Current salary schedules of federal officers and employees together with a history of salary and retirement annuity adju...

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Title:
Current salary schedules of federal officers and employees together with a history of salary and retirement annuity adjustments
Physical Description:
v. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Post Office and Civil Service
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Officials and employees -- Salaries, etc -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Vols. for <Mar. 16, 1983-> distributed to some depository libraries in microfiche.
Statement of Responsibility:
Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, House of Representatives.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Schedules for 19<72>-73 are cumulative from 1945.
General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 90 H622-2, CIS 89 H622-3, CIS 88 H622-2, CIS 87 H622-5, CIS 85 H622-1, CIS 84 H622-1, CIS 84 H622-9, CIS 83 H622-2, CIS 82 H622-4, CIS 81 H622-1, CIS 78 H622-14, CIS 77 H622-8, CIS 77 H622-16, CIS 76 H622-13, CIS 75 H622-1, CIS 75 H622-12, CIS 74 H622-5, CIS 73 H622-1, CIS 72 H622-2, CIS 71 H622-11, CIS 71 H622-2, CIS 70 H622-3, CIS 70 H622-1
General Note:
Previously classed: Y 4.P 84/10:Sa 3/16/
General Note:
Description based on: Apr. 26, 1982.
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from Congressional Information Service, Inc.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 025003299
oclc - 02712417
lccn - 74602078 //r772
issn - 0364-9113
Classification:
lcc - KF49
System ID:
AA00024826:00001

Full Text
N /


95th Congress COMMITTEE PRINT J ComMrrrE
2d Session I RIrNT No. 95-21






CURRENT SALARY SCHEDULES OF FEDERAL OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES TOGETHER WITH A HISTORY OF SALARY AND RETIREMENT
ANNUITY ADJUSTMENTS




COMMITTEE ON
POST OFFICE AND CIVIL SERVICE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES




0 /
&I

/ i/


\N- UVEM\BER 20. 1978






Printed for the use of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 35-450 WASHINGTON : 1978





























COMMITTEE ON POST OFFICE AND'CIVIL SERVICE
ROBERT N. C. NIX, Pennsylvania, Chairman MORRIS K. UDALL, Arizona, 'Vice Chairman JAMES M. HANLEY, New York EDWARD J. DERWINSKI, Illinois
CHARLES H. WILSON, California JOHN H. ROUSSELOT, California
RICHARD C. WHITE, Texas JAMES M. COLLINS, Texas
WILLIAM D. FORD, Michigan GENE TAYLOR, Missouri
WILLIAM (BILL) CLAY, Missouri BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York
PATRICIA SCHROEDER, Colorado TRENT LOTT, Mississippi
WILLIAM LEHMAN, Florida JIM LEACH, Iowa
GLADYS NOON SPELLMAN, Maryland TOM CORCORAN, Illinois
HERBERT E. HARRIS 11, Virginia, STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, New York MICHAEL 0. MYERS, Pennsylvania CECIL (CEC) HEFTEL, Hawaii ROBERT GARCIA, New York LEO J. RYAN, California
DAVID MINTON, Executive Director and General Counsel THEODORE J. KAZY, Minority Staff Director ROBERT E. LOCKHART, Deputy General Counsel J. PIERCE MYERS, Assistant General Counsel HERMAN THOMPSON, Assistanlt General Counsel JAMES CREGAN, Assistant General Counsel












CONTENTS

Part I. Current salary rates: page
General Schedule ------------------------------------ 1
Schedules for the Department of Medicine and Surgery of
the Veterans' Administration ------------------------- 2
Foreign Service Officers Schedule ----------------------- 3
Foreign Service Staff Officers and Employees Schedule----- 4 Postal Service Schedules ------------------------------- 5
Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries -------------- 9
Part II. History of salary adjustments:
Th President ---------------------------------------- 10
The Vice President ------------------------------------ 10
Speaker of the House --------------------------------- 11
President pro tempore of the Senate -------------------- 11
Majority and minority leaders of the House and Senate- 12 Members of Congress --------------------------------- 12
Cabinet officers --------------------------------------- 13
The Executive Schedule ------------------------------- 14
Federal judges --------------------------------------- 15
Classified employees (includes statutory systems and pay
fixed bv administrative action) ----------------------- 17
Postal employees ------------------------------------- 18
Salary vetoes ---------------------------------------- 20
Commission on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial
Salaries -------------------------------------------- 21
Executive Salary Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act --------- 23
Pay comparability ------------------------------------ 25
Part III. Retirement annuity adjustments -------------------------- 29
Cost-of-living adjustments in annuities (an explanation of
5 U.S.C. 8340) -------------------------------------- 31
(111)




















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SCHEDULES FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND
SURGERY OF THE VETERANS' ADMINISTRATION
October 1978

Minimum Maximum

SECTION 4103 SCHEDULE
Chief Medical Director ------------------------------- (1) 4 $68, 909
Deputy Chief Medical Director ------------------------- (1) 3 66, 104
Associate Deputy Chief Medical Director --------------- (1) 2 63, 315
Assistant Chief Medical Director ----------------------(1) 2 61, 449
Medical Director- ......................--------2 $52, 429 2 59, 421
Director of Nursing Service -------------------------2 52, 429 2 59, 421
Director of Podiatric Service -------------------------44, 756 2 56, 692
Director of Chaplain Service -------------------------44, 756 2 56, 692
Director of Pharmacy Service -------------------------44, 756 2 56, 692
Director of Dietetic Service -------------------------- 44, 756 2 56, 692
Director of Optometric Service-........-44, 756 56, 692
PHYSICIAN AND DENTIST SCHEDULE
Director grade ------------------------------------44, 756 2 56, 692
Executive grade -----------------------------------41, 327 2 53, 729
Chief grade --------------------------------------- 38, 160 249, 608
Senior grade -------------------------------------- 32, 442 42, 171
Intermediate grade --------------------------------- 27, 453 35, 688
Full grade ----------------------------------------23,087 30,017
Associate grade ------------------------------------19, 263 25, 041
NURSE SCHEDULE
Director grade ------------------------------------ 38, 160 2 49, 608
Assistant Director grade ----------------------------- 32, 442 42, 171
Chief grade ---------------------------------------27, 453 35, 688
Senior grade --------------------------------------23, 087 30, 017
Intermediate grade ---------------------------------19, 263 25, 041
Full grade ----------------------------------------15, 920 20, 699
Associate grade -----------------------------------13, 700 17, 813
Junior grade -.-------------------------------------11,712 15,222

1 Single rate.
2 Basic pay is limited by section 4107(d) of title 38 of the United States Code to the rate for level V of the Executive Schedule. In addition, pursuant to section 304 of the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, funds are not available to pay a salary for this position or grade at a rate which exceeds the rate for level V of the Executive Schedule in effect on Sept. 30, 1978, which is $47,500.
3 Basic pay is limited by section 4107(d) of title 38 of the United States Code to the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule. In addition, pursuant to section 304 of the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, funds are not available to pay a salary for this position at a rate which exceeds the rate for level IV of the Executive Schedule in effect on Sept. 30, 1978, which is $50,000.
4 Basic pay is limited by section 4107(d) of title 38 of the United States Code to the rate for level III of the Executive Schedule. In addition, pursuant to section 304 of the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, funds are not available to pay a salary for this position at a rate which exceeds the rate for level III of the Executive Schedule in effect on Sept. 30, 1978, which is $52,500.
(2)









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8

POSTAL EXECUTIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE SALARY STRUCTURE

[Effective Oct. 7, 1978]

EAS grade Minimum Midpoint Maximum

1-$7, 175 $8,600 $10,000
2--7, 575 9, 100 10, 600
3 ---------------------------8, 000 9, 600 11, 200
4_-8, 450 10, 150 11, 800
-_-8, 900 10, 700 12, 500
6 ---------------------------9, 400 11, 300 13, 200
7 ---------------------------9, 900 12, 000 14, 000
8 ---------------------------10, 500 12, 600 14, 700
9-11, 100 13, 300 15, 500
10- 11,700 14, 000 16, 400
11 ---------------------------12, 400 14, 800 17, 300
12 ---------------------------13, 100 15, 600 18, 300
13--13, 800 16, 500 19, 300
14 ---------------------------14, 500 17, 500 20, 400
15 ---------------------------15, 400 18, 400 21, 500
16_-16, 200 19, 500 22, 700
17_-17, 100 20, 600 24, 000
18_-18, 100 21, 700 25, 300
19_-19, 100 22, 900 26, 700
20--20, 200 24, 200 28, 200
21 ---------------------------21, 300 25, 600 29, 800
22-22, 500 27, 000 31, 500
23_-23, 700 28, 500 33, 300
24 ---------------------------25, 100 30, 100 35, 100
25 ---------------------------26, 500 31, 800 37, 100
26 ---------------------------28, 000 33, 600 39, 200
27 ---------------------------- 29, 550 35, 500 41, 400
28 ---------------------------- 31,200 37,400 43,700
29------------------------ 33, 000 39, 600 46, 100
30 ---------------------------35, 000 41, 250 47, 500
31 47, 500
31 --------------------------------------------------------------- 0
32=
33-------------------------------47, 500
34 -----------------------------------------------------------------36_ 50, 000
373-----------------------------------------------------------------36--------------------------------------------------------- 5,000
38_ 55, 000

57, 500 --------------57, 500
41
42-----------------66, 000-----------66, 000








EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE AND JUDICIAL SALARIES

October 1978

Salary rate Rate
in effect established
Position Sept. 30, 1978 Oct. 1, 1978

President of the United States-' $200, 000 $200, 000
Vice President of the United States -75, 000 5 79, 100
Members of Congress, including the Resident 2 57, 500 6 60, 700
Commissioner from Puerto Rico and the Delegates from the District of Columbia,
Guam, and the Virgin Islands.
Speaker of the House of Representatives 2 75, 000 5 79, 100
President pro tempore of the Senate 2 635, 000 1 68, 600
Majority and minority leaders of the Senate 2 65, 000 5 68, 600
and the House of Representatives.
Other offices in the legislative branch:
Comptroller General of the United States- 2 57, 500 5 60, 700
Deputy Comptroller General of the 2 52, 500 5 55, 400
United States.
General Counsel of the United States 2 50, 000 5 52, s00
General Accounting Office.
Librarian of Congress ------------------ 000 52, 800
Public Printer----2 50, 000 5 52, 800
Architect of the Capitol-2 50, 000 5 52, 1800
Chief Justice of the United States-- 75, 000 79, 100
Associate Justices of the Supreme Court------ 2 72, 000 761, 000
57, ) )70
Judges, Circuit Court of Appeals ------------ I, 00 5 60 700
Judges, Court of Claims-- 500 g 60, 700
Judges, Court of Customs and Patent Appeals- 57, 500 5 60, 700
Judges, Court of Military Appeals ------------2----- 57, 500 5 60, 700
Judges, district courts-2 54, 500 5 57, 500
Judges, customs court---2 54, 500 5 57, 500
Judges, Tax Court of the United States 2 54, 500 5 57, 500
Other offices in the judicial branch:
Director, Administrative Office of the 2 54, 500 5 57, 500
U.S. Courts.
Deputy Director, Administrative Office 2 48, 500 5 51, 200
of the U.S. Courts.
Commissioner, Court of Claims---------- 2 48, 500 51,200
Referees in bankruptcy (full time maxi- 2 48, 500 5 51,200
mum).
Offices and positions under the Federal executive salary schedule in subch. I of ch. 53 of
of title 5 of the United States Code:
Level I --------------------------------- 2 (3(C, 000 5 69, 600
Level II ------------------------------ 2 57, 500 5 60, 700
Level III -----------------------------2 52, 500 5 55, 400
Level IV-2 50, 000 5 52, 800
Level V-2 47, 500 1 50, 100
Governors, Board of Governors, U.S. Postal 3 4 10, 000 10, 000
Service.
1 Statutory authority: Pullic Law 91-1, Jan. 17, 1969, 83 Stat. 3.
2 Statutory authority: Pul~lic Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 2 U.S.C. 351.
3 Statutor, authority: 39 U.S.C. 202(a).
4 Plus $300 per (lay for each meeting up to 30 per year.
5 Pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391, approved Sept. 30, 1978, funds are not available to pay a salary at a rate which exceeds the rate in effect on Sept. 30, 1978.
(9)









PART IT.-HISTORY OF SALARY ADJUSTMENTS

THE PRESIDENT

Year Amount Statutory authority

1789 --------$25, 000 Act of Sept. 24, 1789, 1 Stat. 72.
Act of Feb. 18, 1793, 1 Stat. 318.
1873 ---------50,)000 Act of Mar. 3, 1873, 17 Stat. 486.
1909 ---------75, 000 Public Law 60-326, Mar. 4, 1909, 35 Stat. 859.
1949 --------100, 000 Public Law 81-2, Jan. 19, 1949, 63 Stat. 4.
1969 --------200, 000 Public Law 91-1, Jan. 17, 1969, 83 Stat. 3.

THE VICE PRESIDENT

1789------- $5, 000 Act of Sept. 24, 1789, 1 Stat. 72.
Act of Feb. 18, 1793, 1 Stat. 318.
1853 ---------8,000 Act of Mar. 3, 1853, 10 Stat. 212.
1873 ---------10, 000 Act of Mar. 3, 1873, 17 Stat. 486.
1874 ---------8,000 Act of Jan. 20, 1874, 18 Stat. (part 3) 4.
1907 ---------12, 000 See. 4, Public Law 59-129, Feb. 26, 1907, 34 Stat. 993.
1925-------- 15, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 68-624, Mar. 4, 1925, 43 Stat. 1301.
1946 ---------20, 000 Sec. 601, Public Law 79-601, Aug. 2,'1946, 60 Stat. 850.
1949 ---------30, 000 Sec. 1, Public Law 81-2, Jan. 19, 1949, 63 Stat. 4.
1955 ---------35, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 84-9, Mar. 2, 1955, 69 Stat. 11.
1964 ---------43, 000 Public Law 88-426, Aug. 14, 1964, 78 Stat. 422.
1969 ---------62, 500 Public Law 91-67, Sept. 15, 1969, 83 Stat. 107.
1975 ---------65, 600 Automatic adjustment,, Oct. 1, 1975, Public Law 94-82,
Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1976 --------1 68, 800 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1976, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1977------- 75, 000 Recommendations of President under see. 225, Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 81 Stat. 642. 1978-----.-.. 2 79, 100 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1978, Public Law 94-82,
Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.

1Payment of salary was limited to $65,600 pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976.
2 Payment of salary limited to $75,000 pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391.
Public Law 81-2, January 19, 1949, 63 Stat. 4, granted the President an annual tax exempt expense allowance of $50,000, and the Vice President an annual allowance of $10,000, "to assist in defraying expenses relating to or resulting from the discharge of his official duties." The tax exemption on these allowances was discontinued, effective January 20, 1953, by section 619. Public Law 82-183, the Revenue Act of 1951.
Economy legislation in effect in 1932-35 reduced the Vice President's salary by 15 percent, 10 percent, and 5 percent successively during that period. Full salary was restored on April 1, 1935.

RETIREMENT
Each former President is entitled to receive for the remainder of his life a monetary allowance at a rate per annum which is equal to the annual rate of basic pay of the head of an Executive department (currently $66,000) (see sec. 6, Public Law 91-658) and the widow of
(10)1







11

a President is entitled to receive a pension of $20,000 per annum if she waives the right to any Federal annuity or pension and does not remarry before age 60 (3 U.S.C. 102, note). Participation in the civil service retirement system (5 U.S.C. 8331-8348) is available to the Vice President on his application.

SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE

Year Amount Statutory authority

1789 ----------* $12 Act of Sept. 22, 1789, 1 Stat. 71.
1816 ---------3, 000 Act of Mar. 19, 1816, 3 Stat. 257.
1818 ------- ---* 16 Act of Jan. 22, 1818, 3 Stat. 404.
1856 ---------6, 000 Act of Aug. 16, 1856, 11 Stat. 48.
1866 ---------8 000O Act of July 28, 1866, 14 Stat. 323.
1873 ---------10,)000 Act of Mar. 3, 1873, 17 Stat. 486.
1874 ---------8, 000 Act of Jan. 20, 1874, 18 Start. (part (3) 4.
1907 ---------12,)000 Sec. 4, Public Law 59-129, Feb. 26, 1907, 34 Stat. 994.
1925 ---------15, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 68-624, Mar. 4, 1925, 43 Stat. 1301.
1946 ---------20, 000 Sec. 601, Public Law 79-601, Aug. 2, 1946, 60 Stat. 850.
1949 ---------30, 000 Sec. 1, Public Law 81-2, Jan. 19, 1949, 63 Stat. 481.
1955 ---------35, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law S4-9, Mar. 2, 1955, 69 Stat. 11.
1965 ---------43, 000 Sec. 204, Public Law 88-426, Aug. 14, 1964, 78 Stat.
415, effective Jan. 3, 1965.
1969 ---------62,)500 Public Law 91-67, Sept. 15, 1969, 83 Stat. 107, effective
Mar. 1, 1969.
1975 ---------65, 600 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1975, Public Law 94-82,
Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
19760--------1 68, 800 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1976, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1977 ---------75, 000 Recommen dat ions of President under sec. 225, Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, S1 Stat. 642. 1978-------- ..2 79, 100 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1978, Public Law 94-82,
Aug. 9, 1975. 89 Stat. 419.

*Per day in session.
IPayment of salary was limited to $65,600 pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976.
2 Payment of salary limited to $75,000 pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391.

ALLOWANCE

$10,000 expense allowance (taxable) to assist in defraying expenses
relating to official duties (2 U.S.C. 31b).

PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE OF THE SENATE
Year Amount Statutory authority
1969 --------$42, 500 Same as rate for other Members prior to 1969 except when there is no Vice President, then same rate as for Vice President (2 U.S.C. 32).
1969 ---------49, 500 Public Law 91-67, Sept. 15, 1969, 83 Stat. 107, effective
Mar. 1, 1969.
1975 ---------52, 000 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1975, Public Law 94-82,
Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1976. -- -- --- 1 54, 500 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1976, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1977 ---------65, 000 Recommendations of President under sec. 225, Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 81 Stat. 642. 1978 -___ 2 68, 600 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1978, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
IPayment of salary was limited to $52,000 pursuant to the Legislative iBx~arch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976.
2 Payment of salary limited to $65,000 pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391.






12

MAJORITY AND MINORITY LEADERS OF HOUSE AND SENATE

Year Amount Statutory authority

1965 ------- $30, 000 Same as rate for other Members prior to 1965. 1965 ------- 35, 000 Sec. 11(e), Public Law 89-301, Oct. 29, 1965, 79 Stat.
1120, effective Oct. 1, 1965.
1969 --------49, 500 Public Law 91-67, Sept. 15, 1969, 83 Stat. 107 effective
M ar. 1, 1969 ----------- - -........
1975 --------52, 000 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1975, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1976 -------- 54, 500 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1976, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1977 --------65, 000 Recommendations of President under see. 225, Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 81 Stat. 642. 1978-______2 68, 600 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1978, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1 Payment of salary was limited to $52,000 pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976.
2Payment of salary limited to $65,000 pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropliation Act, 1979, Public Law, 95-391.

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS I

Year Amount Statutory authority

1856 -----------$3, 000 Act of Aug. 16, 1856, 11 Stat. 48.
1857 ------------ 250 Act of Dec. 23, 1857, 11 Stat. 367.
1866 ----------- 5, 000 Act of July 28, 1866, 14 Stat. 323.
1873 ------------7, 500 Act of Mar. 3, 1873, 17 Stat. 486.
1874 ----------- 5, 000 Act of Jan. 20, 1874, 18 Stat. (part 3) 4.
Mar. 4, 1907.... 7, 500 Sec. 4, Public Law 59-129, Feb. 26, 1907, 34 Stat.
993.
Mar. 4, 1925.... 10, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 68-624, Mar. 4, 1925, 43 Stat.
1301.
Jan. 3, 1947----- 12, 500 Sec. 601(a), Public Law 79-601, act of Aug. 2, 1946, 60 Stat. 850.
Mar. 1, 1955-.... 22, 500 Sec. 4(a), Public Law 84-9, act of Mar. 2, 1955, 69 Stat. 11.
Jan. 3, 1965----- 30, 000 Sec. 204, Public Law 88-426, act of Aug. 14, 1964, 78 Stat. 415.
Mar. 1, 1969.... 42, 500 Recommendations of President under sec. 225, Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 81 Stat. 642. 1975 -----------44, 600 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1975, Public Law
94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
1976- -- 46, 800 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1976, Public Law
94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419. 1977 -----------57, 500 Recommendations of President under sec. 225,
Public Law 90-206, Dec. 16, 1967, 81 Stat. 642. 1978 ----------- 60, 700 Automatic adjustment, Oct. 1, 1978, Public Law
94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.

I Same rates now apply to the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico and the Delegates from the District of Columbia, Guam and the Virgin Islands.
2 Monthly.
3 Payment of salary was limited to $44,600 pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Liw 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976.
4 Paymc(nt of salary limited to $57,500 pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391.

From 1789 to 1856, Senators and Representatives received per diem pay while Congress was in session, except for the period 1815-





13

1817 when they received $1,500 a year. First established at $6 a day, per diem was raised to $8 in 1818 and remained there until 1856 when
embers of Congress were placed on annual salaries.
Economy legislation in the period 1932-35 reduced the compensation of Members of Congress 15 percent, 10 percent, and 5 percent successively during that period. Full compensation was restored April 1 19-85.
RETIREMENT
Participation in the civil service retirement system (5 U.S.c.
8331-8348) is available to the Members of Congress on their applicatjon.
ALLOWANCES
$2,500 expense allowance per annum effective January 3, 1947, to assist in defraying expenses relating to official duty, for which no tax liability shall incur. Section 601 (b), act of August 2, 1946, 60 Stat. 850.
Effective January 3, 1953, expense allowance made subject to tax liability. Section 619(d), act of October 20, 1951 (Revenue Act of 1951) 65 Stat. 570.
Effective March 1, 1955, the expense allowance provisions of the 1946 act were repealed. Section 4(b), act of March 2, 1955, 69 Stat. 11.
CABINET OFFICERS
Year Amount Statutory authority
1789 --------$3, 500 Act of Sept. 1, 1789, 1 Stat. 68.
1799 -------- 5,000 Act of Mar. 2, 1799, 1 Stat. 730.
1819 ------- 6, 000 Act of Feb. 20, 1819, 3 Stat. 484. 1853 --------- 8, 000 Act, of Mar. 3, 1853, 10 Stat. 212.
1873_-----.. 10, 000 Act of Mar. 3, 1873, 17 Stat. 486. 1874----- 8, 000 Act of Jan. 20, 1874, 18 Stat. (pt. 3) 4.
1907 --------12, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 59-129, Feb. 26, 1907.
1925 ------- 15, 000 Sec. 4, Public Law 6S-624, Mar. 4, 1925.
1949 --------22, 500 Sec. 1, Public Law 81-359, Oct. 15, 1949.
1956 ------- 25, 000 Sec. 102, Public Law 84-854, July 31, 1956. 1964 -----------------(Included under level I of the Executive Schedule.)
The above rates have not applied to every job in the President's Cabinet through the years, but each rate was generally recognized as the established rate for the head of an executive department.
In 1873, the rates for top Government officials were increased, but the increases were repealed the next year.
Economy legislation effective in 1932-35 reduced rates 15 percent, 10 percent, and 5 percent successively during that period. Full salary was restored April 1, 1935.








35-450-78-3






14

THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE

Level 19641 19672 19693 19756 19766 19773 19786

---$35,' 000 (4) 3 $60,1000 $63, 000 7 $66, 000 $66, 000 8 $69, 600
II____. 30,000 (4) 42, 500 44, 600 746, 800 57, 500 860,700
III --- 28,' 500 $29, 500 40, 000 42, 000 744, 000 52, 500 855,400 IV--- 27,y 000 28, 750 38, 000 39, 900 741, 800 50, 000 852,800 V_____-26, 000 28, 000 36, 000 37, 800 7 39, 600 47, 500 850, 100

I Sec. 303,' Public Law 88-426, approved Aug. 14, 1964.
2 Sec. 215, Public Law 90-206, approved Dec. 16, 1967.
2 Adjustments based on recommendations of Commission on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries (sec. 225, Public Law 90-206, approved Dec. 16. 1967).
'No change.
5 Public Law 93-178, approved Dec. 10, 1973, reduced the rate for Attorney General Saxbe to $35,000. Level I rate for position restored, effective Feb. 4, 1975. Public Law 94-2, approved Feb. 18, 1975.
6 Automatic adjustments, Public Law 94-82, Aug. 9, 1975, 89 Stat. 419.
7 Pursuant to the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act of 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved Oct. 1, 1976, pay for these positions was limited to the rate in effect on Sept. 30, 1976, i.e., the 1975 rates.
I Pursuant to Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391, pay for these positions was limited to the rate in effect on September 30, 1978, i.e., the 1977 rates.ICI
Note.-The President's recommendations for 1974 (Appendix, 1975 Fiscal Year Budget, p. 1030) were vetoed -by S. Res. 293, adopted by a vote of 71-26 on Mar. 6, 1974.
Level I-Cabinet officers.
Level Il-Deputy Secretaries of major departments, Secretaries of military de-.
partments and heads of major agencies.
Level III-Deputy Secretaries of minor departments, heads of middle level
agencies.
Level IV-As~sistant Secretaries and General Counsels of departments, heads of
minor agencies members of certain Boards and Commissions.
Level V-Administrators, & omissiners, Directors, and Members of Boards,
Commissions, or units of agencies.












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COMMISSION ON EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, AND JUDICIAL SALARIES
Section 225, Public Law 90-206, approved December 16, 1967, 2 U.S.C. 351, authorized the appointment of a Commission on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries to serve for the period of the 1969 fiscal year, and the appointment of a new Commission to serve during the period of every fourth fiscal year following the 1969 fiscal year.
The Commission is composed of nine members, three appointed by the President, two by the President of the Senate, two by the Speaker of the House, and two by the Chief Justice of the United States.
The Commission is required to conduct quadrennial reviews of, and recommend rates of pay for, Members of Congress, the principal officials of the legislative branch, the judiciary, and the principal officials of the executive branch. The quadrennial reviews and recommendations are to be submitted to the President, who, in turn, is required to include in his next budget to the Congress, his recommendations as to the exact rates of pay he deems advisable.
Prior to the enactment of Public Law 95-19, approved April 12,197 7, the President's recommendations became effective automatically, unless within approximately 30 days after the re commendations were submitted to the Congress, the Congress enacted a statute establishing different rates of pay, or one of the I-louses of Congress disapproved all or any part of the recommendations.
Title IV of Public Law 95-19, the Federal Salary Act Amendments of 1977, amended section 225 to require that recommendations transmitted by the President pursuant to that section be approved within 60 days by a majority vote of both Houses in order to become effective.
FisCAL YEAR 1969
The Commission's study and recommendations for fiscal year 1969 were submitted to the President in December 1968, and the President, in turn, submitted his recommendations to the Congress with his budget message in January 1969 (see H. Doe. No. 91-51). On February 4, 1969, the Senate, by a vote of 34-47, defeated a resolution (Senate Res. 82) proposing to disapprove the President's recommendations. On February 5, 1969, the House Rules Committee voted to table a resolution (H. Res. 142) providing for the adoption of a resolution (H. Res. 133) which was before the Post Office and Civil Service Committee, proposing to disapprove the President's recommendations.
Since neither House adopted a resolution of disapproval, the President's recommendations became effective in February and March 1969, as applicable for each group of officials after the end of the 30-day period following the submission of the President's recommendations.
(21)





22

FiscAL Yzma 1973
The appointment of the members to the Commission for fiscal year 1973 was not completed until December 11, 1972, too late for the Commission to conclude a review and formulate a report to the President in time for him to include recommendations in his budget presentation in January 1973.
The Commission's report was submitted to the President late in June 1973, and the President's recommendations were submitted to the Congress with the budget on February 4, 1974 (see p. 10309 Appendix to Fiscal Year 1975 Budget).
The President's recommendations were vetoed upon adoption of Senate Resolution 293 on March 6, 19741 by a vote of 71 to 26. House Resolution 807, disapproving the President's recommendations was reported to the House on March 4, 1974 (H. Rept. 93-870) but was not acted on by the House.
FisCAL YEAR 1977
The Commission's study and recommendations for fiscal year 1978 were submitted to the President on December 2, 1976, and the President, in turn, submitted his recommendations to the Congress th his budget message on January 17, 1977 (see H. Doe. No. 95-47).
On February 1, 1977, the Senate, by a vote of 56-42, tabled an amendment to a resolution (S. Res. 4) which proposed to disapprove the President's recommendations. On February 16, 1977, a special Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Presidential Pay Recommendations of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service met and voted:
(1) by a record vote of 1-4, not to approve for full committee cons ideration House Resolution 201 (disapproving all of the President's recommendations); (2) by a voice vote, not to report House Resolution 152 (disapproving Members' pay creases only); (3) by a record vote of 1-4, not to report House Resolution 201, without recommendation, to the full committee; and (4) by a voice vote, to table all House Resolutions similar to House Resolution 201 and House Resolution 152.
Since neither House adopted a resolution of disapproval, the President's recommendations became effective in February and March 1977, as applicable for each 'group of officials after the end of the 30-day period following the -S'ubmission of the President's recommendatiorls.










EXECUTIVE SALARY COST-OF-LIVING ADJUSTMENT ACT
(PUBLIc LAW94-82, AUGUST 9,1975)
This Act provides annual (generally October 1 of each year) automatic adjustments in the rates of pay of executives by amountsrounded to the nearest multiple of $100, equal to the percentage of such rates of pay which corresponds to the overall average percentage of the annual comparability adjustment in the rates of pay under the General Schedule (5 U.S. Code 5305). The annual adjustments apply to the rates of pay for Nlembers of Congress, judges, positions under the Executive Schedule, and other top positions under the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Branches.
OCTOBER 1,1975
Overall average increase of 55 percent, House Document 94-233, Executive Order 11883, October 6, 19705.
OCTOBER 1, 1976
Pursuant to Public Law .94-82 and Executive Order 11941, October 1, 1976, the rates of pay of the principal officials of the executive, legislative and judicial branches were adjusted by ainounLls (rounded to the nearest multiple of $100) equal to 4.83 percent-the overall average percentage increase in the rates of pay under the General Schedule. However, under the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977, Public Law 94-440, approved October 1, 1976, funds are not available to pay the salaries of these principal officials at rates in excess of the rates which were in effect on September 30, 1976. The positions involved are those referred to in section 225 (f) of the Federal Salary Act of 1967 (2 U.S. Code 356), such as the Vice President, Members of Congress, Judges, positions under the Executive Schedule and certain other specific legislative positions. The Comptroller General has ruled that the language contained in the legislative appropriation act does not suspend the operation of Public Law 94-82 and, thus, is not a limitation on the rates of pay established thereunder. However, the language does prohibit the use of fiscal year 1977 funds to pay salary increases to the principal officials of the executive, legislative and judicial branches. Therefore, while the legal rates of pay for these positions have been increased, the principal officials will continue to be paid at the salaiT rates that were in effect on September 30, 1976.
(23)





24

OCTOBER 1, 1977
There was no adjustment in October 1977, because of the enactment of Public Lttw 95-66. That law provided that the first comparability adjustment which would be made after its enactment pursuant to the Executive Salary Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act would not take effect. The effect of this legislation was to deny the anticipated October 1977 pay comparability adjustment to the Vice President, Members of Congress, Federal judges and justices, executive branch officials under the executive schedule, and certain other officials in the legislative and judicial branches whose pay is established under section 225 of the Federal Salary Act of 1967 (Public Law 90-206).
OCTOBER 1 1 1978
Purstutnt to Public Law 94-82 and Executive Order 12087, October 7, 1978, the rates of pay of the principal officials of the executive, legislative and judicial branches were ad usted b amounts (rounded to the nearest multiple of $100) equal to 5.5 percent-the overall average percentage increase in the rates of pay under the General Schedule. However, under the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1979, Public Law 95-391, funds are not available to pay the salaries of these positions at rates in excess of the rates which were in effect on September 30, 1978. With respect to the effect of the appropriation act limitation, see the discussion on page 23 concerning the October 1, 1976 increase.










PAY COMPARABILITY
THE FEDERAL PAY COMPARABILiTy AcT oF 1970
(Public Law 91-656, 5 U.S.C. 5305-5308)
This act provides a permanent method of adjusting the rates of pay of Federal employees who are paid under the statutory pay systemsGeneral Schedule, Foreign Service, and Physicians, Dentists, and Nurses of the Veterans' Administration. The act also authorizes adjustments to be made in the rates of pay of employees of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of the Government of tl e United States and of the government of the District of Columbia (except employees whose pay is disbursed by the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House) whose rates of pay are fixed by administrative action pursuant to law, and are not otherwise adjusted by the President. 0
The procedure requires the President to direct such agent as he considers appropriate (normally the Chairman of the Civil Service Commission and the Director, Office of Management and Budget) to prepare and submit to him annually a reportThat compares the rates of pay of the statutory pay systems
with the pay in private industry on the basis of the annual survey
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics;
That makes recommendations for adjustments in rates of pay
based on comparability; and
Includes the views and recommendations of the Federal Employees Pay Council, established by this act, which is comprised
of representatives of employee organizations.
There is also established a tbree-member Advisory Committee on Federal Pay, an independent establishment, to assist the President in carrylDgout the policy of this act. This Committee shallReview the annual report of the President's agent;
Consider such further views and recommendations from employee organizations, the President's agent, other officials of the
Government, or such experts as it may consult; and
Report its findings and re corn mend nations to the President.
The President, after considering the report of his agent and the findings, and recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Federal Pay is required to make adjustments in the statutory rates of pay as he determines appropriate to carry out the comparability principles, effective October 1 of each year. The President is required to transmit to Congress a report of the pay adjustments he makes, together with the reports submitted to him by his agent and the Advisory Committee on Federal Pay.
(25)






26

ALTERNATE PAT PROPOSAL
if, because of a national emergency or economic conditions affecting the general welfare, the President determines it inappropriate to make the pay comparability adjustments, he shall prepare and transmit to the Congress, before September 1, an alternate pay adjustment plan. The alternate plan would become effective on October I and would
-continue unless within 30 days after receiving it, Congress vetoed the plan. In such event, the President is required to issue the original comparability adjustments. The congressional veto of an alternate plan would follow a procedure similar to the procedure established for -conTessional disapproval of an executive reorganization plan.
INITIALADJUSTMENTS
The 1970 act authorized the President to make the first two comparability adjustments effective on the first ap liable pay period
-commencing on or after January 1, 1971, and Vanuary 1, 1972, respectively, rather than October 1 of each year, as provided for the
-subsequent adjustments. JANUARY19 1

The first comparability increase under the 1970 act was placed into effect as of the first pay period after January 1, 197 1, under Executive ,Order 11576, dated January 8, 1971.
JANUARY1972
The President sent an alternative plan to the Congress, dated August 31, 1971 (H. Doe. No. 92-158) proposing that ihe January 1972 comparability increase be delayed until July 1972. On October 4, 1971, the House, by a vote of 174-207, failed to approve House Resolution 596, disapproving the alternative pay plan. The Senate did not vote on a disapproval resolution. Since the alternate plan was not disapproved by either House of Congress within the 30 calendar days of continuous session of the Congress following the submission of such plan, as permitted under 5 U.S.C. 5305(c), the alternative plan became effective automatically.
Subsequently, section 3 of the Economic Stabilization Act Amendments of 1971 (Public Law 92-210, December 22, 1971) directed the President to place the January 1972 comparability adjustments into effect as of the first day of the first pay period which began after January 1, 1972, in amounts which would not be greater than the wage guidelines established for wage and salary adjustments for the private sector. The President placed such comparability adjustments into effect as of the first day of the first pay period beginnicr after .January 1, 1972, under Executive Order 11637, dated Deceniger 22, 1971.
OCTOBER1972
The next comparability increase was due on October 1, 1972. On August 31, 1972, the President sent a message to the Congress (House






27

Doe. No. 92-349) advising that on the basis of the provisions of section
-3 of the Economic Stabilization Act Amendments of 1971, he would recommend that the increases necessary to achieve comparability be paid starting January 1, 1973, rather than on October 1, 1972, in
-order that the Federal employees have only one pay increase during calendar year 1972. These comparability pay increases were placed 'into effect on the first day of the first pay period which began on or After January 1, 1973, under Executive Order 11691, dated December 15, 1972.
Subsequently, it was held in the case of National Treasury Employees Union v. Richard M. Nixon, 492 F. 2d 587, that the delay to January 1973 was improper. Executive Order 11777, April 12, 1974, amended Executive Order 11691, December 15, 1972, to provide that the pay raises granted by Executive Order 11691 were to be retroactively effective to October 1972 rather than January 1973.
OCT013ER 1, 1973
The President, on August 31, 1973, sent an alternative plan to the Congress (H. Doe. No. 93-140) proposing to delay the October 1973 increase until the first pay period beginning or or after December 1, 1973. On September 28,1973, the Senate, by a vote of 72-16, approved the resolution (S. Res. 171) disapproving the President's alternative plan to delay the comparability adjustment from October 1 to December 1, 1973.
There was no action in the House on a comparable resolution. The adjustments became effective on the first day of the first pay period beginning on or after October 1, 1973, under Executive Order 11739, dated October 3, 1973.
OCTOBER 1) 1974
The President on Aumist 31, 1974, sent an alternative plan to the Congress (H. Doc. 93-342) proposing to delay the October 1974 increase until January 1975.
On September 19, 1914, the Senate, by a vote of 6n4-35, approved the resolution (S. Res. 394) disapproving the President's alternative plan to delay the comparability adjustment from October 1974 to January 1975.
There was no action on a comparable House Resolution (H. Res. 1351). The adjustment became effective in October 1974 under Executive Order 11811, October 7, 1974.
OCTOBER 1, 1975
The President, on August 29, 1975, sent an alternative plan to the Congress (H. Doe. 94-233) proposing a 5 percent increase in lieu of an 8.66 percent increase required to achieve comparability.
On September 18, 1975, the Senate, by a vote of 39-53, failed to approve the resolution (S. Res. 239) proposing to disapprove the President's alternative plan for a 5 percent adjustment.
On October 1, 1975, the House, by a vote of 278 to 123, voted to table a motion to discharge the Post Office and Civii Service Cem-






28

mittee from further consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 688) proposing to disapprove the Fresident's alternative plan. Previously, on September 25, 1975, the committee, by a vote of 8-14, defeated a motion to report H. Res. 688.
OCTOBER 1, 1976
On October 1, 1976, the President issued Executive Order 11941 adjusting the rates of pay under the statutory pay systerns by an average of 4.83 percent.
OCTOBER 1, 1977
On September 29, 1977, the President issued Executive Order 12010 adjusting the rates of pay under the statutory pay systems by an average of 7.05 percent. OCTOBER 19 1978

The President, on August 31, 1978, sent an alternative plan to the Congress (H. Doe. No. 95-378) proposing a 5.5 percent increase in lieu of an 8.4 percent increase reqt4red to achieve comparability. Neither House of Congress took any action to disapprove the President's alternative plan. Therefore, on October 7, 1978, the President issued Executive Order 12087 adjusting the rates of pay under the statutory pay systems by 5.5 percent.









29






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COST OF LIVING ADJUSTMENTS IN ANNUITIES

5 U.S.C. 8340

Section 1306 of Public Law 94-440 (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1977), approved October 1, 1976, amended the cost-of-living provisions of the civil service retirement law (5 U.S.C. 8340(b)) in two major respects. The amendment eliminated the 1 percent that was added to each cost-of-living adjustment and established a new method of adjusting civil service retirement annuities. Under the new procedure, the Civil Service Commission is required, in January and July of each year, to determine the percent change in the consumer price index over the preceding 6-month period. If a rise in the price index has occurred, each annuity is increased, effective March 1 in the case of the January detennination and September 1 in the case of the July determination, by the percent change, adjusted to the nearest one-tenth of 1 percent.
Prior to October 1, 1976, section S340(b) of title 5, United States Code, provided that whenever the price index increased by at least 3 percent over the index for the month used as the base for the most recent cost-of-living increase, and remained at or exceeded 3 percent for 3 consecutive months, each annuity would be increased by an amount equal to the highest percentage rise in the index during the 3 consecutive months, plus an additional 1 percent. The annuity increases became effective on the first dav of the third month following the 3-consecutive-month period. That procedure for providing costof-living adjustments resulted from several amendments to the civil service retirement provisions.
The 1962 amendments to the Civil Service Retirement Act (Public Law 87-793; 76 Stat. 869) provided that whenever the Consumer Price Index of the Bureau of Labor Statistics rose by an average of 3 percent or more for a full calendar year above the average base year, a comparable percentage increase in retirees' annuities would become effective on April 1 of the following year. If the increase in the Consumer Price Index was not 3 percent, the Civil Service Commission had to wait until the following January 1 for another determination.
The 1965 amendments to the Civil Service Retirement Act (Public Law 89-205; 79 Stat. 840) geared cost-of-living adjustments to a more sensitive monthly indicator instead of the average calendar year indicator. These amendments provided that whenever the Consumer Price Index rose 3 percent or more for 3 consecutive months, annuities would be increased by the highest percentage during such 3 months with the increase taking effect on the first day of the third month following the 3-consecutive-month period.
(31)




UNIVERSITY OF FLORID

32 3 1262 09120 886

Section 204 of Public Law 91-93 (83 Stat. 139) amended the cost of living provisions of law to include an additional 1 percent adjustment when each cost-of-living adjustment was made. The additional
1 percent adjustment feature was added to take into account the 5-month period which elapsed between the initial month in which the Consumer Price Index rose by 3 percent over the previous base month and the month in which the increase was reflected in the annuity check

0