothetio; Acme, susceptible; inkorn, susaeptible. As only three major classes of rust reactions are used, ell three biotypes satisfy the requirements, and it seems best to oon6ider them as belonging to the same raoe, which, then, produces infection types on Reliance and Kota ranging from 0 to 2.

Race 15 comprises two or more distinct biotypes also. All of
the differentials except Khapli are susceptible, but there are differ3nt degrees of susceptibility. The infection types given in table 4 are an average of the types produced by many isolates over a period of years in the United States. -Later, however, an isolate from Japan proved less virulent than most of those from the United States. It was tentatively called 15A. Then an isolate from Brazil was immediately recognized as being extraordinarily virulent and was therefore designated as 15B. Most of the isolates obtained from collections in the United States during the past several years are of the 15B type.







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If the virulence of each race were given a numerical value, generous use of decimals would be necessary to represent slight differences between them. If, instead of mere conventional designations, 17 and 49 represented the virulence of these two races, respectively, as determined by the behavior of those isolates on which the numerical ratings were made originally, biotypes slightly more virulent might properly be 4esignted as 17.1 and 49.1, respectively. Likewise, 59A could be represented by 59.2, and 59B by 59.5. And race 15 would comprise biotypes I4.7, 15, and 15.5.

The use of additional differential wheat varieties in identifying isolates of P. grminis tritici probably would reveal biotypes within some races that new seem very homoeneous. As an example, the differences between 15A and 15B are quantitative only. All differentials except Khapli are susceptible to both, but they are more susceptible to 15B. But Rival wheat is resistant to 15& and susceptible to 15B; and yet this is a difference in degree also; the difference between infection type 2 and type
3 or 4. If all infection types caused by all biotypes were seriated, they would range from 0 to 4+t and there would be 27 classes or infection types, without clear class intervals between most of them. The reaction classes recognized in the key-resistant, mesothetio, susceptible-are therefore rather broad classes; but to attempt to subdivide them for the determination of races would only lead to confusion and mistakes without serving a practical purpose.

The Differential Varieties

The differential wheat varieties used in identification of stem
rust races are listed in table l. They were selected almost 25 years ago, as representative of the behavior of a large number of varieties that were tested against the relatively few races discovered up to that time. As new wheat varieties were produced, they too have been tested; but no generally valuable new differentials were found, although some do enable reoognition of differences that are not apparent on the standard differentials. Eventually it may be desirable to revise the list, but for the present there seems to be no pressing need for radical change. In any case there never could be complete assurance that an isolate identified as a certain race at a given time and place is genetically identical with another isolate identified at another time and place, unless all known wheat varieties were tested under controlled conditions--which obviously is not practicable.

The present system of identification of races, then, makes it possible to recognise similar but not necessarily identical biotypes or groups of biotypes. In the very nature of things, perfection cannot be attained. There are no type specimens; there are only record for cmparing, as an example, the isolates of race 2 in 1943 with those of 1918. And yet those of 1943 fit the record of 1918 perfectly. Likewise, isolate. obtained from foreign countries during the past few years often fitb perfectly race descriptions made in the United States 20 years previously.







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The system used, therefore, seems fairly adequate for comparisons in time and space--for determining geographical distribution and population trends of races. Nevertheless, the conventional determination of' races is only a preliminary step in finding out what needs to be known.

To determine the practical importance of rust races at given times and places, it is necessary to determine, under various conditions,, the reactions of wheat varieties of the region in question to the races that
are prevalent or likely to become prevalent in that region. Naturally,. studies should be made on adult plants as well as seedlings.

Obviously, the seed of the differentials should be absolutely pure; otherwise, confusion and scimotimes erroneous conclusions are likely to result. In the past it has been difficult to maintain the purity of' some varieties, either because of changes in the prevalence of agronomic strains in general or because of mechanical mixtures in the seed lots. As an example, Jenkin is given as an alternative differential. There are several lines of this variety# all of vhich do not react to rust exactly in the same manner. It has been virtually impossible for a number of years to
obtain pure seed lots of Reliance and Kenred. Accordingly, occasional plants react quite differently from the remainder; in most seed lots there have been at least 5 percent of off-type plants. Every attempt should, of course, be made to maintain the purity of the differentials. This is just as important as the use of proper techniques in determining rust races.

Collection and Preservation of Samples

The techniques for collecting and inoculating are rather generally known; accordingly,, only a brief summary is given here.

Collection of oemla-It is best to use glassine bags, about 31 by 7 inches, for field colleiMons. When several successive collections are made on a single trip, care must be taken to avoid contamination. Samples should be taken without touching the rusted portions. When plants are heavily and rather uniformly rusted, the best procedure is to out several off and insert them part way into the glas sine bag, then holdthem, with the bag as protection, in one hand while they are cut to the required length with the other. Unless such precautions are taken, inoculm may easily be carried by the collector to contaminate subsequent collections. The open end of the envelope should be folded over only enough to hold the rusted material in place. If sealed too tightly, the .material may mold, especially if green and succulent.

Preserving inoculn. -Inoculun will retain its viability for several months if kept at moderate humidity in the dark at a temperature of about 50 Ce Fluctuating temperatures should be avoided.





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Inoculation Techniques

Growin& plants for inooulation.--Planti for inoculation can be grown in 4-inch pots. It s Test to sterilize the soil and disinfect the seed to prevent the development of root rots. There shoulC. be 15 to 20 properly spaced plants in each pot. It is best to grow these plants in a greenhouse room where no rust material is kept. Plants should be between 2 and 4 inches tall when inoculated.

Incubation chambers e --A convenient chamber consists of three parts:
(1) a plvanized-iron pan. 2 inches in diameter and 1 inches deep; (2) a cylinder made of the same material, 1 foot high, with rolled edges, which should fit into the pan easily; (3) a top of glass enclosed in a square wooden frame, which can be placed on top of the cylinder. It is important that the upper rim of the cylinder be even, so that the glass top will (over it tightly and thus promote the development of a fine film of moisture on the plants. An incubating chamber of the above dimensions will hold 12 4-inch pots and thus aoaumodate a eoplete set of differentials.

Inoculations.--If field collections contain too little rust to inoeuiT dnffertia1 hosts imdiately, spore material is first increased by inoculating Little Club or Jenkin wheat, which are generally susceptible. When there is enough rust in a collection, all differentials are inoculated at the same time. The techniques are as follows:

For small numbers: Rub the leaves gently between moistened fingers, then spray with water, preferably distilled, to wet the plants thoroughly. It is best to use an atomizer for this purpose. Inoculum is removed from the rusted material with a special type of spatula, made by flattening the end of a dentist's explorer tool. Wet the spatula before using, in order to make the spores adhere. Then run the spatula gently over each leaf to be inoculated in such a way as to insure abundant and uniform distribution of spores. Obvious precautions should be taken to cleanse the hands and disinfect the spatula between successive sets of inoculations made with different eolleotions or isolates.

Place the inoculated plants imediately in the pan of an incubation chamber, containing about 1/2 inch of water. Spray the plants gently with water and spray the inside of the cylinder and the cover thorougly to provide high initial hmmidity. Put the cover in place and leave the pots in the chamber for 36 to 48 hours, preferably in a cool place, then remove them to the greenhouse bench. Abundant ligtt and a temperature of about 700 F. favor optimuw and characteristic development of rust.

When rust pustules appear, out off with a wall pair of scissors
all plant parts above the inoculated seedling leaves to facilitate observations.

For large nuaberst Rub plants to be inoculated with moistened fingers and place the pots in incubation chambers. Spray the plants





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with water to provide a fine fila of moisture. Shake rusted material gently over the plants so that spores will drop off and fall on the plants; then brush the rusted material gently over the plants several times to insure adequate and uniform distribution of spores. Again spray gently, to replace moisture which has been brushed off in the inoculating process. a Incubate in the usual manner. This method saves labor and provides for random distribution of spores, which is Important when more than one race is present in a collection. It increases the danger of contanination, however, and is not recommended for precise work. On the other hand, it is usefi4lwhen there already is considerable information regarding the races present in a region and when it is merely desired to find out their relative prevalence. Extensive use of check plants indicates that this method is safe if ordinary precautions are taken.

Isolation booths.--To prevent spread of the rust fro one series of differential to others in the greenhouse, partitions of muslin or glass may be set up to form booths for each set of plants. This usually is sufficient to prevent contaminations, but it is a good practice to place noninoculated check plants in incubators with the inoculated plants often enough to find out whether there is contamination, either from air-borne sporesa from outside or from rust in the greenhouse*

Use of the Key and Tables (Tables 2, 3v 4)

The key for the identification of rust races is an ordinary triohotomous key. It is necessary to decide only whether varieties are resistant, msothotio, or susceptible, in order to identify races (table 3).

The principal difficulties are likely to be encountered with infection types 2 and X. The type 2 caused by many races, such as 19 and 59, is quite distinctive and could scarcely be confused with anything else. The type 2 caused by certain biotypes of race 38, however# may sometimes resemble type 3 or even type 4h, especially if the inoculated plants are exposed to rather high temperature and high light intensity. It is necessary, therefore, to know the range of type 2 in order to avoid mistakes* The same is true of type X. Under some conditions, and with some races, type X is perfectly distinct, but under exceptionally favorable conditions this type may become X++ and frequently be virtually indistinguishable fro a type 4. This may seem somewhat confusing, particularly to those who have not had opportunity to become intimately acquainted with the range of infection types. It is suggested, therefore, that if an isolate does not fit the table, the above facts be kept in mind and attempt be made to find out what the race would be if a somewhat questionable type 4 were type 2. Moreover, if a certain isolate agrees in all particulars with the infection types given for a certain race. except for an X, it would be well to examine the material more closely or to repeat the inoculation.

The infection types given in table 4 are the means derived from
averaging the types produced by a number of isolates of the race under a considerable range of conditions. From what has already been said about





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closely related biotypes and the effect of enviromental conditions, it probably is clear that infection types may fluctuate considerably about the mean.

As previously mentioned, it has been the practice of the writers not to recognize races except on the basis of differences in the major classes, that is, resistant, susceptible, or mesothetic. For example, if the infection type for Reliance for a given race is listed as O and an isolate agrees in all respects except that the infection type on th3 s variety is I or 2 instead of 0, it is likely that the isolate represents a new biotype, which, however, the writers would be disinclined to consider as a separate race. A good example is race 59. As indicated in the footnote of table 4, there are three clearly recognizable biotypes, but the key does not distinguish between them.

The key and table 4 should be used with the above facts in mind.
Ther* often is a considerable range in infection type of a single biotype because of differences in environmental conditions. And some biotypes are so nearly alike that it seems best to consider them as a single race.

Field collections often contain a mixture of rames, which can be detected on one or more of the differential varieties. Saaetimes it is possible to identify the races even in a mixture because only certain races could cause the particular combination of infection types. For example, races 17 and 19 produce essentially the sam infection types on all of the differentials except Marquis. Race 17 produces type 3 or 4 on Marquis, whereas 19 produces type 2. No other combination of known races produces this combination of infection types; consequently, it is possible to identify both races and to estimate the percentage of each in the oelleotion. Identification is not always so easy, however, and it is then necessary to resort to isolations from single pustules of the various types represented.,

fxtures of races usually are most apparent on Marquis, the durius other than Kubanka and Acne, and on Zinkorn and Vernal. On Marquis there often are type-2 and type-4 pustules. On the durams, Rikorns and Vernal there often are type 1 and type 3 or 4. The mixtures are usually quite evident on the durus, and on Rinkorn arid Vernal, because there is a distinat difference between the infection "ypes. But it is smeties more difficult to detect mixtures on Marqpis, because there sometimes is a tendenoy for heavy infection of typo 4 to obscure that of tpe 2. Moreover, as pointed out previously, eertain races that noemally produce type 2 on Marquis may, under extremely favorable conditions, produce a type resembling 3 or 11. Occasionally mixtures may appear like type X, but the difference usually is apparent to auymz who has had eonsiderable experience.

As it often is desired to learn not only whieh races are present
in a collotion but also the relative proportions of each, it is important first to inoculate with a random sample of the rust in collections. This





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random distribution of inoculum is best attained by the brushing method described under *Inoculation Techniques. It usually is possible to determine the proportions easily by visual inspection. As an example, mixtures of races 17 and 56 have been common in the United States in recent years. The infection types follows

LC Ma Rel K Arn Mnd Spa ub Ao Enk Ver Kpl

Race 17 4- 0 3+ 4- 3++ 34+ 3 1: 1:
Race 56 4 3+ 3+ 3+ 1= 1s 1: 3+ 3+ 1 1: 1It can be concluded that races 17 and 5 are present if the number of uredia on Reliance corresponds with the mber of fleeks. or type-1 uredi4a on Arnautka, Mindum, Spelmar, and Rinkorn, and if the umber of type 3 or
4 uredia on Arnautka, Mindum and Spelmar corresponds with the number of similar uredia on EZinkorn. It is then possible also to estimate the relative proportions of the two races in the collection.

The method of estimation and separation of races is described and illustrated more fully in *Physiologio Races of Pucinia graminis in the United States in 1939," by E. C. Staban and q.Q Loering 1S. Dept. Agr., Bur. Ent. and P. Q. 3-522. The method is described in the next three paragraphs.

Figure 1 represents the results of inoculating the differential
varieties of wheat with the rust as it was obtained from the field. There are two infection types on Marquis, types 4 and 2. Obviously, therefore, there are at least two races present. On Reliance there are type-4 pustules only, but the number is only about 33 percent of the total number of pustules on Marquis. On Arnautka, Mindum, Spelmar, and Einkorn the number of type-1 pustules corresponds with the total number of pustules on Relianoe. It seems likely, therefore, that the race causing the large pustules on Reliance iu causing the sall ones on the three dur as and Einkorn. It would seem that it might also be producing the type-2 pustules on Marquis, but knowledge of races makes this seem doubtful. The most likely comnbinations would be races 17. 19, and 56, but this is not certain. Therefore, inoculations were made as indicated in the diagram, and the results prove that this surmise was correct. In this ease, then, three violations were made: Isolate I proved to be pure race 191 isolate II was pure race 56; and isolate III contained both raoe 19 and race 17, the only differenee being that 17 produces type 4 pustules on Marquis and 19 produces type-2.

It turns out, then. that three isolates were obtained from this
collection of rust. In a given collection the number of isolates or isolations corresponds with the umber of races identified. In the illustration chosen, for exmeaple, several other methods could have been used for arriving at the saone result. A limited number of the differential varieties, known as a half series," could have been Iooulated with rust from the type-I pustules on the three durmas or Einkorn (after increasing the rust on a susceptible variety to obtain enough inoculum), but race 6





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would have been identified from these isolations as it was when transfers were made from Reliance. Even though race 56 had been obtained in several series of isolations from one collection, it still would count as one isolate.

A "half series" is shown in figure 1 and includes the varieties Marquis, Reliance, Kota, Arnautka, Kubanka, and Einkorn. From long experience it has been found that Arnautka, Mindum, and Spelmar react alike to practically all the canon races of stem rust, as do Kubanka and Aeme. Therefore, after observing similar mixtures of type-4 and type-l pustules on Arnautka M1indum, and Spelmar, and complete susceptibility on Kubanka and Aame, it is sufficient to inoculate one variety from each group. Arnautmka and Kubanka are ommonly used for this purpose. In the case of Vernal and Khapli, which were completely resistant in the illustrations used, it must be concluded that these two varieties are resistant to all races in the mixture and need not be tested further. If either of these varieties shows a mixture of two infection types, then that particular variety must be included in the "half series." If there is doubt in any case concerning an identification made on the basis of a "half series," the isolate is tested on a complete series of differentials.


Table 1.-Differential varieties of Triticum app. used in identifying
physiologic races of Puooinia graminis tritici

Triticum compaotum Triticum durum
Little Club, C. I'a No. 4066b Arnmatka, C. I. No. 1493
Mindum, C. I. No. 5296
Triticum vulgare pelmar, C. I. No. 6236
Marquis, C. I. No. 364 Kubanka, C. I. No. 2094
Reliance, C. I. 7370b Acme, C. I. No. 52864
Xota, C. I. No. 5878 Triticum dicoecaum
Triticum monooococum Vernal, C. I. No. 3686
Rinkorn, C. I. 2433 Khapli, C. I. No. 013

a C : Cereal Investigations accession number. b Certain lines of Jenkin, C. I. 5177, notably Hood, C. I. 11456, may
be substituted for Little Club; and, generally, Kanred, C. I. 5146,
for Reliance.





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Table 2.--Infeotion types produced by physiologic races of Puccinia
gaminis tritioi on differential varieties of Tritioun app.&

(0) IMME-No uredia developed; hypersensitive flecks sometimes present and designated by a semioolon, thus, 0;

(1) VERY RESISTANT-Uredia minute; surrounded by distinct neerotio
areas

(2) MODERATELY ]RESISTANT-Uredia small to medium; usually in green
islands surrounded by a decidedly ohlorotic or neurotic
border

(3) MODERATELY SUSCEPTIBZLE--Uredia medium in size; coalescence infrequent; no neerosis, but ohlorotio areas may be present,
especially under unfavorable growing conditions

(4) VERY SUSCEPTIBLE--Uredia large, and often coalescing; no necrosis,
but ohlorosis may be present under unfavorable growing
conditions.

(X) BETEROGEEOUS-Uredia variable, sometimes including all infection
types and intergradations between them on the same leaf;
no mechanical separation possible; on reinoculation mall
uredia may produce large ones, and vice versa



a Plus and minus signs are used to indicate variation within a given types ++ and : indicate the upper and lower limits, respectively, of each type. The symbol indicates a variation between 4 and for the type.


Relation of infection types to rust-reaction classes
used in the analytical key, table 3

In the key, table 3, only three classes of rust reaction are used

RESISTANT includes infection type 0, 1, and 2
MESOTBETIC includes infection type I
SUSCEPTIBIE includes infection types 3 and 4








Table 3.-Key for identifying physiologic races of Puccinia graminis tritici
on the basis of their pathogenicity on 12 differential varieties of
Triticum spp.

Physiologic Races related to those Reaction of differential varieties race (key designated in key, but not
number) necessarily interrelated

Little Club resistant
Marquis resistant
Arnautka resistant........................ 138
Arnautka susceptible......................150
Marquis mesothetic............................99
Marquis susceptible
Khapli resistant......................... .151
Khapli susceptible. ...................... 41
Little Club mesdthetic
Marguis resistant
Kubanka resistant
Einkorn resistant........ ............105 111i
Einkorn susceptible.............. .....*.160 102
[ubanka mesothetic.... ...................68 69
Kubanka susceptible........................72
Marquis mesothetic............................58 121
Marquis susceptible
Reliance resistant........................161 21
Reliance susceptible......................144 40
Little Club susceptible
Marquis resistant
Reliance resistant
Kota resistant
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka resistant
Acme resistant
Einkorn resistant..........111 47,50,70,71,105 Einkorn susceptible........102 104,112,160,167,180 Acme susceptible................2 48,59,75,162
Kubanka mesothetic
Acme resistant
Vernal resistant...........180 102,112,166,167
Vernal mesothetic..........167 102,180,182 Vernal susceptible.........182 167,181 Acme mesothetic................50 47,111,159,186
Acme susceptible
Einkorn resistant......... 139 50,186 Einkorn susceptible.........59 2,25,48,75,162
Kubanka susceptible
Acme resistant...............166 180
Acme susceptible
Einkorn resistant i
Vernal resistant........186 50,159Z4AT PL Vernal susceptible.......27 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant.........25 59,118 Vernal susceptible.......69 68





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T able .5, 1p. 2

Reaction of differential varieties Key Rac elated races

Arnautka mesothetic
Acme mesothetio .....................47 16,950,11-1
Acme susceptible ...................*48 2,14,59,75,178
Arnautka susceptible
Mindum resistant. ............ .00 0 .6 L78
Mindum mesothetic ............ ...... .178 6,14,948
PMindum susceptible
Kubenka resistant ...... ooo.......4
Kubazka mesothetic ............. o45 5
Kubanka susceptible
Einkorn resistsn......1 47,81,94
Linukorn susceptible Vernal resistant......... .14 48,62,88,91,1l78 Vernal susceptible ......0..55 45,91 Kota susceptible
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka mesothetic
Vernal resistant .. ........ ..... 140 105,155
Vernal susceptible....... 00.*65
Kubanka susceptibl... ..... ... o... .145
Arnautka susceptible
Mindum resistant.... o*........ ...... .28
Mindum susceptible
Vernal resistant.. ..........9 78,168
Vernal susceptible .... o........ 123 120
Reliance susceptible
Kota resistant
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka resistant
Acme resistant ................. 155
Acme susceptible.,......... .....07 152,171,176
Kubanka, mesothetic
Acme resistant ....... ..*........ .66
Acme susceptible
Vernal resistant ............ 152 7,33,171,175
Vernal mesothetic... ........ 175 7,51,152
Kubanka, susceptible
Vernal resistant. ..... 9........ .55 152,172
Vernal susceptible... ..... *.....5l 175
Arnautka susceptible
Mindum mesothetic
Vernal resistant ............... 151 10
Vernal susceptible ... .......... 89 85
Mindum susceptible
Einkorn resistant.. .......600600.95
Kinkorn susceptible
Vernal reoistnt............ .10 96,151
Vernal susceptible..........85 89





Table 5, p. 5

Reaction of differential varieties Key race Related races

Kota susceptible
Arnautka. resistant
Einkorn resistant ......... .. ..... 17S
Einkorn susceptible
Vernal resistan........ ...... .177
Vernal susceptible ............ 109
Arnautka iesothetic .................. 58 59
Arnautka susceptible
Mindum mesothetic ................0174 98
Mindum susceptible
Einkorn resistant ...... .. .. ...98 65,1l74
Einkorn susceptible
Vernal resistant ............ 59 58,179
Vernal susceptible ......... 115 Marquis mesothetic
Reliance resistant
Kota resistant
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka resistant
Acme resistant
Einkorn resistant Vernal resistantao......71 70,11
Vernal meeothetic,,,,....70 71,111 Edikorn siiceptible.oos....104 102 Acme susceptible .............. 185
Xubanka mosothetic
Vernal resistant ........ *.....U2 45,102,180
Vernal susceptible ............ 181 162
Xubanka susceptible .............. U8 25,44
Arnautka meoothetic.....*..........,165 119
Arnautka susceptible
E.Inkorn resistant
Vernal resistant.............. .81 16,75,94
Vernal susceptible ............ 169 184
IEinkorn susceptible
Vernal resistant ...... ..... .*88 14,24,6291
Vernal susceptible ............l-gr 57,117,165
Kota mesothetic
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka nexothetic
Acme resistant ...... *.........168
Acme susceptibl**.............162 1,2,59,61
Kubanka susceptible............... 92 176
&rnautka meohtc.........5 2,17,37,48,59,78
Arnautka susceptible
ginkorn resistant ........... .. .. 94 16,21,*81
Einkorn susceptibleo............... 91 9,14,85,88,120
Kota susceptible
Arnautka resistant
Kubanka meaothetic
Kinkorn resistant ............. 1U 80
'Kinkom susceptible
Vernal resistant ........... 155 1,61,106,140
Vernal mesothetic .......... 105 57,95,140,156




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Table 5, p. 4

Reaction of differential varieties Ke race Related races

Kubanka susceptible
Vernal resistant ....... #......156 1,9157
Vernal mesothetic ............. 157 57,9156,154
Vernal susceptible ........ 9..0154 57,157

Arriautka susceptible

Hindam susceptible ,.
Vernal resistant ...............*78 17,19,75,158
Vernal uaesothetic .............158 9,9190780120,149
Vernal moiceptible ............ 120 9,91,123,149,156,168
Rella3rce mesothstic,
Arnaiitka mesothetic...........18 15
Arnautka susceptible..oo................62 11,14,88,96,114,179
Reliance susceptible
Kota resistant
Xubanka mesothetic..,................171 7,5,74,152,172
Kubanka susceptibeoooo............172 55,171
Kota nesothetic...o....o. ..............96 10,11,62,179
Kota susceptible
Arnautka reitn..........4 82
Arnautka susceptible
Mindau mesothetic
Vernal resistant .............. 115 1-1,179
Vernal susceptible ............106 15,87
Nindua susceptible
Eikrn resistant ......... voo..65 54,98
ginkorn susceptible ........... 179 Ut59162v960,ll5
Marqis susceptible
Reliance resistant
Kota resistant
Arnqutka resistant
Mind=m resistant
Kubanka resistant
Vernal resistazit............54
Vernal susceptibl.*..*.oo*.l54 Xubanka meotheticae....o..45 1-12
Kubazaka susceptible Kinkorn resistant Vernal resistant.o..... 155 Vernal susceptible.*o.... 79 linkrn susceptible Vernal. resistant .........4 118 Vernal susceptible ...... 121 58 94"da. gmsceptible...............152
krnautka susceptible
lisdum resistant. ... ....... ... .141 142
Miadis mesothetic...,........142 24,141
Mindum susceptible
lubezIka reaiotant..o.*.**....46 55
Kubankaueohtc......5 48,117




15

Table 5, p. 5

Reaction of differential varieties Key race Related races

Kubanka, susceptible Einkorm resistant
Vernal resistant ..........75 81 Vernal susceptible ....... 184 169 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant
Khapli resistant ....... 24 88,1l42 Khapli susceptible..... .42 Vernal susceptible .......l117 55,119g Kota mesothetic. ....... .. .. .. ... ...... .170 116
Kota susceptible
Axnautka resistant
Kubanka resistant.... .............. .60 49
Kubanka mesothetic
Acme mesothetic
Vernal resistant ............ 128 1129,61,159
Vernal mesothetic ...........l159' 57,g3,124,128
Acme susceptible Einkorn resistant
Vernal resistant ......... 49 60,9176 Vernal susceptible ........ 80 185 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant ...........61 1,128,155,162
Vernal susceptible .... 00..95 57,105,159 Kubanka susceptible
Acme mesothetic....oooo.....o..124 57,159
Acme susceptible
Einkorn resistant. ..... o... o176 49,92 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant...... 0..l0 61,128,136,155,162 Vernal susceptible....*o*O.57 95t105,124,154,157,159
Arnaiitka mesothetic
Acme mesothetic
Vernal resistant... ... . ....... 29 17,128
Vernal susceptible. .............. .50 9,9149
Acme sucpil..........6 9p851149
Arnautka susceptible
Mindun resistant ......... oooe...26
Mindum inesothetic
Kubanka mesotetic......... ....90 Ri
Kubanka susceptible ............50 9,1l49
Mindum susceptible
Kubanka resistant
Vernal resistant..... ........5 57
Vernal susceptible ............ 8
Kubanka mesothetic. ............. .57 5,17,75
Kubanka susceptible Zinkorn resistant
Vernal resistant .......... 21 90,94,161 Vernal susceptible ....... 116 170
Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant .......... 17 29,57,75,78,85,114




-16

Table 5, p. 6

Reaction of differential varieties Xey race Related races

Vernal mesothetic ..... ...85 9,17,76,91,149 Vernal susceptible......... .9 30,76,86,91,120,149,150,
156,158
Reliance 119tei. ......... ..24 U17,962
Reliance susceptible
Kota resistant
Arnautkca resistant
Mindum resistant
Kubanka mesothetic
Kinkorn resistant........ .*64
Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant .......... 74 55,171 Vernal susceptible...... .108 Kubanka susceptible
Acme resistant. ............ .*9137
Acme susceptible.....9oo......35 74,171,*172.
Miiidum susceptible ........ ....0000155
Arnautia mesothetic ......... 06*000000*051 122
Arnautka susceptible
Mindum mesothetic............ ...*00086
Mindum susceptible
Einlcorn resistant
Vernal resistant.............107
Vernal susceptible ........145 129 Einorn, susceptible,9..........122 51
Kota mesothetic
Acme msothetic. ..... .............. ..165 15,911
Acme susceptible .......... .. 2 40,145
Kota susceptible
Arnautka resistant
Mizidum resistant
Kubanka resistant
Einkorn resistant ............148
Einkorn susceptible ...........3 3 6
Kubanka mesothetic Acme mesothetic
Zinkorn resistant.........127 56,125,126 &Lnkorn susceptible Vernal resistant .......01 18,156 Vernal susceptible ...... 67 52 Acme suseeptibl* Sinkorn resistant Vernal resistant ....... 125 568,127,.146, Vernal mesathetic ...... 146 97,125,147 Vernal susceptible ...... 97 148 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant***&* ...56 59,18,82,101 Vernal mesotetic ....... 82 36,5284 Vernal susceptibleo...52 67,82 Kubanka susceptible
Acme resistant. s00000s0000000.20 Acme mesothetic..............164 147




-17

Table 3, p. 7

Reaction of differential varieties Key race &ae ae

Acme susceptible Einkorn resi stant Vernal resistant. ........56 125,127 Vernal susc,.tible.....147 146,164 Zinkorn .uc~ie....8 36,101
Mindum susceptible
,pelmar resistant...,.*.. ...... 25
Spelmar susceptible............22
Arnautka mesothetic
Einkorn resistant..................126 54,$127
Linkorn susceptible ..... 0...........52 11
Arnautka susceptible

Mindum mesothetic. ................... .87 15,106
Mindum susceptible
Spelmar resistant ......... ......187
Spelmar susceptible Kubanka resistant .............1633
Kubanka susceptible Acme resistant........ *0100 Acme susceptible Einkorn resistant Vernal resistant......34 63977,126 Vernal mesothetic....77 34,40 Vernal susceptible ... 40 77,129,144 Einkorn susceptible Vernal resistant..... 1U 32,62,96,110,115,114,179 Vernal mesothetic ... 110 11,15,165
Vernal susceptible Khapli resistant. .15 87,10.6,110,165,188 Khapli susceptible







Table 4 -Mea infection types prodaced by physiojogic Mce orPgc ci-ai graiuinis tritieli on differential varieties of Tritium a",p.-:

Pbysioogic'Mean reaction of differential varieties
race A





1.... 4 4- 0 S+ 1= 1 1= 5+ 544 5 0; 1=

2.... 4 2-- 2=- 2- 1- 1 1= 1+ 5++ 5+ 1- 0;

5.... 4 4- 4; 5+ 1= 1= 1- 1+ 5+- 5+ 1= 3;

4.......9 4+ 2- 1- 2+i 4= S+ 34+ 2 5++ 5+ 1= 1

5....... 4 4- 0; 3 4= 54+ 544 144 5+ 3 0; 0;

6 -00*000 4 2 1= 0; 5+ 2-- 2= 1 5+ 5 0; 0;

7....,,.gg 4 2= 5+ 1= 1= 1++ 1- 3+5-4 5- 1 1-,

s8..0..6. 4 4 0; 4- 4= 54+ 4-- 0; 5 5 4 0;

9 ...... 4 4- 0 5++ 4- 4-- 4-= 4= 34+ 5+ 4+ 110 -.0*0.0 4+ 2- 5++ 2 4 4 4 54+ 4- 5+ 1= =

11.... 4- 4-- 5+4- 5+ 4-- 4-- 4-- 5+4 5+4 3 1= 1=

12.... 4+ 4- 4-- 5+ 4-- 1 1++ 144 5+ 54-4 1= 0;

15.... 4 4- 5++9 5+4- 4= 5++ 5+- 2- 5+4- 3 1 1

14.... 4+ 2- 1- 1+4- 3594 344 3+ 54+ 5+ 4- 5 5 1= 0;

*15 -m 4 4- 4-- 544 4-- 4-- 4-- 344 544 54+9 4+ 1=

i18.... 4- 2= 0 1 5+4- 5+ 544 5+ .4-- 1= 1= 1

17....... 4 4- 0; 5+ 4-= 4-- 40 5++ 3+4- 5 1= 1

18 ....... 4 4- 4-- 5+4- 1 1= 1- 344 544 5+ 1- 1+

19.a.a...a. 4 2- 0; 5- 4=w 4= 4-- 5++- 544 5 0; 1=

20 0 0 go* 4 4-- 4-- 4-- 144 1- 1+4- 54+ 144 S+ 1= 121.... 4 4 0 5++ 4- 4- 4- 4,-- 5+ 1- 0; 1





Table 4. p. 2


Physiologic Mean reaction of differential varieties
rAce r4
0 0
w 0 9 k
0 -H -,4
r 0 r-i
+> C 4
4-) r4
4) 0 VA 04 Q)

22*00#*G* 4+ 4+ 4 3 1 4 4- 0; 5+ 1- o;

25oooo*oo 4 2 1- 1= 1 1= 1- 3+ 3++ 3 0; 0;

24**9*000 4 4= 0; 2= 4-- 4-- 4-- 3++ 5+ 5+ 1= 0;

250000000 4 4 5+ 5 1- 5 1= 5 5++ 3 1= 126..*Oooe 4 4 0; 5 4- 1= 5++ 1= 4= 5 1- 1+

27*00*00* 4-- 2 0 0; 1= 1 1- 4-- 5++ 1= 4+ 1++

28****ooo 4 2 0; 5 4- 1 4-- 5 5 5 1= 0;

29*99***e 4 4- 0 5 X++ 1+ X+ x X+ 3 1- 150*oooe*o 4 4 0; 5++ 1++ X+ 1+ 1+ X++ 5+ 4=

sl**00000 4+ 4 3++ 2- X- X+ X+ x X+ 5+ 152,000 4 4= 4-- 5+ 1+ X+ X+ X- X+ 5 1=

55060*00* 4+ 2 4 1+ 1= 1- 1 4= 5++ 5 154.900*00 4+ 4- 4- 4= 4 4= 4= 4+ 5++ 1= 0; 1+

550000060 4 4= 5+ 0; 1= 1- 1= 5+ 3++ 5 0; 1

56..**Oo* 4 4 4- IVA+ 1= 1= 0; x 5++ 5+ 0; 1570*0606* 4 4- 0 5++ 4-- 4= 4= X+ 5+ 5 1= 158.00*000 4 2-- 4- 3- X+ 1+ X+ X+ X++ 4- 1= 1+

59..Ooo** 4- 2= 4-- 5+ 4+ 5++ 4- 4= .744 4= 1= 140.000000 4+ 4+ 4 4+ 4+ 4+ 4 4= 4 0; 4-- 1=

41.006060 2++ 4 0 0; 4-- 4 4+ 4+ 4- 4- 1- 4c

4 4 1+ 00 4+ 4 4 4 4 4= 2-- 4c
p
45 ... 4 5++ 0 0; 0; 0; 0; x 1 5 1 0;

44..*Oooo 4 S++ 0 0; 0; 0; 0; 5+ 3+ 3 1 0;

45..Ooo*e 4 2 0 2- 4 4 4 x x




20

Table 4. p. 5

Mean rea&tipa of-differential varieties
Physiologic g
race r-4
a V
P.
4-D
(D

46e*906166 4 54+ 0 2- 4 4 4 1 1 5 5 1

47**o**Oo 4 2-1 1+ 1- X; X++ X; X+ 1-- 0; 1=

48sooe. 4+ 1 0; 1+ X+ X-- X+ X+ 4- 4-- 1= 1+

49&*G+GO** 4 4- 0 4-- 1= 1- 0; X-- 54. 1- 0; 1=

50*000000 44. 2+ 0; 2-1+ 1- 0; 0'9 X= X+ 0; 0; 0; 61******* 4 2-- 5+ 0. 0; 0; 4 4- 0;

52*000000 4 4 4- 4 1= 1= 1= X+ 4 4+ 1559oose** 4 2+ 0 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 1

54*000**o 4 5+,V 0; 0; 0; 1 5+ 1 0;

55 ....... 4 0 2- 4 4 4 x x 3

56e.6*06 4 5+ 5+ 5+ 1= 1= 1= 5+ 5+ 1= 1= 157**e***e 4 4- 0; 5+ 1 1 1 4 13+ 3 5 1

68*****&* X+ X+ 0 0; 1+ 1= 1+ 4+ 5+ 5++ 4+ 1++

590*00000 4+ 2+ 0 0; 1= 1= 1- X- 5++ 5+ 1= 0;

60.400*000 4++ 4++ 0; 5++ 0; 0; 0; 0; 5+ 1+ 0; 1= 61.000*06 4+ 4 0 5+ 0; 0; 0; 1 4+ 4 0; 0;

620*0090* 4 1+ 1+ x 4 4 4 4 4 5-04 0; 165******* 4+ X4+ 4 5" 41- 4" 4+ 44- 4P+ 1= 1= 0;

64.000000 4" 4+ 54+ 1+ 1= 0; 1= X+ so+ 1= 0; 1 66.0600 4 2 0 3 0; 0; 0; 1 4 4 4 1

66.06096 4 2 4 0; 0; 0; 0; X+ 1= 3 0 0

67 ....... 4+ 4+ 4 4 1+ 2= 2-- X= X+ 3- 44t 168ooo-oolos X+ 2-1- 0 0; 1= 1+ 1- X-f+ 4+ 4 4-f-f 0;

344 2+ 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 3+ 4-- 3 54+, 1=




21

Table 4, p. 4

Mean reaction of differential varieties Physiologic
race
0
m 0 A $4 Cd
W Id -H
9 :3 F d r-q
Cd 0 '0
A +> r 2
0 0 "A P4
0-1 U)

4+ 1+ 0; 0; 0; 01 0; 0; 0 1= I+ Oe

71t****** 4+ X- 0 0; 0; 1= 0; 1= 0; 0; 0; 0;

72.000*** X- 2 0; 0; l 1+ 1+ 4+ 4+ S+ 5+ X

7S*****9Iv 4 x 0 x x x x 1 5+ 4- 1 1

74.*09406 4 4- 5= 2+ 0; 0; 0; X- S+ 5+ 0; 1 75*6000*0 4 5+ 2+ 0; 5+ 5+ S+ 4- S+ 1 0; 1 76o****#* 4 4- 0 S+ x x x x S+ 5+ 1- 11

77..0004* 4 4 5-- 5- 5-0 5-C B-0- 4- 5+ 1+ 1

4 x 0 5= v-C 5-c C 3+ S+ 3+ 1 1

79000*004 4 4-, o 1- 1- 1- 1- 4- S+ 0; 5+ 1

8060,00000 4 3-C 0 3- 0; 0; 0; 1- 3+ 1- 3+ 1

810000000 4 X 0 1+ 4 4 4 4 4- 1- 1- 14 3+ 5+ Oj 0; 0; x .3+ 5+ 1 1

85406**** 4 1+ 5- 1- 3+ S+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 3+ 5+ 1 849*94000 4 x .3-C 5- 0; 0; 0; x 4 5+ x 1

4 4- 0 5+ 4- 4 4 4 4 5+ x 1

86**00*66 4 5+ 3+ 1+ 3+ x I x 5+ 3+ 5+ 1

87*9*9*60 4 4 4 5+ 4 x x x 5+ 3+ 4 1

8800000** 4 0 1+ 4 4 4 4 4 5+ 1 1

89..**#,* 4 2 5+ 0; 4 x x x 5+ 3+ 3+ 1

4 4 0 5+ 4 x x x 5+ 1 1

4 x 0 x 4 4 4 4- 5+ x 1

92e****** 4 x 0 x 1 1 1 4 4 1 1 1

4 5+ 0 3= 0; 0 0; x




22

Table 4. p. 5

Mean reaction of differential varieties
Physiologic
race 14
ri
0
W4 r4


94ooeeeee 4 0 x 4- 4- 4- 4- 5+ 1 1 1

95o.o. 4 2 5+ 0; 4 4 4 4 175+ 1 .1 1

96 ....... 4 x 4 x 4 4 4 4 3+ S+ .1 1

970000*00 4 5+ 4 S+ 0; 0; 0; x 5 0; 5+ 1

98.e. 4 2-- 4+ 5+ 4- 5++ 3 4-- 5- 1+ 1 1990000000 1+ x S++ 3 0; 2+ 2++ 4+ 2+ 2+ 5++ 5+4

10000*0000 5+ 4 5+ 3= 3 5- 5= 4= 1 1+ X+ 1

1010**00*0 4+ 4++ 4- 4+ 1 0; 0; X+ X- 5 0; 1+

102*99sooo 4+ 0; 1+ 0; 0; 0; 1= 1= 0. 174 0; 1= 105*000000 X+f 0 0; 0 0 0; 0; 0; 0; 2- 1= 0;

104#****** 4 X-- 0 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 914 X+ 0;

105*9***** 4 X- 0 WYI- 0) 0; 0; X- 5+ 3 x 1=

1069***eeo 4 x 5 5- 4 x x x 5 5+ 4- 1107*9essoo 4 34. 5- 0; 4 4 4 4 1- 0; 1108.99se 4 4 4- 0.. 1+ 0; 0; X+ 4- 5 5+ 11090004000 4 2+ 4 5- 1+ 1+ 1+ 4 5- 5+ 4 1

1109****** 4 4- 5 5- 5+ 114 5+ 5+ 54- 3 X- 1

111.9000 54-C 1- 0 0; Oj 0; 0; 0; 0; 1- 0; 1

112.****Oe 4 x 0 0; 0; 0; 0; X- 0; 3 0; 1

115 ...... 4 x 5-- X- X- X- 4 S+ 0; 1

114******& 4 5+ x 5+ 4 4 4 4 4- 3+ 1- 1

1150*0*000 4 2- .3= 5= 4- 4- 4 4- 4- 25+ 5+ 1

116*99*ooo 4 4- 3 4 4 4 4 4- 1 4- 1

117*we**** 4 4- 0 0; 4-- 4- 4- 4- 4 5+ 5+ 1





Table 4. p. 6

PhysilogicMean reaction of differential varieties.
races o







11.... 4 1 0 0; 4 4 4 4 4- 3+ 5+ 1120....... 4 1 0 53= 4 4 4 4 4- 5+ 5 1121.......* 4 4- 0 0; 1- 1- 1- 4 5+ 5 5+ 1

122....... 4- 5+ 4- 0; 4 4 4 4 4- 5+ 1- 1

125......0* 4 2- 0 5- 5+ 4- 4 4 4- 5+ 5+ 1

124....... 50c 0 5-c 0; 0;. 1= 3+ X 5 X- 1

125....... 4+ 4 4 4 0; 0; 0; 1 4 1= 0; 1126....... 4= 4= S+ 5+ X+ X++ X+ X- 1 1+ 1= 1127.......* 4- 4- 5++ 5+ 1= 1+ 1= x x 0; 0; 118.... 4 5+4- 0; S+ 1- 1= 1 K- X+ 5+ 1= 1129....... 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 1- 4 0

150....... 1- 2 0 0 4 4 4 4 4 3+ 0 1151..... 1- 4 0 0 4 4 4 4 4 4+ 1 1152..... 4 4 0 2 1 4 4 1 4 1 1 1

155....... 4 4 0 0 1 2 2 4 4 0 1 2

134....... 4 4 0 0; 0; 0; 0; 1 3 5 3 1

155....... 4 4 4 0; 0; S 2 4 z 1 1 1

156....... 4 1 0 3= 0; 0; 0; 4- 4 4- 1- 1

157....04.0 4 4- 4- 0; 1- 1- 1- IS 1- 5- X- 1

158....... 2 0; 0 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 1+ X- 0;

159....... 4+ 2+ 1- 24- 1- 1= 1 x 4+ 1= 1- 0;




24

Table 4t p. 7

Mean rglaction of differential varieties
Physiologic 005
race
Ok
0
H 43


l40&*o&O4* 4+ 2- 1 4-- 1+ X+ 4+ 4- 1+ 1+

l4l..0006* 4 4 1+ 0 4 1- 4 1+ 4 4 1- 1+

142.000000 4 4- 2 0 5++ 1 4 X+ 4 4 1 14+

145 ... *Go* 4 4- 4- 0 4- 4- 4- 4- 54+ 2 5++ 1=

1"00000** x 4 4 15+ 4- 4- 4- 4- S++ 1+ 5++- 1++

145.000090 4 0 2 4 0; 0.. 0". 4 4 0; 4 2

146*0000*0 4+ 4 4+ 5++ 1- 1+ 1= X+ 5++ X+ 1+

14700400*0 4-1-+ 4* 4 44- 1= 1- 4+ 4 1= 4t 1+

1480000000 4 &#- 5-f 174 1- 0; 0; 0; 3j 1- 0; 14 X+ 0 5- X+ x x x x I x 1150.0494 4 5- 0 5+ x x 4- X, 5+ 5+ 115100000** 4 1 5- 0; 4m. x x x 4- 3+ 0; 1152.000-600 4 1+ 3- 0; i 0; 0; X- TA 0; 1155000*0*0 4- 1+ 5 D; 0; 0 0 0; 0 0; X- 0;

154-000000 4 1 0 5= 1 0; 0- 4 4 5+ 4- 1

155.0WOODO 4 x 0 5-- 1 0; 0; x 4 174 0; 1

1560**0600 4 x 0 5= 4 x 1+ 5+ 4- 3+ 4- 1

4 1 0 5=. 1- 0; Oj 4 4 .11+ x 11580000000 4 x 0 5= 4 4- 4- 4- 4- 5+ x 1

159.*060 4- 4 0 5++ 1= 1= X4+ X 4-- X+ 1

160..00*00 X+ 0- 0 0; 0; 0; 1+ 0 0;

1610*0*0*0 x 4 0 54+ 4;-- 4- 4- 4= 5-++ 0; 0;

162.000000 4 1+ 0; X- 0) 0; 0; x 5 0; 1.




25
Tabl 4, p. 8

Mean reaction of differential varieties

0 *
r4
0 0
.r 0
00 a 0 4'co T
fr4 4' H4


16 .. 4- 4= 4- X 4- 4 4 4- x I1

164 ....* 4- 4= 5+ 0; 0; 0; 3-H- X 1- 5+ 0;

165.... 4 2 0; X- X- X- 1 = 5 4- 1

166...., 4- 144 2+ 0; 1= 0; 0; 4- 0; 5+ 1= 1167....o 4 2- 244 1- 0; 0; 0; 1 0; 5++ X 1

168 .... 4 x 0 x 0; 0; 0; x 0; 3 5+ 1

169 .... 4 x 0 0 4 4 4 4 4 0; 5+ 1

170.... 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 0; 4 2

171 .... 4 X+ 3- 0; 1 0; 0; X- 5+ 5+ 0; 1

172 .... 4 x 3- 2- 1- 0; 0; 4- 4 3 0; 1175.-.. 4 2 4- 3- 0; 0; 0; 4 4- 1- 0; 1

174.... 4 2 4- 5= 4- x 1 4- 4- 1- 0; 1

175....6 4 2+ 4 1 1- 0; 0; X 4- 5+ 1 1176.... 4 4 0 4- 1- 1- 1- 4 4- 1 0; 1177 .... 4 2 4- 5- 1- 1- 1- 4- s+ 5 0; 1178.... 4 1 0; 0; 4 1- I X+ 4 5+ 0; 1

179.... 4 1 4 4- 4 4 4 4 4- 5+ 1- 1180 .... 4+ 2= 0; 1= 1+ 1= 1- X+ 1= 5+ 0; 1+ 181--. 4 X+ 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; x 1- 5+ 3+ 0;

182'-.. 4- 2+4- 2+ 0; 1++9 1+ 1 X+ 1 3 5 1+

183-0. 4 x 0 3= 1- 0; 0; 1 4- 1- 4- 11849-. 4 5 0 0; 3 5 3- 4= 4 1 4 1

185-000 4 X- 0 0; 1m 0; 1= 1= 4 1= 0; 1





-26

Table 4, p. 9


Mean reaction of differential varieties

Physiologic ,
race U -P
4,3 0 -r4 CS
r4 0 4 0 0

186.... 4 1 0 0; 1 0; 01 4= 4= 1 0; 2

187.... 4 4 5 5 4- 5++ 2 1++ 1++ 0 2 1

188.... 4 X+ X+ X+ X++ X++ X+ X+ X+ 5+ 5++ 1+

189.... 4 4 4 3+ 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4c





Infection types given in table 4 are produced by biotypes most frequently encountered up to the present. There may be some deviation from the recorded
types when other closely related biotypes are encountered. The following are the most important examples:

Race 15A has a tendency to produce weaker infection than is represented by
infection types recorded in the table; biotype B has a tendency to produce heavier infection than those recorded.

Race 55A has a tendency to produce type 2= on Reliance, and there is a
tendency toward the production of type X on arnautica, Mindum, and Spelmar. This biotype may eventually be described as an independent race, depending on the results of thorough studies of the type-X infection.

Race 59A produces type 2 on Marquis and Reliance. Race 59B has a tendency to produce type 2+ on Marquis and type 2 on Reliance and on Kota.

Race 69A has a tendency to produce type X on Kubanka. Race 69B produces type 2 on Kota and type X on Kubanka. These two biotypes may eventually be described as a new race on the basis of the X reaction on Kubanka.








4 w ui 0 m 7










k4 i >ACE
INOCULATION o a
FROM FIELD o O A O
COLLECTION B t o a 0 0
0 oo



ISOLATE Ln RACE
III 9 17& 19



00 o 0
ISOLATE 0 0 RACE
II 0 56
0 0
0 a0


00
ISOLATE 9 e RACE
I ,1I II 19
0

FIGURE 1. DIAGRAM SHOWING METHOD OF ISOLATING
RACES FROM A MIXED FIELD COLLECTION





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



3 1262 09227 9966 ..... . . . .