Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288977
oclc - 14207732
lccn - sn 86033973
Classification:
ddc - 632.9 U54
System ID:
AA00023076:00008

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Full Text






























































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State of Florida

STAI Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY









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LIdRARY
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S.R. A. B. E. P. Q. Issued November 1940

United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine




SERVICE AND

REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

1939




These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per.
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations




WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
























UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1940













LA. -o i

Et. OF P LAN
IDUSTRO



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE
LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.
F. H. SPENCER, Business MIanager.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cer:eal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.
C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfiy Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).
II



















TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 138 (JANUARY-MARCH 1939)

Quarantine and other official announcements ---------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48).. 2
Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations revised----------------------- 2
Revision of regulations ------------------------------------------- .--------------------- 2
Notice to general public through newspapers ...------------------------------------- 16
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables. and soil for the Japanese beetle pursuant to notice of quarantine No. 4S
(B. P. Q. 359, supplement No. 4) ---------.--- ... ------------------. ----- --. 16
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit fly Quarantine (No. 64) -------------------------------- 17
Texas Valencia orange harvest extnded to June 15, 1939 ---.. -------------------------. 17
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrict ions of the Mexican fruitfly ouarantine
by extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April30 to June 15 1939 (B. E.
P. Q. 487)- ------ --------- --.------- -- -- --- -------------- -- .. ---- 17
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plnt, and seed quarantine (No. 37) -------------------
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. 4978)---------------.. -------------------------
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarant ine (No. 52) ------------------------------...
Pink bollworm ouarantine and regulations revised ---.------.-----..-----.... -----
Revision of quarantine and regulations ------------ ---------------------------------------. IS
Notice to general public through newspapers------------------.. ----------------------- 25
Administrative instructions--modifying the pink bollworni quarantine reahations by sus-
pending treatment r-ouirements of designated articles from the counties (of Brooks. Jim
W'ells. Kenedy, Kleberg, and Nueces, Tex. (B. E. P. Q. 492)- --- 2.
Administrative instructions-mo.lifying the pink bollworm quarantine regulations by lifting
treatment requirements as to (esignated articles from certain lightly infesctd area in New
Mexico and Texas (B. E. P. Q. 493)-- ---------. 25
Administrative instructions-modifyin' restrict ions of the pink bollworm quarantine regu-
lations by liftin" certain requirements s to samnplv? of lint cotton (B. E. P. Q. 494) ...-- 26
Announcements relating to white-fringed beet Ie quarantine (No. 72) -----------..-------------- 26
Instructions to postmasters- ..-- .------ -------------------- ---- ----..------------ 2
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
July 1, 1939, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the regulated areas
(B. E. P. Q. 485) ------- ------------- --- --- ------- ----- --- .-. 27
Administrative instructions--modifying the restrictions of the white-frined beetle quaran-
tine by authorizing treatment of plants in pots or in soil balls not exceeding 3 inches in
diameter (B. E. P. Q. 486)- .. -...--- -- ..... .- ...-------------.. .. 27
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quaran-
tine by removine under specified conditions the certification requirements for interstate
movement for all restricted articles originating in foreign countries (B. E. P. Q. 4) ..... 29
Administrative instructions-modifying white-frinmed beetle quarantine r'eulations au-
thorizing treatment of potting soil (B. E. P. Q. 49) ...--- 29
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products- .._- ------ ------------- ---.--... 30
Amendment of Oregon plant quarantine order No. 18 --------------- ------------------30
Amendment of Oregon plant quarantine order No. 23 --..--- ..........-
M iscellaneous item s --------. -- -- ---.-. .-- ---..---. -
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q. 355 revised,
supplement No. 2) ... ......... . 31
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, 2d revi-
sion ) .- -. -- . .. .. .... .. . ...... ... .... .-. . .
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Rumania (B. E. P. Q. 422. supplement
N o 3)... ... .. .. ..... .
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colon. of Cey!on (B. E. P. Q. 428, revised) 3.5
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Grece. (B. E. P. Q. 43:. supplement No. 2) 3
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yucroslavia (B. E. P. Q. -17, su)pploeent
N o 4) ....... .. .. .. ... . .. 3
Plant-nuarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Ni ria (B. E. P. Q. 454,
supplement No. 1) 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. t;9. suppln ent No. 2). 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
ment No. 2) ,
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q 178. supplement No. .... 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Bolivia (8. F. Q 4) .... 1
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Kingdom of Albania (B E. . 49 .... 12
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Chosen (Korea) (1. E. P. Q. 491) .......... .. 4
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quaratine Act ........... .
List of current quarantine and other restrict ive orders and miscellaneous regulations .------..-.. 4
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -... ... ........ --- ...

ITI







IV CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 139 (APRIL-JUNE 1939)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ---- ----------------------------. 56
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ----------------------- 56
Administrative instructions-defining the term "commercially packed" as applied to ship-
ments of apples or peaches under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (B. E. P. Q.
498) (supersedes B. P. Q. 352) ---------_------------- -------------_ 56
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vege-
tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499) -- --------- ---------- 56
Japanese beetle auarantine regulations amended ---------------- 68
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1) -------------- 68
Amendment No. 1 to rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48 ------_--------_---------------------------------------------_ 69
Notice to general public through newspapers --------------- -----------. 77
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)--------- ------------------ 77
Texas grapefruit harvest extended through May 15; grapefruit must be sterilized after April 11- 77
Administrative instructions relati ng to the Mexican fruitfly quarantine requiring sterilization
of all grapefruit harvested on and after April 12, 1939, and extending the harvesting season
on grapefruit to the close of May 15, 1939 (B. E. P. Q. 495) -------------------- 77
Announcements relating to white-frineed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ------------- 78
Suggestions for construction of plunging and growing beds and their maintenance under
beetle-free conditions in accordance with regulations of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 496) 78
(B. E. P. Q. 496) --------------- ------------------------------------------------- 78
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
July 1, 1939, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the regulated areas
(B. E. P. Q. 485, revised) ------------------------------------------------- 79
Instructions to postmasters ---- ---------------------------------- 79
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products -------- .------------------------------ 80
Arizona--- .....----------------------------------------------- 81
Arkansas------------------------------------------- 81
California ---------------------------------------------------- 81
District of Columbia ---------------------------------------- 82
Florida -----------..-----------------------------.--- --------------- 82
Hawaii ------.. ---------------------------------------------------- ------------ 82
Idaho -------------------------------------------- 82
Louisiana ------ -------- ----------------_ --------------. -----_-------------- 83
Mississippi ------------------------------------------------------------------- 83
Montana ----_ ------- --------------- ------------------------. 83
Oklahoma --- ---- ---- ------------------------------------------------------------ 83
Oregon 8------------- ------ ------------------------------------------------ -- -------- 83
Puerto Rico--------------------------- -------- 84
Utah ----------- ----------------------------- 84
Washington-------------------------------------------------84
Miscellaneous items ---------------------- 85------ -- ------------ -------- 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406, revised, sup-
nlement No. 2) ----------- --- ----------- ------------ ----------- 85
Plant-ouarantine import restrictions, Eire (Irish Free State) (B. E. P. Q. 408, supplement
No. 1) ....------------ ------------------------------------------------ 85
Plant-nuarantine import restrictions, Republic of Finland (B. E. P. Q. 420, supplement
No.2)---------------------------------------------------- 85
Plant-ouarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Rumania (B. E. P. Q. 422, supplement
No. 4) ----------------------------------------------------- 86
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony of St. Lucia, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.
434, revised, supolement No. 1) ---------------------------------------------- 87
Plant-auarantine import restrictions (Persia) Iran (B.-E. P. Q. 449. suoplement No. 3)----- 87
Plant-ouarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, supplement
No.1)----------------------- -------- ---------------------- 87
Plant-onerantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
ment No. 3) 3 --8----------------------------------------- ------------------ 88
Plant-ouarantine import restrictions, Venezuela (B. E. P. 0. 497) ---------------------- 89
Plant-ouarantine import restrictions, Mandated Australian Territory of New Guinea
(B. E. P. 0. 500) ----------------------------------------------- 89
Penalties imnosed for violations of the Plant Ouarantine Act ---------- --------------------- 92
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine- ---------------------------- 95

CONTENTS OF NO. 140 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1939)
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------ ---------------------------- 98
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No.. 71)----- -------------------- 98
Dutch elm disease quarantine extended -------------------------------------------------- 98
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations --------------------------------- 98
Amendment No. 4 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 71.- 98
Notice to general public through newspapers--------- -- -------------------- 99
Instructions to postmasters -------- ------------------------------------- 100
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable ouarantine (No. 56) .---------------------- 100
Administrative instructions: conditions governing the entry of acorns and chestnuts (B. E.
P. Q. 501. sunersedes B. P. Q. 344) ----------------- 100
Announcements relatine to Jananese beetle quarantine (No. 48) --------------------------101
Instructions to postmasters--------- ----------------------------------------- 01
.Tapanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shinments_ -----------------101
Termination d-;te on fruit and veretable restrictions under Japanese beetle quarantine
(OQarantine No. 48) advanced to September 20 for the year 1939 1--------------------- 02
Instructions to postmasters ._-..-..---.... ---..--..... -------------- 102
Announcements relating to nink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)-------------- --------- 102
Instructions to postmasters ----------------- ------------------------------ 102
Pink hollworm quarantine regulations amended ---------------------------------- 103
Modifications of pink bollworm quarantine regulations ---- ---------------------103







CONTENTS V

Quarantine and other official announcements-Continued.
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)-Continued. Page
Amendment No. 1 to the revised regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52._ 103
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------- 105
Instructions to postmasters------ ------------- -------------------------- 105
The pink bollworm quarantine regulations further extended -.--------..---...-.. --------.. 106
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations ----...-----.-------.--.------------. 106
Amendment No. 2 to the revised regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52_ 106
Notice to general public through newspapers --_ .-----------------------.--------..--- 108
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------- 108
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)..--.--.. ...------..--.------109
Administrative instructions-Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1940, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. E. P. Q. 485, second revision)-..----..---------.-----.------.-------- 109
Instructions to postmasters ...---------------------------------------..---.----------- 110
Administrative instructions-Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1940, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. E. P. Q. 485, third revision) ..------ -- .--..--.. -----...-------... 110
Instructions to postmasters -----....------------- .------- .. ------------------- 111
Announcements relating to Woodgate rust quarantine (No. 65) ...------ .------.--...---------. 111
Woodgate rust quarantine revoked _.-- ---------------------.------------------------ 111
Notice of lifting of Woodgate rust quarantine ..- ...------------. .. ----------------.-------. 111
Instructions to postmasters ... ------- ----------------------------------------------- 112
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ..------------------------------------ -..---. 112
Additional plant inspection place in California __.--------- -------------------------- 112
Arizona State plant quarantines .--.----..----------..--- -------------..-------.... -------- 112
Miscellaneous items ------------------------------------------------------------ 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, supplement No. 6) -- 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q. 355, revised,
supplement No. 3) _---------- --- -------------- -------------------------. 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone (B. E.
P. Q. 390, revised) --------------------------- .......----- ----------------------. 116
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement No. 1). 118
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
N o. 5)_ ....... ........ ....118
No. 5) ----------------------------------- ----------- -------------------- 118
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement
No. 2) ------------- ----------- ----------- 119
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Bermuda (B. E. P. Q. 455, revised)_- 121
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 3)_ 122
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, sup-
ment No. 4) ---------------------------. ---- ------------------- -123
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement
No. 1)--------------------------- ----------------------- 123
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479,
supplement No. 1) -- ----------------------- --------.-----------------------. 123
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479,
supplement No. 2) .... .... .... . ...... 124
supplement No. 2).-------------------------- ------------------------------124
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. E. P. Q. 502) --..---------. 124
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act .....---------------------..------- 125
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine --...--. ..------------------....... 129

CONTENTS OF NO. 141 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1939)
Quarantine and other official announcements ........------. -------------------------.. -----.... ... 131
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) ---.----------.......-....- 131
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50011) .-- _----- -..----. --. -- ----........ 131
Administrative instructions; conditions governing the entry of cipollini from Morocco (B. E.
P. Q. 504) -------- -...... -. .- ------- -- ----.----.--...--..---------- ------. 132
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) ------------. 132
List ofarticlesexempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 386, fifth revision) .....------.-----.. --- .----.----...----.. 132
Instructions to postmasters -----.. -----......--------... .------. ----.... 133
Announcement relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)- ...---------- ......-------- .. 133
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vege-
tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1)...--------..- 133
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)---...-- .........-----------.... 134
Mexican fruitfly quarantine regulations extended------.-------....------------------.. 134
Revision of regulations- -------. ------- -... .---.. ........-- 134
Notice to general public through newspapers .....-----.....-- ---- --.. ,... ....----- 139
Instructions to postmasters --.....-- -. .---------- -----.-- 139
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) .. ..--------....... 139
Conference on pink bollworm of cotton called for December 15, 1939 ... . . .. 139
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the pink bollworm in cotton in the United States. 140
Cotton quarantine again extended in Texas.--.-----.----...- -----------...----. 140
Modification of pink hollworm quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3)-...--.-----...... 140
Notice to general public through newspapers -------- ------ ..------.. ...... ......------ 143
Instructions to postmasters .. ...... ..-............. ........ 143
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ..-...-. 143
Administrative instructions: modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
by authorizing treatment by methyl bromide solution of balled nursery stock not larger than
6 inches in thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503) --....---...... --.-.. ... ---...-.. 143
Revocation of certain Oregon plant quarantines-. . ........ .............. ..... 144
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----...... ............. .... 144
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ................ ............ -147


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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013












http://archive.org/details/servior39u nit








S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q.No. 138 Issued June 1939





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1939


CONTENTS
Page
,Quarantine and other official announcements---------...............------------------------------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48) --..---------------------------- 2
Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations revised....---------.... -.. ---...--..--.--.--...---.. 2
Revision of regulations ........------.................---------------------------------....- 2
Notice to general public through newspapers---------------------------------.. 16
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle pursuant to notice of quarantine No. 48
(B. P. Q. 359, supplement No. 4)--------..................---------------------- 16
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64).------.... ------------.--. -- 17
Texas Valencia orange harvest extended to June 15, 1939 .----..---------. -------- -------- 17
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine
by extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to June 15, 1939 (B. E.
P. Q. 487)--.............--......... ......................-..... ...................... 17
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)--.....----------. 18
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49788)--------- ..... -------.......--------.----- 18
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)..-..--..-....------------------ 18
Pink bollworm quarantine and regulations revised-------- .....----------------------------- 18
Revision of quarantine and regulations...---- ------...... --------------------------------- 18
Notice to general public through newspapers --- ------------.. ---..---------------------- 25
Administrative instructions-modifying the pink bollworm quarantine regulations by sus-
pending treatment requirements of designated articles from the counties of Brooks, Jim
Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, and Nueces, Tex. (B. E. P. Q. 492).........------------------- 25
Administrative instructions-modifying the pink bollworm quarantine regulations by lifting
treatment requirements as to designated articles from certain lightly infested area in New
Mexico and Texas (B. E. P. Q. 493) ..... ..... ...... .._------ ---------------------_. 25
Administrative instructions-modifying restrictions of the pink bollworm quarantine regu-
lations by lifting certain requirements as to samples of lint cotton (B. E. P. Q. 494)---.--- 26
.Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)......--- .....-----------.. 26
Instructions to postmasters......------------------- .. --------------------------.. 26
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
July 1, 1939, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the regulated areas
(B. E. P. Q. 485) ................ __ ................. ------------------------------.. 27
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quaran-
tine by authorizing treatment of plants in pots or in soil balls not exceeding 3 inches in
diameter (B. E. P. Q. 486) __. ....-----------------------_ _-------------- -----------. 27
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quaran-
tine by removing under specified conditions the certification requirements for interstate
movement for all restricted articles originating in foreign countries (B. E. P. Q. 488) ---.-- 29
Administrative instructions-modifying white-fringed beetle quarantine regulations au-
thorizing treatment of potting soil (B. E. P. Q. 489) .--..----..-----.------------... ------ 29
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ...-----..------...-. --------------..---------- 30
Amendment of Oregon plant quarantine order No. 18....-------------..------------.. --.... 30
Amendment of Oregon plant quarantine order No. 23--..-...--.-------.--..---.---.--..... 31
Miscellaneous items.........-------- .. ..... ----............... ....------------------------ 31
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q. 355 revised,
supplement No. 2)..----------..............---- .. .---------------------------------- 31
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, 2d revi-
sion)..---.........-----..---.----------.......... ------- ..--.-----------.------------.. 31
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Rumania (B. E. P. Q. 422, supplement
No. 3)....--.---------.. .-- -----. -- ------------------...--------_-......... 34
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, revised)_.. 35
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Greece (B. E. P. Q. 438, supplement No. 2)-----.-- 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
No. 4).......---................ ....--- -.----.---.-------.------------------------ 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria (B. E. P. Q. 454,
supplement No. 1)-........------------- ---------....------------------...------------- 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 2) -_ 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
ment No. 2)-------------._______ _ --_..............._ ----------------- -.... 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, supplement No. 1)-..------. 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Bolivia (B. E. P. Q. 484) -----..----... -41
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Albania (B. E. P. Q. 490) ------.. .----. 42
Plant-quarantine imports restrictions, Chosen (Korea) (B. E. P. Q. 491) -...-------...... 43
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --..---....--------------------- 45
List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ---..---... 46
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.................................. --54
144804-39-1 1







2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED

[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 21, 1939.
A revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, effective February
20, was announced by the Secretary of Agriculture today. Nominal exten-
sions, he stated, are made in the regulated areas in Maryland, New York,
Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, together with a more extensive
increase in the Ohio area. Counties newly added in part or in entirety include
Jefferson and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Harrison, Licking, Richland, Trum-
bull, and Tuscarawas Counties, Ohio; Mercer County, Pa.; and Spotsylvania
and Westmoreland Counties, Va. Discovery of substantial infestations of the
Japanese beetle in these sections explains their addition to the regulated area.
Shippers of produce will also find that the special area from which the move-
ment of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated
is extended to include parts of Berks, Dauphin, Lehigh, and Northampton
Counties. Pa., and parts of Baltimore and Harford Counties, Md., as well as
additional area in Dorchester and Caroline Counties, Md. Included among
those outlying areas to which fruits and vegetables from the main regulated
area may be moved only when accompanied by certificates, are Hornell, Mount
Morris, and Watertown, N. Y., the regulated parts of Je4erson, Livingston,
and Steuben Counties, N. Y., Newark and Mansfield, Ohio, and other regulated
parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio. Certificates are not required,
however, for the movement of such produce from these outlying points in
New York and Ohio. Fruit shippers have been further relieved by the elimi-
nation of restrictions on the movement of commercially packed peaches in any
quantity except by refrigerator car or motortruck from the special area listed
in regulation 5. Bananas in single bunches packed in commercial containers
are also newly exempt from the restrictions.
Several isolated sections in which Japanese beetles were trapped in the sum-
mer of 1938 are not included in the regulated areas. Action with respect to
these infestations has been deferred to give the States concerned an oppor-
tunity to undertake chemical treatment of the infestations in the spring of
1939.


JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE NO. 48

REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Nominal extensions of regulated areas in Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania,
Virginia, and West Virginia, together with a more extensive increase in the
Ohio regulated area, are made in the following revision of the Japanese beetle
quarantine regulations. Counties newly added in part or in entirety include
Jefferson and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Harrison, Licking, Richland, Trum-
bull, and Tuscarawas Counties, Ohio; Mercer County, Pa.; and Spotsylvania
and Westmoreland Counties, Va. Discovery of substantial infestation of the
Japanese beetle in these sections warranted their addition to the regulated
area. Enlargements of several partially regulated counties were made in Mary-
land, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia.
Counties newly added in part to the special area from which the movement
of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated (regu-
lation 5) include Berks, Dauphin, Lehigh, and Northampton Counties, Pa., and
Baltimore and Harford Counties, Md.
Outlying points placed under regulation include Hornell, Mount Morris, and
Watertown, N. Y., other regulated parts of Jefferson, Livingston, and Steuben
Counties, N. Y., Newark and Mansfield, Ohio, and the regulated parts of Licking







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

and Richland Counties, Ohio. These points are included in the areas to which
fruits and vegetables from the main regulated area may be moved only when
accompanied by certificates. No restrictions are placed on the movement of
fruits and vegetables from these special areas.
Fruit shippers have been further relieved from restrictions on the movement
of certain commodities by the elimination of restrictions on the movement of
commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those moving by refrigera-
tor cars or motortruck from the special area listed in regulation 5. Bananas in
single bunches packed in commercial containers are also newly exempt from the
restrictions.
Certain articles, which because of their growth or production, or their manu-
factured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of infes-
tation, and heretofore exempted in administrative instructions, circular B. E.
P. Q. 395, have been so exempted in the revised regulations.
Qualifications for maintaining a class III status under the restrictions on
the movement of nursery and greenhouse stock have been added to limit these
establishments to those having a legitimate need for certification of stock.
Several isolated sections in which Japanese beetles were trapped during the
summer of 1938 are not included in the regulated area. Action with respect to
these infestations has been deferred to permit the States concerned an oppor-
tunity to inaugurate chemical treatments of the infested sections in the spring
of 1939.
The section numbers which appear in this document agree with the section
numbers in the Code of Federal Regulations now in process of publication.

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now re-
vised, prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the
pod, bananas, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or rasp-
berries from the regulated areas, to or through points outside; and also pro-
hibit (unless a certificate or permit has been issued) the interstate movement
of all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck from the Dis-
trict of Columbia. the State of Delaware, and parts of Maryland, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, and Virginia, to or through points outside the regulated areas
as defined in regulation 3. Refrigerator cars used for loading fruits and vege-
tables, in such area must, prior to loading, be fumigated or cleaned by the
common carrier and kept tightly closed and sealed during the interval be-
tween fumigating or cleaning and loading. Fruits and vegetables must be
fumigated in the car when such action is deemed necessary by the inspector,
and doors and hatches of the cars must be closed or screened. For other de-
tails and exceptions see regulation 5.
The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to or
through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or
certificate has been secured. Portions of plants andl cut flowers are restricted
interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15', inclusive. For
details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.
The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, as described in regulation 3.
These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles
from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and
containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and pro-
vide other safeguards and conditions as specified in regulations 8 to 13, in-
clusive.
To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest branch
office listed in the appendix.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantie.







4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Sec. 301.48-NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (TWELFTH REVISION)
[Approved March 1, 1937; effective March 1, 1937]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is neces-
sary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Mas-
sachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a dan-
gerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quar-
antine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Con-
gress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the
public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut,
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Vir-
ginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 1, 1937.
Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as
aforesaid (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure
shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for
transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported,
moved or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District
into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States
in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the
rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided,
That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or
which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regu-
lated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the en-
forcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas
shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided fur-
ther, That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing
for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas
as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed ade-
quate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts
of the State: And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted
herein may, because of the nature of their growth or production or their
manufactured or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instruc-
tions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
when, in his judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation.1
Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of March 1937.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.
H. A. WALLACE,
[SEAL] Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION), SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
[Approved February 16, 1939; effective February 20, 1939]

REGULATION 1

SEc. 301.48-1. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Japanese beetle.-The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.
(b) Infested, infestation.---The terms "infested," "infestation," and the like,
relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.
(c) Quarantined area.-Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

1Secs. 301.48 to 301.48-14 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat.-318; 39 Stat.
1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

(d) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now. or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (Sec.
301.48). as revised.
(e) Fruits and vegetables.-For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see regulation 5.
(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.-Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.
(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connec-
tion with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.
(i) Certified greenhlouse.-A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
regulation 6 (see. 301.48-6). This term may apply also to potting beds, heel-
ing-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing
sheds, or stores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satis-
factory to the inspector.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment
to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common
carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fom one State
or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State
or Territory or District.
(1) Certificate.-A valid form evidencing compliance with the requirements
of these regulations as to movement of restricted articles to points outside
the regulated areas.
(m) Permnit.-A valid form authorizing movement of restricted articles from
a regulated area to a restricted destination in a separate regulated area.'

REGULATION 2

SEC. 301.48-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.-Conditioned upon
the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48) the restrictions provided
in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products
and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to
such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated
by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.'

REGuILTION 3

SEC. 301.48-3. Regulated areas.-In accordance with the provisos to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48), the Secretary of Agri-
culture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the
States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magis-
terial districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other polit-
ical subdivisions within their limits:
Connecticut.-The entire State.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond.
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland. Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville in Kennebec Co(unty;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and elec-
tion districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29. 31, and 32, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 2, 3, 4 ,and 5, in Anne
Arundel County; election districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, in
Baltimore County; all of Caroline County except election districts of American

See footnote 1, p. 4.







6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Corners (No. 8) and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; the city of Westminster, and election
districts of Freedom (No. 5), Hampstead (No. 8), New Windsor (No. 11), and
Westminster (No. 7), in Carroll County; election districts of La Plata and
White Plains, in Charles County; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East
New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dor-
chester County; election districts of Brunswick (No. 25), Buckeystown (No. 1),
Frederick (No. 2), Jefferson (No. 14), New Market (No. 9), and Petersville (No.
12), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election district of Marshall
(No. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City (No. 2), Guilford
(No. 6), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard County; election districts of
Colesville (No. 5), and Rockville (No. 4), in Montgomery County, and those por-
tions of the election districts of Bethesda (No. 7), and Wheaton (No. 13), in said
county located within the established boundaries of the so-called Washington
Suburban Sanitary District; all of Prince Georges County except the election
districts of Aquasco (No. 8), and Nottingham (No. 4) ; towns of Easton and Ox-
ford, in Talbot County; election districts of Hagerstown (Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24,
and 25), Halfway (No. 26), Leitersburg (No. 9), Sandy Hook (No. 11), Sharps-
burg (No. 1), and Williamsport (No. 2), in Washington County; election districts
of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nut-
ters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), Trappe
(No. 7), and Willards (No. 14), in Wicomico County.
Massachusetts.-The entire State.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Free-
dom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wake-
field, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridge-
water, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron,
Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Montgomery,
Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rens-
selaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and Salamanca,
and the city of Salamanca, in Cattariaugus County; towns of Amherst, Cheekto-
waga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Erie
County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herki-
mer, Litchfield, Little Falls. Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark,
Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town of
Watertown and city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris
and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta,
Dix, Hector, Montour, and Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in
Schuyler County; towns of Caton, Corning, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the
cities of Corning and Hornell, in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby,
Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins County;
towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.
Ohio.-Counties of Carroll, Columbiana, Harrison, Jefferson, Mahoning,
Portage, Stark, Summit, and Tuscarawas; the city of Coshocton, in Coschocton
County; all of Cuyahoga County, except the townships of Bay, Dover, North Olm-
sted, and Olmsted; the city of Columbus, and villages of Bexley, Grandview,
Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and Upper Arlington, in Franklin
County; the township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the
city of Toledo, in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mans-
field, in Richland County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Cham-
pion, Fowler, Hartford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, South-
ington, Warren, Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and
the villages of Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orange-
ville, in Trumbull County.
Pennsylvania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, and Venango
Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, Ashland, Beaver, Elk, Richland
(including the boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg), Salem, and Washington
Townships, in Clarion County; townships of Coolspring, Deer Creek, Delaware,
East Lackawannock, Fairview, Findley, French Creek, Greene, Hempfield, Jack-
son, Jefferson, Lackawannock, Lake, Liberty, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter
Creek, Perry, Pine, Pymatuning, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South
Pymatuning, Springfield, Sugar Grove, West Salem, Wilmington, Wolf Creek,
and Worth, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Grove City,







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7


Jackson Center, Jamestown, Mercer, New Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville,
and Stoneboro, in Murcer C(ounty; and the townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry
Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Lime-
stone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove,
Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar
Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren Coun'ty.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper. Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess
Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in Chesterfield
County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; magisterial
district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick County;
magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County; and the cities of
Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth,
Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
West Virginia.-Counties of Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, and
Taylor; districts of Arden, Hedgesville, Falling Waters, and Opequon. and the
city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the towns of Bolivar and Harpers
Ferry, in Jefferson County; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral
County; the city of Wheeling, in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, in
Wood County.3
REGULATION 4

SE. 301.48--4. Extension or reduction of regulated areas.--The regulated areas
designated in regulation 3 (see. 301.48-3) may be extended or reduced as may
be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any exten-
sion or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the
transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such
areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the
Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are
located.
REGULATION 5

SEe. 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.
A. Control of inovemnct.-(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been
issued therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e),
inclusive, of this regulation: (i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod,
bananas, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries
shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to or
through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits and vegetables of any kind
shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motor-
truck from the State, District, counties, election districts, townships, towns, or
cities listed below to or through any point outside of the regulated areas.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester;
the city of Baltimore; election districts No. 12 and No. 15, In Baltimore County
all of Caroline County. except election districts of American Corners (No. 8) and
Hillsboro (No. 6); election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market
(No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dotrchester County;
election districts of Abingdon (No. 1), Halls Cross Roads (No. 2), and Iavre
de Grace (No. 6), in Harford County; Trappe (No. 7), election districts of
Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters
(No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and Willard
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
lahd, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex. Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware. Lancaster. MIontgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Brecknock. Caernarvon, Cole-
brookdale, District, Douglas, Earl, Exeter, Hereford. Lower Alsace, Muhlenberg,
Oley, Oumru, Pike, Robeson, South Heidelberg. Spring. Union, and Washington,

SSee footnote 1, p. 4.







8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

the city of Reading, and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtelsville, Birdsboro, Boyer-
town, Mohnton, Mount Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple,
West Lawn, West Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County;
townships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and
Swatara, the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown,
Paxtang, Penbrook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County; townships of
Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs of Coopers-
burg and Emaus, in Lehigh County; townships of Lower Saucon and Williams,
in Northampton County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.
Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.
(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill
of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area to
another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required for interstate
movement to Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, and
Watertown, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, Livingston, and
Steuben Counties, N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark,
and Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties,
Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va. No restrictions
are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from Brewer and
Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, and Watertown, N. Y., or
from other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, Livingston, and Steuben Counties,
N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or
from other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Burlington,
Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of (1) apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment; (2) bananas
in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (3) bananas singly, or in
individual hands.
(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples or commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those
moving via refrigerator cars or motortrucks from the area listed in paragraph
(1) of this regulation.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except that any
such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time
or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve
danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to
eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation
or delivery.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables to points outside the regulated areas between
June 15 and October 15, inclusive, under one of the following conditions:
(3) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated area
other than that specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or moving from
such designated area other than by refrigerator car, have actually been inspected
by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infesta-
tion. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited and
their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods
of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulated
areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector
for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Cer-
tificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where, in
the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been exposed to
infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks.
(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation, have been inspected and loaded in a
manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately
screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by
an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common car-
rier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation
or cleaning and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.
(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary
in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have
been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.'

REGULATION 6

SEC. 301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental stock.
A. Control of movement.-Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in regula-
tion 1 (sec. 301.48-1), shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from
the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, unless a certificate
or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector except as follows:
(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are therefore exempt from the requirements of certification:
(a) (i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage
growth, and when free from soil, and (ii) single dahlia tubers when free from
stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers meeting these
conditions, require certification.
- (b) (i) Cut orchids, (ii) orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda
fiber, (iii) Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea,
and 0. claytoniana).
(c) (i) Floral designs or "set pieces," including wreaths, sprays, casket covers,
and all formal florists' designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are
not exempted; (ii) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Epigaca repens), when free
from soil or primary roots, and when shipped during the period between October
16 and June 14, inclusive.
(d) (i) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when
so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials, (ii) balsam
pillows, when composed of balsam needles only, (iii) mushroom spawn, in brick,
flake, or pure culture form, (iv) banana stalks, when crushed, dried and
shredded.
(e) (i) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum), (ii)
resurrection plant or birds'-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla), (iii) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae), (iv) dyed moss, when heat treated
and appropriately labeled.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each container
with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a statement
of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and address of
the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October 10
and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of portions of plants
without roots and free from soil (such as branches, twigs, and scions of trees
and shrubs, and Christmas trees).

See footnote 1. p. i.
144804-39- 2






10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area, except that a certificate is required between June 15
and October 15 for interstate movement of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of
portions of plants without roots and free from soil (such as branches, twigs,
and scions of trees and shrubs, and Christmas trees) to Brewer and Waterville,
Maine; Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, and Watertown, N. Y., or to other
regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, Livingston, and Steuben Counties, N. Y.;
Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or to
other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.;
and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the
interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 of cut flowers, aquatic
plants, and of portions of plants without roots and free from soil (such as
branches, twigs, and scions of trees and shrubs, and Christmas trees) from
Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, and Water-
town, N. Y., or from other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, Livingston, and
Steuben Counties N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark,.
and Toledo, Ohio, or from other regulated parts of Licking and Richland
Counties, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.
B. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.-For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:
(5) Class I.-Nurseries, greenhouses and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I.
Upon compliance with the requirements of paragraph 10 of this regulation,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises without further inspection, and without meeting the
safeguards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating
in nurseries or greenhouses of class III.
(6) Class III.-(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned
in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided, (i) there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas,
certified houses, frames, or plots, or other certified areas, or (ii) there is a
legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock. Such
classification will not be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises
that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent
certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where
one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within
approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or prop-
erties. In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and manage-
ment but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may
be independently classified either as class I or class III upon compliance with
such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly,
unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III, may be open
to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III,
when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and
scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Provided,
That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by
boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond
the point where the infestation occurs.
(b) Upon compliance with paragraphs (7) and (10) of this regulation,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the
roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough
inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock
by shaking or washing: or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory
to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified
greenhouse.






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

(7) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all
potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contami-
nated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from
infested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be
sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner
and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must
be protected from possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector.
(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown
outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or
other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation;
and (iv) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by
the inspector.
(8) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be
certified for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an
inspector and found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grown
in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are
transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector
prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (3) of this regulation.)
(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassi-
fied premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or
(b) that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector, or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the
inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under
such conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(10) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their
classified status, (a) shall restrict their purlhases or receipts of nursery and
ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure within the regulated area to articles which have
been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said
certificate shall accompany the articles when moved; (b) shall obtain approval
of the inspector before such articles are received on their premises or moved
from the open on their own premises into certified greenhouses; (c) shall
report immediately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articles secured
from within the regulated area; and (d) shall also rel)ort immediately on
forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles
both to points outside the regul:ted atres and to other classified nurseries or
greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be lenied to any
person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regu-
lation, and such denial of certification shall coitinme until the information
so omitted has been supplied.
(11) Nursery and ornanientail stock imported from foreign countries and
not r shiIppIed fromn the port (;f entry in the un,111opned original container may
he certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(12) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of







12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan-March

such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.5
REGULATION 7

SEC. 301.48-7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure.
A. Control of movement.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall
not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated
areas to or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall
have been issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand for
construction purposes, molding sand, silica sand, greensand, marl, "bird sand,"
"bird gravel," pottery clay, and when free from vegetable matter and heat-
treated, processed clay, and dyed sand; (b) such other sands as have been
treated or processed and subsequently handled in such manner that in the
judgment of the inspector no Japanese beetle could exist therein, provided that
each container of such article shall be labeled on the outside thereof as to
nature of contents, except that in case of bulk shipments such label shall
accompany the waybill or other shipping papers.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either shredded, ground, pulver-
ized, or compressed, or (b) when treated with crude petroleum or any other
product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled on the
outside of each commercial container of such materials.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped
from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to
each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further
protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on
a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of
the following conditions:
(5) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the
regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.
(6) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.
(7) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an in-
spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an in-
spector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the cars
and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and
in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(8) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition
of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure,
except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (5), (6), or
(7) hereof."
REGULATION 8

SEC. 301.48-8. Conditions governing the protection of restricted articles from
infestation while in transit.-Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental
stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from
or through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and
October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be

6 See footnote 1, p. 4.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to
the inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.
Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain
intact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.6

REGULATION 9
SEC. 301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of intcrstate transporta-
tion.-(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles
listed, the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7
(secs. 301.48-5 to 301.48-7) shall be plainly marked with the name and address
of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have
securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in
compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight,
one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached
to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ac-
company the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-
taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or cer-
tificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificate shall accompany
the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.6
REGULATION 10

SEC. 301.48-10. General conditions governing inspection and issuance of cer-
tificates and permits.-(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved
interstate any of the articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations
5, 6, and 7 (sees. 301.48-5 to 301.48-7), shall make application for inspection and
certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment,
specifying in the application the article and quantity to be shipped, method of
shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and address of the
consignee.
(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspection
may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges
for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services
of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transporta-
tion of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.
(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be
refused.
(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area, except for the articles listed in paragraph (1)
of regulation 5 (sec. 301.48-5) and paragraph (4) of regulation 6 (sec. 301.48-6),
as requiring certification when moved interstate to certain isolated regulated
areas."
REGULATION 11

SEO. 301.48-11. Cancelation of certificates.-Certificates issued under these
regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certifi-
cation refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these
regulations or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector
the further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of
infestation."
RFGULATION 12

SEO. 301.48-12. Inspection in transit.-Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other
container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment inter-

SSee footnote 1, p. 4.







14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

state, which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe
contains either infestations, infested article, or articles the movement of which
is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection
by an inspector at any time or place.6

REGULATION 13

SEC. 301.48-13. Thorough cleaning required of trucks, wagons, cars, boats,
and other vehicles and containers before moving interstate.-Trucks, wagons,
cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in trans-
porting any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas
shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have
been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at a point within the regulated
area.6
REGULATION 14

SEc. 301.48-14. Shipments for etrperimental and scientific purposes.--Articles
subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experi-
mental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as
may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The
container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside
thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine showing compliance with such conditions.6
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after February
20, 1939, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated April 6, 1938.
Done at the city of Washington this 16th day of February 1939.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or Dis-
trict of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or
through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or
any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * or any
other article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner
or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy
any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary
of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon con-
viction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment
not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of
the court.
STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to
the Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation
with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine
orders may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agri-
culture, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:
Connecticut: Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New
Haven.
Delaware: Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover.

o See footnote 1, p. 4.







1939] SERVICE AND ItEGLATOIY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15


Maryland:
Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets. Baltimore.
Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown.
Room 202, New Post Office Building, Main Street. Salisbury.
Massachusetts: Thirteenth floor. Customhouse, Boston.
New Jersey:
Kotler Building. Main and High Streets, Glasshoro.
P. O. Box 1, Trenton.
Yardville Road, White Horse.
New York:
Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York.
Room 200. 2507 James Street, Syracuse.
Ohio: 307 Mellett Building, Canton.
Pennsylvania:
Warehouse No. 4. United States Army General Depot, New Cumberland.
6905 Torresdale Avenue, Philadelphia.
Room 438-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh.
Virginia:
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk.
1005 Grace-American Building, Richmond.
West Virginia: County Agent's Office, Courthouse Building. Clarksburg.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling Republic 4142, branch 2589, inspection house
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street and Con-
stitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.
General offices of States cooperating:
Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston,
Mass.
Deputy commissioner. Department of Agriculture. Durham, N. H.
Bureau of Plant Industry, D'partment of .Agriculture. Trento.. N. J.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany, N. Y.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration, Rich-
mond, Va.
State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.
[The foregoing revision was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through
the regulated area.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., February 16, 1939.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat.
315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations
supplemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after February 20. 1939. The purpose of this revision is to
extend the regulated areas in Maryland, New York. (Ohio, Pernnsylvania, Vir-
ginia, and West Virginia, including the widening of areas in several counties
heretofore partially regulated. Counties newly added in part or in entirety
include Jefferson and Livingistion Counties, N. Y. ; Iarrison, Licking. Rich-
land, Trumbull, and Tuscarawas Counties, ()hio Mercer Clunty. Pa.: and
Spotsylvania and Westmoreland Counties, Va. The speaial area from which
the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is
regulated is extended to include parts of Berks. Dauphin, Lehigh, and North-
ampton Counties, Pa., parts of Baltimore and Harford Counties, Md., and







16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

additional area in Dorchester and Caroline Counties, Md. Included among
those outlying areas to which fruits and vegetables from the main regulated
area may be moved only when accompanied by certificates, are Hornell, Mount
Morris, and Watertown, N. Y., and the regulated parts of Jefferson, Livingston,
and Steuben Counties, N. Y.; Newark and Mansfield, Ohio, and other regulated
parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio. Certain modifications have been
made with reference to restrictions on the interstate movement of bananas and
of commercially packed peaches.
Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,
Washington.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times,
Hartford, Conn., March 4, 1939; the Wilmington Journal, Wilmington, Del., March 3,
1939; the Evening Star, Washington. D. C., March 4, 1939; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, March 6, 1939; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., March 4, 1939; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
March 4, 1939; the Manchester Union, Manchester, N. H., March 6, 1939; the News,
Newark, N. J., March 4, 1939: the Times, New York, N. Y., March 4, 1939 ; the Cleve-
land Press, Cleveland, Ohio, March 4, 1939; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., March 3,
1939; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., March 4, 1939; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt.,
March 4, 1939; the News-Leader, Richmond, Va., March 3, 1939; the Gazette, Charleston,
W. Va., March 4, 1939.]


B. P. Q. 359 (Supplement No. 1).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY
PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES. AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE, PURSUTANT
TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
FEBRUARY 15, 1939.

II. TREATMENT OF PLANTS, WITH OR WITHOUT SOIL

H. Methyl bromide fumigation
In accordance with the provisions of regulation 6 (sec. 301.48-6) of the rules
and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision),
the treatment specified below may be employed as a basis for certification of
potted plants, plants in tubs, balled nursery stock, or bare-rooted nursery
stock, when such treatment is carried out under the supervision of, and in a
manner satisfactory to, an inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture.

Treatment method
The nursery stock shall be fumigated with a dosage of 21/ pounds of methyl
bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space occupied by the nursery stock,
for a period of 2/2 hours, and during this time the temperature of the soil and
the air in the fumigation chamber shall not be lower than 63 F. The treat-
ment is to be applied only to plants with bare roots or in 8-inch pots or smaller,
or in soil balls not larger than 8 inches in diameter. While a reasonable amount
of moisture in the soil does not make the treatment ineffective, the soil should
not be puddled or saturated, and withholding water for a period of 12 hours is
advisable. The treatment shall be applied in a tight room or chamber with
gas-tight doors and the plants shall be stacked on racks or separated so that
the gas can have access to all sides of the pot or soil balls.
After the room or fumigation chamber is loaded and closed the required dosage
of methyl bromide shall be applied as a gas and may be introduced into the
chamber as a gas or volatilized in the chamber. The air-gas mixture shall be
circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 212-hour fumiga-
tion period or for the length of time required by the inspector. The treatment
should be applied in a fumigation chamber of approved design. A chamber lined
with sheet metal throughout, with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets
and held tightly in place by refrigerator-door fasteners, is recommended.
The efficiency of the treatment is dependent upon strict observance of all
requirements herein stated. In authorizing the movement of potted plants and
other nursery stock fumigated according to the requirements stated above,,it is
understood that no liability shall attach to the United States Department of







19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

Agriculture or any of its employees in the event of injury resulting from the use
of the fumigant. A list of plants which have been treated with success experi-
mentally will be furnished those interested in applying the treatment.
CAUTION.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is a poison,
and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed to the gas
at concentrations used in fumigation. The plants in the fumigation chamber
should be well aerated by blowing air through them, and the room adequately
ventilated before it is entered.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)
TEXAS VALENCIA ORANGE HARVEST EXTENDED TO JUNE 15, 1939
[Press notice]

JANUARY 27, 1939.
The season for harvesting Valencia oranges under the Mexican fruitfly quar-
antine regulations, which apply to the Texas counties of Brooks, Willacy, Cam-
eron, and Hidalgo, has been extended to include June 15, Lee A. Strong, Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, announced today. The
harvesting season normally closes, under the quarantine, on April 30.
Valencia oranges are not preferred hosts of the fruitfly, Dr. Strong stated,
and are rarely found infested with the flies. Intensive inspection can be made
of the groves during the additional spring season in which the oranges remain
on the trees, and should any infestation of the fruitfly be discovered, he stated,
it will necessarily require the immediate enforcement of such conditions as may
be necessary to prevent its dissemination through the interstate movement of
the fruit.
The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State De-
partment of Agriculture and is concurred in by J. E. McDonald, commissioner
of agriculture. Quarantine officials of the State Department of Agriculture of
Texas and of the United States Department of Agriculture anticipate the same
cooperation heretofore extended in this work by growers and packers of the
lower Rio Grande Valley.
The modification in no way affects the close of the harvesting season for
grapefruit which is now set at April 30, under the quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 487.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE MEXI-
CAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE BY EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON
VALENCIA ORANGES FROM APRIL 30 TO JUNE 15, 1939
JANUARY 27, 1939.
Under authorization vested in the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in the third proviso of Notice of Quarantine No. 64 (sec.
301.64), it having been determined by me that a modification may be safely
made without increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, section A
of regulation 7 supplemental to this quarantine is hereby modified to extend
the harvesting season for Valencia oranges to the close of June 15 for the
year 1939, provided conditions of infestation do not necessitate an earlier
closing date.
The host-free period for Valencia oranges, under this modification, will begin
June 16 and continue to August 31, 1939, inclusive.
This modification does not affect or alter the harvesting season for grape-
fruit which closes, under the conditions of the above regulation, on April 30.
(Sec. 301.64a, issued under the authority contained in sec. 301.(4.)
* LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


144804-39- 3







18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED
QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

CUSTOMs REGULATIONS-PLANT QUARANTINE--NOTICE OF QUARANTINE 37, NURSERY
STOCK, PLANT AND SEED QUARANTINE, WITH REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS-
T. D. 48257, As AMENDED BY T. D. 48512, FURTHER AMENDED (T. D. 49788)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. 0., January 19, 1939.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
With reference to T. D. 48257 and T. D. 48512, and article 578 of the Customs
Regulations of 1937, amendment 3 to revised rules and regulations supplemental
to Notice of Quarantine 37, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective
December 1, 1938, so as to permit the entry of begonias and gloxinia-tubers on
and after December 1, 1939, without limitation as to quantity and utilization,
is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others
concerned.
JAMES H. MOYLm,
Commissioner of -Customs.
[Then follows the text of the amendment.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)
PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS REVISED
[Press notice]
MARCH 8, 1939.
The Secretary of Agriculture today announced a revision of the quarantine
and regulations relating to the pink bollworm of cotton, effective March 15, 1939.
No change was made in the areas under regulation, which now include 6 entire
counties and part of another in Arizona, 12 in New Mexico, and 35 counties
and parts of 2 others in Texas. The purpose of the revision is chiefly to clarify
the requirements. To meet the need for a more flexible means of administering
the requirements, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
is authorized by this revision of the quarantine to modify by administrative
instructions the restrictions, in accordance with the facts as to pest risk.


PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE NO. 52

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following revision of the pink bollworm quarantine and regulations is
issued primarily to clarify the requirements by some rearrangement of the sub-
ject matter of the various restrictions. To meet the need for a more flexible
means of administering certain requirements, particularly those of a special
nature such as may relate to only part of a regulated area, or a limited period
of the year, administrative instructions, circulars of the B. E. P. Q. series, will
be employed. The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine has
accordingly been authorized in the notice of quarantine to modify by administra-
tive instructions restrictions in accordance with the facts as to pest risk.
No change has been made in the regulated areas in this revision.
The section numbers which appear in this document agree with the section
numbers in the Code of Federal Regulations now in process of publication.






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

SU MMARY

The regulated areas are defined in regulation 2 of this issue of the regula-
tions. Regulation 3 sets forth the restricted articles, classed as to those which
are prohibited interstate movement from the regulated areas and those which
may be authorized to be so moved. Regulations 4 to 10, inclusive, set forth such
requirements as the conditions of certification of the various restricted articles,
while regulation 11 gives the marking and labeling requirements. Definitions of
the various terms are given, as heretofore, in regulation 1. Arrangements for
obtaining certificates or permits may be made with the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 798, or Room 565 Federal Building, San
Antonio, Tex.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


Sec. 301.52-NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)
[Approved March 7, 1939; effective March 15, 1939]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is neces-
sary to quarantine the States of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas to prevent the
spread of infestation of the pink bollworm (Pectinophiora gossypiella Saunders),
a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, luder the authority of section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act
of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, I do quarantile the said States
of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, and do order that (1) cotton, wild cotton,
including all parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton
lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber, gin waste,
cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other
containers and wraplxrs of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats,
and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products
or which are fouled with such products; (4) farm products, farm household
goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall
not be shipped, offered for shipment to a commnon carrier, received for transpor-
tation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or
allowed to be moved from the States of Arizona, New Mexico, or Texas into or
through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in mannimer
or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the regulations
supplemental hereto: Prorided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of
the regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to such areas, now or which
may be hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas,
in the quarantined States, as, in his judgment, shall be adequate to prevent
the spread of the said pest. Any such limitation shall be conditioned, however,
upon the affected State or States providing for and enforcing the control of the
intrastate movement of the restricted articles under the conditions which apply
to their interstate movement under existing provisions of the Federal quarantine
regulations, and upon their enforcing such control and sanitation measures w\ith
respect to such areas or portions thereof as in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the intruastate spread therefroom
of the said insect infestation: Prorided further, That whenever, in any year, the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts
exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the
articles to which the regulations ,supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to
modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regula-
tions, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative instructions,
specifying the manner in which the applicable regulation shall be made less
stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for such period
and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said
administrative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall be made to give
publicity to such administrative instructions through out the affected areas.'

7 Sees. 301.52 to 301.52-12 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318; 39 Stat.
1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.







20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Marecl

Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1939.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


REVISED REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARENTINE NO. 52

[Approved March 7, 1939; effective March 15, 1939]

REGULATION 1

SEC. 301.52-1. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed respectively to mean:
(a) Pink bollworm.-The insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (Pectin-
ophora gossypiella Saunders), in any stage of development.
(b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton and wild cotton plants of the genera
Gossypium and Thurberia, and products of these plants, including seed cotton;
cottonseed; cotton lint and linters, and all forms of unmanufactured cotton
fiber; cottonseed hulls, cake and meal; gin waste; and all other parts of such
plants.
(c) Seed cotton.-All forms of cotton lint from which the seed has not been
separated.
(d) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber except linters.
(e) Linters.-All forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber separated from cotton-
seed after the lint has been removed.
(f) Certificate.-An approved document issued by an inspector evidencing
the apparent freedom of restricted articles from the pest.
(g) Limited permit.-An approved document issued by an inspector to allow
movement of noncertified, restricted articles to or from authorized and desig-
nated gins, oil mills, and processing or manufacturing plants. Limited permits
will cover all interstate movements of restricted articles while in the process
of being made eligible for certification.
(h) Dealer-carrier permit.-An approved document issued to persons or firms
engaged in ginning, manufacturing, or processing restricted articles for subse-
quent interstate movement from regulated areas, and to persons or firms
moving restricted articles interstate from regulated areas.
(i) Infestation or infested area.-Infested by the pink bollworm.
(j) Moved or movement.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,
transported, moved, or allowed to be moved by any person from any regulated
area interstate to points outside thereof.
(k) Inspector.-An authorized inspector of the United States Department of
Agriculture.8
REGULATION 2

SEC. 301.52-2. Regulated Areas.-Arizona area.-Counties of Cochise, Graham,
Greenlee, Maricopa, Pinal, and Santa Cruz, and all of Pima County except
that part lying west of the western boundary line of Range 8 east.
New Mexico area.-Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,
Lea, Luna, Otero, Roosevelt, Sierra, Socorro, and Valencia.
Texas area.-Counties of Andrews, Brewster, Brooks, Cameron, Cochran,
Crane, Culberson, Dawson, Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Glasscock, Hidalgo, Hockley,
Howard, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Loving, Martin,
Midland, Nueces, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Starr, Terrell, Terry, Upton, Ward,
Willacy, Winkler, and Yoakum; that part of Bailey County lying south of the
following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east line of said county
where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of league 207;
thence west following the northern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, 188,
175, and 171 to the northeast corner of league 171; thence south on the western
line of league 171 to the northeast corner of the W. H. L. survey; thence west
along the northern boundary of the W. H. L. survey and the northern boundary
of sections 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of Block A of the M. B. & B.
survey to the western boundary of said county; that part of Lamb County

8 See footnote 7, p. 19.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

lying south of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east
line of said county where the county line intersects the northern boundary line
of section 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west following the northern
boundary line of sections 9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson survey and the
northern boundary line of sections 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A. Thompson
survey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 635 to the
southeast corner of league 239; thence north on the eastern boundary line
of league 239 to the northeast corner of said league; thence west on the northern
boundary line of leagues 239, 238, 233, 222, 218, and 207 to the western boundary
line of said county.
Heavily infested areas.-Of the regulated areas, the following counties and
parts of counties are hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning
of these regulations:
Texas.-Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell,
and all of Hudspeth County, except that part of the northwest corner of said
county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks
of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the
town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line
-of section 11, block 651/.
Lightly infested areas.-The following areas are designated as lightly infested:
Arizona.-Counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pinal, and Santa
Cruz, and the regulated part of Pima County.'
New Mexico.-Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea,
Luna, Otero, Roosevelt, Sierra, Socorro, and Valencia.
Texas.-Counties of Andrews, Brooks, Cameron, Cochran, Crane, Dawson,
Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Glasscock, Hidalgo, Hockley, Howard, Jim Wells,
Kenedy, Kleberg, Loving, Martin, Midland, Nueces, Pecos, Reeves, Starr, Terry,
Upton, Ward, Willacy, Winkler and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey and
Lamb Counties, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County
-lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the
Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of
McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of
section 11, block 651/210
REGULATION 3

SEc. 301.52-3. Articles the interstate movement of which is restricted or
prohibited.-(a) Articles prohibited movement.-The interstate movement from
any regulated area of gin trash and cotton waste from gins and mills, and all
untreated or unmanufactured cotton products other than seed cotton, cotton
lint and linters, either baled or unbaled, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and
cottonseed meal and cake is prohibited.
(b) Articles authorized interstate movement.--Seed cotton, cotton lint, and
linters, either baled or unbaled, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and cottonseed
meal and cake may be moved interstate from regulated areas as prescribed
herein.'l
REGULATION 4

SEC. 301.52-4. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates.-(a) Cotton
lint and linters.-A certificate may be issued for the interstate movement of
cotton lint or linters, either baled or unbaled, originating in a regulated area
when they have been ginned in an approved gin and have been passed in bat
form between heavy steel rollers set not more than one sixty-fourth of an inch
apart, or have been given approved vacuum fumigation under the supervision
of an inspector: Provided, That lint produced in a lightly infested area may
be given standard or high density compression in lieu of either rolling or
fumigation: Provided further, That certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of linters produced from sterilized seed originating in a lightly
infested area when produced in an authorized oil mill.
(b) Cottonseed.-A certificate may be issued for the interstate movement
of cottonseed produced in a regulated area when it h:is been ginned in an
approved gin and has been sterilized under the suipervision of an inspector
by heat treatment at a required temperature of 150 F. for a period of 30

SPart of the iightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberia
weevil under quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the require-
nents of that quarantine.
10 See footnote 7, p. 19.








22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

seconds: Provided, That certificates may be issued for interstate movement
of sterilized cottonseed originating in heavily infested areas only to contiguous
regulated areas for processing in authorized oil mills.
(c) Cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal.-Certificates may be issued for the
interstate movement of cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal produced from sterilized
seed originating in a regulated area when these products have been processed
in an authorized oil mill under the supervision of an inspector.
(d) Seed cotton.-The interstate movement of seed cotton will be allowed
only from lightly infested areas into contiguous regulated areas for the purpose
of ginning for which movement no permit is required.
(e) Movement to contiguous infested area.-No certificates are required for
the interstate movement of restricted articles from a lightly infested area to
a contiguous, lightly or heavily infested area, or from a heavily infested area
to a contiguous, heavily infested area.'

REGULATION 5

SEC. 301.52-5. Limited permits.-Limited permits will be issued for the move-
ment of noncertified, restricted articles to such gins, oil mills, or processing
or manufacturing plants as may be authorized and designated by authority
of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for manufac-
turing, processing, or treatment incidental to preparing such products for
certification. As a condition of such authorization and designation, operators
of gins, oil mills, manufacturing or processing plants will agree in writing to
handle restricted articles as to segregation of processed and nonprocessed
products, as to efficient function of processing equipment, as to disposition of
waste, as to use of uncontaminated containers of processed products, as to pre-
vention of contamination of processed products, as to the maintenance of iden-
tity of regulated and nonregulated products, and to maintain such other
sanitary safeguards against the establishment and spread of infestation and
to comply with such other restrictions as to the handling and subsequent move-
ment of restricted articles as may be required by the inspector.

REGUtATION 6

SEC. 301.52-6. Restricted articles originating outside the regulated area.-
Restricted articles originating outside the regulated area may be certified for
interstate movement from a regulated area without processing, treatment, or
sterilization: Provided, That while in the regulated area these products have
been handled and stored in such manner as to maintain identity, and as to
prevent infestation, or contamination with other restricted articles originating
in the regulated area."
REGULATION 7

SEc. 301.52-7. Cleaning or treating requirements of other articles when con-
taminated with cotton or cotton products originating within a regulated area.-
When contaminated with cotton or cotton products originating within a regu-
lated area, railway cars, trucks, or other vehicles, cotton bagging, or other
containers of cotton, cotton processing machinery, farm household goods, farm
equipment, farm products, or any other articles shall not be moved interstate
from a regulated area until freed from such contamination to the satisfaction
of an inspector, after which cleaning or treatment no certificate or permit will
be required except for cotton bagging, or other containers of cotton and cotton
processing machinery."
REGULATION 8

SEC. 301.52-8. Dealer-carrier permits.-As a condition of issuance of certifi-
cates or limited permits for the interstate movement of restricted articles
handled by persons -or firms engaged in purchasing, assembling, ginning,
processing, or carrying such restricted articles originating or stored in regulated
areas, such persons or firms shall make application for a dealer-carrier permit
to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, San Antonio, Tex., and
agree to maintain an accurate record of receipts and sales, shipments or
services, when so required (which record shall be available at all times for ex-

SSee footnote 7, p. 19.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23


amination by an inspector), and agree to carry out any and all conditions,
treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be required.12
REGULATION 9

SEC. 301.52-9. Cancelation of certificates.-Any certificates, limited permits,
or dealer-carrier permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn
or canceled and further certificates or permits refused, whenever, in the judg-
ment of the Bueau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of
such certificates or permits might result in the dissemination of the pink
bollworm.'
REGULATION 10

SEC. 301.52-10. Alternate treatments to be prescribed by the Chief of the
Bureau.-When more effective methods of treatment, processing or sterilization
shall have been developed or when methods of treatment, processing or sterili-
zation as stipulated in the regulations hereof are found unsatisfactory by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, he is authorized to
alter them or substitute other requirements.12

REGULATION 11

SEC. 301.52-11. General certification provisions and marking and labeling re-
quirements.-To obtain certificates or limited permits under these regulations,
application shall be made either to the local inspector or to the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Federal Building, San Antonio, Tex."
Certificates or permits required under these regulations shall be securely
attached to the outside of each container of restricted articles, or, in the case
of carlot or bulk shipments by freight, to the waybills or other shipping papers
which accompany the shipment. In the case of nmvement by road vehicle, such
certificate or permit shall accompany the vehicle. Each container of restricted
articles so moved shall bear such marking and labeling as may be necessary,
in the judgment of the inspector, to identify the material.
The United States Department of Agriculture shall not be responsible for
any costs incident to inspection or treatment, other than the services of
inspectors.14
REGULATION 12

SEC. 301.52-12. Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.-Products
and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such
safeguards as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely at-
tached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomol-
ogy and Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions."
These regulations shall be effective on and after March 15, 3939, and shall
supersede the revised rules and regulations promulgated on October 13, 1936,
as amended.
Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1939.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of lgricult ure.


APPENDIX

FIELD HEADQUARTERS AND STATIONS

Applications for certificates or permits may be made to the field project
leader, addressing Pink Bollworm Control, Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, P. 0. Box 798, or Room 571 Federal Building (telephone F-7141-
275), San Antonio, Tex., or addressing the nearest inspector.

1 See footnote 7, p. 19.
13 See appendix for list of field stations.
14 See footnote 7. p. 19.








24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Inspectors may be reached at the following field stations:

ARIZONA

Address Town Telephone

Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Buckeye--...--.- ...........-.....
tine, Buckeye Hotel.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Coolidge--........-- .------....
antine, P. O. Box 253.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Mesa...-......- -................
antine, Metz Hotel.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Phoenix -......... 4-4062
antine, 402 Security Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Safford--........- ................
antine, P. O. Box 246, 704 5th Ave.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Tucson--------- 1-960
antine, P. O. Box 449, 240 Federal Bldg.


NEW MEXICO

Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Carlsbad---..----. 513-W
antine, P. O. Box 784, Road Station House.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Las Cruces ...............
antine, P. O. Box 849.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Portales ---- ....... ................
antine, P. O. Box 687.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Roswell-- --....... 457
antine, P. O. Box 845, 340 Federal Bldg.


TEXAS

Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Alice..........-.. -...........
antine, P. O. Box 482.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Alpine.---------- 30
antine, P. O. Box 840, 217 Fuller Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Big Spring---- -------- .
antine, P. O. Box 269.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Brownfield................
antine, P. O. Box 37.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Brownsville---......- -----...-
antine, P. O. Box 385.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Corpus Christi._- 9042
antine, 641 Nixon Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Donna -------- (McAllen) 663
antine, P. O. Box 504.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Edinburg_ ---------------
antine, P. O. Box 432.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- El Paso ---------- Main 3295
antine, 206 U. S. Courthouse.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Fabens --------
antine, P. O. Box 27.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Harlingen..... -....--........
antine, P. O. Box 406.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Kingsville---- -------..............
antine, P. O. Box 733.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar- Lamesa----- --- ----.............
antine, P. O. Box 67.!
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Levelland ....... -----...........
tine, P. O. Box 46.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Littlefield--- ......................
tine, P. O. Box 325.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Lubbock_----.--- 293
tine, P. O. Box 1615, 209 Federal Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- McAllen---- 663
tine, P. O. Box 671, 11 Nassar Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Pecos------ 57
tine, P. O. Box 188, 306 Federal Bldg.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Presidio ......... ..........
tine, P. O. Box 928.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Raymondville-- -----...........--
tine, P. O. Box 706.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Robstown--..- -- ............ ....
tine, P. O. Box 367.
Pink Bollworm Inspector, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran- Stanton ----- ----........ ........
tine. P. O. Box 387.

[The foregoing revision was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated areas.]






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., March 7, 19S9.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 52 and the
iegulations supplemental thereto, on account of the pink bollworm of cotton
effective March 15, 1939. The purpose of the revision is chiefly to clarify the
requirements and to authorize the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine to modify by administrative instructions the restrictions in
accordance with the pest risk. No change was made in the areas under regula-
tion. Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Republican,
Phoenix, Ariz., March 18, 1989; the Journal, Albuquerque, N. Mex., March 18, 1939; the
Chronicle, Houston, Tex., March 17, 1939.]


B. E. P. Q. 492.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
REGULATIoNS BY SUSPENDING TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS OF DESIGNATED ARTICLES
FROM THE COUNTIES OF BROOKS, JIM WELLs, KENEDY, KLEBERG, AND NUECES,
TEX.
MARCH 30, 1939.
Under authority contained in the second proviso in Notice of Quarantine No.
52, revised (sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the pest
risk involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the
restrictions contained in paragraphs (a) and (c) of regulation 4 (sec. 301.52-4)
of the pink bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that baled linters and
products thereof, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal produced in the counties of
Brooks, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, and Nueces, Tex., may be moved interstate
therefrom without restriction other than (1) that the products have been
produced in an authorized oil mill and subsequently protected from contamina-
tion, and (2) that a certificate issued by the United States Department of
Agriculture has been obtained and attached to the containers or shipping papers,
in accordance with the requirements of regulation 11 (sec. 301.52-11).
The removal of certain treatment requirements for the above-mentioned prod-
ucts is due to the fact that a light infestation of the pink bollworm was dis-
covered in the affected area at the peak of the 1938 ginning season, and
facilities were not available for sterilization of the cottonseed from which these
products are being manufactured.
This modification shall remain in effect until April 30, 1939: Provided, That
products manufactured prior to that date will be eligible for certification subse-
quent thereto. (Sec. 301.52-4a, issued under authority contained in sec.
301:52-4.)
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 493.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRn'CTION S-MIODITFYING TIE PINK BOLLWAORN QIrARANTINE
REGULATIONS BY LIFTING TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS AS TO DESIGNATiEDI ARTICLES
FROM CERTAIN LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS IN NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS

MARnC 30, 1939.
Under authority contained in the second proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 52,
revised (sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the pest risk
involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions
contained in paragraphs (a) and (c) of regulation 4 (sec. 301.52-4) of the pink
bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that baled cotton lint and linters
and products thereof, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal may be moved inter-
144804-39- 4







26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

state without restriction from the following area: New Mexico: Lea and
Roosevelt Counties. Texas: Counties of Andrews, Cochran, Dawson, Ector,
Gaines, Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Martin, Midland, Terry, Yoakum, and
the regulated parts of Bailey and Lamb Counties: Provided, (1) That the
products have been produced in an authorized gin or oil mill and subsequently
protected from contamination, and (2) that a certificate of the United States
Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached to the containers
or shipping papers in accordance with the requirements prescribed in regula-
tion 11 (sec. 301.52-11) of said quarantine.
The removal of the treatment requirements until further notice for the
above-mentioned products is considered safe, due to the harvesting of the crop
late in the season, the inability of the pink bollworm to survive the low tem-
peratures of the winter, and the occurrence late in the season of only a light,
sporadic infestation in the areas described. (Sec. 301.52-4b, issued under
authority contained in sec. 301.52-4.)
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 194.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING RESTRICTIONS OF THE PINK BOLLWORM
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS BY LIFTING CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS AS TO SAMPLES OF
LINT COTTON

MARCH 30, 1939.
Under authority. contained in the second proviso in Notice of Quarantine No.
52, revised (sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the pest
risk involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the re-
strictions contained in paragraph (a) of regulation 4 (sec. 301.52-4) of the
pink bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that samples of lint cotton
originating in a lightly infested area may be moved interstate without restric-
tion other than (1) that the bales of lint cotton from which the samples are
taken have been produced in an authorized gin and subsequently protected
from contamination, and (2) that a certificate issued by the United States
Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached in accordance with
the requirements of regulation 11 (sec. 301.52-11).
The removal of treatment requirements for samples of lint cotton originating
in the lightly infested areas is considered safe owing to the marked improve-
ment in ginning methods and machinery, making it improbable that a sample
(approximately 112 pounds) of cotton lint, drawn from a bale for grading
and stapling, would contain even one seed in which the pink bollworm might
be harboring.
This modification shall remain in effect until further notice. (Sec. 301.52-4c,
issued under authority contained in sec. 301.52-4.)
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, January 30, 1939.
Postmaster:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instruc-
tions issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States
Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal Quarantine Order No.
72 on account of the white-fringed beetle.
Under these instructions no certificate of inspection will be required during
the period from January 15 to July 1, 1939, in connection with the acceptance
for mailing of the articles named therein when free from soil and when shipped







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27


from any of the regulated areas in the county of Mobile, Ala.; county of Escam-
bia, Fla.; parish of East Baton Rouge, La.; and counties of Hinds, Jackson,
and Pearl River, Miss.
Postmasters will please take note and be governed accordingly. See para-
graph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


B. E. P. Q. 485.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CER-
TIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL JULY 1, 1939, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES
CONSIGNED FROM DESIGNATED PORTIONS OF THE REGULATED AREAS
[Approved January 14, 1939; effective January 15, 1939]

Under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 all certification
requirements are hereby waived during the regulated periods from January 15
to June 30, 1939, inclusive, of the following articles enumerated in regulation
3 (a) and (b), when free from soil and when consigned from any of the regu-
lated areas in the county of Mobile, Ala.; county of Escambia, Fla.; parish of
East Baton Rouge, La.; and counties of Hinds, Jackson, and Pearl River, Miss.;
it having been determined that sanitary measures and natural conditions have
sufficiently reduced the risk of egg or adult contamination as to render certifi-
cation unnecessary during the periods indicated:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes; sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings; cord-
wood, pulpwood, stump wood, and logs; used or unused lumber, timbers, posts,
poles, cross ties, and other building materials; hay, roughage of all kinds, straw,
leaves, and leafmold; peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any
of these products; seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters; used
implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, utensils or containers coming in
contact with the ground; brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks;
nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.
The restrictions on the interstate movement from any of the regulated areas,
of the following articles designated in paragraph (a) (1) of regulation 3 of
Quarantine No. 72, as carriers of larvae remain in effect throughout the year:
Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure whether moved independent
of, or in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles,
or things. (Sec. 301.72a, issued under authority contained in sec. 301.72.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 486.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING TREATMENT OF PLANTS IN
POTS OR IN SOIL BALLS NOT EXCEEDING THREE (3) INCHES IN DIAMETER

JANUARY 28, 1939.
Recent experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
of the United States Department of Agriculture has proven that certain potted
plants, hereinafter listed, can safely and successfully be fumigated for the
control of white-fringed beetle.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

Under provisions contained in Regulation 5(a) (sec. 301.72-5) supplemental
to Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (sec. 301.72), the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine authorizes as a prerequisite to certification,
the following method of treatment, for certain kinds and sizes of potted and
balled and burlapped plants, when done under the supervision of an authorized
inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.







28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

FUMIGATION TREATMENT METHOD

(1) Fumigation must be done with methyl bromide at a dosage of one pound
pert 1,000 cubic feet, including the space occupied by the plants, for a period
of 4 hours, the soil in which the pots are planted and the air in the fumigation
chamber to be at a temperature of not less than 850 F.
(2) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or
smaller, or in soil balls not larger than those which would be contained in
3-inch pots, and the plants shall be stacked on racks so that the gas mixture
can have access to all sides of the pots or soil ball.
(3) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gastight doors.
(4) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of
methyl bromide shall be volatilized therein and the air-gas mixture shall be
circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation
period.

SUGGESTIONS

(1) A fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout and with a
metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in place by refrig-
erator door fasteners, is recommended.
(2) A list of plants, which have been fumigated experimentally with methyl
bromide according to the recommendations here given and are classified as to
their ability to withstand such treatment as indicated by these experiments,
is attached.
DISCLAIMER

In authorizing the movement of potted plants or nursery stock, fumigated
according to the requirements stated above, it is understood that no liability
shall attach either to the United States Department of Agriculure or to any
of its employees in the event of injury resulting from the use of the fumigant.

CAUTION

Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and prac-
tically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation of plants. It is a poison,
and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposedi to the gas
at concentrations used in fumigation. The plants in the fumigation chamber
should be well aerated by blowing air through them and the room adequately
ventilated before it is entered. (Sec. 301.72-5b, issued under authority contained
in sec. 301.72-5.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



The following plants, known to the trade by the following names, have been
fumigated in up to 3-inch pots with methyl bromide at the rate of one pound
per 1,000 cubic feet for 4 hours at 850 F. with the results indicated:
No injury to the following:
Areca lutescens. Habrus and Hahns ivy.
Aspidistra lurida. Latania barbonica.
Boston fern. Nephthedes.
Cape-jasmine (Gardenia). Norwood fern.
Christmas cactus. Pandan us veitchi. Plants which have
Codiaeum, corkscrew croton. pure white leaves not to be fumi-
Codiaeum croton Robt. Craig. gated.
Codiaeunm croton punctatum. Pedilanthus.
Cressulus arborences. Peperomia (green).
Dracaena, massange. Peperomia (variegated).
Ficus elastica (variegated). Philodendron cordatum.
Ficus elastica (green). Phoenix roebelini.
Ficus nitida. Sansevieria.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

Injury not severe-confined to shedding some of lower, older leaves, to the
following:
Dracaena, M. Story. Hibiscus (red).
)Dieffenbachia. Poinsettia.
Ficus pandurata.
Injury very severe to the following-fumigation not recommended:
Allamanda johnsoni. Dracaena warneckii.
Chrysanthemum. Pothos wilcoxi.


B. E. P. Q. 488.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE BY REMOVING UNDER SPECIFIED CONDITIONS
THE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERSTATE MOVEMENT FOR ALL
RESTRICTED ARTICLES ORIGINATING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

JANUARY 27, 1939.
Under authorization to the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine provided in the second proviso of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (sec.
301.72), I find that, when the following requirements are met, regulations 4, 5,
and 6 (secs. 301.72-4 to 301.72-6) under this quarantine, may be safely modified
to waive all certification requirements for all regulated areas until further
notice, for the interstate movement of all restricted articles imported from
foreign countries and moving through a regulated area, when reshipped in the
unopened, original container and when each container is clearly marked to
indicate the country of origin, and when the articles are protected, while in the
regulated areas, in a manner satisfactory to an authorized inspector of the
United States Department of Agriculture. Such modification is hereby au-
thorized. (Sec. 301.72b, issued under authority contained in sec. 301.72.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 489.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARAN-
TINE REGULATIONS AUTHORIZING TREATMENT OF POTTING SOIL

JANUARY 28, 1939.
Recent experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine of the United States Department of Agriculture has proved that potting soil
can be successfully treated by the following methods for the control of the
white-fringed beetle.
TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

Under provisions contained in regulation 5 (a) (see. 301.72-5) supplemental
to Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (see. 301.72), the Chief of the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine authorizes, as a prrerquisite to certification,
either of the following methods of treatment for "potting soil" when done under
the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States Department of
Agriculture.
FUMIGATION TREATMENT METHOD

(1) Potting soil must be treated in a container with methyl bromide in a
dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl bromide per cubic yard of soil for a
period of 48 hours.
(2) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably
lined with sheet metal, and shall have a cover or be covered with a tarpaulin
immediately after the fumigant is applied.
(3) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of
application of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector
of the United States Department of Agriculture.







30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

HEAT TREATMENT METHOD

(1) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more per square inch, shall
be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the bottom of the sterilizing
box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of 45 minutes or until all
parts of the load reach a temperature of 200 F.
(2) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes
one-thirty-second of an inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at
one end to a manifold into which the steam is introduced.
(3) The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet,
6 inches deep.
DISCLAIMER

In authorizing the movement of potting soil treated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is understood that no liability shall attach either to
the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the
event of injury resulting from the use of these treatments.

CAUTION

Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and prac-
tically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation of plants. It is a poison,
and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed to the gas.
at concentrations used in fumigation.
After fumigation of potting soil by the above method, the cover should be.
removed and the soil allowed to aerate. (Sec. 301.72-5a, issued under authority
contained in sec. 301.72-5.)
SLEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, January 9, 1939.

AMENDMENT OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE ORDER NO. 18

Oregon Plant Quarantine Order No. 18 (A Series) pertaining to the Oriental
fruit moth was amended November 23, 1938, so as to permit the acceptance
for transportation into that State during the dormant period from November
1 to March 15 of bare-rooted trees of the peach, nectarine, almond, apricot, plum,
cherry, choke-cherry, quince, pear, or apple and the flowering forms thereof,
provided they are accompanied with a certificate by a State plant inspector of the
State of origin, showing the plants to have been adequately fumigated, accord-
ing to specifications of the Oregon State Department of Agriculture.
Under the Oregon State quarantine as previously enforced, and as published
in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1937, and on page 44 of the August 1937
Supplement to the Postal Guide all varieties and species including the flowering
forms of the peach, nectarine, almond, apricot, plum, cherry, choke-cherry, quince,
pear, and apple trees and plants and parts thereof were prohibited entry into
Oregon from the States named in the published notice. The modification allows
their entry when the roots are bare during the period from November 1 to
March 15 after fumigation as required and when accompanied with a proper
certificate showing fumigation treatment.
Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be governed
accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.






19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

AMENDMENT OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE ORDER NO. 23

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 13, 1939.
Oregon Plant Quarantine Order No. 23 (A Series) pertaining to the tomato
pin worm was amended January 6, 1939, so as to remove the State of Missouri
from the quarantined area.
This amends the list of "Oregon State Plant Quarantines" dated June 23, 1937,
published in the POSTAL BULLETIN of July 27, 1937, and on page 44 of the August
1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the name of Missouri from
the list of States shown therein as being quarantined on account of the tomato
pin worm.
Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be governed
accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 355, Revised, Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

JANUARY 6, 1939.

IMPORTATION OF SISAL FIBER PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 121 of February 16, 1938, prohibits the importation of
sisal fiber into Jamaica (Jamaica Gazette LXI: 12, February 18, 1938).

TRANSSHIPMENT OF CITRUS FRUITS AT PORT ANTONIO REGULATED

Notification No. 712, published in the Jamaica Gazette LXI: 83 of September
10, 1938, prescribes that the transshipment of citrus fruit from Spanish Hon-
duras and British Honduras at Port Antonio will be allowed in future under
the following conditions only:
(a) The fruit must be clean and free from disease.
(b) The fruit must have been properly processed and packed to the satis-
faction of the officer duly appointed to inspect it prior to transshipment.
(c) Transshipment must be direct from ship to ship and no storage of fruit,
except in the ship by which it arrives, can be permitted pending transshipment.
(d) All fruit must leave the island by ship, any broken or damaged boxes
must be taken away, and any fruit that may fall into the sea at the time of
transshipment must be picked up by one or other of the vessels.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 391, Second Revision.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

FEBRUARY 20, 1939.
This revision of the original digest of the plant-quarantine import restric-
tions of the Gold Coast Colony was rendered necessary by the enactment of the
Importation of Plants Regulation Ordinance, No. 18, of March 28, 1936, and
the promulgation of the Importation of Plants Regulations, No. 25, of May 16,
1936. It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge
of foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, for the
information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in
the exportation of plants and plant products to that Colony.







32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


BASIC LEGISLATION
[Ordinance No. 18 of March 28, 1936, known as The Importation of Plants Ordinance]

DEFINITIONS

Section 2 of the ordinance makes the following definitions:
"Plant" includes everything in the nature of a plant and the fruit, leaves,
cuttings, bark, or any part thereof whatsoever, whether living or dead, severed
or attached, but does not include seed, unless specifically mentioned, nor manu-
factured products of plants, nor anything mentioned in this definition, which has
been cooked.
"Pest" means any insect or other invertebrate animal which may be injurious
to agricultural or horticultural crops.
"Plant disease" means any disease caused by fungus, bacterium, virus, or other
organism which may be injurious to agricultural or horticultural crops.
Section 4 of the ordinance empowers the Governor in Council to make regula-
tions for the following, among other purposes:
(a) Prohibiting, restricting, or regulating the importation into Gold Coast of
plants, seeds, soil, manure, containers, straw, and other packing materials, or
any other similar goods or things.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Importation of Plants Regulation, No. 25, effective May 16, 1936]

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as "The Importation of Plants
Regulations."
PLANT INTERCHANGE SCHEDULE

ART. 2. The plant interchange schedule is a schedule of West African countries
in respect of which agreements have been made with the Government of the
Gold Coast concerning the making and enforcement in such countries and the
Gold Coast of regulations governing the interchange of plants and seeds of plants.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 3. No person shall import or cause to be imported into the Gold Coast
any plant or seed except by mail or through the following ports of entry: Accra,
Winneba, Cape Coast, Salt Pond, Takoradi.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ART. 4. The following plants, produce, and seeds shall not be imported into
the Gold Coast:
(a) All plants iil soil or in any material of which soil forms a part.
(b) All plants from Central America, South America, and Trinidad, and other
countries in which witches'-broom disease of cocoa (Marasmius perniciosus
Stahel) is known to occur, as specified by the Governor by a notice in the
Gazette, except plants required and imported by the Department of Agriculture
for scientific purposes.
(c) All coconuts in husk from Central America, South America, Trinidad and
Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent.
(d) All coffee in cherry (berry) unless accompanied by a certificate of free-
dom from mealy pod disease issued by the Government agricultural authority
of the country of export.
(e) All cottonseed except such as may be required and imported by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture for scientific purposes.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL MAY BE REQUIRED

ART. 5. (1) Any plant or seed, except seeds, bulbs, tubers, or corms of vege-
tables or ornamental plants from temperate countries, or dry hulled rice, coffee,
or pulses (legumes), for consumption, and any accompanying container brought
to the Gold Coast by steamer, post, or other channel may, before being delivered
to the consignee or addressee, be examined by a customs officer for the purpose
of determining whether the plant or seed appears to be one the importation of
which is forbidden or the importation of which is subject to precautions in
accordance with these regulations.

TREATMENT OF INFECTED MATERIAL

ART. 5. (2) Any such plant or seed, together with all other articles in the
same container, and packing material may, where deemed necessary by any
inspector as a precautionary measure against the introduction of any pest or
plant disease, be disinfected or fumigated by and to the satisfaction of the
inspector at the expense of the consignee or addressee, in default of which the
consignment or package may be refused entry into the Gold Coast or may be
destroyed by the inspector.

CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH PLANTS AND SEEDS MAY BE IMPORTED

ART. 6. Subject to the provisions of these regulations, the importation of
plants and seeds of plants shall be governed by the following provisions:
(a) Importations of plants and seeds of plants set out in group A in schedule
I shall be permitted from countries included in the plant interchange schedule
only under permit signed by the director of agriculture first obtained, and in
accordance with any special conditions which may be stated in such permit.
(b) Importations of plants and seeds set out in either group A or group B in
schedule I from countries other than those included in the plant interchange
schedule shall be permitted only under permit signed by the director of agricul-
ture first obtained and in accordance with any special conditions stated in
that permit. Such a permit shall be granted for plants included in group A
only when they are needed for special scientific purposes and provided that the
director of agriculture is satisfied that the plants will be grown under such
conditions as should preclude any possibility of the introduction of any
dangerous pest or plant disease.
(c) Importations of plants and seeds set out in group B in schedule I Zhall
be permitted from countries included in the plant interchange schedule.

Schedule I

Group A: Plants and seeds of cocoa (Theobroma cacao), cotton (Gossypium
spp.), cassava (Manihot esculenta), oil palms, and all species of Musa and
Citrus.
Group B: Plants and seeds of coconut (Cocos nucifera), Kola (Cola sp.),
coffee (Coffea spp.) except hulled and dried berries for consumption, ground-
nuts or peanuts (Arachis hypogaea), yams (Dioscorea spp.), rice (Oryza satira)
except hulled rice for consumption, pulse (legumes) except dry shelled seeds for
consumption, guinea corn (Sorghum vulgare), millets, maize (Zea nays), and
rubber (Hevea spp.).

WRITTEN APPLICATION FOR PERMIT REQUIRED

ART. 7. Applications for permits shall be made in writing to the director of
agriculture, and shall state:
(1) The full name, residence, and postal address of the applicant.
(2) The name and address of the person from whom it is proposed to obtain
the plants.
(3) The botanical name or the generally accepted popular name and varietal
names of the plants and the number of each variety it is desired to import.
(4) The locality in which it is proposed to grow'the plants.
ART. 8. Relates to the form of the import permit.







34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-MarchI

PRESCRIBED PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE

ART. 9. Health certificates required from government agricultural authorities.
to accompany imports by any permit issued under these regulations shall, as
far as practicable, be in the form set out below, or in a form accepted by
the director of agriculture as being substantially to the like effect.
the living plants or plant products15
This is to certify that a representative sample of the living plants or plant
products
included in the consignment, of which particulars are given below were/was
thoroughly examined on (date) -------, by (name of inspector)--
--------, a duly authorized official of the ----------------, and found to
be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect, pest, or disease
(destructive to vegetation 1) ---------------, (destructive to agricultural
or horticultural crops1") (insert words in ( ) if required by existing legisla-
tion) having been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the
packing) covered by this certificate has '/has not been treated in the fol-
lowing manner (e. g., fumigated with ----------------- or disinfected with
----------) prior to/immediately subsequent to inspection.

Not inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector on (date)-----
Signature ...------------_ -
Official status --------
Date -----------
Number and description of packages------------------
Distinguishing marks--------------
Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof ----
Stated to be grown at--- ------- ----------- --------
Exported by --
Name and address of consignee------------------
Name of vessel or particulars of route- ---------
Date of shipment------------- -------
Port or place of entry ---- ---------
Additional certificate(s) attached. (Details of any special certificate issued in
respect of imports specifically scheduled by the importing country.)


B. E. P. Q. 422, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF RUMANIA

JANUARY 6, 1939.

RESTRICTIONS ON TRANSIT OF PLANT MATERIAL
The following regulations governing the transit through Rumania of plants,
potatoes, etc., were promulgated by Ministerial Order No. 300,126, of November
17, 1938 (Monitorul Oficial No. 273 of November 23, 1938) :

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE INDICATING ORIGIN
ARTICLE 1. Transit through Rumania of all kinds of trees, shrubs, nursery.
stock, grafts, vines, and any category of rooted plants, as well as potatoes, beans,
peas, lentils, and fodder seeds, is permitted only when the respective shipment
is accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and a certificate of origin issued
by an official institution recognized by the Rumanian authorities.
ART. 2. The shipment in transit mentioned in article 1 will be subjected to a
phytosanitary control at the point of entry into the country, after which it will
be bonded and sealed by the agents of the Bureau for Plant Protection in
Rumania.
ART. 4. All shipments in transit through Rumania, except those mentioned in
article 1, will be allowed without an accompanying phytosanitary certificate;
nevertheless, on entry into the country, the railway cars will be sealed and, on
exit, the seals will be inspected and removed.

15 Strike out the words not required.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35


ART. 5. All shipments in transit through Rumania, whether accompanied by
phytosanitary certificates in conformity with article 1, or unaccompanied, in
conformity with article 4, if found unsealed within the country or at the fron-
tier exit point from the country, will be retained and subjected to the provisions
of article 75, paragraph 2, of the law relative to the organization and encourage-
ment of agriculture, the shipment being considered as infected or infested.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Pla nt Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 428, Revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF CEYLON

FEBRUARY 20, 1939.
This revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
Colony of Ceylon was rendered necessary by the promulgation, July 22, 1938, of
amended regulations under the Plant Protection Ordinance No. 10, June 27, 1924.
It has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials,
and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
Colony, by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge foreign service
information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the text of the said
amended regulations.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete
up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of,
nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


BASIC LEGISLATION
[The Plant Protection Ordinance No. 10, June 27, 1924]

Section 9 of this ordinance empowers the Governor in Executive Council to
make regulations for the purpose of preventing the introduction into the island
and the distribution therein of weeds, or of pests and diseases injurious to, or
destructive of, plants.
DEFINITIONS

The following terms are thus defined by this ordinance:
"Plant" shall include all members of the vegetable kingdom, whether living
or dead, or any part or parts of such but shall not include canned or preserved
fruits or vegetables;
"Pest" shall include any insect or animal which shall in any stage of its
development eat, destroy, or otherwise injure any plant;
"Disease" shall include any fungus or organism of vegetable origin which
shall injure, destroy, or be parasitic upon any plant.

SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Herea spp., seeds or plants grown in the Western Hemisphere: Importation
prohibited to prevent the introduction of the South African leaf (d' ase
(Melanopsanmmopsis (Dothidclla) ulei (Henn.) Stahel). (Art. 2 of General
Regulations, p. 3.)
Coconut plants (Cocos nucifera L.) : Importation from any source prohibited
to prevent the introduction of coccids. (Art. 2 of General Regulations, p. 3.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Hevea spp., seeds or plants grown in the Eastern Hemisphere: May be im-
ported only under a written permit from the director of agriculture. (Art. 2
of General Regulations, p. 3.)







36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Tea seed (Thea sinensis L.): Importation prohibited, directly or indirectly,
from any place in India, except in such quantities as may be necessary for
experimental purposes and except under and in accordance with the terms and
conditions of a written permit from the director of agriculture, to prevent the
introduction of blister blight (Exobasidium vexans Mass.). (Art. 2 of General
Regulations, p. 3.)
Coconut in the husk (Cocos nucifera L.) : Importation prohibited through any
other port than Colombo. (Art. 2 of General Regulations, p. 3.)
Cottonseed (Gossyplum spp.) : Importation prohibited through any other port
than Colombo, or from any other port than Bombay or except with a certifi-
cate of fumigation, to prevent the introduction of the boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Bob.). (Art. 2 of General Regulations, p. 3.)
Cottonseed, unginned cotton, or raw ginned cotton (Gossypium spp.) grown
in the Western Hemisphere: Importation prohibited through any other port
than Colombo, or except with a certificate of fumigation or disinfection or
both from the collector of customs, Bombay, to prevent the introduction of
the boll weevil (Anthornomus grandis Boh.).
Cassava (Manihot utilissima), any living part of the plant: Importation pro-
hibited except under a written permit from the director of agriculture, to
prevent the introduction of mosaic disease. (Art. 2 of General Regulations,
p. 3.)
Fresh fruit: May be imported only under a license issued by the director of
agriculture or by an authorized officer of the Department of Agriculture, and
not otherwise than in accordance with the condition of such license.
Fresh fruits: No license will be issued for the import of fresh fruit from any
country in which the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.) or any
other pest of fruits which has not become established in Ceylon is known or
suspected of existing unless the director of agriculture is satisfied that either
before export from such country or during transit to Ceylon the fruit is so
treated as to insure that such pest, in all its stages, is effectively destroyed.
(Art. 3 of General Regulations, p. 4.)
Under this regulation each consignment of fruit must be covered by a cer-
tificate of origin and must be consigned directly from the country of origin
to the person or agency specified in the license. All large importing firms and
agencies already have import licenses, others may obtain such licenses on request
within 2 days after the fruit reaches Ceylon. (Letter of the director of
agriculture, Peradeniya, Ceylon, November 1, 1938.)
All living imported plants, coconuts in husk, cottonseed, before release from
the customs, shall be examined, but this does not apply to potatoes, onions,
turmeric, culinary seed, edible vegetables and the seed of such vegetables, and
the seed of any ornamental plant.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Potatoes, turmeric, culinary seeds, edible vegetables, and the seed of such
vegetables, and the seed of any ornamental plant. (Art. 4 of General Regula-
tions, p. 4.)
GENERAL REGULATIONS
[As amended July 22, 1938]

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ARTICLE 1. (1) No person shall import any plant into Ceylon through any
port other than the port of Colombo or the port of Talaimannar: Provided that
any of the following articles may be imported through any port, namely, onions,
gingelly seed (sesame, Sesamum indicum), dried turmeric (Curcuma longa L.),
tamarind, "Karanai" roots, groundnuts (peanuts), gram (chickpea, Cicer
arietinum L.), dhal (pigeon pea, Cajanus indicus Spreng) and other pulses
(legumes), dried chilies, curry stuffs, or other culinary seed.

LIVING INSECTS MAY BE IMPORTED ONLY UNDER PERMIT

(2) No person shall import or land a living specimen of any insect or inverte-
brate animal not already known to exist in Ceylon without the written permission,
previously obtained, of the Director of Agriculture: Provided that the director of
agriculture or the director, Colombo Museum, may make such importations as
may be required for scientific investigations.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37

PROHIBITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS

ART. 2. No person shall import or land: (a) Any seed or plant of any
species of Hevea grown in the Western Hemisphere; (b) any seed or plant of
any species of Hevea grown in the Eastern Hemisphere except under a permit
in writing, from the director of agriculture; (c) any tea seed, directly or in-
directly, from any place in India, except in such quantities as may be neces-
sary for experimental purposes and except under and in accordance with the
terms and conditions of a permit in writing from the director of agriculture;
(d) any coconut plant; (e) any coconut in husk through any port other than
the port of Colombo; (f) the seed of cotton of any species of Gossypium through
any port other than the port of Colombo; (g) any seed, or unginned cotton, or
raw ginned cotton of any species of Gossypium grown in the Western Hemi-
sphere, through any port other than Colombo, or from any port other than
Bombay, or except with a certificate of fumigation or disinfection or both
fumigation and disinfection from the collector of customs at Bombay; (h) any
living plant of the cassava plant, Manihot utilissima, except under a permit
in writing from the director of agriculture.

IMPORT LICENSE REQUIRED FOR FRESH FRUIT

ART. 3. (1) No person shall import any fresh fruit into Ceylon without a
license issued by the director of agriculture, or by an officer of the Department
of Agriculture authorized in that behalf by the director, or otherwise than in
accordance with the terms and conditions of such license.
(2) No license shall be issued for the import of fresh fruit from any country
in which the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.), or any other
pest of fruits which has not become established in Ceylon, is known or suspected
to exist unless the director of agriculture is satisfied that either before export
from such country or during transit to Ceylon the fruit is so treated as to in-
sure that such pest, in all its stages, is effectively destroyed.
(3) Every license issued under this regulation shall: (a) Specify the country
from which the fresh fruit may be imported; (b) be valid for the period speci-
fied in the license; (c) be subject to the condition that it may be withdrawn
by the director of agriculture at any time prior to the expiry of that period by
written notice addressed to the holder of the license; (d) be subject to such
other special conditions as may be set out in such license by, or by the authority
of, the director of agriculture; (e) be in the form prescribed.
(4) No person shall land any fresh fruit at any port other than the port of
Colombo, and no person shall land such fruit at Colombo unless he has satisfied
the principal collector of customs that such fruit was grown in and consigned
from the country specified in the license issued to that person.

INSPECTION, FUMIGATION, AND DISINFECTION

ART. 4. (1) All living imported plants, coconuts in husk, and the seed of all
species of Gossypium shall, before passing out of the customs, be examined by
the inspector in charge of the Colombo fumigatorium, together with the pack-
ing,:, cases, pots, or coverings in which they may be packed: Provided that this
paragraph shall not apply to potatoes, onions, turmeric, culinary seed, edible
vegetables and the seed of such vegetables, and the seed of any ornamental
plant.
(2) Every imported plant, which on inspection is found or suspected of being
infected with any pest or disease, shall be subjected to fumigation or disinfec-
tion, or both, as may be deemed necessary by the inspector: Provided that the
director of agriculture, by notification published in the Gazette, may direct from
time to time, that all imported plants of any species or genus, or all plants of
any specified species or genus imported from any specified part of the world,
shall be subjected to fumigation or disinfection or both; and after the publica-
tion of any such notification all consignments of the plants referred to therein
shall be subjected to fumigation or disinfection or both fumigation and disinfec-
tion, as the case may be.

IMPORTED PLANTS MAY BE QUARANTINED

(4) The director of agriculture may order that any plant which has been
fumigated or disinfected shall be grown for a period of quarantine in special
nurseries provided or approved by him for that purpose.







38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(7) After examination and any necessary treatment, the articles shall be
delivered to the consignee together with a certificate showing that they have
been dealt with as required by this regulation.
(14) Any imported plant which, in the opinion of the inspector, cannot be
cleaned by fumigation or other treatment shall, together with the packings, cases,
pots, or coverings in which they may be packed, be destroyed at the expense
of the consignee.


B. E. P. Q. 438, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GREECE

JANUARY 10, 1939.

COUNTRIES INFESTED BY COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

The decree of December 11, 1937, supplements paragraph 6 of article 1 of the
decree of March 29, 1933 (see p. 11, B. E. P. Q. 438), by adding the following
names of countries designated as infested by the Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata): Belgium, England, Germany, Luxemburg, Neth-
erlands, and Switzerland.

ISLAND OF LEMNOS DECLARED PHYLLOXERATED

The decree of April 5, 1938, declares the entire island of Lemnos to be phyllox-
erated. Therefore the words "(c) The island of Lemnos." should be stricken
from the group of regions suspected of phylloxera, and the words "(except the
island of Lemnos)" should be replaced by the words "(including the entire island
of Lemnos)" in paragraph (d) under the caption "Phylloxerated Regions" on
page 8 of B. E. P. Q. 438.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 447, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF YUGOSLAVIA

MARCH 1, 1939.

LIST OF COUNTRIES INFECTED OR INFESTED BY THE POTATO WART, COLORADO POTATO
BEETE, POTATO TUBER WORM, AND SAN JOSE SCALE

Under date of February 15, 1939, the Royal Yugoslav Legation in Washington
transmitted a list, applicable for the year 1939, recently published by the Yugo-
slav Ministry of Agriculture, of countries regarded as being infected by potato
wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), or infested by Colorado potato beetle (Lep-
tinotarsa decemlineata), potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and
San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus). The following list supersedes that
appearing on page 4 of B. E. P. Q. 447:
1. Potato wart occurs in Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Danzig, Denmark, England,
Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, and
Switzerland.
2. Colorado potato beetle occurs in Belgium, Canada, England, France, Ger-
many, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States.
3. Potato tuber worm occurs in America (North and South), Australia, Azores,
Belgian Congo, France, Greece, India (British), Italy (Sicily), Java, Madeira
(Canary Islands), Malta, Morocco, New Zealand, Portugal, Spain, Tasmania, and
Tunis.
4. San Jose scale occurs in Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile,
China, Germany, Hawaii, Hungary, India (British), Iraq (Mesopatamia), Japan,
Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Rumania, South Africa, Spain, Tasmania, United
States, Uruguay, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

B. E. P. Q. 454, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY AND PROTECTORATE OF
NIGERIA
FEBRUARY 4, 1939.
The Importation of Plants Regulation Ordinance, No. 29 of October 11, 1937,
amends regulation 4 of January 13, 1936 (p. 2 of B. E. P. Q. 454), by inserting
the word "soil" between the words "plants" and "produce" in the first line of
that regulation.
It also substitutes the following for subregulation 4 (a) on page 2 of
B. E. P. Q. 454:
"(a) Any plant in soil and any soil or any mixture of soil with other mate-
rials unless it has previously received such treatment as may have been
prescribed by the Director of Agriculture."
In addition, it amends regulation 6 (a) by inserting between the words
"citrus" and "may", line 3, the words "; cuttings (but not seeds) of sugarcane."
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 469, Supplement.No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY
MARCH 8, 1939.
ANTIPHYLLOXEBA CERTIFICATE AND DECLARATION NOT REQUIRED
It was stated in supplement No. 1 to B. E. P. Q. 469, that live plants, parts of
plants, seeds, etc., whose entry into Italy is not specifically prohibited, remain
subject to the phylloxera restrictions (B. E. P. Q. 469, p. 9), and must be
accompanied by a shipper's declaration and a phylloxera certificate.
Since the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, upon which the
phylloxera restrictions of Italy are based, prescribes that seeds, among other
plant products, are admitted to unrestricted circulation, the question of certifi-
cation was recently taken up through the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
in connection with seeds.
Under date of February 7, 1939, that Ministry stated:
"That the regulations now in force on the importation into Italy of living
plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other plant products from countries not
parties to the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne are those contained
in Ministerial Decree of March 3, 1927 (B. E. P. Q. 469, pp. 4 to 8), and subse-
quent amendments and exceptions.
"Importations of living plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other plant products,
coming from the United States of America need not, therefore, be accompanied
by the declarations and certificates required by the Berne Phylloxera Conven-
tion."
Consequently, no inspection certificate is necessary for shipments of living
plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other plant products from the United States,
the entry of which into Italy is not specifically prohibited. The inspection of
such shipments on arrival in Italy is provided for.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 476. Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
MARCH 16, 1939.
IMPORTATION OF POTATOES FOR CON SUMPTION PROHIBI IT D
By an amendment of the Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations-Statu-
tory Rules 1938, No. 85, under the Customs Act 1 01-193 -published in the
Commonwealth Gazette, August 25, 1938, the importation of potatoes for food
purposes is now prohibited, except as follows:
(a) Intended for: (1) Use as ships' stores on overseas vessels, or (2) ship-
ment to an island in the Pacific Ocean;







40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(b) Entered for transshipment.
Consequently, the following item should be added to the summary under
the caption "Importation into the Commonwealth Prohibited":
"Potatoes for consumption: Importation prohibited except when intended for
use as ships' stores on overseas vessels, or for shipment to an island in the
Pacific Ocean, or when entered for transshipment (amendment to Customs
(Prohibited Imports) Regulations-Statutory Rules 1938, No. 85)."

AMENDMENT

Regulation 27 on page 8 of B. E. P. Q. 476 is amended to read as follows:
"REG. 27. Shipments of fodder, hay, or chaff may be landed only in com-
pliance with regulation 67 of Quarantine (Animal) Regulations and shall be
reported to the Chief Quarantine Officer (Plants) for any additional treatment
that he deems necessary to prevent the introduction of plant diseases and
pests."
Corrections in the text of B. E. P. Q. 476:
Page 1, item Cactaceae: "Nopalia" should be "Nopalea."
Page 4, under definitions in regulation 3: "Diseases" should be "Diseased."
Page 4, in regulation 4: "(Form Q P 1 Importers' Notice)" should read "(Form
Q P 1 Importer's Notice)."
Page 5, in regulation 5 "(Form Q P 2 Timber Importers' Notice)" should read
"(Form Q P 2 Timber--Importer's Notice)."
Page 5, in regulation 17 "Chief quarantine inspector" should be "chief quaran-
tine officer."
Page 8, under "Declared Diseases" "Armillaria A. melea (Vahl) Zuel." should
be "Armillaria A. mellea (Vahl) Quel."
Page 9, on last line "A. fructigena" should be "A. fructigenum."
Page 17, in list of declared weed pests "Foeniculum vulgare Hill." should read
"Foeniculum vulgare Mill.," and "Hypochoeris" should be "Hypochaeris."
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 478, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, MALAYA

JANUARY 26, 1939.

PLANT IMPORTATION BY AIR RESTRICTED

The Plant Importation (amendment) Rules, 1938, revoke the rule under the
caption "Plant Importation by Air Prohibited" on page 1 of B. E. P. Q. 478, and
substitute the following:
"The importation into the Colony by aircraft of any plant is prohibited with the
exception of cut flowers from the Netherlands Indies: Provided, That such cut
flowers are not portions of any plant mentioned in schedule A (see the list on
p. 3 of B. E. P. Q. 478) and that they are imported only through the ports or
aerodromes of Singapore and Penang; the following fresh fruits, namely, pears,
peaches, nectarines, strawberries, plums, raspberries, red and black currants,
and gooseberries: Provided, That the same are imported only through the civil
airport, Singapore: Provided further, That the written permission of the director
of agriculture be first had and obtained and that the said permission be produced
by the importer or his agent at the civil airport, Singapore, and that each con-
signment be accompanied by a certificate in the form shown in schedule B (see
p. 4 of B. E. P. Q. 478), and such additional certificates, if any, as the director
of agriculture may from time to time require."
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMIENTS 41

B. E. P. Q. 484.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BOLIVIA

JANUARY 13, 1939.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Bolivia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge,
foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
original text of the supreme decree of May 28, 1937, creating and regulating the
Bolivian Plant Protection Service (Servicio de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) and
reviewed by the Chief of that Service.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BOLIVIA

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Supreme Decree of May 28, 1937, creating and regulating the Plant Protection Service
(Servicio de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal)]

This decree is divided into four chapters including domestic phytosanitary
regulations (arts. 1 to 6), regulations on plant importation (arts. 7 to 12), those
on plants for exportation (arts. 13 to 16), and general provisions (arts. 17
to 23). Only chapter -II, including articles 7 to 12, is included in this digest.

SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Plants and parts of plants that carry agricultural pests.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants and parts of plants: Every shipment must be accompanied by a phyto-
sanitary inspection certificate issued by competent authority of the country of
origin and is subject to inspection on arrival.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

ARTICLE 7. Applications for permits to introduce plants or parts thereof shall
be made to the chief of the Plant Protection Service (Servicio de Policia Sani-
taria Vegetal), and shall contain the following data: (a) Name and address of
the importer; (b) name and kind of product; (c) country of origin; (d) pur-
pose for which the product is intended (planting, sowing, or sale) ; (e) customs
office or route through which the importation is made.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 7 continued. For its clearance through the customhouse concerned, the
presentation to the agents of the phytosanitary service is required of a phyto-
sanitary certificate issued by competent authority of the country of origin.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ART. 8. The requirements of the preceding article having been complied with,
the agent of the Plant Protection Service will determine the good sanitary
condition of the imported products in the frontier customhouse and will issue
a signed certificate authorizing the continuation of transportation.







42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL

ART. 9. Importers of plants or parts of plants are required to notify the Plant
Protection Service of the arrival of the merchandise at the customhouse where
delivery is to be made to the interested person or at the railroad station of
destination, in order that the said service may have it inspected by one of its
officials, who will carry out a new disinfection, if necessary, before which the
importer will declare the purpose of the importation (planting or sowing).

DISPOSAL OF INFESTED PLANTS

ART. 10. If the agent of the Plant Protection Service finds danger of infection,
he will adopt one of the following measures: (a) Disinfection within 15 days
with materials that he indicates, at the expense of the interested person; (b)
incineration in the presence of the interested person, or of any authority who
witnesses the operation, within a period of 10 days, without responsibility to
the State with respect to indemnity; (c) quarantine of suspected importations
during which investigations of the case are made.

PLANTS CARRIED BY PASSENGERS NOT EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION

ART. 11. Railroad passengers are prohibited from carrying living plants or
parts thereof with them unless those products are accompanied by the corres-
ponding phytosanitary certificate issued by competent authorities. The presen-
tation of this certificate should be required both by the agents of the Plant
Protection Service and railroad conductors.
The lack of the certificate will result in the confiscation of the plants carried,
without right to indemnity.
ART. 12. It is the function of the Plant Protection Service to specify "Pests
of Agriculture" in order to prevent the importation of plants or parts thereof
that contain them.


B. E. P. Q. 490.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ALBANIA

FEBRUARY 1, 1939.
This presentation of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom
of Albania is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, in charge of foreign service information,
Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation made by the Ameri-
can Legation, Tirana, Albania, of the law of April 23, 1929.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative. The law of April 23, 1929, should be
-consulted for the exact text.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Law of April 23, 1929]

IMPORTATION OF INFECTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any kind of plants or parts
thereof, such as seeds, fruits, etc., that may be used for propagation if infected
by any parasitic disease or insect pest.

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 2. Any one who desires to import plants or parts thereof for propagation
or cultivation is required first to present to the Bureau of Agriculture a certif-







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

icate of origin and a certificate affirming their freedom from disease, the certif-
icate to be authenticated by the authorities of the place where they are
purchased.
SEEDS AND FRUITS INSPECTED ON ARRIVAL

ART. 3. The prohibited products mentioned in article 1, with the exception of
plants, shall be examined by the local agricultural administration and, after
verification of noninfection, they may be withdrawn from the custom house.
With respect to plants, a certificate from authorities where the purchase
was made is sufficient.
ART. 4. On presentation of the documents prescribed by article 2, the agri-
cultural expert will examine, with the means at his disposal, the articles pro-
hibited by this law, and within 1 day will notify the customs of his findings.
ART. 5. If upon examining a shipment, the said expert is in doubt and is un-
able to make a definite report of the existence of parasitic diseases or insect
pests, samples of the prohibited plants, together with the documents referred
to, will be transmitted the same day, through the Ministry of National Economy,
to the chemical laboratory for examination.
After analysis, the laboratory will issue a written declaration indicating the
presence or absence of a disease in the prohibited plants. The analysis should
be made during the same day, that is, the despatch, the examination, and the
return of the material to be analyzed should not exceed 3 days.
ART. 6. Customs officials shall not permit interested persons to withdraw goods
from the customs until the receipt of the declaration from the laboratory or
from the local agricultural administration.

INFECTED MATERIAL MAY BE DESTROYED

ART. 7. The Agricultural Administration will order the destruction by fire
of products prohibited in accordance with article 1, if the existence of parasitic
diseases or insect pests is verified therein, or, on receipt of assurances, their
delivery to the owner for return to the country of origin may be authorized.


B. E. P. Q. 491.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CHOSEN (KOREA)

MARCH 17, 1939.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Chosen has been
prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge,
foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a
translation of the texts of the respective orders of the Government General of
Chosen furnished by the American consul general at Keijo (Seoul), Chosen
(Korea).
The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete for its purpose up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended
to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and
it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The original orders should
be consulted for the exact texts.
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Burea.t of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CHOSEN (KOREA)

BASIC LEGISLATION

Order No. 79 of August 23, 1933. (See p. 1.)
Notice No. 394 of August 23, 1933, as amended by Notice No. 235 of March 1938.
(See p. 3.)
Notice No. 395 of August 23, 1933. (See p. 4.)
Notice No. 456 of September 27, 1933. (See p. 3.) R

^rfv O BOLim







44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Order No. 79 of August 23, 1933]

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ARTICLE 1. Plants to be imported or exported between Chosen and Japan
proper and between Chosen and foreign countries shall, in accordance with
this order, be examined by the customs authorities.
Plants that must be examined and the locations of customs offices where
examination may be carried out under the provisions of this order shall be
separately indicated.
ART. 2. The examination prescribed by paragraph 1 of article 1 shall include
examination of containers and packing materials as well as the plants
themselves.
If, when the customs examination is made, customs officials recognize that
articles, other than those set forth in this order, may be contaminated with
fungi or insects harmful to plants, an examination of such things may be
carried out in accordance with this order.

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL REQUIRED

ART. 3. Those who desire to import plants which must be examined in accord-
ance with article 1 shall, immediately upon the arrival of the vessel, vehicle,
or aircraft upon which the plants are carried, present at the customhouse an
application on form No. 1, but if such plants are carried by passengers, an
oral application for an examination is acceptable.

CERTIFICATE MAY CAUSE WAIVER OF INSPECTION

If an inspection certificate, issued by the authorities of the place of exporta-
tion, affirming that the plants are free from injurious insect pests and diseases,
is presented, the examination may be waived.
ART. 4. Application must be made for an inspection of plants intended for
export.
PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT PATHOGENS OR INJURIOUS INSECTS

ART. 5. Those who desire to import pathogens or injurious insects shall obtain
the permission of the Governor General of Chosen therefor, presenting a
written application through the customhouse where the importation is to be
made.
Mail importation of such material is not permitted.
Articles 6, 7, and 8 deal with inspection of pathogens and injurious insects
on arrival.
DISPOSAL OF INFECTED IMPORTS

ART. 9. If, upon inspection, it is determined that plants and other articles
carry plant diseases or injurious insects, such plants or articles shall not be
imported or exported unless disinfected at the customhouse.
If customs officials find it necessary, they may disinfect or otherwise dispose
of contaminated plants or other articles. However, if importers or exporters
request disposal in a manner that will prevent the spreading of the plant
diseases or insect pests, such disposal may be permitted.

PLANTS THAT MUST BE EXAMINED UNDER ARTICLE 1 OF PRECEDING REGULATIONS
[Notice No. 394 of August 23, 1933, revised by Notice No. 235 of March 1938]
Plants to be examined in accordance with the provisions of article 1 of the
regulations for the examination of plants for import into or export from
Chosen are as follows:
1. Plants to be imported from Japan and foreign countries: (a) Plants and
parts thereof for propagation or cultivation; (b) seeds, bulbs, and roots for
propagation; (c) oranges or watermelons produced in Taiwan (Formosa);
(d) in addition to the above, those which customs officials recognize as possibly
contaminated by plant diseases or injurious insects.
2. PFats tie exported to Japan and foreign countries, for which an inspec-
i & e catf f MAsed by the exporting country is required by the importing
co M*tIr y A 8-







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45


PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS FOR WHICH AN IMPORT PERMIT IS RE1QUIRED

[Notice No. 456 of September 27, 1933]

Plants, products, or articles possibly infested by injurious insects, together
with their containers and packing, for which permission to import is required:
1. Raw apples, pears, quinces, peaches, plums, apricots, cherries, and walnuts
(except those without shells), shipped from or landed in Europe, United States,
Canada, Union of South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, or Brazil.
2. Raw apples, fruit of wild roses, and other raw fruits of Malus spp. and
of Crataegus shipped from or landed in the Kwantung Leased Territory or
Manchuria.
3. Oranges, locust fruit, loquats, plums, peaches, pomegranates, Capsicum spp.,
Solanum verbascifolium, etc., shipped from or landed in Taiwan (Formosa),
British India, Ceylon, Java, or Philippine Islands, except oranges shipped from
or landed in Taiwan (and containers or articles used for packing) accompanied
by an inspection certificate issued by the Government General of Taiwan.
4. Cucumbers, watermelons, muskmelons, pumpkins, raw fruits of calabash
and eggplant, beans and peas in pods shipped from or landed in Taiwan,
British India, British Straits Settlements, Sumatra, British Borneo, Netherlands
Borneo, Celebes, Philippine Islands, or other territory located between 30 S.
and 300 N. latitude and between 600 and 1700 East longitude, and places
south of the Yangste River, except watermelons produced in Taiwan and con-
tainers and other articles used for packing them, accompanied by a certificate
issued by the Government General of Taiwan.
5. Raw fruits and raw vegetables shipped from or landed in Hawaii.

Authorized customhouses for the inspection of plants

[Notice 395 of August 23, 1933, as amended]

Kind of inspection Name of customhouse Limitation of inspection

Jinsen (Chemulpo)....------
Fusan----- ...- ..
Shingishu...--------------.
T ashin ....... -- -- -- -
Import and export inspection_ Seshin ------------.----- No limitation.
Seishin ...............
Chinnampo___---------------
Genzan -..... .
Reisui.-----------
(1) Passengers' baggage and mail, except
plant diseases and injurious pests, and
watermelons produced in Taiwan.
Imports ------------------- Kunsan --------(2) Imported fruit trees and cherry trees
................. other than passengers' baggage and mail
from Feb. 15 to May 10, and mulberry
trees from Japan from Feb. 15 to May 15,
and from Sept. 15 to December.
Sambo.---.---------------- Passengers' baggage and mail, except
Do ----.-------- anyo------------------ plant diseases and insect pests, and
Ryugampo --- ------------ watermelons from Taiwan.
Yalu River ----------- -- --
Keijo...------..------...--. Passengers' baggage, freight, and mail
Do -- -Keijo Airport------.-------- transported by aircraft, except plant dis-
............-.... Urusan Airport...---------- eases and insect pests, and watermelons
Seishin Airport ..---------- produced in Taiwan.




PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to
March 31, 1939, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. William Poxwell for transporting from
Salisbury, Md., to a point outside of the regulated area of a truckload of sweet-
potatoes, without certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10
and costs.








46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Paula Leal de Garza---.--------. Brownsville, Tex..-------. 3 plants ---------------------- $1
A. L. Peterson----------------------do ---------------2 plants, 7 avocados ---------- 1
Concepcion Calderon --------------do -.--------------.. 1 avocado-- --------_--------- 1
Concepcion Bello ---------------- do -----..---------- 4 gardenia plants, 1 rooted 1
plant.
Florentino Gonzalez ---.--------. Eagle Pass, Tex--------- 2 oranges---------------------- 1
Refugio Rangel------------------do ---------------2 cactus plants .- .-----------.. 1
Paul Garcia .--------------- -----do .-------------.- 61 plants.---.. --------- ----- -
Angelina Florede Flacon ------- .---do---------------- 2 avocados ....---------- .. 1
Mauro Rodriguez----------------do ---------------- 2 persimmons ..---------.--- 1
Arturo Salinas ------------- -----do ---..------------- 5 avocados __ _-----------_---. 1
Maria Ruis Arambula-------------do --------------- 1 mango.......--- 1
Teheda de Ramos _------------do -------------------do ------------------- 1
Encarnacion Sautana .----------- El Paso, Tex ----------- 8 sweet limes ........-- ------ 1
Antonio Friesquez----- -----------do ---------------- 7 stalks sugarcane -------------
Carmen de la Torre .-------.- ---do ----------------1 mango---------------------- 1
Margarito Montez------------- Hidalgo, Tex--------- 2guavas, 1zapote, Icherimoya_ 1
T. L. Greever------------- -----do -------------- 5 avocados -----------1---------
Josefina Guzman ---_.--------- -----do ___---- .- .------- 7 plants, 5 guavas ...---------. 2
Magdalena Alaniz..--- ------------ -do --- -------- 9 plants, 6 guavas_ ---------- 2
Parfiria Rodriguez ---------- --. do ------------- 13 oranges. 1 cherimoya, 8 1
plants.
Aralia Navarro --------------- Laredo, Tex...---..------- 1 orange- ----------------- 1
Israel Fleischer .------------- -----do_.. ---------------- 5 apples_.----------------- 1
Esther Gutierrez---------- -----do- ----------- 1 orange ---------- 1
C. M. Kenney ------------- ----do .----------- 5 oranges------------------ 1
John Oleszcuk -----------------do ---------------- 1 orange---------------------- 1
Mrs. Jose Jiminez.-----------.---.--do-------------- 1 apple _.-----------.. . 1
Florence E. Tonks ----------.. -----do ------.--------- 1 orange----------------------- 1
Gertrude M. Halleran------------ do.-------------- -----do -----------1
Joe T. Cantu -------------- ----do -------------- 6 avocados -------------------- 1
Jesus Trujillo------ ------- ----- do_---------------- 16 plants--------------------- 1
Jose C. Herrera ----------- -----do -- ----------- 2 plants ------------------- 1
Mrs. Maria Jesus de Sosa -------- --do ----------- 4 plants --------------------- 1
Mrs. Conception Zuniga .-.------- -- do ----- --------- 1 apple, 5 tangerines I----- 1
Severono Salozar-----------------do-------------- 1 plant, 2 citrons --.--------- 1
Joseph F. Tenramski ------------do---------------- 1 lemon -------------------
Mrs. Jose Ortiz --------- ---do-------------------- 3 joints sugarcane._ ..--------- 1
Mrs. Brigida Linares------------- do--------------- 1 orange .-------------------- 1
EzequielAlvarado ----.-------- do---------------- 7 oranges -----------.------- 1
Ellan Stapleton------------- -----do------- --------- 3 apples ----------------
Felix Casteneda--..-- ----------do ---------------4 maypops------------------
C. W. DeFreest _---------- ---do ------------- 1 papaya_----------------- -- 1
Benito Flores-------------------do ---------------3 oranges. -------------------I
Tadis Martinez----------------do ---------------1 orange_ ------------------- 1
Mrs. Julia Zuniga ---- ------ ----do --------------- 2 oranges --------------------- 1
Mrs. Amalia Alva .--- ----- -----do-- ------------- 2 guavas ------------------ 1
Mrs. Rosa Alonzo---------- --- do---------------- 2 avocados --------------------
Gregoria M. Rodriguez------------do---------------- 23 plants-------------------- 1
Manuela Guiterrez ------------do---------------- 1 avocado .---------.. ------ 1
Mrs. L. L. Schofield -----------do ---------- 1 plant------------------------ 1
U. Partida------_---------- San Ysidro, Calif ------- 16 pieces sugarcane ---------- 1


LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINE AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE
ORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

[The domestic and foreign quarantine and other restrictive orders summarized herein
are issued under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20, 1912, as amended.
The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued under
specific acts of Congress.]

QUARANTINE ORDERS

The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological
order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical
series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have
either been superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quaran-
tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines being
divided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States and
(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico.



"I;l







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES

QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Black stem rust.-Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective September 1, 1937:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
effective August 1, 1931, the movement into any of the protected States, namely,
Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana.
Nebraska, North Dakota. Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota. Virginia, West
Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well as the movement from any one of
said protected States into any other protected State of the common barberry
(Berberis vulgaris), or other species of Berberis or M3alionia or parts thereof
capable of propagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regula-
tions place no restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry (B.
thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties, or of cuttings (without roots) of
Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and not for propagation.
Gypsy moth and browrn-tail inoth.-Quarn. tine No. 45. revised, effective Sep-
tember 29, 1938: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supple-
mental thereto, revised, effective September 29, 1938, the movement interstate to
any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested
area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone and quarry products, and of
the plants and the plant products listed therein. The regulated area covers Rhode
Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, and Vermont.
Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective March 1, 1937: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective February 20, 1939. the interstate movement of (1) fruits and
vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental. and greenhouse stock, and other plants;
and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from the regulated area
to or through any point outside thereof. The regulated area includes the entire
States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Delaware,
and the District of Columbia, and portions of the States of Maine, New Hamp-
shire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and
Ohio.
Pink bollicorm.-Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective March 15, 1939: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 15, 1939, the interstate movement from the regulated
areas of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, of (1) cotton, wild cotton, incl lilng
all parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint. liniers,
and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cot-
tonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and
wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other ve-
hides which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which
are fouled with such products; (4) farm products, farm household goods, farm
equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Thurberia ceevil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927: Pro-
hibits the interstate movement of Tll rberia, including all parts of the plant,
from any point in Arizona and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto effective October 2, 1933, as amended effective
October 22, 1936, the interstate movement from the reigulaited area of Arizona
of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters,
and all other forms of unlmanufactured cotton lint. gin waste, cottonseed, cotton-
seed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and
wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other
vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which
are fouled with such products; (4) hay alnd other farm products: and (5) farm
household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other
articles.
1White-pine blihftr ru.st.-Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1920: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective July 1, 1938, the interstate movement from every State in the
continental United States and the District of Columbia of five-leafed pines
(Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia), including
cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts.
Mexican fruitfly.-Quarantine No. 64. revised, effective October 15, 1937: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective October 15, 1937, the interstate movement from the regulated
area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.







48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mardc

Woodgate rust.-Quarantine No. 65, effective November 1, 1928: Prohibits,
except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective
November 1, 1928, as amended, effective April 1, 1929, the interstate movement
from the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs,
or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Island pine (P. canariensis),
slash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora), Corsican pine (P.
nigra poiretiana), stone pine (P. pinea), western yellow pine (P. ponderosa),
Monterey pine (P. radiata), loblolly pine (P. taeda), or Jersey pine (P. virgini-
ana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pine here-
after found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust.
Dutch elm disease.-Quarantine No. 71, effective February 25, 1935: Prohibits,
except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective
February 25, 1935, as amended, effective November 9, 1937, the interstate move-
ment from the regulated areas in the States of New Jersey, New York, and
Connecticut to or through any point outside thereof, of elm plants or parts
thereof of all species of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest,
or privately grown, including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark,
roots, trunks, cuttings, and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such
plants; and (3) lumber, crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers
manufactured in whole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely
free from bark.
White-fringed beetle.-Quarantine No. 72, effective January 15, 1939: Prohibits,
except as provided in the regulations; supplemental thereto, effective January 15,
1939, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the States of Ala-
bama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to or through any point outside
thereof, of (1) nursery stock or any other plants or plant products; (2) soil,
independent of, or used in connection with nursery stock, plants, or plant prod-
ucts; and (3) other articles (as specifically named in said regulations, in modi-
fications thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in said
regulations).

QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PUERTO RICO

Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,
1917: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, the movement from the Territory of
Hawaii into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United
States, of all fruits and vegetables in the natural or raw state, on account of the
Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata) and the melonfly (Dacus cucurbitae).
Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 16, revised, effective January 1, 1935: Prohibits
the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through
any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canes of sugar-
cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases, except that movement will be allowed
under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or are to be
so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department,
their movement will involve no pest risk.
Sweetpotato.-Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1934: Pro-
hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into
or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any
variety of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), regardless of the use for which
the same is intended, on account of the sweetpotato stem borer (Omphisa
anastomosalis Guen.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Euscepes batatae Waterh.).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No: 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits the
movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety
of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same is in-
tended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscurus and Meta-
masius hemipterus).
Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.-
Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided in
the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, the
movement of cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products, except oil, from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States on account of the pink bollworm (Pectinophora
gossypiella Saund.) and the cotton-blister mite (Eriophyes gossypii Btnks),
respectively.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.-Quarantine No. 51, effective
October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the United
States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or as baggage or effects of
passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn (other than shelled corn), cotton, alfalfa,
and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account
of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraca saccharalis Fab.),
the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton boll weevil (Anthoononzus
grandis Boh.), the papaya fruitfly (Toxotrypana curricanda Gerst.), and certain
insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.
Puerto Rican fruits and regetables.-Quarantine No. 5S, effective July 1. 1925:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
effective July 1, 1925, as amended effective January 1. 1933, the movement
from the Territory of Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or un-
processed state, on account of injurious insects, including the West Indian
fruitfly (Anastrepha fraterculus Wied.), and the bean-pod borer (3aruca testu-
lalis Geyer).
Sand, soil, or earth. withf plants from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.-Quarantine
No. 60, revised, effective September 1. 1936: Prohibits the movement from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory,
State, or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand),
soil, or earth around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs,
the Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants. Provision is made for the
retention of potted plants on board vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when
evidence is presented satisfactory to the plant quarantine inspector that the
soil has been so treated, or is so safeguarded, as to eliminate pest risk.

FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES

Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 8, effective July 1, 1913, with revised regula-
tions effective July 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality
and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State of
Baja California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species
and varieties and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed
hulls from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.
Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.-Quarantine No. 12. effective February
27, 1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Centraln
America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado
weevil (Heilipus lauri).
Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Prohibits
the importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane.
or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse. on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases, except that importation will be allowed
under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or are to be
so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department,
their entry will involve no pest risk.
Citrus nursery stock.-Quarantine No. 19, revised, effective September 1, 1934:
Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus
nursery stock, including buds and scions, on account of the citrus canker and
other dangerous citrus diseases. The term "citrus," as used in this quarantine,
includes all plants belonging to the tribe Citrinac.
Indian corn, or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24. effective July 1,
1916, as amended effective April 1. 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from southeastern Asia (including India. Siam. Indo-China. and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia. New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan. and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-
ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea
mnays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte
(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on
account of the downy mildews and Physoderna diseases of Indian corn. except
that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance
with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretar'y of Agriculture.
Citrus fruits.-Quarantine No. 28. effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-
China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania







50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan
(Formosa) and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South
Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus
canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and
tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with
the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Sweetpotato and yanm.-Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbids
the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams
(Ipomoea batatas and Dioscorea spp.), from all foreign countries and localities,
on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee
(lEuscepes batatae).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-
tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.),
or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the
banana-root borer (Cosmopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-
tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the
entry of the fruit of the banana see quarantine 56.)
Bamboo.-Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1, 1918: Forbids the importa-
tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seeds, plants, or cuttings thereof
capable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae,
from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases,
including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does
not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which
are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any
kind of articles manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or
otherwise preserved.
Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.-Quarantine No. 37, effective June 1, 1919:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective December 22, 1930, and amended effective January 14, 1935, the
importation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capable
of propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain
injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following
plant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil,
or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant
products imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field,
vegetable, and flower seeds, except seeds of Lathyrus and Vicia. Cut flowers
from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry without permit. The
entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds is permitted
under permit:
Under regulation 3:
(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stock (pips) of the following genera: Lilium (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), and
'Crocus; and, until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus
(snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Ixia, Eranthis
(winter aconite), and Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil).
(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided. That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-
sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise.)
(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.
(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.
(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be im-
ported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America,
Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.
Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permissi-
ble under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.
Under regulation 14: Provision exists in this regulation for the entry of
most kinds of plants that are not covered by other regulations of this quarantine
or by other quarantines.
Under regulation 15: Provision exists for the entry in unlimited quantities of
most kinds of plants which can be considered as peculiar to or standard produc-
tions of the Dominion of Canada, as opposed to stock imported into the
Dominion from foreign countries and held or grown on there for later sale.
European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries and
localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-
poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,
sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl
millet, napier grass, teosinte, and jobs-tears, on account of the European corn
borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.
Rice.-Quarantine No. 55, revised, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids the
importation of seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities ex-
cept the Republic of Mexico, and forbids the importation of rice straw and rice
hulls from all foreign countries and localities, and seed or paddy rice from the
Republic of Mexico, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemen-
tal thereto, effective July 1, 1933, as amended effective August 1, 1934, on
account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclero-
spora macrocarpa), leaf smut (Entyloma oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum),
and glume blotch (Melanomma glumarum), as well as dangerous insect pests.
Fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 56, effective November 1, 1923: For-
bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 1, 1936, the importation of fruits and vegetables, ex-
cept as restricted, as to certain countries and districts, by special quarantines
and other orders, and of plants or portions of plants used as packing material
in connection with shipments of such fruits and vegetables from all foreign
countries and localities other than the Dominion of Canada, on account of
injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Trypetidae). Includes and
supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the citrus blackfly.
Flag smut.-Quarantine No. 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the
importation of all species and varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.) and wheat
products, unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut
spores, from India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy. and
Spain.
Packing naterials.-Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amended,
effective July 1, 1933: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-
ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commlodities,
except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture are
judged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to have
eliminated risk of carrying injurious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw,
hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;
bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil with
an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for by regu-
lation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited except from
Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, a nd South
America. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving inspection
at will by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the following
when used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice) : corn
and allied plants from Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South
America; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar plant mixtures
from all countries; and authorized soil packing materials from all countries.
This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,
paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials.
Dutch elm disease.-Quarantine No. 70, revised, effective January 1, 193v:
Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease (ue to the fungus
Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plant., cuttings, and scions of elm or related
plants, defined to include all genera of the family Ulnaceae; logs of elm and
related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present on
them; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers, and other
articles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related
plants if not free from bark.







52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Marcb

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the
United States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. The
act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or
plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the
plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation.
Nursery stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicated above
under "Foreign plant quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37.)
Potatoes.-The order of December 22, 1913, and the regulations issued there-
under, revised, effective March 1, 1922, and amended, effective December 1,
1936, restrict the importation of potatoes from all foreign countries and locali-
ties except the Dominion of Canada and Bermuda, on account of injurious
potato diseases and insect pests. The importation of potatoes is now authorized
from Bermuda, Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Spain
(including the Canary Islands), and the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, and
the northern territory of Baja California, Mexico.
Cotton and cotton wrappings.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and
regulations issued thereunder, revised, effective February 24, 1923, amended
effective May 1, 1924, December 15, 1924, December 11, 1937, and July 1, 1938, re-
strict the importation of cotton and cotton wrappings from all foreign countries
and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.
Cottonseed products.-The two orders of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regu-
lations issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended, effective August 7,
1925, restrict the importation of cottonseed cake and meal and all other cotton-
seed products except oil from all foreign countries and localities, and the impor-
tation of cottonseed oil from Mexico, on account of injurious insects, including
the pink bollworm: Provided. That these commodities which originate in, and
are shipped directly from, the Imperial Valley, Baja California, Mexico, may
enter without restriction.
Plant safeguard regulations.-These rules and regulations, revised, effective
December 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for trans-
shipment and exportation and for transportation and exportation in bond of
restricted or prohibited plants and plant products when it is determined that
such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the
United States and also provide for the safeguarding of such plant material at a
port or within the territorial limits of the United States where entry or landing
is not intended or where entry has been refused.
Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products
into and out of the District of Columbia.-These rules and regulations, revised
effective April 30, 1938, are promulgated under the amendment to the Plant
Quarantine Act of May 31, 1920. They provide for the regulation of the move-
ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the
District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect
pests within the said District.
MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

Rules and regulations prohibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed
from Mexico into the United States and governing the entry into the United
States of railway cars and other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other
materials from Mexico at border points.-These rules and regulations, promul-
gated June 23, 1917, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act for
the United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1918, and since
repeated annually, and amended effective January 291, 1920, are designed to pre-
vent the entry of the pink bollworm of cotton which is known to exist widely
in Mexico. They provide for the examination of passengers' baggage, for the
disinfection of railway cars, freight, express, and other shipments, and for the
cleaning of domestic cars handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for dis-
infecting railway cars are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscel-
laneous receipts.
The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border
points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants
and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.

S







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

Regulations governing sanitary export certification.-These regulations, re-
vised effective September 21, 1936, were promulgated pursuant to authority
granted in the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17. 1935 (49 Stat. 268),
and repeated in subsequent appropriation acts. They provide for the inspection
and certification of domestic plants and plant products intended for export
to countries requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are
deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.





















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.
C. M. PAOKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge. Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.
C. F. W. MUESEBEOK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. 'F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations, (headquarters, Memico
City, Mexico).
54













U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1939









S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No 139 Issued September 1939.



United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1939


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements.-------------------------------------------- 56
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) -------------------------------. 56
Administrative instructions-defining the term "commercially packed" as applied to ship-
ments of apples or peaches under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (B. E. P. Q. 498)
(supersedes B. P. Q. 352)---------------------------------- ----------------------------- 56
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vege-
tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499)--------------------------------. 56
Japanese beetle quarantine regulations amended-------------------------------------------. 68
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1) -----------... 68
Amendment No. 1 to rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of
QuarantineNo.48- ------------------------------------------------------- 69
Notice to general public through newspapers --- -------- --------------------.-. 77
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) --------------------------- 77
Texas grapefruit harvest extended through May 15; grapefruit must be sterilized after April 11_ 77
Administrative instructions relating to the Mexican fruitfly quarantine requiring sterilization
of all grapefruit harvested on and after April 12, 1939, and extending the harvesting season
on grapefruit to the close of May 15, 1939 (B. E. P. Q. 495) .---- .. .---------------.-. 77
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_ ------------------------ 78
Suggestions for construction of plunging and growing beds and their maintenance under
beetle-free conditions in accordance with regulations of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 496) ------- --------------------- -------_-------- --------- 78
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until July 1, 1939, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the regulated
areas (B. E. P. Q. 485, revised) -...- -------------------------------------------. 79
Instructions to postmasters..---.-.--.._---------_ ----------------------------- 79
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products--- ------ ----- ------ .--------- 89
Arizona .---------- --------------- ------------..-- ----------------- 81
Arkansas-....------..-----.....--------- --- -------------------- -------. 81
California _----------------------------- ------------------------------ 81
District of Columbia --_ _--------------------------------- --- ----------- 82
Florida _..- ..---------------------------------------------------------------- 82
Hawaii .....-- ...--- .... ..----------------------------------------------. 82
Idaho.....---------- .....------------------.-------- ----------.--.- ------. 82
Louisiana ..-----..----...- --.... -------.------------------------------------83
Mississippi ...-------------. ----------- --------------- ------------------------ 83
Montana ..-.--------------------- ---------------------------- -------- --..-. 83
Oklahoma-.....------..... -. ---....-----------------------------------------.------ 83
Oregon ....----.....-.----..----------- --------------------------------------83
Puerto Rico- ........--------... ......------------------- .--------------------.------- ...84
Utah ......-.......------..-----------------------.---------.----.-- .... 84
Washington .-------. --------------- -- ---------..................----------------.... 84
Miscellaneous items ._ _ _ .------ ---------- _------------------ ....... 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406, revised, sup-
plement No. 2) ------.-------.---- --------------------------------------------- 85
Plant-quarantine import res trictions, Eire (Irish Free State) (B. E. P. Q. 408, supplement
No. 1)------- .------.-- ----------------------------- -- --.-------------. 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Finland (B. E. P. Q. 420, supplement
No. 2) ...-------------..------------------------ ----------------------.---- 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Rumania (B. E. P. Q. 422, supplement
No. 4) .. .------------------- ------- ---..------------------ 86
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony of St. Lucia, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.
434, revised, supplement No. 1) ---- ----------------------------------------- 87
Plant-quarantine import restrictions (Persia) Iran (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 3)----.. 87
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, supplement
No. 1)_--_ ..-------- ........-..-........-------------..--- .-----------. 87
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
ment No. 3) ..--... ... .----- ..------- --....... ----------.--------_.------ .. 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Venezuela (B. E. P. Q. 497) .. ._--------------.---- 89
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Mandated Australian Territory of New Guinea
(B. E. P. Q. 500)------------ ----------------------.-----------------89
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------------------------- 92
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.....-----..--..---..-----.----.. 95
55
167471-39---1








56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

B. E. P. Q. 498 (supersedes B. P. Q. 352).
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-DEFINING THE TERM "COMMERCIALLY PACKED"
AS APPLIED TO SHIPMENTS OF APPLES OR PEACHES UNDER THE JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
MAY 27, 1939.
Regulation 5 of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (sec. 301.48-5)
exempts from certification "commercially packed apples or commercially packed
peaches in any quantity" except those moving via refrigerator cars or motor-
trucks from the special area listed in paragraph (1) of that regulation.
In interpreting this exemption the term "commercially packed" will include:
(a) All apples or peaches in closed barrels, boxes, baskets, or other closed
containers.
(b) Apples or peaches in open packages when such fruits have been graded in
accordance with the official standards for apples or peaches promulgated by the
United States Department of Agriculture or in accordance with any official
grades authorized by the State in which the apples or peaches were grown and
when the containers are marked with such grade. The so-called Unclassified
Grade is not, however, considered a grade within the meaning of this defini-
tion, and apples or peaches in open packages so marked are not considered com-
mercially packed. (Sec. 301.48-5a, issued under authority contained in sec.
301.48-5.)
LEm A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 499.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURS-
ERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

JUNE 9, 1939.
Existing methods authorized for the treatment of sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, manure, nursery stock, fruits, and vegetables for the elimination of
the Japanese beetle have been revised and consolidated in these instructions.
Methods outlined herein are to be employed as a basis of quarantine certification
under regulations 5, 6, and 7 (secs. 301.48-5 to 301.48-7) of Quarantine No. 48,
revised (sec. 301.48). The issuance of these instructions cancels the methods of
treatment prescribed in B. P. Q. 359 and its four supplements, B. E. P. Q. 473,
B. E. P. Q. 475, and B. E. P. Q. 480.
While no guaranty can be given that no injury will be caused to the com-
modity, the treatments are recommended only for those commodities which
experience has shown were not seriously injured. It must be understood by
the nurseryman and shipper that no liability shall attach either to the United
States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in event of injury.
The inspector must bring this condition of treatment and the facts in reference
to the use of the chemicals to the attention of some responsible person at the
nursery or shipping point before the treatments are applied.
Inspectors must familiarize themselves with cautions for each chemical.

GRADES REQUIRED AND CAUTIONS ON THE USE OF
AUTHORIZED CHEMICALS

The chemicals authorized for the treatment of soil, nursery stock, fruits, and
vegetables, especially carbon disulfide, carbon disulfide emulsion, ethylene
oxide, hydrocyanic acid, and methyl bromide, are dangerous and proper care
must be exercised in handling them. The facts in reference to these chemicals
must be brought to the attention of some responsible person at the nursery or
shipping point before the treatments are applied.
(a) Carbon disulfide.-A technical, C. P., or U. S. P. grade is required. It
should be stored in tight drums or cans in a cool, dry place.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

The vapor of carbon disulfide is inflammable and explosive. At a tempera-
ture of 297 F. it may take fire spontaneously and in the presence of certain
metals, particularly copper, it may ignite at considerably lower temperatures. It
must be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric-light bulbs,
unprotected brush-type motors, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, cigarettes, or
pipes must never be brought near carbon disulfide.
Carbon disulfide is a blood poison, but poisoning by this chemical is rare.
Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and headache. When these symp-
toms develop, the individual should get into the open air.
(b) Carbon disulfide emulsion.-The required carbon disulfide emulsion con-
sists of carbon disulfide, meeting the above requirements, mixed with an equal
volume of a castor-oil-soap emulsifier which has been prepared according to the
directions published in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry,
volume 20, pages 849-850, August 1929.
The carbon disulfide and the castor-oil-soap emulsifier should be obtained in
separate containers. The emulsion must never be prepared in a large quantity.
It should be prepared in the field as it is used. In preparing the stock emulsion,
equal volumes of carbon disulfide and the emulsifier are mixed. This stock emul-
sion, when diluted with the required amount of water, forms the treating
solution.
Carbon disulfide emulsion, even after dilution, is inflammable. The precau-
tions given for handling carbon disulfide must be observed.
(c) Ethylene oxide.-A technical, C. P., or U. S. P. grade is required.
The vapor of ethylene oxide is inflammable and explosive. It must be kept
away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric-light bulbs, unprotected
brush-type motors, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, cigarettes, or pipes must
never be brought near ethylene oxide.
Ethylene oxide is not highly toxic to man. Continued exposure to the vapor
may cause giddiness and headache. When these symptoms develop, the indi-
vidual should get into the open air.
(d) Hydrocyanic acid.-Commercial liquid hydrocyanic acid, 96 to 98 percent
HCN, or this material absorbed on fiber discoids (which are divided into two
units, each comprising a series of discoids held together in the form of a chain)
in a can containing 61/, ounces of HCN, or calcium cyanide, 88 percent pure, are
required. The cylinders and cans of these cyanide products should be stored in
a cool, dry place.
Gaseous hydrocyanic acid is inflammable and explosive. All fire and unpro-
tected brush-type motors must be kept from contact with the gas. Lighted
cigars, cigarettes, or pipes should never be carried. In addition it is known
that liquid hydrocyanic acid undergoes decomposition on long storage in a
closed container. It is advisable that only sufficient of these cyanide products
be procured for the season's work. The residue left after fumigation with cal-
cium cyanide is dangerous and great care must be exercised in disposing of it.
Hydrocyanic acid is a violent poison. Inhaling hydrocyanic acid gas or absorb-
ing it through the skin is very dangerous and must be avoided. A suitable gas
mask and rubber gloves must be worn at all times when handling hydrocyanic
acid, or calcium cyanide, and when opening the hatches of fumigated cars for
aeration. If it is absorbed by the system, prompt action may prevent serious
consequences. The established principles of first aid in IICN poisoning are:
(1) Induce continued heavy breathing of fresh air by artificial respiration, using
the Shaefer (prone pressure) method: (2) neutralize the gas poisoning with
weak ammonia fumes or aromatic spirits of ammonia; (3) call a physician.
Small bottles of ammonium carbonate, as the source of ammonia fumes, should
be readily available as an inhalant at all times.
(e) Lead arsenate.-Lead arsenate which satisfies the standard requirements
of the chemical for use as an agricultural spray is required. It should contain
at least 30 percent of arsenic pentoxide, and not more than 0.75 percent of water-
soluble metallic arsenic. It should be obtained in powdered form to which no
stickers have been added. Lead arsenate should be stored in a dry place that
is not accessible to animals.
Lead arsenate is poisonous to man and animals. When applying the material,
the worker should wear gloves to protect his hands, since the poison may be
absorbed into the system through cuts and abrnsiois of the skin. The worker
should keep his hands away from his mouth at all times while handling the
material and be sure to wash thoroughly before eating. If absorbed by the sys-
tem, call a physician, give an emetic such as warm water and mustard, and
give milk or white of egg.







58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

(f) Methyl bromide.-The commercial grade is required. Containers of
methyl bromide should be stored in a cool, well-ventilated place. Avoid leakage
by seeing that the valves on the cylinders are tightly closed.
Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. As it has only a very
slight odor, toxic concentrations of methyl bromide may be encountered and the
persons so exposed may be unaware of the danger. While methyl bromide is not
so toxic as hydrocyanic acid, it is dangerous to inhale the gas or to get the
liquid in contact with the skin. Rubber gloves should be worn while releasing
the liquid methyl bromide either from cylinders or applicators. CAUTION.-
Rubber gloves absorb methyl bromide which may result in skin injury if they
are worn continuously.
(g) Naphthalene.-Flake naphthalene, free from tar, is required. Naphtha-
lene is not explosive and it burns only with difficulty. It is advisable, however,
to keep the material in the solid and gaseous form away from fire.
Long exposure to naphthalene may cause giddiness and headache. When
these symptoms develop, the individual should get into the open air.
(h) Paradichlorobenzene.--A technical or C. P. grade of small- to medium-
size crystals is required.
Paradichlorobenzene burns only with difficulty. It is advisable, however, to
keep the material from fire. Long exposure to the gas may cause giddiness and
headache. When these symptoms develop, the individual should get into the
open air.
TREATMENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS

(i) POTTING SOIL

Potting soil must be treated by the use of heat, carbon disulfide, naphthalene,
or lead arsenate.
Fumigated or heat-treated soils should be aerated to remove excessive
fumigant or heat before using for potting plants. When stored, the soil must
be kept and handled in such a manner as to prevent reinfestation. When
stored for a long time, without aeration, it is advisable to thoroughly mix the
upper and lower layers in the bin. When used as recommended, these treat-
ments do not impair the fertility of the soil.
Lead arsenate treatments are more limited in their application because of
the susceptibility of some nursery plants to arsenical poisoning.. E-418 of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine gives some information on the
susceptibility of nursery plants to lead arsenate in the soil.

(1) Heat treatment

Condition and type of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated, provided it is
friable.
Temperature.-The soil must be heated throughout to 1300 F.
Period of treatment.-The temperature of the soil must be maintained at
1300 F. for 30 minutes.

(2) Carbon disulfide fumigation

Equipment.-A gastight bin or box is required. It is necessary to have the
top, sides, and bottom tight.
Condition and type of soil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated, provided it
is friable and thrown loosely into the bin or box. Wet soil must never be
fumigated.
Temperature.-The temperature must be at least 450 F. when the fumigant
is applied and must not fall below 400 during the course of the treatment.
Dosage.-One pound (352 cubic centimeters) to 1 cubic yard.
Application.-One method is to apply the fumigant while the soil is being
put into the bin or box. Place 18 inches of soil in the bin or box. Inject
carbon disulfide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for each square yard of
surface, distributing the material uniformly in holes 2 inches deep and 18
inches apart, using 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soil
immediately after the liquid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil have
been treated, put in 18 inches more and repeat the operation. This can be
repeated until the container is filled.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

Another method is to apply the fumigant after the box or bin has been filled.
This is done by making holes from the surface to the different levels, so that
the carbon disulfide is applied in the same positions as by the first method.
The liquid, in this case, must be poured into the deep holes through a tube, or
injected to insure that it reaches the proper level.
Period of fumigation.-The box or bin must be sealed and left undisturbed
for 48 hours.
(3) Naphthalene fumigation

Equipment.-No special equipment is necessary. It is not necessary to cover
the soil.
Condition and type of soil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated, provided it
is friable. Wet soil must never be fumigated.
Temperature.-The temperature must be at least 50 F.
Dosage.-Five pounds to 1 cubic yard.
Application.-The fumigant must be thoroughly mixed with the soil, and the
soil then placed in a pile.
Period of fumigation.-The soil must be left undisturbed for 1 week.

(4) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.-The treatment must be applied before August 1.
Condition and type of soil.-The soil must be friable. Wet soil must never
be treated. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly
acid or neutral in reaction. Any type of soil may be treated provided it meets
these requirements.
Dosage.-Two pounds to 1 cubic yard.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed with the soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in
the above manner, by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the
following October 1 and June 15.
Handling of potted plants.-When plants potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil
are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of
these beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at
the rate of 1,500 pounds per acre.
Treated plants carried after June 15.-When plants potted in soil treated as
prescribed are carried after June 15, they may be again eligible for certifica-
tion between October 1 and June 15 of the second year if, on August 1 of the
second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of
2 pounds per cubic yard.

(j) SHIPMENTS OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE

Shipments of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure must be treated by
the use of heat or carbon disulfide. The instructions given in (i) (1) and (i)
(2) must be followed.
Type of car.-Tight boxcars must be used between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, and may be used at other times of the year. Open freight cars, of
the steel gondola type, may be used between October 16 and June 14. In cars
of this type, with dump bottoms, planks must be laid on the bottoms and covered
with heavy paper, in a manner approved by the inspector.
Doors.-The doorways of boxcars must be boarded up and covered with heavy
paper up to a point beyond the height of the sand, soil, etc. Certified cars must
have the doors closed and fastened while en route within the regulated area.
Depth of sand, soil, etc.-In boxcars, the sand, soil, etc., must not be loaded to
such a depth as would restrict the overhead working space and hamper the
work of the men applying the treatment. In the open-type cars, the material
should not be piled above the sides of the car.
Covering with canvas, etc.-When open-type cars are used, canvases or heavy
paper must be used to cover the surface as the treatment is applied. These
covers must be free from holes and a foot or more wider than the width of the
car. Where several pieces are used, they must be large enough to allow for
overlapping at least 1 foot. The covers must be fastened down at the sides of
the car and weighted on the surface, particularly where they overlap.







60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

(k) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS

Soil in and surrounding coldframes, plunging beds, heeling-in areas, etc.,
must be treated with lead arsenate, except, under special conditions, when the
inspector may authorize the use of heat, carbon disulfide, carbon disulfide emul-
sion, or naphthalene. With the exception of lead arsenate, the treatment must
not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in
the case of beds protected from beetles.
Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified, a strip 3 feet
wide must be treated around the entire coldframe, plunging bed, or heeling-in
ground. No plants will be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes,
etc., extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, no safety zone
is required.
Marking.-In the case of coldframes, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper
designations will be made on them by the Department representatives. In all
other cases the nurseryman shall furnish suitable stakes, at least 4 inches
square and 30 inches long, to be placed at the boundaries of the certified plots
and marked by the Department.

(1) LEAD ARSENATE TREATMENT

Season.-The treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to
be used in the fall.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Dosage.-Thirty-five pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,500 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore the original
concentration, as determined by chemical analyses, must be applied.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 inches of soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants must not be placed on or in the soil thus treated
until after October 1.
(2) HEAT TREATMENT

Hotbeds, equipped with steam pipes or electrical resistance coils in the soil,
may be treated by heating the soil to at least 1300 F. and maintaining this tem-
perature for 30 minutes.

(3) CARBON DISULFIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-A heavy paper or other gasproof cover must be provided to
cover the soil during the fumigation period.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth. A wet soil
must never be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must be
at least 450 F. when the fumigant is applied, and must not fall below 400 during
the period of treatment.
Weather conditions.-The ideal conditions are a warm, humid atmosphere
without wind.
Dosage.-Six pounds (2,100 cubic centimeters) to 100 square feet of surface.
Application.-Carbon disulfide must be uniformly distributed over the surface
of the bed, plot, or heeling-in area. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1
to 2 inches deep, putting 21 cubic centimeters into each hole. Fill each hole
with soil immediately after the liquid is poured. Cover each section as soon
as the fumigant is applied.
Period of treatment.-The soil must remain covered for 48 hours.

(4) CARBON DISULFIDE EMULSION TREATMENT
Equipment.-Suitable tanks, barrels, or tubs for preparing the emulsion and
24-gage galvanized-iron collars 10 inches wide and not more than 4 feet square,
for applying the treatment, must be provided.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable. The surface must be level and
not disturbed by recent cultivation. Drainage conditions must be such that the
solution does not disappear from the surface in less than 10 minutes or more
than 5 hours.






19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

Temperature.-The temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must be
at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied, and must not fall below 40
during the period of the treatment.
Dosage.-Two and one-half gallons of dilute emulsion to each square foot.
The concentration is dependent upon the temperature. Follow table 3 of
paragraph (m) (1).
Application.-Level the surface of the soil, removing weeds and debris. Force
a galvanized-iron collar 3 inches into the ground, and firm the soil against the
metal. Place another collar next to the first, and so on. When enough collars
are in place, pour the dilute emulsion into the basins formed within the collars.
As soon as the liquid has disappeared from the surface, the collar may be lifted
and set in another position.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not, be disturbed for 48 hours.

(3) NAPHTHALENE FUMIGATION

Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must not
be less than 50 F. during the period of the treatment.
Dosage.-Forty-six pounds to 1,000 square feet, or 2,000 pounds per acre.
Application.-The naphthalene must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 inches of soil.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 1 week.

TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS

The effect of insecticidal treatments on plants, when applied to soil about their
roots, varies with the variety, age, vigor, and condition of the plants. It should
be understood that these treatments have not been tried on all varieties of
plants, or under all of the varied conditions in the nurseries. In general, it is
not possible to destroy an insect in close proximity to the roots without causing
some damage to the plant. While guarantees cannot be given that no injury
will be caused to the plants, the treatments are recommended only for those
plants which experience has shown were not seriously injured. It must be
understood by the nurseryman that no liability shall attach either to the United
States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in event of injury.
After all treatments the plants must be handled in such a manner as to prevent
reinfestation.
(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING

(1) REMOVAL OF INFESTATION

With some deciduous and herbaceous plants, infestation can be removed by
shaking and washing all soil from the roots. Only such root masses as can be
thoroughly examined and absence of infestation verified may be certified by this
procedure.
(2) HOT-WATER TREATMENT

Equipment.-A water tank, equipped with a suitable heating device and
circulating system, must be provided.
Temperature.-The water must be maintained at 1120 F., with a variation of
not more than 0.50. Before the plants are immersed, thermometers must be
inserted in the center of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets, or root
masses placed at each end and at the center of the tank. In addition, three
thermometers must be placed in the water of the tank in the same relative
positions as those in the root masses. Temperature readings from each of these
thermometers must be recorded on Form No. 91.
Application.-The root masses must be inimmersed completely.
Period of treatment.-Seventy minutes after the root masses are heated to
1120 F.
Varieties of plants.-The varieties which have been treated successfully by
this procedure are given in Technical Bulletin 274.
Preparation of plants.-Large clumps should be divided as much as possible
without injuring the roots. Excess soil should be removed and the roots pruned.
Small plants and rootstocks may be packed loosely in wire baskets or in other







62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

suitable containers, provided the water can circulate through the masses. Large
plants must be placed individually in the water.
Care of plants after treatment.-Plants should be cooled slowly to room
temperature, Pot or heel them in the ground as soon as possible after cooling.
Tubers should be dry when packed. Avoid subjecting treated plants to freezing
temperatures shortly after treatment.

(3) CARBON DISULFIDE EMULSION DIP

Equipment.-Watertight tanks or tubs must be provided.
Temperature.-The temperature of the dip must be maintained between 65
and 700 F.
Dosage.-Forty-five cubic centimeters of carbon disulfide emulsion to 10
gallons of water. The treating solution must be prepared immediately before
using.
Application.-The root masses must be immersed completely.
Period of treatment.-The root masses must be immersed 24 hours.
Varieties of plants.-The varieties which have been treated successfully by
this procedure are given in Technical Bulletin 478.
Preparation of plants.-Large clumps should be divided as much as possible
without injuring the roots. Excess soil should be removed. No wet root
masses or root masses measuring more than 6 inches across the narrowest
dimension must be treated. The temperature of the root masses must be at
least 600 F. before treatment. Small plants and root stocks may be packed
loosely in wire baskets or other suitable containers, provided the dipping solu-
tion can circulate through the masses. Larger root masses must be placed
individually in the dip.
Care of plants after treatment.-Tubers should be dry when packed. Avoid
subjecting treated plants to freezing temperatures 'shortly after treatment. It
is advisable to allow plants which are to be potted to stand in the open to per-
mit evaporation of the fumigant before placing them in soil.

(4) PARADICHLOROBENZENE FUMIGATION

Season.-The treatment must be applied between October 1 and May 1.
Varieties of plants.-The following varieties of plants have been treated suc-
cessfully by this procedure: Aquilegia sp. var. Mrs. Scott Elliott's hybrid, Anemone
hupehensis, Artemisia dracunculus, Azalea amoena, A. kaempferi vars. Cleopatra,
Fedora, Othello, and Salmon Beauty, A. hinodegiri, A. obtusa kiusiana var.
Coral Bells, Aster alpinus, Campanula medium, Ceratostigma plumbaginoides,
Chrysanthemum sp., Dianthus caryophyllus var. Abbotsford Pink, Digitalis pur-
purea, Eupatorium coelestinum, Helianthemum glaucum croceum, Iberis amara,
Myosotis sp., Pachysandra terminalis, Phlox sp. var. R. P. Struthers, Santolina
chamaecyparissus incana, Sedum acre, Sempervivum alberti, Stokesia laevis,
Thymus serpyllum, Viola sp. vars. Jersey Gem and Rosina.
Preparation of plants.-Excess soil should be removed and the mass reduced
as much as possible without injuring the roots. The plant ball should be moist,
but not wet. Pots must be removed from potted plants. When burlap on
balled plant is of coarse weave, it may be left on the balls, but when it is
closely woven, it must be removed.
Preparation of plunging soil.-The paradichlorobenzene must be thoroughly
mixed with a light sandy loam, or sand, which is moist but not wet, and free
from lumps, stones, and debris. It must be mixed immediately before using.
Care of plants during treatment.-If it is necessary to water the plants during
the treatment to prevent desiccation, the operation must be limited to a light
syringing, under the supervision of an inspector.
Care of plants after treatment.-It is advisable to avoid excessive watering
of the plants after treatment in order to permit any residual gas to escape from
the plant balls.
(i) Complete coverage

Temperature.-The temperature of both the treating soil and the soil ball
must not be less than 50 F. during the period of treatment. To prevent injury-
to the plants, it should not go above 65.
Dosage.-Ten pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (6 ounces per cubic foot)
for soil balls up to 6 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension. Twenty







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63


pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (12 ounces per cubic foot) for soil balls
from 6 to 8 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension.
Application.-Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard
surface, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the
balls spaced at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the
plant balls with treated soil and cover the plant balls to a depth of 1 inch.
Then, place about 1 inch of treated soil against the row of plants. This opera-
tion is repeated until all the plants are plunged.
Period of treatment.-The plants must be left undisturbed for a period of
5 days.
(ii) Side application

Temperature, dosage, period of treatment.-The various combinations of
dosage and exposure which may be used at different temperatures are given in
table 1. It is desirable to maintain the temperature fairly constant. The tem-
peratures given at the head of the column in table 1 are the minimum tempera-
tures during the period of treatment.

TABLE 1.-Temperature, dosage, and period of treatment for
paradichloro benzene


Crystals Period of treatment I required when the minimum
per cubic Fahrenheit temperature is within the range
of--
Width or depth of plant ball (inches) yard of
plunging
soil 450-490 500-540 550-590 600-640 650-690 700-74o

Pounds Days Days Days Days Days Days
f 1 (1) (1) 10 9 7 5
5 9 7 6 5 4 2
Up to 2-...-------.... ---------.--------- 10 7 6 5 4 3 2
20 5 5 4 3 2 1
5 (1) 10 10 9 8 4
2 to 4...-.......-----...--------------...... 10 9 8 8 7 6 3
20 7 7 6 6 5 2
|1 () () () (') () ()
4 to 5 ( I) ) (t) () () (i)
to 6O------------------------------------- 10 (1) (1) (1) (1) 9 7
10 (1) (1) (1) (1) 9 7
20 (1) (1) 8 7 6 4

I Exposure period more than 10 days.

Application.-Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard
surface, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the
balls spaced at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the
plant balls with treated soil, taking care not to get the treated soil in contact
with the stems of the plants, and cover the upper side of the plant balls with
treated soil to within 2 inches of the stems. Then, place about 1 inch of treated
soil against the row of plants. The operation is repeated until all the plants
are plunged.
(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-A fumigation chamber, of approved design, equipped with
vaporizing, air-circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be va-
porized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation
during the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the
chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed.
The ventilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire
period of removal of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperature.-The temperature of the soil (with bare rootstock, the root
spaces) and air must be at least (3 F. during the entire fumigation period.
Dosage.-Two and one-half pounds of methyl bromide per 1,(0) cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the load.
167471-39-----2








64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Period of treatment.-Two and one-half hours.
Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied only to plants with
bare roots or in 8-inch pots, or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 8 inches
in diameter or thicker than 8 inches when not spherical. The soil should not
be puddled or saturated. With wet material, drying for a period of 12 hours
is advisable before treatment. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of
pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other, they should not be jammed tightly together.
Varieties of plants.-The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, in-
cluding also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied
on request.
(ii) Fumigation of strawberry plants in shipping crates of field-packed baskets

Temperature.-The temperature of the plants and air must be at least 600 F.
during the entire fumigation period.
Dosage.-Three pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the
space occupied by the load.
Period of treatment.-Four hours.
Preparation of plants.-Strawberry plants may be fumigated either bundled
and packed in damp moss in slatted shipping crates or in field-packed baskets
of 1 bushel or less. The load in the fumigation space should be arranged to
allow the gas to enter from all sides of the containers.
Varieties of plants.-This treatment has been authorized for strawberry
plants only.
(m) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING

(1) CARBON DISULFIDE EMULSION

Equipment.-Strips or squares of 24-gage galvanized iron, 10 inches wide
of the proper size, and watertight cans or tubs must be provided.
Season.-This treatment must not be used when adult beetles are present.
Temperature.-The treatment must not be applied when the temperature of
the soil at a depth of 6 inches is below 40 F., or it is anticipated that the
temperature will fall below this during the period of treatment.
Dosage.-The dosage of stock emulsion which must be used is dependent on
the minimum soil temperature anticipated- during the period of the treat-
ment. Schedules 1, 2, and 3 in tables 2 and 3 give the dosages required for
the treatment of plant balls of various sizes.

TABLE 2.-Dosage for circular collars

Stock carbon disulfide Stock carbon disulfide
emulsion emulsion
Diameter Diam- Diameter ia
of ball to of ball to
be dug eter of Water Sched- Sched- Sched- ballo eter of Water Sched- Sched- Sched-
inbe dug collar ule ule ule be dug collar ule ule ule
(mches) No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 (ches) No. 1 No. 2 No. 3
400-500 500-600 600-700 400-500 500-600 600-70
F. F. F. F. F. F.

Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic
centi- centi- centi- centi- centi- centi-
Inches Gallons meters meters meters Inches Gallons meters meters meters
12 or less_ 18 4.5 31 26 20 21 .-------. 36 17.5 119 99 80
14 ---------- 21 6.0 41 34 27 25-27---... 39 21.0 143 119 95
18--..---. 27 10.0 68 57 45 28-30 ..--- 42 24.0 164 136 108
20 ---...- 30 12.0 82 68 54 33_----,-- 45 27.5 187 156 125
22..--.---- 33 15.0 102 85 68 36--------- 48 31. 5 215 179 143





II







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65


TABLE 3.-Dosage for square collars

Stock carbon disulfide Stock carbon disulfide
emulsion emulsion
Diameter Length Diameter Length
of ball to of side Water Sched- Sched- Sched- ofball to of side Water Sched- Sched- Sched-
be dug of col- ule ule ule be dug of col- ule ule ule
(inches) lar No. 1 No. 2 No3 (chs) lar No. 1 No. 2 No 3
400-500 500-600 600-700 400-500500-60 60-700
F. F. F. F. F. F. F.

Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Cubic
centi- renti- centi- centi- iceni- centi-
Inches Gallons meters meters meters Inches Gallons meters meters meters
12orless___ 18 5.5 37 31 25 24......... 36 22.5 153 128 102
14_ ------ 21 7.5 51 43 34 25-27..---- 39 26.0 177 148 118
18 -------- 27 12.5 85 71 57 28-30------ 42 30.5 208 173 139
20_------ 30 15.5 106 88 70 33. -------- 45 35.0 238 199 159
22 .------ 33 19.0 129 108 86 36 -------_ 48 40.0 272 227 182


Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours.
Period of digging.-The plants must be dug within 3 days after the com-
pletion of the treatment.
Varieties of plants.-The varieties which have been treated successfully by
this method are given in Technical Bulletin 478.
Preparation of plants.-The surface of the soil about the base of the plant
must be practically level; treatment must not be applied on a slope which
cannot be leveled without filling. Weeds and debris must be removed from
the surface of the soil. It is advisable to tie low-hanging branches so they
will not dip into the treating solution. After the size of the ball to be lifted
with the plant has been determined, a galvanized-iron collar of the proper size
is placed about the base of the plant and forced to a depth of 3 inches into
the soil. The soil must be firmed carefully on each side of the galvanized iron
to prevent seepage.
Application.-The quantity of treating solution to be used must be determined
from tables 2 and 3. The required quantity of stock emulsion is added to water
and mixed well. Then the solution is poured into the collar, avoiding splash-
ing or unnecessary disturbance of the soil. Pouring the solution on a spade
will be of considerable help. A record must be made of the time required
for the treating solution to disappear from the surface. Irainage conditions
must be such that the solution does not disappear from the surface in less than
10 minutes or more than 5 hours. An examination must be made after the
treatment has been applied to determine the uniformity of penetration.
Handling plants after treatment.-The inspector must be sure that a ball of
soil no larger than that originally planned is removed with the plant.

(2) LEAD ARSENATE TREATMENT

Season.-Treatment must be applied by July 1. Plants may be certified
when the period of treatment is completed, and until the following June 15.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth. This treat-
ment is reconmmended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Dosage.-Thirty-five pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,5p00 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore the origi-
nal concentration, as determined by chemical analyses, must be applied.
Period of treatment.-Plants in plots treated initially must not be dug until
October 1; those on re-treated plots may be dug on September 20.
Application.-Lead arscnate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with
the upper 3 inches of soil. The ridge of soil between the plants in the rows
and the soil about the base of the plants nmust le removed to a depth of 2
inches and placed in the space between the rows of plants. Lead arsenate may
be applied with a suitable distributor, or broadcast by hand, before or after
the hoeing operation is completed. Then the soil between the rows of plants
must be cultivated three times. On the last cultivation, the cultivator is
adjusted in such a manner that the treated soil is thrown toward the rows
of plants. At least 3 inches of treated soil must be placed in the rows about
the bases of the plants.







66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Varieties of plants.-The varieties of plants which have been treated success-
fully by this method are given in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
E-418.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in (k).
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in (k).

TREATMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

The effect of insecticidal treatments on fruits and vegetables varies with the
variety and the condition. While guaranties cannot be given that no injury
will be caused to the fruits and vegetables, the treatments are recommended
only for those commodities which experience has shown were not seriously
injured. It must be understood by the shipper that no liability shall attach
either to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees
in event of injury to the commodities.
After all treatments, the commodities must be handled in such a manner as
to prevent reinfestation by the adult Japanese beetles.

(n) CARBON DISULFIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-A fumigation chamber, of approved design, equipped with a
vaporizing, air-circulating, and ventilating system, must be provided.
Temperature.-The temperature must be at least 800 F. during the treatment.
Dosage.-Ten pounds to each 1,000 cubic feet in the chamber.
Period of treatment.-Two hours.
Varieties of fruit.-The varieties of fruit treated successfully by this method
are given in Circular 373.
Preparation of fruit.-The crates and baskets of fruit must be stacked in the
chamber in such a manner that the gas will have access to all sides of the
containers.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the carbon disulfide must be vapor-
ized within it. The water in the coils of the vaporizing pan must be at least
1480 F. and should never exceed 1800. The water must be circulated through
the coils of the vaporizing pan for 60 minutes after the fumigant has been put
into the pan. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during the
period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must be
well ventilated before it is entered and the fruit removed.

(0) CYANIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-Refrigerator cars in good condition and dry must be provided.
Four screens, made of cotton netting on light wooden frames which fit tightly
over the hatch openings, and equipped with three wires for fastening to the
hatch cover, hinges, and graduating arm, must be provided for each car.
When liquid hydrocyanic acid is used, two metal trays having an area of 2
square feet and equipped to be suspended about 24 inches below the hatch
cover, a 3-ounce measuring cup, and a tube for putting the material into the pans
must be provided.
When HCN discoids are used, an approved type of can opener must be
provided.
When calcium cyanide is used, two trays of light wooden construction, 6 to 8
feet long, 2 feet wide, and 2 inches deep, and sufficient building paper to properly
cover these trays must be provided.
Temperature.-The temperature must be at least 750 F. in the car during the
treatment.
Dosage.-Liquid hydrocyanic acid---------------- 6 ounces per car.
HCN discoids----------------------- 6. 5 ounces per car.
Calcium cyanide, 88 percent ---- 3 pounds per car.
Period of treatment.-Liquid hydrocyanic acid------- 2 hours.
HCN discoids------- ------- ----
Calcium cyanide --- ----- 1. 5 hours.
Varieties of fruits and vegetables.-This treatment is authorized for bananas
and empty refrigerator cars.
Preparation of commodities.-The bananas must be stacked in such a manner
that the gas will have access to all sides.
Application, liquid hydrocyanic acid.-The doors must be closed tightly and
the ice drips properly plugged. Remove one insulating plug from each bunker







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67


and suspend a tray therein. Fill the 3-ounce measuring device with liquid
hydrocyanic acid, and pour through the tube into the pan. Replace the plug and
close the hatch cover tightly. Then repeat the operation in the ice bunker at
the opposite end of the car.
HCN discoids.-The doors must be closed tightly and the ice drips properly
plugged. Remove one insulating plug from each ice bunker. Open the can,
remove one discoid unit and suspend it immediately in the bunker, holding the
string at the edge of the opening and wedge it in position by closing and fasten-
ing the insulating plug. The open end of the can must be covered with the
fiber cap immediately after the unit is removed to prevent loss of gas. Then
place the second discoid unit in the bunker at the opposite end of the car.
Calcium cyanide.-The doors and the hatches must be tightly closed and the
ice drips properly plugged. Open one door. Cover the trays with paper and
apply 11j pounds of calcium cyanide uniformly to the paper in each tray. Then
place the trays on the load near the door of the car. Finally, close the door
tightly.
After the treatment is completed, open the hatches and place the screens in
position and remove the plugs from the ice drips. Remove the pans and trays.
Doors must be kept closed, unless an approved screen has been provided.

.(p) ETHYLENE OXIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-A fumigation chamber. of approved design, equipped with
vaporizing, air-circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Temperature.-The temperature must be at least 750 F. during the treat-
ment.
Dosage.-Two pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet in the chamber.
Period of treatment.--Two hours.
Varieties of fruit.-The varieties of fruit treated successfully by this method
are given in Circular 373.
Preparation of fruit.-The crates and baskets of fruit must be stacked in
the chamber in such a manner that the gas will have access to all sides of the
containers.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the ethylene oxide must be vapor-
ized in the pan in the chamber. The air within the chamber must be kept in
circulation during the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treat-
ment, the chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the fruits
removed.
(q) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

(1) Refrigerator cars

Equipment.-Refrigerator cars must be in fair condition with sound, well-
fitting doors and hatches. Standard cloth screens for covering the hatches
and a temporary cloth screen for covering one door during ventilation are
essential. An electric blower of not less than 750 cubic feet per minute capacity
against /-inch water pressure, equipped with devices for lowering into the
bunker and securing, so that the blower outlet butts against the bunker screen
unimpeded either by studs or burglar bar.
Temperature.-The temperature within the car must be at least 700 F. dur-
ing the treatment.
Dosagc.-Two pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet; or 5 pounds per refrigerator
car.
Period of treatment.-Two hours from the end of the fumigant release period.
Application.-The doors must be closed tightly and the ice drips properly
plugged. The methyl bromide may be released either by weight or measure.
through a copper or brass applicator tube of 'M-inch bore. This tube must be
fitted with a disk-type spray nozzle and must be bent in a U-shape at the end,
so that the spray nozzle is directed upward toward the center of the bunker and
not less than 1 foot below the ceiling during the release of the fumigant. The
blower must be in continuous operation during the release of the fumigant and
for 5 minutes thereafter. At the end of this period' the blower may be removed
and transferred to the next car. The fumigant must be released in a split
dosage consisting of 3 pounds in the bunker end through the hatch across from
the blower and 2 pounds in the hatch at the opposite end of the car and in line
with the blower.







68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Ventilation.-At the end of the exposure period, all hatches must be imme-
diately propped open and screened, and the drip plugs removed. One door must
be opened and screened for a period of 20 minutes, following which it should be
closed and sealed. If the car is to be moved within one-half hour, the opening
of the door may be omitted.
Commodities treated.-The treatment is approved for the following fruits
and vegetables: Potatoes, sweetpotatoes, onions, tomatoes, snap beans, lima
beans, sweet corn, cabbage, carrots, beets, apples, and peaches.

(2) Flumigation house, room, and box

The commodities listed above may be fumigated in approved fumigation
chambers. The same requirements as to dosage, circulation period, exposure,
temperature, and screening of doors listed under refrigerator-car fumigation
apply. The chamber must be ventilated with the ventilating equipment in con-
tinuous operation for one-half hour. All ventilator intakes must be protected
with eight-mesh wire screen. The ventilating fan must run during -both the
placing and removal of the load. In addition, the requirements for screened
loading facilities and the subsequent certification of loads must be met. (Sec.
301.48a, issued under authority contained in sec. 301.48.)
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS AMENDED
[Press notice]

JUNE 24, 1939.
An amendment to the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, effective July 1,
was announced by the Secretary of Agriculture today under which Rochester
and Brighton, N. Y., are added as isolated, regulated areas, and all of Cuyahoga
County, Ohio, is brought under regulation. This changes the status of Cleveland
so that certification is required for all restricted commodities moved from that
city to nonregulated territory.
Another change included in this amendment is the omission of regulated parts
of Steuben County, N. Y., other than the town of Hornellsville, from the isolated
areas. The exemption of certain types of sand and clay has been clarified and
the requirements for certification of nursery and ornamental stock received by
establishments within the regulated areas have been modified.


MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following amendment to the Japanese beetle- quarantine regulations adds
to the regulated area four townships in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, bringing the
entire county within the area. This extension parallels action already taken
by the Ohio Department of Agriculture to relieve a traffic situation encountered
in the operation of vehicular inspection stations on westbound highways from
the Cleveland area. With the extension of the continuous regulated area to
include that city, certification is required for all restricted commodities moving
from Cleveland to nonregulated territory. Rochester and Brighton, N. Y., are
now included as outlying regulated areas subject to the same restrictions as
apply to similar isolated points.
Another change included in this amendment is the omission of regulated
portions of Steuben County, N. Y., other than the town of Hornellsville, from
the isolated areas to which the movement of certain quarantined articles was
heretofore required to be certified.
A section of regulation 7 exempting from the certification requirements certain
types of sand and clay is reworded to clarify the requirement.
Requirements are modified for the certification of nursery and ornamental
stock received by nurseries and greenhouses within the regulated area, both as
to the infested and noninfested nurseries and greenhouses.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and PTant Quarantine.






1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
(Approved June 22, 1939; effective July 1, 1939)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917
(39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 (sees.
301.48-3, 5, 6, 7, and 9) of the rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) sup-
plemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sec. 301.48) on account of the Japa-
nese beetle, which were promulgated February 16, 1939, are hereby amended
to read as follows:
REGULATION 3

SEC. 301.48-3 Regulated areas.-In accordance with the provisos to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48), the Secretary of Agri-
culture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the
States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magis-
terial districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other politi-
cal subdivisions within their limits:
Connecticut.-The entire State.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the City of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and
election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 32 in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne
Arundel County; election districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, in
Baltimore County; all of Caroline County except election districts of American
Corners (No. 8) and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; the city of Westminster, and the
election districts of Freedom (No. 5), Hampstead (No. 8), New Windsor (No.
11), and Westminster (No. 7), in Carroll County; election districts of La Plata
and White Plains, in Charles County; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7),
East New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in
Dorchester County; election districts of Brunswick (No. 25), Buckeystown (No.
1), Frederick (No. 2), Jefferson (No. 14), New Market (No. 9), and Petersville
(No. 12), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election district of
Marshall (No. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City (No. 2),
Guilford (No. 6), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard County; election
districts of Colesville (No. 5), and Rockville (No. 4), in Montgomery County,
and those portions of the election districts of Bethesda (No. 7), and Wheaton
(No. 13) in said county located within the established boundaries of the so-called
Washington Suburban Sanitary District; all of Prince Georges County except
the election districts of Aquasco (No. 8), and Nottingham (No. 4) ; towns
of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County: election districts of Hagerstown
(Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Halfway (No. 26), Leitersburg (No. 9), Sandy
Hook (No. 11), Sharpsburg (No. 1), and Williamsport (No. 2), in Washington
County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis
(No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No.
4), Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willards
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.
Massachusetts.-The entire State.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Etlingham, Free-
dom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wake-
field, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridge-
water, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, lHanover, Ilebron,
Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango. Co-
lumbia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnanm, Queens,







70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk,
Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and
Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; towns of Am-
herst, Cheektowaga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna,
in Erie County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats,
Herkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark,
Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town
of Watertown and city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount
Morris and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester
and town of Brighton, in Monroe County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix,
Hector, Montour, and Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler
County; towns of Caton, Corning, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of
Corning and Hornell, in Steuben County; -towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden,
Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins County; towns
of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls. in Warren County.
Ohio.-Counties of Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Harrison, Jefferson, Ma-
honing, Portage, Stark, Summit, and Tuscarawas; the city of Coshocton, in
Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and villages of Bexley, Grandview,
Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and Upper Arlington, in Franklin
County; the township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the
city of Toledo, in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mans-
field, in Richland County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Cham-
pion, Fowler, Hartford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, South-
ington, Warren, Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and
the villages of Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orange-
ville, in Trumbull County.
Pennsylvania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, and Venango
Counties; Mercer Township in Butler C-ounty; Ashland, Beaver, Elk, Richland
(including the boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg), Salem, and Washing-
ton Townships, in Clarion County; townships of Coolspring, Deer Creek, Dela-
ware, East Lackawannock, Fairview, Findley, French Creek, Greene, Hemp-
field, Jackson, Jefferson, Lackawannock, Lake, Liberty, Mill Creek, New Vernon,
Otter Creek, Perry, Pine, Pymatuning, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South
Pymatuning, Springfield, Sugar Grove, West Salem, Wilmington, Wolf Creek,
and Worth, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Grove City,
Jackson Center, Jamestown, Mercer, New Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville,
and Stoneboro, in Mercer County; and the townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry
Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Lime-
stone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove,
Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar
Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren County.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess
Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in Chester-
field County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; magis-
terial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick
County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County; and the
cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Ports-
mouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
West Virginia.-Counties of Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, and
Taylor; districts of Arden, Hedgesville, Falling Waters, and Opequon, and the
city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the towns of Bolivar and Harpers
Ferry, in Jefferson County; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Min-
eral County; the city of Wheeling, in Ohio County; and the city of Parkers-
burg, in Wood County.'
REGULATION 5

SEC. 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables-A.
Control of movement.-(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), in-

SSees. 301.48-3. 5, 6, 7, and 9 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318; 39 Stat.
1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

clusive, of this regulation: (i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod,
bananas, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries
shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to
or through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits and vegetables of any
kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or
motortruck from the State, District, counties, election districts, townships,
towns, or cities listed below to or through any point outside of the regulated
areas:
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester;
the city of Baltimore; election districts No. 12 and No. 15, in Baltimore County;
all of Caroline County, except election district of American Corners (No. 8) and
Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market
(No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County;
election districts of Abingdon (No. 1), Halls Cross Roads (No. 2), and Havre
de Grace (No. 6), in Harford County; election districts of Camden (No. 13),
Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons
(No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury,
Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), in Wicomico County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Brecknock, Caernarvon, Cole-
brookdale, Cumru, District, Douglass, Earl, Exeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace,
Muhlenberg, Oley, Pike, Robeson, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Wash-
ington, the city of Reading, and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtelsville, Birdsboro,
Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring,
Temple, West Lawn, West Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in
Berks County; townships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Sus-
quehanna, and Swatara, the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire,
Middletown, Paxtang, Penbrook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County;
townships of Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs
of Coopersburg and Emaus, in Lehigh County; townships of Lower Saucon and
Williams, in Northampton County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.
Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.
(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill
of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area
to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required for interstate
movement from the main regulated area to Brewer and Waterville, Maine;
Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the
town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie,
Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield,
Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland
Counties, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va. No
restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from
Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris,
Rochester, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y.,
or from other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. Y.;
Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or from other
regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and
Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of (1) apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment; (2) bananas
in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (3) bananas singly, or
in individual hands.
167471-39- 3







72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE tApr.-June

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples or commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those
moving via refrigerator cars or motortrucks from the area listed in paragraph
(1) of this regulation.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that any
such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time
or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve
danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to
eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation
or delivery.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables to points outside the regulated areas between
June 15 and October 15, inclusive, under one of the following conditions:
(3) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than that specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or moving
from such designated area other than by refrigerator car, have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be
limited and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned
on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for
the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such
inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during
periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulated
areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector
for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Cer-
tificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where, in
the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been exposed
to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unloading
docks.
(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese beetle
has not begun or'has ceased its flight.
(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation, have been inspected and loaded in a
manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately
screened, doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by
an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common
carrier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumiga-
tion or cleaning and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and
sealed.
(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary
in the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors and hatches of the car have
been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.2

REGULATION 6

SEC. 301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental
stock.-A. Control of movement.--Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in
regulation 1 (sec. 301.48-1) shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate
from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, unless a cer-
tificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except as
follows:
(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are therefore exempt from the requirements of certification:

2 See footnote 1, p. 70.






19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73


(a) (i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage
growth, and when free from soil, and (ii) single dahlia tubers or small dahlia
root divisions when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other
than single tubers or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require cer-
tification.
(b) (i) Cut orchids, (ii) orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda
fiber, (iii) Osmunda fiber, osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmuinda cinnamnomea,
and 0. claytoniana).
(c) (i) Floral designs or "set pieces," including wreaths, sprays, casket covers,
and all formal florists' designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are
not exempted; (ii) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Epigaea repens), when free
from soil or primary roots, and when shipped during the period between October
16 and June 14, inclusive.
(d) (i) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when
so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials, (ii) balsam pil-
lows, when composed of balsam needles only, (iii) mushroom spawn, in brick,
flake, or pure culture form, (it) banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and
shredded.
(e) (i) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridiium recognitum), (ii)
resurrection plant or birds'-nest moss (Sclaginella clpidophylla), (iii) sphag-
num moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae), (ir) dyed moss, when heat
treated and appropriately labeled.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the port
of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each container
with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a statement
of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the nime and address of the
consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October 16
and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and of portions of
plants without roots and free from soil (such as branches, twigs and scions of
trees and shrubs, and Christmas trees).
(4) No certificate or peirmit will be required for the interstate movement
of nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area, except that a certificate is required between June 15 and
October 15 for interstate movement of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of
portions of plants without roots and free from soil (such as branches, twigs,
and scions of trees and shrubs, and Christmas trees) from the main regu-
lated areas to Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell. Mount
Morris, Rochester, and Watertown. and the town of IHornellsville. Steuben
County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston
Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, ('oshocton, Mansfield. Newark, and Toledo, Ohio,
or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Burling-
ton, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling. W. Va. No restrictions are placed on
the interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 of cut flowers, aquatic
plants, and of portions of plants without roots and free from soil (such as
branches, twigs, and scions of trees and shrubs, and Christmas trees) from
Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris,
Rochester, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsville. Steuben County,
N. Y., or from other regulated parts of Erie. Jefferson, and Livingston Counties,
N. Y.; Columbus, (Coshocton. Mansfield. Newark, and Toledo. Ohio, or from
other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio: Burlington, Vt.;
and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.
B. Conditions yorItCInlig the SIs;uawI e of certificatfs and permits.-For the pur-
pose of certification of nursery and ornamlental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premnises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:
(5) Class I.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and ,other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within alppro ximately 500 feet
of which no infestation has been found may be classifild as class I. Upon com-
pliance with the requirements of paragraph (111 of this regulation, nursery
and ornamental stock may le ccrt ified by the inspector for shipment from
such premises without further insipection, and withlout meeting the safeguards
prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in
nurseries or greenhouses of class III.







74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

(6) Class III.-(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided, (i) there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas,
certified houses, frames, or plots, or other certified areas, or (ii) there is a
legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock. Such
classification will not be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises
that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent
certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where
one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within
approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or prop-
erties. In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and manage-
ment but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels, may
be independently classified either as class I or class III upon compliance with
such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly,
unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to
subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III,
when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent
and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Provided,
That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by
boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond
the point where the infestation occurs.
(b) Upon compliance with paragraphs (7), (10), and (11) of this regula-
tion, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for ship-
ment from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That
the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough
inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the
stock by shaking or washing; or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satis-
factory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified
greenhouse.
(7) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all
potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(o) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown out-
doors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other
material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv)
shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.
(8) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be certified
for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector and
found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grown in a greenhouse
of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class. III and are transported under
such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infestation.
(See also par. (3) of this regulation.)
(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the foll9wing
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b)







19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75


that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(10) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
III status shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to
make the report required by this regulation, and such denial of certification
shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(11) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class I
status, or to maintain, in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision, a
certified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (a) shall restrict their purchases or
receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable
matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure secured within the regulated area
and intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certifi-
cate shall accompany the article when moved; (b) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on class I or certified premises or
are taken into certified greenhouses; (c) shall report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area for
use on such premises; and (d) shall also report immediately on forms provided
for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points
outside the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses
within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has
omitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation, and such
denial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been
supplied.
(12) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(13) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.8
REGULATION 7

SEc. 301.48-7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, and manure.-A. Control of movement.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, com-
post, and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from
any point in the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof unless
a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except
as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand and
clay when free from vegetable matter; (b) greensand marl; and (c) such
other sands and clays as have been treated or processed and subsequently
handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese
beetle could exist therein, provided that each container of such article shall
be labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in the
case of bulk shipments such label shall accompany the waybill or other ship-
ping papers.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either shredded, ground, pulver-
ized, or compressed, or (b) when treated with crude petroleum or any other
product having high potency as an insecticide, and eWhen so labeled an the out-
side of each commercial container of such materials.

See footnote 1, p. 70.







76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is fur-
ther protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area; or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of
the following conditions:
(5) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.
(6) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.
(7) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an
inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspec-
tor that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the cars
and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and
in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(8) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition
of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure,
except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (5), (6),
or (7) hereof.4
REGULATION 9

SEC. 301.48-9. Marking and certification a, condition of interstate transporta-
tion.-(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in
regulations 5, 6, and 7 (secs. 301.48-5, 6, and 7) shall be plainly marked with
the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the con-
signee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid cer-
tificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of
lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and
another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall
accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading
pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely
attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate
or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.4
This amendment shall be effective on and after July 1, 1939.
Done at the city of Washington this 22d day of June 1939.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in or
through the area regulated on account of the Japanese beetle.]

4 See footnote 1, p. 70.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THIROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., June 22, 1939.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as
amended, has promulgated Amendment No. 1 to the revised rules and regulations
supplemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after July 1, 1939. The purpose of the amendment is principally
to include in the regulated area the entire county of Cuyahoga, (hio, changing
the status of Cleveland so that certification is required for all restricted com-
modities moved from that city to nonregulated area ; to add Rochester, N. Y.,
and Brighton, N. Y., as outlying regulated are'as; to omit part of the area in
Steuben County, N. Y.; and to include minor modifications as to certification
requirements. Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Times. HTfIrtford,
Conn., July 1, 1939; the Journal-Every Evening. Wilinington. Del., July 1, 193!9: the
Press-Ierald, Portland, Maine, July 5, 19:39: the Sun. Baltimore. Md.. July 3. 1939:
the Post, Boston, Mass., July 3, 1939; the 1inion. Manchester, N. f1.. July 7, 19309; the
News, Newark, N. J., July ., 1989: the Times. New York. N. Y., July 3. 1939; the
Press, Cleveland, Ohio. July 3, 1939: the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., July 1, 1939: the
Bulletin, Providence, R. I., July 1, 1939; the Free Press. Burliniton. Vt., July 3, 1939;
the News Leader. Richmond. Va.. July 1, 19!39; the Gazette, Charlhston, WV. Va., July
5, 1939; and the Star, Washington, D. C., July 3, 1939.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)

TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT HARVEST EXTENDED THROUGH MAY 15; GRAPEFRUIT MUST BE
STERILIZED AFTER APRIL 11

[Press notice]
APRIL 10, 1939.
The season for harvesting grapefruit under the Mexican fruitfly quarantine
regulations, which apply to the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Ilidalgo,
and Willacy and part of Jim Wells ('ounty, has been extended to the close of
May 15, Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, announced today. The harvesting season normally closes under the
quarantine on April 30.
In order to insure against, spread of infestation all grapefruit ha'rvested in
the regulated area after April 11. 11939, must be sterilized in manner and by
method approved by the Chief of the Bureau of IEntomology and Plant
Quarantine.
The extension of the harvest season for grapefruit and the requirement, of
sterilization for such fruit harvested after Airil 11, 19)39, was annlounced after
consultation with the Texas State epa rtment of Agriculture and is concurred
in by J. E. McDonald, commissioner of agriculture.
The harvesting season for Valencia oranges closes on June 15, 1939, as
provided in circular B. E. P. Q. 487, dated January 27, 1939.

B. E. P. Q. 495.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATING TO THE MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARAN-
TINE, REQUIRING STERILIZATION OF ALL GRAPEFRUIT IHARVESTED ON AND
AFTER APRIL 12, 1939, AND EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON GRAPE-
FRUIT TO THE CLOSE OF MAY 15, 1939
APiRIL 7, 1939.
Under authorization vested in the Chie f of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in the third proviso of Notice of Quarantine No. 1,4. revised
(sec. 301.64), it is hereby required, as provided in paragranph (e) of regulation







78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

6 thereto (sec. 301.64-6), that all grapefruit harvested on and after April 12,
1939, in the area regulated under said quarantine, shall be sterilized under
approved methods as a condition of issuance of permits for movement of such
fruit from the regulated area.
Section A, regulation 7 (sec. 301.64-7) of said quarantine is also hereby
modified to extend the harvesting season for grapefruit to the close of May 15,
1939. The host-free period for grapefruit, under this modification, will begin
May 16 and continue to August 31, 1939, inclusive. (B. E. P. Q. 487, dated
January 27, 1939, extends the harvesting season for Valencia oranges to June
15, 1939.)
Sterilization of grapefruit has been found necessary to insure against dis-
semination of Mexican fruitflies, due to the occurrence of such flies in the
regulated area. The extension of the harvesting season, it has been determined,
may be safely made without increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruit-
flies since sterilization will render grapefruit safe for movement from the
regulated area. (Sec. 301.64b, issued under authority contained in sec. 301.64.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 496.
SUGGESTIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF PLUNGING AND GROWING BEDS AND THEIR
MAINTENANCE UNDER BEETLE-FREE CONDITIONS IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGU-
LATIONS OF THE WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE
APRIL 28, 1939.
Nursery stock with soil attached is eligible for certification for movement
from areas under quarantine on account of the white-fringed beetle provided
it has been grown and maintained under beetle-free conditions, -as specified in
paragraph (b) of regulation 5 of Quarantine No. 72.
The following types of units are suggested as means of providing for beetle-
free conditions and if properly maintained should be- effective in preventing
natural infestation by the white-fringed beetle.

RAISED PLUNGING BEDS

Beds or benches, indoors or outside, which are at least 12, preferably 18
inches, above the ground, and which are protected from infestation in manner
and by method satisfactory to an authorized inspector. Structures * *
are to be protected against infestation by approved oil or other barriers.

SURFACE PLUNGING OR GROWING BEDS

A heeling-in area or growing grounds enclosed within walls extending far
enough underground to prevent larvae from passing under. This may require
a wall as much as 24 inches in depth. The walls should be of sufficient height
above ground to permit the construction of oil or other barriers on a level 12,
preferably 18, inches above the ground. The soil or other material contained
or used therein should be treated in approved manner under the supervision
and direction of an authorized inspector. Such articles not immediately placed
in the units should be adequately protected from infestation.
During the active adult beetle season, barriers constructed in connection with
plunging and growing beds should be properly maintained, and adequate sani-
tary and protective measures should be taken by establishments concerned to
fully protect the approved units from infestation. Vegetation should be kept
down and calcium arsenate dust or other specified treatment applied to the
satisfaction of an authorized inspector.

BARRIERS

It will be necessary to protect the beds during the season of adult activity
by approved barrier.
Whenever practicable, the oil barrier is recommended. The heavy construc-
tion enables it to withstand jars or jolts which would greatly decrease the
efficiency of the all-metal barrier.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

Barriers should at all times be maintained in a manner that will assure their
efficiency.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 485, Revised.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTI-
FICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL JULY 1, 1939, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES CON-
SIGNED FROM DESIGNATED PORTIONS OF THE REGULATED AREAS
(Approved May 6, 1939; effective May 8, 1939)
Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, issued effective January 15, 1939, waived certifica-
tion requirements until July 1, 1939, for specified articles consigned from cer-
tain parts of the areas regulated under quarantine No. 72. The present revi-
sion adds additional areas in Louisiana from which certification of the same
articles is waived from May 8 until July 1, 1939.
.Under authorization provided in notice of Quarantine No. 72 (sec. 301.72),
all certification requirements are hereby waived during the regulated periods
from May 8 to June 30, 1939, inclusive, of the following articles enumerated
in regulation 3 (a) and (b), (sec. 301.72-3) when free from soil and when
consigned from any of the regulated areas in the county of Mobile, Ala.; county
of Escambia, Fla.; parishes of East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, Orleans (includ-
ing the city of New Orleans), and Plaquemines, La.; and counties of Hinds,
Jackson, and Pearl River, Miss., it having been determined that sanitary meas-
ures and natural conditions have sufficiently reduced the risk of egg or adult
contamination as to render certification unnecessary during the period indicated:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes; sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings; cord-
wood, pulpwood, stump wood, and logs; used or unused lumber, timbers, posts,
poles, cross ties, and other building materials; hay, roughage of all kinds,
straw, leaves, and leafmold; peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells
of any of these products; seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters;
used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or containers
coming in contact with the ground; brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and
blocks; nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.
The restrictions on the interstate movement from any of the regulated areas,
of the following articles designated in paragraph (a) (1) of Regulation 3 of
Quarantine No. 72 (sec. 301.72-3), as carriers of larvae remain in effect
throughout the year:
Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure whether moved independent
of, or in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, arti-
cles, or things. (Sec. 301.72a, issued under authority contained in sec. 301.72.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[The foregoing circular was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through
the areas regulated on account of the white-fringed beetle.]


INSTRUcTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIID ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 16, 1939.
Postmaster:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed administrative in-
structions issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United
States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal Quarantine Order
No. 72 on account of the white-fringed beetle.
Under these instructions no certificate of inspection will be required during
the period from May 8 to July 1, 1939, in connection with the acceptance for
mailing of the articles named therein when free from soil and when shipped
from any of the regulated areas in the county of Mobile, Ala., county of Escam-
bia, Fla., parishes of East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, Orleans (including the city
of New Orleans), and Plaquemines, La., and counties of Hinds, Jackson, and
Pearl River, Miss.







80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Postmasters will please take note and be governed accordingly. See para-
graph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 19, 1939.
Terminal inspection is required of plants and plant products addressed to
Arizona, Arkansas, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Utah, and
Washington. All parcels addressed to the States named must be plainly marked
on the outside to show the exact nature of their contents.
Section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, prescribes three methods of
handling such parcels, as follows:
1. As provided in paragraphs 3, 4, 5, and 6 of section 596, the parcels shall,
upon payment of postage therefor, be forwarded by the postmaster at the
post office of their destination to the proper State official at the nearest place
where plant inspection is maintained, where, after inspection and passing and
the payment of return postage therefor, they shall be returned to the post
office of address and delivered to the addressee.
2. Or, as provided in paragraph 7, section 596, if the addressee so desires,
he may have the parcels addressed to himself in care of a State plant inspec-
tor arranging with the inspector to forward the parcels, after inspection and
passing, to the addressee upon payment of the forwarding postage therefor
which shall be furnished to the inspector by the addressee.
3. Or, as also provided in paragraph 7, section 596, the addressee may have
the sender place a pledge to pay the forwarding postage on the parcels, ad-
dressed in care of a plant inspector, in which case they shall, after inspec-
tion and passing, be forwarded rated with the forwarding postage, such postage
to be collected from the addressee upon delivery of the parcels.
In addition to the above-described methods of handling, arrangements have
also been made whereby the shipper may at his own instance address the parcels
to the addressee in care of a State plant inspector at an established terminal
inspection point. When so addressed at the instance of the mailer he shall
place on the parcels immediately below the return address his pledge guaran-
teeing payment of forwarding postage, such postage to be collected upon de-
livery to the addressee as provided by paragraph 4, section 769. Parcels so sent
shall be labeled as follows:
"Shipped for (or on a/c)
W. H. JONES,
Garfield, Utah.
From:
John Doe Nurseries,
Shenandoah, Iowa.
Forwarding Postage Guaranteed. To:
Contents: W. H. Jones,
-------------- c/o State Plant Inspector,
Salt Lake City, Utah."
When forwarding parcels under the latter arrangement, the inspector shall
first cross out "c/o State Plant Inspector," and the name of the post office
at the point of inspection appearing in the original address, and insert the
name of the post office to which the parcels are to be forwarded. After en-
dorsing the parcels to show that the contents have been inspected and passed,
the inspector will return them to the postmaster who will rate the same with
the necessary forwarding postage and dispatch them to the office of ultimate
address, the additional postage to be collected from the addressee upon delivery
to- him.
It is essential in following this arrangement that the shippers have their
parcels directed to the State inspector at an inspection point located 'to the
best advantage with respect to the post office of final address, thus facilitating
onward dispatch and delivery.








1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81


Following is a list of the States and Territories operating under the terminal
plant inspection laws, the plants and plant products which when sent to these
States or Territories are subject to inspection and the names of places located
in each where inspection is maintained.

ARIZONA

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit
and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products for
propagation, except vegetable and flower seeds.
Terminal inspection places:
Benson. Kingman. Prescott. Tucson.
Globe. Parker. Safford. Yuma.
Holbrook. Pnoenix. Solomonsville.
(At the following places inspection may be had upon call only.)
Bisbee. Duncan. Nogales. Williams
Casa Grande. Flagstatf. Springerville. Winslow.
Chandler. Glendale. Tempe.
Douglas. Mesa. San Simon.

ARKANSAS

Plants and plant products s ubject to inspection.-Sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato
plants, vines, draws, and slips.
NOTE.-Under a State quarantine on account of the sweetpotato weevil the articles
named are prohibited entry into Arkansas unless accompanied with an inspection cer-
tificate issued by the State of origin showing the plants and plant products to be free
of infestation. Parcels accompanied with such certificate will be delivered to the ad-
dressees without inspection. Parcels not accompanied with such certificate shall be
returned without auclitional postage to the office of mailing endorsed "Unmailable-Not
accompanied with required certificate."

CALIFORNIA

Plants and plant products suibject to inspcction.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products
in the raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and flower seeds.
Terminal inspection places:
Ager. Camarillo. Elsinore. Hueneme.
Alimeda. Centerville. Escalon. Hughson.
Alhambra. Charter Oak. Escondido. Huntington Beach.
Alturas. Chatsworth. Etiwanda. Iluntington Park.
Alvarado. Chico. Eureka. Hynes.
Anaheim. Chino. Exeter. Imperial.
Anderson. Chowchilla. Fairfield. Indio.
Arbuckle. Claremont. Fairmead. Inglewood.
Arcadia. Clearwater. Farmersville. Irvington.
Arlington. Coachella. Fillmiore. Irwindale.
Aromas. Colfax. Fontana. Ivanhoe.
Artesia. Colma. Fort Bragg. Jamestown.
Atascadero. Colton. Fowler. Kelseyville.
Auburn. Colusa. Fresno. King City.
Azusa. (ompton. Fullerton. Kingsbur".
Bakersfield. Concord. Gardena. La Ilabra.
Banning. Corning. Gazelle. Lakeport.
Bard. Corona. Gilroy. Lanc iste'.
Beaumont. Cottonwood. Glendale. La Verne.
Bell. Covina. Glendora. Le Grand.
Bellflower. Cucamonua. (oshen. Lemon Cove.
Belmont. Culver City. Gridley. Lincoln.
Berkeley. Cut lr. Gust ine. Lil say.
Beverly Hills. Davis. Half Moon Bay. Livermore.
Bieber. IDeath Valley. Hanford. Livilngston.
Biggs. Delano. Itnrbor City. Lodi.
Bloomington. Del Rosa. I ayward. Lomita.
Blythe. )inul)a. lealdsburg. Lomlpoc.
Brawley. Downey. Iflemet. Long Beach.
Brea. DI)arte. llermosa Beach. Loomis.
Bryn Mawr. Iucor. HIighland. Los Angeles.
Burbank. Earlimart. llilmar. Los Bans.
Burlingame. East lighlands. Hollister. ,Los Molinos,
Calexico. El C(jon. 1Hollywood. Lower Luke.
Caliente. El Cent ro. lHolt ille. Madra.
Calipatria. El Monte. Hodland. Manteca.
Calistoga. El Segundo. Hlornbrook. Martinez.








82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Marysville. Palms. San Fernando. Sultana.
McFarland. Paradise. San Francisco. Sunol.
Menlo Park. Pasadena. San Gabriel. Susanville.
Merced. Paso Robles. Sanger. Tehachapi.
Millbrae. Patterson. San Gregorio. Terre Bella.
Mill Valley. Penryn. San Jose. Tipton.
Mission San Jose. Perris. San .uan Capistrano. Topanga.
Modesto. Pescadero. San Leandro. Torrance.
Monrovia. Piru. San Lorenzo. Tracy.
Montalvo. Pixley. San Luis Obispo. Tulare.
SMontebello. Placerville. San Mateo. Turlock.
Monterey. Pleasanton. San Pedro. Ukiah.
Moorpark. Pomona. San Rafael. Upland.
Mount Eden. Porterville. Santa Ana. Upper Lake.
SNapa. Puente. Santa Barbara. Vacaville.
I National City. Red Bluff. Santa Cruz. Vallejo.
Nevada City. Redding. Santa Fe Springs. Van Nuys.
Newark. Redlands. Santa Maria. Venice.
Newhall. Redondo Beach. Santa Monica. Ventura.
Newman. Redwood City. Santa Paula. Visalia.
Niles. Reedley. Santa Rosa. Walnut.
North Pomona. Rialto. Santa Susana. Wasco.
Norwalk. Richgrove. Saticoy. Waterford.
SOakdale. Ripon. Saugus. Watsonville.
Oakland. Rivera. Sausalito. Watts.
Ocean Park. Riverside. Selma. Whittier.
Oceanside. 'Roseville. Shafter. Williams.
SOjai. Sacramento. Sierra Madre. Willowbrook.
Ontario. Saint Helena. Simi. Willows.
Orange. Salinas. Somis. Winters.
Orland. San Andreas. Sonora. Woodlake.
Orosi. San Benito. South Pasadena. Woodland.
Oroville. San Bernardino. Spadra. Yettem.
Oxnard. San Bruno. Springville. Yreka.
Pacoima. San Diego. Stockton. Yuba City.
Palmdale. San Dimas. Strathmore. Yucaipa.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit
and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products in the
raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and flower seeds.
Inspection place: Washington, D. C.

FLORIDA

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-Trees, shrubs, and vines
(except soft-bodied) or any part thereof.
NOTE.-Shrubs and vines of a woody nature such as rose bushes, hibiscus, grape vines,
blackberry vines, etc., are subject to inspection. Bedding plants (such as coleus and
pansy), vegetable plants (such as cabbage and sweetpotato), and strawberry plants, are
not subject to inspection.
Terminal inspection places:
Gainesville. Jacksonville. Miami. Pensacola. Tampa.
West Palm Beach.

HAWAII

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds. fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit
and ornamental trees and shrubs and other plants and plant products in the
raw or unmanufactured state except vegetable and flower seeds.
Inspection place: Honolulu.
IDAHO

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit
and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products in the raw
or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and flower seeds and succulent plants
such as tomato, pepper, and cabbage,: Provided, That this list of plants and plant
products shall not apply to plants and plant products shipped either under the
certificate of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United
States Department of Agriculture or of the Idaho State Department of Agri-
culture.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83


Terminal inspection places:
Blackfoot. Emmett. New Plymouth. Saint Anthony.
*Boise. *Idaho Falls. *Parma. Sandpoint.
Bonners Ferry. Jerome. *Payette. *Twin Falls.
Burley. *Lewiston. *Pocatello. Weiser.
Caldwell. Moscow. Rathdrum.
*Coeur d'Alene. *Nampa. Rupert.
NOTE.-Asterisks (*) show places to which parcels shall be sent when addressed at the
instance of the mailer in care of a plant inspector for onward transmission to the ultimate
addressees.
LOUISIANA

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-Corn on the cob, ears of corn,
cornstalks, and other parts or debris of corn and broomcorn plants, and sor-
ghums and Sudan grass; cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster,
dahlia, and gladiolus, except gladiolus corms and dahlia tubers without stems;
lima beans in the pod, green shell beans in the pod (including varieties variously
known as cranberry or horticultural shell beans but not including string or wax
beans), beets with tops, and rhubarb.
Inspection place: New Orleans.
MISSISSIPPI

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-Sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato
plants, vines, and cuttings; morning-glory vines and roots: Provided, That this
list of plants and plant products shall not apply to any of the above plants,
roots, or tubers, the shipments of which originate within the State of Mississippi
and are addressed to places within that State, when wccompanied with a certifi-
cate of inspection issued by the State plant board of Mississippi.
Terminal inspection places:
Aberdeen. Gulfport. Moss Point. Starkville.
Brookhaven. Jackson. Ocean Springs. State College.
Durant. Laurel. Poplarville.
Grenada. Meridian. Senatobia.
MONTANA

Plants and plant products subject to inspcction.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit
and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products in the
raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and flower seeds and succulent
plants such as tomato, pepper, and cabbage.
Terminal inspection places:
Billings. Glasgow. Ilavre. Laurel.
Butte. Glendive. Helena. Miles City.
Culbertson. Great Falls. Kalispell. Missoula.
OKLAHOMA

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All field-grown florists' stock,
trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs and other plant products in the raw or
unmanufactured state including cottonseed, sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants,
and sweetpotato vine cuttings: Provided, That this list of plants and plant prod-
ucts shall not apply to-
(1) Vegetable and flower seeds, and such succulent plants as tomatoes, egg-
plants, pepper, cabbage, etc.
(2) Shipments of plants and plant products originating in Oklahoma and
addressed to places in that State, or when the Oklahoma permit, the Oklahoma
dealers' certificate, or the Oklahoma inspection certificate is attached to the
shipment.
Inspection place: Oklahoma City.

OREGON

Plants and plant products subject to inpcction.-- All florists' stocks, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs. and other plants nd plant products
in the raw or unmanIufactured state, except vegetalble and1 flower seeds.







84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Terminal inspection places:
Albany. Grants Pass. McMinnville. Roseburg.
Astoria. Gresham. Medford. Salem.
Baker. Heppner. M-ilton. The Dalles.
Coquille.- Hillsboro. Ontario. Tillamook.
Corvallis. Hood River. Oregon City. Toledo.
Cottage Grove. Klamath Falls. Pendleton. Warren.
Dallas. Li Grande. Portland.
Gold Beach. Lakeview. Redmond.
PUERTO RICO

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products
in the raw or unmanufactured state, including field, vegetable, and flower seeds;
also cotton lint.

UTAH

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products
in the raw or unmanufactured state, including field, vegetable, and flower seeds;
Terminal inspection places:
Brigham City. Logan. Price *Richfield.
*Cedar City. *Ogden. *Provo. *Salt Lake City.
Farmington.
NoTE.-Asterisks (*) show places to which parcels shall be sent when addressed at the
instance of the mailer in care of a plant inspector for onward transmission to the
ultimate addresses.
WASHINGTON

Plants and plant products subject to inspection.-All florists' stock, trees,
shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and -other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products
in the raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and flower seeds.
Terminal inspection places:
Bellingham. Olympia. Sumner. Walla Walla.
Benton City. Prosser. Tacoma. Wenatchee.
Chehalis. Seattle. Toppenish. White Salmon.
Everett. Spokane. Vancouver. Yakima.
Mount Vernon.
Pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, and Order No. 9620 of October 15,
1936, amending section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, the following States
have also established quarantines prohibiting or regulating the entry into these
States of certain plants and plant material, known to be hosts of insects or
plant diseases:
State: Dates of notices relating thereto
Arkansas --_- -------- May 6, 1938; May 31, 1938 (p. 43, June 1938 Supple-
ment to Postal Guide).
California----- -- Apr. 6, 1937 (p. 23, May 1937 Supplement).
Florida--------------- Nov. 7, 1938 (p. 21, November 1938 Supplement).
Mississippi --------- Apr. 7, 1937 (p. 26, May 1937 Supplement).
Montana -- --------- Apr. 8. 1937 (p. 26, May 1937 Supplement).
Oregon------------- June 23, 1937; Mar. 2, 1938; Aug. 1, 1938; Jan. 9,
1939; Feb. 13, 1939 (p. 44, August 1937 Supple-
ment and subsequent issues)
Postmasters are cautioned to exercise care in the acceptance of parcels
containing plants and plant material in order to prevent the improper dissemi-
nation of any plant pest injurious to agriculture. In addition to terminal plant
inspection and State quarantines referred to in this notice, attention is also
invited to the nursery stock certificate requirement and to the various Federal
plant quarantines issued by the United States Department of Agriculture re-
ferred to in section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, and listed on pages 18,
-19, and 20 of the July 1937 Postal Guide, Part I.
RAMSEY S. BLAcK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 406, Revised, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF MALTA
MAY 9, 1939.

POTATOES MAY BE IMPORTED FROM ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT
Government Notice No. 236 of August 27, 1934, has been amended by Govern-
ment Notice No. 126 of March 25, 1939, to exclude the port of Alexandria, Egypt,
from the operation of the provisions of the said Notice No. 236 (item 2, p. 2,
B. E. P. Q. 406, rev.). Consequently, potatoes may now be imported into Malta
from the port of Alexandria, Egypt.
The words "except from the port of Alexandria, Egypt," should, therefore, be
inserted in line 1, item 2, page 2, B. E. P. Q. 406, revised, after the word "Africa."
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 408, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, EIRE (IRISH FREE STATE)

MAY 12, 1939.

CHRYSANTHEMUM MIDGE ORDER AMENDED
IMPORTATION OF CHRYSANTHEMUM PLANTS PROHIBITED

The Destructive Insects and Pests (Chrysanthemum Midge) Order of March 8,
1939, prescribed that it shall not be lawful to import into Eire any chrysanthe-
mum plants except from Northern Ireland or under and in accordance with a
license issued by the Minister for Agriculture.
Hitherto the importation of rooted and unrooted chrysanthemum cuttings was
prohibited. The present order prohibits the importantion of chrysanthemum
"plants." For a definition of plants see page 2 of B. E. P. Q. 408.
The same order prescribes that a statement shall be added to the required in-
spection certificate (see p. 5 of B. E. P. Q. 408) that the shipment concerned does
not contain any chrysanthemum plants.
DECLARATION IN CERTIFICATE THAT SHIPMENT CONTAINS NEITHER ELM TREES NOR
CHRYSANTHEMUM PLANTS
In a letter dated March 24, 1939, from the Department of External Affairs,
Dublin, Eire, we are reminded not only that a statement should be added to the
required inspection certificate to the effect that the corresponding shipment or
mail package contains no chrysanthemum plants but also that it contains no elm
trees. The endorsement "No chrysanthemum plants or eln trees" will meet the
requirements.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 420, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FINLAND

JUNE 26, 1939.
PRECAUTIONS AGAINST FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE

Although Decree No. 381, of December 9, 1938, does not pertain to plant
quarantines, it is believed desirable to indicate its provisions as a matter of
information.
As a precaution against the introduction of foot-and-mouth disease into Fin-
land, the importation of forage or fodder into that country is prohibited until
further notice; this applies also to sacks and other packing materials. Exemp-
tion from this prohibition may be granted by the Ministry of Agriculture under
prescribed conditions.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.








86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

B. E. P. Q. 422, Supplement No. 4.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF RUMANIA

JUNE 22, 1939.
INSECT PESTS AND PLANT DISEASES DECLARED INJURIOUS

(Publication No. 5, Rumanian Plant Protection Service, March 1938)

As prescribed by article 14 of the general regulations of October 4, 1934
(B. E. P. Q. 422, p. 6) the following insect pests and plant diseases are declared
injurious to Rumanian crops and plant protective measures have been taken
against them in accordance with the provisions of article 76 of the law on the
organization and encouragement of agriculture of March 1937, and. the report
of the Ministerial Council, No. 785, of March 3, 1938:
Insect pests:
SAonidiella perniciosa Berl.- Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San Jose scale.
Aulacaspis pentagona (Targ.) Newst., white peach scale.
Ceratitis capitata (Wied.). Mediterranean fruitfly.
Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hbst.), plum curculio.
(Cydia) Grapholitha molesta (Busek), oriental fruit moth.
Dreyfusia niissTini Ritz-Adelges niisslini (BEiener). a gall louse.
Dreyfusia piceae Ritz=Adelges piceae (Ratz.), a gall louse.
Epitrix cucumeris (Harr.), potato flea beetle.
Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), Colorado potato beetle.
(Platyedra) Pectinophora gossypiella (Saund.), pink bollworm.
Plant diseases:
Acanthostigma parasiticum (Hart.) Sacc., a needle disease of conifers.
Ascochyta piniperda Lind., a disease of spruce, etc.
Bacillus amylovorus. (Burr.) Trev., fire blight. =Erwinia amylovora (Burr.) Con.
S. A. B.
Bacillus baccarinii Machiatti, associated with "mal nero" of the grapevine.
Bacterium holci Kendr., bacterial spot of Holcs.
Bacterium hyacinthi Wakk., yellow disease.
Bacterium (Pseudomonas) malvacearum E. F. Sm., angular leaf spot of cotton.
Bacterium mori Boy. and Lam.
Bacterium (Pseudomonas) turnefaoiens E. F. Sm. and Towns.
Bacterium vesicatorium Doidge, bacterial spot of tomato.
Cenangium populneum (Pers.) Rehm., a canker disease of poplar, et al.
Ceratostomella ulmi (Schw.) Buis, Dutch elm disease.
Cronartium ribicola Fisch., white pine blister rust.
Dasycypha willkommii Hartig. European larch canker.
Dibotryon morbosum (Schw.) Thiess. and Syd.=Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.)
Sacc., black knot of plum and cherry.
Elsinoe ampelina (deBy.) Shear= Gloeosporium ampelinum (deBy.) Sace., anthrae-
nose of grape.
Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And., chestnut blight.
Gnomonia erythrostoma (Pers.) Auers., a cherry disease.
Gnomonia veneta (Sacc. Speg.) Kleb.. anthracnose of sycamore.
Guignardia bidwellii (Ell.) Viala and Ravaz, black rot.
Gymnosporangium sabinae (Dick.) Wint., a rust of Pyrus and Juniperus.
Heterodera cohachtii Schmidt, sugar beet nematode.
Leptosphaeria hierpotrichoides de Not., a foot rot of wheat, et al.
Lophodermium pinastri (Schr.) Chev., needle cast of pine.
Melanconis perniciosa Br. and Fa.. and its iWrperfect stage Ccryneum perniciosum
Br. and Fa. were associated with "ink disease" of chestnut, but the disease
is now known to be caused by Phytophttora cambivora (Petri) Buis.
Melampsora populina (Pers.) Liv., a rust of poplars.
Neocosmospora vasinfectum (Atk.) Smith =Fusarium vasinfectum Atk.
Neopeckia coulteri (Peck.) Sacc., take-all.
Olpidiaster radicis (Willd.) Pasch., a root disease of flax, Brassioa spp., etc.
Ophiobolus graminis Sacc.. take-all.
Ophiobolus herpotrichus (Fries) Sacc., a foot-rot iisease of wheat.
Peridermium pini (Willd;) Kleb., a rust of pine trunks and branches.
Rhabdooline pseudotsugae Syd., needle cast.
Rosellinia necatrix (Hart.) Berl., a root rot of the grapevine.
Sclerotinia bulborum (Wakk.) Rehm., onion and hyacinth sclerctinia.
Sclerotium tuliparum Kleb.=Rhizoctonia tuliparum (Kleb.) Whetzel and Arthur,
gray bulb rot.
Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pers., potato wart.
Urophlyctfs alfalfae (Lagh.) Magn., crown wart.
Urcphlyctis leproides (Trab.) Magn., a root-gall disease of h t.
Virus diseases:
Crinkling of leaves of Soja.
'Afosaic of leaves of Soja.
Streak disease of tomato.
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.







1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

B. E. P. Q. 434, Revised, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF ST. LUCIA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES
JUNE 22, 1939.

IMPORTATION OF BANANA PLANTS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 13 of April 29, 1939, prohibits the importation into that
colony, until further notice, of any banana plants or any parts thereof pro-
ceeding either directly or indirectly from any place beyond the limits of the
Colony of St. Lucia.
Provided that this prohibition shall not apply to any such plants or parts
thereof which are imported under license given by the Governor and subject
to the provisions thereof.
Accordingly, the last two items on page 1 of Circular B. E. P. Q. 434, Revised,
should be deleted and replaced by the following item:
Banana plants or parts thereof (Musa spp.) : Importation prohibited from any
source, except under license issued by the Governor and under the provisions
thereof. (Proclamation No. 13 of April 29, 1939.)
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA (IRAN)

MAY 22, 1939.

DISINFECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR FLOWER BULBS AND ORNAMENTALS

Note Verbale No. 58755/4544 of March 18, 1939, from the Division of Eco-
nomics, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Teheran, Persia, to the American legation,
states that flower bulbs recently imported from certain countries, although
provided with phytosanitary certificates, have been infested with pests, such as
nematodes (Anguillulidae) and mites (Acarida).
Hereafter, flower bulbs and ornamental plants must be accompanied by a
disinfection certificate for entry into Persia. Otherwise an entry permit will
not be granted.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 471, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

MAY 4, 1939.
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF HAY AND STRAW AS PACKING FOR
MnERCHANDISE

Although the following regulations, published in the Government Gazette of
the Union of South Africa of March 3, 1939, represent precautions against the
introduction of foot-and-mouth disease and other diseases of livestock, they
are presented as a matter of information, since hay and straw as packing
materials are involved.
ARTICLE 1. The regulations published under Government Notice No. 331 of
March 16, 1934, are hereby repealed.
ART. 2. No person shall introduce into the Union any hay or straw used
for the packing of merchandise unless-
(a) It is kept in a bond store at the port of entry for a period of 4 months
reckoned from the date of shipment to the Union; or







88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

(b) It is accompanied by a certificate, signed by an official authorized there-'
to by the Government of the country of origin, stating that the hay
or straw-
(1) Has been kept in store free from contact with any animal likely
to be affected with the foot-and-mouth disease, contagious bovine
pleuropneumonia, sheep pox, or rinderpest for a period of 4
months immediately prior to its use; or
(2) Has been subjected to the action of live steam in a closed compart-
ment at a temperature of 1850 F. for at least 10 minutes; or
(3) Has been placed loosely in a closed compartment having a tempera-
ture of not less than 650 F. and thoroughly sprayed with 10
fluid ounces formaldehyde solution (containing not less than 37
percent formaldehyde by weight) for each 1,000 cubic feet of
space in the compartment, the compartment being immediately
closed in such a manner as to prevent the escape of the form-
aldehyde vapor and kept closed for a period of not less than 8
hours; or
(4) Placed loosely in a closed compartment and subjected to the action
of heat in the presence of moisture at a temperature of not less
than 2600 F. for a period of not less than 2 hours, the said tem-
perature being maintained during that period throughout the
whole of the compartment.
ART. 3. No person shall introduce into the Union any fodder, hay, straw,
maize stalks, or kaffir-corn stalks unless it is accompanied by a certificate, signed
by an official authorized thereto by the Government of the country of origin,
stating-
(a) That the product was derived from a district which was free from
foot-and-mouth disease, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, sheep pox,
and rinderpest for a period of at least 12 months prior to shipment-to-
the Union; or
(b) That the product was kept in store free from contact with any animal
likely to be affected with foot-and-mouth disease, contagious bovine
pleuropneumonia, sheep pox, or rinderpest -for a period of 4 months
immediately prior to shipment to the Union.
ART. 4. These regulations shall take effect as from May 1, 1939.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 476, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

MAY 9, 1939.
AMENDMENT OF REGULATION 21 OF THE REGULATIONS EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 19, 1935

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF VEGETABLES

Regulation 21 of the Quarantine (Plants) Regulations is amended by adding
at the end thereof the following subregulation:
E. (1) In the case of vegetables from any country, a certificate dated and
signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture
of the country of origin identifying the vegetables, stating the
quantity, and certifying:
(a) That they were grown in the country named;
(b) That the pest known as cabbage butterfly (Pieris rapae L.)
does not exist in the part of the country in which they were
grown;
(c) That they were, on inspection prior to shipment, found to be
free from Pieris rapae L.; and
(d) That they were packed in the country of origin in clean new
packages.







19391 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89


(2) For the purpose of this subregulation "vegetable" means borecole,
broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, chou moellier,
horseradish, kohlrabi, radish, rape, Swedes, turnip, or any vege-
table whatsoever of the family Cruciferae, and includes lettuce.
Since Pieris rapae is quite generally distributed throughout the United States
the provisions of (1) (b) cannot be certified, consequently this subregulation
constitutes a prohibition of importation of the vegetables above named from the
United States.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 497.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, VENEZUELA

MAY 12, 1939.

Pending the enactment of a new plant quarantine law now before the Vene-
zuelan Congress, the provisions of an official notice published in the Gazeta
Oficial, No. 17264, of November 5, 1930, will remain effective. That notice reads
as follows in translation:

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED

Fruits, seeds, plants, and parts of plants may not be introduced into
Venezuela if they are not accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate
indicating origin, in which it is affirmed that they are found to be free
from any disease or pest dangerous to agriculture.
The certificate must be issued by competent authorities of the country of
origin and be visaed by the Venezuelan consul.

SPECIAL PERMIT IN ADVANCE FOR PLANTS IN SOIL

A special import permit must be obtained in advance of shipment from the
Venezuelan Ministry of Agriculture for the importation of plants in soil.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Freight shipments are inspected at the maritime ports of Venezuela, or in
some cases, at Caracas. Parcel-post shipments are inspected at Caracas, or if
consigned elsewhere, at the cities where parcel post service is available.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED PLANTS

Plants suspected of being diseased are sent to the experiment station near
Caracas for inspection. If found to be diseased they may be destroyed, held
for observation, or the infected portions removed.
The most feared diseases are the witches'-broom disease (Mara.'niuts pcrnici-
osus Stahel) and root-rot diseases of cacao (Thcobromai cacao) apparently
caused by issellinia spp.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Burcau of Entonology & Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 500.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, MANDATED AUSTRALIAN
TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA
JUNE 28, 1939.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Mandated
Australian Territory of New Guinea has been prepaired for the information of
nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in thle exportation
of plants and plant products to that Territory.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge, For-
eign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the text







90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

of Quarantine Ordinance No. 3, of March 1931, and proclamations made
thereunder.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, TERRITORY OF NEW GUINEA

BASIC LEGISLATION

[Statutory Rules No. 8, ch. VII, of January 25, 1927, promulgated under the Quarantine
Act 1908-24, as amended, of the Commonwealth of Australia]
[Quarantine Ordinance No. 3, art. 14, March 25, 1931 (parts III and V) of the Territory
of New Guinea]

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Hay, straw, grass, moss, fiber, charcoal, bark, or other material used as
packing material for imported plants, if considered likely to introduce disease,
shall be forthwith destroyed. (Regulations effective January 25, 1927, reg. 152.)
Unroasted coffee beans (Coffea spp.): Importation prohibited from Java,
Malaya, Uganda, and Brazil (Proc. No. 30, December 24, 1932) or from Ivory
Coast, Tanganyika, French West Africa, Belgian Congo, and Kenya, except by
or through the Director of Agriculture. (Proclamation No. 34, May 25, 1934.)
Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) : Importation of tobacco plants or
parts thereof from Australia prohibited. (Proclamation No. 29, December 24,
1932.)
Banana plants or parts thereof (Musa spp.) : Importation prohibited to pre-
vent the introduction of "bunchy top" disease. (Proclamation No. 4, February
22, 1926, supplementing proclamation of June 9, 1924.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Fruits, vegetables (including tubers, bulbs, corms, and rhizomes), nuts, cereals,
pulse and other seeds, any proportion of which is found to be or suspected of
being affected with a disease, or any cereals, pulse or other seed found on inspec-
tion to be mixed with the seed of a weed pest (see p. 6) shall be ordered into
quarantine for treatment or sorting if deemed necessary. (Regulations effective
January 25, 1927, reg. 161.)
Plants, imported: Entry subject to inspection on arrival, with disposal accord-
ing to the findings. (Territorial Ordinance No. 3 (pt. V) of March 25, 1931, art.
62, see p. 3.)
Cotton plants (Gossypium spp.), cottonseed, unginned cotton, and raw cotton:
May be imported under the following conditions only:
1. A written permit from the Director of Agriculture required for each
shipment.
2. The imported cottonseed must be accompanied by a certificate of disinfec-
tion from the Department of Agriculture and Stock, Queensland. The
precautions are designed to prevent the introduction of the pink boll-
worm, (Platyedra) Gelcchia gossypiella Saund. (Proclamation No. 7,
February 22, 1926.)
Living cultures of bacteria: Importation prohibited unless the written consent
of the Administration has first been obtained. (Proclamation No. 8, January 30,
1935.)
GENERAL REGULATIONS
(Promulgated by Territorial Ordinance No. 3, pt. V, March 25, 1931)

IMPORTATION PERMITTED AT AUTHORIZED PORTS ONLY

ART. 58. No person shall import any animals or plants into the Territory except
at a port declared to be a port where imported animals or plants may be 'anded.
Proclamation No. 1, February 22, 1926, authorizes the landing of plants at the
port of Rabaul.



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