Quality of life

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Quality of life an analysis of environmental and social indicators, 1973
Physical Description:
ix, 181 . : illus, maps. ; 22 x 29 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Gainesville (Fla.) -- Dept. of Community Development
Publisher:
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Social surveys -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Economic surveys -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Social conditions -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Bibliography: leaves 173-181.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 024977221
oclc - 02402259
lccn - 76369657
Classification:
lcc - HN80.G26 G33 1973
ddc - 309.1/759/79
System ID:
AA00024825:00001

Full Text










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TABLE OF GONTENT

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I Areas.aofFuture Investig tions****.. *..... **.---******* t-***----****-**2

$344 44 0 $270CATMNHAL AG~lEViiD NT ******.*** *****************e****************A.******a4.0 0 a m& -7


Swe e Area C o Futurns Inves. ig. ti.ns.......................-................- 58


C~tbu9 MELTI-VAUTE ANRALYSBES.**-***************-**.--*64




Buluph l hde fgo tmAalysias*****...****..*.*....*************68








A Feeltta xoolgy wsag time Socia Indicators ...........*......... ** -- -- *- -* 86

The antor Seae se........... *........ . . . .. . . . ........ 88







































































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LIST OF TABLES



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1 1 CHAltACTERSTICS OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN
STAIOTICAL AREAS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA,. 1970 . .. . o a ... 28

2 EDERIE thigh 98'Wl4 WELARB AND OTHER SOCIAL VARIABLES .. . ... ... 47

as ConaiaWMMI- rWM ERiDIDAL DEVATIO, FAMILY DISORGANIZATION, AND 04 VAlitAtl, ...............m.e ......................a

4, 4 CORRI##TWW sTjhat "DOTOA ACHIEVEqMEN4T AND OTHER SOCIAL


5 6 -SCOMM5P4iMAlh~liuiI ENUMERA'flN DISTRICTS . a . . . . . . ..87

$HESUTS OP' MUIE MBORSSION ANALYSIS .................. .@......* *...92



a ~ ~~~~~~ (CTR C ld ti W MAA O D TI TS ........... a0. 00 ..........113


4 ERtaAISOPM AND FEAMS IN PERCENTAGES ...............................120

AIMttfADRS '

7511010 TI $"t~s xor: i









TA ST OF MAPS


Pt Page
1 RELATIVEV HOUSING VALUE BY ENUMERATION DIS TRICT. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. ... 31

2Wl PECg'AOF ALL UNrTS WITH 1.01 ..ORt MORE PERSONS
PfM 1100M BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT ..a.. .....a a.............. 9 a .. .....32&

10 GOilfNTHRAiWSLACE GOCUPIED HOUSIN UNITS: BY:
44 MM3W 1YA IN, DISTRlCT ....................... ......a

193tSRVFAUAOPSUBSTANDARD, HOUSING UNITS BY ENUMEIRATION DISTRICT .................... ...........0 4 .. 6.......a..........34

6 ESTINATED PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLDS THAT EARN LESS
IMMMER.8t~~~~~~aP~~~if Y A B A FI EO E. .. .... ...... ....... .4
l*'l j J l H Y "Y, 'tkf**
J.$ AID TO FAMIJS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN BY ENUMIERATION


AID TODPNDT CHILDREN BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT. . .. .... .. .... 43

tAW**VOW4NW Sm ATOMERATION DISTRICT o..............Z44

AWPERSORS 'CONNTTRIG CRIMES AGAINST








ADDKS ,O PERBWSCOMMIITTIMINOR CRIMES BY ENUMRATION DISTRICT ........... ........................55

THE PERCENTAGE BREAKDOWN AND ORIGINATION OF CALLS A-1 ~ ~ qjC @@,95MVIQE BY POLICE ZONE$,.................5

PERCENTAGEAE OF NON-IRISBAND-WIFE TYPE FAMIfLIES WITH
CHILDREN LESS THAN 18 YEARS OLD BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT .. ........................ .. ...............................57

$4 COUNT OF REPORTED TUBERCULOSIS CASES BY ENUMERATION
IR TRICT .. . . .. . . ................... Ra0q 9008 8* .. ..........SS6

ASRATES OF DEATH BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT ...........................m o 67

IS RATES OF VENEREAL DISEASE HY ENUMERATION DISTRICT .. ... . .. .. .8

17 AVERAGE READING COMPREHENSION TEST SCORES 4TH GRADE
PUP"S AY ENON RATION DISTRICT .................000 ... .... .. ..........75

A AVERAG9 READING COMPREHENSION TEST SCORES 6TH GRADE
70984 BY ENUbMBATION DISTRICT ..................................... JS6

$8 AVERAGE READING COMPREHENSION TEST SCORES 8TH GRADE
StWILS 'BY ENUBM ATION DISTRICT ........... .........I. a................7

A AMEAGE READnGO COMPREHENION TEST SCORES 4TH, 6TH,
AN ig'M "S PUPILS 13Y ENMERATION DISTRICT ... .. .. .. ... .. .... .78

AV M)ORMA SENORk PLACEMENT TEST SCORES 12TH
rom lAUMTAIO DISTRICT .........................79










r" SW ARAS OF SOCIAL WELL-BBING BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT .- - 113




A44 RATING OF HOUSING CONDITONS BY BLOCKS $@:. .. .. ..J ... i







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aferassstatn o as .. chapter 1

In wich reh ITRODUCTION TO QUALITY OF LIFE STUDY





it* tandely4 Ap amid to clait when several .individuals inter relate with each: other over .a length ...ee n.1 .. ....
If It is to earvive, every society has certain basic functions that must be ,accomplished. In
84Attis to a pggatand, sealahation aV ne iiulech society must provide basic.. $MAfda OAnd; !n!tou t*AWamtaass in order that they, might, physically survive, maintain order aiaetabqu progad wpreside$'rorelaonhp with other new membedrs, group&. and societies,

ther hsW*dq baseff teewre incitate through the organization of the:.five .major institutions of Staett AR 14itih*AattdletopJanity4.goverament educatban, the economy, and religion. Institutiseby, be' defined as those cultural patterns that help condition human behavior They are the pl Vtass 1Fphigher estma a*nd ftranamtftng oum cultural heritage. Through these, individuals
the*b aglaapagt ely idddrdth the, hae physicalkascia needs such as adequate food,

ato gnrally a raveh trgea e.A
*10umta doubt. te major agency of our society has been and will continue, to be the faily
MIA~~bte)$@4 ataaesA WeApetethead and one or more persons, who are related by
iosg or adoto 4rin tethfer in the same household).
AV~ imral emar niy 141 a "sml c 0.
reasisty thauess ad Tzrbimited, 1he family was totally responsible Manatheye s~iqoset~wity1luded, supporting the, unemployed, carx4hatti& Whtalso providing for all the formal education
4 The thddrat ldnvide seame annort in the educational arena, however. As the









of Mig sort in
CftU rdd Ihe: Ober ingUM[669.
*0001*6410, &a economic instituflon evolved to provide for the physical subsistence of society tg&-**icb preductiou processing, distribution, and consumption of goods and services became 31111111 jnm AiVA Ihe
for iroup,'9urvIval. Meanwhile, educational fiI9fitVU6n a WI100daftit. viefi-ordated t"t&i of pahlic and prIvati6 learrAn" faciiii s. AS
SaNdi WaWlfotmerly divided tip between tfte.'..family:ahd ur "h institutionM.::
I**h"*afiI*WO&ftlIgkrkpTbVUd thft, as bow. a Idnd of cuRtuftl PvMmrn in Which 'individuals weft Ptovided a meaning towards life and-a means of coping with everyday problems. However.
toW&-laft & of, the tra(fitional functions by. both tho dhurch and:::
-rek*vdcwt',of'Vmme ftific-dow to the school, the economy, and govern-......
.. .. .. . ....
.. ... ... ........
1 1-0 J V tt W I Dl
*W It, 46AWOb R&Vi&e ihatituUMs t6lneet the biological, psych6logical, and social
AWOW-4 4blo V030" Vory weiVai Thotb institatibms, it -should be noted : not only occupy*
-ad *Y*O, but oftm do SO in fairly close proximity to each other. Social interaction occurs VUft amabers of *"a lustitations interrelate vnth each other, develop rational interests, and fL *61i* that physical area that these persons r on MonI I Al 414 aft ~ AiSI'*SUIW' 4vxel r" 40 as it" devwauldt .
wAj j istirw. ;ne ic, ia,-,o,4tc
from society. Wiffle a.6ftwuft usuaffy.In1091t4t t AW kocOtL&Vions interacting Vdth each other for ecific locally-shared
In igefter"Y fa*IA= and is governed by a common set of institutions, a
hi I Idomb. 1W Wahmaim" of thousands of communi as.'
491
Irw P rt ml, t&ba* and metropolitan.::

'*,,Vw4 oommmity I's a "snmU omst9latim a institutions and families focused on a common InWasts and functions.'ff I* r While some community members may live A"V otbars generally live further out in the country and conOf **.Jug*
hah'C, ft vt t*4ntkft 6ezit phenomenon M lind u"WNW IAW*t a *Otftl cfty. The mexbP4ftan









1 14 oil r DdRAMQ&Nrn inftettial methods. *e of oomnunicafitm-.0 and ftrms of tranWorMiry. ,Cwbkik Ws study is involved is the, urban one (i.e.. the City o Gaines11"noW to -, 11*WvJcgAy. -1ho lairb an commt*ity has been the center of social change as well as
Ow omter of social problems. Many persons of different racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious ties commmmUds brmqmM vdth them new ideas, values, and::cultures.

dUbad4WMXkd6 of many. persom encourages men tp..,develop new techniques "i Ong witb each other auid 1heir physical environment. Intricate transportation, communicaOm Umo aud industriauzation syst are thereby devised, and new innovations occur. Sometimes
*Am* ft-MFwfthW,, no Pas about so rapidly, that primary group cmtrGIs at. least begin to bxeak .... .. .. .. ....
00010 91& 4K)d tk",thst bix4these many persms kgeher.bqcome:- disorganized, r&11-A-Inv4"aft" XOMW* Am, addkdcu. =ime, fm)il-y disorganizadw::, sexual delinquency,.

C7 i 4 tM U L e kk f L ..... ... .... ..... .. ......
ft &4p4kMT4kW P Abosaiporows, md ftmiliw incurring such social Aecay prob1ma. Uve in
4, 0 1 -11
13 ___ j xaddebtiw arew dwacterized by subsUindard units
of land uses,-:..::::Such areas are, in a
*p vW, *,manace W the pubho. health. safety, and welfare of the residents imd the larger urban
V
:ri P Wr**M It' LO Sk n 7 W'V
SRI, I I An* qa0ek-j&ysiW docay, proWem areas, these oommunibow oDn Jewt paxtW1 soluti-ons, for ending the physical decay and The following section describes whikt an urban IN' _Wop- W 01 lavelvad.


W -,Rio 04s: tog W'd W j; f *tt, 74
_0 ~ *;bsequent pxoblems, urban renewal has prubIva 000 1 W W, 1 0 0" to OVM. BaRiaaUY, urimm ran wal has ved = Ijjw (44 1 Akadal vaban areas by way of three main activities: refts primary purpose is to improve the quality of


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pie qkw ity' by attaddng the sodta, economic. and physical decay problems of
401004r.!* lblhwpeat'turb n rete"wal, programs bave been more specifically oriented to slum Imd TiMoring deficient, dbaolete and unsanitary structures providing ArthVort6fion and ad*it service facilities,: and eliminatibg both traf andIke bsohatakd adxing of Ishd uses.

Putlic AO&WOk POOM dhW- i0taffs Octop4tft clearance of &-teridiated structures in large areas of new ones. Structures that are deteriorating are often razed because they 'Stat re6 d%(*v,& public 'and/or private ekj*ndi sk can economically be

x N.
OkINNO"We M*%ouregi 4a the other- hand, are generally not: afthed at-, tatid:: d o1id 19aaft" ditabOO&Itt tboft twighbortwods which contain blightifig InIlueftCes':::bUt iftill
V9MWk*-W*-V*M*Mty tUprovIding-6 s6urid Iriving environment, Rehabilitation 'Procedurds Ihnited to, developing vacant land, removing obsolete buildsad upgr*ding building facades, providing new neighborhood amenities (such Lix.15 '. h n
Ot- gOOCISS''. P416W" 4".1 add i' AIIA* Individuid building amenifiet sue ew
WjAftt-O &I pt&itt Viese could be accomplsihed in hopes of restoring an area to
On arlataid bm cdon or, an the other hand, to bring about a more appropriate use to an area.

'T*'66W dIr66ft& M Owe pftyention of blight in: cUtrently sound OatiMN"i pi& 4deginJed, W viaintaift lho quality, and:. f Ction of an
064ANIP06%im-0 TWA, p*dctft aMa-*W, Jbr && m1equate maintenance of an area while % of land and building structures. In short,' the conserWMIh tad blight so thAt an area WiWnat need redpVra "W
4W_ V"OMOWMI "0 tax 14010h
#Owwag Wn concerned with a wide range of urban activities. I* tbo dooftil iod unrading of slum and blighted areas and the improvement of older AM I
'imdmv4Agh*npi 'and open space planning and developoil -In shboti urban renewal has been udlized
I

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10 1 *a A*OWW bvulhe CltyQf Gainesville, Code of OrMnances. 54 blighted area is one: which
v at ubmber of dUapWated sixd deteril orating structures. ... In additim to in*mo A"outori, faully lot, Uqouts (espezially io relation to structure :size, adequacy.
anw toad torstww drivers of uvmersbip and delinquencies in es paym ents. In brief, the blighted area is one which is unsanitary,
uni*rx, and constitutes economic or social liability to the community and is a menace to the
PW*41"ft_ AWMMT, 'Mammas. sad welfare in its present condition

That same section in the charter also defines a slum area as one in which there is a
nobw or- Id at* deteriorated, old, and obsolete. These buildgwwrally contain inadequetp provi sions for ventilation, light. air, sanitation, and open
$am P4, dom4des, overcrowding conditions and: conditions which
Uf*,4*dtor Vwepartr- at* p"aoowt n these areas. The sIuW6 area in conclusica. is toju -health, infant mortality.. ju e;ile deliAquency, 9f dfteaxe4, ...... .
.. .... ... ...
bjASW may be broken up into three main forms: phy AaOlx 600a-dcow=U, and complex.

deWleration. pour or mi m* g sanitation facilities, at', trAsh and rubbish, pollutku..: (air, noise, (PUftrounds, adiool*4 open spacer, X. : waftr/sewer/elec

La % ,- -L)740
UU&t Might include areas with high rates of crime, prostitution, Juvenile ZO'0*,%WR4* may
wAWd,,V_*ftW TMO-plency, In addition, it
tM*Vropwties. decUxdng property values, vadan cy rates.

*WNU 414veAV4 aroas-with large awnunts of socio-economic MOM$ A""ft dt lats.1- bkkks. sUeeft. and nelghbbrhoods;
*4444%rqIW oMftdve, to Ekeding, malvhtzess .









Ag gP(w4;qpogl 4#.rdxiances definitions imply, the basic difference between a slum
gap is tha, size. The slum area is more concentrated and definite, contains sitag comples blight forms, and probably requires wholesale redevelopment; a blighted area
ik -agl~g ess disxepair. Blight, too, may be: considered proes ad a
dbptope.A w ppa, pum.

ghlqqetud Wil atmpt to desvrib4 by way of the utilization of social indicators the exbust of the complex blight forms that exist in the City of Gain esville.



For siputypgnng-operations have proferred the idea that the physical
envnronmen determined the social behavior of the residents. It was felt then that if
$aepigigla t gkggaputwere improved, social pathologies would diminish. Well-planned and glesigned neighborhoods, parks, and community facilities would aid in the elimination of overemawdk glegetlpsagg4 agita odablighted areas, which in turn would help. alleviate crime,: agglgapmptsstAi .ss broke-n homes, ec. ....

eagagegesigyqeqpr ppiggqet tOa these initial presumptions were only partially
pgg (bgg>9t ratyicla pa that axm'ted in slum and blighted areas was result4gp esWpaptorgistiagght of, ageipl Patideal, econic and psychological factors.
phaersrealized they must begin weighing the social repercussions more heavily ,
App s w phainggoneequently coverged with the social approaches
App a gKWIgOUSity planning -efforts.

qggPgAzip depp-makers width au objective, analysis of the Stilibti gelpen atglesem~unity so as to point out posMcPPp 4 eatropenta Iadicatrs, the relative age,]p rsagp, pue ystematic and objective









,Noft he00 4 .'t seeit and environmental indicators in the following quality of life study I 4r fab isiaafonal enough to:

thetag188 akUMgeneral social programs which could imrove the overall quality of life in the
t"ta community;

Adefae the social-physical decay problems as thoroughly as possible;

3.delineate general areas in need of an improved quality of life; and

4* provide Sam insight as to possible comprehensive methods that might improve the alWeatYrgelefally -defined areas.



AMI 9 SNi*~ VIrtuAly, impossible to define because of the generality in terminology and its
appliability to almost any individual or class trait or characteristic, the phrase does come exceedtheatealtminiga stt eagitat an individual or group of individuals It has been
thidltttridit9earCa:Vththe extent to which environments, social. and Physical, are
Wptaa (tdapl e Aeeping atwpa in had that for many people externals play a
d~letheted du$ gagltra) eatents or durptimofa their episodes of happiness....

Wt MA$$UM U g thetall agreed that a society would enjoy a high quality of life when each and Now% t Dil1ihrft W: adequate food, shelter, and clothing-. a god. o
ipatmaq) on@ galasicak health ad health services; a decent: education; good 0110 ~ ~ ge 1 110*Uw4~ at=ra *fltte: an ality to be socially and economically Ifipt ianlatuaton. (See. Appendix Table A-1) .

bO"SAle la o time case. We know that there are often deep-seated problems ,M4M and quality of life needs serious upgrading in some or ,Os Whase areas are atten defined as slum mi blighted areas. This study Wae7a77u"tsee lu:pvry byaical beana, housing quality,









Fr* And $ndividal deviatten.

USo following criteria were designated to be indicators of quality of life or social well.Socio-Economic Status

2. Rasea gtvmn



ar 41 -. Quality of Hiousing

a ag/ih apgds afas wdual -Deviation............ .




40 ;wXWpItoalsatehu'-O acnaut is getting better or worse. However,
dfir~rtd gae-gibb6 issAldlty of lift stadies, the gap between. theactaual environkiltieM ctsA- 46Wa hytstee **asi inaesdrin that actual environment. effectively, seems saae Tam PAnew ed o2nww
I taed the primary purpose of this study is to expand upon 'the relationships
10"" -A~d ~ QW*W 4 Aireas. In another study, quality of housing was objecMidtly at 4 tSfut to a refaed scaling system. This section will attempt to deliver some
MO MW Owavit aggtltl' etadeceyw sproblen areas through the Uuiiation of


MiageidashadilAwnn on s









=4 Provaunt M ":-of am Sa lit bit.. WAhe Mowing
... .. .....


*..,a stmostic oF dbrect interest which fadlitates concise comprehensive, and balanced
$UdV*Vmft-*"*t the condthm of Me t"Jorsapects of ;;; Azi. M its.
4*ftflftQ&,,, A" T5t
bw At WommUo at. tim aggregate well-being ammag *0 pegwm:. md kaA1168-ViSdA a
1 0 .. .... ... ...
...... .. .. .... .. .. ... ...
-pop" a oft,, or a zmdghboftwd... for

aN Vow JUww-Jq=d to be a Staftdc, dfdamnanly held impormice that was capable of p&VO41ag at leaft some evidence as to the extent of the social well-being of pax#cular geograpbic
arms. V+31 I T y L; Lip 4
. ..... .. .. ..... ... .. .....
..... .....
...... .. .... ... .. .... .....
an indicator should also be able to elicit
*ON" qualitative inxigbt Ci.e.. when accurately stated. an indicator should enable ifte audience to 1"" atiod"O"k 00"AWM at ftadneww of 6w henom*mma being m6asdrtd). A K

the ty *MW4- *iOWn**!be-* 801OW4 UWUM04-40-V6U Of'tM&h*: diffelvAt public
I IT
,4nwfjpOqgtmOW jk*,,ft "for a lawt Atft at crucilil urbaft problem."
boyAwkwfluff Aft *L M"I"ft the nft-wsory k*wmatum for Ing.
~es"d ft dedUned. It should also make due provisions WY temadc and objecAvis evaluafim of social. envuvnmental. and economic conditions,
.. ........ .
A LA ... .. .. ... ....
aotdWr, Jet, r it i,
4W do ftcW-t4q*enaw (empodsll y In the gocial inilicalor movenent) WNW taffit tbW-cWVwA Ab" 40 &a social indimtor movement is me jill1w. mmat be overcome before acceptance can become mrs Sq"O" I* be an matty and varied points.

000 6 i 1 0 hoW 6- addel *ndkator stmly Should be viewed.
4L
WNW
14 .


4141 VA- r?









gagiggggaeadttltouadasortntto state that the social indicators used should be viewed
add aspristory tools capable of spatially describing how certain urban areas quataivl Whigh pigalal oan&ahe .eo spealfic aualW and environmental questions..

SOaa U4tetors, historically, have lacked agreement and general understanding on the
x W I ~ de Wlsaonasaring, ertain social phenousana,.. .In addition, there appears to
glasigh Ageaimrangrfuelen a nthe 'sacial indicators validity,. reliability, a=4deucyi
W-h t6 tm wkepth sodlal -well-being. in addition to the: problem of assigning "wei ghts"F top M .dli.t.rs there is also the problem of the widespread disagreement as to what are the
*pfw sogale Iaepe -mms fpr socia well-being .

Pleally, there is a distinct problem in the possibility of extensive error by the various
agestath;Vt istledJ $1f yh6da~ya inbmto 'relative to stopial idiatos such that any use 0" aii An 00ttho )AAAO #Mde distaItedI F dor biased results,.

In r~gitagow~Megsbelcaliatudy. several other major abstnoles were incurred..as well 11l*efo1re the a dy was begun, several agencies were contacted in order to: more clearly define
*0g ty~e /"searbeM *igpAiftty and acssthutty to pattin, intermation. In addition to the
tasgDitisag ballet 2apatheat al: osrnity Develapment, the Staff also contacted the Alachua MgPgagg cfth DepOWd-N qartmtent.,.the abunty Welfare Departent, City of Gainesville
Ala Dptgtiagrprga
(aggabugoit atiAnagede supre, found to be receptive and responsive: to the doneept OR ft Arioakeani .eawaer, it was discovered that information could not IO#IA 'ar wn ildavit allowing accessibility preceded each particular individual adAPR 01,04haalsytht ppae to be more than a sincere reluctance
0me ageaSyM 0tacials to divulge some information, apparently because of its high deWON gel4duttglg vifttodotyAlanager's zanance in written form, however,


1 g@MinitowAAg iquiit VAiaema"n a the lack of a::centralized,
0diAged at agq*ft and sickly pztract the desi re d flAbiiaabetingipiled by hand. This process seriously im41# afesastn vh could be gleaned, especially when time and money











as(Ahq4gganJakof explanatory va-riables in this study should be viewed with
g~gh agypagtioedli~taios.
aina6f 4gggtion AyFthag nstrats (twsas elzed that certain majr asumtion
uaiyo only relative to the basic study mechanics but more especially in defining Vastl 0,ell-45etag and quality of life. These include the following:

py r Vq#uajt efll than others; while some people find it
ag & sea4,to a 4good quality of life, ofhr fidi xrmly, difficult;

9Wetf (pli Cgzzifed ML ~when a -larger number of -people (numerically and proporItwig ret tT* %greAe to d clothe, house e and educate themselves; aAgtt b. alli~yAd~t apa gg employxtypt statusE feel, they will achieve more equal protua t by *O (pik MgUdi 4eap andeapgnis tagelves as inAdividuals with individual talents;

th'IHau**We' 6974 e &,Itype,in they pubic domain,, anyone has a right to define
tgte ~ ina44t ag" tpi pfgdwptl 4 nomtive' construct, like welfare and happiness,
FNR~hiss suppagppgdfWS 9 and of consensus ifit is to play any role
trabatiad evalu of policy .. 1

p 4@f, TW through time will be affected both by individual char-Vx =,of-Vew

2na lm l ec Ae aethe same ones
gaklbor and srvice functions of our _society.:

4 itae sageo Peol, Miadered by the fact that there exists an ever -decreasing need ..t~at anderemoplore and are often pressured intop










UZUT AtLddl1ed1V they often are unable to qualify for reliable, and gainful
im4WO& 191 6&qn'ste in e. they ate unable to secure the necessities of Iffe
md, ahd sadal status) The lack of stable and meaningful emIt@" -hi 'hict ed social and emcdional unsteadiness 1:6d seriously hinders
6 1 1 Asbil
Wma Wr edubated. better housed. and from obtaining better access to a of choices of privileges that the middle class experiences routinely. as wen as a better


F pallngja of worthlessness and marginal family membership. therefore grow out fmm long 10YUMUL. Faxhilial Abandc(nment, feelings of hopelessness
.... .. . ....
alp O*J CMAJ N*f [jo Ir
.. .... .. ...... .
*ii4 4bif "6MCI thW ifi becouted ''the dondnant member or thd
m
*eit i4ifth "a a 8 Mau and a- father W her children. As the
... .. .... ...
b "NO"Pelafikid& S67 the subcWture; relationships: axe Men 9c
JjJOiAJ&6h* "99J MmU cbildrm. and, broken homes.
.. .... .
.. ... ...... ..
##0 Wgtv*'tq iiid& the guidanc46of some male 'Authoritaflite
amplif
kwyw" VAMOWM- %AMWW -Y d 4 *rbttt hidp'vrevite feelings of despair and
# vordAessooss. PYto a very a" age, thwe children must learn to adjust to ill-treatment, strugtUft v *Ad vko.
A
416
$wt as Otair pwmwts before thm, Mesa children lack the proper Inspirational guidance and
v
40 01 nay, bm* *0 Uftrest and the sIdn to participate in contemporary society. 17 They suffer,
OWAM"ftty to "WPOIZO an OPporbmity and to take advantage of it if and when it should
ftoftp- at tndifference, despondency.- and rejection result. and even more social $0" in. against eneudes, living in households with mental ill*M M *UzbWO or dtwaddlcted parent. and lacldng in the necessary 4 001100, 4 to Uu*ft to X"d. v2iw study, and relate to teachers becomes a way of


V be taken mder the wing of some sensitive teacher or'
L








54
Alasatad are taught to read, write, and study properly are often classified by their fellow
attlaptesabapqas As, ftleit or queer. Often, these children must regress to the level of
$@LY ( ,Abe nalt to be ,axcially -acceptable. Those who are unwiln to regress: must be
pr4p d aa Ithemelves. In effect, abildren learn behavioral patterns totally useful in their bdtottt bi but ty unacceptable in society as a whole .

As they reach adiM and become physically mature, emotional growth, social growth,
a d catih attaintment become retarded.

Furhotbladeshi lythe over-decreasing need for-unsklled: labor, they too must seek.::employassta 46bet~dadiwustuM anagatm bors of Mhe generation begare him,: must: also .learn. to cope with oCasatlet meaMtyl adiin olrgrscit' rjcig him for his: upbringing,. lack of education, and MMltys* oth mf tdroutyweunid:tk s. In short he must learn to cope. with his .particular: quality
att AwitAnstuate leasn to gato *elf-iprt and dignity. He becomes. apathetic,, cynical andO, even boatWl tdwards thaarwho try to help him. The generation that follows will suffer from a wors e or at best similar quality of life.

Children consequenty grow up, experience the world as a place where it makes no sense to gVIag for ther$3tues4W Odadpas one sOets, and to conform to society's standards.:


AIRI
.. .. .. ..1
.. . .
.. . . .
.. . . . . .. . . .
.. .. . . . . .






FOOTNOTES



-flety. Jr.,, '*The Folk Village:. A comparative Analysis,"a Rural Soci(ecember, 1981) 28: 335-353, as listed in Merrill, Socit and Culture (Englewood


E. Mearril, Soxand Culture (Englewood Cliffs, 1965) p. 440.



holpeopt. Preface to Urban Economic(Blioe198,p22.Atug
Am* lt*t "all probems, attendant to slum, areas: OThe Current program of urban reAo 11a grt-program in employmmencounseling vocational: retraining and general
A~I stphll aiely to raise the socio-economic level of the slum dwellerst in
pIw~ Ag btieamsteuly niey to ven keep pace: with: the: prospective rate
ot blight formation..

Yor ,? 4( IN lie. tate Laws, Section 84 (M and (g) (1 960) p. 70.8.8

Higesa s.S3r thregard t6o, the arban housing problem, Wilbur R. Thompson
has painted out that. ntVery few students of the subject now believe that slums create crime
andV~ls agg tha r A istiw Qpsierd share lkely that the slums simply attract problem
Boadit IigoAmovy"$t;Wt be erased putting families in a public housing pro513a atf4e:-Toward a Miconomic Definition, Urban Studies
pltivirety at Glasgow. 19973). 4.

ages~1 gags agyAgineglanatve of the evolution of the social indicator aa s ctabphyBobert4, Gray titled, #Soalal Well-Beig In heUse of Social Indicators at the Intra-Gity Level." pp. e amL e Abythe Evitanmiental Protection Agency titled, ualit of Life Indi-








eat S Qaliatas -A Be view Of State-of-the- Art and. Guidelines Derived to ItaisomeaalIndicatorst Environmental Studies Division Office of Reff tS4Vrammental Protestian Agency (December 92 p. 5.

WOU= G. .Stuart, Urban Indicators: Their Role in Plan ,n Planning Advisory

VW, p 1

14,teodand J. Levin, "Some Social Functions of Urban Slums", p. 72, as listed in
rileden and R. Morris, eds., Urban Plann and Social Polc (New York, 1968).
garly,# any attempt to regard the slum as only a residential habitat for this working class ,
at rely a locus of poor housing and low rent, or as mainly a harbor for many forms of J; 11 adal pathelegy, neglects its prime significance in rendering a meaningful life in a society
witch Is rlanfted to diferent values and different patterns of social relationship. "

C. L w and B. H. Roberts, Famil and Class Dyanncs in Mental Illness (New
Yeti, 1958). Members of lowest class groups show highest rates of schizophrenia. E. L.
Farib and i. Wt. Danham, Mental Disorders in Urban Areas (University of Chicago Press, 1939) .
IWgleat tale for certin forms of mental illness are found in or near CBD.

X S. Bradhern and D'. Caplovitz, Reports on Happiness (Chicago, 19:65) Income
-*4 ang grmentusttn correlates with happiness.

AGoode., economicc Factors and Marital Stability, American Sociologcal Review, 16: SSS).p.803. There are higher divorce ratios among persons of lower socio-economic


m). 6. S311a, d, n termatoal diof the Social Sciences, 4, 301. There is
18$*Week or Abseet fahrdistrt a boy's sex identity so that he tends to be effemighpgAA~htl eveat dinga.








t~~it A. -Kahl, "tEducational and Occupational Aspirations of 'Common Man' Boys," HarShiallsma Reiew23 (1953) 3, 180 203. Middle class parents, in comparison with
faltlp parents, place more stress on values which result in high levels of aspirations
A I'llevaboat In the educattsmlcedpat;60'~ iol sphres

1.J. 04Mn. Social and nsa Planning for the Elimination of Urban Pogr as listed
110 Windon, pp. 38-54.



hi orde a tc
AB .5 3 .....
lie asq: "' rw Wr 1lW. ....







.... .e .. . .
R .L 4o



li. r.. .r.a .. ..r.e .. ..r ... r









upaghpg it'rkt thf C hapter 2








, l) e eacts
AFa reavujta BASIC STUDY MTHODOLOGY

It assausion two

4 rder to understand and appreciate the methodology utilized in this study the reader
StOAd pges l &atomwet the basic. teahniques mad assusptios, that were utilzed in the
kWl am performd



ableier o eter define those social-physical relationships which exist between the physical
gge ABl, dat tht Ws calleeled arust be cmarable in relation to both time and sp ace.

M~dist sadyIs Me* s am* I the time factor will be constant in order to allow for signifidowt bhaitd In view of the fact that information from the 197 0 Conogus of PopAbox ate iattvo ulised as a basic data, source, it was necessary-to. continue collecting data
ltub~stpmda&asrs1 for that same year.

to holding the sptial variable constant, it was decided that characteristics at. the dhottist level would be analyzed in favor of available population and household informathra fthaldat aggtegate al, the, eumeration district level is based on a survey penggia d(p oi*daeJa rqUestion whiledata ag gregated at their centsus tract: level 48pouhei~egeaptreet ta1fftmation-doesi include, however, much, broader: Infordatabste mdmnalh iWameto holeAnto and 'residential coality, the entire.







Ap lo|tP1sd bcaatrais hc e tw


at enAucueOi h nlss

ff &wtWrd(h iyo ansil)sol edvreeog oisr htra
"MR!slt cu

tw ucasmtoswr aewt epc oageaigdt oasto
NO t ( t i t i ... ..... ....... .......

A*Sca rbesa osm xetrlte t hi hsclpoiiyt oepeoeo
-"in Ot phnmna n

P Wsa iifeetae uSicarig. bter oil h scl


.-.. ..
ftug Leach hoshl hudb G k nohrhue dW1W ke
exstn in_ anohe orajiig itit_-dtoal.oshls xsigi

:OW~W -a a trct
-0 *ti 11P iV T .. ...
.i...i. ...
iA Inio cofinIsanme hs au age rmpu .0t iu n e









oU*&-jwodwA ct variatbm In the two variables. N the two variables are:nxll and
WNLUBM.



N
(X, (y,

__Ectu as

W4WreI#iW coeMIcient assumes no cause and affect relationships between variables. The
ODjj It is a statistically derived equation defining a causal'relationship between
variable (or sacial indicator) and a set of independent variables. This, of course, reIJIW *100" 140011 110 ig"M QC the of tW data to be analyzed. Chapter 9 will explain this proce101


1 40
Th# t*0004" LIAM410010 JW a Saft of analyzing the va3ambles and presenting the information contained
- .- *-% - A
ww ,da,* samUer. more inclusive and significant set ct factors. The way these signif(soda! W.Mators) work can be conceived by thinIdng of a pair of highly correlated


11M Ot if two var'Wes are highly correlated, there is
ih 0% 130 as betsw4w the Wo. H the value, assumed by one variable is known.
10 00" IMIM
4tA" thak-5 vartablo Is *.=wn, a good estmation as to the value of
--In IVAO(Or IdAhe IDEN -Wim presented by the two variables A A- 40 vue 40 tho varlabho. For example, the variable of.
i a-11111h I'l astus. gloom and (2) percentage of housing
*t Ok lbo 4maft"d In depict the social indicator of poor
"Wift tt Wao *10ft to, we generituy acceptabia statistics
_PIW*gW*w- dataA fte presence of social pathologies






11craaye eepromdo l h vralsi re opeeta vnmr "A rs a niao.-ah oilidcao a iwdideednl st h
inasto ereso qain wt h lmnt ftesca

Inbtito)frigtese fidpnetvrals Uigzsoeteesca
U odtrieth tnadsoead osqetyterako aheuea




Moo pepeaefmla ihtecluainfth vrgo envleasca niao SAUe ncluaigteaeae ausfraltecssaeadd n h oa sdvd
th me fee esrd

|v h iegneo h ausmaueaohrmauecnb band hsi h
deiaio whc el'nepce au ifrneo h aibemaue n t vrg








Ifth
a N4 "Wil'
--- OdbWVVd shouW: provide some as,.,to th aracteristka
coaddered for treatment to remedy certain social pa0mlogies. In addition this
aboul supply some general useful policy information relative to government control
dWbft soot= of the social system.





S-FOOTNOTES


l01h s study a strong relationship was assumed to exist when the "Ir" equalled .775
at (fai Or 2 equalled .600);- same relationship was assumed to exist when the ."r" e@$.$Beat ,871 (or "r 2n equalled at least .450). Correspondingly,awekrltosi
ida agsiatdto exist when th6 "r" equAlled at lbast .48 (or the "r 2. equalled at least .300).




< t]4Ott L4 Ad a









m F
At gtr, .x,aspj 1 ,rillDtr



a4r ar





Amm* X L










pbtpdt thus Ia I. AN INTRODUCTION TO GAINESILLE

'hippt +s t

%#qi 800Q's the Gainesville Area was inhabited by the Seminole Indians who grazed V"'#"gaiie near the present city.

ch is now known as Gainesville first began to grow as a non Indian settlement i-* Vl $3 I The CiY was founded in 1854 with a population of 275 and has grown to a population of


.w """'e" cau ...Y vitthe economic history of the Gainesile IArea are
go Cityu As thei location for the University of Florida in 1905.

a sed a he qtalaionof the rairad. Gainesville became a significant market and service
Aggiculteral region. This agricultural recource remained the primary economic Orth Area until after World War II. It was not the only source, however, and at one time
tape egpreai tempteam phosphate mdAinng, and the processing. of forest products
M~palead the4 *asurana. jpts agriculture varied in its prinicpal crop ovear the
rPpiom y*thap qFeaapy, ,tre areps livestock, and even peanuts dominating .

Itsa$gg4 *l*g, poted. 4144 Untweaity of Florida or its predecessor existed, slowly growing.
*Pw'4atti vO tee o deathete ties esonomy of Gainesville and provide base employ-: agigAt a nains todUp as ftp sigl lagtfrce in the economy. with other Leagtmagulaalae M ietwre to recent years, such as Spe~rry Rand, General wr$Mitt MSaWeal0t440tr *0te41.A optagovernment, various ;retail and serand the aercindustry .









S Ifinunced the growth and insured the success of Gainesville during its early tiltead. By 1880, the railroad leading from Fernandina to Cedar Key was comSan Itking Gainesville with shipping facilities on both coasts. During the railroad boom of
$;-tiderailroad was Joined by other tracks runtdng north and south, thus expanding the of the, area.
7





*wtv %% &&,~ shw eswn as Payne's Prairie was known as Alachua -Lake in the late 1800's. The. land was thed extensively for growing crops. So productive were these crops that a line plied Alachua Lake, connecting the agricultural area to the south with: the: rail terille







*Ukk" La"@ drained to form the prairie, and the decline of agicultur e. reduced the: need of the.
8 yThe automobile, has become the primary form of transportation, :with air travel and. buses
Ihthe hdminant public transportation into and out of the: areaa.





atbi
The East Florida Seminary was founded in Gainesville in 1857 and was moved to Ocala in 1866. The
M944 O(Ahe dearert character of the Gainesvile Area was planted in 1905S when the Seminary was
tfiVW~esfte 8ad terhmed the UtIfe*Itty bf Florida. The University has' grownl from about, 25 0
*Ob#9,98,inN192. Gathevmet s now called *fThe University city."......... .

bt 1985 a comprehensive public community college was established in Gainesville by the Florida
I'kWilthJasttee, Sant Fe Goaataity CoRege, is aspected to add a great deal to he :di7.a 1@ Blasvilla Arlea changed, grew, and prospered, the once agricultural and rural environWhMieted h than dWtelpwtaet. Adceletated population growth, expanding, non-agriIArts,, growth in higher education, and an expansion of medical facilities have fostered
at Ceteetrates f urban development. Growth in recent years has meant the drawing of
aAtMLata tWIi_, and@atstelpabag~t theatttof an expanding =rban Gainesville Area.

roedmadfr oa oosad evcead
fi afygU= e|ms









Uvrovide a comparative view of the Gaftied4iile SM A Oak*,# 'ohin 6A 46 S with the other Florida
eaM MXJAI anti physical characteristics.

p gain in popu'4 0608e.' 1he Gainesvine SMSA showed the thijd highest arcentage
VW 1.4 percmt (from 74,074 to 104,764) from 1960 to 1970. The G "ne Ile SMSA also had the
0- 111 p0pulation (21. 1%); t1le fift lowest percentage of persons that were
_bOM a-nd, the lowest percentage of persons aged 65 or more ( 3%). In addition, the
V*Awabaw"I'tho'bitheat percentage ofthe total population (5 years old and over) living .11%) and the third highest percentage of units Whi Ch are renter ocL

Othievement and lo 98vitY, the aginesville SMSA population in comparis.9m 'W1dkWtBVM, *Vulations had the second highest median school years completed figure
J*04Wiockidd highest percentage of persons (25 years old and over) who completed four
Tug a kt$4)
OK r, M I I -I
the, Gaftiftville SMSA registered third lowest In m6diati fbadly income ftath lowest In mean family income ($10,155); second highest in percentage of total fmilies yeiw at les*, (13. 3V; and third lowest in percentage of total families earning
*00* per year or e (39.3%).
1 Ao t4p 'o m:D jt .. .. .. .. .....
01 Of i I Apercentage of the total number of households" were analyzed, the Gainesville Oto seamd Icrwest percantege (76.7%) of all the SMSA's. This may be attributed to the Oil gi4i f
Ulu* M t IL&; 1%, P
to SWSA had reaul% that kept fairly close to the mean Of all the SMSA's in the following
J 4 .. .... ... ......

pWSMS age It or low as a percentage af the total population (31.4%). ... .. ......... .. ... .
labor foriDe (3. 4








tas, a percentage of the total population(.37. 8%). (which,.nidnaly a Nghet in resident employment rate); Udugh It or t
a housing units with 1. 0 1 persons per roomu. (8. 3); and percentage aof single family units to the total housing units (6 8 .6%) .

aSAU had. the second highest percentage of workers who were white-collar



i
rpare the second highest percentage of tota units lacking all or same plumbing fatbe Gainesville SMSA can be characterized as young and highly, mobile with a o.It is already a retailing and educational center while rapidly dvlp


TIsO study, the, examines the following qualities of Iffe: housing quality, socio-economic status,
alydisorgaan, Individual deviation, health quality, and educational achievement.

Tho e chapters, S 8, provide the following information:

1.A* explaaio concerning the concepts and logic tha point up The available indicators of satialwel-leing:,

M. ta~p fthe Individual variables which delineate the social indicators by enumeration distlM I order to give emphasis to those areas in need of improvement: and )tasetin a thsesignitcant relainsis between indicators, especially between housing gality and social pathology by means of correlatioal analysis .

$Wil1 addrsS fo analysis, regression analysis, and z-score analysis.
Ar|

m V
"#T







,A "inl ttd ataayi same hrb ag ubro aibe hc ca e Sn namr icuieadsgiiat aho.B lmntn
661 kI nlsssoldpoierslsta ontotbscsca rbe
Uadidi re opoiefrabte ult flf o h iyo Ede
a euttfco creueainditit a ecmae n akd
vP t mta aO te ad ae n tep opeitasnl eedn
AtteW x anme f needn aibe.Ti nlsssol i i
sbIo lmnsintesca ytmad h oilidctr
. . ....
"-p*VWII hudpoiersltn nomto hc nbe h.

4f*1|af fec ititwt epctt hs aibe n~oilidctr

OiU*. Vr %eratseii egahcra a edtrie n












Table I
SOCIAL-PHYSICAL CHAAok tPJMCS OF STANDARD MOTW!TLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS FOR THE STATE OF FLORIDA,,2970 to
E a z 0 tic
JR 0 0 0 a -5 $4
U 0
ju 0
0 o E Lo L.
ca tu
14 E


qj
Bc
f -OP a cp CD
0 .0 ca or cr all

9.8 47.0 61.1 3.4 36.9 52.0 00.8 1.8 27.2' 71


F*34 &X S 12.1 9 MI 8.471 12.4 41,1 WE 3.3 W4 S3.9 75.1 4.0 32.4 83
I

12.1 11"456 9.245 10.1 45.4 58.2 3.1 40.5 51.1 56.2 2.9 45.9 13.6

Ar 1-i 11%' *3 SO. 2 12.2 15.361 8,884 10.4 42 6 56.0 4/8 36.7 52.7 77.3 3.6 30.31 7.3

U-2 In.# 22.1 9,V4 7 RV 13.0 U.9 53.6 5.0 31.0 47.9 B12.0 7.4 29.2 91.5

2ft; r mr' 11.7 8'"1 11.4 o. 8 $9.6 3.0 42.0 GS.7 96.6 9.3 40.0: 9.1
. ....... .
il ,I' A.i 0.4 11.0 S.L509 7,883 IZ.2 35.4 54.1 3.6 34.2 50.8 7Z. 6 3.3 25.S 5.9


1.# 20.7 5s.? '12.3.1 12.310 9,.11-2 10.8 44.7 56,5 3.0 37.7 48.9 62.7 4.2 32.4 9.6

$Ing 14.3,+ 30A 61.4 3.4 37.8 50.9 68.6 9/2 39.2 9.3

40 is, ftA Oi 3 4. Y33 is.$ 41.4 57.9 3.1 37.0 33.5 M 1 9.5




#%mfK At




0 %4#Dk Wt! 40









say o serarrChapter 4
O' tgge* #eg Uls dr Le
lsah
115%~~~~1 48lp?~d)J'"
30pagrlaghaming quality continues to be an exceptionally difficult task, especially In defining tila tar ubespoplehousing mneant each more than physical structures. Ift not only "has
asubject of highly charged emotional content; N 20but it also has became "the symbol of status,
MA eveent atsocal ccetantce. It seems to control, in a large measure, the way in which the Wallgnperhilee hmsef/isel and is perceived by others. i 21

Ali 1 OMM$Kg MASSArl"1lat (Put, .a familiar and satisfying environment with nearby frieds
dat10" AssalypNOWgat~cl institutions, and specialized activities adapted to the character of the
MIbg tha Mana gore to people than the physical standards of their housing. ." 22

tA*e *004l by ite two afaramentioned quotation, housing has coe to mean more than just Wheawatu been equated with the neighborhood A culture,. and a life-style of a .sghaort it has provided physical, social,- and psychological attachments for persons


housag ualiy cnno he overstated. As several studies point out, at btalg has a direcaltosi on Individuals' state of mental and physical health,3 111111101 ahd V*Rde and their degree of social interaction. 24

O*MtAAx pqletesenge "There i& a long hiatory of studies associating overcrowded
Appeasta con rd!ios with lom of self-esteem, lack of privacy to permit concentration o
*84to*a"agg Ifat gttt as Vl~te are forW ced to play unsupervised out of doors.=2
.Of=sac and re=reana facilitiesm are amenite of utmost Importance, if not critical.
Mailtawegv ngeement and privacy are seen ascontributing to low

















7 a ttdta h olwf fet a pigfo orhuig apreto
16f opsiimadpsil test hc h niiulcno dp.po
of4saifcin yks bu epl n raiain.ahg ereo

7,
leiimt oult ifclyi oshl aaeetadc i
ar**afwo h stolgclafc|pre ydeeirtdhuig hc
'WM t cn

V&vnU *a h okit m"uy0bfsn aibe:(e as1 .S n
i-7

A *d 4M1& VLB

peajp lhq'' htI vrrrg I~.1 1o oeprosprro yEu
ta,


mm wa



















4; MUM



I 1-mm: gg= I..






....... ......








Asti















......... ....




...... .... ... ... .... .....







'35





VI Itz".10,



:* ........ ....
...........



4,







4# ....... ...
'it










IN













Ck





MAfi' 2



P i&tL-+srrAGr.---- br-l ALL UN ITS



WITH 1.61 OR KIAORE PEASONS PER ROOM



BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT CITY OF GAINESVILLE, FLORI'DA-1970



WA

no an



mob

"a
no Kna 0. W:,WR GAXOPMVILLF: 0: W NUN 014L a























............. ........

... . . . .
. ..... . . . .





.... ...... ........... ......


A








44







....... 1. ALM OA

....... Ionian.


am
lot,


11%

TO TA UMEL F"GWSt LIVEL O L*k




.'r PM25AWA4t tV TOTAL AMIOLUTe VA, AM PtAH&E V"= TO EA" LCVIEL

A7.16 ".tz J-60 K kPALucit e^r* Ltvft mop











nr



Oman lwpo




P Tr'tr MAP$



PEROENTAGF O F aLACK



,q<;CUPIED HOUSING UNITS

RY ] -NUM,.-fRATtON Dl$TRICT CITY OF GAINESVtLLe.Pt.0JfiDA-197Q






Iwo WWI 0. 040.



ir w isle.





4 i

VNRN-abu A Will 1.
Now
......... --.. 41OW 6 r
...........
..... ow




1W
-44 m Mir






al
1 vm 6 ................


1V


v Fro



m I'll' I

to












AW
1"00:



*44
on*

...........



2t


,44VF TO C E rLru M".9t it-om W kLV)



01 a Lqc wo wo Owo
%ca Soo AMa4: 962k PV"L AZr OF TOT*, ABS LUTV YALIJE 44NGE A YIMM TO FACH LFVV C.,ft ..It 6g.tl. go.me 11.6
3.
3F7 bOYA Rt)14T V*w [I eA- IE EL lot
41,B
Ll

"E2.






MAP 4



PERCENTAGE Or



SUBS7ANOARD HOUSING UNITS


BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT


CITY OF GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA 1972

.. .... .... .
f WbU* 1,


WALDO
mom elm.
r rr;t
-VIA*
AIR a
w, w;'
tn oxa v-ao !'k WAR a mww 0"A
i 0 Aft lm::% .. ... .. .. .. me Rm"w: Am 'm

19 "A"esviLtz M
no
so azqpa*T
It RR
mmmum, a, 0.
++m AN Val,
Wjbpm It'am a OR PAR" a" it
Avs


-A-- RAM


.. ..... ... .. ..
... .. ... ... ...


Tj

:.::" ..... .0 "Raw,
........ a .am. IRIS



........... ......... gme
or.
Alf. .................... .......
... ........ ............. ,fr ".4-4- *TR 0000 MAIN .................



04 lk a









-4




.4*




.... ... .. .

A'!
T7
...... .... .....
Own- .... .. .. ...
aw RRR.



RD.



3. Wit" as
i Ir ROW
......... I a"
OR.


AIROLuva EAV tvl-m
LF-VEL ONLY1





0 PEXWW"f OF rOTAL AaMPLOYE VALUE RAP419 APPLYINA TO EACH L Ll ...... t2-1- 15-tt Z2. 76 4t.3i

the pft *W'ts%,4 co








1 F -1.. 1 1-2-1 lw3mml 1 L
r 1-1.4 XX-l
3 L






wwalps
Of "JWI; 91LLE









15te W ad, a intated s ubstandard state, 4 and, 5 constitutd existing standard units) .



in assaduation of the above-mentioned variables, the correlational analysis pointed out the


A.A IRghtSgree of aceotiation between:the: percentage of Black occupied housing units
per district and the percentage of housing per district that is overcrowded (i.e.,
hooday t mh are thaftl 1.00 persons per room) The higher the pecnae of overoreehd unitseper district, the higher the percentage of Black occupied: units..

I. Some degree of association between the percentage of Black occupied housing units
Jr dt@AcV and* the- percentage of substandard housing tmits. As: the percentage Of:
Blacard~kcuiedudt niftnrased per district, so did the percentage of substandard
housing units. (It should be pointed out here that these. two correlated variables
#7 MvIArbdert 4 two different sources and in two different years. The first vartabid*, the percentage of Black occupied units per district, was taken from the 1970 gadits@Hosingi~f. Vatiable nutmber two, the percentage of substandard housing
anitaipb"dletritat was determined through the above-mentioned 1972 Housing Survey:
ago-lbbe by tl* HOMilig Division, Departent of Community Development. With htpc to Ohe utilization of this second variable, this and other correlations were
easo~glitWM98hle btt Assumpt iA mind tht any change in overall: housing




Amtae housing value per district and:











a$LW~ tti~prentage of Black occupied housing per district().

#cena ofverorowded. housing per. disric and. thepercentage: of substandard basu per district (+)



1L A IUvabilitY index which can include me asur es of:

as exuality _(density, overcrowding, air, water, noise, solid. wastes) ,soil
quality, timber, wildlife, minerals, living space, sense of nterritory,"m privacy, street/
as. ,stilities/fecilities, transportation/communication, leisure time facilities;

b. Public safety factors (locations of crime); sense of physical and psychological security
wit reference to neighborhood, block, tract, district, etc.;

W- o, Lad use mixes; residential stability;
'A t. Opultal relationships (between tracts, districts, neighborhoods, blocks, individual sites,
and even ros with respect to functional and aesthetic considerations, types of families, ladsaing, community facilities, schools, etc.);

o. Sans of "community feeling" (or degree of sentimentality towards a neighborhood, bloc,
disticts trat Community. etc.);

It. sdent participatta (in socta-poltical activitie of the block, neighborhood, community e );Poltical awareness, seae of justice, freedom, equality, and community concern, $al









M~ra~ay tdest which can include areasures of:

Tetrk Mkriaad of obsolescence: abateri1al quality oxf housing;m neighborhood quality of housing-,

b. Te availability of decent, safe, and sanitary (standard) housing;

0. Pinoftcial ability of displaced residents to benefit from such housing;

4,Accesibility of standard housing to employment, schools, churches, public transpor1 tot~h and other saeiissuch As doctor, dentist, and child care centers; and

a Nighborhood stability/safety.


...u t ..a..... ...
........ .. .mm m





FOOTNOTES


aldson Guild Neighborhood House and New York University Center for Human RelaItV gad b Cameannity Studies, Human Relations in Chelsea,. 1980. Report of the Chelsea Housing
IM~fattar Iaaios Cooperative Project, as listed in the office of the Governor, The Governor's
Tagh Pere, on Housing and Community Development, and the State of Florida Department of Comabila0ly Aftirs, "Housing in Florida," 4, 84.


... ,. p .. 50 .....

4% lSake ad Aofthes PHousig Arctature and :Social::Interactio,* :Socizg (1956) ,


are (Ias PAUt, "Crowding: A. Selected: Rihliography," Council ;of Planning Librarians No.


AbieveUd Atlaw *900181 Science and the Enmination of Poverty." Journal of the American InAttaeteOtay 197) XXXIH, 149.



MV~n Scharr, "Slum and Social Insecurity," Research. Report No. 1, Division of Research
M Mti$ Piuldoraio (fWitgton, D. C., 1983) p. 31.

Ag~O this SWphab (+ dane1atwZ a positive orrelatio was found to exist. That Is, as one
ishdate ;so dMPs the othe '4trbleo being derr-elated. Similarly it may also indicate
98aWebelue Ne ete verabl decreases- also: the symbol (- on the other
WidF Invhee stafissistiy estates That is, as one variable increases, the other











IB4/r pychoagiaeSOCIO-E CONOMIC STATUS29


ab e $$ghleta to that social position which a person occupies resulting from his age, sex, ar1#6 leeetcupaIon or achevement. It may also refer to an individual's partipular standing


(tghgii giy Jhtghelature of our society to anticipateAdifernt behaviorl responses. from
NJwthltag diffrent statuses, but also to expect, at least in theory, that everyone strive for baeote-eaonote status. These behavioral patterns, or roles as they are commonly called,
*WW-lthj due, expected to perform for each statna or set of statases,:

brdia saety to function normally, widespread acceptance of statuses and roles must be
Agsc~ Ag. *ehaviar of mnan consistsof acting in a, manner designed to preserve or
A~~o~ AD *Wlls dtltts* 30 It appears that nearly every person is concerned with his self-image
68gsof wifert. They are often dictated by friends, peers, and society as a whole. Much of
4tit( a- adia lpeds dveoted, topreserving, and promoting both his socio-economic status


a dggslaedby~peaniary values, the individual's ideas of his personal 488alag iyhe lawal of Apia~mooRd the prestige 94 is occupation. His conAUstW "te gy1eelated by his position in it. If it Is high, if he has wealth and m8 A its is moving upward on the scale or at least maintaining a high position, he is
th dsocio-economic system and to believe that it distributes rewards in a .Adatalncewith Individual merit. Criticisms or expressions of discontent by persons tigteataay grhodtp~lkheaa,4 Ia epart as daagerous and ,subversive





Ir4


-4k esn Ilreupre tmoail rpraety: icpbeo cur


tt* 1101 'U hIuhe p o m n n e ur ulcassa c ih o elz iaca

4*0i ihkia euiy hu hybcm h efr eipet forscey eas
V *to*imtoe atri a esmpdta hs esn xeinearltvl o
Ao ; tts hssck m~~ate, h olwn 97 oshl noevr


Hi onftiet1
cllrn(D) yeueaio itit
i#prm eeiigIdt





bil
imf








MA

'f*IMRCW4-rAdZ' dF kOUM6440LOS


*00r ZAM4W Lit
-80 THAN' SSSPCPO P ER YEAR 13Y TFtAV*FfC ZONIt .2-,-aTY OF, GAINESVILLE, FLORIOA-1971 'on




as a.




.......... IL





440









4r
#





"V-4





........... .... .... .














9 M plgw # ua
10,














ft~ Tmr.Nr Or lrlAANGp*wr*TW" tmq*Aps a ICCL.Czy awfA TABULAricHis TMHMMAL MPCMT HMO





MAPS



A I T N4*1 L IE S


AWI, TA k64 CH I L D'R E N


iN*UME_: RIAT tlbt WeMFRICT CITY OF G AINiSVILLF, FLOAIDA




WALDO



MI.

NN'i'
a 2
Rm"m MR No 11
'01

P AMIIT K'F' "It



V- W
W "I. Aft. IN ff A ol OMAN
so" FARAMANN, I

ON
......... IN

MEN


W*MW IM7 4m ON

.... NON,
MOM

# .............

.......... ....... .. I, ;N
.............
.. .............. ...............
..............









4a,
















'w.*4

WON,

O"TmokNr

NOW .


on
sol
NO

4 ...... NON
MPm

If FkCR THOUeAt4D
4,00L 1mr 'm evtL
34 "94-esyl EYFL ONLY) "4

-a -Z 0 t-I ba on zc g*


2P rl"A, A"OLfOre VAUM R"4y, APPLVIM Tt EACH LCVEL ir. ".AL ..61 14.47 9.04












Ol




%


t4




MAp
A IDfgP NaWI O ID E
BYEUCgraNos-~c
itr f A~f~L~tFbli-or
i?

0111 a, t" I
m Iw:n0

a No
60A"ot~mI
P.

.. . .. . .
-...... af "
.. . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .
...... .. ,r v ;
.... ...... ...... h ..
........ io
. met#I
. . . . ..I






MAP 8
r

2
AID TO THE DISABLED


BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT v CfTY OF SAINESVILLE, FLORIDA -#970
#


...... *ALM .. . ......
... ... .. ....






at. ow A

..... ... ..... .. ... ....
............ .......

iNE
.............





...... In


...... .................. lot ........... m ......
--------446, rl ex- I V 4 t SO "so

.......... ...... loom.
0 'MMOBF7
...... .......

i"ff

r't,
.......... 3wm 0,


..................

vo

Nita WSW
m,"o
........... --- --@To AV& ..............
......... ..........

NNW .. ...............
+4W ..... ............



it,



*WT


'40"m

*0A*N6ftWK


so




wt" 41 4VAILUE13 VWf't-lZC'r RATE FIER TWCtM^W
*ftMCkLVM VM-WE **AMK A0PLVl*X" ftfflL




















m:1



3 1 :41,3 OR".



4f









SM41 mM U Imm#.* vadAkd ft We Disabled). As overcrowding was found to have increased per S did welfare recipiency.
4,, It*
IWw am percentage cif families receiving AFDC and the average housing score, the percent'Ir" 2 M-4-1 third uldft, and the relative housing value. As the percentage of families per
district receiving AFDC increased, the average housing score per district decroased. the percentage of substandard housing units per district increased, and the relabousing value per district decreased. As might be expected, persons receiving welfare V t tie Ad4 looftd to live in districts with lower quality housing units.

Debra= the percentage at Black occupied units per district and the percentage of families/
pareem xecniving welfare assistance per district (AFDC, ADC, and AD). As the percentage Of XWwck occupied housing units increased per enumeration district, so did the percentage of
Owe and fadlies receiving welfare ass! tance.

in a to housing quality, the resultant information disclosed there to be at least some rela7


W010m rociptency and the ratio between average Black housing value to the average total
volue per district As the percentage of persons/families receiving welfare (AFDC, and AID) Increased, so did the abovw-mentLoned ratio;

The pwowtwire of ftwilies. per district receiving AFDC and the relative housing value. Belaaft boadag value decreased as the percentage of farnill increased.
,W- --- --- ,

lop
Ovi"led betwom Me percentage of persons per district receiving ADC and


*W* betwom #vorep 81=* rout/average total rent per district

y4fte P" disbict H;

I






















47











































































Vb* ;t"rage housing score per district and





























Uge.of substandard houdAR units -per distdct ... ... ... .... ...... .. . . .. ................

























ps between welfare variables and those that indicate other than housing














































I? I


































































.. ............ .......

.... ..... ... ... .... .













































































.. ...... ...... ....... .. .... ....

















































. ... ..... .........
.... .. .. ................ ..... .. .... ... ... ......
.. ... ... ....... ... .... .... ....... ... ............... ....

... ......... .............. .




























































































































































































































































,1131L_























aOm

in va iwo
4 & A 93A

V

0+



.. .. H. u
0~ +9 -a<0











-thaMeibtinof what is "tadequaWs employment, "economic s ecuritya

3.Local price indexes, 8.Local poverty levels,

4.Labor force participation,

pl*agI amelyzatsons by block, neighborhood, district,. tract:,. eftc.

dentification of groups. classes, communities, etc. of persons in need of or deserving
16tbmoastta (age, race, set, education, family size, etc.) ,

a eAfrailable, existing and desired employment possibilities by enumeration district. census prmatrigh, etc., (ekti~at, seed-skilled, anskilled, and professional labor positions) ,

S. Percent unemployed, underemployed per district, tract, etc.,

C. Work environment, work safety, work challenge,

1O, Personal as well as labor skills, and

1I1. Awmts ot time and monies devoted to particular cultural leisurely, and recreational
activities.









AA





F' "asFOOTNOTES


3SOad A Social Report, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
GIol iagbui, 1ISO). Economic status is universally held to be a social indicator. D. C.
ofRsac einadSocial Measurement (New York, 1970) p. 169.
150So0-oonlhe poitiono the person affects hscances -for education, income, 6%,bsia marriage, health, friends, and even life expectancy-"

Stdbethni, Sog and P(EnglIewood Clifs, :1961), p.270.

411 R~dat~a~ithand A. L. Strauss, Social PsyNecYrkh166lp 621.

%The, rafte is calculated by determining the total number of cases per district and multi60- F;h1M* 4000 A TIs, tefutt Is then divided by the.: toa population o~f that enumeration
agt-dets theretbrethe number per thousand.

Pgt Edusy IMtoned in Chapter 2, in this study a strong relationship was assumed
VMi oh, #r *Aiealed M. o/ t better (or upr 2 "1 equally G00) Some relationship w as
Sttdihftte Irn equaled at east .0671 (or "r 2 ", equalled at least: .450) :Corres.Opt*akx alalnhip was dontaildred If exist When the "ru" equalled :atleast .548 (or
eqinalld at least .300) .









... .... . ... .. .. ...
chapter, 61

V,146 y DISORGANIZATION AND INDIVIDUAL DEVIATION ... .. ..... .. ..... .. .. ..
.. ... ... ... ..

is seriously hampered by various behavioral: pattex= that cons.titutemajor 4'6 Wggat* or, social pxoblems. Juvenile delinquency, drug'addictiam, prostitution, crime-,,..
... .. .. .. .. .....
an- /separation/divorce, mental illness,# underemployampt unemployment,, prejuall= can be considered major scx:ialproblems. .. .. ... .... .

pxqblpwa can arise when various situaUons are cmmd dered.to.: be threatenin apd:
xWpe47 por*onsfoEa that they can do something about it...

Sp;44W 4* made up of w=eraus small social groups. The most important small social group:.
vfU *,* roq)o Ing. zvqring, and socializing its newest members. In
naible for pretecti
gxm*o however. neighb4prhood., emmunity, business, and pr6fessional groups
juavspce the raointepaum oad enhascement of certain, important socW values and ... .. .. ...
.. .... . .....
xWepi zabap often results when individual members depart from the group's norms
the inter-relations that bind'theim groups together at least begin to break down. art
#
# *htch isawly 4uwapiable due to rapid changes in technology, inmd degree of urban12adon occurs when large scale group disorganization takes place.
_040440m4w, "40, evidenciaoby laxga fiscal, iAvolvement in, such sod4lly Amapprovod,
t Prosutution,,etp. in addition, family 41sor .. .. .....
JW,*pm4awUbw,*at exebrokeuby separation, divorce.: desertioa,,,%.
aWturg of tbo- al
q= problms, wbich
*w we ohm over=wa and resort to the major social-psychological

44



all
4 Ir ta
P .









blems become W ge -scaW...
t.iW abeve. When these pro 'it: might be. said thatsecial
Ims occurred/is occurring.

*9aW*",WoU" jo, made up vf -individuals with complex human.. xesponse patterns which are
by the external pressures of the social environment, they might exhibit behavioral pat disorganized. When a person demmistrates seemingly disorganized be34
%4wW fron group norms and cannot be adequately predicted, he is said to be deviant.
-Use been awd to oc= when aperson feels that he has failed in performing: a las to show disorganized behavior. However, individual deviation can be organic
=4 even manifested at iiirth. These persons are considered to be subnormal in that they
ow WwWOM # ,damaged andinentally retarded,. Because of their mental deficiency, they are:
poWy able to functimadequatelyla*aMaLl SocAal situations.

0,40"ft- p-m-opm mst persom do not experiame pr4blems paralleling thi s, but s om e do exhibi t b eINION posb=oampT*oaribodes4wtD=ryby"conmum*tyinwhicb they exist. Thesepersons
zOwrOtmas ptyebatics neurn#cs. or eamiftrics. A psychotic can be described as an the, munication processhas been broken down and who becomes incapable to a w r of a group by rewoft of Uds fact. 1135 This person suffers from mental confusion
'AW 000 00 lfdm ot apatbj, haUucinatinns, destructiveness (of self
4)1* ,OdWftY* *W= and stupor.

AL n MO;t* v* the Odber tmod, dw,* Act svffer ftow as radical a bre with rea ty or e exAlp'"- *04W 'Incapacity that dbaracterizes the psychotic PB
I it t -I. 4k i 'a
AID 0OW f W% lu* ps aTevsm wjw idisplays a number of deviant behavioral patterns
J Vmvaad4w"d 4MUrvaty za#r"Wxing p9yebistric attention. When deviant beooo*s to be cotWdiwed UY the coarAunity as harmful, labels of unlawful, "subvexsive, del W0101047m, 1 boambed.

_71W 2"VsW behavior indicators, (see Maps 9, 10: and.


-**Uwftt bj*&v$w roUft" to=lmes against property by enumeration district;






.. . . .. . . .
.. . .




Th aeo naflbhvo eaiet rmso ilneb nmrto iti|-3
|=
g 1 l m fulwu ehvo eaiet io rme yeueaindsrc;
(4 *4 ene htteemp ilrfettersdnillcto ftepro itn
Oo"piq h oamo h cieEeeHneteflown il~)o as ei
Prsn ComtigCie f ime net rms....adMnrCie
Di # t ... ...
Wp 12prot oso tIs oainofciecaatrsisb eitn h
|wa sdlnae yd anki~,PUeet etrn oie evcs. h
th radw ndor fclsfr oiesrie hemprfet l
c-- (ecp oo eil ciet. orteya 90 hr ee3.4
I a-. ecMp-wOA,-se2-1. ecn;zn 36prt
111 oc 1, e n oe7hd2. ecn




$mn srgnatOhWmwlas ecnsdrd(eegp2)




m A*


kNt Ac)c)Rrtd' 9__*OF 11 467 CRIMES' AGAINSt PROPER-FY

Oy' PNUMtRA-rlbt_4 016TRIOT
11 14
CITY OP GAINtSVULLIt rL6,R[,DA t 70









..K-3-L A




... ..........
Nr



..............
................. ....... ...... o n

saw






















A"h*







411% Lm AePLE F;A-ri Pr" -rHOtjeAb4r) WWrL DNLln coa" t"EL vES IN C4&A LEVEL











Ak _k PaLl" QL *.




mig


MM tPERSON S 11



4=- 'RIMEM-OF VIOLE:NCE



lay F_,NUMtRA-rl'z>,N ) It.-TRICr Y 6F 6 k tftir_ S V ILA'. r Lo R ID' A 1970













2 A m Ww Alt 4 It ka A a Pl* r-4EGVK LL K
4 lcl.
IN an W"p4y oil 0101.

wpm






as

......... ....... a SISM





In out.
... ....... ......
sw*4


...........

.......... ..........

.. .. ........ .......... ........

...4 ........... ......










At a













qIN
6T""




on
ol



fEFLEC r, RA PER THOUGALMD
-4*
(:Ljtpev it -IJUR Lffor L W*V) wk "bv mt
63-17


........ . . . ...... . . . C" At a- ram^- "S LVTE **LUC -10t -P-LYDNG TO TACAr LEV't.X2 4*HER





MAP I I



RESIDEN-r ADDRESS_-OF PERSONS



commi-ri-iNG MINOR CRIMES


BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT


CITY OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 1970






.... ....... .






or 0. t lal


............... Aw-ticip

........ ........ x mok Wm**
.................... N.'**- -l"'l
............ ,*Oo of,
0 30T AVE. MOO~ 'Woto
pm"), Am
......... ....... q..................
Oil w
41* .......... ........
.......... ....... ...... v
.... .................. ......... .... ................. wvw
a L
...... .. ..... .

411 1 . ..... 0
of .......
.........


..zf4*34TO .......... .......
r ..........A. .........
..........
ot'm 0


14 Av .

.........
.......... ...... --DOW
.............

in



0
r
Mm"0.0001D

-am





14.

'Ar




4,
Ice:.





aw
A

lt V"


LF-c-r RA-rr- PER T"CYLISAND R&Irt' MG "CR LbOUL Ago LM- f4CLJ0E!O OR LLVtL U-l
#
Ol Z"o 31,11,
'w't" un -.9


A L CN 10 t"Fj4 A%-Vf 52.30
Ir
W"" VINTRT Rf" Jr 0AM"ONT VALUL 11% EACW LLVEL h, 44 so
w v 1 lit, a
00
"OiBms








J,
















.........
i.a ... ...
.. .. . .. .
... .. ..

.. . . . .


MAP 12
f*ECNAE irAD WtIAD RGNTO
!,AL O OIESRVC YPLC OE






MAP 13



PERCENTAGE 0 F


N-HUSBANO-WIFE TYPE FAMILIES 2WITH' HILCRE:N LESS THAN IS YEARS OLD

BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT CITY OF GAlNf-GVtL-LE, FIqR),DA -4$ 70 Il a 1; .......



Pro.



MIA
late -0 ..;k A


Ila IW I ESVMLEPI 5 it MUNICIPAL 01 ....... .... a MR At kpn*y


a A WANORK a ARM

omm
At

......... ....... ... a rm
W&S




Ilk




..... ...... .
,A ... o.:.2* ST- "fW.*

............

..... ......




......... ... ...............
% .......
....... .. ........
. ........ ...........




ad
to .........................
101jv mffi mwswomv


Tawl"



.T"ORNE



A RD.


Af, Ion
aa I%



7-1
di It,

-mu-numg-lk H-LGM-ST Lur"'t

3 luo
X0AAlKl= W. wo "D 4QW
RAM

0 V A ,R*mom APPLrgw. To E*cp it,"cL 54.?. ..t.tT V.-kw
Is




vow 91 it L 1=11 Its
**oo*r


all,
pA
1 W









So ho iatserunlawful behavior relative to crimes of violence, and. minor: crimes per


I 1 Sa average housing sore per,. district, (-n);

-thi percentage of substandard housing units per district (+) .As the rate of
unlawful behavior increased. the average housing score decreased, and the
6 ~ ~ apoetgofsbtandard housig units increased per district. In other. words,
eterekisted a strong positive, corelation between crime and poor housing quality.

R.The Idt ntsanlawful behavior relative to. crimes of violence and the percentage, of


a3. *'he poeentage of families per district wit 'children who are less. than, 181: years. old
that are not' husband-wife type famities and the.. ratio. between. the: aSverage Black:-rent
to the average total rent per district. This ratio increased, as the percentage of famiUee tacreased.'

M alationshiy was uncovered between the following: ... .... .

0 1. The rate of unlawful behavior relative to crimes of violence per district and:

a. the percentage of housing units with 1.01 or more persons per room. The rate of
1, Thei untWl bbhador increased as the percentage of over crowded units per. district


b. the ratio between average Black housing value to the average total housing value
.The poedistakes as this, rabe hAxtree ao did the ratp of unlawful behavior relative


terate of salawAS bdaevior retalks to ork6 @gRID@$ Paspegad
15tri pcu ta uof us tadr uni: pe ditit Astepretgo vrrwe









4,, 1Re Tbe aarerage housing score per district. The average housing score decreased
that usetigzrat of unlawful behavior, increased per district.

3. thete atfantwful behavior relative to minor crmsadtePercentage of Black
cOaupied units per district. As this percentage increased, so did the rate of untawsbl behavior ... .

4. Te^permntage of families per district with children who are less than 18 years old
that are not husband-wife type families and:

'a. Itheuerage monthly rent per district. As the percentage of families increased, INM the average monthly rent per district decreased.

b. the percentage of housing units per district with 1.01 or more persons per room. iAM dow':-st Tbt Parapage inUcreases as the percetage, of families increaes perwdistrict. ...

co the percentage of Black occupied housing units per district. As the percentage
of Black occupied housing units increased per district., so did the percentage of familes with children who are less than 18 years old that are not husband-wife
type families.

ek Assdmship was found to exist between:

lle rate of unlawful behavior relative to crimes of violence, property crimes, and
pinrimhes and, the ratio between average Black rent and the average total rent


M.wh rat of unlawful behavior relative to crimes of violence and minor crimes and
th$ Waatv houetag value per district (H).




.. ........ .....















ZW potomtage of families per district4ith children who are less than 18 years old AW are not husband-wife type fau dlies and:
............. ............. ... ........ ... .... ... ... .... .. .......... ........ ..... .......... ......... ........... ........... ....... .... ... .. ....... ....



fibp percentage of substandard housing units per district J+); ... .. ... .. ....

Ow relative bousing value: per: district

.. .... .... ...
... ... .....
... .. ....

tm percentage of*scant mits per distrWt




tha,'rotia betwom average Black housing value.. tp the. average -total housing value

Pw d4 trict N ; ... .... ...
..... .... .. .. .. ...
..... ... ..... ....... ..... .. .... .. .. .. ..... .. ... ... .... .... ........ ........ ....... ....... .....



8. the averase value of owner-occupied housing units per district W.
.. .. ... .. ... .... .... ............. .... .... .... .... .......... .. ..... .. ..



table (3) points,+ out those relationships betweeih dKee variables that delineate other

q u a l i t y ................. ... ... ........ .......... ... . ..... ... ..... ... .. .. ....... .... ... ......

Ile 14


.. ... ........ ...... .... .... .. ... .. .. .... .... .. .... ... .. .. ... ..... ..... .. ... .. .... ..

XK







..... .. ........... .. ..... .... .... ... ....... .......... ......... .. .......... .. .............. ..... .. ... ..... .. .... ... ....









































6 40-1 +
%-- -,tc t '_ + -0-













Table 3
CORRELATIONS BETW EEN T,=V7DXJAL DEVIATION,
FAMILY DISORGANIZAT10N, AND OTHER SOCIAL VARIABLES t!


bo m w G'o be
4v
s w to Q
1 1 .18 is 1% 0 in
is 0, 0 u
44 jib W fa
ip wr co
C A k w
i3 v 0
mo ra ev 16t 2
to go
0 41 cd
to to to to v
46, IH u
ri bo

s w s


s s
w $V s vt s


s
s sv s s w s
+ + +

s s s s s sv s w
*fw































4t,
16









.. .sp., ..ests,..
$....p.. tutign.



$. $gl@Stgtistics (Age, Sex, Race, Income) ,

4. (QUOglop Stathettas (Age, Sex, R ace, income)

of Cxrimes (In determinig safety of, certain urb an: areas), CRIld Molesting, Beating Etc.

opegpgs90 (epson Esprastang Fear at NeighborhodCie

OA5 prv ...
g e..... ... ....







343vant behavior is generally defined by politically dominant or superordinate groups
** 4 AMllirally determine whether some actMi. should be positively valued or negatively valued. "a %ndesmith, p. 658.

44,,d p. 652.
IA t4 711 4 .. p.. .... .......... ..

00*Ot h* OLVlbif Crime Reports," U. S. Department of J-ustice (Washington, 1970) p. Crie
*V*W~abk rk Bti tael defined as offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated ascrimes are offenses of burglary, larceny ($50 and over) and auto theft; these are
:A age or crimes and are considered to be the most consistently reported to the police.

Of WYV 3utbet8%udy frola January 1, 1970, through, December 3111, Plannting and Research, msalf ita Adevillet Police Department, pp 4-5.

j j*north16egly stated, family disorganization is assumed to occur when divorce, separation,
d os










-OII


rate#









8 Rte .Chapter 7

HEALTH 4


card. on. . ....
1 Publication, ToatascilPpr (,Washington, D).C., U.S. Governen
#mth United States Department of Health:,: Education, 'and Welare st ated tha aee of the basic means for determining quality of lie was the consideration of health. Howeven 4ogggr toproperly look at health problem areas, the concept of health must first be......
40046 Y W points out the following difficulties incurred while defining health:.

t*ia'h is both a generalized and a relative concept which has been defined in a variety
a Tppe t has, meant merely freedom frm ical disease. In recent years the con-,4**kaj~n,,broadened to include social well-being, "

t nlan,a~y of "health" heye merely ,involved the tAbulation of 'inds and amounts
"r.he-.absence of health) for various. geographic areas'. The examination Of the types.
locations of health problems is extiemely important in analyzing 'various peoples'
( Ile.The way they live, for example, often reflects the status of their own social welle orAntance reeldtht or health --- whether real or imagined --- mdght
AFRNtO theindividual's actiyties as to prevent the acquisition of further education and contribq ainethefolilg 1 10 health prdeal tdicators 44Nb (se ups 14, 18


i# df seported-ttiberculosis cases by enumeration district;45









$,Rates of venereal disease: by nmrto district. 48



tn regard 'to housing quality and health problems, one study has shown that "when housing
eanitiesare highly inadequate, the physical environment itself can have a deleterious effect upon healtand that when a group that formerly lived in such conditions moves to better housing, its
Sai v diminish,," 49.........

i this particular study, rate of infant mortality per district, rate of tuberculosis per district,
average age, at death per district were investigated. Because of an insufficient number of
at least somewhat unreliable correlations were uncovered.

4endeathi rates per enumeration district were analyzed, however, results were achieved
out; at the very best, the following masty very weak relationships. As death rates indteasd, it was uncovered, the partntage e hame-headed families increased; the
VWo sh tandard units increased; the ratio of the average Black housing value to the:
toarosing value increased; and the percentage of Black occupied units per district


4rrelationship was, discovered lbetween death- rates per district and thie-:rate
fe edbb r relative to crimes of violence'. As death sates -taureased, so did the rate
PW* wA~wW rivor relative, to crimes of violence.

AdArystrong relationship was detected, however, between the death rettesper district
$40at of *Aawful behavior relative to minor crimes per district. As death rates..increased,
sate itunlawful behavior relaeto rninor crimes.

4f Feature Investigations:
ofbM oo elh






M Ar, 14,,,



COUNT OF- R5:POPTED



TUI$ERCULOSI-9 CASES



SY ENUMERA-rlOk lEYVSrA'tC r


CITY OF oAiNF-8VILLEFL40RIbA-I9-r0 LA





Mail


... .... .. .
-:g_ Alp
so ax


.......... it




"T4 A E. 14 Z;; to KKR"
a RWRRR %RM
me jt"%mPM. P, x
..........


.......... wo
mo


pli. 41 1617
mjt.


rels, a in









tw" mpt low
W16E

...........





H%54

OUR"
..............
..................
"Pip
tvl "lqv *VF. RL
-7 7"p 64 -x-s ......
WSW
'Low nz
1"7




LOE'
lcr
..... MID
am ft
06"s



WOW


dew
Limcc

1-00 I-so A... -2.
Mr." 1.60 7..b


........... msnLvTv vm_,m 4444 7

20 ao-ft zu.co 2 .ot


aTaTTq"Tlow






MAP IS




RATES OF, DEATH


BY ENUMERATION '01STRICt









0% %







0, mommm


0 po GAME5.1- v ommow, .' '10 WK him-my w

a 0 WAR
.. ........ .. a mmm" Jm 11
30" *-F- 1 00 in 0 1
aommw-.




..........
40 w

40"4*"
--- ----In -M M=.-40



11 mil 11 own


























.......... .... .. ....








..........



............ on



ow Uri
............



+ Vokl-UEB REFLECT R^,rE PER THOUSAND
........ AGMMUTt VALLW RAK16F APPLV "U TO E*40 LFVft
tKa4lDW A" "XQC ,T LLVM nWyl T.xx *5*-AA 12 W11: 97
V, = Qr 4114s'. ,, '71KI 04


va-W VAmm APPLVVNG TV Z440 Leum 67-Nm -95 l..*2 341. -,2


paur Wmiml, it ea "U:

I'mm .........

-V. -









MAP 16




'RATES OF VENEREAL DISEASE



BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT


CITY OF GAIP4EGVILLE.FL0Rt0A-i970











0 MR.
a MR M-*
.;iM.
as Rik MR 191,01111"1 ....... 2'. skim's E I
wumIc Is
-1 "a ON
a RM OR
Loot "M a
ML MR
MOR

...... "ORRIN

.......... PLn
............ 49
1a
.......... ff .. .......... & oil in no

............
lqlg .0 Million MBFT
.:::#441 teM

"Milin
IN ............ a lime Jim
0 ............ all,
.......... Ar a
'2 r
........... .....
.......... ................. 15TH vo
... ............. ...................... ............ ST.
a b0ou
Tk 0000 .41. MR


-"*ww"aboom ............
3
.................. ....... Em awn
+ ... ............... . .

o"
...........
. ...... ..
+



:= =-==4-%U . ...........

DO=- A a 2
Sou Homngu-- wilawago ....... va . . .... ............. ......
OwnuWbogap a an 111411111001211"s INIV11145ft"M



'A-V"s
aw
It
n I DO

MT so*Was
No HA- E


in
lun,0111111 I ...........
ow ...........
PM ...... IF
MR,
It



V*1-lJC9 R FLZCr RATE PeR -rmOUSAND 10 11Cd LEVE, olwm-1, A t F4 L ,LO 1. TC CST Lt! L "LIJ

-t LOPC L51 6
-,Q, zo -600



L. A"C--XYAQf OP TOY^- ABA71LOIF VA -UU PAK E APOLItM TO LIAC t-EX
13.6z 2Y.Z5 35.15


0,19Tz'""ZON w2oATIk OlvT E. -L. Lt f
If 3






Pmoot I
1_2 1+124,.l [a I-H.
fi: I *.Z- I tae3s,1511 F I I
too"W
T-LA*t

MI.VY HEOLT" V-T,

.4- It,









S.A eb ade which an: nclude. mesueee

4. Sigt



e. 00e~a/artOWa status and levels,



4 1
.. .Da....arit.. ....



f. Phy"totgl uac capacities,p

g Agpabiltyto' and use of services of doctors and dentists,

b. l -bre@htakdowas as to tp/aeofmrity-Mortality



.LAfe expectancy rates,

J .Detal problems,

k. Use of prescriplion/non-prescription drugs,

4 COnicw disease,

b. Ssabtagdiseases, and
petpi f bsllhelhsau









to hthX indft which can Include measures of:

tunty a E tonladjustment and balance, Pt~tl....ab......
catory o r Avn t;,
a* Itreonal competence:,





r! name, osnonnese

have 4Sb*aid adds,

hi apeegeda-ilneses(asthma, ulceraf, etc.o and Su o aAp tv (giglmill-WOW (Bdich as loseania, ulcers, et.) para. ..s .r .....
cam 3of that g en e fOl h
t .. .o...i.y...s... ...

Ok ~ h aEig de'AJ t n at~ .. ... .. .
.... ... ....




L o T t.. .





F" FOOTNOTES


ThhA.uiiler,, nMental Health May Depednd on EcnmcSituation," Gainestille Sun,
192M p. .. Fo onissch as Alachua, "mental: illness is associated
and deprivation while- health is associated with relative affluence and oppor4ft 11 Lee, "tHealth and' Well-Being," T'he Annals of the AAPS, Social Goals and Indifor' t (September 97 ,14

4LOSchnore and James D.. Cw I "Some Correlates of Reported Health in Metropolitan
enesIrbblems (1959-60)., Table 3, p. 225.

O~hiidak6 reqired by law to be reported to the County Health Department.

"T.i. agbb, it should be noted, are a relatively accurate measure and are often closely
relate to adowfding conditions. it should also be noted that health centers generally may not
tufe the 9 we 1..cases or cases of T. B., infection without disease reported.

4. Hicks, "Economy May Spur Mortality," Gainesville Sun,: November 20, 1972, p. 4-C.
Itaeti td information on mortality, it should be emphasized that generally the place of residence
glasta As merely the mailing address (which can be another city, town, or country in which a
t^ A %",*Mis born or has died); "... many experts have equated infant mortality ... to be an indieafte of the general health of the nation..." M. V. Jones and M. J. FlaxThe Quality of Life in
Washingtan, D. C.: Some Statistical'Benchmarks (Washington, D. C. 1970) In'Af' m altyused as the ony health indicator in Quality of Life Study: in Washington, D. C.

'llie information given on death certificates relative to causes of death is often unreliable
s Adil *Ww ecidogis are often subjective. As an example, a man may be listed as dying from a
Manastndswhm In atuality it ay be luncr cancer that spurred the heart attack.
r %svibewsntpae nteaayi nta totntnst rvd eybae

























04 Uhig


a, fohs esn gd3 er rls, sbuigqaiyipoeteewr



les seiu curnso lns swl a esrnme fdy fdsblt
(sriu ilnese weetoeta eurdmdca tednado n rmr
daso isblt)

=*_ Aty rtoeprosae 0yaso esacdns eddt eraead1 a ae










gtegges 1. -Chapter: 8

.Te ... . EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTr



$1~aainis arhaps the most.- significant indicator concerning the competitive aspects of the .ugt ....is...

*ktucation is now the most important agency whereby a young man with ability but limg$0 eq~a" an rise from the class of his parents; 51........ ...

Several studies point up the importance of the educational factor. As ou r society :and
ShaIgwaypeture omplex, and sophisticated, changes occur with greater raidty.: Individuals q*Ut graptop apwpupts of time to lears and adjust to the changes. In an advanced, technical,
soolety, .a man requires more than just the ability to adjust to rapid changes.- He must
Ap: RtapY' 4usgint to these rapid chnes. Both general and specialized form aleducation
to Ppgglid Persons with the proper learning, tools necessary for adequate adjustment into


lb aappagFegadusoed #rom April 21 thrugh April 23, 1972, by George H. Gallp2i
petswere asked their opinions on the chief reasons for educating their children, the
igausAWresponding .percentage of Person replying) were",

he lgater las .44%

"TO$k get along better with people at all social levels 43%

,,eabemoney -achieve financial success 38%



their minds 15%









A -Iftan those same parents were asked what they would like their local elementary schools Wadh 1-8) to emphasize, the predominate response was:

"'Teaching students the skills of reading, writing and arithmetic."154

In this section we will consider the following educational achievement indicators (see Maps 1f,7 itv 19, 20 and 21) .

17. The aVerage 1970 reading comprehension test score for Alachun County School pupils
for grade 4 by enuaration district

1t. The average 1970 reading comprehension test score for Alachua County School pupils
AprW grade- 8 by anmeaondtrc

0.The average 1970 reading comprehension test score for Alachua County School pupils
for grade 8 by enumeration district

26, average reading comprehension test score for 4th, ORW, and 8t grade Alachua
ivpupils by enumeration district and

$.Meirage 1970 Florida Senior PlaceMen) test stirre fai Alpua County Public School
12th graders by enumeration' district

fuhvemehot in housing conditions, it should be notait, *proatep on environment that is
to less severe Illness (both in number and iLn Wash,, Eas iIlness an d less severe *IIrI e the possibilities of more and better schael atigae.With more and: better
Areadec comes an increased likelihood for edAMirement,



painted out, as housing quality improved,. so did school performance. anayss revealed coresposagag results. For example, there was shown to
II1





MAi6 11





Tt- -r t6ORES

4+H 4*fk. ,Pt: OUP I ,S BY ENUMP-RAT16t4 dfS*T'f4lt T OF OAT"IlkaVILLt, PLbktOA 10"tO













Mr "I.VZSWALIE m
*zw-iwr
om M, L

MW
3WV W"* A ". m Ale















k'




















goo" moo







)8*0 w44 1 mm "Am


am





UM Miq WN. VAA "#qo W mw WW-"& -ALW ""FF ".9-y W E"" ttML



lqRmacK
..............




MAP

AVERAGE: RK-AQING FQ? PRCHE:NSION Trt1- SCORES
6TR GRAOE OLJOII-Sr BY tNUMttftAPrldN 0161IRlibT C17Y OP GAIMESVILLIE.FLOP'I'DA-1970









In AL M
..........

P"Pokioo












44..

...... ... .......... ......
lie ......
............... ..
.........


..........








a" lm
Ok" za -AWTOn"E

"No



Mae
11 4"w Ok ON L YJ

;4:p
PAM WW KOF, 14144j, RAKW VRLVA;* VU EA "M Xq ",*z 16.67 11,410












vw.





MAO HW



AVERAGE 0 k-40tNilt5i


ClOMpRf_:'HENStON TEST SCORtS:::: 9-rH 0RADE, PUPILS SY ENUMERATiON D(STMICT cl*ry Or GAIlmOMeVILLE. PLOA IDA 1970











Al



i i 441 It -" -041 9!% wll cAlmmsQ1 E .#M ON" AW AIR= %
$I I will Ilk
ONO %A
AO&k_ ll lor4 AMC. 0 a
an
awo

am=





OB 40
4,,t- . . .
,"4-4

.............
...................... .......... WOW

..................


..............



zt ....... ......
...........







.... ... .......... ....


....................


........... JOWRIMT1, Pt IOA
CAOP Ong (k
41,






....... loto

OWN 'm ta4d Ab.






O Saw i&



. ..... w rLJOEO AT'"Sfr LEVEL Oku'fl

77.co aR.ft .9.,Dc g sit. u o 4-- .0-00 '*E kCltAiAjrft UP r lf#,L 41P Lftr V*LUt R4kE OkPi-LYTW TO VAt" LEVEL 4a




'Soto"







fa




,i4r

4,

AVLi-R A dt 0 1

C dk 0* et t ,4,c ; 1'0 N

4TH,6-rHtk ft4 'G F4A E5E 01 U P I L S

BY ENUMF-RA.TtQbJ'0tGTfilqT CITY OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA -1970












"A GAJ E%


Lo. %






















ln.










+ mm










+ +






uv!Z 10*Ljt RRMGL A *LIPTWG TO eAtK LEWL aSW- 14( -nfO 31W "JG* eST LEVEL -Lll


A" vo
-f-cSNTAGr OF TVT kRS3LUTr V&LQU -K5 -L-AQ E-A 1-F-L 2-te pz.'PIATMAW,4" Am 9 t 0*00,

VWPP,







A ,AMA I 0ZM IMEMOW J-0A"




MWA P 21



PLACEMENT TEST SCORES 12TH GRADE PUPILS BY ENUMERATION DISTRICT
CITY OP' GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA -1970 .. ... .... % .y stre. r.

d it m... .. ... ....

g.. wors ned .. ... .. ..-


as WAN Im 4Wk
In~~ ~ Av 0000 00a 00W000 "MO00OOO *A m 11

anm c aoo" a.da.agu








a % WNW








INg .r 1111 E" o N EA LYam.
WWI. .000DCU 1111 N i L -If~ooowj~obm M





A'




r
to bteuaheeet n vrrwigcn

40
OM" t stepreto nt e.dsritta eeoecodd rmr hn10
04pM,1 wsd h vrg edn opees etsoeprdsrc erae

Ab nMdnt osn ultterslsiniae hti l ieiodsm eain
1.U vrg rd n rd edn cmrhnints cr e ititad




pecnaeo lakocpe nisprdsrc














































... .. .......




theprcentaom Of renter occupied utifts per district .... .. ...... ......... ...... ...... .. .. .... .. ........ . .. .... ........ .....













Ow lowimtags of vacant. imits per district and











vie

Mative housing: *Alue Per. district














th At C ft relationship pOmr than housing quality, see Table 4.




























.. .. ..... .. ... ........... ........ .... ..... ...... .. ........... ...... .... .. ...... ...... ..... ..... ... ... .... ..

















........ .. ............. ...... ..... ......



















......... ... ........ ... ...... .. .......... ... .. ..


















... .... ... ... ... .. ....... ........ ... .


















....... ..... ................................. ...... ... ... ... .. .. .. ..... ...... .. .. .. ......






... ................. .... ........ ...... ...... ........... ...






.. ......... .... . .. .... . ............... ... .. ... ................... ........ ........ .... .. .... ... .. ... ..................... .....











49 *OOCW














Table 4









0~ a v to ca ei.









48 H 5o o


+ +n
e .. ; o
co 11S.
3- a s m 0 040++




r 4












3. H e delinqecs, 4. 16w vandalism, $. M 4auRdlon receiig mtedical threat, S. School children receiving dental teatmentp

7. Stdaut-teacher attitudes, S. Ptan attitudes, and





II







g44f






FOTOE
mR~ .Gos dSca neliec o mrc' uur Bso,16),p 9

in erip.38

S2wg alp Fut nna akm olo Attds oadEdcto (pi 1
..a.. .
i #ftd o~
.... .. ...
. . .
.. .... .. .. ... .. ....... .. .
Z41-252 s. Mted n Gtman ppo 189201

... . . .... . ... .

.. . .
.. . ..A. .









Chapter 9

MULTI-VART.AE ANALYSES



Thea past chapters have described those social adevrnntlvariables depicting .
0alit at life characteristics; explained the .logic pointing up the conceptual make-up of the
ig$181indcatrs;mapped the variables according to increasing quality of life characteristics; blg) rotated out the correlational analyses: which' described ths aibe htwere related v"el as their strength of relationship.

4W Apter will explain -three other sttsia tcnqe r multi4varat analyses
Adadn~le large amounts of useful and descriptive information and present them in
o~g~mitpossible terms. These multi -variate analyses include: z-scores, multiple re, ni th t r analysis ....... ..... . ....



Basically, a score.which generally has results ranging somewhere between -3.00 to io ane which expresses an enumeration district's position in a given distribution both agghstto the mean (average) for the city and with respect to the variability. By con *a relation to each variable.

especea z-score allows for the conversion of any score into a standard score
#at the mean and standard deviation for the distribution of which it is part is
4% an be expressed in the following. formula:
qq






.. . . . .. .
.I. ..... . ....... ... .. ....... ........ .............. ........ .. ...

whre

.. . .
x tnadIr

xIa cr

x!h en(raeae ftevral.fralteeu rto

districts

-9sadaddvito t h aral oralenteaic is
i II
trcs .
mb avnaeo i tht 0 .........
-Yajsn rigrwSoe
th .......I q p. ... ..
4ifrn itiuks bawsostersligz-crsfrtevralswihwr tlzdI t
weapidt h ndeawdsrcs