A device for spraying bean seed in the row while planting

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
A device for spraying bean seed in the row while planting
Physical Description:
3 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Elmore, J. C ( John Clifford ), b.1896
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Spraying equipment   ( lcsh )
Lima bean -- Seeds -- Predators of -- Control   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Caption title.
General Note:
"ET-279."
General Note:
"January 1950."
Statement of Responsibility:
by John C. Elmore.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030362643
oclc - 783517309
System ID:
AA00023186:00001

Full Text
L E" N~R
LIE.. .RY
NTE PLANT BOARD
January 1950 ET-279

United States Department of Agriculture
Agricultural Research Administration
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine



A DEVICE FOR SPRAYING BEAN SEED
IN THE ROW WHILE PLANTING

By John C. Elmore1!
Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations


In connection with investigations on the control of the seed-corn
maggot (Hylemya cilicrura Rond.) in southern California, an attachmraent
to a bean planter has been developed for spraying lima bean seed and
the adjacent soil with an insecticide as a part of the seed-planting
operation. With this attachment the spray is applied directly behind the
boot of the planter while it is in motion. The spray covers the seed
immediately after it falls, before it is covered with soil. The attach-
ment was first tried with a hand planter during the summer of 1948 and
with a commercial planter in 1949. This paper describes the construc-
tion and operation of the attachment.

Construction

The planter attachment (fig. 1) is constructed so that it slides over
the heel of the boot of a lima bean planter (A). A commercial nozzle (B)
is screwed onto a 3-inch section of 1/4-inch iron pipethat has been bent.
This pipe is welded to a 3-inch section of 1 1/2-inch iron pipe split
lengthwise. A metal flange, 2 by 3 inches, is welded to each side of the
split section of pipe. This section of pipe (C) holds the nozzle rigid, and
the adjustable clamp (C) holds the attachment in place and allows it to
be raised or lowered as desired. The flanges act as baffles and prevent
the soil from falling back into place until after the nozzle has passed (D).
A rubber hose (C) leads away from the planter attachment to the sprayer.
Figure 1, D, shows the attachment in place and ready for use. The
nozzle shown delivers 0.3 gallon of spray per minute at a 65-degree
angle in a flat pattern, at a pressure of 40 pounds per square inch. It
is provided with interchangeable filters of 50- or 100-mesh screen,


l1 This work was done at Alhambra, Calif., under the direction of
Roy E. Campbell and with the assistance of bean farmers in Los Angeles
and Orange Counties.




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and a series of tips with orifices that deliver from 0.1 to 0.8 gallon per
minute at 40 pounds' pressure and at spray angles ranging from 15 to
80 degrees. Of the several nozzle tips that have been tested, the one
delivering 0.3 gallon per minute is the most satisfactory.

Operation

For experimental use four of the planter boots of an eight-row lima
bean planter were fitted with these attachmetnts. Each nozzle was adjusted
so that the tip was about 2 1/2 inches higher than the tip of the boot point
and the spray struck about 1 inch to the rear of where the seed fell.
With four nozzles, two delivering 0.15 and two delivering 0.3 gallon per
minute, 8 and 16 gallons per acre were applied in 30-inch rows by
properly adjusting the planter speed and spray pressure.
Insecticides in the form of wettable powders were used, at con-
ce-ntrqtfons of 1 to 6 pounds of the powder per 100 gallons of water. At
these conc,'.ntrations it was possible to apply comparatively small
quantities of insecticides ranging from a fraction of 1 ounce up to
7 1/2 ounrices per acre in 30-inch rows. Of the many insecticides tested
chlordaint and alJrin were the most promising against the seed-corn
maggot.
With this method ,,f _-praying lima bean seed at the time it is planted,
the conk entration of insecticide in contact with the seed is much lower
and subject to more accurate control than with methods of coating the
:c,.d 1 -o. planting Furticrmore, smaller quantities of insecticide
; *. af .J'ir',d for broadcast soil treatment are applied to a narrow
trip of soil.
:.y of spiravy i, m. t4.at will operate at low pressure and capacity
is sui .le fr this type uf application, Tict- writer used a small rotary
:-.; :,..0" .i. an easily .djus.I..ble pressure-relief valve and a
10- : ,' c. con' .cn .', ing th(. material t. be tesT d.





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I1/2 r:pe


_-a__ /4" Pipe


Nozzle



_ F F Cl ge


"Boot


Attachment


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A (x 7/16)


B (x 5/6)


Hose-


(spiif)


r 4- Clamp




F lag..


Flanges


C (x 7/16)


D (x 5/9)


Figure 1.--Different views of bean-planter boot attachment for applying liquid
insecticides.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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