Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the colony of Grenada, B.W.I

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Material Information

Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the colony of Grenada, B.W.I
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q.
Physical Description:
3 p. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Strong, Lee A
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Grenada   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"June 1, 1936."
General Note:
"Lee A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine"--Prelim. p.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030432119
oclc - 786001822
System ID:
AA00023350:00001

Full Text







UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Washington, D. C.


B. E. P. Q.- 397


June 1, 1936.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF THE

COLONY OF GRENADA, B. W. I.








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Washington, D. C.


B. E. P. q.- 397


June 1, 1936.


PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRI CTIONS

OF THE

COLONY OF GRENADA, B. W. I.


This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of
the Colony of Grenada, B. W. I., has been prepared for the informa-
tion of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested
in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, Plant Quarantine Inspector,
in Charge of Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from the Plant Protection Ordinance of June 1, 1906,
and the proclamations and regulations promulgated thereunder, and
reviewed by the Agricultural Authority of the Colony.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be
correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not
intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the
original texts.





LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomolopny and Plant Quarantine.







PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS


OF THE

COLONY OF GRENADA, B. 1. I.



BASIC LEGISLATION

The Plant Quarantine Ordinance of June 1, 1906. (No. 7 of 1906.)
The Noxious Weeds Ordinance of March 23, 1912. (No. 2 of 1912.)



SUMMARY*


Importation Prohibited
COCONUT PLANTS (Cocos nucifera L.): Importation into the Colony
prohibited from any place out of the Colony, to prevent the
introduction of the red ring disease (Aphelenchus cocophilus
Cobb). (Proclamation of April 4,, 1919, p. 4.)

SUGARCANES AND SUGARCANE PLANTS (Saccharum officinarum L.): Importa-
tion from Barbados, directly or indirectly, prohibited (except
with the special sanction of the Governor in Council), to prevent
the introduction of the mosaic or yellow mottling disease.
(Proc. of Jan. 5, 1921.)

SUGARCANES AND SUGARCAi1E PLANTS (Saccharum officinarum L.) from Trinidad,
B. 1. I.: Importation prohibited of all varieties except the
Uba sugarcane plant when imported by the Agricultural Department
of Grenada, to prevent the introduction of the mosaic or yellow
mottling disease. (Proc. of May 30, 1924.)

* BANANA PLANTS (suckers), Musa spp., from all places except the Leeward
Islands (Anguilla, Antigua, Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis,
Redonda, St. Kitts, and the Virgin Isles, B.7.I.), St. Vincent,
and Barbados: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduc-
tion of the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E.F.Sm.).
(Proc. of Dec. 14, 1922, p. 4.)

CACAO PLANTS (Theobroma cacao L.), parts thereof, and cacao beans from
Trinidad, B.,..: Importation, directly or indi "ctly, prohibited
to prevent the introduction of the Surinam witchesbroom disease
(Marasmius perniciosus Stahel.) (Proc. of Oct. 24, 1928.)

Items indicated by an asterisk concern the United States. Except as
thus indicated, there are no restrictions upon the entry into Grenada of
plants and plant products of the United States and no phytosanitary
inspection certificate is prescribed.





,6 -.


-2-


*ALL SUCCULENT FRUITS (including apple, apricot, cherry, citrus,
grape, guava, mango, nectarine, peach, pear, and plum):
Importation prohibitedfrom Africa, America (Central and
South), Australia, Azores, Bahamas, Bermuda, Cape Verde,
France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madeira, Malta, Palestine,
Spain, and Turkey, to prevent the introduction of the
Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis caoitata Wied.).
The importation of such fruits from countries other
than those above named is prohibited unless each shipment
is accompanied by a certificate of origin affirming theft the
fruit was not grown in any area infested by the Mediterranean
fruit fly and that it did not pass through any area so
infested. (Proc. of Sept. 10, 1930, as amended by the Proc.
of Feb. 8, 1932.)


Importation Restricted

* COCONUTS IN THE HUSK (Cocos nucifera L.) imported into Grenada are
subject to immediate treatment with efficient fungicides and
to planting under quarantine conditions; then to be kept
under observation by the Superintendent of Agriculture. Any
resulting plants suspected of disease may be destroyed. (Proc.
of Apl. 14, 1919, p. 4.)

COTTONSEED AND SEED COTTON: Importation from St. Vincent, B. IV. I.,
prohibited, except under license given by the Governor or
the Superintendent of Agriculture and subject to the provisions
and conditions of such license. (Proc. of Feb. 4, 1924.)

* LIME PLANTS (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), and parts thereof, includ-
ing the fruits: Importation prohibited from all countries and
places, except with the special sanction of the Governor in
Council, to prevent the introduction of withertip disease
(Gloeosporium limetticolum Clausen). (Proc. of July 1, 1925,
p. 4.)


Plant Protection Ordinance
(Jule 1, 1906)

As defined by this ordinance "Plants" includes growing plants,
cuttings, buds, and grafts, bulbs, roots, seeds, and berries, also
fruits, and vegetables; "port of entry" means the port of St. George's
and any other port or place in the Colony designated by the Governor
for the importation of plants.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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The ordinance empowers the Governor in Council, by proclamation,
to prohibit or to restrict the importation of plants as above defined,
either generally or with respect to any country or place. He is also
authorized to seize prohibited "plantz~t offered.,for entry into thel
Colony; to apply such treatment to imported 'plants" as may be deemed
necessary at the..expense of the importer; andto make rules and
regulations fo carrying out the provisions and intentions of the
Ordinance.


Noxious Weeds Ordinance
(Mar. 23, 1912)

-.This Ordinance empowers the Governor, with the consent of the
Legislative Council,-to make, modify, or revoke regulations to prevent
the introduction inftp the Colony, or the sale of any plant, seed, or
grain that is likely to propagate or spread the growth of noxious
weeds.