Library Informer (Vol.7 no.2)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Library Informer (Vol.7 no.2)
Physical Description:
9p.; 28 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
Publisher:
Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Libraries--Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
The College of the Bahamas
Holding Location:
The College of the Bahamas
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
System ID:
AA00024254:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

1r----------------oJ-----f--I--, I VIINO.2TheCollegeofTheBahamasJan."Febr.,1995A Bi-monthlyNewsletterThanksto COBUSPresident .; ,U., he Reserve Book ollectionRESERVESTUDYAREASECONDFLOORLIBRARY.specialnoteofthanksisextendedtoMr.royClarke,COBUSPresident,forthe onation ofmaterialsobtainedfromtheiodiversityConferenceheldatCableeach.inceallchangeswillhavetobereflectedntheReserveBooksListsfortheemester,thenI'msureyouappreciatethergencyofthisrequest.Thankyoutoryourpromptattention.11lecturerswhowishtoplacebooks oneserveorwho maywishtowithdrawitemsreviouslyplacedonreserveshouldontactMrsSandraDonovanextension226assoonaspossible.sta note to new andetumingstudents. The studyeaonthesecond floorofthe ibrary is reservedfor tudents who wishtohaveauitestudy area fordoing esearch, using microfilm collection, reserveks, and materials fromSpecial Collections. ose individuals who collectthereforthe'ntentof socializing, fraternizing, visiting, just lain chatting, or anydisturbing non-study ehavior. will shortly findactivitiesofthisature are notwelcomednortolerated!fenderswillromtlbe excused fromthe1ibra.Saturday, November 26th,1994MissMelodyR.Rolle and Mr. Sherman1.Coxwere unitedinmarriageatThe Baptist Bible Church, on OldTrailand Soldier RoadinNassau.LibraryStaffNotes:JanuaryAndFebruaryBirthdayGreetingsJan.10,MrsMelody RolleCox18,Mr. StanleyWilliams 28,1".1rs LorraineCoxFebruary February 02,Iv1s Elsie Bain From t.heEdit.orandStaff(?)I .. ishea.cha.ndeveryoneAVeryHa.ppyNew[ear!In1995may youf '"Lovewha tyoudoandfeelthatit atters --how r'1t couldanything .,. he more fun?" 16SQ!fltlQIIsm9A811smliSleas998lIa1811,I1666mi1lJ!lsll

PAGE 2

ljIlIiBIPi\Btllllll';SllPltllllII:LI'.I17AIiIIiIII&.t&6IiliIillilt&tlltllli(il ASpecialReportbyVirginiaBalanceLibrarian.HildaBowenLibraryGCC. Last August I attended the 60th annual meetingofIFLA,the International FederationofLibrary Associations and Institutions heldinHavana, ,Cuba. Althoughitisjust alittleover and hour away from the Bahamasbyair,Cubaistrulyanother world.From Librarian's DeskHappyNewYeartoallcollege constituents!As we begin1995,wedoso with much excitement and anticipation for more positive developments at the college and within thelibraryduring the courseofthiscalendar year. The1994year ended with much exultation for thelibrarystaff.First,in early December, a databaseofperiodicals,(magazines, journals)onCD-ROMwas installed.Thisisa potent resource and has tremendous potential for researchers at the college andinthe wider Bahamian Community. Patrons may obtain a bibliographyofavailablearticleson a topic or full-text copiesofcurrent,articles,allinjust afewmoments. A nominal feeof.25cents per page willbecharged to the patrontodefray operating expenses relatedtothe replenishingofconsumable supplies. Demonstrations for college constituents willbeorgani2ed duringJanuary and other promotional activitiesinthisregard wpl beannounced when appropriate. ," l .',1The databaseofthelibrary'sholdings is steadily being built.Oo..,line public accessisenvisionedasearly as the summerof1995.Thelibrarystaffisextremely pleased with the responseitreceives from the college community.Wecontinuetosolicit your ongoing support and cooperation as together,webuild a dynamic i,nstitutiontocomplement the instructional Have aHappyandProsperous New Year!The themeofthe conference was Libraries and Social Development. All sessionsandspeeches dwelt upon the roleslibrariesplay and have playedinthe improvementofliving conditionsaswellasthe future roleofthelibraryactivityasanagentoisocial change.Thisyear'sIFLAmeeting attracted over1500libraryand information science professionals from many countries.Owingto the long-standing United States embargoonalltrade and travel to CubabyUSciti2ens, the numberofconference attendees from the United States wasatanall-timelow.The embargo also madeit difficulttofindgoodairconnections from otherpartsofthe world.Notso formefrom the Bahamas with three convenient flights a week, I was abletopurchase a flight and hotel package fortwoweeks, and was lucky enough to stayatthe venerable Hotel Inglaterrainhistoric Old Havana. I attended theIFLAPre-conferenceonMobile Library Services toMulticulturalPopulations, a two-day meeting co-sponsoredbythe Mobile Libraries and Library Services toMulticulturalPopulations sections.Wetravelled together from Havanatotr,e most charmin2 city of Trinidad. Trinidadisonthe south sideofthe island andhasbeen declared aUNESCOWorld Heritage Site. The wholetownisa museum! ,,' There the group'of35spenttwodayshearing papers, visitinglibrariesand experiencin2 Cubanrurallife. The most memorable papers told about the delivery oi booksbyhorseinColombia and booksbyboatinOrinoco River regiQh'of Venezuela, both services taking booksto trielocal native Indian populations. BackinHavanawehad a full scheduleof2 meetings, visits, receptions and presentations,ItwasmyfirstIFLAand was very exciting. In

PAGE 3

fact, I often couldnItchoose which sessiontoattendtl-leofferings were so good, Sometimes I hadto leave partway through a sessiontocatch the tail-endofanotherone!Inmyprevious position I worked in alibrary serving multilingual andmulticulturalspopUlations in Canada, hence I was involvedinmany sessions and meetings on that theme.Aswell,asI belieYe inthe important.rolethatpubliclibrariesplay in society, I attended se ..... eralsessions sponsoredby tJ-IB PUblic Libraries Section. In between sessions andbusinessmeetings, there were poster sessionsto Yiew, They provided alotofinterestinginformation aboutnewand innovative programs and services offeredbylibraries. Ofthe many sessions I attended I enjoyed hearing Stephney Ferguson's paper about "Interlending and Document Deliveryinthe Caribbean".Nodoubt muchofwhatshereportedistruehereatthe College of the Bahamas:ILLstatisticsarelow,bordering on non-existent;myprofessorsdotheirresearch when>abroad duringtheirholidays;itisdifficulttoidentify locationsofwantedmaterialsbecause thelibrarieslacksuitable tools; andthatitsimply takes toolong to receivematerialsbypost.ItishopedthatInternetaccess to onlinelibrarycatalogues and sendingILLrequestbye-mailwill eventually help sohe someofthese problems. TheInternetanditsmany resources was discussedatmanyoft1-1e 1FLA meetings, My former colleagues from the National LibraryofCanada wereonhand giving workshops on Internet, ftp,gophers, WASIS,WWW,Archie, Mosaic...etc. In between meetings, I met manyofmyformer colleagues from Canada and had tr18 opportunitytomeet manynewpeople.Itwasparticularlyinterestingto make the acquaintanceoflibrariansfrom the Caribbean area. Although I was the onlylibrarianpresent from the Bahamas,therewerelibrariansfrom Jamaica, Barbados,Trinidadand Tobago, theNetherlands .. Antilles, French Antilles, and other nationsinthe area.Atthe time I was not officiallyonCollegeofthe Bahamas staff, therefore I did not.represent theinstitutionatany meetings. The social aspectofthe conference was well 3 organi2ed. Each eveningtherewas a reception orculturalevent.Wewere served lotsofwonderful Cubanfoodanddrinkatthe receptions and attended a special performanceofthe National Contemporary DanceTheater(arealtreatbecause I love contemporary dance).Atthe Cuban government receptionitwas rumoredthatFidel Castro himself would appear -alas, he was otherwise occupied. In the pastfewyears, whereverIFLAconferences have been heldtherehasbeen somesortofcivilunrestatthe timeofthe meeting ... In:M:oscowIFtAclelegates were climping over thebarricadesduringtheoverthrowofMikhailGorbachev;there werE! riotsin Indi&:,"',c. justpriortothe meetingin1992;andlast yearin Spain, Basqueseparatistsweremaking headlines withcarbombs and protests. Havana wasnoexception. The week before the conferencetherewere public demonstrationsinthestreetsand during the conference a mass exodusofCuban Boat-people took place. I saw groupsofpeople preparingtoleave Cubabyseaonmake-shiftrafts,usuallylateinthe afternoon, hoping tocrossthestraightsto theFloridaKeys during the coolofthe evening.Duringmyvisitto Cuba,Castrogavehis citi2ens permissiontoleave andthusthe U.S . Coast Guard would intercept theraftsandtakethe refugeestoGuantanamo Bay.Asusual,interestingtimes. Inmytravelsaround the cityofHavana I met many Cubanswhoopenly talked about thesituationintheircountry. Despite thehardshipthey have been forced. to endure, manyareloyal totheirhomeland andJook forward to better days.Thereisstill a greatsenseofpatriotism and the latin-Caribbean joie de 'livre. Havanaitselfwas a great place to .... isit.Thearchitectureinthe old cityisglorious. The old city,LaHabana Viejahasalso been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. Manyofthe old buildings have been restored totheirformer splendor. I enjoyed following the footstepsofErnestHemingway to therestaurantLaFlorida, where he enjoyedhisdaiquiri, and toLaBodegita del Media, where he enjoyedhismojito (a rum, mint and lime juicedrink)Librariesand reading played asignificantpartinthe developmentofCuba.FollOWingthe revolutionliteracyprogrammes were a toppriorityofthe regime andasaresult,today Cuba enjoys a highrateofliteracy.Thereare

PAGE 4

publiclibrariesthroughout the countrythat are well usedbythe population. Libraries also play a role in the provisionofhealth information to tJ-le public.Socloseto the Bahamas, yet so differentinmany ways. Cubaisan interesting place to visit, not onlytoattend a conference, buttohave a tasteofEurope, to experience a socialiststateandtomeet your neighbours.ReportonDisasterPreparednessWorkshopOctober20,1994 While thestudentstooktheirmid-term breakonOctober20,1994,librarystaff membersofThe CollegeofThe Bahamas took the timetoparticipateinaDisasterPreparedness Workshop, under the theme,"BePrepared: Protecting Facilities, Personnel and Resources." Also participating inthisseminarwere the security andjanitorialstaff assigned to the library. After a warm welcome and afewIce-Breaker anecdotesbyMr. followedbya brief overview ofthe seminar, a panel discussion took place. SerVingaspanelistswere: M:rs. Agatha Brown, Library Assistant,MissMaryAnn Clare, LibraryAssistantandSandraGrant, former Library employee and presently assigned to the Grosvenor Close Campus. These ladies recountedtheirinvolvementinthe preparationofalibrarydisasterpreparedness manual. They also included in theirpresentation the scopeofthe plan, building safety recommendations, the need for volunteerstoassistinthe event of a disaster, and for adisasterrecovery team tobe estatdished. Mr. Eric Hepburn, SuperintendentofPhysical Plant, presentedonthe topic, "Preparing the physical Environment.IIHegave some very usefultipsand suggestions.First that in ordertodeal more effectively with emergencies, thelibraryshouldbeorganizedbysections and there should belibrarypersonnel responsible for specific functions. For example, directing the patrons to the appropriate exists.Further, he pointed outthatkeys forallexits shouldbereadily accessible,thatthe lightinginthoseasstorage boxes or furniture, shouldbeblocking the doorways or stairwells.Thishe saidisa very serious violationofthe building safety code and should never happen. Our second presenter, Mrs. Cecile Knowles, Nurse Counselor,hertopic was "Protecting the Human Resources." She beganbygiving the definitionofstressand trauma. In addition she pointed outthatduring emergency cases, specificinstructionshavetobe given bya team leader. The importanceofbeingincontact with medical services was highly stressed. Mrs. Knowles brought to light the need for post-traumatic treatmentof per:sons involvedin disaster/emergency situations. Finally, she pointed out that the key to Disaster, Preparednessistoknowthe plan and to protect yourself. Ourlastspeaker was Mrs. Yvette Ingraham. Mrs. Ingraham servesasCustomer Relations Manager atJ.S. Johnson Insurance Company. She pointed outthatbefore taking outinsurancecoverage, one must lookatwhat his potential losses couldbe.Nine typesofcoverages available were citedbyMrs. Ingraham.Other.areascovered were the physical conditionofthe building, namely: cleared stairwells, doors than can open, back up generator, smoke alarms,alarmbells and working fire extinguishes, Having a knowledgeof ttle escape routes and where the exit keysarelocatedarevitalinformation forallstaff.MrsIngraham statedthat a listofpersonswhoareto be contactedafterworking hours should beprepared and availableatalltimes for those personswhoareondUty.Thisworkshop ended with a very lively and productive question and answer session. The overall commentsofparticipantsto the workshop were very positive ones and an appeal to have moretrainingsessionsonthistopic was encouraged. Preparedby:Jacqueline Ferguson, Secretary and Jacqualyn Hanna, Library Assistant. NewIVideoLnstructinnatSoft-ware Lecturers Please Contact theM;dia Departmentifanyofthematerials listed onthe 4 following pagesareofinterestto you.

PAGE 5

'" .\-.. ... .-..... Planet EarthUsing computer graphics, location footage from every continent, underwater andextraterrestrialphotography,PlanetEarthinvestigates discoveriesingeology and astrophysics. Geologist James Hayes, predictoroffuture ice ages; atmospheric chemist James Lovelock, creatorofthe Gaia theory; astrophysicist Rich 1\Iuller,whopostUlated the deathstartheory; and physicist Robin Stebbins, discovererofsunquakes, explaintheirground-breaking theories. Stunning special effects and cinematography capture images textbooks alonecannotPlanetEarthSeriesconsistsofsevenone-hourprogramsasfollows:1.The Living Machine The theoryofplate tectonics 2. Ttle BluePlanet A studyofthe oceans3. T1"le Climate Puzzle Ice age or global warming?4.Tales from Other Worlds Jupiter,10and Venus5.Gifts from theEarthEarth'snaturalresources6.The Solar Sea . Our life-givingsun7.FateoftheEarthLife shapesEarth'sfuture**Note to Lecturers: for the three new programsTheBrain,PlanetEarth,andTheEarthRevealed,wehave also obtain textbooks, study guides and faculty gUides. Thesematerialsarehousedinthe ReserveBookCollectiononthe second floorofthelibraryandareavailable for use there. Reserve BooksDoNotLeave The Library'EarthRevealed-Introduction to Geology This introductiontogeology explores how scientific theoriesaredeveloped, as well as howouractivitiestoday impactEarth'scontinuing evolution. In footageofthe aftermathofcataclysmic geologic events, suchasthe1912eruptionofNovarupta VolcanoinAlaska, the1989LornaPrietaEarthquakeinCalifornia, and the mudflows from the Nevala del Ruiz volcano in Colombia,studentsseehowgeologic features and. phenomenarelatetothe theoryofplate tectonics, the most comprehensive model for understandinghowtheearthworks Geologistsareseenatwork analyzing changing landscapesatdiversesitesand providingcriticaladviceonengineering and construction projects. Interviews with a rangeofexperts, graphicillustrations,and location footage reveal key facts about the planetthatsustainsallknown life. Eartt! Revealed consistsof26half-hour programs, withtwoprogramsoneach video tapeasfollows: Tape1.#1.DowntoEarth: Introduction.#2.EarthBecoming Alive:Earth'sCreation Tape2.#3.Earth'sInterior#4.The Sea Floor Tape3.#5.The BirthofTheory#6.Plate Dynamics Tape4. #7. Mountain Building#8.Earth'sStructuresTape'S.#9.Earthquakes # 1O.Geologic Time Tape6.#11.Evolution Through Time#12.Minerals:MaterialsofEarthTape7.#13.Volcanism#14.IntrusiveIgneous Rocks Tape8.#15.Weathering and Soils#16.MassWasting Tape9.#17.Sedimentary Rocks #18.Metamorphic Rocks Tape10.#19.Running WaterI:Rivers, Erosionand Deposition#20.Running WaterII:Land Evolution Tape11.#21.Groundwater#22.Wind, Dust, Deserts Tape 12.#23.Glaciers#24.Waves, Beaches, Coasts 5 Tape13.#25.Living WithEarthPartI ..\.J.".

PAGE 6

#26. Living WithEarth Part II ** Pleasenoteinstructional video materialsareClassifiedasReference for Libraryuse onl}' withone exception. Media Software Reference are ay-allable tolecturersforclassroomuseonathree{3} loanschedule.Students wishingtoview anyoftliesematerialsmaydosoby sctJedulmg adateand timetousethe video equipment (TV-VCR) in trle Audio-VisualRoomlocated in the Library. Request to use the Roomshouldbemadeatleastthree(3) daysinadvancetoprevent conflictsinscheduling.AllschedUlingofVideomaterialsandthebooking oftheAudio-VisualRoomisdoneintheMediaDepartmentRoom A-58. '.fllg lIrfJlll.(lIrlllll.AUfJllll lltlllllrlfJl') ThisPeabody Award-winningseriesartfullyblends interviews with world famousbrainscientistsanddramaticreenactmentsoflandmarkcasesinmedical history. Programs explain andillustratethebrain'sbasic operating principles,itsmajorstructuraland functional systems, and the biological foundationsofemotion, memory and unconsciousness. Computer animation, time lapse microphotography, three-dimensional modeling, and biological imagingareemployed to reveal unknowninteriorworlds. Celebrated casestudiesadd human interest.ThisseriesisproducedbyWNET/New York and Antenne2TV/Franceinassociation withNHK,Japan; The SocietedeRadio Television Quebec and Kastel Enterprises, Ltd. TheseriesconsistofeIght(8)one hour video programsasfollows:1.The Enlightened Machine: Beginning with the 19th century experimentsofViennese physician Franz JosephGallthe creatorofthe pseudoscienceofphrenology,thisepisode moves rapidly to the forefrontof20th century science, using microphotography to showhowthebrain organizes its"electrical symphony"ofneurotransmitterrscrossingsynapticgaps.2.Vision and Movement: The Neurological miracleofcoordinating vision and movementisillustratedbyOlympic diver Greg Louganis and the workofNobel Prize-winners David Rubel and Torsten WieselontheVisualCortex.3.Rhythms and Drives: Vignettes from both theanimalworld and human societyillustratetheseatofour basicinstincts ""the primitivebrain--anditseffectsonsex, sleep, aggression, depression, and euphoria. 4_Stressand Emotion:Twocase histories, a manwhosufferedanaccidental frontal lobotomy and a stress-riddenairtrafficcontroller, framethisepisode about pain, anxiety, and behavior.5.Learning and !','1emory:. Howdoweremember? Whydo we forget?Scientistsinvestigate theSUbject with examplesofa man with a most remarkable memory and a famous psychologist losing his memory .6.TheTwclBrains: Left brain,rightbrainwhat happens if they don't communicate? Research work Wittl split-brainpatientsisthebasisfor exploring thecorticalhemispheres, therelationshipbetween thought and language and the sex differencesofthe human brain.7_Madness: Compelling humanportraitsofschizophrenics andtheirfamiliesarefeatureddramaticallyillustratingthe effectsofasplitbetween thethinkingand feelingpartsofthe brain.B.StatesofMind:Howfardoes our knowledgeofthebrainextend?Thisfinalprogram explores whatscientistsdonot understand and looks to trle futureof research inmedicine,artificialintelligence, and genetic manipulation. Abrilliant Illustrated lectureseriesbythe renowned modernhistorianA.J.P. Taylor. Theseriesconsistofsix(6)30minute presentationsincoloronthe following topics: 1.Napoleon'sLastGreatWarNapoleon invaded Russiaasthemasterofmainland Europe, yet snatched defeat from the jawsofvictory throughunclearaims, miscalculationoftheenemy's intentions, andintractabilityinnegotiation. Theresultwas aturningpointinmodern European history_6 ... 2.TheCongressofVienna

PAGE 7

Four'ofShakespeare'sPlays:VideoFormatMacbeth--BymembersofThe Royal Shakespeare CompanyHenryV--Produced and directedbyLaurence Olivier.TheDeathPenalty--30min. E.xamining the casesoftwomenwhocommitted Virtually identical murders and were triedinthe same courtroomtwoweeks apart,thisprogram discusses theissueswith prosecutors, lawyers, jurors, and victims to analyae whether the deathpenaltyisworking, andhowitisapplied. 3.WorldWarI:ArmisticeThe warthatbegan without any war aims other than winning enged in a rushto armistice, with different warring coUhtries simply signing with the nearest available memberofthe Allies. Thearmisticeneitherdefined, nor resolved the war aims, but left everythingtothe peace treaty.4.ThePeaceConferenceIts aims were both vengeful and idealistic, butits precautions.to prevent Germany fromstartinganother war failed, and the subjectofPoland was not solved to anyone's satisfaction;itnearly lead to a newwar in1920and sparked World WarII.Monarchies were restored, republics absorbed and -a latter-day versionofthe Holy Roman Empire was established.Itfunctioneduntilthe selfinterestofmember countries ledtoits demise, and the apparently inevitable roundoflittlewars led to a Great War.5.TheSecondWorldWarThiswar endedindifferent placesatdifferent times.Francebowedoutin1940,Italybowedout in1943,JapanonlyaftertheA-bombs.The Alliedinsistenceonunconditionalsurrenderundoubtedly lengthened the war, giving the Axis powers nothing to bargain for. 6.ThePresentChaos The legacyofW.orldWarII: dispossessed Germans, Hungarians and Caechs; Germany divided; Polandstilla trouble spot; and thethreatoftheA-bomb.However, sayshistorianAJ.P. Taylor,"Donot worry. TheThirdWorldWarwillbethe last."TheCavalryoftheCloudsAS2minutehistoricaldocumentaryonthe useofaircraftinwarfare.Hamlet--Laurence Olivier's presentationKing Lear --With Laurence' OlivierasKing Lear E-MailTimes NewE-maH Hours are 4:00PM To '\' .,8:00PMMondaythrough Friday. SpecialCollectionssecondfloorLibrary.Thisisthe story of thebirth of aerialwarfare therealitybehind the legendofthe "death or glory" boysoftheBritishRoyal Flying CorpsofWorld War I.Itistoldingrim documentary footagethatshows the dreadful conditionsoftheground warfare so manyofthe pilots sought to escapebyvolunteeringtofly; fascinating footageofaerialencounters andactualbattles; footageofBaron von Richthoven(the famous Red Baron); and reminiscencesofsomesurvivorsofa time and acareerwhen men were oldat19,often dead before they were20,when the life expectancyofa pilot wastwoweeks 7CatalogingDepartmentBook Review:eaching:AnIntroductionby1.CecilClarke.PublishedbyHarcourt,Brace,Jovanovich,SanDiego: c1990: 466p.Withthisbook,theauthordiscussesthewondrousfieldofteaching,itschallengesandfrustrations,itsjoysanddisappointments,itslaughterandtears.Itemphasizesthefactthat what youdo as ateachermatters.

PAGE 8

EachchapterbeginswithalistofmainpOIntsandconcludeswithexpansions.ThebookisaboundswithexamplesandvignettesthatprovideglimpsesintotheIivesofteachers.Emphasizesthateducationistoosignificantanddynamicanenterpriseto belefttomeretechniciansand we mightaswellbegin now theprodigioustaskofpreparingmenandwomen who understandnotonlythesubstanceof what theyareteaching,butalsothetheoriesbehindtheparticularstrategiestheyemploytoconveythatsubstance. New BooksReceivedTheUniversityasanInstitutionToday:TopicsforReflectionbyAlfonsoBorreroCabel.Publishedby IDRC/Unesco,Ottawa:1993 238p.LB2328. 2 C32TheHistoryofMaryPrince:AWestIndianSlave,relatedbyherself.editedwithintroductionbyMoiraFerguson,prefaceby ZiggiAlexander.PublishedbyUniversityofMichiganPress,Ann Arbor: 1987 124 p. E444 H57.TheCompleteGuidetoTelemarketingManagementbyJoelLinchitz.PublishedbyAmericanManagementAssociation, New York: 1990 33p. HF5415.1265 L56 WomenArtistsintheModernEra:ADocumentaryHistorybySusanWaver.PublishedbyScarecrowPress,Metuchen,N.J.: 1991, 256p. N43 W26. Looking Ahead:PlanningtheAnnualTeacherDemand: ABasicGuide1993--2031byDr. E. Stabbs.MinistryofEducationBahamas,Nassau1994. 69p.LC71.2 S78CollectionDevelopmentManualforCollegeandUniversityLibrariesbyBlaineH.Hall.Publishedby OryxPress. Phoenix: 1985. 212p.2687H35.StrategiesForTeacher:TeachingContentand"ThinkingSkillsbyPaulD.Eggen.PublishedbyPrenticeHall,EnglewoodCliffs,N.J. 317p.LB1027.3 S77. 8SocialPsychologyby Steven Penrod.PublishedbyPrenticeHall,EnglewoodCliffs,N.J.: 1986. 616p. HM251 P416.SocietyandEducationbyDanielU.Levine.PublishedbyAllynandBacon, Boston: 1992. 618p. LC 191.4 L48.InternationalHandbook ofUniversitiesPreparedbyStocktonPress,New York: 1304p. 1993. L900158.D oUp-datingLibraryServices! The libraryisproud to AnnounutheinstaUatinn of its most currentn7,searchservia .. wenowhave'l1'l11UJ(jllzin&S,journals, periodiaJf.s onCDR.OM for the 1jears 1988throu November 1994. ThisincreasesthecoUution of periodicals on eitherMiaofUm or CD-ROM from 606 to 183 YouIreinvitdto stop bythE rEservEsection on thesuoncLfloor of theUbrar1jandchecftthisnewservi,u out. Weareconfident1jOU IU bepleaseandexcitedwhenyoubecomeaU'CIre of whatthesemwsgrvtcescanprovide for 1jOUandothersif1jOUaredoit1fjresearch projects.!You AUcomenowI

PAGE 9

ToAchieve YourDreams Remember Your A.B. C.""sAvoid Negative Sources, People,Places,ThingsandHabits. Believe in Yourself. Consiaerthingsfromvery angle. Don't giveupand Don't give In.Enjoylifetoday, Yesterdayisgone,Tomorrowmaynevercome.FamilyandFriends are hiddentreasures,seekthemand enjoytheirriches.Givemorethanyouplannedto.Hangontoyour dreams. Ignore those who trytodiscourage you.JustDoItKeeptryingnomatter how harditseems,It will geteasier.LoveYourselffirstand most.MakeItHappen!NEVERLie, Cheat orSteal,alwaysstrikeafairdeal.OpenYoureyes and seethingsastheyreallyare.PracticeMakesPerfect!Quittersnever win and winners neverquit.Reaay, Stuay, ana Learn acout everything Important in yourlife.StopProcrastinating!Takecontrol of yourowndestiny.Understand YourselfInordertobetterunderstandothers.Visualizeit! Want itmorethan anything.XcellerateYourEfforts!Youareunique ofallGod'sCreations,Nothing canreplaceYOUZeroInonyourtargetandgoforit!