A special cage for confining insects on tall plants or portions of a plant

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Material Information

Title:
A special cage for confining insects on tall plants or portions of a plant
Physical Description:
Book
Language:
English
Creator:
Hills, Orin A., 1903-
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Washington, D.C)
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 30341022
oclc - 781177754
System ID:
AA00023080:00001

Full Text


;TAIL
ET-138 January 1939

United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine


A SPECIAL CAGE FOR CONFINING INSECTS ON TALL PLANTS
OR PORTIONS OF A PLANT

By Orin A. Hills, Division of Truck Crop
and Garden Insect Investigations



A special type of cage was used in the Salt River Valley of
Arizona in 1938 for confining insects on sugar-beet seed stalks.
A cage of special design was needed, inasmuch as the stalks of these
plants reach a height of from 5 to 7 feet and have a spread of
from 2 to 3 feet. The cage designed for enclosing these plants
was very satisfactory and cost approximately 50 cents.

Construction of cae.--The frame of the cage consists of two
No. 9 gauge wire hoops approximately 30 inches in diameter, suspend-
ed 4 feet apart between two 1 by 2 inch stakes 8 feet long (figure
1). The hoops were made by twisting the ends of the wire around
each other to form a lineman's splice. A cloth tube of sufficient
diameter to go around the hoops and long enough to tie at each end
was sewed and placed around the hoops before they were nailed in
position on the stakes. The hoops were then tacked to the inside
of the stakes by means of small fencing staples, and the cloth was
gathered at each end and tied as shown in figure 1. To strengthen
the cage further and to prevent the staples from being pulled out by
separation of the stakes, a piece of lath was tacked across the
stakes at the top and a similar piece approximately 1 foot below the
lower hoop. These laths were nailed to the stakes with a single
nail in each place so that the cage could be folded flat as shown in
figure 2.

Use of cage.--The cages were taken into the field folded
flat, and unfolded as they were used. The beet stalk to be caged
was selected, and the cage, with the lower end open, was placed over
the stalk. The side stakes were then driven into the soil, and the
bottom of the cloth tube was gathered in about the seed stalk and
tied. Figure 3 shows the cage in place in the field. To introduce
the insects into the cage the top gathering was loosened. Intro-
duction can be greatly facilitated by replacing the string at the
top with a rubber band and then replacing the string after the in-
sects have been introduced. This prevents the whole top from opening
and falling inside of the cage and still allows sufficient expan-
sion for the insertion of a small tube or vial. A sleeve sewed into
the side of the cage, and tied up when not in use, might be found
more convenient for introducing or removing insects, although this
has not been used by the author.









2 -


Cages of this type were used to confine species of Lgu,
pentatomids, and the false chinch bug on sugar-beet seed stalks.
For the larger insects a cheap grade of curtain scrim was found
satisfactory, while for the false chinch bug a high-grade cheese-
cloth was used. Smaller cages of the same type, approximately 11
inches in diameter, 20 inches tall, and covered with high-grade
cheesecloth, are being used this winter for confining beet leaf-
hoppers on creosote bush.









Lath


A Snooth Wire


Cloth Tube
















No.7 Sm oo th Wire


Lath


IX2 n. Pine


I 2.


Figure l.--Diagram of the special cage for con-
fining insects on tall plants.






















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