Committee budget and justification statements

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Committee budget and justification statements
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Letter of transmittal
        Page v
        Page vi
    Recapitulation of budget request
        Page 1
    Full committee budget
        Page 2
    Subcommittee budget estimates
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Statement of Chairman Harley O. Staggers on House Resolution 978
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Subcommittee justifications of expenditures
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Committee and subcommittee employees
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Back Cover
        Page 40
Full Text


95th Congress COMMITTEE PRINT COMMrrrE
2d Session PRINT 95-36






COMMITTEE BUDGET AND
JUSTIFICATION STATEMENTS




COMMITTEE ON
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES





~jD7;All.




JANUARY 1978







U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 20--827 0 WASHINGTON : 1978






















COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE
HARLEY 0. STAGGERS, West Virginia, Chairman JOHN E. MOSS, California SAMUEL L. DEVINE, Ohio
JOHN D. DINGELL, Michigan JAMES T. BROYHILL, North Carolina
PAUL G. ROGERS, Florida TIM LED CARTER, Kentucky
LIONEL VAN IYEERLIN, California CLARENCE J. BROWN, Ohio
FRED B. ROONEY, Pennsylvania JOE SKUBITZ, Kansas
JOHN M. MURPHY, New York JAMES M. COLLINS, Texas
DAVID E. SATTERFIELD III, Virginia LOUIS FREY, JR., Florida BOB EjCKHARDT, Texas NORMAN F. LENT, New York
RICHARDSON PREYER, North Carolina EDWARD R. MADIGAN, Illinois CHARLES J. CARNEY, Ohio CARLO S J. MOORHEAD, California
RALPH H. METCALFE, Illinois MATTHEW J. RINALDO, New Jersey
JAMES H. SCHTEUER, New York W. HENSON MOORE, Louisiana
RICHARD L. OY1TINGER, New York DAVE STOCKMAN, Michigan
HENRY A. WAXMAN, California MARC L. MARKS, Pennsylvania
ROBERT (BOB) KRUEGER, Texas TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado PHILIP R. SHARP, Indiana JAMES J. FLORIO, New Jersey ANTHONY TOBY MOFFETT, Connecticut JIM SANTINI, Nevada ANDREW MAGUIRE, New Jersey MARTY RUSSO, Illinois EDWARD 3. MARKEY, Massachusetts THOMAS A. LUKEN, Ohio DOUG WALGREN, Pennsylvania BOB GAMMAGE, Texas ALBERT GORE, JR., Tennessee BARBARA A. MIKULSKI, Maryland W. E. WILLIAMSON, Clerk KENNETH J. PAINTER, First Assistant Clerk ELEANOR A. DINKINS, Assistant Clerk Pro fessional Staff
ELIZABETH HARRISON CHRISTOPHER E. DUNNE
JEFFREY H. SCHWARTZ WILLIAM M. KITZMILLER
BRIAN R. MOIR MARK J. RAABE
KAREN NELSON THOMAS M. RYAN
Ross DAVID AIN
LEWIS E. BERRY, Minority Counsel

0aI)














CONTENTS

page
Letter of transmittal -------------------------------------------------- v
Recapitulation of budget request --------------------------------------- 1
Full committee budget ------------------------------------------------ 2
Subcommittee budget estimates:
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations --------------------- 3
Subcommittee on Energy and Power ------------------------------ 4
Subcommittee on Health and the Environment --------------------- 5
Subcommittee on Communications ---------------------------------- 6
Subcommittee on Transportation and Commerce --------------------- 7
Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Finance ----------------- 8
Statement of Chairman Harley 0. Staggers on House Resolution 978 ---- 9 Subcommittee justifications of expenditures:
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations ---------------------- 11
Subcommittee on Energy and Power -------------------------------- 17
Subcommittee on Health and the Environment ---------------------- 24
Subcommittee on Communications ---------------------------------- 26
Subcommittee on Transportation and Commerce -------------------- 28
Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Finance ------------------ 30
Committee and subcommittee employees -------------------------------- 33
(III)




















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iNETYJIFTH CONUMESS
HAREY 0. STAGGERS. W. VA., CHAIRMAN
.IJOH4N &. MOS, CALIF. SAMUEL L. DEVINE. OHIO PAULO a ROGES. FLA. TIM LiE CARTER. "C. JOHN D. DENGELL. MICH. JAMEB T. BRTIL N.C. a n ~ntu 'ae
------; ----CLF-CMI= .nw" M Congress of the Vnitets Otates
LIONEL VAN DEERLIN. CALIF. CLARENCE J. BROWN, OHIO FRED S. MOONEY. PA. JOE USIGTZ' SCANS. jam MURPHY. N.Y. JAMES M. COLLINS.ouze of Representatibe
DAVID E. SATTERFIELD 1, VA. LOJE3 FROEY. JtR. FLA. am EC"IARDY. T. NORMAN F. LEWT. N.Y Commgttee on interstate anb Yortign Comnmt RICHARDSON PREYER. .C. EDWARD R. MADIGAN, om 2125. Rapburn ouse eOffit ~uibThing CHARLES J. CARNEY. OHIO CARLOS J. MOORHEAD, CALIF. ...RALPH METALFE. ILL. MATTHEW J. RINALDO. N.J. Wasb n~ton, ]B.C. 20515
JAMES H. SCHEUER, N.Y. W. HENSON MOORF LA. RICHARD L. OTIER. N.Y. DAVE STOCKMAN, MICH. MENRY A. WAXMAN, CALIF. MARC L. MARKS, PA. ESRN (m80) KMRUEGER TEX. TIMOTHY E. WIR T. COLD.
PHILIP R. SHARP. INC0.
JAMES J. FLORID. N.J.
ANTHONY TOBY MOFFETT. CONN. A.m. .~~... ... January 26, 1978
ANDREW MAGUIRE. N.J.
MAWY NUSSO. ILL.
EDWARD J. MARKEY, MASS.
THOMAS A. UKEN. OHIO
DOUG WALGRME PA.
0 GAMMAGWE, TEX.
ALERT GORE. JR., TEN.
SARSARA A. MIOULSKI, MD.
W. WILLIAMSON. CHIEF CLERK AND STAFF DIRECTOR

The Honorable Frank Thompson, Jr.
Chairman
Committee on House Administration
House of Representatives
Washington, D.C. 20515

Dear Mr. Chairman:

At the direction of the Committee on Interstate and
Foreign Commerce, I have introduced H.Res.978, the Primary
Expense Resolution for the Committee, authorizing expenditures
not to exceed $4,005,612.00 during the Second Session of the
95th Congress.

I am enclosing the following for the use of your Committee:

Eighty copies each of the proposed Committee budget, justification
statements for the full Committee and the six standing subcommittees,
and the list of all Committee employees, showing job titles, home
and office addresses and office telephone numbers.

It is respectfully requested that you schedule a hearing at
your earliest convenience before the appropriate subcommittee of
the House Administration Committee for the consideration of our
budget resolution, H.Res.978, and that the subcommittee chairmen,
members of the minority and I, be given the opportunity at the
hearing to present justification for the various amounts in the
budget.

With kind personal regards, I am

5' ce ely,4


H TAGGERS
IRM N

HOS/smb

Enclosure

(V)
















RECAPITULATION OF BUDGET REQUEST


HOUSE COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE


95th Congress Second Session



FULL COMMITTEE . . . . . . . $ 828,500.00


Subcommittee on Oversight & Investigations . . 934,400.00 Subcommittee on Energy and Power . . . . 764,640.00 Subcommittee on Health and the Environment . . 407sl69.00 Subcommittee on Communications . . . . 353,500.00 Subcommittee on Transportation and Commerce . . 326,100.00 Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Finance 391 303.00



TOTAL .$4,0059612.00






2


BUDGET ESTIMATE


COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE


95th Copgress, Second Session


FULL COMMITTEE:

Additional Personnel for Use of the Six Subcommittees


6 Staff Members appointed by the Minority under 225,000.00
Clause 5(d), Rule XI

6 Staff Members appointed by Subcommittee 225,000.00
Chairmen under Clause 5(d), Rule XI

Sta-ff Members for the Full Committee not covered 230,000.00
by statutory authorization as follows:

I Computer Operator
3 Secretaries (Clerk's Office)
5 Secretaries (Professional Staff)
I Assistant Documents Clerk
3 SecretAries (Minority)

$ 680,000.00


Stationery and Supplies 5,000.00

Telephone and Telegraph 12,000.00

Travel (Domestic) 35,000.00

Consultants 20,000.00

Miscellaneous 20,000.00

Periodicals 4,000.00

Witness Fees and Transportation 2,500.00

Estimated amount needed for overseas travel 50,000.00

$ 148,500.00


TOTAL: $ 828,500.00





3


SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS

95th Congress, 2nd Session

1978 Funds Request
Funds
Budget Allocations Request 1976 1977 1978

Personnel Costs $621,000 $674,000 $781,000

Telephone, telegraph
and miscellaneous 22,500 22,700 28,000

Stationery and supplies 12,500 13,300 14,500

Travel 38,500 30,000 66,900*

Witness fees, transportation,
reporting and publications 12,500 13,200 16,000

Consultants 13,000 7,500 28,000


Total $720,000 $760,700 $934,400
*Includes foreign travel.

































20-827 0 78 2





4


SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER

95th Congress, 2nd Session 1978 Budget Request



PERSONNEL COSTS .............................. $669,790

Counsels (7) ($307,090)
Research-Analysis (4) ($139,700)
Research Investigation (2) ($ 54,200) Staff Assistants (8) ($132,600)
Minority Counsel (1) ($ 25,200)
Interns (5 for 3 months) ($ 11,000)


OTHER EXPENSES .................................. $ 94,850

Travel ($24,000)

Witness Expenses ($ 7,000)

Stationery & Supplies ($ 750)

Telephone and Telegraph ($ 7,000)

Publications ($ 3,100)

Miscellaneous ($53,000)

Consultants ($30,000)
Computer Services ($10,000) Lease Equipment ($12,000) Miscellaneous ($ 1,000)


TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE ........................... $764,640










BUDGET OF THE SUBCOM MITTEE ON HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT



Personnel

(1) Existing Filled Positions at Present Salary Levels

Chief Counsel $47,500
Director, Research & Planning 47,500
Staff Associates (4) -129,879
Assistant Counsel 23, 551
Administrative Assistant 17,128
Staff Assistants (5) 66,508

$332,066

(2) Proposed New Position

Minority Staff Associate $25,000

(3) Merit and Cost of Living Increases

5 percent of all salaries excluding those of individuals paid at statutory maximum $13,103

Total $370,169

Other Expenses

Travel $15,000
Stationery & Supplies 250
Telephone & Telegraph 7,000
Periodicals 1,'750,
Miscellaneous 13,000

Total $37,000

TOTAL BUDGET ESTIMATE $407,169






6


SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS
OF THE
COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE


REVISED
BUDGET ESTIMATE





PERSONNEL

Permanent Staff (11) ........... o .......... $294,000


OTHER EXPENSES

Travel ...................................... 15,000
Witness Fees ................................ 53,000
Stationery Supplies ....................... 2,500
Telephone Telegraph ....................... 5,000
Periodicals ..... 2%000
Electrical Equipment & Misc ............... 302000
Equipment ......... 133,000 Consultants ........ 171000


TOTAL ...................................... $3533,500






7


SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND COMMERCE

95th CONGRESS -SECOND SESSION

1978 (Budqet)- 1977 (cul
Personnel Costs:
Direct $273,600 $-163,865

Consultants 30,000 40,938

TOTAL $303,600 $204,803




Other Expenses:
Travel $ 10,000 $ 8,360

Witnesses 500 -Stationery and Supplies 500 192

Telephone and Telegraph 2,000 1,275

Periodicals and Publications 2,000 1,454

Miscellaneous (Xerox, IBM, etc.) 7,500 6,419

TOTAL $ 22,500 $ 17,700


TOTAL BUDGET REQUEST $326,100 $222,503





8


SUBCOMMITTEE ON CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE


BUDGET REQUEST
SECOND SESSION, 95TH CONGRESS



Personnel Costs:

Present staff commitments
(5 counsel (including 1 minority), 3 legal assistants, 1 economist,
1 reseacher, and 3 support staff) $336,014

Expansion (including anticipated
cost-of-living increase) 29,864

$365,878


Expenses:

Travel $7,200
Witnesses 2,000
Telephone 3,600
Publications 3,725
Supplies 8,150
Miscellaneous 750
$ 25,425



TOTAL $391,303






9


STATEMENT OF

HARLEY 0. STAGGERS, CHAIRMAN

ON H. RES. 978

PRIMARY EXPENDITURE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 95th CONGRESS, 2nd SESSION


Chairman Dent and distinguished Members of the Subcommittee, I

appreciate very much the opportunity of appearing here today in support

of H. Res. 978, the Primary Expense Resolution of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, for the Second Session of the 95th Congress.

In the consolidated budget of the Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, in the amount of $4,005,612.00, the full Committee has requested for its use $828,500.00 which will be used as follows:


Additional Staff Personnel for the use of the Subcommittees

6 Staff members appointed by the minority under ...$225,000.00
Clause 5(d), Rule XI of the Rules of the House

6 Staff members appointed by Subcommittee ......... $225,000.00
Chairmen under Clause 5(d), Rule XI of the
Rules of the House

Additional staff members for the full Committee .... $230,000.00
not covered by statutory authorization, including
a computer operator, 3 secretaries (Clerk's Office),
5 secretaries (Professional Staff), 3 additional
secretarial positions authorized by the full Committee for the use of the minority, and an assistant documents
clerk

$680,000.00

The additional $148,500.00 requested for the use of the Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee is budgeted as follows:

Stationery and S.upplies 5,000.00

Telephone and Telegraph 12,000.00

Travel (Domestic) 35,000.00

Consultants 20,000.00

Miscellaneous 20,000.00

Periodicals 4,000.00

Witness Fees and Transportation 2,500.00

Estimated amount needed for overseas travel 50,000.00

$148,500.00

TOTAL ........ $828,500.00





10


The Committee Rules provide payment out of the full Committee budget for salaries of six staff members appointed by the Minority under Clause 5(d), Rule XI, one for each subcommittee. The rules also provide for six staff members to be appointed by the subcommittee chairchairmen under Clause 5(d), Rule XI, one for each subcommittee. The maximum salary that can be paid these top-level staff people is $37,500.00 per annum. Although all of the twelve 5(d) staff persons were not used for the entire year in 1977, the positions have been filled for 1978 and if every one of them reach the maximum salary, we will need the amount requested.

An additional $230,000.00 will be needed to pay the salaries of additional staff members not covered by statutory authority, as shown on the projected budget page. There is one item listed which is making its initial appearance, due to the ruling in 1977 that all items relating to overseas travel have to come out of the Committee budget, rather than out of counterpart funds. The $50,000.00 requested is probably a low estimate but it is hoped that it will be sufficient to cover the overseas travel for 1978.

I am happy to have with me the subcommittee chairmen and the

Minority Leader and we will do our best to answer any questions you may have in regard to our budget request.

We were keeping our expenses within our budget in 1977, until the October pay raises went into effect and for October, November and December, we exceeded one-twelfth of our budget by a substantial amount. I feel that the amount requested for 1978 will be needed and, of course, we will continue to run the Committee as economically as possible and not use any of the funds which are not absolutely needed.

Thanks again for the continuous courteous treatment you have shown our Committee and I appreciate very much you giving us the opportunity of presenting our budget request to you today.





11



SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS

95th CONGRESS 2nd SESSION

1978 BUDGET JUSTIFICATION


The funds requested by the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations will provide for a staff of 30 (21 professional and 9 clerical) staff members, a decrease of two from that requested in 1977. The professional staff will consist of a new position for a minority counsel, an accountant and auditor, attorneys, investigators, and researchers. This staff would be supplemented where necessary by requests to the General Accounting Office for the assignment of auditors and investigators.

The Subcommittee has broad oversight jurisdiction concurrent with the jurisdiction of the full Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, including matters relating to energy and power, communications, health, the environment, consumer protection, finance, transportation (railroads, travel and tourism), and commerce generally. The Subcommittee's oversight jurisdiction includes such federal agencies as the Federal Trade Commission, Department of Energy, Federal Communications Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Interstate Commerce Commission, Food and Drug Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Securities Exchange Commission, Department of Transportation, Department of Commerce, and agencies responsible for nuclear energy.

Within the scope of its oversight and investigatory responsibilities, the Subcommittee views itself in large measure as a resource available to supplement the actions of the legislative Subcommittees. Thus, in addition to general oversight responsibility pursuant to House rules, the Subcommittee is receptive to requests of the legislative Subcommittees for (1) in-depth study of areas which the legislative Subcommittees are unable to investigate and (2) oversight of the administration of laws authorized by the legislative Subcommittees, to the extent that they cannot undertake such reviews.

In exercising oversight and investigative jurisdiction with regard to the foregoing subject matter, the Subcommittee will maintain continuing oversight regarding the application, administration, execution, and effectiveness of laws within the jurisdiction of the Committee pursuant to Rule X of the Rules of the House.

Major Accomplishments

Some of the Subcommittee's major accomplishments in 1977 included: (1) 54 days of hearings, including 5 days of field hearings in California, Ohio, Tennessee, Nevada, and New York;
(2) publication of 11 sets of Subcommittee hearings totaling 3,536 pages; (3) issuing 8 reports, (4) bringing to public light Gulf Oil Corporation's participation in an international uranium price-fixing cartel; and (5) upholding the constitutional authority of the Congress through the successful resolution of a conflict between the Executive and Legislative Branches over Congressional access to warrantless wire-tap records in possession of American Telephone and Telegraph. Unfortunately, access was attained only after protracted and costly litigation.

It is estimated that in excess of $2.7 billion in savings will be realized by the Nation's taxpayers and consumers as a direct and indirect result of the Subcommittee's oversight and investigation of Federally-financed and regulated activities.

20-827 0 78 3





12


American consumers will save more than $580 million annually as the result of a definitional error found in 1976 by the Subcommittee in the Federal Power Commission's Opinion No. 770. Another $142 million will be saved as a result of a cut in Medicaid payments to 20 states because they failed to meet requirements for reviewing the quality and efficiency of hospital and nursing home care for the poor; ultimately the action will improve quality and effectiveness of these services. More than $2 billion in savings will be realized over the next 3 years as a result of a Federal-State program instituted by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare to reduce fraud and abuse and curtail unnecessary surgery. HEIV's acknowledgement that it had in the past been unresponsive to too much unnecessary surgery culminated a two-year struggle between that Department and the Subcommittee on the unnecessary surgery issue.

Of greater significance is the Subcommittee's role in
reducing the potential for death and disabling illness resulting from cancer-causing agents in consumable products and the environment. For example, EPA formed a Task Force on Environmental Emergencies in November 1977 to act in chemical crises, directly responding to a specific Subcommittee recommendation that such a group be formed; EPA issued improved drinking water standards which for the first time address the problem of organical chemical contaminants, including many cancer-causing chemicals such as carbon tetrachloride, again in response to Subcommittee urging; and the Subcommittee's extensive input in the 1977 Clean Air legislation immeasurably helped improve EPA's clean air programs. Other Subcommittee investigations relating to cancer and the environment resulted in the Consumer Product Safety Commission banning cancer-causing Tris in children's sleepwear and monitoring by EPA and the Michigan Department of Health of the major manufacturers of Polybrominated Biphenyls (PBBs), a dangerous toxic substance to which much of the Michigan population had been continuously exposed. Similarly, evidence developed by the Subcommittee demonstrated clear and potential dangers from the overuse of antibiotics in animal feeds causing drug resistance in humans to such antibiotics as penicillin and tetracyclines. Consequently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has undertaken steps to ban sub-therapeutic uses of tetracyclines when appropriate alternative antibiotics can be used in animals.

The Subcommittee's continued interest in the nation's
children has led to improved child health care. During 1977, the Subcommittee's 1976 report on the poor administration of the Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program that led to unnecessary crippling, retardation, and even death of many thousands of children was the topic of legislative hearings by the House Health and Environment Subcommittee in consideration of a comprehensive health program for children; and disturbing reports of the low rates of immunization of children led the Subcommittee to hold hearings in Los Angeles, California. Evidence was presented on the alarming rise of measles and the potential for corresponding increases in polio, diphtheria, and tetanus. These findings have been supported by the Secretary of HEW's announcement of a major child immunization initiative.

Other consumer and public benefits will be realized as a
result of the Subcommittee's efforts. Natural gas supplies for the hard-pressed interstate market will be increased because of the Subcommittee's findings that a major oil company failed to produce certain known natural gas reserves. This resulted in an order from the Secretary of Interior directing the drilling of additional wells pinpointed by the Subcommittee and





13


the oil company's agreement to launch a multimillion dollar program for that purpose. Additionally, oversight of the Department of Transportation's effort to halt automobile fires caused by faulty fuel tanks promise the saving of many American lives.

The Subcommittee also contributed significantly to avoiding a future national crisis by focusing attention through hearings in July and August on the possibility of shutdowns of nuclear plants generating electrical power. These shutdowns will occur unless new facilities are made available, as the Subcommittee has urged, for storing spent fuel that must be discharged from reactors regularly in order for them to refuel. Other Subcommittee efforts., including its hearings on conflicts of interest in several regulatory agencies, have had an indirect public benefit: reducing bias in regulation improves the quality of regulations affecting the public.

By H. Res 1420, H. Rep. 94-1422, and subsequently by continuing resolution, H. Res. 334, H. Rep. 95-226, the Subcommittee was authorized to pursue the information-gathering interests of the Congress by intervention in pending litigation entitled United States v. American Telephone & Telegraph Co., (D.C. Civil 76-1372). At issue was the right of -the Congress to information in the hands of the Federal Bureau of Investigations and American Telephone and Telegraph on certain domestic wiretaps, access to which the Department of Justice had been able to block temporarily through a District Court injunction. At this time last year the case was pending an appeal. The U. S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rendered its final decision October 20, 1977, resolving all substantive issues in favor of the Congress.

1978 Program

l..Energy. The Committee has broad energy jurisdiction concerning the role of the Federal Government with respect to oil, nuclear energy, allocation of scarce materials, and the role of the Department of Energy. In addition, the Committee can consider the competitive structure of the energy industries, through its jurisdiction over the Federal Trade Commission Act.

The Subcommittee plans to devote considerable time and
resources this coming year in reviewing various key programs as administered by the new Department of Energy. A major investigation will focus on consumer conservation, particularly home insulation and the need to set appropriate fire and other performance standards. Other areas of inquiry will focus on the international uranium cartel and possible violations of U. S. oil pricing regulations by various oil companies.

2. Health. The Committee has general jurisdiction over
"health an-a-Tealth facilities, except health care supported by payroll deductions." The Subcommittee will continue its study of health care as part of the Congressional planning for national health insurance legislation. A major purpose of this stiidy is to delineate problem areas, to identify gaps in existing statutes, and to propose, in cooperation with the House Subcommittee on Health and the Environment, appropriate legislative and administrative remedies for areas of the health care delivery system.

Additional cancer investigations in 1978 will include an examination of how the National Cancer Institute is carrying-out its mandate under the National Cancer Program and specific investigations into hair dyes, cosmetics, toxic residues in raw meat and poultry, cancer-causing chemicals in the workplace, and other environmental causes of cancer,, including cigarettes.





14


Numerous investigations begun in 1977 will round out the Subcommittee's 1978 Health program. Some of these include an investigation of Blue Cross and Blue Shield, barriers to competition in the health care delivery system, and the safety of consumer products, notably cosmetics and food, with particular emphasis on lead and lead acetate in foods.

3. Regulatory Oversight. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of the regulatory agencies in whole or in part within its jurisdiction and follow-up on the implementation of more than 125 recommendations in the Subcommittee's October 1976 report on regulatory reform.

The primary oversight target for the year will be an assessment of enforcement programs at four agencies: The Environmental Protection Agency,, the Federal Trade Commission, the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Projects to be continued from 1977 include nuclear waste storage and disposal, conflicts of interest, regulatory reform legislation, the safety of automobile fuel tanks, and improprieties in the surveillance of nuclear critics by the utilities and several federal agencies. Oversight of the activities of the Securities and Exchange Commission will focus on the direction and speed of the agency's implementation of the 1975 amendments to the federal securities laws, with particular emphasis on progress toward a national market system for trading securities, and on the strength of the agency's leadership in the area of corporate accountability, with particular emphasis on improving the work of independent auditors. New projects planned for the year include an insurance industry investigation, an assessment of cancer hazards in drinking water, and an oversight questionnaire to be directed to all agencies under Subcommittee jurisdiction.

4. NCAA and Accounting Investigations. In addition to the studies referred [_to above, Subcommittee resources will be utilized in several other areas, including major studies and investigations of the accounting profession and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Subcommittee will examine the self-regulatory organization and measures adopted by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) to achieve needed reform within the accounting profession and the possible need for regulatory legislation.

At the request of 68 Majority and Minority Members of the
House from 33 States, the Subcommittee, in October 1977, initiated an investigation into alleged abuses by the NCAA. In its preliminary phase the investigation has centered on the NCAA's enforcement procedures, with special attention to due process and antitrust implications. It is anticipated that sufficient investigative work will have been completed to warrant Subcommittee hearings throughout the late winter and early spring of 1978, culminating in
a Subcommittee Report in the summer.

The resources requested by the Subcommittee for the performance of the specified studies and investigations and the discharge of other statutory responsibilities are realistic. While the Subcommittee believes at this time that the responsibilities of the Subcommittee can be adequately discharged with the resources requested, it nonetheless desires to-emphasize that additional projects, new information on the scope of projected studies, revised priorities, and the needs of the legislative Subcommittees could make it necessary to request supplemental funding.





15
Tentative hearing schedule of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, 9Sth Congress, 2d Session, is as follows:

January 23, 1978 Chemical Causes of Cancer

January 26, 1978 Chemical Causes of Cancer (continuation)

January 27, 1978 Chemical Causes of Cancer (continuation)

January 30, 1978 Self-regulation and Reform by the
Accounting Profession

January 31, 1978 Self-regulation and Reform by the
Accounting Profession (continuation) February 1, 1978 Self-regulation and Reform by the
Accounting Profession (continuation) February 3,, 1978 Chemical Causes of Cancer (continuation)

February 13, 1978 Cancer Causing Agents in Raw Meat and Poultry

February 14, 1978 Cancer Causing Agents in Raw Meat and Poultry (continuation)

February 21, 1978 Home Insulation Industry

February 22, 1978 Home Insulation Industry (continuation) February 23, 1978 Home Insulation Industry (continuation)

February 27, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association February 28, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association (continuation)

March 6, 1978 Use of Cadavers in Auto Safety Crash
Testing

March 73, 1978 Use of Cadavers in Auto Safety Crash
Testing (continuation)

March 13, 1978 Pricing Practices in the Meat Industry

March 14, 1978 Pricing Practices in the Meat Industry
(continuation)

March 20, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

March 21, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

April 3, 1978 Uranium Cartel: International Conflict of
Laws

April 4, 1978 Uranium Cartel: International Conflict of
Laws (continuation)

April 10, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

April 11, 1978 National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

April 17, 1978 Blue Cross/Blue Shield: Competition i n
Health Care and Delivery

April 18, 1978 Blue Cross/Blue Shield: Competition in
Health Care and Delivery (continuation) May 1, 1978 Petroleum Price Regulation Enforcement,
Department of Energy Oversight





16


May 2, 1978 -- Petroleum Price Regulation Enforcement,
Department of Energy Oversight (continuation)

May 3, 1978 -- Petroleum Price Regulation Enforcement,
Department of Energy Oversight (continuation)

May 8, 1978 -- National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

May 9, 1978 -- National Collegiate Athletic Association
(continuation)

May 17, 1978 -- Agency Oversight: Enforcement Programs of
FTC, EPA, ICC, NRC, SEC

May 22, 1978 -- Department of Energy Oversight: Oil Imports

May 29, 1978 -- Lung Cancer: Causes

June 6, 1978 -- Political Surveillance by Nuclear Powered
Utilities
June 7, 1978 -- Political Surveillance by Nuclear Powered
Utilities (continuation)

June 15, 1978 -- Safe Drinking Water

June 20, 1978 -- Agency Oversight: Enforcement Programs of
FTC, EPA, ICC, NRC, SEC (continuation)

July 10, 1978 -- Agency Oversight: Enforcement Programs of
FTC, EPA, ICC, NRC, SEC (continuation)

July 11, 1978 -- Agency Oversight: Enforcement Programs of
FTC, EPA, ICC, NRC, SEC (continuation)

August, September and October:

Continued hearings on the meat industry; Competition in health care and delivery; Hearings on the life and casualty insurance industry; FTC oversight; Toxic residues in cosmetics; NRC oversight; Nuclear Waste Disposal; Oversight of Energy Information Administration--Department of Energy; Oversight of Economic Regulatory Administration--Department of Energy; Oversight of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission--Department of Energy; Warrantless Wiretaps--Enforcement of the Federal Communications Act of 1934; and Fuel Tank Safety.






17



SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER

95th Congress, Second Session

Budget Justification



INTRODUCTION

The funds requested by the Subcommittee on Energy and Power are adequate to support a staff of 22 individuals (7 counsels, 4 assigned to research and analysis, 2 assigned to research and investigations; 8 staff assistants and 1 minority counsel).


Continuing the pattern which had been set in the 94th Congress, the Subcommittee labored under an extremely heavy workload during the first session of the 95th Congress. Most of this work was concentrated on the legislation which comprised the President's energy proposals, but a considerable amount of support activity and analysis of related energy matters was required as well. The same state of affairs seems destined to continue through 1978.


The Subcommittee's jurisdiction is broad, covering oil and gas production and regulation, electric utility regulation, many aspects of U. S. energy policy which relate to regulation of energy demand in the United States, and others. During the second session of the 95th Congress the Subcommittee's legislative activities are likely to center in the following areas: continuation and it is devoutly hoped conclusion of consideration of the National Energy Act; legislation concerning the safety of liquified natural gas and natural gas pipelines; nuclear siting legislation; legislation authorizing funds for the Department of Energy and for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; extension of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission






18


and other legislation of an emergency nature which, it is entirely possible, will appear as time goes on.


Beyond this legislative jurisdiction, the Subcommittee

expects to continue its extensive oversight responsibilities, over energy-related agencies and programs. The principal agency involved in this regard is, of course, the new Department of Energy; this Department, being new, will require careful and detailed analysis as it begins its programs. A partial listing of the oversight areas into which the Subcommittee expects to explore would encompass the following: the enforcement and compliance program of the Department of Energy, both within the Energy Regulatory Administration and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program; electric utility oversight matters, both at the State and Federal level; the capacity of the Department of Energy to respond to energy emergencies in the future; the data-gathering program within the Department of Energy, presently situated in the Energy Information Agency; the Department of Energy and its role in international energy agreements involving the United States and multi-national corporations; the balance of payments problems created by the increasing U. S. dependence on imported oil; the development of the regulatory structures involved following authorization of the Alaska gas pipeline; and others. These areas of oversight comprise a portion of the kinds of energy issues which the Subcommittee feels the Congress cannot justifiably ignore.


It should be noted that the staff of the Subcommittee has been assigned and has exercised principal staff responsibility for the House of Representatives in connection with the national energy legislation proposed by President Carter early in 1977. The bulk of the legislation considered by the Congress was






19



considered and acted upon by the Subcommittee during 1977. Most of the substantive analysis of this legislation which was done by the United States Congress was, in fact, performed by the staff of the Subcommittee on Energy and Power. While this is, of course, flattering to the staff of the Subcommittee, it also entails an enormous workload which had to be borne by the Subcommittee staff.


Also required as a result of this complex legislation was the shifting of a number of personnel to legislative responsibilities, most of whom had had considerably less contact with legislative work in the past. This is, of course, what Subcommittee staffs do and this is what the Subcommittee staff will continue to do in the future. What this inhibits, however, is the kind of careful attention to analytic effort which has characterized the work of the Subcommittee in the past. The Subcommittee, therefore, concludes that it will be necessary to intensify its efforts and to increase its resources in order to be in a position to discharge these responsibilities properly in the future.


BREAKDOWN OF PROPOSED BUDGET

The major item of expense to the Subcommittee consists of staff salaries which are estimated to amount to $669,790 as follows:


Counsels The Subcommittee will require the professional assistance of 7 counsels, all of whom are presently on the staff. One of these counsels will act as Staff Director; he will also be principally responsible for legislation involving authorizations to the Department of Energy, environmental issues and energy information. Two counsels will be principally responsible for legislation and oversight respecting the utilization of coal and the enforcement of DOE regulatory programs.






20



Two counsel's will be responsible for legislation and oversight respecting oil and gas matters. One counsel will be responsible for legislation concerning the conservation of energy and emergency programs of the Department of Energy and one counsel will be principally responsible for oversight of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and legislation respecting the siting of nuclear plants.


Research Analysis One research analyst has been assigned responsibility for computer analysis of computer models and macroeconomic models and for review of the economic implications of alternative energy policies under review by the Subcommittee. Another research analyst has been assigned principal responsibility for the review of private sector implications of alternative energy strategies. A third analyst has been assigned responsibility for identifying and retrieving information required from Federal and State agencies and from publications and a fourth analyst has been assigned responsibility for developing support to assist the other staff members.


Research Investigations The two positions identified in the budget as research investigators have been assigned varying responsibilities with respect to programs presently underway in the Federal agencies over which the Subcommittee has jurisdiction. one of these positions is vacant pending the availability of an appropriately qualified individual to fill this position. These individuals will be responsible for organizing and collating the immense flood of information on energy-related areas and seeing that this information is made available to Members upon demand.


Staff Assistants This category includes 8 individuals, one of whom serves as Office Manager.






21



Minority Counsel At the request of the ranking Minority Member, an additional minority counsel has been appointed. This individual does not work in the Subcommittee offices, but carries major responsibility in assisting the Minority in analysis of the complex issues confronting the Subcommittee.


Interns The Subcommittee has maintained a highly effective system of employing interns. It expects to hire 5 interns to assist on specific projects during the summer of 1978.


OTHER EXPENSES


Travel For 1978, $24,000 is requested to cover travel

expenses for the Subcommittee. It is presently planned that 3 out-of-town hearings will be conducted by the Subcommittee during the year. It is anticipated that these hearings will be attended by 10 Subcommittee Members and 4 staff members and that the cost of these field hearings will be $18,000. In addition to these hearings, it is anticipated that each of 10 top staff members will be in travel status for a maximum of 30 days during the year in reviewing and investigating matters in the field on issues within their respective jurisdiction. Estimated costs of these trips will amount to $6,000.


Witness Expenses Compensation for the travel and expenses incurred by witnesses appearing before the Subcommittee is provided in those instances when an undue financial burden would be imposed upon a witness who could not otherwise be heard and his information is considered important to the Subcommittee's deliberations. A careful review is given to any request for reimbursement and a determination is made upon a case-by-case basis. An amount of $7,000 is requested for this purpose.





22


Computer Services There is an enormous amount of information on energy and energy-related economic systems which may be affected by-energy policy decisions. A number of agencies within the government maintain energy data or models and independent organizations and universities maintain many such systems as well. The Subcommittee makes use of each of these facilities in varying ways, many of them at little or no cost to the Subcommittee. It is clear, however, that the retrieval of data from some of these sources is critical to the task of the Subcommittee and the Congress in determining the implications of Congressional decisions now and in the future. Additional time and money has been saved by making use of the computer terminal available to Subcommittee consultants who are able to have immediate access to their own data and can thus respond immediately to requests from Members and staff of the Subcommittee. The Subcommittee is considering acquiring a low-cost computer for its own use in the hope and expectation that the use of such computer may further reduce the total cost of computer-retrieved information in the future. The best estimates which we can develop as to the cost of computer services are that they will be in the neighborhood of $10,000.


Consultants The Subcommittee budget provides critical

access to individuals outside the Congress who have particular expertise in energy matters. In this way the Subcommittee has obtained specific information on urgent matters without committing itself to long-term employment of the individuals required on the specific projects. The amount of $30,000 is being requested for this purpose.


Additional Expenses The sum of $23,850 is requested for other costs. This portion of the budget includes such expenses






23



as leased equipment, publications, telephone service, stationery, and miscellaneous items of expense. CONCLUSION


The 1978 Subcommittee budget includes those expenses which are considered essential for the Subcommittee to continue at the high level of quality which has characterized its existence since 1975. Every effort will be made in the future, as it has been in the past, to operate at an efficient and economic level. While it is recognized that this budget is higher than that of many other Subcommittees in the Congress, it is felt that the quality of the work that is demanded of the Subcommittee staff and produced by the Subcommittee staff is sufficiently high and sufficiently imperative to justify these expenses.






24



BUDGET OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE 014 HEALTH AND THE ENVIRCINXENT

JUSTIFICATION

Legislative Program

The legislative authority of the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment includes all public health programs, hospital and nursing home construction and regulation, mental health services and research, biomedical research and demonstration programs, health professions education, health protection, maternal and child health programs, Medicaid, Part B of Medicare, health insurance, foods, drugs and cosmetics, drug abuse and alcoholism prevention, treatment and rehabilitation programs, and environmental protection in general, including the Clean Air Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Radiation Health and Safety Act.

During the first session of the 95th Congress, the Subcommittee undertook a heavy schedule of legislative activities, conducting 36 days of hearings and 39 markup sessions. Public laws developed by the Subcommittee during the first session of the 95th Congress include the Health Programs Extension Act, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, the Safe Drinking Water Amendments of 1977, the Medicare-Medicaid Anti-Fraud and Abuse Act, the Saccharin Study and Labeling Act, amendments to the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976, reauthorization of appropriations for the Drug Enforcement Administration-and legislation which would expand support for rural health clinics.

The Subcommittee has reported to the Committee for its consideration the Recombinant DNA Act, which would regulate recombinant DNA activities and the Hospital Cost Containment Act of 1977, which would place a ceiling on increases in hospital expenditures. The Subcommittee has also begun its consideration of the Child Health Assessment Act designed to expand participation of needy children under the Medicaid program and the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act which is designed to improve the quality of clinical laboratory test results and procedures. Finally, the Subcommittee conducted oversight hearings in such areas as the administration of the Swine Flu Immunization Program, the proposed National Health Planning Guidelines, the incidence of ineligible individuals receiving services under the Medicaid program, and the controversy surrounding liquid protein diets.

In the course of its deliberations, the Subcommittee used the opportunity to examine the activities of the Health Care Financing Administration, the Health Resources Administration, the Health Services Administration, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Center for Disease Control, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

During the second session of the 95th Congress, the Subcommittee plans
an equally heavy schedule of legislative and oversight activities. We intend to begin by examining the health effects of ionizing radiation which will be a subject of Subcommittee consideration throughout the year. Late in January we will embark on our consideration of substantive revisions to and extension of the authorizations of appropriations for a considerable number of health authorities including the programs originally authorized by the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974, community health centers, migrant health centers, family planning programs, community mental health centers, immunization and other preventive health services programs, grants to States for health services, cancer and heart, lung and blood research and demonstration programs, drug abuse prevention and treatment programs, authorities under the Nurse Training Act, and authorities for health services research and statistics. While we are developing legislation to renew these programs, we also plan to conclude our consideration of the Child Health Assessment Act and the Clinical laboratory Improvement Act and report legislation to the Committee for further action.






25



New legislative initiatives which the Subcommittee plans to consider during the second session of the 95th Congress include: legislation which would substantially revise the drug authorities under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to enhance the ability of the Food and Drug Administration to get new drug products on the market and dangerous drug products off the market more rapidly and to provide consumers with health information respecting drug products; legislation which would amend the food authorities under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to provide better assurances of food safety and to provide consumers with more complete ingredient and nutritional information respecting food products; legislation which would assure the privacy and confidentiality of medical records while protecting the public health; legislation which would encourage a greater number of physicians to practice as primary care providers; and, legislation designed to reduce domestic violence. Finally, the Subcommittee plans to examine, during oversight hearings, the need for Federal action to resolve current medical liability and compensation issues relative to Federally sponsored immunization programs, the need for reform of the Medicaid program, the need to expand the number of and revise the reimbursement for home health services, and the possible role of the Federal government in encouraging the development of innovative services, such as those provided by hospices, designed to assist the terminally ill.

Proposed Budget

Personnel. Other than the one new professional position allocated to the minority, the Subcommittee does not anticipate adding any new personnel during 1978. In the view of the Subcommittee, the existing staff of seven professionals and six support personnel is adequate to assist the Subcommittee in developing and successfully completing its schedule of legislative and oversight activities. The Subcommittee has allocated an additional staff position to assist the minority. While this position is intended to assist the minority in analyzing the complex issues confronting the Subcommittee, the Subcommittee wishes to make it clear that the professional staff of the Subcommitteed1l continue to provide assistance to all Members of the Subcommittee and Committee.

The proposed budget also reflects an allocation of $13,103 to provide merit raises and to take into account any approved cost of living increase. The allocation is based on 5 percent of all salaries, including that of the proposed new position for the minority but excluding the salaries of those staff members presently being paid at the statutory maximum.

Other Expenses. The proposed budget provides for modest increases over actual 1977 expenditures in all categories except travel. The travel request is higher than 1977 expenditures in that the Subcommittee plans to examine health care systems in Europe this summer in conjunction with its ongoing consideration of national health insurance proposals. Under the amended rules of the House of Representatives, expenditures for foreign travel are no longer reimbursed by the Department of State but instead from Committee funds.

Conclusion. The proposed budget of the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment represents virtually no increase in present expenditures of the Subcommittee except for the new minority position and the allocation for travel. Although the Subcommittee spent only approximately $280,000 during the first session of the 95th Congress, current expenditures of the Subcommittee calculated on an annual basis total approximately $360,000. In view of the proposed new Minority position and the Subcommittee's travel plans, the budget request of $407,169 represents an extremely conservative estimate of the Subcommittee's projected expenditures. If additional funds become necessary, the Subcommittee would submit a supplemental budget to the House
Administration Committee.






26



SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS


BUDGET JUSTIFICATION



The Subcommittee on Communications has jurisdiction over all interstate and foreign communications, including, but not limited to, all communications and information transmissions by broadcast, radio, wire, satellite, microwave or other mode. In addition to its extensive legislative responsibility in these areas, the Subcommittee maintains an active oversight role.



Oversight


During the First Session of the 9Sth Congress, the Subcommittee
hold extensive oversight hearings involving the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In addition, the Subcommittee continued its oversight of the enforcement of equal employment and antidiscrimination laws in public broadcasting and issued a report making recommendations for statutory changes to deal with the problem.

The Subcommittee concluded its oversight hearings dealing
with television violence and its impact on children and issued a Subcommittee report detailing its findings and making recommendations.

The Subcommittee also conducted a four-month investigation and study of the relationship between television networks and professional. and amateur sports. The Subcommittee held three days of hearings on this subject and has turned over much of the material which it developed to appropriate federal agencies for possible further action.

It is anticipated that the Subcommittee will continue its
active oversight role in the Second Session of the 9Sth Congress. A series of oversight or exploratory hearings will be utilized early in the session in order to advance the Subcommittee's legislative program. For example, the Subcommittee intends to hold oversight hearings involving the FCC, hearings to review federal policy affecting electronic mail systems, further hearings on privacy, and hearings to review the structure and function of the new National Telecommunications and Information Administration once it is formally established within the Department of Commerce. The Subcommittee will also review any other reorganization plan which affects telecommunications functions and make appropriate recommendations to the Government Operations Committee.



Legislation


(a) Communications Act: The major legislative activity of the Subcommittee during the Second Session of the 9Sth Congress continues to be the revising of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended. During the First Session of the 9Sth Congress, the Subcommittee held,44 days of hearings examining existing policy effecting broadcasting, cable television, domestic and international common carrier, safety and special. radio, and spectrum management. In addition, the Subcommittee held a series of panel discussions dealing with FCC reform and reorganization, privacy, and special problems and needs of minorities in telecommunications issues. Background for these hearings and panel discussions was provided by a 664 page document prepared by the Subcommittee staff providing policy options which could be considered by the Subcommittee.






27



The Subcommittee anticipates that the continuing process of rewriting the Communications Act and developing a legislative Proposal will occupy most of the Subcommittee's time during the Second Session of the 95th Congress.

(b) Other Legislation: While the Subcommittee expects to spend most of its time and resources on the rewrite project, it intends to deal with separate legislation in the areas of public broadcasting and international maritime satellite planning. The Subcommittee will also be involved in final action on H.R. 7442, dealing with the problem of cable television pole attachments, which was reported out by the Committee and which passed the House but must be reconciled with a different version that is pending in the Senate.



Personnel


The Subcommittee budget anticipates a permanent staff consisting of a chief counsel (who also serves as staff director), a staff counsel, an engineering assistant, an economist, and two communications policy analysts. In addition, there is an administrative assistant, two legislative assistants, and two secretaries (all of whom provide secretarial and clerical support in addition to their other duties). The line item for permanent staff also includes funds for a minority staff assistant (in addition to the minority counsel and associate minority counsel provided for as a part of the Full Committee budget) and for an intern.



Other Expenses


An amount comparable to that expended during the First Session of the 95th Congress has been provided for expenses to support the Subcommittee and its staff. The Full Committee requires its subcommittees to include funds for consultants under the line item "Electrical Equipment and Miscellaneous". The Subcommittee has included $17,000 for consultants during the Second Session of the 95th Congress. This amount will enable the Subcommittee to discharge its current contractual obligations and provide a small additional amount for the funding of special projects in connection with the Communications Act rewrite.






28



SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION & COMMERCE BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

95TH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION


The aim-ount of funds recjuested by the Subcormmittee on Transportation an~d Commerce for tIChe 95th Congress, Second Session, is slightly 12ss than the amount approved for the First Session of this Congress, ie., $326,100 as compared to $331,000.

The am-ount requested for direct personnel cost ($273,600) appears hu h, consi derably hiriher than the amount expended during the First Session. Actually, th~s amount is $10,100 less than the amount approved for last year. The annual payroll for the staff presently em'lployedi amuounts to $202,000. The difference between the amount requested and the present annual payroll ($71,600) represents funds for the cost-of-living increases expected in the month of October, a modest amount for staff promotions, an amount for 3 interns, and prim-iarily ($60,000) an amount for two additional counsels and one clerical position. The additional positions are replacements for the staff employed during 1976, but not in 1977, and do not represent an increase in previously designated staff positions. With the addition of this staff, the positions on the Subcommittee would consist of a Staff Director, 5 counsels, 1 legislative assistant and 4 staff assistants, for a total of 11 positions. During 1976, this Subcommittee had a total of 11 positions.

It is anticipated that the funds requested for Consultant Fees

($30,000) will be required in conjunction with the oversight review of problems relating to the transportation and disposal of nuclear waste and also for an oversight review of an anticipated request for additional funding by Conrail. During the First Session, funds for consultant fees in the amount of $41,000 were expended for one-fourth of the cost of Phase III of the National Tourism Policy Study conducted by Arthur D. Little, Inc., in accordance with Senate Resolution 347 of June, 1974.

The amount of funds requested for other expenses ($22,500) is

comparable to the amount expended during 1977. A request is made for $500.00 for witness fees whereas no expenditures have been made by this Subcommittee for this purpose in recent years. During the hearings held by this Subcommittee on January 5, 1978, testimony was received






29



from a public inLecst witness and the Subco:mitte agreed to aRy the expenses of this witness since the witness came at the request

of the Subcommittee. The use of a public intere-st witness p-oved such witnesses will be used again in the near future.






30



CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE SUBCOMMITTEE

Proposed Budget
Second Session, 95th Congress


Background

The budget request submitted by the Consumer Protection and Finance Subcommittee is designed to enable the Subcommittee to continue the active legislative and oversight schedule which it initiated in the First Session. The Subcommittee's jurisdiction is extremely broad, and its schedule during the First Session and its proposed activities during the Second Session reflect the Subcommittee's broad legislative responsibilities. Its budget is tailored to meet the needs of the Subcommittee in fulfilling this schedule.

During the First Session, the Subcommittee held 27 days of
legislative hearings and 15 days of oversight hearings. Legislation originating in the Subcommittee during the First Session which has already been signed into law includes the Unlawful Corporate Payments Act of 1977 and authorizations for the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The Subcommittee held extensive hearings on the passive restraint
rule issued by the Secretary of Transportation. The hearings culminated in a major report supporting the passive restraint rule, and this report was adopted by the full Committee. Because of the importance of this rule, the Subcommittee expects to watch closely its implementation and enforcement. In addition, the Subcommittee held oversight hearings on the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the Federal Trade Commission. In these hearings, a number of serious issues were raised which require the continued oversight of the Subcommittee.

Important legislative work which was begun by the Subcommittee during the First Session remains unfinished. The Subcommittee wrote legislation making major amendments to the Federal Trade Commission Act and the Securities Investor Protection Act. Both bills have passed the House and are awaiting conference with the Senate. Also, the Subcommittee completed hearings during the First Session on a number of pieces of legislation which are now awaiting Subcommittee mark-up. For example, the Subcommittee held field hearings in four states on no-fault automobile insurance as well as hearings in Washington, D. C. The Subcommittee also conducted hearings on bills designed to protect franchisees from arbitrary action by their franchisors and legislation which would mandate a study to determine if there is a need for a national fire code.


In addition to action on the issues pending before the Subcommittee, the Subcommittee's schedule for the Second Session include action on four authorization bills. Authorizations are necessary for the SEC, the CPSA, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Significant substantive amendments to the Securities Exchange Act will be considered along with the SEC authorizations. In addition, review of the present level of authorizations under the Toxic Substances Control Act and oversight of EPA's implementation of that Act will be undertaken by the Subcommittee.

The Subcommittee also plans to undertake a busy schedule in new areas. The Subcommittee has before it legislation to encourage the
dispensing of drugs which are -generically equivalent to but less expensive than brand name drugs. A number of studies have indicated that use of generic drugs could save the consumer millions of dollars. Consideration of this legislation will be a priority during the Second Session.

The Subcommittee also plans to hold oversight hearings on the
FTC's implementation of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. At the same time, the Subcommittee plans to examine problems associated with once-in-a-lifetime consumer purchases.






31



The Subcommittee plans to act to improve the self-help remedies available to injured consumers by encouraging states to improve their small claims courts and other procedures for resolving consumer disputes.

The Subcommittee will conduct hearings and studies to determine the need for legislation to protect the purchasers of municipal securities. Such legislation would require issuers of municipal securities to disclose information describing the fiscal condition of the issuer. Problems associated with auto repairs, and bank securities activities will also be the subject o Subcommittee hearings and study.

Breakdown of Proposed Budget

Personnel -- The bulk of the Subcommittee budget is earmarked for staff salaries. The workload outlined above will be extremely heavy and require considerable staff resources. The requested funds will enable the Subcommittee to maintain its present staff of five counsel (including one minority counsel), one economist, three legal assistants, one researcher, and three support persons. The majority counsel will have primary responsibility for the issues discussed above. One of the counsel will also serve as the staff coordinator.

The economist will perform economic and statistical analysis of
issues before the Subcommittee. For example, the economist has already begun analysis of the economic implications of generic drug legislation and the economic effects on consumers of practices within the automobile repair industry. The legal assistants and researcher will assist the counsel in doing background research on proposed legislation, preparing for hearings, and preparing legislation for consideration by the Subcommittee.

It is likely that the Subcommittee will have referred to it midway through the Second Session a major proposal to recodify all the existing securities laws. Money has been included in the budget to hire an additional staff assistant mid-way through the year to work on this issue.

The support staff presently consists of two secretaries and one secretary/receptionist. These individuals handle correspondence, telephone inquiries, typing and filing, as well as serving as clerks during Subcommittee hearings and mark-ups. One secretary also has administrative responsibilities. Because the present ratio of three professionals to one support person has imposed an extremely heavy burden on the support staff, the budget includes funds for one additional secretary.

At the request of the ranking minority member, money was included in the 1977 budget for a minority counsel. The minority counsel assists the minority members in preparing for hearings and analyzing the legislation before the Subcommittee. The 1978 budget continues the funds for the minority counsel.

Other expenses -- The requests for the remaining items within the budget are based on 1977 expenditures and represent only a modest increase ove r the 1977 level. The increases are due primarily to anticipated increased costs from inflation rather than increases in real expenditures.






32



The Subcommittee has requested $7,200 for travel. This is to enable the Subcommittee to conduct field hearings on such issues as 9meric drug substitution, consumer problems associated with auto repairs and household moves, and municipal securities disclosure. During the First Session, the Subcommittee held six separate field hearings. The Subcommittee found that field hearings are extremely important for a number of reasons. By conducting hearings in various states on one particular issue, the Subcommittee is able to study that issue in depth. Field hearings also enable the Subcommittee to hear views from experts who would not be able to come to Washington, D.C. Further, a greater spectrum of persons who may be affected by legislation have an opportunity to testify. Individuals and organizations which do not have Washington offices or cannot afford Washington representatives have a better chance of finding out about hearings and appearing to testify.

During the First Session the Subcommittee paid travel expenses for a limited number of witnesses to come to Washington, D.C. to participate in Subcommittee hearings. This helped the Subcommittee obtain the views of expert witnesses who were not dependent upon the sponsorship of interest groups. The Subcommittee plans to continue this practice during the Second Session.






93



CCOht4TTEE EMPLOYEES HOUSE COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMERCE


-Nm and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telepxoy

W. E. Williamson Falls Church, Va. Em 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Chief Clerk/Staff Dir. Kemeth J. Painter Wheaton, Md. Em 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
First Assistant Clerk Elemmor A. Dinkins Chevy Chase, Md. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Assistant Clerk

Edwin Earl Thomas Alexandria, Va. Rin 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Staff Assistant

Lewis Berry Silver Spring, Md. Rm 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) William L. Burns Rockville, Maryland Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-3927
Printing Editor

Elizabeth Harrison Washington, D. C. Eni 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Jeffrey H. Schwartz Arlington, Va. Rm 2147, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Brian R. Moir Washington, D. C. Em 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Karen Nelson Washington, D. C. Rxn 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Ross D. Amn Washington, D. C. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Christopher E. Dunne Arlington, Va. Em 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

William M. Kitzmiller Washington, D. C. Em 2147, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Mark J. Raabe Alexandria, Va. Em 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Prof. Staff Member

Thomas M. Ryan Washington, D. C. Rin 2147, Rayburn 225-3147
Counsel

James S. Cowen Potomac, Md. Em 2218, Rayburn 225-4650
Prof. Staff Member

Henry T. Greene Alexandria, Va. Em 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) Jan Benes Vlcek Chevy Chase, Nd. Em 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) Ronald D. Colen Vienna, Va. Em 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) J. Paul Molloy Silver Spring, Md. Em 2122, Rayburn 225-6971
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) Barbara Bullard Washington, D. C. Em 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Admin. Asst. (Min.)

Darlene McMullen Temple Hills, Md. Em 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Legis. Asst. (Min.)






34



Name and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telephone
Mollie Brown Washington, D.C. Rm 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Clerical-Steno. (Min.) Joseph Kelley Washington, D. C. Rm 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Clerical Asst. (Min.) Robert Henley Lamb Alexandria, Va. Rm 2322, Rayburn 225-3641
Prof. Staff Member (Min.) Jean McLean Arlington, Va. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Clerical-Stenographic Joanne E. Bell Washington, D. C. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Clerical-Stenographic Sharon E. Davis Arlington, Va. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Clerical-Stenographic Anne P. Jordan Alexandria, Va. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Clerical-Stenographic Barboura C. Flues McLean, Va. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Clerical-Stenographic Selene M. Byrd Greenbelt, Md. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Clerical Assistant Veronica Crowe Greenbelt, Md. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Clerical Assistant Dennis Mosher Arlington, Va. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Documents Clerk Jan Higgins Silver Spring, Md. Rm 3330-T, Annex # 2 225-2963
Clerical Asst. (Min.) Charlotte E. Watkins Washington, D. C. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Clerical Assistant Rose M. Balitis Alexandria, Va. Rm 2145, Rayburn 225-3147
Clerical Assistant Sara E. Gettys Washington, D. C. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Clerical Asst. (Acct.) Karen E. Dahl Washington, D. C. Rm 2125, Rayburn 225-2927
Staff Assistant


SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS

Harry M. Shooshan, III Rockville, Md. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Staff Dir./Counsel

Karen B. Possner Silver Spring, Md. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Staff Assistant

Karen Anne Allen Arlington, Va. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Office Mgr/Secretary

George H. Harder, III Alexandria, Va. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Minority Staff Assoc.

Mary Jane Dox Alexandria, Va. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Secretary

Stella Mae Jackmon Washington, D. C. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Legis.Asst./Secretary Carolyn F. Sachs Washington, D. C. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Research Assistant






35



Name and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telephone

SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMUNICATIONS (continued)

Shirley Jeter Adelphi, Md. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Legis. Asst./Secretary Charles L. Jackson Washington, D. C. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Staff Engineer

Kathleen E. Casey Washington, D. C. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Min. Staff Asst.

Edwina E. Dowell Washington, D. C. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Staff Counsel

Deborah A. McCormick Arlington, Va. Rm B-333, Rayburn 225-9304
Receptionist/Secretary


SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER

Frank M. Potter Reston, Va. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel

Robert M. Howard Arlington, Va. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Research Assistant

William F. Demarest, Jr. Vienna, Va. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel

Valerie P. Duval Washington, D. C. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Admin. Assistant

Carolyn G. Speir Alexandria, Va. Rm 3204, Annex I# 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

Randall E. Davis Alexandria, Va. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Min. Staff Assoc.

Michael F. Barrett Washington, D. C. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel

Barbara H. Witmeyer Washington, D. C. Pm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

Danielle M. Beauchamp Washington, D. C. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Research Assistant

Patricia C. Leahy Arlington, Va. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

Peter D. H. Stockton Chevy Chase, Md. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Research Analyst

Peter S. Hunt Alexandria, Va. Rm 3204, Annex I# 2 225-1030
Research Analyst

Bruce R. Henke Alexandria, Va. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Min. Staff Asst.

Walter W. Schroeder, III Reston, Va. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Research Analyst

David Schooler Washington, D. C. Rm 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel

David B. Finnegan Annandale, Va. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel

Joan R. Herring Vienna, Va. Em 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant






36



Name and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telephone

SUBCOM4ITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER (continued)

Ruth McLeod Alexandria, Va. Rin 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

Dale K. Weldon Reston, Va. Bin 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

William D. Braun Reston, Va. Bin 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Staff Assistant

Michael J. Ward Washington, D. C. Bin 3204, Annex # 2 225-1030
Counsel


SUBCOM4ITTEE ON HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Stephan E. Lawton Chevy Chase, Md. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Chief Counsel

Jo Anne Glisson Washington, D. C. Rm 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Sr. Staff Associate

Robert W. Maher Chevy Chase, Md. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Dir. ,Research & Plan.

Donald W. Dalrymnple Washington, D. C. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Assistant Counsel

Stephen J. Connolly Bethesda, Md. Ba 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Sr. Staff Associate

Rosalyn Davidson Washington, D. C. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assistant

Frances dePeyster Washington, D. C. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assoc. (Min.)

Deborah M. Prout Alexandria, Va. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assistant

Rebecca B. Walker Arlington, Va. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Admin. Assistant

Susan H. Strok Washington, D. C. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assistant

Linda Sue Ritchie Alexandria, Va.. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assistant

Burke K. Zimmermnan McLean, Va. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Research Associate

William V. Corr Washington, D. C. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Assistant Counsel

Robert M. Crane Silver Spring, Md. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Sr. Staff Associate

Bonny A. Falk Arlington, Va. Bin 2415, Rayburn 225-4952
Staff Assistant


SUBCOMMITTEE ON CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE

Janie A. Kinney Washington, D. C. Bin 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Counsel/Staff Coord.

Peter Kinzler Reston, Va. Bin 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Counsel






37



Nm and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telephone

SUBCC!ITTI ON CONSUME PROTECTION AND FfINANCE (continued)

Mary T. Foldes Arlington, Va. Ri. 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Counsel

Nancy Ann Nord Alexandria, Va. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Minority Staff Assoc.

Marion S. Reid Temple Hills, Md. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Clerk-Stenographic

Judity A. Quinn Falls Church, Va. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Clerical-Assistant

Dale C. Bechtel Rockville, Md. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Research Assistant

John P. McLaughlin Mt. Rainier, Md. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Legal Assistant

Franz Opper Washington, D. C. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Counsel

Milton D. Lower Washington, D. C. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Economist

Corliss L. Yancey Forestville, Md. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Receptionist/Sec.

Kathryn Seddon Washington, D. C. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Legal Assistant

Margaret A. Taylor Herndon, Va. Em 3161, Annex # 2 225-7790
Minority Staff Asst.


SUBM*UTTfEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND (X)WERCE

William T. Druhan Silver Spring, Md. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Staff Director

Wendy G. Valentine Washington, D. C. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Executive Assistant

Cheryl E. Sparks Silver Spring, Md. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Secretary

Ernest A. Trakas Chevy Chase, Md. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Legislative Asst.

Charles E. van der Burgh Washington, D. C. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Minority Staff Assoc.

Richard N. Little, Jr. Arlington, Va. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Counsel

Gay A. Duty Forestville, Md. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Admin. Assistant

Kevin B. McCarthy Rockville, Md. Em 3364, Annex # 2 225-1467
Counsel


SUBCO1IITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS

Benjamin J. Smethurst Springfield, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

Elizabeth A. Eastman Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Off ice Manager






38



Name and Title Home Address office Address Office Telephone

SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS (continued)

James T. Greene Alexandria, Va. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel to the Chrmn.

Kirk C. Smith Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

Bernard J. Wunder, Jr. Dumfries, Va. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Minority Staff Assoc.

Elliot A. Segal Bethesda, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Dir., Health Task Force

John Galloway Reston, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Dir., Energy Task Force

Eather H. Higginbotham Temple Hills, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

Lester Brown Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

Stephen F. Sims Alexandria, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

Patrick M. McLain Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Lowell Dodge Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Dir. Oversight Task Force

Janice E. Daniels Arlington, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

James L. Nelligan Burke, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Operations Director

Richard A. Heller Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Katherine C. Meyers Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

John McE. Atkisson Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Deputy Chief Counsel

Ellen A. Foley Alexandria, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

Yvonne P. Knight Cheverly, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

Pamela R. Morrisette Oxon Hill, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

Charles E. Chatinan Silver Spring, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

marian Susan Leal Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Allegra P. McManus Adelphi, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

Richard Lee Tallman Alexandria, Va. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Staff Assistant

William A. Shook Washington, D. C. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Research Assistant






39



Name and Title Home Address Office Address Office Telephone

SUECONMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS (continued)

Richard A. Frandsen Alexandria, Va. Rin 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Thomas G. Kaplan Washington, D. C. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Jay C. Shaffer Alexandria, Va. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Counsel

Raymond C. Cole, Jr. Annapolis, Md. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Special Assistant

Janet L. Holmes Washington, D. C. Em 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Receptionist

June L. Cassidy Alexandria, Va. Rm 2323, Rayburn 225-4441
Clerical Asst. (Min.)


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09119 2962