Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Switzerland

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Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Switzerland
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q.
Physical Description:
12 p. : 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Strong, Lee A
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Edition:
Rev.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Switzerland   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"November 15, 1938."
General Note:
Signed Lee A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030432330
oclc - 786034049
System ID:
AA00023365:00001

Full Text


E2


UNITED STATES DEPARVEIET OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Pl"hnt Quarantine
Washington, D. C.


B. E. P. Q.


413, Revised.


November 15, 1938.


PLANT-QUARAiTINE iJPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF THE


REPUBLIC OF SWITZERLAND







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Washington, D. C.




B. E. P. Q. 413, Revised.. November 15, 1938.




PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF THE

REPUBLIC OF SWITZERLAND

This revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine
import restrictions of the Republic of Sv.tzerland, which was
rendered necessary by the promulgation of more recent regula-
tions, has been prepared for the information of nurserymen,
plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the
exportation of plants and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, Plant Quarantine
Inspector, in charge of Foreign Service Information, Division
of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the French and German texts
of the corresponding Swiss laws and regulations, and reviewed
by the Division of Agriculture, Federal Department of Public
Economy of the Republic of Switzerland.

The information contained in this circular is believed
to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but
it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a sub-
stitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpre-
ted as legally authoritative. ^


---~-- -'V

~







PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS


OF THE

REPUBLIC OF SWITZERLA\D. .'


BASIC LEGISLATION


Federal Law of December 22, 1893,; Article :12, as amended by those
of ,October 5, 1929, and. April 7, 1930, concerning the improvement
of agriculture by the Federation* .
*
"The Federal Council is authorized to order 4n efficacious
supervision of- bineyards and. to take necessary preventive'
measures against the spread of phylloxera and other parasites,
to prohibit the importation, traffic in,- and exportation of plants#
materials, and products that could serve as carriers of phyllox-
era or any other parasite menacing agriculture, and to: enact
penal provisions against violators, prescribing fines up to
1,000 fr..".1



SUMMARY ..

Importation Prohibited

*GRAPEVINE STOCKS, SHOOTS, STEiMS, LEAVES, REFUSE, UNPRESSED
VINTAGE GRAPES, USED PROPS AND SUPPORTS, COIvPOSTS, AND
VEGETABLE MOLDS: Importation from any source prohibited,
as a precaution against the introduction of Phylloxera
vitifoliae Fitch. (Art. 57, Regulations of July 10,
1894. Soe p. 4.)


Importation Restricted

*TABLE AND VINTAGE GRAPES, GRAPE MARC, FRUIT TREES, STOCKS, AND
SHRUBS proceeding from countries that do not adhere to
the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881:
May be imported only with the permission of the Division of
Agriculture of the Swiss Federal Department of Public
Economy. (Art. 58 of the Regulations of July 10, 1894.
See also the Order of June 5, 1937, concerning fruits
originating in the United States, p. 4.)

*Items indicated by an asterisk concern the products of
the United States.


-1-







-2-


STOCKS, SHRUBS, FRUIT TREES, AND ALL PLANTS EXCEPT GRAPEVINES
from countries that adhere to the International Phyl-
loxera Convention of Berne: May be imported through
designated ports, but must be accompanied by a shipper's
declaration of origin and a phylloxera certificate. (Ar-
ticles 61 and 62, Regulations of July 10, 1894, see p. 6.)
Those grown in countries that do not adhere to that Con-
vention, including the United States, may be imported
only under a special authorization from the Swiss Division
of Agriculture. (Art. 58, Regulations of July 10, 1894,
p. 4.)

*ROTIED VEGETABLES, SUCH AS EDIBLE BULBS, SALADS, ETC., from
countries that do not adhere to the International Phylloxera
Convention of Berne: May be imported into Switzerland
only when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate is-
sued by the authorities of the country of origin. In
the absence of that certificate, the products may be im-
ported only under a special authorization of the Swiss
Division of Agriculture. (Letter from the Swiss Division
of Agriculture, June 13, 1936.)

*TREES, SHR_-B3S, AID 0TRi LIVING PLANTS not in tubs or pots,
parts of plants, such as scions, cuttings, layers, etc.,
proceeding from countries named in article 3 of the 3rder
of June 5, 1937, including the United States (see p. 9):
Must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the phyto-
pathological service of the country of origin, pra-
pared in, or translated into French, German, or Italian,
affirming that the shipment is free from San Jose scale,
other parasites, and diseases. The certificate must also
affirm that the shipment has been subjected to an effec-
tive treatment with hydrocyanic acid gas -Kd that the
shipment has been sealed with an official seal. However,
it should be borne in mind that under the phylloxera restric-
tions such plant material from the United States may be
imported into Switzerland only under a special authoriza-
tion from the Swiss Division of Agriculture. (See preceding
item.) (Art. 1, 1 order of June 5, 1937, p. 7.)

*rRUITS, FRESH PO-MaCEOUS AD STONE: Fresh pomaceous and stone
fruits proceeding from the countries named in article 3
of the Order of June 5, 1937 (see p. 9), including the
United States, must be accompanied by an inspection cer-
tificate issued by the phytopathological service of the






:





-'3-


country of origin prepared in or translated into French,
..... German, orv Italian, affirming that, the shipment is: free
.from San Jqse sca3e,e other parasites, and diseases. (Art.
1i, rider of June 5, 1937, p. 7). The Swiss authorities
will accept State as well as Federal certificates. The
prescribed form ,of certificate included a declaration that
also the establishment here the fruit ms grown is free
from San,Jose.scale.. However, for the present, the
SSwiss Division of. Agriculture will accept the standard
export certificate, Form EQ-375, revised March 1, 1938.
That Division requires a certificate for each European car-
load of fruit (about 400 boxes of apples). Therefore a
.sufficient number of copies of the certificate must be
Furnished to meet the requirement.

POTATOES'FOR CONSUMPTION capable of introducing potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum) or the Colorado potato beetle
(Leotinotarsa decemlineata), in that they originate in
countries in which those parasites are known to occur
.(see the Order of May 18, 1938, p. 12), must be accompanied
by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin and cer-
tifying that the potatoes were grown in land here neither
the Colorado potato beetle nor wart have hitherto appeared
and that wart has not beendetermined within a radius of
*-5 km and Colorado beetle within a radius of 20 kn thereof.
(Art. 1, Order of April 14, 1938, p. 10.)
This is, in effect, a prohibition against the importation
of potatoes from the United. States, except possibly from
the State of California.

POTATOES FOR SEED PURPOSES: The Department of Public Economy is
authorized to make special provisions for the importation
of and traffic in seed potatoes. (Art. 13, Order of
April 14, 1938, see p. 12.)


Zmportation .Unrestricted

*WINE, DRIED GRAPES, GRAPE SEEDS, CUT FLOWERS,. VEGETABLES WITH.IUT
ROOTS, SEEDS, FRUITS OF ALL KINDS (except American and Aus-
tralian fruits): May be. imported into Switzerland from
any source, without restriction. (Art. 60, regulations of
July lO, 1894, p. 5.) This applies to the phylloxera
restrictions only.









PHYILLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

(Articles 57 to 63 of the Regulations of July 10, 1894, promul-
gated under the Federal Law of December 22, 1893, as amended)


Importation Prohibited

Article 57 The importation into Switzerland of stocks,
shoots, stems, leaves, refuse of grapevines, unpressed vintage
grapes, used props and supports, composts, and vegetable molds,
is prohibited.*

Arrangements that may be made in conformity with article
4 lj of the International Phylloxera Convention concerning the
importation of vintage grapes, grape marc, vegetable molds, and
used props and supports are reserved.

Furthermore, the Federal Division of Agriculture may,
exceptionally, grant authorizations derogating in part the pro-
hibition mentioned- in the first paragraph of the present article,
when it is shown that such action will result in no risk.


Products from Nonadhering Countries Restricted

Art. 58. Table and vintage grapes, grape marc, fruit
trees, stocks,and shrubs proceeding from countries that do not
adhere to the International Phylloxera Convention may be imported
only with the permission of the Division of Agriculture of the
Swiss Department of Public Economy. 2/



I/ Article 4 of the International Phylloxera Convention of
November 3, 1881, reads: "Contiguous States will arrange for the
aCimittance into the frontier zones of wine grapes, grape marc
composts, vegetable molds, and previously used props and supports
on condition that those articles do not proceed from a phylloxera-
infested district."I

2/ Since the Government of the United" States does not adhere to
the International Phylloxera Convention, article 58 is applicable
to the plants and products mentioned therein which originate in
that country.






-5-


Grapes Must Be Free fr6m Leaves and Stems

Art. 59. Table grapes may be admitted at the Swiss
Frontier only when they include no grapevine leaves or stems and
are packed in well-closed boxes, cases, or baskets, which
nevertheless are easy to inspect. The weight of a full case,
box, or basket shall not exceed 10 kg.

Customs offices are authorized, exceptionally, to allow an
additional weight of 2 kg. 3J

Vintage grapes may be imported only compressed in well-
closed casks (barrels) of at least 5 hectoliters capacity, or in
sealed tank cars; the latter must be so cleaned that they carry
no earth or fragments of grapevines. Exceptions to these pro-
visions may not be permitted unless the cantonal authority con-
sents and engages to have the compressing supervised.*

Grape marc may be imported only in well-closed cases
or casks.


Importation Unrestricted

Art. 60. Wine, dried grapes, grape seeds, cut flowers,
kitchen-garden products 4/ (vegetables, truck crops), seeds,
and fruits, may be imported into Switzerland without restriction.
(See the Order of June 5, 1937, concerning fruits from the
United States, p. 7 et seq.)



3/ A general authorization of August 16, 1925, permits the impor-
tation of table grapes packed in boxes, cases, or baskets exceeding
10 kg from countries adhering to the International Phylloxera
Convention, valid for all Swiss cantons except Valais, into which
table grapes may not be imported*

4/ Rooted vegetables, such as edible bulbs, salads, etc., from
countries that do not adhere to the International Phylloxera
Convention may be imported into Switzerland only when accompanied
by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the authorities of the
country of origin. In the absence of such a certificate the
products may be imported only under a special authorization of
the Swiss Division of Agriculture.







-6-|


Authorized Customs Ports of Entry

Art. 61. Stocks, shrubs, fruit trees, and all plants
except grapevines, proceeding from nurseries, gardens, or green-
houses, may be imported only through designated ports*


Shipper's -Declarati6n and Phylloxera Certificate Required

Art. 62. These products shall be securely packed, but
in such a way as to permit the necessary verifications, and they
must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and an attestation
of the authority of the locality of origin.

The attestation of the authority is unnecessary for shipments
of plants from establishments borne on the lists published in
conformity with article 9 (6) of the International Phylloxera
Convention, 5/

The shipper's declaration shall:

1. Certify that the contents of the shipment proceed
entirely from his establishment;
2. Indicate the exact receiving point and the address
of t`e consignee;
3. Affirrq that there are no grapevine stocks in the
ship: c-s;t;
4. State vihether or not the shipment includes plants with
balls of earth;
5. Bear the shipper's signature.

The attestation of the authority at the place of origin
shall be based on the declaration of an expert and certify:

(a) That the articles proceed from ground separated
from any grape stock by a space of at least 20
meters, or by some other obstacle to the roots
deemed sufficient by the competent authority;


5/ Art. 9. The contracting States, in order to facilitate community
of action, engage to transmit regularly, with authorization to make
use of them, publicatioa:- which they rc'ke and exchange:
(6) Lists, prepared and kept up to date, of horticultural or bontan-
ical establishments, schools, and gardens, which are subject to
regular inspection, at suitable times, and officially declared
to be in due form with the exigencies of the present convention*









(b) That the ground- itself does not contain any grape
stocks; ,.." :

(c) That no "torage of that plant is made there;

()) That if there had been phylloxerated grapevines in
that ground, thorough extirpation, repeated toxic
applications, and investigations during a period
of three years had been carried oni which insured
the complete destruction of that insect and of the
roots.
Art. 63. The Federal Department of Public Economy is.
authorized:

1. To permit exceptions to articles 59, 61, and 62, where
small plants dther than grapevines, flowering plants in pots,
table grapes without leaves or stems, arriving with a traveler
as hand baggage or registeredbaggage, are concerned;

2. To prohibit the importation of table grapes intended
for viticultural regions of Switzerland, but not to prohibit
their transit;
*
3. To take restrictive measures concerning the importation
of kitchen-garden products grown between rows of phylloxerated
grapevines*


RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF FRESH FRUITS, TEEES, SHRUBS,
LIVING PLANTS, AND PARTS OF PLANTS

(Order of June 5, 1937)


Phytosanitary Certificate Required

Article 1 (1). Every shipment of fresh "pip-fruits" (poma-
ceous fruits) or stone fruits 3./, trees, shrubs, and other living
plants, not in tubs or pots, parts of plants, such as scions,


l_/ The Swiss Division of Agriculture requires a certificate
for each European carload of fruit (about 400 boxes of apples),
therefore a sufficient number of copies of the certificate must
be furnished to provide for that contingency. (See also Foreign
Plant Quarantines Memorandum N1 53, Supplement No. *.)









cuttings, layers, etc., proceeding from the countries named in
article 3, must be accompanied by a certificate of the phytopatho-
logical service of the country of origin. 2/ That cartifie ate,
prepared or translated into German, French, or Italian, shall
affirm that the shipment is free from San Jose scale., other para-
sites, and diseases. 3/


Fumigation of Plants Required

(2) Certificates accompanying trees, shrubs, other living
plants, and parts ..of plants must, furthermore, affirm that the
shipment has been subjected, in the country of'origin, to an
effective disinfection with hydrocyanic acid gas aid provided with
a seal bearing an inscription, in order to preclude the substitu-
tion of otlrer plants that have not been fumigated. The inscrip-
.tion on the seal shall be reproduced in the accompanying certif--
icate6



Inspection on Arrival

Art. 2 (1). For all merchandise mentioned in article 1,
inspection at the frontier will establish whether or 'not the ship
ment is free from San Jose scale, other parasites, and diseases.
Entry may not be authorized unless the shipment is free from such
pests and diseases. Infested shipments will be refused entry.




g/ See also article 58 of the Regulations of July 10, 1894 (p. 4),
which is applicable to the United States; consequently, living
plants from the United States may be imported into Switzerland
only under a special authorization of the Swiss Division of Agri-
culture, notwithstanding the Order of June 5, 1937.

j3 Form EQ-375, revised March 1, 1938, should be used for Federal
certification, but State certificates are acceptable.




* I,


.. > .. 0"' "


Countries Affected


5 Art. 3 (1) The provisions of the present order are
applicable to shipments proceeding from the following countries:


v


aEurope:


. Africa:


Austria, Hungary, Portugal, Rumania, Russia
(U.S.$.R,), Spain, ana Yugoslavia.

Uhion of South- Africa.


America: All countries of that continent*,


Asia; China, Iraq, and. Japan.

.O*':ceania: The Australian Continent, Hawaii, and New Zealand.


(2) If circumstances require it, the Department of Public
Economy can modify the above list.


*Authorized Ports of Entry

Art.*"4. The customs offices at Basle, Buchs, Romanshorn,
St. Margrethen, Zurich, the free port of Albisrieden, Chiasso,
Domodossola, Brigue, Berne, Neuchatel, Lausanne-Entrepot, and
Geneva are open for the entry of shipments mentioned in article 1.


Arts. 5 and 6.

Art. 7. Relat


Prescribe inspection fees and procedure.


es to frontier traffic.


. Art. 8. (1) With the exception of paragraph 1 of
article 1, the present Order becomes effective July 1, 1937.
It abrogates the Order of the Federal Council of April 20, 198,
concerning the importation of fresh fruits of American and Aus-
tralian origin and that of October 25, 1932, concerning the
importation of fresh fruits, trees, shrubs, and other living
plants proceeding from Austria and Hungary.

-*: (2) Paragraph 1 of article 1, relating to cer-
tificates to accompany shipments, becomes effective September 1,
1937.









POTATO WART AND COLORADO POTATO BEETLE RESTRICTIONS

(Order of. April 14, 1938)

Certificate of Origin Required

Article 1. 'Shipments of potatoes capable of introducing
potato wart (Synchytrium endobi6ticum) or the Colorado potato
beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) in any stagEof.development,
insofar as they originate in the countries indiated in article
4, will be admitted to customs entry only vhen accompanied by
an official. certificate of origin*

Art. 2. In default of any other speciallydesignated
authority, the certificate shall be issued by. the municipal author-
ity of the place of origin and verified by an official phytopath-
ological institute and include the following data:

(a) Name and address of shipper.

(b) Place where grown; name and address of grower.

(c) Exact description of goods, especially as to the
variety, car numbers, packing, etc., in such a man-
ner that the identity of the shipment can be estab-
lished.

(d) Declaration that in the land where the potatoes were
grown neither potato wart nor Colorado potato beetle
have hitherto appeared, and that potato wart has not
been determined within a radius of 5 km or Colorado
potato beetle within a radius of 20 km thereof, lI




lJ This is a practical prohibition against the importation
into Switzerland of potatoes* grown in the United. States with the
possible exception of those grown in California, notwithstanding
the fact that the Resolution of May 18, 1938, mentions European
countries only.




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(e) Destination of the shipment and addressoof consignee.

() Place an.. date of issuance of the certificate, as
.well -as the seal and signature of the competent
station; the plant protection station that confirms
a certificate of origin must affix its seal and' sig-
.nature.

A shipment that is furnished by various growers in the
same municipality may be accompanied a by a collective certificate
of origin,.

Art. 3. To prevent the introduction of Colorado potato
beetle, the Department of Economy may furthermore prescribe the
production of a certificate of origin for shipments of the fol-
lowing products: Root crops with or without soil, tubers, bulbs,
rhizomes, and. other subterranean parts of plants, in accordance with
the provisions of articles 1 and 2.

;, o The Department of Economy is'authorized to extend the
same regulation continuously or for certain periqds of the year,
also to the importation of tomatoes, eggplants, fresh vegetables
of all kinds, and to packing materials*

..Art. 4. The Department of Economy will designate
the countries to which articles- 1 -to 3 are applicable.

It is also empowered to prohibit or to apply restrictive
regulations to the importation of potatoes and other products named
in article 3 from countries that are infested or infected by
Colorado potato beetle or potato wart.

It will absolutely prohibit all importations from countries
that have not taken steps toocombat efficaciously those two
potato enemies.

The Department of Economy can, inparticular, order the
following measures:
(a Make importation conditional upon special permits.
(b) Require the accompaniment of phytosanitary certificates
issued by official plant protection stations and the
sealing of the shipment by those stations.
(.) Promulgate provisions on packing and transport material
and on their disinfection.
(d) Restrict importation through designated customs of-
fices and prescribe technical inspection of the ship-
ment at the frontier.




"'" UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11111 ff1111 11 Il I 1111 J ll I li1 liii nI JI 1111111 111
3 1262 092417871
'" .' "D "
**
S, Art 5. Potato'an&p*bduce shipmentsn-that &o not
comply with the provisions of thi A -Order or with the ad"
Sministrative provisions of the Department b'f economy or of the
Division of Agriculture, 'r in which pbtatb wart or Colorado
potato beetle has been determined, are at'once to be reported
to the Division of Agriculture. The latter will decide
on further procedure and, finally, on the d. isposal.of the ship--
'Ainment. Precautions will be taken' to prevent any distributIon of
these posts.

Art'.6. The Division of Agriculture may permit excep-
t.. ions.to the provisions of articles i to 5 when risk'to Swiss
--I 'potato culture is precluded.
-.- .
: ..... . .
Traffic' in Seed Potatoes

Art. 13. The Departhment of Public Economy is authorized
,- to make special provisions for the importation of and traffic
S[ in seed potatoes and to .entrust that impordtatidn to purchasing
cooperatives* ..- "


Countries from which Certificates of Origin Are Required
(Resolution of May 18, 1938)

Article 1. The certificate of origin prescribed by
article 1 of the Federal Resolution of April 14, 1938, is
required:

:; (a) In connection with Colorado potato beetle, for
all shipments of potatoes from Belgium, France,
Luxemburg, Netherlands, and the GOrman Provinces
of Baden, Bavaria (Pfalz), Prussia (Rheinland),
and Saarland.

(b) With respect to potato wart, for all shipments of
potatoes 'from Belgium, Denmark, Germany, France,
;Great Britain and Ireland, Netherlands, Poland,
Sweden, and Czechoslovakia.

The certifications required concerning potato wart and Co-
lorado potato beetle may be preparedeither separately or together.