A demountable isolation cage for field use

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
A demountable isolation cage for field use
Physical Description:
2, 3 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Jones, Laurence S
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Peach -- Field experiments -- Equipment and supplies   ( lcsh )
Peach mosaic disease -- Control -- Equipment and supplies   ( lcsh )
Insect cages   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
"ET-174."
General Note:
"June 1941."
Statement of Responsibility:
by Laurence S. Jones.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 781849265
ocn781849265
System ID:
AA00024201:00001

Full Text

STATE PLANT BOARD
ET-174 June 1941


United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine


A DEMOUNTABLE ISOLATION CAGE FOR FIELD USE

By Laurence S. Jones, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations




A cloth-covered cage capable of being assembled or disas-
sembled in the field has been used at Brownwood, Tex., to isolate
young nursery peach trees used in experiments with possible vectors
of peach mosaic. Most of the cages used at Brownwood were 24 feet
long, 4 feet wide, and 4 feet high (fig. 1), but these dimensions
may be varied to suit other needs. Structural features of a com-
pleted cage, as shown in figure 1, include a covered-wagon shape,
iron bows supporting a cloth cover, a demountable wooden base with
iron pipe standards in which the bows are inserted, and a slide-
fastener closure.

The wooden base of the cage is constructed of 1-inch by
6-inch lumber. Eight-foot lengths placed on edge and joined to-
gether with bolts are used to facilitate disassembly. When com-
plete, the base is placed in position and fastened to the ground
with stakes.

Arch-shaped supports for the cloth cover are made of 1/4-
inch iron rod and then inserted in 3/8-inch pipe standards attached
to the upright wooden base at 32-inch intervals. These bows, each
10 feet and 2 inches long, must first be shaped, then coated with
aluminum paint before use to prevent rust damage later to the
cloth cover. Since 1/4-inch iron rod bends easily, bows of the
length required for cages 4 feet high are not sufficiently rigid
unless reinforced. To provide rigidity, the iron pipe standards
are made 20 inches long and the bows are inserted to the full length
of the standards. The lower end of each standard is crimped to
prevent the bow from sliding through into the ground. Each standard
is attached to the wooden base by a sheet-metal clip grooved to
receive it. The groove in the sheet-metal clip is crimped at its
lower end to prevent the standard from slipping. Figures 2 and 3
illustrate the cage skeletons, the pipe standards and their attach-
ment, and the manner in which the bows are inserted in the pipe
standards.

A cloth cover for the cage is sewed to the correct dimen-
sions, an allowance being trade for shrinkage. Strips through
which the bows can be threaded, in the manner that rods are inserted





-2-


in curtains, are sewed to the underside of the cloth cover, thus
providing a means of holding the cover securely. After the cover
is in place with all bows threaded, it is tacked to the base and
then fastened with wooden strips.

Necessary closures can be placed at one or both ends. They
consist of heavy-duty slide-fasteners sewed in position as illus-
trated in figure 4, with the slides pulling from top to bottom
to release the triangular cloth. A hanging flap on the interior
of the cage, behind the top of a closure, will help to prevent
insects from escaping.

The cost of the cage described is approximately two-thirds
of the cost of a wood-frame cage of the same dimensions.




























Figure l.--Field cage; 24 feet long, 4 feet wide, 4 feet high.


Figure 2.--Field cage assembled, without cloth cover.
































L | "* .,"
Lw ..-'


Figure 3.--Details of base of field cage, with iron pipe
standards attached.



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013













http://archive.org/detailIs/demountableisola00unit




























































Figure 4.--Slide-fastener closure in the end of the
field cage.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
II I I I I II II ill III II III
3 1262 09240 9290