Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee ... annual report

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
    Table of Contents
        Page iv
    Introduction and Committee action in 1977
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Complying with statutory provisions
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Appendix I. Principal issues discussed at Committee meetings in 1977
        Page 11
    Back Cover
        Page 12
Full Text






95th Congress COX2ITTEE PRINT f COMMITTEE
2d Session PRINT No. 95-19






FEDERAL PREVAILING RATE ADVISORY

COMMITTEE 1977 ANNUAL REPORT





MESSAGE

FROM


THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITNG

THE 1977 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FEDERAL PREVAILING RATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE, PURSUANT TO 5 U.S.C. 5347(e)



(Referred to the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service)













SEPTEMBER 15, 1978






Printed for the use of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session


U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
33-302 WASHINGTON : 1978































COMMITTEE ON POST OFFICE AND CIVIL SERVICE

ROBERT N. C. NIX, Pennsylvania, Cwarman MORRIS K. UDALL, Arizona, Vice Chairman JAMES M. HANLEY, New York EDWARD J. DERWINSKI, Illinois
CHARLES H. WILSON, California JOHN H. ROUSSELOT, California
RICHARD C. WHITE, Texas JAMES M. COLLINS, Texas
WILLIAM D. F.ORD, Michigan GENE TAYLOR, Missouri
WILLIAM (BILL) CLAY, Missouri BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York
PATRICIA SCHROEDER, Colorado TRENT LOTT, Mississippi
WILLIAM LEHMAN, Florida JIM LEACH, Iowa
GLADYS NOON SPELLMAN, Maryland TOM CORCORAN, Illinois
HERBERT E. HARRIS II, Virginia STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, New Jersey MICHAEL O. MYERS. Pennsylvania CECIL (CEC) HEFTEL, Hawaii ROBERT GARCIA, New York RALPH H, METgALFE, Illinois LEO J. -It YA f4, Cifornia
DAVW MINTON, Executie Director and General Counsel
'I EODORE J. KAZY, Minority Staff Director ROBlRT E. LOCKHART, Depup General Cousd J. PIERCE MYERS;, Assi4tat General Counel
HRi N THOMPSON, Assitant General Couned
STAMEns CREGAN, Assistant General Counsel ItII)




























LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

To the Congress of the Unitted States.
In accordance with section 5:347(e) of title 5 of the United States Code, I hereby transmit to you the 1977 Annual Report of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee.
JIA~.IYx CARTER.
THE WXHITE HOUSE, Atigust 17, 1978.
























CONTENTS

Page
Introduction- 1
Committee action in 1977:
A. Issues under the Federal wage system resolved by formal
recommendation:
1. Establishment of a new environmental differential for
high voltage wr---------------1
2. DiscoitirtuAnee -of special wage rates for patternmakers; in
the San Francisco, Calif., wage ae----------2
3. Establishment, of a.. new environmental .differential for
welding, cutting, or burning in confined spaces -----------2
B. Issue under the Federal wage system resolved by mutual agreement:
1. Discontinuance of special wage rates for electronic mechanics in the Albany, Ga., wage area--------------------- 3
C. Other issues and items considered by the Committee:
1. Effect of the Government in the Sunshine Act on Corn.mittee operations ---------------------------------- 4
2. Special wage schedule for National Park Service overlap
area----------------------------------5
3. Special wage schedules for lock and dam employees ---------5
4. Congressional request for the Committee's comments on
proposed changes to the Federal wage system -----------6
Comply 'ing with statutory provisions:
A. Charter of the Cmite-----------------7
B. Organization of the Committee ------------------------------- 8
C. Sample Federal Register notice------------------------------- 10
D. Annual report to the General Services Administration -------------11
Appendix:
I. Principal issues discussed at Committee meetings in 1977 ----------11
(IV)












INTRODUCTION
The Charter of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee (FPRAC), contained in 5 U.S.C. 5347, is to "study the prevailing rate system and other matters pertinent to the establishment of prevailing rates . and, from time to time, advise the Civil Service Commission thereon."
There was one change in the membership of the Committee in 1977. The Department of the Army, as a part of the normal rotation of the military departments' membership on the Committee, replaced the Department of the Navy on the management side of the table.
The Committee's first Chairman, Mr. David T. Roadley, who left the Committee on May 31, 1977, was succeeded by Mr. Jerome H. Ross. Chairman Ross, a former Federal mediator, held his first Committee meeting on July 21, 1977.
The Committee held a total of 23 meetings in 1977. The number of meetings was down from previous years because of an inactive interim period between the former Chairman's retirement and the appointment of Mr. Ross as his successor.
The Committee holds its regular meetings at the U.S. Civil Service Commission, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, D.C.
COMMITTEE ACTION IN 1977
ISSUES RESOLVED BY FORMAL RECOMMENDATION
1. Establishment of a vear environmental differential for high voltage
work
At the request of the National Association of Government Employees, the Committee agreed to discuss a propoasl to provide environmental differential pay for employees working on or near energized high voltage electrical lines. In the course of its deliberations, the Committee heard the testimony of expert witnesses and thoroughly debated the proposal at eight meetings.
Labor's position was that there was a hazard involved for employees who were working on or near energized high voltage circuits. Labor argued that while safety procedures were an important part of the training that an electrician received, training per se did not practically eliminate the unusually hazardous character of the high voltage work.
Management acknowledged that there was a risk in work with
high voltage, but that if the prescribed safety procedures and practices were followed by trained electricians, then under normal circumstances the work was as safe, if not safer, than many other skilled trade and craft occupations.
After intermittent caucuses in the course of these meetings, in which the Chairman met separately with both sides, it became clear this issue could not be settled by consensus. At the meeting of January 13, 1977, the Chairman voted with management to accept an amended proposal to giant the following differential:
(1)






2

50 percent. Under Part I, Appendix J of FPM Supplement 532-1. Working on energized electrical lines rated at 4160 volts or more which are suspended from utility poles or towers, when adverse weather conditions such as steady rain, high winds. icing, lighting, or similar environmental factors make the work unusually hazardous.
Labor filed a minority report on this issue, but the Commission approved the Committee's majority recommendation.
2. Discontinuance of special wage rates for patternmakers in the San
ktranxcisco, Calif., wage area
Special rates for patternmakers were established in a number of Wage areas by the Department of the Navy throughout the early years of the 1950's, and were continued after the establishment of the Federal Wage System (FWS). These special rates were necessary because locality regular wage schedules provided rates of pay which were inadequate for recruitment and retention of these employees. Over the last few years, these special rates have been abolished in every wage area except San Francisco. They were abolished under the agency practice of discontinuing the special rates once they were exceeded by the regular schedule rates for this level of work.
It was management's position that the regular schedule pay rates in the San Francisco area for this level of work were now sufficient to recruit and retain qualified patternmakers. Therefore management proposed that, under the provisions of Federal Personnel Manual (FPM) Supplement 532-1 which authorize the payment of special rates only when regular rates are too low to recruit and retain qualified employees, the special rate be discontinued.
Labor argued that the survey rates for patternmaker in the San Francisco wage area have always been higher than the regular schedule rates. It was their view that there was a need to examine conditions of employment, rather than just applying a mechanical formula, where recruitment and retention problems might exist.
The Chairman caucused separately several times with each side, but no agreement could be reached. The Chairman voted with management to recommend to the Commission that:
(a) The agency's established special rates practice for patternmaker and patternmarker foreman positions in San Francisco
be discontinued.
(b) That both patternmaker and patternmaker foreman positions in San Francisco be paid from the local area FWS regular
schedule.
(c) That the change be effective the first pay period following
the effective (late of the next regular schedule to be issued for
the San Francisco, California, wage area.
W) That this proposed action be considered a pay system
change and the provisions for pay retention in S10-9 of FPM
Supplement 532-1 be applied.
The Commission approved this recommendation.
3. E tablishment of a new environmental dtferential for welding, cutting,
or birn ingy 'in confined spaces
The request for this new environmental category stemmed from an arbitrator's award relating to a work operation at the Naval Air Propulsion Test Center, Trenton, New Jersey. rhe award entitled the grievant to whatever environmental differential the Civil Service






3

Commission might approve above the 4 percent dirty work differential he already received. As a. result of this award the commanding officer of the facility and the local lodge of the International Association o f Machinists and Aerospace Workers jointly proposed a new environmental differential for welding, cutting, or burning in confined work spaces.
Management's position was that the work situation at Trenton was not unusually hazardous. Their proposal contained no reference to hazardous work, but was specifically intended to mirror the specific work situation at Trenton and to establish a differential only for an unusually severe working condition.
Labor stated that the welding, cutting, or burning operation at Trenton, which was performed inside a long and narrow tubular structure, did constitute an unusually hazardous work situation and merited a percentage differential far in excess of one granted for an unusually severe working condition.
The Chairman caucused several times, separately, with each side during the course of the discussion on this topic. Although he was successful in persuading both sides to offer amended versions of their original proposals, no agreement was reached.
The Chairman voted with labor on the prol)osed text of the new category and with management on the percentage to be ascribed to it. The following Committee recommendation was approve(] by the Commission:
6 percent. Under Part I, Appendix J of FPM Supplement 532-1. Welding, ,cutting, or burning within a confined space which necessitates working in a horizontal or nearly horizontal position, under conditions requiring egress at least 14' over and through obstructions including: (1) access openings and baffles having dimensions which greatly restrict movements, and (2) irregular inner surfaces of the structure or structural components.

ISSUE RESOLVED BY MXTUTUAL AGREEMENT
1. Discontinuance of special wage rates for electronic mechanics in the
Albany, Ga., wage area
Special wage rates for Navy electronic mechanics in the Albany area were originally established Ito correct internal employment competition between Air Force and Navy activities in the area. To overcome the pre-coordinated FWS differences between the two schedules, the Navy adjusted their rates ul)ward by 20-25 cents to equal the Air Force rates. Some time later, the Air Force facility was deactivated an(l the FWS was enacted, buit the special rates were allowed to continue until they could be reviewed by this Committee. An initial review by the Committee in 1976 ended in an agreement to keel) the rates in place until after the movement of another Marine Corps sunply activity into the area was completed. This (lelay allowed both sides to see if the presence of the new activity woul( affect the recruitment and retention of these employees.
Management's position was that the move of the new supply activity into the area had not caused a. recruitment and retention problem to recur. They argued that the reason for the special rate, an internal recruitment and retention problem, no longer existed and that the special rate should be eliminated. They stated that if the local activity later discovered a need for a special rate, the special rate provisions of paragraph S5-14 of FPM Supplement 532-1 could be applied. In






4

light of these arguments, and in consideration of the need for an orderly transition to the regular schedule, management made a motion that:
(a) The agency's established special rate practice for designated
electronic jobs at Navy installations in the Albany, Georgia,
wage area be discontinued.
(b) That the employees covered by the special wage rates be
converted to the appropriate rates of the local area FWS regular
schedule.
(c) That the change be effective at the beginning of the first
pay period following the pay period in which the next wage adjustment resulting from a full scale survey of the Albanyr,
Georgia, area is made.
(d) That this proposed action be considered a pay system
change and the provisions for pay retention in S 10-9 of FPM
Supplement 532-1 be applied.
Labor responded to this proposal by stating that while they were not convinced a recruitment and retention problem did not exist, they did not view this as a voting issue. They agreed to accept management's proposal with the clear proviso that. either side could bring this issue back to the table if they became aware of a particular pay problem at Albany.
Management replied that they were in agreement with labor's statement.

OTHER ISSUES CONSIDERED BY THE COMMITTEE
1. Effect of the Government in the Sunshine Act on Committee operations
The provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, codified at 5 U.S.C. 552b, et seq., were approved in 1976. An initial determination, made by CSC Acting Chairman Georgiana Sheldon after discussions with the Chairman of the Committee and the CSC Gener'al Counsel, was to continue closing the Committee's meetings under authority of 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), exemption 9(B).
However in June 1977, the Office of Management, and Budget requested that this decision be reviewed. In response, CSC Chairman Campbell directed that an ad hoc review group be formed from key officials, including the Committee Chairman, within the Commission. The group was to determine if there might be some opportunities for more openness in the activities of the Committee without allowing, premature disclosure of Committee (deliberations when this would significantly frustrate the implementation of Committee actions.
The ad hoc review group submitted a memorandum of their findings to Chairman Campbell. They included the following points:
(a) The authority of 5 U.S.C. 552b(c), exemption 9(B), providles sufficient justification to keep the Committee meetings
closed.
(b) However, to meet the spirit of the Act, the Committee
would open their meetings to the public on an experimental basis. After the conclusion of the trial period, at determination, would. be made on whether to keep) the meetings open or closed.'
(c) The Committee would continue to hold closed cauicuses
where each side meets separately to discuss bargaining- str-ateg-y or where the Chairman meets separately with one side or the
other to mediate dlisare-ements between the two sides.





5

Chairman Campbell agreed with these findings and the first open meeting was held on December 15, 1977. The Committee also inaugurated, on a trial basis, the use of verbatim transcripts of the Committee proceedings at this meeting.
2. Special wage schedule for National Park Service overlap areas
This issue had been decided by the Committee, by majority vote. at the meeting held on August 26, 1976. The recommendation made by the Committee to the Commission included language which stated that the special wage schedule for these areas would be "based on the FWS regular schedule in the respective parkway or park which produces the most favorable payline for the employees." However, a dispute arose over what constituted the most favorable payline for the employees.
Labor's position was that when the comparison of the different revular schedules was made, only the rates at grades which were occupied by employees should be included. They argued that just taking, an overall 15-grade average would not necessarily produce the most favorable payline.
MJanagement replied that during the 10 years that the National Wage Policy Committee and this Committee have been operating, policy decisions and comparisons have always been based on the stan( ard procedure of comparing the entire payline, not just a portion o it. They said labor should have noted any differences from standard practice when their motion was made.
After both sides presented their viewpoints the Chairman offered the following language as a solution to the disagreement:
(a) Labor and management agree that there is no intent in
implementing the proposed FPM\l Letter to disadvantage
employees.
(b) The proposed FPI Letter on overlap schedules for the
National Park Service will be issued as prepared, using the average of all 15 grades of existing nonsupervisory regular schedules, to establish a single area special schedule in each respective parkway or park that produces the most favorable payline for the
employees.
(c) If at any time, after full implementation is completely, there
is any doubt that the resulting single area special schedule (11cussed above does not produce the most favorable payline for employees in each park or parkway, the issue or issues in dispute may be brought back to the Committee table for review an(
resolution.
Both sides agreed to this proposal and it was inserted into the Committee minutes as a matter of record.
3. Special wage schedudes for lock and darn employees
This issue has been decided by the Committee, by majority vote, at the meeting held on January 26, 1976. However, at the July 26, 1977, meeting, management requested that the Committee address an unforeseen side effect of the Committee's recommendation. The provision in question stated that "If navigation lock and dam installations under an administrative headquarters are located in more than one FWS wage area. operating and repair employees are paid from a special schedule having rates identical to the regular FWS wage schedule authorized for the administrative headquarters."
33-302-78-2






6

Management informed the Committee that the presence of three employees at a small lock near Alanson, Michigan, would trigger the provisions of the cited language. Specifically, the location of these employees in a different EWS wage area from the 93 lock and dlam employees at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, would cause the application of~ the FWS wage schedule used at the administrative headquarters in Detroit, Michigan, to the employees in both areas.
.Management said that this unforeseen effect would raise wages for these employees an average of $1 per hour. They stated that this would place the Corps of E ngineers at Sault Ste. Marie in an unfair competitive position relative to private firms employing skilled labor in the area. They also predicted employee discontentt since not all Corps employees at Sault Ste. Marie would receive the benefit of the increase.
Labor replied that this issue had been considered for more than 2 years before a final recommendation was made. It was their position that any major policy decision had positive, and negative effects on pay and that management had not presented evidence of a compelling needle to make an exception to the general provisions of the recommendation.
At the second meeting held on this topic, management informed labor that the Corps of Engineers had informed them that the Corps had contracted out the Alanson lock operation to the State of Michigan and that the State had already taken over the lock's operation. Management noted that this change in the situation re moved the immediate need to discuss amendling the Committee's recommendation since the effect of the contracting out was to negate the provision requiring the importation of Detroit rates to Sault Ste. Marie.
Labor )replied that they were concerned with the manner in which this question had been treated by management. They stated it was their position that, since the Corps' still owned andl maintained the Alanson lock, the provision requiring the use of Detroit rates would still be in effect.
At the August 18, 1977, meeting both sides agreed that there was nothing to be gained from further debate on this topic. Therefore, the Chairman tabled this topic until such time as either sidle decided to renew discussion on it.
4. Congressional request for the Committee's comments on proposed
changes to the Federal wage system.
On December 12, 1977, the Committee received a request from Congresswoman Gladys N. Spellman, Chair of the House Subcommittee on Compensation and Employee Benefits, to comment on pr1olposedl leg-islative changes to the IFWS.
Labor's position was that the proposed changes, first raised in a General Accounting Office (GAO) report and later by the Rockefeller Pay Panel. were based on limited and outdated data. Labor was concerned that some of the recommend at ions made in the GAO report, such as redefining at number of the present wage areas, were no0t part of the proposed changes. Labor also noted that none of the leg-islative chano'res addressed the plight of the many nonapprop~riated fund employees. For- these reasons, labor proposed that the Committee should fully study all the Rockefeller report's recommendations andl the changes p)rolposcl by GAO before any major changes wNere mnade to the FWS.








Management disagreed that any further st udy of the legislative changes was needed. It was their position that each side had already had ample opportunity to present their views to the Rockefeller Panel and in congressional oversight hearings. They noted that the management side of the table had been directly involved in drafting these proposals and were in total agreement with them.
After more discussion, both sides agreed to provide their comments to the Chairman by January 6, 1978, so that he could forward them with a cover letter to Congresswoman Spellman.

FINAL NOTE
After 5 years of operation the Committee continues to maintain a viable bilateral atmosphere, and has been successful in taking needed action on a number of items concerning the FWS. In the past 5 years there have been numerous items which have been brought before the the Committee for consideration and discussion. On most issues the Committee was able to reach a consensus. It is noteworthy to point out, however, that during this period of time the Committee has developed and submitted 30 formal recommendations to the Civil Service Commission. Every formal recommendation submitted by the Committee during this 5-year period has been approved and implemented by the Civil Service Commission.
This Annual Report is an abbreviated chronicle of the Committee's deliberations and actions. Copies of Committee proceedings and all official Committee documents are available for public inspection in the Committee's offices at Room 1338, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, D.C. 20415.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE CHARTER
A. The Committee's Official Designation:
The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee. B. Objectives and Scope:
The Committee shall study the prevailing rate system and
other matters pertinent to the establishment of prevailing rates under this subchapter (subchapter IV, ch. 53,
5 U. S.., as amended).
C. Duration:
There is no time limit set forth in the Act (P.L. 92-392).
It is expected that the mandate of the Committee is one of a continuing nature, until amended or revoked by appropriate act of Congress.
D. Responsible Agency and Official:
Recommendations of the Committee are made to the Civil
Service Commission.
The Chairman of the Committee reports to the Chairman,
Civil Service Commission.
E. Agency Providing Support:
United States Civil Service Commission. F. Committee Responsibilities:
The Committee is advisory. Its primary responsibility is to
stu(ly the prevailing rate system and from time to time
advise the Civil Service Commission thereon.






8

The Committee shall submit an annual report to the Commission and the President, for transmittal to Congress, as required by section 5347(e) of the Act (P.L. 92-392). G. Estimated Annual Operating Costs in Dollars and Man-years:
Using current salary schedules, $136,000 and 4-man years. H. Estimated Number and Frequency of Meetings:
The meeting schedule contemplated for the Committee is
one meeting each week throughout a calendar year; more frequent meetings shall be scheduled when deemed
necessary.
I. The Committee's Termination Date:
There is no statutory termination date. The Chairman
of the Committee serves for a 4-year term, as set forth in section 5347(a)(1) of the Act (P.L. 92-392). Management members serve at the pleasure of the designating authority.
Labor membership is reviewed every 2 years to assure entitlement under the criteria set forth in section 5347(b)
of the Act (P.L. 92-392).
Approved: Robert E. Hampton, October 1, 1976.

ORGANIZATION OF THE FEDERAL PREVAILING RATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Chairman; Jerome H. Ross.

MANAGEMENT MEMBERS
Carl W. Clewlow, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Depart ment of Defense.
J. Craig Cumbey, Director of Civilian Personnel, Department of the Air Force.
Ben B. Beeson, Director of Civilian Personnel, Department of the Army.
Frederick A. Kistler, Director, Bureau of Policies and Standards, U.S. Civil Service Commission.
Martin Wish, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Personnel, Veterans Administration.
LABOR MEMBERS
Paul J. Burnsky, President, Metal Trades Department, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations.
Rick M. Galleher, Director of Research, Public Employees Depairtment, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations.
Kenneth T. Blaylock, National President, American Federation of Government Employees, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations.
Alan J. Whitney, Executive Vice-President, National Association of Government Employees (Ind.).
James M. Peirce, President, National Federation of Federal Emp)loyees (Ind.).








DESIGNATED MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVES
Cecil E. Allen, Department of the Air Force. Jean M. Becht, Department of Defense. A. W. Brand, Veterans Administration. William M. Frailey, Department of the Army. J. B. Leon-Guerrero, Department of the Air Force. Hugh Hoffman, Department of the Army. James P. Madigan, Department of the Air Force. Pascale A. Petosa, Department of Defense. Thornton U. Sanborn, U.S. Civil Service Commission. Harvey Shaynes, Department of the Army. Andrew B. Smith, Veterans Administration. William C. Valdes, Department of Defense. Raymond C. Weissenborn, U.S. Civil Service Commission.
DESIGNATED LABOR ALTERNATES
Richard H. Anderson, Jr., National Association of Government Employees (Ind.).
Gilbert G. Bateman, Metal Trades Department/AFL-CIO.
Janet Cooper, National Federation of Federal Employees (Ind.). Dennis N. Davis, National Federation of Federal Employees (Ind.). Robbie Exley, National Federation of Federal Employees (Ind.). Irving Geller, National Federation of Federal Employees (Ind.). Joseph D. Gleason, American Federation of Government Employees/AFL-CIO.
B. W. Hensley, Metal Trades Department/AFL-CIO. George A. Hobt, American Federation of Government Employees/ AFL-CIO.
James G. MacDonald, American Federation of Government Employees/AFL-CIO.
John F. Markuns, National Association of Government Employees (Ind.).
Robert H. Merritt, American Federation of Government Employees/AFL-CIO.
J. Gene Raymond, National Federation of Federal Employees (Ind.).
Saul S. Stein, Metal Trades Department/AFL-CIO.
Gerald W. Welcome, National Association of Government Employees (Ind.).
Henry Wilson, American Federation of Government Employees/ AFL-CIO.
Stanley Wisniewski, American Federation of Government Employees/AFL-CIO.
Theodore A. Vanderzyde, Metal Trades Department/AFL-CIO.
COMMITTEE STAFF
Albert F. Wiecjorek, Secretary.
Richard J. Liebl, Wage Policy Specialist.
Mary G. Reifsnyder, Secretary to Chairman.






10

SAMPLE FEDERAL REGISTER NOTICE
Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee
Open Committee Meeting
Pursuant to the provisions of section 10 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (P.L. 92-463), notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee will be held on: Thursday, December 15, 1977
The meetings will convene at 10 a.m., and will be held in Room 5A06A, Civil Service Commission Building, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, D.C.
The Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee is composed of a Chairman, representatives of five labor unions holding exclusive bargaining rights for Federal blue-collar employees, and representatives of five Federal agencies. Entitlement to membership on the Committee is provided for in Section 5347 of the Federal Prevailing Rate Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-392).
The Committee's primary responsibility is to review the prevailing rate system and from time to time advise the Civil Service Commission thereon.
At this scheduled meeting, the Committee will consider proposed plans for implementation Of the Prevailing Rate Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-392), which Law establishes pay systems for Federal prevailing rate employees.
This scheduled meeting will convene in open session with both labor and management representatives attending. During the meeting the labor and management members may caucus separately with the Chairman to devise strategy and formulate positions. Premature disclosure of the matters discussed in these caucuses would impair to an unacceptable degree the ability of the Committee to reach a consensus on the matters being considered and disrupt substantially the disposition of its busihess: Therefore, these caucuses will be closed to the public on the basis of a determination made by the Chairman 'of the Civil Service Commission under the provisions of Section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Ac4 (P.L. 92-463). These caucuses may, depending on the issues involved, constitute a substantial portion of the meeting.
Annual, the Counmittee publishes for the "Civil Service Commission, the President, and Congress a comprehensive report of pay issues discussed, concluded recommendations thereon, and related activities. These reports are also available to the public, up written request to the Committee Secretary.
Members of the public are invited to submit material in writing to the Chirman concerninii.gdFeeraI Wage System pay matters felt to be serving of the Committee's attention. Additional information concerning this meeting may be obtained by contacting the Secretary, Federal Prevailinz Rate Adivisory Committee, Room 1338, 1900 E Street, NW., Washington, D.C. 204.15 (202-632-9710).
JEROM H. Ros,
Chairman, Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory (imidtee.
NOVEMBER 28, 1977.









11


ANNUAL REPORT TO THE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

As required by Section 7(a) of Public Law 92-463, the Federal Advisory Committee Act, a summary report of the 1977 operations of the Committee was submitted to the designated Advisory Committee Management Officer of the Civil Service Commission for transmission to the General Services Administration.
The report covered such items as Committee establishment authority, membership, functions of the Committee, meeting dates, advisory recommendations to the Civil Service Commission, and the estimated total aggregate annual cost to fund, service, supply, and maintain, the Committee.
The details of these activities are covered elsewhere in this Report, with the exception of cost data. Available resources were reported to be $145,000 for Committee staff maintenance for 1977, utilizing 4 man-years for staff support to the Committee. None of the Committee members or alternates receive compensation or other emoluments for their service on the Committee.

APPENDIX I
PRINCIPAL ISSUES DISCUSSED AT COMMITTEE MEETINGS IN 1977

Meeting date Meeting No. Subject matter discussed

Jan. 6, 1977---------------- 149 FPRAC report to 0MB.
Government in the Sunshine Act.
Jan. 13, 1977--------------- 150 Environmental differential pay-high voltage.
n. 27, i1977 ---------------151 Special wage~schedules -National Park Srieoelpaes
Feb. 3, 1977--------------- 152 Do.
Feb. 10. 1977--------------- 153 Do.
Feb. 24, 1977--------------- 154 Government in the Sunshine Act.
Special wage schedules-National Park Service overlap areas. Mar. 10, 1977--------------- 155 Special wage rates-paternmakers in San Francisco, Calif.
Mar. 31, 1977--------------- 156 Proposed amendments to Committee rules.
Apr. 7, 1977--------------- 157 Special wage rates-patternmakers in San Francisco, Calif.
Apr. 28, 1977--------------- 158 Do.
May 5,19~7--------------- 159 Do.
July 21, 1977-_'--------------160 Environmental differential pay-work in confined spaces.
Special wage schedules-lock and dam employees. July 28, 1977--------------- 161 Environmental differential pay-work in confined spaces.
Special wage schedules-l -ock and (tam employees. Aug. 18, 1977--------------- 162 Do.
Environmental differential pay-work in confined spaces. Aug. 25, 1977--------------- 163 Government in the Sunshine Act.
Environmental differential pay-work in confined spaces. Sept. 1, 1977--------------- 164 Do.
Sept. 15, 1977-------------- 165 Government in the Sunshine Act.
Environmental differential pay-work in confined spaces. Sept. 22, 1977-------------- 166 Do.
Oct. 6, 1977---------------- 167 Do.
Oct. 20, 1977--------------- 168 Special wage rates-electronic mechanics in Albany, Ga.
Nov. 10, 1977--------------- 169 Government in the Sunshine Act.
Nov. 17, 1977--------------- 170 Do.
Special wage rates-electronic mechanics in Albany, Ga. Dec. 15, 1977--------------- 171 Congressional request for FPRAC's comments on proposed changes to the.
FWS.
Special wage rates-electronic mechanics in Albany, Ga.




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