Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288977
oclc - 14207732
lccn - sn 86033973
Classification:
ddc - 632.9 U54
System ID:
AA00023076:00007

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Full Text




























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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD






State of Florida
Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
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STATE PLANT BOARD


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S. R. A, B. E. P. Q. Issued September 1943

United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine




SERVICE AND

REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

1942




These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations




WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS























UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASINGTON : 1943













4 A





ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.
F. C. BISHOPP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.
W. L. POPHAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.
F. H. SPENCER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Administration.
B. CONNOR, in Charge, Division of Finance and Business Services.
WM. F. LEFFLER, in Charge, Division of Personnel.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, in Charge of Editorial Work.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBELTON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
W. E. DOvE, in Charge, Division, of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
C. P. CLATSEN, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. .
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide.Investigations.
C. F. WV. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
J. F. MARTIN, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
R. A. SHEALS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Mloth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters,
Orange, A'. J.).
R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
CL AUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexi Ciy,
3IU.Lico). "











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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 150 (JANUARY-MARCH 1942)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements.- _ ..------------ ----------.....------------ 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ..- ------_ ------ ---- ------- 1
Revise quarantine on Japanese beetle (press notice) ..--- ---... ---------- ------ ------
Revision of regulations effective March 24, 1942... ---------. ............................... __ 2
Notice to general public through newspapers..----------------------------------- 14
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) -----------.. -----------------. 15
Texas citrus fruit harvest extended (press notice) _---------------------------------- 15
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified-harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)--.------ 15
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) .-...--.--- ..-----------....- 16
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified-treatments authorized (B. E.
P. Q. 503, fourth revision) ------ ..------------------------ ----._---------_------------_ 16
Miscellaneous items -...----------.... ...--- ----.-- -- ----------. ------.. ----.-------------- 19
Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) .------------------------- 19
Plant-quarantine import restriction, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement No. 1)_ 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. E. P. Q. 520) .-- ------------------------- 20
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522) -----..-------. 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quaratine Act ------------------------------- 25
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ---------------------------- 27
CONTENTS OF NO. 151 (APRIL-JUNE 1942)
Quarantine and other official announcements ........-- ---- -----.-.-....----------------------. 24
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48).---------. --------------..----- 29
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
fifth revision)..---.-------------------------------.--..---------------..--..---. .. ... -- 29
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No; 4,
first revision) ----------------.---------------------.. ...-----. .....31
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 5) : -32
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37) ...---------------- 33
Additional quantity limits for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. E. P. Q. 523,
am endin g P Q C A 278, revised) .. ..-----.------------.-- - --..... .. 33
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) --..--------. ------------ 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) ------------------------- 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective May 9, 1942) 35
Notice to general public through newspapers------------...... ------------..----------- 42
Instructions to postmasters. .......----------------------------------------.---------. 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
503, fourth revision, supplement No. 1)_ -----------------------------------------. 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision) 43
Miscellaneous items .-----.......--------------------------- -----.----..... ---... 44
L. A. Hawkins retires (press notice)_ ___-------------------.-...--..-.. .................. 44
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice)_ .. --------------------------. 44
S. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(press notice) --....------------------- .------------------------------..... 45
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 5)-. 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia, (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement
No. 2).......... -----------------------------..--.-----.------....... .. -- 46
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act .----------------------------- 46
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaraptine ....-------------------------- 48

CONTENTS OF NO. 152 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942)

Quarantine and other official announcements- ---.---------------- : ..-----.------ -------------- 49
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) -------------. 49
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice) --------------------------- -----------49
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ----------- ------------- 50
Instructions to postmasters --.--- ...---. ------------- ....... .-----------------------. 50
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394. second revision) -- 0
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)- ------ 51
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shinments under
301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to deptember 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524) 52
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6) 52
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
sixth revision) .....- _..... .----- .... ....................- 54
Japanese beetle adm.nistrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7)... i
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) --.. --..--...--- .. ------ .------. 58
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations mod'fied (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision) .--------- 58
Announcements relating to white-frinved beetle quarantine (No. 72) .----------.-- -------- 59
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision) .--- --....... 59
Heaw ng will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice) ---..------------- 60
Nctice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine to include North Carolna --...---....................................... 60
541987-43 nI








I CONTEN TS


ntne and other official announcements-Continued.
Announcements rlating to Mexican border regulats..............--.....--.......
Mexican Border Act ----- --------- * ----------- ---------p ---- 8
Mexican Border Act...... ..............................................................
Mexican border regulations (press notice).--------- .----------------------.............. 62
Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942 -----------------.....
M iscellaneous items_ ....---------- ..----------.... --... ... ...----- ------------------ .... ..... A
Plant-quarantine import restrictins, Jamaica, Britih West Indies (B. P. Q. 355, re
supplement Nc. 4) .................------------------............................ 6
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, suppemet No. )
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products-...........--.......----...........- ......
Arizona plant quarantine..............................---........-........... .... 6
Oregon State plant quarantines.. ----------- -- -.---- --.. ..- .
Penalties imposed for vilations of the Plant Quarantine Act.- .._- .---..---.--.---------,-- 69
Organization of the Buieau of Entomoloey and Plant Quarantine .---------- ----------- ..

CONTENTS OF NO. 153 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942)
Quarantine and other official announcements ........--------------.-.. -------.---.-------- .
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38) ..-------..... -----.--.. 7
Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P. Q. 385,
third revision) .........--............----- --....-----..---... --------........ .
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) .,-....... 7
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, s th
revision) --------...................----------------------------------------------......------................. 74
Instructions to pGstmasters -..----------.....------------...-------------..-.. 7
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ------- ------------.. -
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised (press notice)--- -------------------- ---,- 7... 6
Revision of quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942 ----_-. .....-..._.... 7.
Notice to general public through newspapers. -................ ......... ....... 84
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision), ......-- ,
Announcement relating to Mexican bordei regulations ---.----.-----.------- ---.........
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50757j) --------------
Miscellaneous items --.-----.---- .---------- ------- ----------------------------------- 8.
Plant-quarantine impoit restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
N o. 7)__.....___.__ -...... . . . . . ..........-..- -............. . . .... 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1
List of cu rent ouarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations - ...
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products _------------------------------- ..-
Plants and plant products addressed to places in California-- -----------........... 93
California State plant quarantine modified .------ ------------------------------...... 94
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-- ....----.--- -- ....----..-.
Organization cf the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ..-------.. ...-.-- --.. -------....

0

























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a N

4i






. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 150. Issued June 1942


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1942


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------..---.----------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)---------- 1
Revise quarantine on Japanese beetle (press notice) ------------------------------------ 1
Revision of regulations effective March 24, 1942..- -------------------------------------- 2
Notice to general public through newspapers---------- ------------------------------- 14
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)----------------------------- 15
Texas citrus fruit harvest extended (press notice) --------- ------------------------- 15
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified-harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)-------- 15
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ------------------------- 16
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified-treatments authorized (B. E.
P. Q. 503, fourth revision)-------- --------------------------------------------------- 16
Miscellaneous items.....------------.... --.---------- ---------------- -- ---------------------- 19
Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) .- ------ ------- 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement No. 1) 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. E. P. Q. 520) ------------------------- 20
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522) ---------------- 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----------------------------------- 25
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------.-----------------------. 27



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

REVISE QUARANTINE ON JAPANESE BEETLE
[Press notice]

M'RCH 25, 1942.
The United States Department of Agriculture announced today that Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been revised, effective March 24, 1942.
Regulated areas have been extended to include relatively small sections in
Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. The new areas
include parts of the counties of Allegany and Washington, Md., the previously
unregulated parts of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince Georges Counties, Md., parts
of Ontario and Monroe Counties, N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City, and the magisterial district of
Lincoln in Tyler County, W. Va. These additions to- the regulated area are
made because numbers of beetles were found in these sections by scouts in 1941.
That part of the regulated area from which the movement of fruits and vege-
tables is under regulation-the more heavily infested area-has been extended
to include additional districts in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md.,
and in Berks, Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Char-
lottesville, Va., is now included with Toledo, Ohio, (rnl Winchester, Va., aS
isolated regulated points to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator
car or motortruck may move only under certification. Shilpers of cut flowers
located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested part, now are
not required to obtain certification for their shipments. Soil-free rooted cuttings
and fresh manure are exempt from certification under current regulations.
463S02-42--2-1 1





2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

B. E. P. Q.-Q. 48. Revision of Regulations
Effective March 24, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOM~ESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In the current revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, relatively
small extensions of regulated areas are made in Maryland, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Additions to the regulated area in Mary-
land include portions of the counties of Allegany and Washington, and the
previously unregulated portions of the counties of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince
Georges. In New York, the town of Manchester, Ontario County, and the town
of Pittsford and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County, are brought under
regulation. Extension of the Pennsylvania regulated area is limited to the city
of Meadville, in Crawford County. The cities of Charlottesville and Danville,
the village of Schoolfield in Pittsylvania County, and the town of Front Royal
in Warren County, Va., are added to the regulated area. The area in Warwick
County, Va., has been slightly increased and described as the magisterial district
of Newport, which includes the Camp Stuart locality heretofore under regulation.
An addition to the West Virginia area was made by the inclusion of the magis-
terial district of Lincoln, Tyler County, and the town of Paden City, in Tyler and
Wetzel Counties.
Areas from which the movement of fruits and vegetables is regulated
( 301.48-5) have been further extended to include additional election districts
and towns in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and Berks, Cumber-
land, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va., is now
included with Toledo, Ohio, and Winchester, Va., as isolated regulated points
to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator car or motortruck
may move only under certification.
Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure have been added to the list of
exempted articles, and the special labeling requirements previously prescribed
for containers of certain exempted articles have been removed.
Restrictions on the movement of cut flowers are now confined to shipments
moving from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside the regulated
areas. This heavily infested area ( 301.48-5) is that from which the move-
ment of fruits and vegetables is also restricted. This will relieve shippers of
cut flowers located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested
portion, from the necessity of obtaining certification for their shipments.
Minor changes have been made in 301.48-6 relating to the maintenance of a
classified status at an infested nursery or greenhouse.
Authorization for the issuance of permits for the movement via motortruck
of all restricted articles from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area has been restored.
This revision supersedes the rules and regulations supplemental to the revi-
sion of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, which became effective February 12,
1941, as amended by administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 513), effective
April 21, 1941.
SUMMARY
Unless a certificate has been issued, these regulations, as now revised, pro-
hibit the interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 (between June
1 and October 15 in the case of Accomac and Northampton Counties. Va.) of
all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck and cut flowers by
any mode of transportation, from the District of Columbia, the State of
Delaware, and parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and -Virginia, as
defined in 301.48-5, to or through points outside the regulated areas as
defined in 301.48-3.
Also restricted in the regulations is the interstate movement of plants, sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or
certificate has been obtained. For details and exceptions see 301.48-6 and 7.
Included in the regulated areas are the District of Columbia, the entire States
of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, as described in 301.48-3.
These regulations also specify the conditions governing the protection of
restricted articles from infestation while in transit ( 301.48-8), require thor-
ough cleaning of vehicles, containers, and refrigerator cars which have been
used in transportating restricted products ( 301.48-5 and 13), and provide
other safeguards and conditions, as specified in the regulations.
To obtain permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest
branch office listed in the appendix.
DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
The Secretary of Agriculture, having determined that it was necessary to
quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachu-
setts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Is-
land, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a danger-
ous. insect new to and not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States, and having given the public hearing required
by law, promulgated the thirteenth revision of Notice of Quarantine 301.48,
part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, and rules and regu-
lations supplemental thereto, governing the movement of (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from any of the above-
named States or the District of Columbia, into or through any other State
or Territory or District of the United States, 301.48-1 to 14, inclusive, part
301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 48, effec-
tive on and after February 12, 1941].
I have determined that it is necessary to revise the aforesaid rules and regu-
lations for the purpose of extending the regulated areas owing to the dis-
covery of substantial infestations of the Japanese beetle in additional sections,
and to make other modifications.
ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7
U. S. C. 161), the subpart entitled "Japanese Beetle" of part 301, chapter III,
title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.--Q. 48, as revised] is hereby
revised effective March 24, 1942, to read as follows:

SUPART--JAPANESE BEETLE

QUARANTINE

301.48. Notice of quarantine.-Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), I
do quarantine .the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle. Hereafter (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamehtal, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, shall not be shipped, offered
for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported
by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved
from any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other
State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or
under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations herein-
after made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this
quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited
to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated
by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of
the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and






4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE Jan.-ar.

regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread
of the Japanese beetle: Provided further, That such limitations shall be con-
ditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures
with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese
beetle therefrom to other parts of the State: And provided further, That cer-
tain articles classed as restricted herein may, because of the nature of their
growth or production or their manufactured or processed condition, be exempted
by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered in-
nocuous as carriers of infestation: And provided further. That whenever, in
any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or
more of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making
it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any
such regulations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative
instructions, specifying the manner in which the applicable regulation should
be made less stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective,
for such period and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be
Ipecified in said administrative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall
be made to give publicity to such administrative instructions throughout the
affected areas.
RULES AND REGULATIONS

Meaning of Terms

301.48-1. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Japanese beetle.-The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.
(b) Infested, infestation.-The terms "infested," "infestation," and the like,
relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.
(c) Quarantined area.-Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.
(d) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of
Agriculture in accordance with the provisos of 301.48, as revised.
(e) Fruits and vegetables.-For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see 301.48-5.
(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.-Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.
(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connec-
tion with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.
(i) Certified greenhouse.-A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
301.48-6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or
stores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to
the inspector.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(k) 1Mored interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,
transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or
District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or
District.
(1) Certificate.-A valid form evidencing compliance with the requirements
of these regulations as to movement of restricted articles to points outside the
regulated areas.
(m) Permit.-A valid form authorizing movement of restricted articles from
a regulated area to a restricted destination in a separate regulated area.

1 301.48 to 301.48-14 inclusive, issued under the authority contained in see. 8, 39
Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250 ; 7 U. S. C. 161.






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Limitation of Restrictions

301.48-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.-Conditioned upon the
compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to 301.48, the
restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants
and plant products and other articles enumerated in said 301.48 will be limited to
such movement from the area in such State now or hereafter designated by the
Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

Areas under Regulation

S301.48 -3. Regulated areas.-In accordance with the provisos to 301.48, the
Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these
regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election dis-
tricts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs,
or other political subdivisions within their limits:
Connecticut.-The entire State.
Delaware.--The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
Maryland.-Counties of Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford,
Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Queen Annes, Somerset, Talbot,
Wicomico, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the
town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 22, 23,
24, 26, 28, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis, and election
districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; election districts of La
Plata (No. 1), Pomonkey (No. 7), and White Plains (No. 6), in Charles County;
election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), Church Creek (No. 9), East New Market
(No. 2), Fork (No. 1), Hurlock (No. 15), Vienna (No. 3), and Williamsburg
(No. 12), in Dorchester County; all of Washington County except the election
districts of Hancock (No. 5) and Indian Spring (No. 15).
Massachusetts.-The entire State.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom,
Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and
Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater,
Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holder-
ness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Montgomery,
Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rens-
slaer. Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and Salamanca,
and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; city of Auburn and the towns
of Fleming, Owasco, and Sennett, in Cayuga County; towns of Amherst, Cheek-
towaga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Erie
County: towns of Columbia. Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herki-
mer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark,
Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town
of Watertown and city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris
and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester, towns of
Brighton and Pittsford, and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County: town
of Manchester, in Ontario County; towns of Catharine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector,
ontour. lnd Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen. in Schtiuler County:
towns of Caton, Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of
Corning and Hornell, in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden,
Enfi'd. Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tomnkins County; towns of
Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.
Ohio.-Counties of Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and






6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and
Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Wil-
loughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-
Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County; the
township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the city of Toledo,
in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield, in Richland
Cowunt:; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Champion, Fowler, Hart-
ford. Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, Southington, Warren,
Weather-field, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and the villages of
Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orangeville, in
Trum bull County.
Pennsylrania.-The entire State except the townships of Athens, Beaver, Bloom-
field, Cambridge, Conneaut, Cussewago, East Fairfield, East Fallowfield, East
Mead, Fairfield, Greenwood, Hayfield, North Shenango, Pine, Randolph, Rich-
mond, Rockdale, Sadsbury, South Shenango, Spring, Steuben, Summerhill, Summit,
Troy, Union. Venango, Vernon, Wayne, West Fallowfield, West Mead, West She-
nango, and Woodcock, the boroughs of Blooming Valley, Cambridge Springs, Coch-
ranton, Conneaut Lake, Conneautville, Geneva, Linesville, Saegerstown, Spring-
boro, Townville, Venango. and Woodcock, in Crawford County; the townships of
Amity. Conneaut, Elk Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield,
Harborcreek, Lawrence Park, Le Boeuf, McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit,
Union. Venango, Washington, and Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranes-
ville, Eist Springfield, Edinboro, Fairview. Girard, Middleboro, Mill Village, North
East, North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville,
in Erie County; the townships of Deer Creek, Delaware, Fairview, French Creek,
Greene, Hempfield, Lake, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry, Pymatun-
ing, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Sugar Grove, and West
Salem, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Jamestown, New
Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in Mercer County.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.
Virgin ia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess Anne,
and Stafford; magisterial districts of Bermuda, Dale, Manchester, and Matoaca,
in Chesterfield County; town of Emporia, in Greensville County; magisterial dis-
trict of Sleepy Hole, in Nansenmond County; village of Schoolfield, in Pittsylvania
County; magisterial districts of Hampton, Jackson, and Wakefield, in Rappa-
hannock County; magisterial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County;
town of Front Royal, in Warren. County; magisterial district of Newport, in
Warwick County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County;
and the cities of Alexandria, Charlottesville, Danville, Fredericksburg, Hampton,
Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk,
Suffolk, and Winchester.
West Virginia.-Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, Ohio, and Taylor; magisterial districts of Arden, Falling Waters,
Hedgesville, and Opequon and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the
city of Charleston, in Kanawha County; magisterial districts of Sand Hill, Union,
Washington, and Webster, in Marshall County; town of Keyser and magisterial
district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; magisterial district of Lincoln, in Tyler
County; town of Paden City, in Tyler and Wetzel Counties; and the city of Parkers-
burg, and magisterial districts of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.

Changes in Regulated Areas

301.48-4. Extension or reduction of regulated areas.-The regulated areas
designated in 301.48-3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by
the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the
areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies
doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by
publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture
within the States in which the areas affected are located.

Movement of Fruits and Vegetables

301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.-(a) on-
trol of movement.--(1) Unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor, by an






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

inspector, except as provided in subdivisions (i) to (iv), inclusive, of this section,
no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved interstate via refrigerator car
or motortruck from any of the areas listed below to or through any point outside
the regulated areas:
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Muryland.-Counties of Baltimore, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annies, Somer-
set, and Worcester; election districts Nos. 3, 4 and 5, in Anne Arundel County;
the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of American
Corners (No. 8), and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7),
East New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in
Dorchester County; election districts of Elk Ridge (No. 1), and Ellicott City (No.
2), in Howard County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11),
Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg
(No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), and the town
of Salisbury, in Wicomico County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland,
Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean,
Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle
Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield, and Hacken-
sack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Paterson, East
Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glenn
Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, Moonachie, North
Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and
Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East
Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Menham, Morris, Morristown. Parsippany-Troy Hills,
Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham Park,
Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County; township of Little Falls,
the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne,
North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in Passaic County;
townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong,
and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; all of Berks County except the townships of Albany, Bethel,
Centre, Greenwich, Jefferson, Marion, North Heidelberg, Penn, Perry, Tilden,
Tulpehocken, Upper Bern, Upper Tulpehocken, and Windsor, and the boroughs
of Bernville, Centreport, Hamburg, Lenhartsville, Shoemakersville, Strausstown,
and West Leesport; townships of Lower Allen and Upper Allen, and boroughs of
Lemoyne, Mechanicsburg, and New Cumberland, in Cumberland County; town-
ships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara,
the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County; all of Lehigh County except
the townships of Heidelberg, Lowhill, Lynn, Washington, and Weisenberg, atnd
borough of Slatington; all of Northampton County except the townships of
Bushkill, Lehigh, Moore, Plainfield, Upper Mount Bethel, and Washington, and
boroughs of Bangor, Chapman, East Bangor, Pen Argyl, Portland, Roseto,
Stockertown, Walnutport, and Wind Gap; and the townships of Chanceford,
Conewago, East Hopewell, East Manchester, Fairview, Fawn, Hellam, Hopewell,
Lower Chaneeford, Lower Windsor, Manchester, Newberry, Peach Bottom, and
Springetsbury, the city of York, and the boroughs of Cross Roads, Delta, East
Prospect, Fawn Grove, Goldsboro, Hallam, Lewisberry, Manchester, Mount Wolf,
North York, Stewartstown, Wrightsville, Yorkana, and York Haven, in York
County.
Virginia.--Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.
Provided, That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the
area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to other points in the regulated
area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be
regarded as direct shipments from the points of origin. As such they require
certification:
Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the ares specified in
this section when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
(i) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of move-
ment interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the
period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:
Virginia.-The counties of Accomac and Northampton.






8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

(ii) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of
lading either from a point outside the area designated in this section through that
area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this section through
a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required
for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this
section to Toledo, Ohio, and Charlottesville and Winchester, Va.
(iii) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(iv) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables from the area listed in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to the remainder
of the regulated area, other than as specified in subdivision (ii) of this section.
(b) Conditions of certification.-Certifi:ates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomac County
or Northampton County, Va.) under one of the following conditions:
(1) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of
general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.
(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas desig-
nated in this section, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reship-
ment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases
where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unload-
ing docks.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists
and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the
areas designated in paragraph (a) (1) of this section, or are shipped from in-
fested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the
inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent
infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and
hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as fumi-
gated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid
it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or cleaning and load-
ing, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed. (For further re-
quirements on the cleaning of refrigerator cars, see 301.48-13.)
(6) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary
in the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors and httches of the car have
been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

Movement of Nursery and Ornamcntal Stock

301 48-6. R.strictio.ns on the movement of nursery and orutanental stock.-
(a) Control of movement.-Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in
301.48-1 shall not be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof, unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:
(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are, therefore, exempt from the requirements of certification.
(i) True bulbs, cornms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil; and single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers
or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require certification.
(ii) Cut orchids; orchid plants when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber;
Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea and
O. claytoniana).
(iii) (a) Floral designs or "set pieces," including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists' designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared
are not exempted; (b) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Epigaea repens), when
free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16 and June
14, inclusive.
(iv) (a) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated; (b) mush-
room spawn, in brick, flakes, or pure culture form.
(v) (a) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum) ; (b)
resurrection plant or bird's-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla) ; (c) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) ; (d) dyed moss.
(vi) Soil-free dried roots incapable of propagation.
(vii) Soil-free rooted cuttings.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soil-free aquatic
plants, and of portions of plants without roots. and free from soil, except that
a certificate is required during the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomac County
or Northampton County, Va.), for the movement of cut flowers from the area
designated in 301.48-5 interstate to points outside the regulated areas
( 301.48-3).
(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.
(b) Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.-For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:
(1) Class I.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b) (7) of this section nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
scribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III..
(2) Class II.-(i) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas, certified
houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas. Such classification will not
be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises that do not maintain
certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent certification. Such
classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where one or more beetles or
grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of
such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery
properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels
of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either
as class I or class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as
shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which
would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose
of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the
inspector such action is warranted by scanty infestation limited to a portion
of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infesta-
tion shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall
be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.
463802-42- 2







10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

(ii) Upon compliance with paragraphs (b) (3), (6), and (7) of this section,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (a) That the
roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough in-
spection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by
shaking or washing; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to
the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.
(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all pot-
ting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(i) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on
premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the in-
spector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
(ii) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to, the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(iii) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (a) shall be
potted in certified soil; (b) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (c) shall, if grown outdoors
during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other mate-
rial shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (d) shall
comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.
(4) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (i) when they have been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (ii) when they
have been grown on a class I establishment or in a certified greenhouse of class
III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the
inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (a) (3) of this section.)
(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (i) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (ii)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class III
status, shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to
make the report required by this section, and such denial of certification shall
continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(7) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class I
status, or to maintain in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision, a cer-
tified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (i) shall restrict their purchases or receipts
of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated area and
intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate
shall accompany the article when moved; (ii) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on class I or certified premises or are
taken into certified greenhouses; (iii) shall report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area for







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

use on such premises; and (iv) shall also report immediately on forms provided
for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points out-
side the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within
the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted
to make the report or reports required by this section, and such denial of
certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(8) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and
certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be certified
for reshipment from premises other than those on which they originated, under
provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from
infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when found advisable by
the inspector after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.

Movement of Soil and Similar Materials
301.48-7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure.-(a) Control of movement.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure shall not be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or
through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been
issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (i) fresh
manure; (ii) sand and clay when free from vegetable matter; (iii) greensand
marl; and (iv) such other sands and clays as have been treated or processed
and subsequently handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector
no Japanese beetle could exist therein.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (i) when dehydrated, shredded, ground, pulverized, or com-
pressed, or (ii) when treated with crude petroleum or any other product having
high potency as an insecticide.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped from
the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further protected
in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.
(b) Conditions of certification.-Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of the
fbllowing conditions:
(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the
regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.
(2) When the material consists of mined, dredged, or other similar materials,
and it has been determined by an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.
(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an inspec-
tor, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground and
either (i) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or (ii) is
loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that
no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (iii) when the cars and loading
operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner and
by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulfide or otherwise
treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition of
certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, except
such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with subparagraphs (1), (2), or (3)
of this paragraph.
Protection of Articles in Tran.it
301.48-8. Conditions governing the protection of restricted articles from in-
festation while in transit.-Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock,







12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or
through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and
October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be
screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.
Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed by
the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain intact as
long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.
Marking and Certification

301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transportation.-
(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in 301.48-5,
6, and 7 shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and
the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regu-
lations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one
of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining
to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates
accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.
Procedure for Applicants

301.48-10. General conditions governing inspection and issuance of certifi-
cates and permits.--(a) Persons intending to move interstate any of the articles
the movement of which is restricted in 301.48-5, 6, and 7 shall make applica-
tion for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable
date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be
shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and
address of the consignee.
(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at such
points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspection may
readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for
storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transportation
of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.
(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles
enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be refused.
(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area, except for the movement of fruits and vegetables as
specified in paragraph (a) (1) (ii) of 301.48-5.

Certificates May Be Canceled

301.48-11. Cancelation of certificates.-Certificates issued under these regula-
tions may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification
refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regula-
tions or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the
further use Of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.
Shipments Inspected En Route

301.48-12. Inspection in transit.-Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other con-
tainer moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate,
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infestations, infested articles, or articles the movement of which is re-
stricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at
any time or place, and when actually found o involve danger of dissemination






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may
be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.

Cleaning of Vehicles

301.48-13. Thorough cleaning required of trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and
other vehicles and containers before moving interstate.-Trucks, wagons, cars,
boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting
any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not
thereafter be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and
cleaned by the carrier at a point within the regulated area. Refrigerator cars
originating in the area designated in 301.48-5 into which fruits or vegetables
are to be loaded for interstate movement from any regulated area shall be
thoroughly swept or cleaned or fumigated prior to loading as may be required
by the inspector.

Articles for Experimental and Scientific Purposes

301.48-14. Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.-Articles sub-
ject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental
or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container
of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an
identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing
compliance with such conditions.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of March 1942.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * or any other
article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or
method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any
certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction
thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not
exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.
STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION-

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promulgate
quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture, 266
Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:
Connecticut: Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New
Haven, Conn.
Delaware: Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.
Maryland:
2 Sherwood Avenue, Pikesville, Md.
Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.
Room 205, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.






14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY A PLANT QUARNTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Massachusetts: 144 Woody Street, Waltham, Mass.
New Jersey:
Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.
P. 0. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.
New York:
Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.
Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
Ohio: 21065 Euclid Avenue, Euclid, Ohio.
Pennsylvania :
Room 303, Post Office Building, Harrisburg, Pa.
6905 Torresdale Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.
Room 438-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Virginia:
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
17 North Boulevard, Richmond, Va.
West Virginia: 245 West Philadelphia Avenue, Bridgeport, W. Va.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling Republic 4142, branch 2598, inspection house
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 224 Twelfth Street SW.,
Washington, D. C.
GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
Conn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston.
Mass.
Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
N. Y.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,
R. I.
Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.
State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.
[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent -o all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area.]
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register March 23, 1942, 11: 57 a. m.; 7 F. R.
2202. ]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUTOIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Washington, D. C., March 20, 1942.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, un4er authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1 as amended (7
U. S. C. 161), has promulgated a revision of the regulations of Japanese beet e
quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48), effective on and af r March 24, 1942.
New areas brought within the regulated areas include parts or all of the counties
of Allegany, Carroll, Frederick, Prince Georges, and Washington, Md:, arts of
Ontario and Monroe Counties. N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City and one district in Tyler County,
W. Va. The area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is regulated ( 301.48-5) has been extended to include
additional sections in Anne'Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and in Berks,
Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va.,
is added as an isolated regulated point to which such fruit and vegetable ship-
ments may move only under certification. Restrictions on cut flowers are now
confined to shipments from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside






1942 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

the regulated areas. Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure are exempt from
certification. There are other slight modifications. Copies of the revised regula-
tions may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford,
Conn., March 31, 1942; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., March 30, 1942; The
Evening Star, Washington, D. C., March 30, 1942; the Press-Herald Portland, Maine,
March 31, 1942; the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Md., March 30, 1942; the Post, Boston,
Mass., March 30, 1942; the Union, Manchester, N. H., March 31, 1942; the News, Newark,
N. J., March 30. 1942: the Times, New York, N. Y., March 30, 1942; the Press, Cleveland.
Ohio. March 30, 1942; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1942; the Bulletin,
Providence, R. I., March 30, 1942; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., March 31, 1942; the
News-Leader, Richmond, Va., April 7, 1942; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., -March 30,
1942.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY
QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT HARVEST EXTENDED
[Press notice]

JANUARY 23, 1942.
Under a modification of the Mexican fruitfly Federal quarantine regulations
announced today by the Department of Agriculture, the harvest season for
oranges and grapefruit from the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo,
and Willacy has been extended through May 31, for this year, provided condi-
tions of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing.
The harvest season normally closes, under the regulations, on April 30, except
that the grapefruit harvest in the counties of Dimmit, LaSalle, and Webb ends
with the last day of February. The harvest begins on September 1. The quar-
antine regulations require a fruit-free period between harvests to prevent
fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande Valley.
It is believed that no risk of infestation is involved in this modification, the
Department said, as intensive inspection has resulted in finding no fruitflies
in any stage of development. The longer harvest will, furthermore, provide a
more orderly marketing of this year's large crop of oranges and grapefruit.
The area under regulation includes the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron,
Dimmit, Hidalgo, La Salle, Webb, Willacy, and part of Jim Wells County.
Extension of the harvest season, which became effective January 20, under
administrative instructions of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, was announced after consultation with the Texas State Department
of Agriculture.


B. E. P. Q. 521. Effective January 20, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

MEXICAN FRUITFLY REGULATIONS MODIFIED--ARVESTING SEASON EXTENDED

301.64-5d Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the
exican fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on oranges and
grapefruit.-Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third proviso of 301.64, Chapter
III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it
having been determined by me that a modification may be safely made without
increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, 301.64-5 (a) [para-
graph (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this quarantine] is hereby modified
effective January 20, 1942, to extend the harvesting season for oranges and






16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

grapefruit for the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy to
the close of May 31 for the year 1942, provided conditions of infestation do not
necessitate an earlier closing date.
The host-free period for oranges and grapefruit, under this modification, will
begin June 1 and continue through August 31, 1942, inclusive, in the above-named
counties.
In the counties of Dimmit, La Salle, and Webb, the grapefruit harvesting
season closes on February 28, 1942, under the regulations, and the orange
harvesting season closes on April 30 as to these three counties and the portion
of Jim Wells County which is under regulation. No modification is made as to
the harvesting seasons in these counties (7 C. F. R. 301.64-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat.
1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161).
Done at Washington, D. C., this 17th day of January 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Copies of foregoing instructions were sent to all common carriers doing business in or
through the State of Texas.]
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 20, 1942, 2: 51 p. m.; 7 F. R.
444.1

B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision. Effective January 9, 1942.
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHVITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED-TREATMENTS
AUTHORIZED
Introductory note.-Recent investigational work has shown that it is possible
to destroy all stages of the white-fringed beetles (Pantomorus spp.) in soil,
with either carbon disulphide or methyl bromide applied as a liquid, provided
the temperature of the soil is sufficiently high and the period of exposure is long
enough. The administrative instructions in this circular, specifying the various
authorized methods of treatment of plants in soil, and of potting soil, are
therefore hereby revised by authorizing the above treatment for soil plots, plung-
ing beds, and potting soil (see paragraph (c)).
All treatments apply to the various species of white-fringed beetles.
This circular supersedes all instructions in Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486, 489,
and previous issues of 503.
301.72-5c.2 Administrative instructions-Treatments authorized.-Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine by paragraph (a) of 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account
of the white-fringed beetle], the following methods of treatment are hereby
authorized effective January 9, 1942, when carried out under the supervision of
an authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(a) Plants in pots or in soil balls.
(1) Methyl bromide fumigation at atmospheric pressures.-(i) Fumigation
must be done with methyl bromide at a dosage of 1 pound per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the plants, for a period of 4 hours, the soil
masses and the air in the fumigation chamber to be at a temperature of not
less than 850 F.
(ii) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or smaller,
or in soil balls not greater than 3 inches in diameter when spherical or thicker
than 3 inches if not spherical, and the plants shall be stacked on racks so that
the gas mixture can have access to all sides of the pots or the soil balls.
(iii) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gas-tight doors.
(iv) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of
methyl bromide shall be volatilized therein, and the air-gas mixture shall be

2Superseding 301.72-5a and b.






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation
period.
(v) The use of a fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout and
with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in place by
refrigerator door fasteners, is recommended.
(2) Methyl bromide fum-igation under partial racuum.-(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury must be done with
a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber space,
including the space occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 1 2 hours,
the vacuum to be maintained throughout the entire period.
(ii) The temperature of the soil balls shall be 75 F. or above, and the diam-
eter of the soil balls shall be not greater than 11 inches if spherical, or thicker
than 11 inches if not spherical.
(iii) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vapor-
ized fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in contact
with the surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with one or
more changes of air at the end of the exposure period.
(iv) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and
will withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A
vacuum pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum
chamber to the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level)
in not more than 20 minutes is necessary.
(3) Methyl bromide solution.-(i) Treatment method.-(Applicable to all
regulated areas.)
(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays which are watertight and approximately 1 foot deep.
(b) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls.
also above and beneath them.
(c) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent dena-
tured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by first
mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this mixture
to the water and mixing thoroughly.
(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be applied
evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40 gallons
per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or sprayer.
(ii) Type of material, exposure, and temperature.
(a) In Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish,
and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes, La., the treatment shall
be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter, nor
greater than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the required dosage
has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period
of 8 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 650 F.
, (b) In all regulated areas other than Orleans Parish, including the city of New
Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish, and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines
Parishes, La., the treatment shall be applied to soil balls not greater than 8 inches
in diameter, nor greater than 8 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the
required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the
sand for a period of 6 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treat-
ment shall not be lower than 620 F.
(b) Potting soil.
(1) Carbon disulphide fumigation.-(i) Potting soil shall be treated in a con-
tainer with carbon disulphide at a dosage of 2 pounds per cubic yard of soil for
a period of 48 hours.
(ii) The grade of carbon disulphide shall be comparable to U. S. P. grade having
a specific gravity of 1.25 at 680 F.
(iii) The container shall be tight, preferably lined with sheet metal, and shall
have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin immediately after the fumigant
is applied. The container shall not be more than 36 inches deep.
(iv) The soil shall be friable, and wet soil shall not be treated by this method.
The fumigant shall be applied to the soil in holes 3 inches deep, the dosage to
be evenly divided among holes 1 foot apart over the surface of the soil, and the
fumigant shall be covered with soil as soon as it is applied.
(v) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 400 F. during the entire
time of treatment.







18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

(vi) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
cation of the fumigant must meet with the approval of an authorized inspector of
the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) Methyl bromide fumigation.-(i) Potting soil must be treated in a ontainer
with methyl bromide in a dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl bromide per
cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.
(ii) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably
lined with sheet metal, and shall have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin
immediately after the fumigant is applied.
(iii) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 400 F. during the entire
time of treatment.
(iv) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
cation of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector of the
United States Department of Agriculture.
(3) Heat treatment.-(i) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more per
square inch, shall be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the bottom of
the sterilizing box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of 45 minutes
or until all parts of the load reach a temperature of 2000 F.
(ii) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes
A inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at one end to a manifold into
which the steam is introduced.
(iii) The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet, 6 inches
deep.
(4) Methyl bromide and carbon disulphide.-(See instructions in para-
graph (c).)
(c) Soil plots, plunging beds, and potting soil.
(1) Methyl bromide.-(i) Inject the liquid methyl bromide into the soil at a
depth of 6 inches by means of a hollow needle or other suitable injector at the
rate of 4.7 milliliters per square foot or 7 milliliters per 1%/ square feet of soil
surface.
(ii) After treatment has been applied to the plot the soil should be covered
with 10- or 15-pound building paper, lapped 4 inches and weighted down so that it
will not be blown off.
(iii) The soil must be at a temperature not lower than 450 F. at a depth of
6 inches when the treatment is applied. At temperatures from 45 to 62 inclusive
the soil must be kept covered for a period of 6 days to insure complete mortality
of all eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of the insect which may be present in the soil
under treatment. At temperatures above 620 the soil must be kept so covered for
a period of not less than 4 days.
(2) Carbon disulphide.-(i) The insecticide shall be applied at the rate of
33 milliliters per square foot of soil surface, the liquid to be poured into holes
at least 6 inches deep and 1 inch in diameter at the top, and covered immediately
with earth.
(ii) After application the plot should be covered with 10- to 15-pound building
paper which shall remain in position for at least 4 days in order to insure complete
mortality of any eggs, larvae, pupae, or adults of white-fringed beetles that may be
present.
(iii) The treatment shall not be applied to soil which is below 80* F. in
temperature at a depth of 6 inches.
(d) Disclaimer.-There has been opportunity to test these treatments on only
relatively few varieties of plants and in authorizing the movement of potted
plants, nursery stock, or soil treated according to the requirements stated above,
it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States
Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of injury to
either plants or operators.
(e) Caution.-(1) Methyl bromide.-(i) Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary
temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for
fumigation of plants or potting soil. It is a poison and the operators should
use gas masks approved by the United States Bureau of Mines for use with
methyl bromide, when exposed to the gas in concentrations used in fumigation,
or while preparing the solution. The plants in the fumigation chamber should
be well aerated by blowing air through them, and the room adequately ventilated
before it is entered. After fumigating the potting soil by methyl bromide the
cover should be removed and the soil allowed to become aerated.
(ii) The method for application of methyl bromide described in paragraph
(c) provides a closed system in which the operator is not exposed to a dangerous
concentration of the gas provided there is no leakage in any exposed portion of







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

the equipment. Extreme care should be exercised to keep all joints of such
apparatus tight and replace any defective parts to prevent accident. The
operator should avoid getting any liquid methyl bromide on his clothing or his
body at any time.
(2) Carbon disulphide.
(i) The vapor of carbon disulphide is inflammable and explosive. At a
temperature of 2970 F. it may take fire spontaneously and in the presence of
certain metals, particularly copper, it may ignite at considerably lower tempera-
tures. It must be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric
light bulbs, unprotected brush-type motors, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars,
cigarettes, or pipes must never be brought near carbon disulphide.
(ii) Carbon disulphide is a blood poison, but poisoning by this chemical is
rare. Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and headache. When these
symptoms develop, the individual should get into the open air.
17 C. F. R., 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of January 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 13, 1942, 11:18 a. m.;
7 F. R. 239.]

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
WAKELAND TO HEAD DIVISION OF GRASSHOPPER CONTROL
[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 4, 1942.
The Department .of Agriculture today announced creation of the Division of
Grasshopper Control within the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
to supervise cooperative programs with the States in control of grasshoppers,
Mormon crickets, and chinch bugs. Leader of the new division is Dr. Claude
Wakeland, said Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau.
While programs of control for chinch bugs, Mormon crickets, and grasshoppers
have been in operation for a number of years, this is the first time that the work
has been unified under one division. Headquarters for this division will remain
in Denver, Colo., where they have been since 1940. Doctor Wakeland, who has
had field direction of the cooperative programs of grasshopper and Mormon
cricket control since 1939, was born August 2, 1888, at LaJara, Colo. He at-
tended public school in Denver, graduated from Colorado State College with a
B. S. degree in 1914, received an M. S. from the same institution in 1924, and
in 1934 received a Ph. D. from Ohio State University.
He started active work in entomology with the Colorado Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. In 1920 he was appointed extension entomologist for the Uni-
versity of Idaho, and 1928 was made head of the Department of Entomology at
that University.
In 1938 he was appointed to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
as project leader on Mormon cricket control with headquarters in Salt Lake
City, and the following year was made field director of the combined grasshopper
and Mormon cricket control programs.

B. E. PQ.Q. 519, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA
MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS AFFETING BROOMCORN

FBBUARY 23, 1942.
The Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, in Resolution No. 7, dated January 5, 1942,
authorized for a period of 1 year from that date, the importation into Cuba of
broomcorn (Holcus) plants and parts thereof, raw materials used in the manu-
facture of brooms, when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, issued by
a competent official n the country of origin and legalized by a Cuban consul,
stating that the product has been carefully selected and that it is free from
Pyrausta ubilais (European corn borer) and other insects. Importers will be
required to vacuum fumigate their importations with hydrocyanic acid gas,







20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AN PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

under the supervision of the Plant Quarantine Service, within 10 days after
unloading.
Importations are exempt from these requirements when they comply with
those of Article 7 of Decree No. 2745 (see page 5 of B. E. P. Q. 519).
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 520.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA

JANUARY 13, 1942.
This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Burma has been
prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that
country and plant quarantine officials.
The text, which was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certifi-
cation for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, consists of digests of
notifications issued by the Agricultural Branch of the Department of Agriculture
and Forests, Rangoon, Burma, on the following dates: December 16, 1940; Janu-
ary 15, February 28, April 24, and June 2, 1941. It was reviewed by the Secretary
to the Government of Burma.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as
legally authoritative.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
B. E. P. Q. 520.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA
BASIC LEGISLATION

JANUARY 13, 1942.

[DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND FORESTS AGRICULTURAL BRANCH, RANGOON,
BURMA. NOTIFICATION No. 377, DECEMBER 16, 1940; NOTIFICATION No. 13 (Con-
RIGENbUM), JANUARY 15, 1941; NOTIFICATION No. 56, FEBRUARY 28, 1941; NOTIFI-
CATION No. 89, APRIL 24, 1941; NOTIFICATION No. 141, JUNE 2, 1941.]

In accordance with the provisions of the Insects and Pests Act and in super-
session of all previous orders, the Governor makes the following order for the
purpose of prohibiting, regulating, and restricting the import into Burma of the
articles hereinafter specified.
CONCISE SUMMARY

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

A Federal certificate is required with all plants, other than fruits and vegetables
intended for consumption, in a prescribed form (page 6). (By definition, "plant"
does not include seeds) (par. 5).
A certificate from the consignor and a Federal certificate in relation to potato
wart disease are required with shipments of potatoes (par. 6).
A special certificate issued by the Entomologist, Burma, is required with plants
used for the purpose of introducing parasitic insects into Burma (pars. 3 and 4).
Two certificates are required with importations of rubber plants (par. 7),
citrus plants (par. 8), and unmanufactured tobacco (par. 9).
A special certificate is required with importations of sugarcane (par. 10).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cotton, unginned (par. 15 (1)).
Gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinum) (par. 16).
"Mexican jumping bean" (Sebastiania palmeri) (par. 12 (b)).
Sugarcane from the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippine
Islands (par. 10).






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Berseem (Egyptian clover) seeds (pars. 12 (a) and 14).
Citrus plants (par. 8).
Coffee plants, seeds, and beans (par. 13).
Cottonseed (pars. 12 (a) and 15 (2)).
Flaxseed (par. 12 (0) ).
Hevea rubber pillalt ;all seeds (par. 11).
Potatoes (par. i;).
Rubber plurns () par. 7).
Sugarcane from countries other than the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia,
and the Philippine Islands (par. 10).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits and vegetables intended for consumption.
Roasted or ground coffee (par. 13).

GENERAL REGULATIONS

NOTIFICATION NO. 377

1. Definitions.-(i) "Official certificate" means a certificate granted by the
proper officer or authority in the country of origin. (In the United States the
U. S. Department of Agriculture has been designated by the Burmese authorities
as the proper authority to issue such certificates.)
(ii) "Plant" means a living plant or part thereof, but does not include seeds.
(iii) All provisions referring to plants or seeds shall apply also to all packing
material used in packing or wrapping such plants or seeds.

RESTRICTIONS ON MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION

2. No plant shall be imported into Burma by letter or parcel post, except sugar-
cane for planting intended to be grown under the personal supervision of the
Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle, Pyinmana. (See also
par 10.)
3. No plants shall be imported into Burma by air, except those used for the
purpose of introducing living insects accompanied by a special certificate from
the Entomologist, Burma, stating that the plants are imported for such purpose,
and sugarcane for the Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle,
Pyinmana, if the conditions of paragraph 10 are satisfied.

FUMIGATION REQUIRED

4. No plants, other than fruits and vegetables intended for consumption, pota-
toes, and unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall be imported into
Surma by sea, except after fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas at the port
of Rangoon. except that plants which are used for the purpose of introducing
insect parasites may be imported without fumigation when accompanied by the
required special certificate from the Entomologist, Burma. (Another proviso
relates to rubber plants grown in Sumatra or in the Federated Malay States.)

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

5 No plants, other than unmanufactured tobacco imported from India, fruits
and vegetables intended for consumption, and potatoes, shall be imported into
Burma by sea unless accompanied by an official certificate that they are free
from injurious insects and diseases. The certificate shall be in the form prescribed,
or in a form as near thereto as may be and supplying all the information called
for in the prescribed form. (See p. 6.)

SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS

POTATOES

6. Potatoes shall not be imported into Burma by sea or by air, except from
India. unless they are accompanied by-






22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

(a) A certificate from the consignor stating fully in what country, and in
what district of such country, the potatoes were grown and guaranteeing that
wart disease was not known to exist on the farms where the potatoes were
grown; and
(b) An official certificate that no case of wart disease of potatoe has been
known during the 12 months preceding the date of the certificate, within 5 miles
of the place where the potatoes were grown.

RUY'BER PLANTS, INCLUDING IEVEA

7. Rubber plants imported into Burma by sea must be accompanied by two
certificates, the form prescribed in paragraph 5 and an official certificate affirming
that the estate from which the plants originated, or that the individual plants,
are free from Fomes lignosus, Sphaerostilbc repens. Dothidella ulei (Melanopsam-r
mopsis ulei) (Fusicladiumz macrosporium), and Oidium heveae.
11.3 Hevea rubber plants and seeds shall not be imported into Burma from Amer-
ica or the West Indies except by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.

CITRUS PLANTS AND CUTTINGS

8. No lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, or other citrus plants, or cuttings thereof,
shall be imported into Burma unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in
paragraph 5, they are accompanied by an official certificate affirming that they
are free from the Mal Secco caused by Deuterophomi tracheiphila, or that the
disease does not exist in the country in which they were grown.

UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

9. Unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall not be imported into
Burma by sea unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in paragraph 5, it is
accompanied by an official certificate affirming that Ephestia elutella does not
occur in the country of origin.

SUGARCANE

10. Importation of sugarcare into Burma by sea from the Fiji Islands, New
Guinea, Australia, or the Philippine Islands is prohibited absolutely. From other
countries sugarcane may be imported into Burma by sea or by air, only by the
Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle, Pyinmana, to be grown by
him in quarantine for 1 year, when accompanied by an official certificate stating
that the sugarcare has been examined and found free from cane borers. scale in-
sects, while flies, root disease (any form), pineapple disease. Ceratostomella para-
doxa or Thielaviopsis paradoxa. sereh dwarf disease, leaf scald, and cane gummo-
sis, that it was obtained from a crop which was free from mosaic and streak
diseases, and that the Fiji disease of sugarcane does not occur in the country
of export.
SEEDS OF FLAX, BERSEEM, AND COTTON

12. (a) Seeds of flax. berseem (Egyptian clover), and cotton shall not be im-
ported into Burma by air, or by letter or parcel post otherwise than by sea.
14. Flaxseed and berseem seed may be imported by sea only under a license
issued by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.
15. (2) Cottonseed may be imported by sea for experimental purposes only by
the Deputy Director of Agriculture, Myingyan Circle, Meiktila, in quantities not
exceeding one hundredweight (112 pounds) in any one consignment, through the
port of Rangoon only, to be fumigated upon arrival with carbon bisulfide.

COFFEE

13. Coffee plants, seeds, and beans shall not be imported into Burma except for
experimental planting purposes by the DIrector of Agriculture. Burma. or the
Principal Agricultural Officer, Federated Shan States. This prohibifion does not
apply to roasted and ground coffee.

3 The numbered paragraphs do not follow in sequence, because an effort has been made
to assemble the paragraphs on "Specific Restrictions" in one place, to be followed by the
paragraphs on. "Prohibitions."






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

PROHIBITIONS
MEXICAN JUMPING BEANS

12. (b) The importation of "Mexican jumping beans" (Sebastiania palmeri of
the family Euphorbiaceae) into Burma is prohibited absolutely.
UNGINNED COTTON

15. (1) Unginned cotton shall not be imported by sea or by air.
GRAM
16. The importation of gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinun) into Burma is pro-
hibited absolutely.
PRESCRIBED FORM OF CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products, a repre-
sentative sample of the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products (strike out
the words not applicable) included in the consignment, of which particulars are
given below, were/was thoroughly examined on the--- ------------ by
(date)
------------------, a duly authorized official of ,-----------
(name) (country of origin)
and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect,
pest, or disease [destructive to agricultural or horticultural crops or to trees or
bushes having been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the
packing) covered by this certificate has/has not been treated in the following
manner (e. g. fumigated with--------------
or disinfected with ---------------------- ] prior
immediately subsequent
to inspection. Inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector on
Not inspected

(Signature)
(Official status)
D ate -.... ..... ....
Number and description of packages- ---
Distinguishing marks ------
Description of plants or plant products or parts thereof---- ---_-- ---- _.
Stated to be grown at ------------------_-----.--
Exported by------- --- --- ------------------
Name and address of consignee,----- ------------------
Name of vessel or particulars of route-------------------
Date of shipment----- -------------------------
Port or place of entry----------------------------------
Additional certificate(s) attached----- -------------- ---
(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect of
imports specifically scheduled.)
(According to information received from the Secretary to the Government of
Burma, the standard export certificate, Form EQ-375, will be acceptable on con-
dition that it contains all the information called for in the above form. A state-
ment should be made under "Qualifying Notations" that the certification includes
packing material. In addition, the names and addresses of the shipper and con-
signee should be given in the body of the certificate, along with the date of
shipment and port or place of entry. In case the certification is in relation to
fumigation, a description of the treatment should be given under "Qualifying
Notations.")
B. E. P. Q. 522.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ECUADOR

FEBRUARY 12, 1942.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Ecuador has been prepared for the information of exporters of domestic plants
and plant products to that country, and for plant quarantine officials.






24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

The circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certification
for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation of an Ex-
ecutive Decree of February 15, 1940, and Regulatory Decrees relating to animals
and plants issued November 17, 1925, and January 25, 1926, and reviewed by the
Director General of Agriculture and Animal Industry of Ecuador.
The information in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently com-
plete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

BASIC LEGISLATION

An Executive Decree of February 15, 1940, established general plant and animal
health regulations, and provided for the establishment of a phytosanitary service
charged with the inspection of plants. This service administers regulations issued
November 17, 1925 (effective January 1, 1926), and January 25, 1926, in relation to
importations of plants and plant products.

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cottonseed, cotton bolls, or raw cotton from countries infested with the cotton
boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.).
Plants and plant products for planting or propagation in Ecuador from infected
regions.
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Hay or straw, live plants, seeds, cuttings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., must be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate.
Parcel-post shipments of seeds, cuttings, etc., must be certified to be in healthy
condition by the shipper.
Consular visa is required with official phytosanitary certificates and will be
supplied free of charge.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decrees of November 17, 1925, and January 26, 1926]

ARTICLE 1. Relates to animal quarantines.
ART. 2. The importation is prohibited of hay and straw, live plants, seeds, cut-
tings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., which come from disease-infected places. Said
plants and parts thereof, even though they may be shipped in small quantities by
mail, must be accompanied by a certificate issued by an Official Entomologist, or
by the phytosanitary authorities of the country of origin, in which it is stated that
the plants or parts thereof are not infested with any insect or infected by any
fungus disease and that they have been properly disinfected. (See also Revision
of January 25, 1926, regarding parcel-post shipments.)
This certificate must be certified by the Ecuadoran consul in the country of
shipment.
In the particular case of cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, the certificate
visaed by the consul must state under oath or formal declaration, that the bolls
or seeds come from a country in which the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.) does not exist.
ART. 3. The consuls are required to keep close watch of all shipments covered
by these regulations, and to report to the Ministry of Agriculture concerning the
occurrence and disappearance of insect pests and plant diseases in the country
in which they reside, in order to safeguard the interest of Ecuador from pests
which might be imported with restricted material.
ART. 4. Consular authorities, Customs inspectors, the Smuggling Patrol, and
Postmasters are entrusted with the fulfillment of these regulations.
ART. 5. Customs inspectors and postmasters are required to notify the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of all importations of plants, seeds, etc., passing through their
offices, and to send a copy of the certificate accompanying such shipments handled
by them with each notification.






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

REVISION AGREED UPON JANUARY 25, 1926

PARCEL-POST SHIPMENTS

ARTICLE 1. All shipments of seeds, cuttings, shoots, buds, grafts, bulbs, etc., except
cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, coming from foreign countries in small
quantities by mail are exempt from the official certification requirement. How-
ever, the foreign shipper of such products must send with each shipment a cer-
tificate in which he testifies as to the healthy condition of the material.
ART. 2. Postmasters are required to send copies of such certificates to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
ART. 3. If such certified plant material is found in bad condition, diseased, or
infested with insects by the addressee, he shall notify the Department of Agricul-
ture immediately. In case further examination by Department inspectors con-
firms his report, the result of the inspection will be published in the Official Bulle-
tin of the Department.
ART. 4. In the event that parcel-post packages containing seeds, plants, etc.,
arrive without health certificates of any kind, the postal authorities must advise
the Department of Agriculture, or the nearest plant inspector, by telegraph, giving
necessary details of the shipment and hold same for disposition by the plant-
inspection authorities.
ART. 5. Consular visa required by previous decrees in connection with official
certificates will be supplied free of charge.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during thq period January 1 to
March 31. 1942. penalties have recently been imnosed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material the pennalies indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penaltv

Pedro Aguil-r ---------------- Brownsville, Tex------ 8 avocados.-------------------- $1
Elena Aceves Lavios --------------- --do --....-------- 1 cherimoya ------------------- 1
Miguel Escobar -------------------do---------------- 1 maneo -------------------
Jose Angel Guiterrez -------------- -----do-------------- 2 oranges ---------------------- 1
Jose Villareal ...- -- ---- --------- - do- --- ---- 5 potatoes -----------------------
Castrimira Rangel.---------------- Del Rio, Tex ------- 2 oranees ---------------------- 1
Jose Rosado .....----- -----.-----. -----do ----------- 4 oranges .----------------------- 1
InQcente Villanueva ------------------ do..------------ 3 oranges -------------------- 1
Lris Castorena --------------------.. do ------ avocados--------------------- 1
Donaciano Arauza ---------------- Eagle Pass, Tex ------ 2 oranges --------------1------
Juan Chacon ...-----------------------do ------------- 9 guavas -.----------.. ---------- 1
Andrea Fuentes .------------------- --- do-- ------- 2oranees ----------------------1
Luz Maldonado ----------------.-.-- do --------------- 2 mangoes -----------------
Bessie Jefferson --------------------- do ---. _-------- 1 oranee .--- -------
Abdias Gomez----_..-------..------ Hidalgo, Tex-------- 6 avocados.- ------------------. 1
Romana Zamora de Paloma------- ----do -------------- 1 orange, and 4 ounces tree seed__ 1
Regino Camocho ------------------- do -------------- 1 orange ...---------.- ----- 1
Juan Gayado.-- ---------------- -----do --------------1 cutting (ornamental vine).. 1
M arcella Munoz --------------- -----do ------------- 5 plants-----------------------. 1
L. Ruebeck ----------------- ------ -----do ---.------- 14 oranges.----------------.-----. 1
Rosa Torres ----- -------------------do ------------- 2 avocados ---------------------1
Cruz Rodriguez -------. -------do-------------- 2 plants .-----------------------1
Francisco Luna -- -------------------do..------------- 7 oranges -------.---------- --- 1
Angelo Ranoldo ----------------------do --.------------- 19 nodes sugarcane, 3 sapotes, 4 1
avocados, 101 coffee berries, 1
pound tree seed, and 1 pound
tree seed in pulp.
Benigno Martinez .----------------- do.--. -----------. 8 nodes sugarcane and I orange 1
Paula Hernandez ------------------- do ------------- 5 avocados .-----.------------- 1
Juliana Garcia .-------_------------. do_ -------------12 tree seed ---------------------1
Paula Garcia -------------------.------ do ---------------- 1 plant -------------------------
Concepcion Saldina. ----------------do------ 1 avocado ---------------------- 1
Nasaria Garza .---------------. -----do_ ------------- orange---.-------------------- 1
Doroteo Martinez ----.----------....do----- 3 avocados---------------------- 1
Hipolito Suarez ------..-----------do .......---------... ---do.. ....--------. ..-----------1







26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar


Name Port Contraband Penalty

JuanaGalvande Garza..----------. Hidalgo, Tex...------ 2 avocados.-----------......... $1
Elena Garza Montuno --- --......- .---do....-- ---------- 1 avocado and 1 mango------.... 1
Beneto Rodriguez ---.--------...----do ------------ 1 avocado--------..... .----- .....
Juana Maldonado ---- -------.----..do .-- --------- 3 avocados-................... 1
Margarito Ramirez -------------..---..... do ..--.---------- 2 avocados-....--------.----.. I
Mrs. H. W. Holimon ...----..------ - do -------------- 1 mango.--------------------- I1
Francisco Rodriguez .-.-------------.---.do .----------- 4 avocados.------.-------.--...
Alberta Lopez --- ...----------------do ...---------- 2 plants-..---------..----....... 1
Maria Ortizde Maldonada --------.---. do .-------------. 11 avocados------.....----------.
Flavia Pena ----------------------- -----do .-------------- 1 plant..-------------.----------
Domingo Garcia .----------. -----. do----.--------. 3 avocados---------------------- 1
Augustine Rocha ---------------. Laredo, Tex -------- 14 oranges --------------------
Geo . Kunkle...---...--------------- do -------- -------- 10 oranges and 8 tangerines--. 2
Andres Gonzalez ---------------------do------------ 10 plants.----------.. ------.--. I1
Cecilia Sanchez de Silva---------- --do -------.------ 10 oranges ---------------------- 1
Encarnacion Figueroa -------------do ---------- 12 sweet limes ...------ -----..... .
Armando Chapa --------------...----do_- ------------ 1 avocado_ ---- -------------1
Jesus Motajano -------------------do------------ 2 mameys --------------- 1












ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AViEY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.
F. C. BISHOPP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.
W. L. POPHAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.
F. H. SPENCER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge. Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHrrE,in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
E. C. CUSHING, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge. Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.
C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADIS. in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SAssclE, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge. Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-
field, N. J.)
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
CLAUDE WVAKELAND. in Field Charge. Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).
27



















U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942















































c




































~





umBRARY
STATE PLANT )BARD


8. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 151 Issued September 1942


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


APRIL-JUNE 1942


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ----- --------------------.------------------------ 24
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)---...-------------------------.- 29
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
fifth revision)....---......----------------------------------------------------.......... 29
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4,
first revision)-.----..--------------------------------------------------------------- 31
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 5)_-_ 32
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37).. ------------- 33
Additional quantity limits for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. E. P. Q. 523,
amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised) ---------------------.-----------. ---.----. 33
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)--....---.. ----_.....--- 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) ------------------------ 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective May 9, 1942) 35
Notice to general public through newspapers-- ----------------------------------- 42
Instructions to postmasters--------------------------- -------------------- 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
503, fourth revision, supplement No. 1) -------- --------------------------------- 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision)-- 43
Miscellaneous items ...............----------------------------------------------------------- 44
L. A. Hawkins retires (press notice) ---------------- ----------------------------- 44
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice)..-...---------..---------.. ------ 44
8. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(press notice)---------. .- ----------------------------------------------------------. 45
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 5)-- 45
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement
No. 2).......................................................... 46
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ..----------------------- 48
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine --------------.................... 48


QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
B. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 1, Fifth Revision Effective April 23, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
S CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The fumigation of packaged plants to. free them from infestation by Japanese
beetle has heretofore been authorized for treatment by fumigation with methyl
bromide at 670 and 63' F. schedules. Further investigation has shown that
boxed or wrapped plants can be fumigated successfully with methyl bromide for
this insect at all seven of the dosage and temperature schedules authorized for
the treatment of balled and burlapped nursery stock. These instructions are
accordingly revised to provide authorization for the use of any of these schedules
for packaged plants.
301.48-b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treatment authorized.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
29





YRARWU
"A(O8 ThAJq 3TAT8
30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of 301.48-b I [on page 13 of the mimeo-
graphed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939] is hereby further
modified effective April 23, 1942, to read as follows:
(5) Methyl bromide fumigation
Equipment.-An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal
of the fumigated articles.
(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.-The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:

Dosage Dosage
Period (methyl Period (methyl
Temperature at least of treat- bromide Temperature at least of treat- bromide
ment per 1,000 ment per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)

Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
1. 730 F ..._----- --------- 2% 1% 5. 570 F ---------------- 3% 2%
2. 670 F .- -..------ .- 2, 2 6. 540 F- _------------ ---- 4 2
3. 630 F. ---- --------- 21 2% 7. 50 F ----------------- 4 2%
4. 60) F. ------------- 3 2


The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.
Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare roots
or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in diameter
nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be puddled
or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the inspector is
suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or separated so
that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots or soil balls.
While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each other they
should not be jammed tightly together.
Packaged plants.-Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than 14 inches
in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above seven temperatures, per-
iods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have access
to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be tightly
closed.
Varieties of plants.-The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.
The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subsection
(1) (5) (ii) of 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P.
Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore. (7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec 8, 39 Stat. 1165,
44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated August 6, 1941.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 21st day of April 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
I This section was originally issued as I 301.48a.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

B. E. P. Q. 499 Effective May 7, 1942
Supplement No. 4, First Revision
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Qua-
rantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], subsections (i) (4), (k) (1),
and (m) (2) of 301.48b [see pages 6, 8, and 15, respectively, of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499 issued June 9, 1939], are hereby modified,
effective May 7, 1942, to read as follows:
301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle
(i) POTTING SOIL
(4) Lead arsenate treatment
Season.-The treatment must be applied before August 1.
Condition and type of soil.-The soil must be friable. Wet soil must never be
treated. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or
neutral in reaction. Any type of soil may be treated provided it meets these
requirements.
Dosage.-Two pounds to 1 cubic yard.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed with the soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in the above
manner, by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following October
1 and June 15, inclusive.
Handling of potted plants.-When plants potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil
are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of these
beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at the rate
of 1,000 pounds per acre.
Treated plants carried after June 15.-When plants potted in soil treated as
prescribed are carried after June 15, they may be again eligible for certification
between October 1 and June 15, inclusive, of the second year if, on August 1 of
the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of 2
pounds per cubic yard.
(k) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS
(1) Lead arsenate treatment
Season.-The treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be
used in the fall.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Dosage.-Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 in'ches of soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants must not be placed on or in the soil thus treated
until after October 1.

(M) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
(2) Lead arsenate treatment
Season.-Treatment must be applied by July 1. Plants may be certified when
the period of treatment is completed, and until the following June 15.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth. This treatment
is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.







32 BUREAU OF ECNTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Dosage.-Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.
Period of treatment.-Plants in plots treited initially must not be dug until
October 1; those on re-treated plots may be dug on September 20.
Application.-Lead arserate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with
the upper 3 inches of soil. The ridge of soil between the plants in the rows and
the soil about the base of the plants must be removed to a depth of 2 inches and
placed in the space between the rows of plants. Lead arsenate may be applied
with a suitable distributor or broadcast by hand, before or after the hoeing
operation is completed. Then the soil between the rows of plants must be cul-
tivated three times. On the last cultivation, the cultivator is adjusted in such
a manner that the treated soil is thrown toward the rows of plants. At least
3 inches of treated soil must be placed in the rows about the bases of the plants.
Varieties of plants.-The varieties of plants which have been treated successfully
by this method are given in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Circular
E-418.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in (k).
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in (k).
(7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 2d day of May 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective May 18,1942
Supplement No. 5
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Experience and further experiments in paradichlorobenzene fumigation for the
treatment of plants after digging to free them from infestation by Japanese beetle
permit modification of treating requirement approved June 9, 1939, without
increasing risk of spread. The instructions authorizing the use of this method are
accordingly revised to reduce the period of treatment from 5 to 3 days.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) (4) of 301.48b
[see page 11 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9,
1939] is hereby modified effective May 18, 1942, to read as follows:
301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. *
TEEATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING *

(4) Paradichlorobenzene fumigation
Season.-The treatment must be applied between October 1 and May 1.
Varieties of plants.-Many different kinds of plants have been successfully
treated experimentally. The list of plants which have been treated without
injury is subject to such continual expansion that it cannot be appropriately
included in these instructions. Experience has shown that possible plant injury
is associated at least to some extent with the condition and growth of the plants
at time of treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that trial tests be made before
large numbers of plants are treated.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUN CEMENTS 33

Preparation of plants.-Excess soil should be removed and the mass reduced as
much as possible without injuring the roots. The plant ball should be moist, but
not wet. Pots must be removed from potted plants. When burlap on balled
plant is of coarse weave, it may be left on the balls, but when it is closely woven,
it must be removed.
Preparation of plunging soil.-The paradichlorobenzene must be thoroughly
mixed with a light sandy loam, or sand, which is moist but not wet, and free from
lumps, stones, and debris. It must be mixed immediately before using.
Care of plants during treatment.-If it is necessary to water the plants during the
treatment to prevent desiccation, the operation must be limited to a light syring-
ing, under the supervision of an inspector. During the treating period care should
be used to assure that the natural air movement will aid in reasonably rapid dis-
persal of the fumigant that escapes from the soil to prevent it from being held about
the foliage of the treated plants.
Care of plants after treatment.-It is advisable to avoid excessive watering of the
plants after treatment in order to permit any residual gas to escape from the plant
balls.
(i) Complete Coverage
Temperature.-The temperature of both the treating soil and the soil ball must
not be less than 500 F. during the period of treatment. To prevent injury to the
plants, it should not go above 650.
Dosage.-Ten pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (6 ounces per cubic foot)
for soil balls up to 6 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension. Twenty
pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (12 ounces per cubic foot) for soil balls from
6 to 8 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension.
Application.-Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard
surface, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls
spaced at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls
with treated soil and cover the plant balls to a depth of 1 inch. Then place about
1 inch of treated soil against the row of plants. This operation is repeated until
all the plants are plunged.
Period of treatment.-The plants must be left undisturbed for a period of 3 days.
(ii) Side Application
Temperature, dosage, period of treatment.-The various combinations of dosage
and exposure which may be used at different temperatures are given in table 1.
It is desirable to maintain the temperature fairly constant. The temperatures
given at the head of the column in table 1 are the minimum temperatures during
the period of treatment.
*
Application.-Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard sur-
face, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls spaced
at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls with
treated soil, taking care not to get the treated soil in contact with the stems of the
plants, and cover the upper side of the plant balls with treated soil to within 2
inches of the stems. Then, place about 1 inch of treated soil against the row of
plants. The operation is repeated until all the plants are plunged.
(7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of May 1942.
P. N. ANNAND
Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT,
AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
B. E. P. Q. 523, amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised Effective May 11, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 319--FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINE NOTICES
ADDITIONAL QUANTITY LIMITS FOR PLANTS IMPORTED FOR PROPAGATION PURPOSES
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, 319.37-14a [P. Q. C. A.
278, Revised, July 14, 1931] is hereby amended effective May 11. 1942. by adding








34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April--Jun

the following items to the list of representative genera for which quantity liits
have been determined; and effective July 1, 1942, by increasing by 25 percent
the quantity limitations specified in 319.37-14a both as to the original list and
as to this supplemental list:
319.37-14a Administrative instructions; limitations on special-permit plant
material entered for propagation purposes under 319.37-14.


Genus early Genus Yearly
limits limits

Abutilon- .---..---------------plants 100 Dierama ... -._----._--- bulbs-. 1,000
Acanthaceae d----------------- .. 2250 Diospyros ------- --------...scions-- 1,000
Acidanthera .-------..---------corms. 1,000 Disanthus. --. .----..... ---.._ plants 100
Adiantum ---.--..---.--.---. -plants. 250 Echinacea--------------..... do ... 250
Adlunia .------ .--..-...--------- roots. 250 Epigaea ....-------------.. .------..do-- 100
Aloevera(medicinal) _------ plants-_ 5,000 Erythrina. -.---...--.. --- --- do.--- 100
Aloe (ornamental) .-.------ -..do .. 250 Erythronium ---------_.. --..bulbs-- 10,000
Amaryllidaceae ----.------. per genus_ 1,000 Eucharis--_ .... ----------.--.. do .--. 6
Amherstia....-- -----------. plants_ 100 Eugenia.......----------------...plants 100
Ananas -------.------.---------.. do---- 250 Eurycles ..------------ ...-.... bulbs-- 1,000
Andira -----.--------------do 100 Fagus ..- ..--------...plants-_ 100
Annona ---------------------.. do. 250 Farquharia --------------. ------..do-.... 250
Anthemis ..-- --------------divisions- 250 Fern ------- ---------- --do-... 250
Antholyza -----.. ------------.. bulbs_ 1,000 Ficus---------....------------- do.... 250
Aponogeton --- ------------ plants_ 500 Galtonia----.-------- ----.... bulbs__ 10,000
Aralia -----.--. -------..----- do..- 500 Gardenia_--,-- _---- --- ----plants- 1,000
Aralia.. -------c-------c. uttings.. 2,500 Gelssorhiza ----------------- ulbs- 1,000
Araceae --------------------- plants_ 2250 Genipa --------------------..plants.- 100
Arlstea---------..-----------. bulbs_ 1,000 Gravisia------------------.. .-do- 250
Arundo (reed) ..------------plants__ 250 Guiacumr ..-- .--------. ...-..-- do 100
Avocado ----- ---------------do .. 2,000 Gypsophila ..------.----------. do- 250
Bablana ------. --------------bulbs-_ 1,000 Haemanthus ---------- ------bulbs__ 250
Bessera. ------------------------do---- 10,000 Haworthia ----. ---------plants-. 250
Bombax .--------- ----------plants__ 500 Heliconia_--- ....---------- do--.. 250
Bougainvillea ----- -------------. do-..- 250 Heliopsis .------- -------. do-..- 250
Bomarea ----- -------------- do..- 250 Hermodactylus ....------------. roots_- 1,000
Srodiaea --------------. --bulbs__ 10,000 Hippeastrum n----------..--...... bulbs 5,000
romeliaceae------- pl ants& sue__ 250 Homeria ..---------.--.------do.... 1,000
Bromeliads ------------------ plants__ 2250 Inga .---------------------- plants 100
Brosimum (breadnut) -------.do.--- 100 Ismene---_ ---------------- bulbs 10,000
Brownea ------ -----------do- 100 Ixiolirion_- ------------do ... 5,000
Brunfelsa. ------------------- do 100 Ixora--.....------------- plants-- 1,000
Bryophyllum -- -----------do _. 250 Jacaranda ----------------do-.. 100
Bulbocodium ---------- --------corms 10,000 Juglans .-------- ---------do -.... 100
Bursera --------------------plants 250 Kerria .. .... -------------------do.... 100
Cactus _---------- ----------- ..do .._ 5,000 Koelreuteria ----------------- do .. 100
Calathea ..------.._ ..---- -----tubers._ 1,000 Lantana ---------------do.--. 1,000
Oallicarpa .. ..._------------ plants__ 100 Leucocrinum -------------bulbs_. 500
Calluna ....--- ...----.-------- do- .- 250 Lomatia ----------------plants 1,000
Calochortus ......----------- corms-_ 10,000 Lonchocarpus---------- ------stems-_ 10,000
Calystegia .---..------- .----plants-_ 250 Lupinus.----.--- ------- plants-. 500
Calycanthus- .-.--.---------. do--- 100 Maianthemum ----------do-.. 250
Campanilla --- -----------do- 250 Mammea ----- ----------do ... 100
Campanula.---.... ----.. ------do- 1,000 Mangifera..---- -------_ ..----- do..-. 100
Caragana -------------do- 100 Manihot.----...----------------do-... 250
Cardwellia ..----------------. -tubers.. 250 Marica---- ----------------do.... 250
Cassia ...--- ----.------ plants.. 100 Meconopsis..--.--.-----------. do.... 1,000
Cestrum- .------------------do -... 200 Michelia .....------... .- -------do-.... 100
Clethra ----------.-----------do.... 100 Monarda ---. ..-----------------.. do... 250
Clivia --- .-------------..-.--do ... 500 Monstera .. ..-----------------. do_. 250
Codlaeum .-------------------. do.... 100 Moraea ..---------------------.bulbs-- 1,000
Colocasia -----------------. tubers-_ 1,000 Montrichardia-------------- plants-. 250
Convolvulus... _--------------.. plants__ 250 Myosotis _ --------------- do-... 250
Cordyline ------------------- do -. 250 Myricaria .------.--.. -------.--- do .- 100
Coriaria ..-------.--.....----- do... 250 Nandina.......------------..------do-.... 250
Comus...--- -.---------------- do..-- 250 Neanthe ------------.... --.--..... -do .. 250
Crambe .__-------..---.------- bulbs 5,000 Neillia ....-------.. --------------.. do-.. 250
Crescentia -------_ -----------. plants_ 250 Nelumbium ...........-.--------- roots_- 500
Crinum ....------------.------.- bulbs__ 1,000 Nepenthes ...-------..---------- plants-- 500
Crocosma ...------- ------.----..- do.--- 1,000 Nerine ..-------------------bulbs.. 5,000
Croton.---. -----------------....plants-_ 500 Nerium----.........-----...-------plants 100
Cryptocoryne -----....----.-------do-.. 500 Nomocharis ......----------------do .. 500
Curcuma ------------------_do-- 250 Omphalodes --------....------..--- do..- 250
Cycadaceae ------.-.. ---------.-- do.-- 2250 Ormosia ...--------... ------------..do_--- 100
Cycas _..----- -----..----------. do---- 250 Orthrosanthus ------------- rhizomes.. 1,000
Cyperus .. --- ----- do .. 250 Parthenium..------.. --... ----..plants_- 5,000
Daboecia..--------...--......----do ... 500 Petrea ----.------------- ---.do ... 1,000
Danae......-------..--------.... -- do ..- 1,000 Phaedranassa- .... .....--.--------bulbs- 500
Datura...-------- .... ..--..... do.... 250 Phaeomeria---------.......------plants. 250
Davidia .----------- .....-- ..-..do -.. 100 Philodendron ----.-----------... do... 500
Dianthus ..- ---....-. .....--... do -__ 100 Pinus-------.. -- ........-------------do.... 100
Dicentra -----------.-..--- divisions__ 250 Plumieria ..---..---------------..do .... 200
Dieffenbachia -...--...---.----.. plants 1,000 Polygonatum..-------...-------... do--.. 250
Per genus.







1942] SE*RVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35


Genus Yearly Genus Yearly
limits limits

Poterium. ------------------- plants-- 250 Stenomesson.......-----....--....-..----bulbs.- 5,000
Prunus----------------------------do----.. 200 Sterculia --......----------------.---..plants-- 100
Pulmonaria.------------------------- do ---- 250 Strelitzia ----------------... --...... do---- 250
Pyrus .--------.......--------------------- do ....-- 250 Succulents ------------------.... do ---- 2250
Ramondia ...............-------------------.... do -- 1,000 Tabebuia ........-------..----. -....--...---..--do.... 100
Rhodohypoxis ----------------do.. -- 250 Thymus..------------...... ----........do---- 250
Rudbeckia ---.......------------.---... .. do.... 250 Tillandsia-..--- ----------------....do.... 250
Sandersonia...................--------------bulbs.. 1,000 Tree fern--------------.....-----... do... 250
Schizoloblum.....--------------- plants.. 100 Tropaeolum-.----.----------...-.... do.... 250
Selaginella ....... ......---------. do.... 100 Vaccinium ------------------....do -...-- 100
Senecio..........................-------------------------do.... 250 Velthelmia-----------------..... bulbs 1,000
Shortia....... --------------------do-.... 500 Vitis----- ---------------....plants 100
Silene..............---------------..---.........--do ....---- 250 Warszewiczia.-------------. -. --do --- 100
Stapelicae ......-------------------do.... 250 Zephyranthes --------------- ...bulbs- 1,000

2 Per genfus.
(7 C. F. R. 319.37-14; sec. 7, 37 Stat. 317; 7 U. S. C. 160.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of May 1942.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED
[Press notice]
May 12, 1942.
The Department of Agriculture said today that the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine and regulations have been revised, effective May 9, 1942. The regulated
areas in the four quarantined States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Missis-
sippi have been extended to include new sections in which the beetles have been
found since the original quarantine was put into effect more than 3 years ago.
The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested areas,
including the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola,
Fla., New Orleans, La., and Gulfport and Laurel, Miss.
Part of the area at Monroeville-some 84 square miles-has been released
from quarantine, however, as repeated inspections indicate there are no beetles
there now. Because several communities in the vicinity of Hattiesburg, Miss.,
have been found infested, the regulated areas in that State have been extended
to include parts of the counties of Forrest, Covington, and Lamar, and a small
area in Pearl River County not heretofore under regulation. Parts of Dallas and
Escambia Counties, Ala., and of Iberia and Saint Tammany Parishes, La., are
also brought within the regulated area for the first time.
, Among the commodities placed under regulation throughout the year (unless
exempted by administrative instructions) are grass sod, peanut hay, lily bulbs,
and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials. All re-
strictions are lifted on the movement of sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans.
There is a new regulation as to the cleaning of railway cars, trucks, and other
vehicles, and another permitting the shipping of live specimens of white-fringed
beetles for scientific or experimental purposes as specifically authorized.

B. E. P. Q.-Q. 72 Revision of Quarantine and Regulations
Effective May 9, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
SUBPART--WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
To bring the white-fringed beetle quarantine and regulations in line with cur-
rent information this revision is made to extend the regulated areas in Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to include several small areas in which infesta-







36 BUREAU OF NTOMLOGY AD PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

tions of the beetles have been found since the original quarantine became effective;
to release an area of approximately 84 square miles in the vicinity of Monroeville,
Ala., where repeated inspections fail to show that the beetles are now present;
to add to the articles that are restricted throughout the year, lily bulbs, grass sod,
peanut hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials;
to lift the restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to make other modi-
fications. A regulation ( 301.72-8) has been included to require the cleaning
of railway cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been used for transporting
restricted articles within the regulated area, before such vehicles may be moved
interstate to points outside.
The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested
areas in the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola Fla..
New Orleans, La., Gulfport and Laurel, Miss., and include also Hattiesburg, Miss.,
and several communities in the vicinity thereof. Brought within the regulated
areas, in part, for the first time, are the counties of Dallas and Escambia, Ala.,
the parishes of Iberia and Saint Tammany, La., and the Mississippi counties of
Covington, Forrest, and Lamar.
Under the authority contained in the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905, the inter-
state movement of living white-fringed beetles in any stage of development is
prohibited except when so moved under certification for scientific purposes as
authorized in paragraph (b) of 301.72-9.
To conform with current nomenclature of the white-fringed beetles, the designa-
tion of the genus is changed from Naupactus to Pantomorus and the restrictions
apply only to species of the subgenus Graphognathus.
Arrangements for inspection may be made by addressing the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or other field offices
listed in the appendix.
DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to prevent the spread of dangerous infesta-
tions of insect pests, commonly referred to as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore
widely prevalent within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938,
promulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations, and the regulations supplemental thereto 301.72-1 to
301.72-9 inclusive, Part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
MB. E. P. Q.-Q. 72, effective on and after January 15, 1939]. At the time the
aforesaid hearing was held, the insect pests known as white-fringed beetles were
classified as species of the genus Naupactus and were so referred to at the hearing
when the importance, status, and habits of these insects were fully covered. This
group of insects has since been reclassified as species of the subgenus Graphognathus
of the genus Pantomorus. It is therefore necessary to revise the quarantine to
adopt current nomenclature for such insect pests, as well as to extend the regulated
areas to cover more recently discovered infestations, and to make other
modifications.
ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by sec-
tion 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U. S. C. 141, 143), the subpart
entitled "White-fringed Beetle" of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 72] is hereby revised effective May 9, 1942, to read
as follows:
SUBPART-WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE
Authority: I 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive, (except 301.72-2a) issued under see. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat.
250; 7 U. 8. C. 1940 ed. 161. 301.72-2a issued under see. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. .C. 1940 ed. 141. 301.72-9
(b) issued under sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. 8. C., 1940 ed. 143.
301.72. Notice of Quarantine.-Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
the Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisi-
ana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations of introduced
species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as
white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the aforesaid Plant
Quarantine Act and Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U. S. C. 141, 143), the







1942] SE~VICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37

Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hereafter the following articles
(as specifically named in the regulations supplemental hereto, in modifications
thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in the regulations supple-
mental hereto), which are capable of carrying the aforesaid insect infestations, viz,
(1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or plant products; (2) soil inde-
pendent of, or in connection with, nursery stock, plants, or other products; or (3)
other articles as stipulated in 301.72-3; or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any
stage of development, shall not be transported by any person, firm, or corporation
from any quarantined State into or through any other State or Territory or
District of the United States, under conditions other than those prescribed in the
regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quaran-
tine and of the regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to such areas,
designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, in the quarantined
States, as, in his judgment, shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said
pest or pests. Any such limitation shall be conditioned, however, upon the
affected State or States providing for and enforcing the control of the intrastate
movement of the restricted articles and enforcing such other control and sanitation
measures with respect to such areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the
Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate
spread therefrom of said insect infestation: And provided further, That whenever,
in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more
of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe
to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regu-
lations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative instructions,
specifying the manner in which the applicable regulations should be made less
stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for such period
and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said adminis-
trative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity
to such administrative instructions throughout the affected areas.
REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms
301.72-1. Definitions.-(a) The pests.-Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.
(b) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of 301.72, as revised.
(c) Restricted articles.-Products or articles of any character whatsoever, the
interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-fringed
beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.
(d) Nursery stock.-Forest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes.
'(e) Inspector.-Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.
(f) Certificate.-An a.pproved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing the
movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.
(g) Limited permit.-An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized proc-
essing plants or for other restricted operations.
(h) Administrative instructions.-Documents issued by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the quarantine.
(i) Infested or infestation.-Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)
(j) Infested area.-That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.
Areas Under Regulation
S301.72-2. Regulated areas.-The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof as described, are designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as regulated areas:
Alabama.-In Conecuh. Monroe, and Wilcox Counties: The W. % T. 5 N.,
W. Y T. 8 N., all of Tps. 9 and 10 N. R. 9 E_ S V and sees. 8. 9. 10, 15, 16. and
477153-42- 2







38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

17, T. 11 N., R. 9 E. All of Tps. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and S. 2 T. 10 N., R. 8 E. Ses.
25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., and secs. 1 and 2, T. 6 N., R. 7 E.; in Covinqton County:
Secs. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; sees. 25, 26. 35, and 36, T. 2 N., R. 17 E.; T. 1
N., Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE. T. 1 N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof to
the Alabama-Florida State line; also all of the town of Opp; in Dallas County:
That area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Railroad where
it crosses Bougechitto Creek; thence southwest along the Southern Railroad to
Caine Creek; thence southeast along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bouge-
chitto Creek; thence northward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point;
in Escambia County: Sees. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the
town of Flomaton; in Geneva County: Secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and
all area south thereof to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of sees.
21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.; in Mobile County: That area included within a
boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of the city limits of
Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern boundary of S
% T. 3 S.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence northwestward along Chicka-
saw Creek to Eight-Mile Creek; thence westerly along Eight-Mile Creek to the
western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to Eslava Creek; thence easterly
along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile; thence following the city limits
east and north to the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city
of Mobile; also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where
old Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway
90 to the junction of old Highway 90 and the Alabama-Mississippi State line;
thence south along the Alabama-Mississippi State line to the southern boundary
of N. % T. 7 S.; thence east to the SE. corner of sec. 9, T. 7 S., R. 3 W.; thence
north to the NE. corner of sec. 4, T. 7 S., N. 3 W.; thence east to the point where
the south boundary of T. 6 S. intersects Fowl River; thence northwestward
along Fowl River to the starting point.
Florida.-In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northern
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western boundary
of R. 31 W.; in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and sees. 1, 2, and 3, T. 5
N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; sees. 7, 8, 9. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of
the town of Crestview; and secs. 13, 14, 23, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton
County: T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.,
and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1
to 24, inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.
Louisiana.-All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish. In East Baton Rouge Parish: All of T. 7 S., Rs. 1 and 2
E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
sees. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and secs. 46, 55. 56, 57, 58, 59
60, T. 13 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemines Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
secs. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7 S., R. 11 E., and secs. 40 and 41, T. 8 S., R. 11 E.
Mississippi.-In Covington County: All of secs. 28, 29, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R.
14 W.; in Forrest County: All that part of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W. lying west of
Leaf River; all that part of the S. Ys T. 5 N., R. 13 W., lying west of Leaf River;
all of sees. 7, 18, 19, and those parts of sees. 6, 8, 17, and 20, lying south and
west of old Highway 49, T. 5 N., R. 13 W.; the east % and sees. 5 and 8 of T.
5 N., R. 14 W.; those parts of sees. 2, 3, 4, and 5, lying south of Beaverdam Creek,
and all of secs. 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17, T. 1 S., R. 12 W.; secs. 9, 10, 15,
16, 21, 22, 27, 28, 33, and 34, T. 2 N., R. 12 W.; secs. 2, 3, 4, 9, and 10, and those
parts of sees. 11, 14, 15, and 16, lying north of Black Creek, T. 1 N., R. 12 W.;
in Harrison and Stone Counties: That area included within a boundary beginning
at the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 4 S., R. 11 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
2, T. 4 S., R. 12 W.; thence south to the NE. corner sec. 15, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.;
thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence south to inter-
section with Wolf River; thence following a general southwesterly direction along
Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence following a general southerly direction
along the east shore of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward
along the Mississippi Sound to a point where the east line of sec. 31, T. 7 S., R.
10 W., would intersect with the Mississippi Sound if extended without change n
direction of said Sound; thence north to Bayou Bernard; thence following a
general northwesterly direction along Bayou Bernard to east line of sec. 22, T.







19421 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOJUNCEMENTS 39

7 S., R. 11 W., thence north to intersection with Biloxi River; thence northwest-
ward along Biloxi River to the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to starting point, including all properties extended onto or over the waters of
Mississippi Sound; also all of the town of Wiggins; in Hinds County: E. Y T. 6 N.,
R. 3 W., and W. Y3 T. 6 N., R. 2 W.; in Jackson County: That area included
within a boundary beginning at a point where the east line of sec. 19, T. 7 S., R.
5 W., intersects the Escatawpa River; thence west along said river to the Pas-
cagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula River to the township line
between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE corner sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 5 W.;
thence north to the starting point; in Jones County: Secs. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,
22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35, T. 9 N., R. 11 W.; sees. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, T. 8 N., R. 11 W.; secs. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35, and 36, T. 9 N., R.
12 W.; and those portions of sees. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W., lying east of Tal-
lahoma Creek; secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.; and sees. 25, 26,
27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; in Lamar County: All of the town of Purvis;
all of sees. 35, 36 ,T. 1 N., R. 15 W., sec. 31, T. 1 N., R. 14 W., and sees. 1 and
2, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; in Pearl River County: All of sees. 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16,
T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; all of T. 5 S., R. 16 W., and E. 2 T. 5 S., R. 17 W.
Articles Prohibited Movement
301.72-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.-The interstate shipping of living
species of whitefringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved inde-
pendent of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided
in paragraph (b) of 301.72-9.
Articles Restricted Movement
301.72-3. Restricted articles.-(a) Movement regulated throughout the year.-
Unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate movement of the
following articles from any regulated area is regulated throughout the year:
(1) Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or in
connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles,
or things.
(2) Potatoes.
(3) Nursery stock.
(4) Grass sod.
(5) Lily bulbs.
(6) Peanut hay.
(7) Compost and manure.
(b) Movement regulated part of the year.-Except as provided in 301.72-4
hereof, and unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate move-
ment from any regulated area of the following products is regulated from June 1
to January 31, inclusive, of any 12-month period:
(1) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.
(2) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leaf-
mold.
(3) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.
(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.
(5) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.
(6) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.
Conditions of Interstate Movement
801.72-4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.-(a)
Certification required.-Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate from a
regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied by a
valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certification
requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be waived,
during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk of
contamination by the pests in any stage of development.







40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARAN NE [April-June

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.-Every container of restricted articles moved
interstate from any regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except
that in the case of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached
to the shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In
the case of shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a master
permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany shipments
to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.
(c) Movement within contiguous areas unrestricted.-No certificates are required
for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement is wholly
within contiguous regulated areas.
(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas.-No certificates are required
for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside of the
regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the point of
origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained, and when
the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner satisfactory
to the inspector.
Conditions of Certification
301.72-5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.-(a)
Approved methods.-Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the in-
spector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2) have
been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods; or (3)
were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner that,
in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted thereby:
Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of soil, earth,
sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, or manure originating in an infested area may
be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under methods
or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.
(b) Limited permits for manufacturing or processing purposes.-Limited permits
may be issued for the movement of noncertified restricted articles to such manu-
facturing or processing plants, mills, gins, or establishments as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
for manufacture; processing, treatment, or other disposition. As a condition of
such authorization and designation, persons or firms so designated shall agree in
writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against the establishment and
spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions as to their handling
or subsequent movement of restricted products as may be required by the
inspector.
(c) Dealer-carrier permit.-As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted
articles originating or stored in regulated areas, may be required to execute a
signed agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all con-
ditions, treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed
necessary.
Procedure for Applicants
301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.-Persons intending to
move restricted articles interstate from regulated areas shall make application for
certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment.
Applications must show the nature and quantity of articles to be moved, together
with their exact location, and if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment.
Applicants for inspection may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to
be shipped so that they may be readily examined by the inspector.
The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.
Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled
301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.-Certificates or permits issued
under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further certification
refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits might result in the
dissemination of infestation.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

Cleaning of Vehicles
301.72-8. Thorough cleaning required of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles
before moving interstate.-Freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been
used in transporting within the regulated areas any restricted articles, shall not
thereafter be moved interstate from the regulated areas until they have been
thoroughly cleaned by the carrier or owner at a point within the regulated area.
Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes
301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.-Articles sub-
ject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific pur-
poses, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.-Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development, may be moved interstate for scientific purposes only
under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall bear
an identifying tag issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
Done at the city of Washington this 8th day of May 1942.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(SEAL) CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES
The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or
any class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character what-
soever, capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation,
specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under
conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also
provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or
who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided
for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a
fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such
fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION
Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Build-
ing (Telephone 1591), P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed
Beetle Inspector at one of the following subsidiary offices:
Alabama:
Florala: Hughes Building (Telephone 64), P. O. Box 187.
Mobile: 111 Federal Building (Telephone Belmont 3781, Ext. 214), P. O.
Box 670.
Monroeville: City Hall (Telephone 90), P. O. Box 169.
Florida:
Pensacola: 18 Federal Building (Telephone 5652), P. O. Box 343.
Louisiana:
New Orleans: 4425 Bienville Ave. (Telephone Audubon 3860), P. 0. Box
7086, Sta. G.
Mississippi:
Hattiesburg: 110 Evans Street (Telephone 2686), P. O. Box 988.
Laurel: Civic Center, P. 0. Box 546.







42 BUREAU OF EINTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

GENFRAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING
Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.
Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.
Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., May 8, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after May 6, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 72) and regulations
supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the regulated
areas to include additional infested sections in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and
Mississippi; to release an area in the vicinity of Monroeville, Ala.; to add to the
list of commodities restricted throughout the year lily bulbs, grass sod, peanut
hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials; to
lift restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to require cleaning of
freight cars and other vehicles.
Copies of the quarantine as revised may be obtained from the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News, Birmingham,
Ala., May 21, 1942; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., May 21, 1942; the News, Jackson, Miss., May
22, 1942; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., May 21, 1942.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June SO, 1942.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed revision of Quarantine Order
No. 72 of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, on account of the white-fringed beetle, modifying slightly the
area under quarantine and making some changes in the list of restricted articles
and other revisions as indicated. Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regu-
lations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision, Effective May 6, 1942
Supplement No. 1
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED;
TREATMENT AUTHORIZED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Further Investigational work has shown that it is possible to kill all stages of the
white-fringed beetle by methyl bromide fumigation under. partial vacuum applied
at a modified dosage or at a modified temperature under the dosage heretofore







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY AN-NOUN AEMENTS 43

authorized. This work has also shown the practicability of applying these treat-
ments to soil masses up to 16 inches in diameter, instead of the maximum 11-inch
diameter required heretofore. The instructions in B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision,
which became effective January 9, 1942, are modified accordingly.
The description as to the size requirements of the soil masses has been somewhat
reworded for the purpose of clarification.
301.72-5 (c) 8 Administrative instructions-Treatments authorized.-Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine by paragraph (a) of 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-
fringed beetle], subparagraph (2) of paragraph (a) of 301.72-5 (c) [page 2 of the
mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision] is hereby
modified effective May 6, 1942, to read as follows:
(2) Methyl bromide fumigation under partial vacuum.-(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury may be done with a
dosage of either 4 pounds methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space
occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 1% hours at a temperature of
700 F.; or a dosage of 3 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet for a period
of 1/2 hours at a temperature of 750 F. In either case the vacuum shall be main-
tained during the entire period.
(ii) The soil masses shall have a diameter of not more than 16 inches if spherical,
or if not spherical the masses or pots shall be of such size that no point within
them will be more than 8 inches from the nearest point on the surface.
(iii) The soil shall not be wet but shall be in condition satisfactory to the
inspector when treatment is applied.
(iv) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vaporized
fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in contact with the
surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with one or more changes
of air at the end of the exposure period.
(v) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and will
withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A vacuum
pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum chamber to
the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level) in not more
than 20 minutes is necessary.
(7 C. F. R. 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 29th day of April 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 485, Ninth Revision Effective May 11, 1942 through July 31, 1942

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED
301.72a Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements for
specified articles.-(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of 301.72,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 72,
on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for the inter-
state movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective May 11,
1942, through July 31, 1942, for the following articles and materials enumerated
in 301.72-3:
(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below: (i) Soil, when taken from a depth
of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from any
surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.
(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the satis-
faction of the inspector.
'* uperseding | 301.72-5a and b.







44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARAIMN ([April-June

(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:
(i) Nursery stock, including all annual and perennial plants.
(ii) Hay, including peanut hay, roughage of all kinds, straw. leaves, and leaf-
mold.
(iii) Seed cotton, baled cotton lint and linters, and cottonseed when free from
gin trash.
(iv) Lily bulbs, except when freshly harvested and uncured.
(v) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.
(vi) Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.
(vii) Used implements, machinery, and containers.
(viii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.
(ix) Potatoes, except locally grown potatoes.
It has been determined that the methods under which such articles and materials
are produced and handled, the maintenance of sanitation practices, or the applica-
tion of control measures and natural conditions, have so decreased the intensity of
infestation in the regulated areas as to eliminate risk of spread of the white-
fringed beetle, thereby justifying the removal of certification requirements as set
forth above.
(b) Except as specified above, the following articles and materials shall remain
under the restrictions of 301.72-3 throughout the year:
(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants,
products, articles, or things.
(2) Grass sod.
(3) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.
(4) Scrap metal and junk.
(5) Gin trash.
(6) Locally grown potatoes are under regulation during May, June, and July.
This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, eighth revision, which became
effective May 1, 1941.
(7 C. F. R., 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161).
Done at Washington this 1st day of May 1942.
P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
L. A. HAWKINS RETIRES
[Press notice]
JUNE 3, 1942.
The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the retirement
of Dr. L. A. Hawkins, veteran of 35 years' service in the Department. He has
been in charge of the Division of Control Investigations in the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine since this Division was started. Born in Lamont,
Iowa, he attended public school at Rowley, Iowa, and received his undergraduate
work at Morningside College in that State and his doctor's degree from Johns
Hopkins University.
C. P. Clausen, head of the Division of Foreign Insect Parasite Introduction,
will take charge of the work of the Division of Control Investigations in addition
to his parasite work until more permanent arrangements are made for the
administration of this activity. Mr. Clausen was born in Randall, Iowa, attended
the Oklahoma A. & M. College and the University of California. During the
first World War he served as 2d Lieutenant, Coast Artillery.
WALTER E. DOVE NAMED USDA DIVISION CHIEF
[Press notice]
JUNE 10, 1942
The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the appoint-
ment of Dr. Walter E. Dove as chief of the Division of Insects Affecting Man
and Animals (Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine), in the absence of
Emory C. Cushing, who has joined the military services as Major, Sanitary Corps,
U. S. Army.
Dr. Dove was born in Hamburg, Miss., and attended public school in Roxie,
Miss. He graduated from the Mississippi State College with B. S. degree, and
received his Ph. D. from Johns Hopkins University. During the last war Dr.







1942] SE'RVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOOUNICEMENTS 45

Dove was a 2d Lieutenant in the Air Service, serving 13 months in France. In
1931 a paper on the transmission of endemic typhus through the bites of tropical
rat lice, prepared by Dr. Dove and Dr. Bedford Shelmire, was awarded the silver
medal of the American Medical Association. His previous service with the
Bureau embraces a series of responsible assignments in the field of insect research
and control, including the direction of an educational program for the control of
screwworms in livestock in the southern United States and the direction of
grasshopper control work in most of the States west of the Mississippi River.
He has recently been in charge of research work on mosquitoes and other insect
pests of man and livestock in the Southeast.


S. B. FRACKER NAMED COORDINATOR OF INSECT AND DISEASE RESEARCH; It,
SUCCEEDED BY J. F. MARTIN
(Press notice]
MAY 8, 1942.
The United States Department of Agriculture today announced the appoint-
ment of Dr. Stanley B. Fracker as Research Coordinator on the staff of Dr.
E. C. Auchter, Agricultural Research Administrator. Doctor Fracker will
coordinate research dealing with plant diseases and insects affecting plants and
animals. In addition to his attention to research in these fields, Doctor Fracker
will also review plant pest control programs and will be responsible for Depart-
ment cooperation with industry in insect and plant disease research.
At the same time the Department announced the appointment of Dr. James
Francis Martin to suceed Doctor Fracker as Chief of the Division of Plant Disease
Control, of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.This Division is
responsible for the control and prevention of spread of white pine blister rust
and black stem rust of cereals.
Doctor Fracker was born at Ashton, Iowa. He received the Ph.D. degree
from the University of Illinois in 1915 and has been active in entomological
research and control work for the past 27 years.
In 1915 Doctor Fracker was appointed Assistant State Entomologist and later
was promoted to the position of State Entomologist of Wisconsin. In June,
1927, he entered the Department of Agriculture as Senior Plant Quarantine
Administrator in the Federal Horticultural Board, in charge of Domestic Plant
Quarantines; from 1928 to 1942, he served in the same capacity in the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
Doctor Martin was born in Amherst, Mass., November 17, 1888. He attended
the public schools in Amherst and graduated from the Massachusetts Agricultural
College (now Massachusetts State College) in 1912, and in 1914 received the
degree of M S., and in 1915 the degree of Ph.D. from the same institution.
Doctor Martin started his work with the United States Department of Agri-
culture in 1913 working in the parasite laboratory of the gypsy moth investigations.
In 1915 while working as a deputy nursery inspector of the Massachusetts State
Department of Agriculture he discovered the general distribution of white pine
blister rust on native pines in Massachusetts. Doctor Martin has been associated
with white pine blister rust work in the Department of Agriculture since its incep-
tion, and was placed in charge of this work in 1934.


P. Q. 0. A. 310, Supplement No. 5
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS. REPUBLIC OF PERU
JUNE 1, 1942.
EXECUTIVE ORDERS OF JULY 19, 1941, LIMA
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COFFEE AND THE INTRODUCTION
OF PARASITIC INSECTS
Orders of the President of Peru dated at Lima, July 19, 1941, prohibit the
importation into Peru of coffee plants, and parts thereof, including the seeds, on
account of the possibility of introducing the coffee berry borer, Stephanoderes
coffeae Hag., and:







46 BUREAU OF EiNTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The introduction of parasitic insects shall be effected solely through the tech-
nical staff of the Department of Agriculture and Livestock. A separate authoriza-
tion for each importation of parasitic insects will be required, to be issued by the
Plant Protection Board.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIAL BY AIR
The prohibition against the importation of fresh fruits, vegetables, seeds, and
plants by air, as stated in Art. 6, page 5 of P. Q. C. A. 310 still stands. Never-
theless, upon application of the importer, and with the approval of the Plant
Quarantine Service, the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock may authorize the
entry of such plant material by air, and will issue permits for such importations.
(Letter from Mr. Julio Gaudron, Plant Quarantine Service, Lima, Peru, April 25.
1942.)
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant 4uarantine


B. E. P. Q. 477, Supplement No. 2
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA
JUNE 1, 1942

IMPORTATION OF UNTOASTED CACAO PERMITTED TEMPORARILY
(Decree No. 769 of March 26, 1942)
Foreign Commerce Weekly for May 9, 1942, reports that the importation of
untoasted cacao beans into Colombia is permitted through the ports of Buena-
ventura and Ipiales for 6 months beginning March 26, 1942, according to the
above decree. The cacao beans are subject to sanitary inspection and must be
shipped perfectly dry in double packing of paper or fiber.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June
30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities for
violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Agapita Placincia de Roja ---------. Brownsville, Tex----- 1 orange -----------.----------. $1.00
E. Austin ----------- ------- Del Rio, Tex----- 5 avocado seeds ...-------- --- -1.00
Pablo Garcia --- ---------------- --_-_do ------------. 5mangoes .------ ------------ 1.00
Maria Muniz --------------------.---do .------------ 3 avocados .---------------- -- 1.00
Jose Cardenas ---------------- Eagle Pass, Tcx----- 1 orange .------ ---------- 1.00
Lupe Zepeda .-------------------- do------------- 14 avocados, 6 mangoes. and 4 1.00
mameys.
Julia M. de Rivera_ .----------- do ------------ 2 mangoes -------------------- 1.00
Cruz Bustos._ -----------------------do ------.------- 1 avocado seed ----------------- 1.00
Tomas Rodriguez ----- --------..----do ------ ----.---do-- ------------------ 1.00
Elias Menchaca ----------------do------------ 8 mangoes -------- ----------- 1.00
Albert 8. Aguilar ------------------do ---------- 4 plants.------------------ 1.00
Joe Medina--------------..--- ----do ------ 1 orange --------------------. 1.00
Dorotea Chavez de Barrios .-..- .-----do_----------- 2 sapotes_--------- -----------_ 1.00
Triniday Saucedo de Perez .. El Paso, Tex ..-.---. 2 live plants with soil...------. .. 40
Silvania Zurita de Sandoval .... --.....do- --------- mango.---------------------- .10
Felta Gomez de Zanez .----------. Hfidalgo, Tex ..------ 21 cuttings--------------------- 1.00
o...------. --------------- -----. do .--..----. 2 plants--- ------------------- 1.00
Concepcion Vasquez -------- ....--.--- do---------------- 1 mamey. ------------------.. 1.00
Natalia Ouajardo ---- --------do ------------- mamey seed ---.- ------ 1.00








1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Refugia Castaneda _--------------. Hidalgo, Tex.....---- 1 avocado seed..-.------------- $1.00
Trinidad Gonzalez.----------------- do.------------- 1 mango.._-------------------- 1.00
Concepcion Perez .-----------------do -------------- 2 avocados. -------------------. 1.00
Jesus Trevino-------------------do-------------4 avocados -------------------- 1.00
Santos Mata----------- --------------do------------- 2 avocados .---------------...- 1.00
Rosa Leander-------- ------- -----do ----------- 4 avocados--------------------- 1.()
Abundio Perez..-------.-- ------------- do------------- 1 mango-..---.. ..---------- 1.00
Nativad Ramos ---- ------ d----------- -----do ---------- ----------- do -1.00
Guadalupe Garza Barreire -----------do------------- 1 avocado seed .---------------- 1.00
Samuel Farias-------------------do ------------- 3 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Trinidad Roman-----------------do------------- 2 mangoes--------------------- 1.00
Maria Garcia ------ ---------------- do--.-----------1 avocado---------------------- 1.00
Juana Canche -------------------do ------------- 4 avocados--------------------- 1.00
Fanilicia Florez --------------- -----do ------------ 3 mangoes-------------------- 1.00
Cristiano Alaniz--- -------------do------------- 2 mangoes --------------- 1.00
Maria Victoria M. Martinez ---------..do------------- 2 plants (bulbs) --------------- 1.00
German Rocha.--------- ------------ do -------------10 plants.---------------------- 1.00
Guadalupe Torez -----------do---------- 3 mangoes__---------------- 1.00
Matiana Bustamante --------------do------------- 7 plants--------------------- 1.00
Maria Vasques ----..-------------.--do ------------ mango ----------------------- 1.00
Maria Garcia.------.---------- -----do ------------- 2 apples__------------- ---- 1.00
Maria Refugio Anzallua --------- ----do-- -- 1 orange ------- -------------- 1.00
Beatriz B. Saenz ----------------do------------- 4 avocados--------------------- 1.00
Josepa SanchaZamora -- ------- -----do------------- 2 plants ---------------------- 1.00
Lucia Wise --------------------do------------- 2 mangoes --------------------- 1.00
Cristina Sanchez------------- ----do-------------2 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Damasio Rodea.....------------- -----do ------------- 5 apricots -------------- 1.00
Mrs. A. L. Fields ------- -----do ---------- 2 avocado seeds and 10 plants_ 1.00
Guadelupe Villeral ----------- -----do----- 1 mango---------------------- 1.00
Hilma Gonzalez ---------------do ------------- avocado ---------------------- 1.00
Rafael B. De Melina ----------------- do -------------- 4 avocados ------------------ 1.00
Simon Gutierrez, Jr ------------Laredo, Tex --------- 2 plants. -------------------- 1.00
Peter Simonini ------------------ do------------- 4 orchid plants ---------------- 1.00
Rebecca Garcia --------- -----do------------- 7 gladioli bulbs. -------------- 1.00
Mrs. Josefa Solas Garcia .------------do------------- 4 ounces miscellaneous seed ---- 1.00
Roberto Jasso--- ------------ ----do------------- 1 orchid plant _----------- -1.00
Minnie Jasso---------- -------------do------------- 1 plant------------------------ 1.00
Josefina Torres...----------- ----do ------------- 1 mamey- -------------- ---- 1.00
Maria Jasso ..-------------- -----do ---------- ----do------------------------ 1.00
Lupe Midrano---. ---------------- do ----- ---------- do------------------------ 1.00
W. Salazar .--------- ------------ ---------- 2 oranges, 1 mango, and 4 1.00
avocados.
Lozaro Torres--------------------do------------- 4 avocados -------------------- 1.00
Josefa G. Guerrero ..--------- --do --- -------23 plants --- ------------- 1.00
F. R. Ayala ----- -------------- do_------------- 1 mango and 1 orange---------- 1.00
Guadalupe Diaz -------------do ------------- 2 mangoes--------------------- 1.00
Lozano Torres ----------------- do ------------4 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Belen Trevino Bocanegro --------Mercedes, Tex------- 2 plants and 3 cuttings---------- 1.00


















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE
P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.
F. C. BISHOPP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.
W. L. POPHAM, Assistant Chief tn Charge of Control Operations.
F. H. SPENCER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, sn Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of'Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W' HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
W. E. DOVE, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
C. P. CLAUSEN, Acting in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.
C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Divtsion of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
J. F. MARTIN, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Divisson of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-
field, N. J.)
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfiy Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).
48












U S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE- 1942








S . A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 152 Issued December 1942.



United States Department of Agriculture
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements----------------- -------- ---------------_ 49
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) -------------- 49
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice)-----------------------------------------------.. 49
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48).-------------------------...--.. 50
Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------------------------- 50
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394, second revision)-_- 50
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)---------- 51
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under
301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to September 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524). 52
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6)-__ 52
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
sixth revision) --_--..........--------------------- ----------------------.....----.. 54
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7) -..- 56
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)....... ------------..------....-. 58
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision) -- ---- 58
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)----.-..-....-- ......--.... 59
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision) ----------------. 59
Hearing will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice) ------------.. ----. 60
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine to include North Carolina-.....---------..--------------------- ----------- 60
Announcements relating to Mexican border regulations ---------------------.......... ------.. 61
Mexican Border Act------------------------------------ ------------------------------- 61
Mexican border regulations (press notice)--- .....------ .... ----------------..----------.. 62
Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942 --.....----... ..- -----.... --....... 62
Miscellaneous items ... --------------------. ---- --------------------------------------. 65
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q. 355, revised, sup-
plement No. 4) ..-- .--------------------------------------------------------- 65
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 6) 65
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products .-----------------------------------......---. 65
Arizona plant quarantine_... ---....--------- ---.--...-------.-------------------- 65
Oregon State plant quarantines _-_ ...----------- ....------------------------------------- 66
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----------....---- -------------- 69
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-------- -------------------- ...71



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

SHEALS TO HEAD DIVISION OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH CONTROL
IN U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
[Press notice]
AUGUST 18, 1942.
The Department of Agriculture today named Ralph A. Sheals as leader of
the Division of Gypsy and Brown-tail Moth Control in the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine.
Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau, said that Mr. Sheals will relieve
A. F. Burgess, who has been in field charge of the work on gypsy moth control
since its beginning as a Federal project nearly 35 years ago. By releasing Mr.
Burgess from administrative responsibility the Bureau can take advantage of
his long experience in nsect control work by having him review for the Chief
of the Bureau other insect control projects now being carried on. Mr. Burgess
49
495903- 2----1







50 bUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

will also prepare a history of the gypsy moth work in the United States, in
advance of his normal retirement.
Mr. Sheals was born at Brushton, N. Y., on March 26, 1893. His collegiate
training was in forestry with specialization in forest insects. He graduated
from New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse, N. Y., in 1917. His
early association with the Department of Agriculture was with the white pine
blister rust work, extending from 1917 to 1928. Since 1928 he has been associ-
ated with the organization now known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine. During this period he has been a member of the Division of Domestic
Plant Quarantines, and since 1929 has been Assistant Chief of the Division. His
work with the Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines has included a number
of assignments and administrative responsibility for activities over a wide
field. He shared in organizing the work of inspection of plants and plant prod-
ucts in transit to assure compliance with quarantines; aided in the direction of
extensive cooperative control campaigns against insect pests and plant diseases
such as grasshoppers, Mormon crickets, chinch bugs, white-fringed beetle, mole
crickets, citrus canker, phony peach, and peach mosaic.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 20, 1942.
POSTMASTER :
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision
of Federal Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, issued by the
United States Department of Agriculture, which became effective March 24,
1942, and which increases somewhat the area previously under quarantine
and also modifies slightly the restrictions formerly imposed. You will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and
Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



B. E. P. Q. 394, Second Revision. Effective July 20, 1942.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
In reissuing this circular to replenish the supply no change has been made in
the list of bulbs, corms, and tubers that are exempted from the certification
requirements of the quarantine. Some modifications have been made in the
names, however, principally the common names, in order to bring them into line
with standard plant nomenclature.
301.48-6a. List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese
beetle certification. Under 301.48-6 [regulation 6 of quarantine No. 48], true
bulbs, corms, and tubers are exempt from Japanese beetle certification when dor-
mant, except for storage growth, and when free from soil. The exemption in-
cludes single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from stems,
cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers or small root divisions
meeting these conditions, require certification.



f .







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

The following list of bulbs, corms, and tubers, issued effective July 20, 1942, is
for the information of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers
within the regulated areas. The key letter (B) before the name stands for true
bulb, (C) for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given
on this list are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes, and are therefore not exempt
from certification. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C)
Amorphophallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, A.
deltoidea, (C) Antholyza (madflower), (C) Babiana (baboonroot), (T) Begonia
(tuberous rooted), (T) Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Brodiaea, (B) Bulb-
ocodium (meadowsaffron), (C) Calochortus (Mariposa-lily or globe-tulip), (B)
Camassia, (B) Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), (B) Colehicum (autumn-crocus),
(T) Colocasia (Caladium esculentum and fancy-leaved varieties), (B) Cooperia
(evening-star and rain-lily), (B) Corydalis bulbosa, C. tuberosa, (B) Crinum,
(C) Crocus, (C) Cyclamen, (T) Dahlia (see statement in introductory para-
graph), (C) Dierama (elfinwands), (T) Dioscorca batatas (cinnamon-vine), (T)
Eranthis (winter-aconite), (B) Erythronium (fawnlily troutlily or dogtooth
violet), (B) Eucharis (Amazonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary),
(B) Galanthus (snowdrop), (B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer-
hyacinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T) Gloriosa rothschildiana. (T) Gloxinia (see Sin-
ningia), (B) Hippeastrum, (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch, and Roman), (B)
Hymenocallis, (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B) Ismene
(Peruvian-daffodil), (B) Ixia, (B) Ixiolirion, (B) Lachenalia (cape-cowslip),
(B) Lapeirousia (Lapeyrousia, Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) Lycoris, (B) Milla (Mexican-
star), (B) Muscari (grape-hyacinth), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B)
Werine, (B) Ornithogalum (Star-of-Bethlehem), (B) Oxalis, (B) Pancratium,
(B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Puschklinia, (T) Ranunculus (buttercup), (B)
Scilla (squill, starhyacinth), (T) Sinningia speciosa (Gloxinia), (C) Sparaxis
(wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (Aztec-lily, Jacobean lily, St. Jameslily), (B)
Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerflower or shellflower), (C) Tritonia (Mont-
bretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia (bugle-
lily), (T) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (callalily), and (B) Zephyranthes
(zephyrlily).
(7 C. F. R. 301.48-6; sec. 8,39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 13th day of July, 1942.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register July 15, 1942, 11:47 a. m.; 7 F. R.
5455.]

BEETLE RESTRICTIONS ON VEGETABLE AND FRUIT SHIPMENTS ENDED FOR
SEASON
[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.
Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the United
States Department of Agriculture announced. Restrictions on cut flowers, how-
ever, remain in force through October 15.
Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and vege-
tables of any kind moved by refrigerator car or motortruck from the areas of
heavy beetle flight. An order issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine releases the fruits and vegetables from this requirement 5 weeks
earlier than is provided in the regulations.
The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the D'strict of Columbia, and
parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight, and results of field surveys show that adults of the
Japanese beetle have decreased to a point where it does not seem advisable to
continue the fruit and vegetable inspection and certification requirpment the rest
of this season. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle
after the active period which is now apparently over throughout the regulated
areas.







52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [uly-Sept.

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers will
remain in full force through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.


B. E. P. Q. 524. Effective September 9, 1942.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QTUARANTINE NOTICES

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE BY ADVANCING THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER 301.48 OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE
QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 9 FOR THE YEAR 1942

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle'in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is therefore safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and
vegetables from the regulated areas. Therefore, pursuant to the authority con-
ferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by
the fourth proviso of 301.48, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of Japanese beetle], it is ordered
that the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables im-
posed by 301.48-5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, revised effective March 24,
1942, be removed effective on and after September 9, 1942. This order advances
the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in
301.48-5 from October 16 to September 9, 1942, and applies to this season only.
(7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 5th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
rFiled with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11: 08 a. m.; 7 F. R.
7135.]


B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 6. Effective September 5, 1942.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) of
301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939] is hereby amended effec-
tive September 5, 1942, by the addition of the following subparagraph:
301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nurs-
ery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.
4 *







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING
*
(6) Ethylene dichloride emulsion dip
(i) Materials:
Potassium hydroxide: C. P.
Alcohol: 190 proof ethyl alcohol.
Oleic acid: crystal white olein.
Ethylene dichloride: commercial.
(ii) Formula:
Pounds
Potassium hydroxide 1------------------------------ 2.5
Alcohol 2------------------------------ 14.0
Water----------------------------------------- 6.0
Oleic acid---------------------------------------- 17. 5
Ethylene dichloride--- ------------------------ 60. 0
100. 0
1 An amount of commercial caustic potash containing an equivalent weight of potassium
hydroxide may be substituted for the C. P. grade.
2Completely denatured alcohol (190 proof) may be substituted for the ethyl alcohol
(190 proof).

(iii) Preparation of dip.-Mix the several ingredients in the order given in
the formula. Dissolve the potassium hydroxide in the alcohol and water, add
the oleic acid, and stir intermittently for about 10 minutes. Compensate for
evaporation loss by the addition of alcohol and water in the ratio given in the
formula. Add the ethylene dichloride and stir.
The emulsible ethylene dichloride shall have a specific gravity of about 1.070
at 250 C. (770 F.) and contain 60 percent by weight of ethylene dichloride.
It shall be a clear solution that may be readily diluted with water to form a
uniform, stable, milklike emulsion. The product should be kept in gastight
containers in a cool place at a temperature above 4.50 C. (400 F.). At lower
temperatures it will separate into layers, in which case it must be warmed to
room temperature and stirred to restore it to its original and usable condition.
(iv) Caution.-Ethylene dichloride is an inflammable volatile solvent. It.
the emulsible ethylene dichloride, and the ethylene dichloride emulsion should
be kept away from fire, heat, and open flame. They should be used with ade-
quate ventilation and prolonged breathing of the vapor should be avoided.
(v) ,eason.-The treatment must be applied between October 1 and June 1.
(vi) Temperature.-The temperature of both the dip and the plant balls at
the time of dipping shall not be lower than 450 F. nor higher than 750 F. At
no time thereafter, during the holding period, shall the temperature of the
treated plant balls be lower than 40 nor higher than 80.
(vii) Dosage.-Use at the rate of 1 gallon of the emulsible ethylene di-
chloride in 100 gallons of water. (For convenience in making small quantities
use 40 cubic centimeters in 1 gallon of water.) To prepare the emulsible
ethylene dichloride as a dip, add small quantities of water successively, stirring
continually until a uniform, creamlike emulsion is formed. Dilute this emulsion
with the remainder of the water, stir a few minutes to insure a uniform sus-
pension, and pour into a trough or tank. This dip must be prepared imme-
diately before using.
(viii) Preparation of plants.-Plants with root masses or balls up to 10 inches
in diameter at the narrowest dimension may be treated, either bare, wrapped.
or in unglazed clay pots. If wrapped, the wrapping material must be of such
a nature as not to prevent the proper penetration of the emulsion into the root
mass. The plant balls shall be moist but not wet.
(ix) Application.-The size of the trough or tank (wood or metal) used for
the dipping vat, and the quantity of the emulsion shall be sufficient to provide
a complete coverage of all the plant balls. The plant balls or pots must be
immersed for a period of 10 seconds in the dip. They may be treated either







54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

singly or in groups with the balls spaced approximately 1/ inch apart in a wire
basket or perforated tray, and arranged so as to permit of rapid penetration
of the emulsion into all of the balls. In any case the plant balls or tray shall
rest on the bottom of the tank. A sufficient quantity of freshly prepared,
diluted emulsion shall be added to the dip so that the plant balls are completely
covered during the immersion period. To reduce the hazard of plant injury,
not more than the lower 1/2 inch of the plant stems should be immersed during
the treatment. The contents of the trough shall be discarded and the trough
rinsed out 4 hours after charging and/or when the dirt and debris exceed 2
inches in depth. The trough shall be located during plant treatments in a
covered and well ventilated place. On removal of balled plants from the dip
they may be allowed to drain into the tank for 1 or 2 minutes and then must
be placed in a compact group either on a bench with a tight bottom and side
walls as high as the plant balls, or on a tight floor of a greenhouse, packing
shed or other enclosed area, and surrounded by wodoen side walls as high as the
plant balls. If they are placed on a dirt floor it must be wet and packed hard
before using. In the case of potted plants any excess emulsion should be
poured from the pot immediately after removing from the dipping vat. All
plants must remain undisturbed for the prescribed 48 hours during which time
excessive ventilation should be avoided. A light spray of water applied to the
tops of the plants during this period may be beneficial.
(x) Period of treatment.-Ten seconds immersion in the dip followed by a
48-hour holding period.
(xi) Varieties of plants.-The list of plants which have been successfully
treated in experimental work includes 18 varieties of azaleas, 60 kinds of
greenhouse plants, 48 kinds of perennials, and 28 kinds of trees and shrubs.
The list is subject to expansion and will be furnished on requet.
(7 C.F.R., 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S.C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 4th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11 : 08 a. m.; 7. F. R.
7134.]

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective September 18, 1942.
Supplement No. 1, Sixth Revision.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Two new schedules for methyl bromide fumigation of potted or bare-rooted
plants are provided in this revision of supplement No. 1. These two treating
schedules, at lower temperatures than have heretofore been authorized, are Nos.
8 and 9 in the table under subparagraph (i). The instructions as to fumigation
of packaged plants are carried forward in this revision of the supplement.
301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of
nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treat-
ment authorized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of 301.48b [on
page 13 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9,
19391 is hereby further modified effective September 18, 1942, to read as follows:




UBRARY
STATE PLAYNT BOA
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE Roors OF PLANTS
*
(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING
*
(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.-An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of re-
moval of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

(a) Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.-The temperature of
the soil (with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type
of treatment must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the
minimum specified in the following table, or higher:

Dosage Dosage
Period of (methyl Period of (methyl
Temperature at least tr t bromide Temperature at least emet bromide
per 1,000 per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)

Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
1. 730F_ ..-- -------- 2% 11 6. 540 F ------------------4 2
2. 670 F ----------- 22 2 7. 500 F..--------------- 42 2%
3. 630 F - ------- 2 2 8. 460 F --------------- 4 3
4. 600 F_------------._- 3 2 9 9. 430 F--------------- 4% 3
6. 570 F ---------........ 3 2%

The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by the
load.
(b) Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied to plants with
bare roots or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be
puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the
inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots
or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each
other they should not be jammed tightly together.
(c) Packaged plants.-Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than
14 inches in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above nine tempera-
tures, periods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have
access to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be
tightly closed. -
(d) Varieties of plants.-The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial,
and nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion,
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.
The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subpara-
graph (5) (ii) of paragraph (1) of 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.
(7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, effective April 23,
1942.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 16th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942, 11: 42 a. m.:; 7 F. R.
7381.1




Y HAmAU

LgAU.I TWAIq 3TAT8
56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE July-Sept.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 7. Effective September 18, 1942.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUAIrNTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED


INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Experiments with methyl bromide dissolved in water and applied to specified
soil areas have resulted in the development of new methods for treating the
soil of areas free from plants and of individual items of nursery stock in field
rows. The application of this treatment in meeting the requirements of the
Japanese beetle quarantine must be conducted under the supervision of an
inspector of the Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue,
Bloomfield, N. J., and in accordance with detailed instructions furnished by
him.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6 and 301.48-7, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulations 6 and 7 of the rules and regulations
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], paragraphs (k) and (m) of
301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], as amended, are hereby
further amended effective September 18, 1942, by the addition of the following
subparagraphs:
301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.
*
TREATMENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS
*
(k) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFlAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS
* *
(6) Methyl bromide solution

(i) Season.-The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.
(ii) Equipment.-Equipment includes a gastight drum, complete with spigot
and hose, methyl bromide applicator, collars when necessary, and measuring cans.
Such equipment must be inspected, tested, and approved by an inspector of the
Department before use.
(iii) Preparation of solution.-The solution must be prepared in accordance
with the directions of the inspector.
(iv) Condition and type of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated provided the
surface can be pulverized sufficiently to absorb the solution. To prepare a well
pulverized surface, areas to be treated must be leveled and thereafter cultivated
to loosen the soil to a depth of at least 1 inch. The treatment must not be applied
during rain. The surface of wet soil should be tilled, allowed to dry for at least
24 hours, and then pulverized preparatory to treatment.
(v) Dosage and application.-The dosage shall be at the rate of 3 gallons of
solution per 1 square yard. The strength of the solution shall be based on the
minimum soil temperature within the top 6 inches as follows:
Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration by volume of
top 6 inches (F.) : methyl bromide
47 to 56, inclusive------------------------- 0.150
57 to 67, inclusive----------------------------. 100
68 and over ------- ----- --------------------- .050
The surface must be divided by strings or marks in the soil into units of approxi-
mately 1 square yard. The solution is to be applied uniformly in a crisscross pat-







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

tern to the soil surface from the spout of a sprinkling can or other vessel with
a similar spout, held no more than 6 inches above the soil surface.
(vi) Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified, a strip 3 feet
wide must be treated around the entire coldframe, plunging bed, or heeling-in
ground. No plants will be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes,
etc. extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, no safety zone is
required.
(vii) Marking.-In the case of coldframes, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper
designations will be made on them by the inspector. In all other cases the nursery-
men shall furnish suitable stakes, at least 4 inches square and 30 inches long, to be
placed at the boundaries of the certified plots and marked by the inspector.
(viii) Period of treatment.-The area must remain undisturbed for a period of
48 hours after treatment.
(ix) Alternative treatment.-If 1-square-yard collars are used in treating
frames, plunging beds, and heeling-in areas, the dosages and methods of procedure
listed below for treatment of soil about the roots of plants may be used.
*
TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS

(m) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
*

(3) Methyl bromide solution-collar treatment
(i) Season.-The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.
(ii) Equipment.-The equipment required is the same as that under TREAT-
MENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS (subparagraph (6) of paragraph
(k)) except that collars are necessary.
(iii) Preparation of solution.-The required solution must be prepared in
accordance with the directions of the inspector.
(iv) Dosage, solution, concentration, and soil temperatures.-The dosage is at
the constant rate of 3 gallons per square yard. The percentage concentration
of methyl bromide in solution, by volume, is dependent upon the minimum soil
temperature within the top 6 inches, as follows:
Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration of
top 6 inches (*F.) : methyl bromide
47 to 51, inclusive------------------ ------- 0. 100
52 to 56, inclusive_----- ---------.--------- .075
57 to 62, inclusive----------------- 050
63 to 67, inclusive ------------ ----------- 040
68 to 72, inclusive---------------------- .025
73 and over---------------------------------- .015
(v) Condition and type of soil.-There are no limitations so long as there is no
standing water on the area to be treated and all of the solution enters the soil
within 30 minutes after application.
(vi) Preparation of collar areas.-The area must be free from weeds and debris
and must be practically level. Leveling can be expedited by filling in and sub-
sequent tamping to produce a uniformly packed subsurface for the application.
The entire surface of the collar about the plant treated must be loosened to a depth
of 1 inch. The collar should be set so that the solution will not break out beneath
or through it.
(vii) Safety area.-The collar must be of sufficient size so that a safety margin
of soil of at least 2 inches all around remains when the treated nursery stock unit
is dug for balling.
(viii) Withdrawal and application of solution.-The solution is to be with-
drawn from the preparation-drum through a hose extending to the bottom of the
dosage-measuring vessel. It must be poured from the open top of the vessel onto
the collar area quickly and without unnecessary splashing. Irmediately there-
after the soil within the collar must be smoothed off without splashing so that
the entire surface is uniformly submerged.
(ix) Use period.-If the drum is tightly sealed between dosage withdrawals
the solution may be used at any time within 24 hours after preparation. While
in storage between treatments within this period the drum must be shaded.
495903-42---2







58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sep

(x) Treatment period.-The plants must be dug not less than 20 hours or
more than 48 hours after treatment.
(xi) Plant reactions.-The Department's records on plant reactions to the
treatment are limited. Such information as is available will be supplied on
request to the Division of Japanese Beetle Control. All interested nurserymen
are advised to run test lots of their own stock for observation. So far as
possible, the Department will cooperate in this testing on written request to the
Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
(xii) Precautions.-Directions as to precautions may be obtained from the
above Division and should be observed.
(7 C. F. R. 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 14th day of September 1942.
P N. ANNAI,
Chief.
SFiled with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942, 11: 42 a. m.; 7 F. R.
7381.]



ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE .
(NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, Second Revision. Effective October 1, 1942.

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHrAPrE III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULTIONS MODIFIED



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The administrative instructions issued May 1, 1940 (Circular B. E. P. Q. 493,
revised) modified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to
baled lint and linters and products thereof and restored certain requirements
for handling cottonseed in certain counties in northwestern Texas and Lea and
Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. The present revision does not change the
requirements for these counties.
Continued improvement in seed sterilization and in sanitary measures in force
at gins in the heavily infested area and at oil mills receiving and processing
cottonseed produced in that area, makes it safe to allow linters produced from
sterilized seed in such area to be moved interstate without additional treatment.
The present revision of the administrative instructions therefore removes the
requirement as to fumigation or roller treatment of linters produced from
sterilized seed originating in the heavily infested area. This modification of
the quarantine regulation does not affect the procedure as to handling cottonseed
originating in the heavily infested area as provided in paragraph (b) of
regulation 4 ( 301.52-4).
301.52-4b. Administrative instructions; removing the treatment requirements
as to cotton linters produced from sterilized cottonseed in the heavily infested
areps, and extending the area in which baled cotton lint may be moved from
certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico and Texas without treatment.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of 301.52, Chapter. III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the
pink bollworm], and having determined that facts exist as to the pest risk
involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in paragraph (a) of 301.52-4, notice is hereby given that,
effective October 1, 1942, (a) all restrictions and certification requirements
are hereby waived on the interstate movement from any regulated area of
cotton linters produced from sterilized seed; and (b) all restrictions are hereby






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

waived on the interstate movement of baled cotton lint and products thereof
from the following area:
New Mexico: Lea and Roosevelt Counties.
Texas: Counties of Andrews, Cochran, Concho, Dawson, Ector, Gaines,
Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion, Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Sterling,
Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated parts of Bailey, Coke,
and Lamb Counties:
Provided, (1) That the products have been produced in an authorized oil mill or
gin and subsequently protected from contamination, and (2) that a certificate
of the United States Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached to
the containers or shipping papers in accordance with the requirements prescribed
in 301.52-11.
These instructions supersede those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493, dated May 1, 1940.
(7 C. F. R. 301.52; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 28th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND.
Chief
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1942, 11: 52 a. m.; 7 F. R.
7792.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Tenth Revision. Effective August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1943.

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

301.72a. Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements
for specified articles. (a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomolgy and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for
the interstate movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective
August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1943, for the following articles and materials
enumerated in 301.72-3:
(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below: (i) Soil, when taken from a
depth of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from
any surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.
(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.
(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:
(i) Potatoes.
(ii) Lily bulbs, except that freshly harvested or uncured bulbs are not exempt.
(iii) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.
(iv) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and
leafmold.
(v) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.
(vi) Baled cotton lint, and linters.
(vii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.
The intensity of infestations has been greatly reduced by drastic suppressive
measures applied throughout the infested areas. This factor, as well as the
conditions of growth, production, or maintenance of the restricted articles, has
so reduced the danger of dissemination of white-fringed beetles that certifica-
tion of the exempted articles is no longer necessary.






60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(b) Except as specified above the following articles and materials shall
remain under the restrictions of 301.72-3:
(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock,
plants, products, articles, or things.
(2) Nursery stock.
(3) Grass sod.
(4) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.
(5) Peanut hay.
(6) Seed cotton and cottonseed.
(7) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.
This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision, which be-
came effective May 11, 1942.
(7 C. F. R., 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. O. 161.)
Done at Washington this 1st day of August 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
(Filed with the Division of the Federal Register August 8, 1942, 12 : 06 p. m., 7 F. R. 6179.]

HIEARING WILL CONSIDER BEETLE
QUARANTINE FOR NORTH CAROLINA
[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.
Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard announced today a public hearing
to consider placing North Carolina under Federal quarantine because of the
recent discovery of infestations of the white-fringed beetle in that State. The
hearing will be held in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture,
South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue, SW., at 10: 30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942.
The white-fringed beetles were first reported as occurring in the United
States in 1936, and since 1937 have been known to be present in parts of
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. On January 15, 1939, these
States were placed under a Federal quarantine which restricts or prohibits the
interstate movement of soil and certain plants, plant products, and other
articles to points outside the areas regulated by this quarantine.
Surveys to determine whether this insect exists in places not previously known
to be infested have been conducted over wide areas during the past several
years. During the past summer white-fringed beetles were discovered at several
places within and in the vicinities of Atkinson, Burgaw, Goldsboro, and Wilming-
ton, N. C. Farm land, as well as industrial and residential areas, was found
to be infested.
This insect in its various stages may be carried from place to place through
movement of soil and other articles.
Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae are
capable of causing serious damage to many field and garden crops, and are
exceedingly destructive to several important crops grown in many sections of
the country. If allowed to spread, this insect may become a serious pest in
agricultural regions of the United States not now infested.


TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF REVISING THE WHIT-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE TO INCLUDE NORTH CAROLINA

SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that white-fringed beetles (species
of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus), insect pests dangerous to






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

agriculture, and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and
throughout the United States, but known to be present in Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, and Mississippi, have been found to exist in the State of North
Carolina.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of revising the
quarantine on account of the white-fringed beetle (7 CFR 301.72 [Notice of
Quarantine No. 72]) to include the State of North Carolina, and of restricting
or prohibiting the movement from that State, or regulated portions thereof, of
(1) soil, sand, clay, peat, or muck, independent of, or in connection with, nursery
stock, plants, or other things; and (2) such other articles or materials as may
be determined to present a hazard in spread of the beetle, including the following:
Nursery stock.
Potatoes.
Grass sod.
Lily bulbs.
Compost and manure.
Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.
Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.
Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.
Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.
Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with section 8 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C. 161) as amended,
a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., in
the South Building, Independence Avenue and 14th Street SW., at 10:30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine
revision may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
GROVER B. HILL,
Acting Secretary.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 25, 1942, 11: 34 a. m.; 7 F. R.
7646.]



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS

MEXICAN BORDER ACT

[PUBLuc LAW 426--77TH CONGRES]

[CHAPTER 31-2D SESSION]

[H. R. 4849]

AN ACT

To provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That to prevent the introduction of insect
pests and plant diseases the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized and directed
to promulgate such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary to regulate
the entry into the United States from Mexico of railway cars and other vehicles
and freight, express, baggage, and other materials which may carry such pests
and to provide for the inspection, cleaning, and, when necessary disinfection of
such vehicles and materials; to carry out the activities required to accomplish
this purpose, the Secretary of Agriculture shall use such means as he may deem
necessary, including construction and repair of buildings, plants, and equipment
for fumigation and disinfection or cleaning of vehicles and materials; the clean-
ing and disinfection of vehicles or materials necessary to accomplish the purpose
shall be carried out by and under the direction of authorized inspectors of the






62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Department of Agriculture, and the Secretary of Agriculture shall make and
collect such charge as will cover, as nearly as may be, the average cost of ma-
terials, facilities, and special labor used in performing such disinfection, and
fees so collected shall be covered into the Treasury of the United States as
miscellaneous receipts.
Approved, January 31, 1942.

MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
[Press notice]

SEPrEm 4, 1942.

Approval was given by the Secretary of Agriculture today to regulations estab-
lishing inspection and treatment procedures under the Mexican Border Act
approved January 31, 1942, relating to safeguard measures necessary to prevent
the incidental introduction of the pink bollworm of cotton and other insects and
plant diseases into this country from Mexico by means of railway cars and other
vehicles, as well as in cargo, or in waste and debris likely to carry pests.
Authority for inspection and cleaning and for fumigation or other treatment
of these cars, vehicles, and contaminating materials has been granted by Congress
on a yearly basis since 1917, and regulations for carrying out these activities
have likewise been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican
Border Act providing in a permanent manner for these protective functions it has
become necessary to revise existing regulations to bring them under the authority
of the new Act and into accord with its terms. The revision thus accomplished
follows closely in scope and procedure the regulations long effective in this field.


B. E. P. Q.-Mex. Border Regs. Regulations under the Mexican Border Act, approved
January 31, 1942. Effective September 8, 1942.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 320-THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Authority to inspect and apply safeguards to railway cars, vehicles, and various
materials entering this country from Mexico has been granted by Congress on an
annual basis since 1917 and regulations covering these activities have likewise
been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican Border Act,
approved January 31, 1942, it has become necessary to revise the existing regula-
tions so as to bring them under the authority of the new act, and into accord with
its terms. The revision thus accomplished follows closely in scope and procedure
the previous regulations, care being taken to avoid encroachment on the field
covered by the Plant Quarantine Act.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture by the act,
approved January 31, 1942, entitled, "To provide for regulating, inspecting, clean-
ing, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway cars, other vehicles, and other
materials entering the United States from Mexico" (Public Law 426, 77th Con-
gress), I, Grover B. Hill, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do prescribe and pro-
mulgate the following regulations to be in force and effect on September 8, 1942
THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
AUTHORITY: 320.1 to 320.9. inclusive, issued under the act approved January 31, 1942,
entitled "To provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico,
(Public Law 426, 77th Cong.).







19421 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

320.1. Administration.-The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine is charged with the administration of the provisions of this Act and
the regulations in this part concurrently with the Plant Quarantine Act and the
quarantines and orders issued thereunder.
320.2. Regulated vehicles, articles, and materials.--To carry out the purpose
of the aforesaid Act to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases
these regulations shall apply to railway cars, boats crossing the Rio Grande, air-
craft, drawn or self-propelled vehicles (such as wagons, carts, trucks, automo-
biles), freight, baggage, containers, and articles or materials which may be con-
taminated with insect pests or plant diseases. These regulations, however, shall
not apply to railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials originating in and
moving directly from the Northern Territory of Baja California, Mexico.
320.3. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following words,
names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Inspector.-An inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, United States Department of Agridulture.
(b) Owner or agent.-As used in these regulations this term shall include both
singular and plural and shall denote the person, agent, firm, company, or official,
having responsible custody of railway cars, vehicles, or other materials subject to
these regulations.
(c) Disinfection.-Disinfection as used in these regulations includes any
treatment or process designed to destroy insect pests or plant disease organisms.
(d) Railway cars.-As used in these regulations shall include all types of cars
commonly employed in the transportation of freight, such as box, flat, tank,
refrigerator, gondola, stock, etc.
(e) Cleaning.-Cleaning as used in these regulations shall mean the removal,
to the satisfaction of the inspector, of matter, other than the cargo and articles
being moved, which may carry insect pests or plant diseases from railway cars,
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, and other materials.
(f) Other vehicles.-As used in these regulations the term "other vehicles"
includes means of conveyance other than railway cars, such as aircraft, boats,
automobiles, trailers, trucks, wagons, and carts, etc.
(g) Other materials.-As used in these regulations the term "other materials"
shall include all commodities, articles, and materials which may be the means of
introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United States.
320.4. Inspection.-As a condition of entry into the United States from
Mexico all articles and materials under these regulations ( 320.2) shall be
subject to examination by an inspector for the purpose of determining whether
they may enter the United States without risk of introducing insect pests and
plant diseases.
320.5. Railway cars.-When the inspector has determined by examination
that railway cars may enter the United States without risk of introducing
insect pests and plant diseases into the United States, he shall, insofar as these
regulations may govern, permit their entry. If the examination discloses that
any car is contaminated and would involve risk of introducing insect pests
or plant diseases into the United States, he shall prescribe, as condition of entry,
cleaning, transfer of cargo, or disinfection, or all three. When cleaning alone
has been prescribed and done to the satisfaction of the inspector he shall permit
the entry of the cleaned cars, insofar as these regulations may govern entry.
When disinfection is prescribed the entry of the cars, shall be conditioned on
their being fumigated, under the supervision of the inspector, either in a govern-
ment-owned fumigation house or otherwise in a place and by methods prescribed
by the inspector. Immediately upon entry of railway cars for fumigation they
shall be moved by the owner or agent having charge of same directly to the
government-owned fumigation plant, or "spotted" at an approved place and
before placing the cars in the fumigation chambers or "spotting" them for
fumigating the railroad company servicing the cars shall cause the car doors to
be opened and subsequent to fumigation it shall be the responsibility of the
railroad company to remove the cars from the fumigation plant or place where
they have been "spotted" and to close the car doors when the occasion requires.
When the prescribed fumigation has been accomplished in manner required by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the inspector

SThe entry of certain plants and plant products is regulated or prohibited by quarantines
and regulations promulgated under the Plant Quarantine Act as amended.







64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

shall permit entry into the United States insofar as these regulations may
govern. The inspector may authorize temporary 'entry of railway cars under
conditions to be prescribed by him for unloading or loading in railroad yards
at the port of entry or for in-transit movement from and to Mexico.
320.6. Vehicles, articles, and materials, other than railway cars and unregu-
lated boats.-When the inspector has determined by examination that vehicles,
other than railway cars and unregulated boats, or any of the various articles
and materials covered by these regulations may enter the United States without
risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases, he shall permit their entry
insofar as these regulations may govern. If the examination by the inspector
discloses such regulated vehicles, articles, or materials are contaminated and
would involve risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United
States, he shall prescribe, as a condition of entry, cleaning, transfer of cargo,
or disinfection, or any or all of these. The cleaning, transfer of cargo and
disinfection shall be carried out under his supervision and to his satisfaction
and until it has been so accomplished, entry into the United States shall be
refused.
320.7. Responsibility for opening and cleaning.-The owner or agent in
charge of railway cars, other vehicles, and freight, express, baggage, articles,
or other materials shall open these for inspection as required by the inspector
and provide reasonable access to every part thereof, and when cleaning is
prescribed by the inspector as a condition of entry, shall so open, and clean,
and do any and all things reasonably pertaining thereto as required by the
inspector. All costs incident to entry, opening, and cleaning, except for the
services of the inspector, shall be paid by the owner or agent in charge.
320.8. Responsibility for disinfection.-When disinfection involves fumiga-
tion the inspector will apply the fumigant whether in the houses erected for
the purpose or in the cars themselves. If, in the judgment of the inspector,
fumigation will not provide adequate safeguards against the introduction of
insect pests and plant diseases, he may prescribe another type of disinfection
which shall be applied by the owner or agent under the supervision of the
inspector. Costs incident to such disinfection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be borne by the owner or his agent, or paid for as prescribed
elsewhere in these regulations.
320.9. Fees for disinfection in government-owned facilities.-Prior to entry
of railway cars or other vehicles requiring fumigation in government-owned
facilities as a condition of entry, the owner or agent in charge shall buy fumiga-
tion coupons from the inspector in charge at the port of entry. The price
fixed for these coupons shall represent as nearly as may be, the average cost
of materials, facilities, and special labor used by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in performing such fumigation. On the basis of the
average cost for such fumigation over a period of years the inspector in charge
shall, until further notice, collect a fee of $4.00 for each coupon sold. Payments
for coupons, if practicable, shall be in the form of postal money orders, or bank
drafts or certified checks drawn on United States banks, drawn to the credit
of the Treasurer of the United States. Payments in United States currency
will be accepted if tendered. All fees so collected by the inspector shall be
promptly turned into the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts
in accordance with the practices approved by the Secretary of Agriculture.
These regulations shall supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the
Movement of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the United States and
Governing the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective July 1, 1917, as amended January 29, 1920 (7 C. F. R. 320.1 to 320.6;
39 Stat. 1164) and may be referred to as "The Mexican Border Regulations."
Done at the city of Washington this 3d day of September 1942.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
GROVER B. HILL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing regulations were sent to all American diplomatic and consular
officers in Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador, through the State Department, and to all
customs officers through the Treasury Department.]
[ Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 4, 1942, 11: 14 a. n.; 7 F. IL.
7025.]







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. P. Q. 355, Revised, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES
SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.

COTTON LINT OR SEED-RESTRICTED IMPORTATION PERMITTED
Proclamation No. 34, published in the Jamaica Gazette Supplement of June 29,
1942, prescribed that the importation into Jamaica of cotton lint or seed, or any
part whatever of the cotton plant or of any plant of any species or variety of
Gossypium, is allowed only under permit granted by the Director of Agriculture
and in compliance with the following rules:
1. No consignment of cottonseed may exceed 1 ton in weight.
2. All cottonseed imported into this Island shall be placed in the fumigation
chamber immediately on landing and shall not be removed therefrom until it has
been fumigated for a period of 1 hour with hydrocyanic acid gas at a concentration
of 1 ounce of cyanide for every 300 cubic feet of space.
3. All cottonseed shall before planting be immersed for not less than 3 minutes
in concentrated sulphuric acid or treated with fungicide approved by the Director
of Agriculture.
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


P. Q. C. A. 310, Supplement No. 6.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU
JULY 3, 1942.

REGULATING THE CULTIVATION OF FLAX IN PERU AND THE IMPORTATION OF FLAXSEED
[Executive Order of June 3, 1942, Lima]
All seedings of flax for fiber made in certain coastal valleys are restricted
generally to a planting season from May 15 to July 31. (This season is extended
to August 15 in 1942.)
The importation of flaxseed by individuals is prohibited. This can be done only
through the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock, who will import flaxseed in
quantities not exceeding 1 kilogram upon application by interested farmers. The
flaxseed will be passed upon by the technical services of the Bureau and released
to the farmers concerned if the test proves satisfactory.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARIZONA PLANT QUARANTINE 4
(Amendment of Notice dated November 10, 1941)
Item 6 of the notice of November 10, 1941, published in the Postal Bulletin of
November 17, 1941, relating to Arizona plant quarantines is amended by removing
"Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits" from the prohibited list (column
II) and placing these articles in the restricted list (column III) so that the
amended item will read:

(Column I) (Column III) (Column IV)

(6) Arizona, California, Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits, Peach mosaic disease.
Colorado, New Mexico, peach and nectarine trees, root stock, grafts,
Oklahoma, Texas, and buds, or other parts capable of propagation, ex-
Utah. cept fruit pits, admitted under proper certifi-
cation from State of origin.


The Postal Bulletin, Washington, August 17, 1942.








66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES
(Revision of Notice dated September 11, 1940)
Postal Bulletin 18032-September 17, 1940
Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions, or entirely
prohibited.
The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and
regulations, showing the quarantine areas, the plants and plant products affected,
and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts. Under the
provisions of paragraph 2 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, post-
masters should not accept such plants and plant products when presented for
mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations, and should invite
the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Plants and plant products affected

Area quarantined Acceptance for mail- Accepted for ant pests
ing entirely Accepted for mailing only when and diseases
ing entirely pro- accompanied with approved
hibited from quar- certificate or Oregon permit
antined area
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(1) Counties in Oregon:Baker, _____.................. Potatoes and potato tops require Colorado po-
Grant, Malheur, Morrow, State of origin certificate tato beetle.
Umatilla, Union and Wal- showing they were grown and
lowa. packed in noninfested areas;
All States except California or, screened and packed as
and Nevada. prescribed by Oregon law.
(2) All of the United States ........................ Narcissus bulbs, including daf- Narcissus bulb
and all counties in Oregon. fodils, jonquils, and Chinese fly, eelworm,
sacred lilies require satis- or nematode.
factory State-of-origin certifi-
cate as to . freedom from
infestation, based on inspec-
tion or treatment.
(3) Parts of Oregon, Idaho Fresh cherry fruit en- Fresh cherries may be shipped Cherry fruit
and Washington: tirely prohibited into Oregon from noninfested fly.
shipment from in- counties in Idaho and Wash-
(Infested Areas) fested counties in- ington with inspection certifi-
tonon infestedcoun- cate showing growth, packing,
ties. and shipment from a county
Counties in Oregon: Benton, Used cherry boxes free of fruit fly.
Clackamas, Clatsop, Co- also prohibited ex- Cherry fruit and used boxes
lumbia, Lane, Lincoln, cept when steam- may be shipped from infested
Linn, Marion, Multnomah, or hot-water treated counties into infested counties
Polk, Tillamook, Union, and so certified. without certification, but are
Washington, Yambill. subject to inspection at desti-
Counties in Idaho: Benewah nation.
and Latah.
Counties in Washington: Clal-
lam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays
Haroor, Island, Jefferson,
King, Kitsap, Lewis, Ma-
son, Pacific, Pierce, San
Juan, Skagit, Skamania,
Snohomish, Spokane, Thur-
ston, Wahkiakum, What-
com, Whitman.
(4) All of Oregon..----------------------------..... Gladiolus bulbs accepted for Gladiolus
intrastate shipment only when thrips.
accompanied by special gladi-
olus permit.
(5) Counties in Oregon: Ben- ..-------------.... ----_ Poplar and willow trees or parts Satin moth.
ton, Clackamas, Clatsop, thereof capable of propagation
Columbia, Douglas, Hood accepted from quarantined
River, Lane, Linn, Marion, areas when accompanied with
Multnomah, Polk, Wash- certificate of State of origin
ington, and Yanhill. showing they were grown in
States of Connecticut, Maine, county free from satin moth
Massachusetts, New Hamp- and not stored where poplar
shire, Rhode Island, Ver- or willow trees from infested
mont, and Washington. areas are or have been stored,
or a certificate showing the
trees have been effectively
treated in approved manner.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon--Continued.

Plants and plant products affected

Plant pests
Area quarantined Acceptance for mail- Accepted for mailing only when and diseases
ing entirely pro- accompanied with approved
hibited from quar- certificate or Oregon permit
antined area
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(6) Entire United States ------ .-----------------. Grapevines and cuttings ac- Grape phyllox-
cepted with State-of-origin cer- era.
tificate that shipment is from
a section free of phylloxera or
certificate that shipment has
been given an approved treat-
ment under the supervision of
a qualified inspector of State
of origin.

(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Con- All varieties and spe- Scions or budwood admitted Oriental fruit
necticut, Delaware, Flor- cies, including the under Oregon permit from moth.
ida, Georgia, Illinois, Indi- flowering forms of Nov. 1 to Apr. 1. Bare rooted
ana, Kansas, Kentucky, the peach, nectar- plants allowed entry from
Louisiana, Maryland, Mas- ine, almond, apricot, Nov. 1 to Apr. 1 after fumi-
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis- plum, cherry, choke- gation as required, provided
sissippi, Missouri, New cherry, quince, pear, with satisfactory State-of-ori-
Hampshire, New Jersey, and apple trees and gin certificate.
North Carolina, New York, plants and parts
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode thereof and the fresh
Island, South Carolina, fruit.
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,
West Virginia, and District
of Columbia.
(8) California, Florida, Lou- --_---- -------------- Potatoes-accepted only with Potato tuber
isiana, North Carolina, certificate of state-of-origin to moth.
South Carolina, Tennessee, show the potatoes and district
Texas, Virginia, and where grown are free of infesta-
Hawaii. tion or that the potatoes were
fumigated. ....

(9) All States east of and in- All trees, plants, cut- -------------------------------- Filbert blight.
eluding the States of Mon- tings, and scions of
tana, Wyoming, Colorado, the cultivated and
and New Mexico. wild filbert and
hazel.
(10) All of the States and dis- -------------------- Genus rubus, such as black- Virus diseases
tricts of the United States berry, dewberry, loganberry, of the genus
and the following counties and raspberry and their horti- rubus ....
in Oregon: Baker, Crook, cultural varieties, accepted
Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, under field inspection certifi-
Harney, Jefferson, Kla- cate of State of origin. . .
math, Lake, Malheur, Mor-
row, Sherman, Umatilla,
Union, Wallowa, Wasco,
tWheeler.
(11) Connecticut, Delaware, -------------------- Stalks, ears, cobs or other parts European corn
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, or debris (except seed and borer.
Maine, Maryland, Massa- shelled grain free from frag-
chusetts, Michigan, New ment of cob and other plant
Hampshire, New Jersey, debris) of corn, broom corn,
New York, North Carolina, sorghums or Sudan grass; cut
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode flowers or entire plants of
Island, Vermont, Virginia, dahlia, gladiolus (except
West Virginia, Wisconsin. corms, bulbs, or tubers with-
out stems) chrysanthemum,
aster; lima beans in the pod,
green shell beans in the pod (of
the variety known as cran-
berry or horticultural); beets
with tops; and rhubarb-ad-
mitted under approved disin-
fection treatment certificate
issued by U. S. Department
of Agriculture or State of
origin.
The following admitted if ac-
companied with certificate of
inspection showing freedom of
infestation: Beans in the pod,
beets with tops, rhubarb (cut
or plants), cut flowers or
entire plants of chrysanthe-
mum, aster, or entire plants of
gladiolus and dahlia.








68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon-Continued.


Plants and plant products affected

Area quarantined Acceptance for mail- Plant pests
ingArea quarantined A eptantior mail- Accepted for mailing only when and diseases
iited tiry qapro- accompanied with approved
antined area q certificate or Oregon permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(12) California, Delaware, --- ---.-------- Tomatoes and tomato plants Tomato pin
Florida, New Mexico, Mis- require certificate pf State of worm..
sissippi, Pennsylvania, Vir- origin showing fruit or plants
ginia, and Hawaii. were grown and shipped from
a free area, or treated with
Oregon approved formula.
(13) All States east of and in- Chestnut and chin- Foreign grown chestnuts and Chestnu t
cluding Montana, Wyom- quapin trees, nuts, chinquapins not restricted blight.
ing, Colorado, and New cuttings, grafts, or when reshipped into Oregon
Mexico. scions. in the original unopened con-
tainers.
14) Territory of Hawaii ..--- Maunaloa Flowers _---------------_.----------._ East Indian
bean borer.
(15) Counties in Arizona: All trees, cuttings, --------------------------Peach mosaic.
Apache, Cochise, Coconino, grafts, scions, or
Graham, Maricopa, Pima, buds of the peach
Santa Cruz, and Yavapai. and nectarine, in-
Counties in California: Im- eluding the flower-
perial, Los Angeles, Orange, ing forms.
Riverside, San Bernardino,
and San Diego.



Counties in Colorado: Delta, All trees, cuttings, ---------------------------- Peach mosaic.
Garfield, Mesa, and Monte- grafts, scions, or
zuma. buds of the peach
Counties in New Mexico: and nectarine, in-
Bernalillo, Dona Ana, Lin- eluding the flower-
coln, Otero, Rio Arriba, ing forms.
Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Taos, and Valencia.
Counties in Oklahoma: Bryan.
Counties in 'Te.as: Bowie,
Brown, Callahan, Cher-
okee, Comanche, Denton,
Eastland, El Paso, Erath,
Floyd, Grayson, Gregg,
Hopkins, Jones, Mills, Palo
Pinto, Rusk, San Saba,
Smith, Tanant, and Wil-
barger.
Counties in Utah: Grand and
Washington.
(16) Alabama, Arkansas, Peach, nectarine, or ----------------- -----------Peach yellows,
Connecticut, Delaware, apricot trees; cut- little peach
District of Columbia, tings, grafts, scions, and peach
Florida, Georgia, Indiana, buds, or pits, in- rosette.
Kentucky, Maryland, Mas- eluding any trees
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis- budded or grafted
sissippi, New Jersey, New on peach stock or
York, North Carolina, Ohio, peach roots-from
Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, areas where any of
Rhode Island, South Caro- these diseases are
lina, Tennessee, Virginia, known to exist.
and West Virginia.


Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct to
the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem, Oreg.
Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and plant
products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should take the
action prescribed by paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations,
if parcels sent to such officers for terminal inspection are found to be in violation
of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to
September 30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authori-
ties for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

S. B. Palacios....-........------------- Brownsville, Tex..- 2 avocados with seed --.--. $1
Eusebio Benavides Garza-.----- ----- do--..------.. -. 5 avocados with seed---------- 1
Constancio Mendoza --------------- do...-..-...-- 1 mango...-----.----..--- -----. 1
Guadalupe Guerra--------------.. --- ..do--....--. .. ---- 3 quinces ------ ---------.--_---
Jose Valdez ...----------. ...-------- ----- do-...---------- 4 guavas -----------------.-------- 1
P. D. Warren .___.-------- ---------- Del Rio, Tex------- 2 mangoes..---.---. ------------- 1
Candelario Rodriguez------ --------- -do...........---- 2 avocados._-------. .- ---------- 1
Maria Guerro... --------------- --- --do..-.--------- 1 mango --------.----------.. 1-
Teresa Torres do Moreno-----------------do.--- ------- 2avocado ----------------------- 1
Francisco Paz .---------.-------------.--do ------------ -----do -------------------.... .. 1
Savina Dyer .---------.. ------------- -----do--....------- --7 avocados ------------ .. --------1
Francisco Mota Rodriguez .-------.--.--..do--..----.. ---- 7 nodes bugarcane--- ----_ --------1
Rosa Mlaldonado ---..--..-----------.. -- do-.---------- 8 avocados. -------------------. 1
Eustolia Rodriguez Vda. de Garza___ Eagle Pass, Tex----- 4 plums.-..---------------.------- 1
Linalbarra.---------------------------do .----------- 2 mangoes------------------------ 1
Ramona Bias Gueda ------------- .-....do---------- 1 avocado seed-------------------- 1
Eloisa Montalvo Lugo. ---------.--.-- do- ----------- 2 mangoes ----------------------- 1
Dolores Ayala Leal .------------ ----- -do------------9 figs- .-.---------------------.-.. 1
Josefa Cruz de Valdez -----.--------.--- do------------ 5 pears------------------------ 1
Feliz Castro _--------...--------- ---.---do ---..---------- 4 pomnegranates ----------------. 1
Frank Guerra .....--------. ------------- .do.--------- 15 peaches------------ --------. 1
Teodora Martinez Herrera ---------- .---do------------ 3 bulbs. .... -------------------- 1
Virginia Macias de Bosquez -------- -----do -------------- 3 avocado seeds-----------.------..
Guadalupe G. Whitt.------------- ...- do.---..-------- I orange------ -------------------- 1
Susana Montalvo --------.--.--- --.. do....----------- peach-----------------.--------. 1
Ramon Villasenor Careaga .--------. ---do--.---------- 1 avocado----------------------- 1
Matias Tenerio ...------------------ Hidalgo, Tex------ 7 mangoes----- -----------.----- 1
Santes Martinez---....------------- --- do----------- 7 apples-------------------------- 1
Monico Cortez---------- -----------.. do.......----.. 2 plants-------------------------- 1
Guillerma Herrera.------------------...do-----..------- 7 plants--- ----------------------- 1
Cristina Benitez----------------- ----do ------------5 plants...._...------ -------------
Eraristo Ybarra ....---.--------------do------------ 5 avocado seeds------------------- 1
Santiago Ramos- .-------------- ----- do--- .--------- 3 avocados -----------------------1
Roberto Pizzanne-..------ ..-- ----... -----do --.--------. 2 avocados-.. --- -----------.--- 1
Angelita Cantu ------------------ Hidalgo, Tex ------12 plants------------------------ 1
G. H. Raymond --------------.---.--do ---.--..--- 2 mangoes-------------.... ------- 1
Dolores Salazar --------------------do.---------. 1 mango__.----------_----.------. 1
Maria Moreno -..-- -------------- -----do----------- 3 pomegranates -------..--------- 1
Mrs. Ben Brooks ---------------.---- do----------- 5 plants .... .------------.-------
Pedro Garcia ---------------- -do------------2 plants-------------------------1
Rbberto Ruiz----...... .------..... --.... do---------- 6 Irish potatoes ------------------ 1
Anastacia Martinez---------------.... do----------- 1 mango --------------------------1
Pedro Soto-----------------.........do ------------ 1 avocado_--------------------- 1
Lucy Gomez Garcia ------------ ----- do.------------ 1 mango ..--------------------- 1
Amelio Castillo----- ------------- do ------------ 9 pomegranates----------------.. 1
William Dusek...----.-----.... -- ...-...do_ ------------ 2 mangoes.--...----------------.. 1
Genoveda Escamilla--------------.....do------------ 2 avocados -----..... ---------
Glen E. Miller---- ---------- ---- do--..-------- 1 plant -------------- -------------1
Benjamin Castillo --....---------... -- ..do-----..--.. ... 1 mango, 2 peaches, and 2 apples 1
Juana P. Calvo -------------...---..-.....-do----.-- .--- 3 peaches------------------
Nacario Mendiola-..........------------- do--- ------- 4 avocados-----.--------------- 1
Fidel Martinez--- --........----.... --...do----.-..-..... 2avocados .---------- -.--------. 1
Delfina Barrientos------------------ ...do.---------.--- 16 pears and 1 avocado seed. ..-. 1
Rogelio Lozanio--- ---------------- .-.. do ---....---... 2 avocados..----------..--------- 1
Vicente Moreno----------------------- ....do --...-----.--- 2 avocados and 3 pomegranates.._
Emma Parmenter-..----...-------------do ---------- 1 avocado seed --.----... .------- 1
Guadalupe Baloma----------....--...--do----------- 2 pomegranates .... .....--------. I
Lorenza Martinez ----------------.....do .------..--.- 1 quince...------------------...- 1
Anacleto Perez ---------------... -----do--.----........ 4 avocado seeds-------------...... 1
Leona Torres ----------. ---------- ----. do------....... 2 peaches and 1 pear------......--.
Amelia Salinas----------------- ----... do-----...---.. avocado -_--..------.... ....-- 1
Laurio Rodriguez- --------------.....do------.-------. do ------------------- -. 1
M: ercelina Torrez_ .-----..-...----.. ..do.----.-----. 5 plants..-....------------------. 1
Rosa Ortega-..------- ------------- ..-....do ---......-- I- avocado .-------...---....... ... 1
Anastacio Solis ..-------. ---------. ....do ------..-- 2 avocados and 2 peaches........... l
Manuel Fuentes- --------..--------.... .do.-----..--- 4 avocados -----..-------------- 1
Florentinis Cervante----------------..... do .---.-----.-- 3 avocados ---------------------- 1








70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.



Name Port Contraband Penalty

Fabian Casas ........................- ----do ----------- 4 avocados--..------.. ------....-- $1
Santos Rameriz .....----- ----.-------.. do..-----------. 3 oranges-- ------------------...... 1
Caesario Rios---..-----------------. ----- do----------. 4 plants-------------........... ... 1
Victorinia Vera ----------..---.---. --- --do ------------ 1 apple--------... ---------------- 1
Cirilo Escobeda......------..--------- ---- do ------------ 1 avocado, 1 quince, and 1 pome- 1
granate.
Lorenza Gonzales------------------ do.------------ 1 avocado and 3 guavas --.--... ---- 1
Maria Perez Solis....---...---------- . --- do------------ 1 peach---....-------...... -....- -..
Maria Briones ------------------------do ------------ 5 apples.... ----------------...... I
Francisco Garcia ---------------. ----do .------------. 4 oranges ------------.----------... I
Felipi Garcia. ---------------...... -..-- do..------------ 2 oranges .--------------_....... 1
Maria Silva de Garza.. --------- ----. do ------------ 18 plants------------------------ 1
Lilia Esparanza Bustillas------------ do ------------1 orange and 3 guavas ------------ 1
Seferina Pena.--..------------------- Laredo, Tex -------1 pear...----- .....-------------- 1
Belen 11. Compean---------- do ----------- 1 avocado and 17 plants----------- 1
Regino Sanches .------- -------- ----do ------------ 4 avocados ----------------------. 1
Micela Vaquera .---- ------- ---- do------------ 2 avocados with seed -------------- 1
Esther Jimenez ------ _--- ----- -- do------------- 8 plants-------------------------- 1
Mrs. Josefa B. de Perales------------ -----do ------------ 32 plants --------------------_-- 2
R. M. Camacho -------------------- ----- do -------------- 3 guavas and 1 plant -------------- 2
Dan K. Johnson ------ ------- -----do ------------ 11 plants --------------------- 5
Francisco Martinez ----- ----- ----do ------------ 3 avocados .-------------------.. 1
Enriqueta Villerreal ----------------- -----do -------------- 2mangoes---------- -------------- 1
Beatrice Arreaga -------------- -----_do------------ 8 avocados------------------------ 1
Dolores Garcia .-- -.-----------------do ----------- 1 mango --------------------------
Victor Olivares _----------- -----do ----------- 4 apples ...---- --------------_ 1
Lidia Hinojosa-- ----------- -----do------------ 2 peaches -------------------------
Francisco E. Estrado ------- ---------do ------------ I guava ------------------------ 1
Cirlo Sanchez ---------------------- do ------------ 40 agave plants------------------- 2
B. Medrano_ ---_-- ---------------- ---- do ------------ 6 oranges------- ---------------- 1
A. Vasquez--------------------do ------------ 2 plants _------------- ----------- 1
Emilio Dally ------------------------ -----do -------------- 10 avocados ----------------------- 1
Adelaida Salinas ------------------ -----do -------------- 4 nodes sugarcane ----------------- 1
Filomen Pena ---------------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant -------------------------- 1
Eva Rodriquez de Salinas ----------- Roma, Tex-------- 10 plants with soil ----------------- 3















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
Avi:EiY S. I OYT, A ssociaite Chi cf.
S. A. ItoIwr'IW Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulator! l Work.
Fi. ('. BisIHOP, A ssistnt Chief in Charge of Hl'search Work.
\. I,. P()PIIAM, Asxistan(t Cfhie ifin Charge of Control Operations.
F. H. SP:N'ER, .1sxis t hnt Chiief in Charge of lBusiness Admininistrat ion.
ROLLA P. CU(RIE. l'ditor.
J. IYS orP, in Chtarge, Divisionm of Inlsct P'st S urvr? ey' alnd Iformat ion.
J. I. I\IMBLETON, in CIhar'fe, Division of li'c Culture Irn'vc'stigfi! iols.
D. . VAN IDTN). in Charge, Division of Fruit Inecct Inivestlif/(flions.
F. (C. CRAIGHEAD. in Cdharg'e, Dirision of Forcst siInsclt InrcF'lifaltions.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and (IGrden Injsect Inrest lifa-

C AI. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Ceroeal and Floratge Inscct In estigations.
R. XW. IIAINEI) in Charle, D)irision of Cotton Iis(ect Inrestijgations.
W. E. DovE, in Charge, D)iision of Insects Affecting Man and A ninals.
C. P. CLAITSEN. in, Charge. DiVision of Control Ihnvestigations.
It. (. ROARK, in Charge, I)ivision of JInsectiidc Ir 'stitilations.
C. F. WV. M1UESE ECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identificat ion.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Dirision of Foreifn Parasite Introduction.
J. F. MAITTrN. in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Conitrol.
B. 31. GADDIS, in Chl(IIge, Divis ion of Domestic Plantt Quatra/nines.
E. R. SAssCER, in Charge, Division of F,'crcignt Plant QuarCantines.
A. F. BURGE.ss, in Field Charge, G!Ips!i Moth awnd Brotn;-Tail Moth Control ( Iead-
quarters. Greenfield. Mass.).
E. G. BREWER. in Field Charg(e. Japanese lBee'tle and Gypsy Hfoth and Browvn-Tail
Moth Quaradntines, and Dutch ELim Disease Eradication (headqularters, Bloom-
field . J.).
R. McD)o.NALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollrorma and Thiurberia Weecil Q(uatran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio. Te.r.).
P. A. HODAALE, in Field Charge, MAlexican Fruitfly Quarantinec (headquarlters,
Harlingen, Tc,r. ).
CLAUDE AVAKELAND, in Field Chalryg, Grasshopper Control (1healquarters, DenFir,
Colo.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfi y Investigations (headquarters, Mexico (ity,
lMexico).
71

















U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1942










S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 153 Issued March 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------------------..... 73
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38) ---.-------------------------.. 73
Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P.[Q. 385,
third revision) ------ --------------------------------------..........-------.....- 73
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) ..---------.. 74
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, seventh r
revision) ----------------------------------------------------............... 74
Instructions to postmasters --- -----------------------------------------...... 76
AnnounCements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)-_.--_------------.......... 76
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised (press notice) .----------- .... ......----------- 76
Revision of quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942 --------------------- 77
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------ 84
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision) ---------- 84
Announcement relating to Mexican border regulations---------------- ----------.......... 85
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50757)-----------------.--..---------------- .----. 85
Miscellaneous items------------------------------------------------------ --- ---------.. 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement No.17)i 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1)----- 86
List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ----------- 86
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products--------------------------------- ---. 93
Plants and plant products addressed to places in California---------------. .----------- 93
California State plant quarantine modified-- -------------------------------- 94
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------- -------------------- ---...__ 94
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -------------------------.--------- 96



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM RUST QUARANTINE
(NO. 38)

B. E. P. Q. 385, Third Revision Effective December 15, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

SUBPART-BLACK STEM RUST (QUARANTINE NO. 38)

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CLASSIFICATION OF BARBERRY AND
MAHONIA PLANTS



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Under this revision of Circular B. E. P. Q. 385, two species of barberries,
Berberis aCemulans and B. dictyophylla var. albicaulis, have been removed from
the list of species which may be shipped into or between the protected States,
inasmuch as recent tests have shown that both aemulans and dictyophylla. are
susceptible to the black stem rust. B. bealei (Mahonia) has been added to the
permitted list. The range of this species for satisfactory cultivation, however,
is practically limited to the area south of the protected States.
512242-43-- 1 73



1.^







74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE LOct.-Dec

Other modifications in the circular are concerned only with improved nomen-
clature, B. thunbergii pluriflora having been eliminated from paragraph (A)
for the reason that it is not in reality a different variety of Japanese barberry;
B. thunbergii pluriflora crecta has been changed to B. thunbergi f. erecta; and
B. diversifolia has been eliminated from paragraph (B) because it is a synonym
for Mahonia aquifolium.
301.38a. Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and maoi
plants.-The rules and regulations supplemental to 301.38 [Notice of Quarantine
No. 38, revised, on account of the black-stem rust, effective September 1, 19371
provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, or other plant
parts capable of propagation, of the genera Berberis, Mahonia, or Mahoberberis,
"shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any State of the conti-
nental United States or from the District of Columbia into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, nor from any one of said protected
States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued
therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no re-
strictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement either of
Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties,
or of cuttings (without roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and
not for propagation." (See paragraph (a) of regulation 2 ( 301.38-2 (a)).)
The protected States referred to under paragraph (B) are the 17 barberry
eradication States named in the regulation quoted above. Barberry and mahonia
plants other than those listed in paragraphs (A) and (B) following may not be
shipped interstate into any of the protected States.

(A) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTERSTATE TO ANY STATE WITHOUT PERMIT
OR RESTRICTION
Berberis thunbergi, B. thunbergi var. atropurpurea, B. thunbergi var. mai-
mowiczi, B. thunbergi var. minor, B. thunbergi f. erecta.

(B) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTO OR BETWEEN PROTECTED STATES UNDER
FEDERAL PERMIT
Berberis aquifolium (Mahonia), B. bealei (Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. busi-
folia, B. candidula, B. chenaulti (hybrid), B. circumserrata, B. concina, B. dar-
wini, B. edgeworthiana, B. gagnepaini, B. gilgiana,, B. julianae, B. koreana, B.
mentorensis, B. nervosa (Mahonia), B. potanini, B. repens (Mahonia), B. san-
guinea, B. sargentiana, B. stenophylla (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verru-
culosa.
Application for permits should be addressed to the Division of Domestic Plant
Quarantines, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States De-
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
(7 CFR 301.38-2; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 3d day of December 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 10, 1942, 11: 06 a. m.; 7
F. R. 10305.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

B. E. P. Q. 386 (7th revision) Effective November 20, 1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

This revision of circular B. E. P. Q. 386 adds to the list of articles exempted
from certification requirements, exfoliated or expanded vermiculite when packaged







1042] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

in closed containers, slal (known to the trade as lemon) cuttings, for orna-
mental use, and sawd(st and shavings produced under certain prescribed con-
ditions and so identified.
Wintergreen cuttings have been nmore specifically laissified as to slecies.
301.45a Admnil islt'atir ir 4tlvctliois; (irlicl(s c.r(tnip/ldW frow rl strictions.-
Pursuant to thile authority conlferred upon the Chi('f Iof te Bureau of Ent ml)ogy
and Plant Quarantine by the second provis of 30~1.45., (hapter 111, Title 7,
Code of Federal Itegulation(s (Inoltice of Quitar nllinet. No. 45, ,ton a(counilt (f ihe
gypsy imioth and brown-itail moth), the followig iai'ticles, lhe itlerltale move-
ment of which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth (disseninai irio, are
exempted froim tlie restrictions of the regulations of this (lquaraltilne, (~ffective
November 20. 1942.
Acacia cuttings for ornamient]l use (Acacia spp.).
Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.
Birch slabs f)or use as post cards.
Birch )ark when wxaxed, polished, or otherwi'se treated to :Iadeiqua1tlly (liminiate
all risk of tralnsittingl infestation and when used in the lImanufal ture of niovelties.
Box shooks, when newly manufactured and planed on four silds.
Boxwood cntii s and branlciies for ornamliental use (B)H'u.r s.c')i''ir ns).
Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.
('alifornia peppertree cuttings and branches for ormnaental use (S.hinus
nmoole).
Clubmoss (sometimes called "ground pine") (Lycopodiun spp.).
(Cuttings of woody plants that have been grown ill the gre'en house throughout
the year, when labeled on the outside of the container to show lhat the contents
were greenhouse grown.
Eucalyptus cuttings and branches for ornamental use (Eucalyplls globulus).
Evergreen smilax (Sinilax lanceolata).
Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).
Galax (Galax aphylla).
Geranium (P larlyonl im spp.).
Heather cuttings for ornamental use (Erica spp., Calluna spp.).
Heliotrope (IIcliotropiu' spp.).
Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container.
Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum cap.icastrum. S. pe(Udtocapsicum, S. Lu hldcrsoni).
Leaves of deciduous or evergreen trees that have been treated or dyed.
Mistletoe (Plhoradentjron flarvcescns, Viscunm albumn, etc.
Oregon huckleberry (Vaccin ium oratum).
Iartridgeberry (Mitchclla rcpens).
Salal, known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gaultiheria
shallon).
Sawdust that has been (1) produced in established, nonportable, commercial
sawmills from boards or other timber previously sawed four sides, (2) subse-
quently blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a ini mum length of
50 feet and at least one 45 or sharper angle, (3) protected from infestation
prior to shipment, and (4) identified as specified below.
Shavings that have been either (1) produced by planers having 6 or more
blades, or (2) blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a minimum
length of 50 feet and at least one 45 or sharper angle; and in either nase pro-
tected from infestation prior to shipment, and identified as specified below.
Invoices and waybills covering bulk carload or less-than-carload shipments of
sawdust or shavings meeting these conditions for exemption shall bear thereon
a notation to the effect that:
"The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been pro-
duced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as specified
in the Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative instructions
thereto."
Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).
Trailing arbutus (Epigaea repcns).
Verbena (Verbena spp.).
Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or ex-
panded and when packaged in closed containers.
Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumnbcns, Pyrola spp.). See
also Salal.
Wood flour, pulverized wood, or ground wood sawdust, when processed by
screening or sifting through a screen of at least 30 meshes per inch.
I







76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

These instructions supersede the list of exempted articles contained in B. E.
P. Q. 386, 6th revision, which became effective October 10, 1941.
(7 CFR 301.45; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 17th day of November 1942.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register November 25, 1942, 11: 00 a. m.; 7
F. R. 9828.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, December 28, 1942.

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE
(QUARANTINE NO. 45)

The notice of this Bureau appearing in the POSTAL BULLETIN of October 20,
1941, and on pages 23 and 24 of the November 1941 Supplement to the Postal
Guide is amended by adding the following to the list of articles exempted from
plant quarantine restrictions imposed under Quarantine Order No. 45 of the
United States Department of Agriculture on account of the gypsy moth and
brown-tail moth, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute
a risk of moth dissemination:
Salal, known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gautltheri
shallon).
Sawdust and shavings when accompanied with a statement to the effect that:
"The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been
produced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as speci-
fied in the Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative
instructions thereto."
"Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or
expanded and when packaged in closed containers.
Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumbens, Pyrola spp.).
Postmasters will please correct their list of exempted articles and be governed
accordingly. (See par. 1, sec. 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article
62 (c), p. 24, of the current Postal Guide, Part I.)
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REVISED
[Press notice]
DECEMBER 31, 1942.
Quarantine and regulations against the white-fringed beetle have been revised
(effective December 28, 1942) the Department of Agriculture said today.
First found in the United States in 1936 in the Gulf coast area, white-fringed
beetles are potentially serious agricultural pests of South American origin. The
larvae or grubs live in the soil, where they feed on and destroy the roots of such
important food, feed, and fiber crops as peanuts, cotton, and corn. While the
adult beetles are less destructive to crops than the grubs, they feed on a great
variety of plants and cause some damage.
Extensive efforts to suppress beetle populations and prevent damage by this.
new pest are conducted cooperatively by the Department and the States. Fd-
eral and State quarantines are enforced to prevent spread of the pest to other
States and to uninfested parts of the States in which the beetle has been found.
The regulations were revised because of the discovery of white-fringed beetle
infestations during the past summer and fall in the vicinity of Wilmington and







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

other places in New Hanover County, N. C., as well as in the vicinity of Goldsboro,
Wayne County, and in parts of Pender County.
The area regulated by the quarantine is now extended to include parts of these
counties and also several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infestations
of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were last
revised. These include part of Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis
County, Miss. Minor additions to the quarantined area are made in Dallas
County, Ala., and in six Mississippi counties. No change is made in the regulated
areas in Florida and Louisiana.
Articles brought under restriction for the first time include bulbs, corms,
tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, and moss and. gravel. Other re-
stricted articles and materials that must be certified for movement interstate
from the regulated areas to points outside include soil, nursery stock, hay, pota-
toes, scrap metal, implements, forest products, and building materials.


TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

SUBPART-WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE (QUARANTINE NO. 72)
REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 28, 1942


INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This revision of the quarantine and regulations is made principally because of
the discovery during the past summer and fall of white-fringed beetle infesta-
tions in North Carolina in the vicinity of Wilmington and other places in New
Hanover County, in the vicinity of Goldsboro, Wayne County, and in parts of
Pender County. The regulated area is extended to include parts of the above
counties as well as several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infesta-
tions of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were
last revised. Brought within the regulated area for the first time are part of
Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis County, Miss. Minor addi-
tions to the regulated areas are made in Dallas County, Ala., and Forrest, Har-
rison, Jackson, Jones, Pearl River, and Stone Counties, Miss.
All restricted articles are placed under quarantine throughout the year be-
cause of seasonal variation in the development of the pests in the different areas,
the differences in the life history and habits of the various species, and other
biological factors. However, the quarantine provides for modification of cer-
tification requirements as to articles, seasons, or areas through administrative
instructions issued from time to time by the Chief of the Bureau when in
his judgment no hazard of dissemination of the beetles is presented by such
modification. Articles brought under restriction for the first time in this revision
include gravel, moss, and bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.
Peanut shells are no longer restricted by these regulations.
Minor modifications have been made in regulations pertaining to limited
permits (paragraph (b) of 301.72-5) and to the cleaning of railway cars
( 301.72-8).
Arrangements for inspection of the restricted articles may be made by ad-
dressing the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulf-
port, Miss., or other field offices listed in the administrative instructions.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Ala-
bama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore widely prevalent or dis-
tributed within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938, pro-







78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-De

mulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, effective
January 15, 1939, with regulations supplemental thereto, and revision theref,
effective on and after May 9, 1942, governing the movement of live white-fringed
beetles in any stage of development and carriers thereof. The Secretary of
Agriculture, having given a further public hearing in the matter, has determined
that it is necessary to revise further the quarantine and regulations for the
purpose of quarantining the State of North Carolina because of the discovery
of substantial infestations of the white-fringed beetle therein.
ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. .
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U. S. C. 141, 143), the
subpart entitled "White-fringed Beetle" of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.--Q. 72] is hereby revised effective December
28, 1942, to read as follows:
SUBPART-WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
(QUARANTINE NO. 72)

Authority: 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive (except 301.72-2), issued
under sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 161. 301.72-2a issued
under sec. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 141. 301.72-9 (b) issued under
sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 143.
301.72 Notice of quarantine.-Under the authority conferred by section 8
of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), the
Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana,
Mississippi, and North Carolina to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the
aforesaid Plant Quarantine Act and the Insect Pest Act of March ,, 19 5 (7
U. S. C. 141, 143), the Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hreater
the following articles (as specifically named in the regulations supplemental
hereto, in modifications thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in
the regulations supplemental hereto), which are capable of carrying the afore-
said insect infestations, viz, (1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or
plant products; (2) soil independent of, or in connection with, nursery stock,
plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in 301.72-3; or
(4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, shall not be trans-
ported by any person, firm, or corporation from any quarantined State into or
through any other State or Territory or District of the United States, under
conditions other than those prescribed in the regulations supplemental hereto:
Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the regulations supple-
mental hereto may be limited to such areas, designated by the Secretary of Agri-
culture as regulated areas, in the quarantined States, as, in his judgment, shall
be adequate to prevent the spread of the said pest or pests. Any such limitation
shall be conditioned, however, upon the affected State or States providing for
and enforcing the control of the intrastate movement of the restricted articles
and enforcing such other control and sanitation measures with respect to such
areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall
be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate spread therefrom of said inse
infestation: And provided further, That whenever, in any year, the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to
the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the articles to which
the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to modify, by making
less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regulations, he shall set forth
and publish such finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in
which the applicable regulations should be made less stringent, whereupon such
modification shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area
or portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and
every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity to such administrative
instructions throughout the affected areas.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

R]EGULATIONS

Meaning of Terms

301.72-1 Definitions.-(a) The pests.-Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus raphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.
(b) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of' 301.72, as revised.
(c) Restricted articles.-Products or articles of any character whatsoever,
the interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-
fringed beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.
(d) Nursery stock.-Forest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes.
(e) Inspector.-Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.
(f) Certificate.-An approved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing
the movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.
(g) Limited permit.-An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized des-
Linations for processing or other restricted handling.
(h) Administrative instructions.-Documents issued by the Chief of the Bu-
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the
quarantine.
(i) Infested or infestation.-Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)
(j) Infested area.-That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.

Areas Under Regulation

S301.72-2. Regulated areas.-The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof, as described, are designated by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture as regulated areas:
Alabama.-In Conecuh County: W2 T. 5 N., R. 9 E., and all of those por-
tions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 E. lying in Conecuh County; in Covington County:
Ses. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; sees. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 2 N., R. 17 E.; T. 1 N.,
Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE %/ T. 1 N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof to the
Alabama-Florida State line; also all the town of Opp; in Dallas County: That
area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Ry., where it crosses
Bougechitto Creek; thence SW. along the Southern Ry. to Caine Creek; thence
SE. along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bougechitto Creek; thence north-
ward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point; all of Tps. 13 and 14 N., R.
11 E., and sees. 1, 12, 13, 24, 25, and 36, T. 14 N., R. 10 E.; in Escambia County:
Ses. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the town of Flomaton; in
Geneva County: Secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and all area south thereof
to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of sees. 21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19
W.; in Low~des County: W% T. 14 N., R. 12 E.; in Mobile County: That area
included within a boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of
the city limits of Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern
boundary of S% T. 3 S., R. 1 W.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence
northwestward along Chickasaw Creek to Eight-Mile Creek; thence westerly
along Eight-Mile Creek to the western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to
Eslava Creek; thence easterly along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile;
thence southeasterly following the city limits east, south, east, and north to
the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city of Mobile;
also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where old
Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway 90
to its junction with the Alabama-Mississippi State line; thence south along the
Alabama-Mssissippi State line to the southern boundary of N% T. 7 S., R. 4 W.;
thence east to the SE. corner sec. 9, T. 7 S., R. 3 W.; thence north to the NE.
corner, se. 4, T. 7 S., 'R. 3 W.; thence east to the point where the south bound-
ary of T. 6 S. interects Fowl River; thence northwestward along Fowl River







80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARATINE [Oct.-e.

to the starting point; in Monroe County: W%3 T. 8 N., all of T. 9 N. and the
S%/ T. 10 N., all in R. 9 E.; S% T. 10 N., all of Tps. 7, 8, and 9 N., R. 8 E.,
and those portions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 E. lying in Monroe County; sees. 25,
26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., R. 7 E., and sees. 1 and 2, T. 6 N., R. 7 E.; in Wilco
County: N1 T. 10 N. and 18% T. 11 N., R. 9 E., and sees. 8, 9, 10 1, 16, and
17, T. 11 N., R. 9 E.
Florida.-In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northrn
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western bound-
ary of R. 31 W.; in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and sees. 1, 2, and 3,
T. 5 N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; sees. 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of the
town of Crestview; and sees. 13, 14, 23, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton County:
T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and sees. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W., and all
lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also sees. 1 to 24,
inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.
Louisiana.-All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish; in East Baton Rouge Parish: All of T. 7 S'., Rs. 1 and
2 E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
sees. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, and 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and sees. 46, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59,
60, T. 13 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemiftes Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
sees. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7 S., R. 11 E., and sees. 40 and 41, T. 8 S., R. 11 E.
Missiippi.-In Covington County: All of sees. 28, 29, 32, and 33, T. 6 N.,
R. 14 W.; in Forrest County: All that portion of T. 5 N., R. 13 W. lying west
of Leaf River; E2/ T. 5 N., R. 14 W. and sees. 5 and 8, T. 5 N., R. 14 W.; all
of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W., lying west of Leaf River, and that portion of T. 3 N.,
R. 12 W., lying south and west of Leaf River; that portion of T. 3 N., R. 13 W.,
lying east of U. S. Highway 49, and that portion of T. 2 N., R. 12 W. lying east
of U. S. Highway 49; and sees. 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11 and those portions of sees.
12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 lying north of Black Creek in T. 1 N., A. 12 W.; and E%
T. 1 S., R. 12 W.; in Harrison County: That area included within a boundary
beginning at the NW. corner sec. 26, T. 4 S., R. 12 W., thence south to the NW.
corner sec. 14, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S.,
R. 12 W.; thence south to the intersection with Wolf River; thence south-
westerly along Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence south along the east shore
of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward along the Missis-
sippi Sound to a point of intersection with the Bay of Biloxi; thence westerly
along the Bay of Biloxi to the SE. corner sec. 17, T. 7 S., R.. 10 W.; thence
north along the section line to the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 10 W.; thence
west along the section line to Biloxi River; thence northwestward along Biloxi
River to the intersection of the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to the Stone County line; thence west to the starting point including all prop-
erties extending over or into the Mississippi Sound and the Bay of Biloxi;
in Hinds County: E T. 6 N., R. 3 W., and W% T. 6 N., R. 2 W.; in Jackson
County: That area included within a boundary beginning at a point where the
east line of sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 5 W. intersects Escatawpa River; thence west
along said river to the Pascagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula
River to the township line between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE.
corner sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 5 W.; thence north to the starting point; all that
portion of T. 7 S., R. 9 W. lying in -Jackson County and the W% Tps. 7 and
8 S., R. 8 W.; in Jefferson Davis County: Sees. 1, 2, 11, and 12, T. 7 N., R. 19 W.;
sees. 35 and 36, T. 8 N., R. 19 W.; sec. 31, T. 8 N., R. 18 W., and sees. 6 and 7,
T. 7 N., R. 18 W., including all of the town of Prentiss; in Jones County: Sees.
16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35, T. 9 N., R. 11 W.;
sees. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, and 18, T. 8 N., R. 11 W.; sees. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35,
and 36, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.; those portions of sees. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.,
lying east of Tallahoma Creek: sees. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.;
sees. 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; sees. 29, 30, 31, and 32, T. 6 N.,
R. 13 W., and those portions of sees. 28 and 33, T. 6 N., R. 13 W., lying west of
Leaf River; in Lamrar County: All of the town of Purvis; all of sees. 35 and 36,
T. 1 N., R. 15 W.; sec. 31, T. 1 N., R. 14 W., and sees. 1 and 2, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
in Pearl River County: All that area included within a boundary beginning at a
point at the northern city limits of Poplarville in sec. 19, T. 2 S., R. 15 W. on
the New Orleans and Northeastern R. R.; thence northeasterly along said rail-






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

road to a point where it intersects the south line of sec. 15, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
thence east to the SE. corner sec. 14, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence north to the
Lamar County line; thence west and north along said county line to the NW.
corner sec. 4, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 1 S.,
R. 15. W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south
to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 2 S., R. 15 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
13, T. 2 S., R. 16 W.; thence south along the section line to a point where it
would intersect the line of the northern boundary of Poplarville if extended
westward; thence east along this line to the starting point; all of T. 5 S.,
R. 16 W., and the E'2 of T. 5 S., R. 17 W. in Stone County: Wl Tps. 2 and
3 S., R. 11 W.; sees. 5, 6, 7, 8, 17, 18, 19, 20, T. 4 S., R. 11 W.; E1$% T. 2 S.,
R. 12 W., and sees. 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10, T. 2 S., R. 12 W.; E%1 T. 3 S., R. 12 W.;
and sees. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 14, 23, and 24, T. 4 S.. R. 12 W.
North Carolina.-In- New Hanover County: The city of Wilmington; Cape
Fear Township; all that part of Hartnett Township lying west of the Wrightsboro-
Winter Park Road, including all of the town of Winter Park; and that part of
Masonboro Township north of the new road between Sunset Park and Winter
Park; in Pender County: Townships of Burgaw, Caswell, and Rocky Point and
that part of Columbia Township lying south of an imaginary straight line drawn
east and west across the township to connect the northern boundaries of Burgaw
and Caswell Townships; in Wayne County: Goldsboro Township.

Articles Prohibited Movement

301.72-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.-The interstate shipping of living
white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved independent
of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided in
paragraph (b) of 301.72-9.

Articles Restricted Movement

301.72-3. Restricted articles.-Except as provided in administrative instruc-
tions, the interstate movement of the following articles from any regulated area
is regulated throughout the year:
(a) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or
in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or
things.
(b) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.
(c) Nursery stock.
(d) Grass sod.
(e) Potatoes.
(f) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.
(g) Hay.
(h) Peanuts in shells.
(i) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.
(j) Scrap metal and junk.
/ (k) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers, posts,
poles, and cross ties.
(1) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.
(m) Concrete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.
(n) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.

Conditions of Interstate Movement

301.72-4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.-
(a) Certification required.-Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate
from a regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied
by a valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certifica-
tion requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be
waived, during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk
of contamination by the pests in any stage of development.
512242-43--2






82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.-Unless exempted by administrative
instructions, every container of restricted articles moved interstate from any
regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a certificate
or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except that in the ca
of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached to the
shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In the
case of shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a
master permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany
shipments to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.
(c) Movement withln ccmtin~ous' areas unrestricted.-No certificates are
required for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement
is wholly within continuous regulated areas.
(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas.-No certificates are
required for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside
of the regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the
point of origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained,
and when the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.

Conditions of Certification

301.72-5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits. (a)
Approved methods.-Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the
inspector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2)
have been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods;
or (3) were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner
that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted
thereby: Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of
soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, muck, or compost, originating in an infested area
may be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under
methods or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine.
(b) Limited permits.-Limited permits may be issued for the movement of
noncertified restricted articles to destinations and consignees as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
for processing or other handling. As a condition of such authorization and
designation, persons or firms shipping, receiving, or transporting such articles
may be required to agree in writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against
the establishment and spread of infestation and to comply with such conditions
as to the maintenance of identity, handling, or subsequent movement of restricted
products and cleaning of railway cars, trucks, or other vehicles used in the
transportation of such articles as may be required by the inspector.
(c) Dealer-carrier permit.-As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted articles
originating or stored in regulated areas, may be requiied to execute a signed
agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all conditions,
treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed necessary.

Procedure for Applicants

301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.-Persons intending
to move restricted articles, the certification of which is required, interstate from
regulated areas shall make application for certification as far as possible in
advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature
and quantity of articles to be moved, together with their exact location, and
if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection
may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped so that
they may be readily examined by the inspector.
The United States Department of Agriculture will not be respopsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled

301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.--Certificates or permits
issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

certification refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits
might result in the dissemination of infestation.

Cleaning of Vehicles

301.72-8. Cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles.-When in
the judgment of the inspector a hazard of spread of infestation is presented,
thorough cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles may be required
before movement interstate to points outside the regulated areas when such
freight cars, trucks, or other vehicles have been used for the transportation of
uncertified restricted articles within regulated areas.

Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes

301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.-Articles
subject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of 'articles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.-Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development; may be moved interstate for scientific purposes
only under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
Done at the, city of Washington this 23rd day of December 1942.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] PAUL H. APPLEBY,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), pro-
vides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor
shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any
person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District of
the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any
other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class
of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or any
class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character whatsoever,
capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation, specified in
the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions
other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that
any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge,
counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or
in the regulations of the .Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding
$500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment,
in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Building
(Tel. 1591), P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed Beetle
Inspector at one of the subsidiary offices.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.
Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.







84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.
North Carolina: State Entomologist, Raleigh.
[Copies of the foregoing quarantine weresent to afl common carriers doing business In
or through the quarantined area.]
[Filed with the Division of thf Federal Register December 24, 1942, 2: 43 p. m.; 7
F. R. 10902.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., December 23, 19412.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after December 28, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 301.72) and regula-
tions supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the
regulated areas to include parts of the North Carolina counties of New
Hanover, Pender, and Wayne, and additional infested sections in Alabama and
Mississippi; to add to the list of restricted articles gravel, moss, and bulbs,
corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants. Peanut shells are no longer
restricted.
Copies of the quarantine as revised may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.
PAUL H. APPLEBY,
Acting Secretary.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News,
Birmingham, Ala., January 5, 1943; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., January
5, 1943; the News, Jackson, Miss., January 6, 1943; the Observer, Charlotte, N. C., Jan-
uary 5, 1943; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., January 6, 1943.]

B. E. P. Q. 485, Eleventh Revision Effective December 28, .1942
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
301.72a Administrative instructions; modification of certification require-
ments for specified articles.-Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], the certification requirements are
hereby modified effective December 28, 1942, through June 15, 1943, for the
interstate movement of the following articles and materials enumerated in
301.72-3:
(a) Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of the following
materials under the conditions specified below:
(1) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, when taken from a depth of at
least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free fom any surface
soil to a depth of 2 feet.
(2) Sand and gravel, when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.
(b) All certification requirements are waived for the following articles and
materials when free from soil and when sanitation practices are maintained
as prescribed by or to the satisfaction of the inspector:
(1) Potatoes, except that those freshly harvested are not exempt.
(2) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, except that
those freshly harvested or uncured are not exempt.
S(3) Hay, except that peanut hay is not exempt.
(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.
(5) Scrap metal and junk.
(6) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.
(7) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.
(8) Concrete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.
(9) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

ARTICLES REMAINING UNDER QUARANTINE
(c) Certification is required for the following articles and materials enumerated
in 301.72-3:
(1) All soil, sand, gravel, el:y, peat, or inck, whthethr moved indepen(dent of,
or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles or
things.
(2) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.
(3) Nursery stock.
(4) Grass sod.
(5) Potatoes, freshly harvested.
(6) True bulbs, cornis, tubers, and rhizomes of ori:mewntal plants, when
freshly harvested or uncured.
(7) Peanuts in the shell.
(8) Peanut hay.
This revision superse(les Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, tentll revisimo, which became
effective August 3, 19 12.
(7 C. F. R., 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at \Washington, this 23d day of December 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
C1I ief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 24, 1912, 2:43 p). m.; 7
F. R. 10905.]


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
REGULATIONS FOR CARRYING INTO EFFECT THE INSPECTION OF AND APPLICATION
OF SAFEGUARDS TO RAILWAY CARS, VEHI-CLES, ANI VARIIOuS AATERIALS ENTER-
ING THE UNITED STATES FROM MEXICO (T. D. 50757)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE (COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, I. C., November 3, 1942.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of the Mexican Border Regulations, approved by the Sec-
retary of Agriculture on September 2, 1942, in pursuance of the Mexican Border
Act approved January 31, 1942 (Public Law 426, 77th Congress), entitled, "To
provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States
from Mexico," is published for the information and guidance of customs of-
ficers and others concerned.
These regulations supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the Move-
ment of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the Unitedl States and Gov-
erning the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective Juily 1, 1917 ((1917) T. D. 37255), as amended January 29, 1920 (not
published as a Treasury decision).
The iuntmler of this Treasury (lecision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite articles 578 (a) and 579 (a), Customs Regulatifons of 1937.
W. I. JoIIN SON,
Contmlissioiicr of Ciustoms.
[Then follows the text of the regulations.]


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 7.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA
OCTOBE1I 13, 1942.
PRINTING RE1QUIREMENTS ON WR!APS OF IMPO(RTIE FRilTs ABiLISHED
A Government Decree of August 22, 1942, abolished the requirements that
waterproof tissue ptaper wraps of imnported apples, pears. olraillgs, tangerines,







86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-D

grapefruit, and lemons must carry the name of the grower, the packing com-
pany, or the exporter, as well as the country of origin. (See page 11,
B. E. P. Q. 426.)
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 448, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BELGIAN CONGO
iOVEMBER 30, 1942.
BANANA PLANTS-IMPORTS SUBJECT TO QUARANTINE PERMIT
The importation of cultivated or wild banana plants into the Belgian Congo
has been made subject to special permit from the Governor General, on sani-
tary grounds, by ordinance No. 207/Agri. of July 16, 1942, published in the
Bulletin Administratif du Congo Belge of July 25.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINE AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS
AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS
[The domestic and foreign quarantine and other restrictive orders summarized herein
are issued under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20. 1912, as amended.
The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued under
specific acts of Congress.]
QUARANTINE ORDERS

The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological
order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical
series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have
either been superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quaran-
tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines being
divided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States and
(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico.
DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES

QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Black sterm rust.-Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective September 1, 1937:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective September 1, 1937, the movement into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well as the movement from any one
of said protected States into any other protected State of the common barberry
(Berberis vulgaris), or other species of Berberis or Mahonia or parts thereof
capable of propagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regula-
tions place no restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry
(B. thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties, or of cuttings (.without
roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and not for propagation.
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45, revised, effective Sep-
tember 29, 1938: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, revised, effective September 29, 1938. the movement interstate
to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested
area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone and quarry products, and of
the plants and the plant products listed therein. The regulated area covers
Rhode Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, and Vermont.
Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective March 24, 1942: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 24, 1942, as amended, effective January 14, 1943, the






1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

interstate movement of (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and
greenhouse stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, from the regulated area to or through any point outside thereof. The
regulated area includes the entire States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, (on-
necticut, New Jersey, and Delaware, and the District of Columbia, and portions
of the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania,
Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio.
Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective March 15, 1939: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 15, 1939, as amended effective February 10, 1943, the
interstate movement from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, and
Arizona, of (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or
wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of un-
manufactured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed
cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and
cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been
used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such
products; (4) farm products, farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if
contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Thurberia weevil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927: Pro-
hibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant,
from any point in Arizona and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto, revised, effective October 2, 1933, as amended
effective October 22, 1936, the interstate movement from the regulated area of
Arizona of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint,
linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed,
cottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other contain-
ers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and
other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or
which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and
(5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton,
any other articles.
White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1926: Prohib-
its, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revised,
effective July 1, 1938, the interstate movement from every State in the conti-
nental United States and the District of Columbia of five-leafed pines (Pinus)
or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia), including cultivated
or wild or ornamental sorts.
Mexican fruitfly.-Quarantine No. 64, revised, effective October 15, 1937: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, re-
vised, effective October 16, 1939, the interstate movement from the regulated area
of Texas of fruits of all varieties.
Dutch elm disease.-Quarantine No. 71, revised, effective October 1, 1941: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
effective October 1, 1941, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in
the States of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut to or
through any point outside thereof, of elm plants or parts thereof of all species
of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown,
including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings,
and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber,
crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured in
whole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely free from bark.
White-fringed beetle.-Quarantine No. 72, revised, effective December 28, 1942:
Prohibits, except as provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, effective
December 28, 1942, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the
States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and North Carolina, to or
through any point outside thereof, of (1) nursery stock and other stipulated
plants or plant products; (2) soil, independent of, or in connection with nursery
stock, plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in 301.72-3;
or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development.
QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PUERTO RICO
Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,
1917: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, as amended effective May 12, 1941, the






88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTIN t-Dec

movement from the Territory of Hawaii into or through any other Territory,
State, or District of the United States, of all fruits and vegetables in the natural
or raw state, on account of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitat) and
the melontly (Dacus cucurbitae).
Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 16, revised, effective January 1, 1935: Proibits
the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through
any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canes of sugar-
cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that movement will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or
are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their movement will involve no pest risk.
SwIetpotato.-Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1934: Pro-
hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or
through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any vari-
ety of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), regardless of the use for which the
same is intended, on account of the sweetpotato stem borer (Omphisa aasto-
mosalis Guen.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Euscepes batatae Waterh.).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits the
movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety
of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same is -
tended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd. and
Metamasius hemipterus Linn.).
Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.-
Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided in
the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, the
movement of cotton, seed or unginned cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products,
except oil, from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States on account of the pink boll-
worm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) and the cotton-blister mite (Briophyes
gossypii Banks).
United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.-Quarantine No. 51, efectve
October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the United
States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or as baggage or effects of
passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn (other than shelled corn), cotton, alfalfa,
and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account
of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis Fab.),
the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.), the papaya fruitfly (Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst.), and certain
insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.
Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 58. revised, effective
January 22, 1941: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective January 22, 1941, the movement from the Terri-
tory of Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of
the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state,
on account of certain injurious insects, including the fruitflies Anasrep
suspensa (Loew) and A. mornbinpraeoptans Sein, and the bean-pod borer Mar
testulalis (Geyer).
Sand, soil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.-Quarantine
No. 60, revised, effective September 1, 1936: Prohibits the movement from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil,
or earth around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the
Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants. Provision is made for the re-
tention of potted plants on board vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when
evidence is presented satisfactory to the plant quarantine inspector that the
soil has been so treated or is so safeguarded as to eliminate pest risk.

FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES

Pink bollrorm.-Quarantine No. 8, effective July 1, 1913, with revised regula-
tions effective July 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality
and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State of







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

Baja California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species
and varieties and cottonseed ihulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls
from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.
Seeds of arocado or alligator pcar.-Quarant ine No. 12, effective Felbruary
27, 1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central
America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado
weevil (Heilipus lauri).
Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Prohibits
the importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane.
or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcarle leaves, and1 bhagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that importation will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been
or are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their entry will involve no pest risk.
Citrus nursery stock.-Quarantine No. 19. revised, effective September 1, 1934:
Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus
nursery stock, including buds and scions, on account of the citrus canker and
other dangerous citrus diseases. The term "citrus," as used in this quarantine,
includes only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the
family Rutaceae.
Indian corn or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1.
1916, as amended, effective April 1, 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indio-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-
ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea
mays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte
(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Clhionachne, and Sclerachne, on
account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except
that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon coimpliance
with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Citrus fruits.-Quarantine No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-
China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania
(except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan
(Formosa) and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South
Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus
canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and
tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with
the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Sweetpotato and yam.-Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbids
the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams
(Ipomoea bafatas and Dioscorea spp.), from all foreign countries and localities,
on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee
(Euscepes batatae).
SBanana plants.-Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-
tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Mau. spp.).
or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the
banana-root borer (Cosniopolitf s sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-
tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the
entry of the fruit of the banana see quarantine 56.)
Bamboo.-Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1. 1918: Forbids the importa-
tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants. or cuttings thereof
capable of propagation, including all genera and( spocies of the tribe Bambuseae,
from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases.
including tie bamboo smut (U7tilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does
not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which
are imported for fishing rods. furniture imaking, or other purposes, or to any
kind of articles manufactured from bambco, or to Ibmboo shoots cooked or
otherwise preserved.
Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.-Quarantine No. 37, offective .une 1. 1919:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and reigulations supplemental thereto,
revised. effective December 22, 1930. and amended effective December 1, 1:9 3. he
importation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capable
of propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain







90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTIN [Oct.-Dec

injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the fo
plant products may be imported without restriction when free from san, soil,
or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Pnt
products capable of propagation imported for medicinal, food, or manufactung
purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds, except seeds of Latrs and
Vicia. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry wt-
out permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds
is permitted under permit:
Under regulation 3:
(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Lili (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), rocs,
Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil), Begonia, and Gloxinia; and, until further
notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill),
Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).
(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-
sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise.)
(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), a R.
rugosa.
(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.
(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be im-
ported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America,
Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.
Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permis-
sible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.
(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.
Under regulation 14: Provision exists in this regulation for the entry of
most kinds of plants that are not covered by other regulations of this quaran-
tine or by other quarantines.
Under regulation 15: Provision exists for the entry in unlimited quantities of
most kinds of plants which can be considered as peculiar to or standard produc-
tions of the Dominion of Canada, as opposed to stock imported into the
Dominion from foreign countries and held or grown on there for later sale.
European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries and
localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-
poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,
sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl
millet, napier grass, teosinte, and jobs-tears, on account of the European corn
borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.
Rice.-Quarantine No. 55, revised, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids the
importation of seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities ex-
cept the Republic of Mexico, and forbids the importation of rice straw and rice
hulls from all foreign countries and localities, and seed or paddy rice from the
Republic of Mexico, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemen-
tal thereto, effective July 1, 1933, as amended effective August 1, 1934, on
account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclero-
spora mncrocarpa), leaf smut (Entyloma oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum),
and glume blotch (Melanomma glumarum), as well as dangerous-insect pests.
Fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 56 effective November 1, 1923: For
bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 1, 1936, as amended effective February 27, 1940, the
importation of fruits and vegetables, except as restricted, as to certain countries







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91

and districts, by special quarantines and other orders, and of plants or portions.
of plants used as packing material in connection with shipments of such fruits
and vegetables from all foreign countries and localities other than the Dominion
of Canada, on account of injurious insects, including fruitflies and melonflies
(Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the
citrus blackfly.
Flag smut.-Quarantine No. 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the impor-
tation of all species and varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.) and wheat products,
unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores, from
India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.
Packing materials.-Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amended,
effective July 1, 1933: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-
ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commodities,
except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture are
judged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to have
eliminated risk of carrying injurious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw,
hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;
bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil contain-
ing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for by
regulation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited except
from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South
America. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving inspection
at will by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the following
when used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice) ; corn
and allied plants from Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South
America; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar dried plant mix-
tures from all countries; and authorized soil-packing materials from all countries.
This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,
paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials which, because
of their nature or process of manufacture, are unlikely to transport plant
parasites.
Dutch elm disease.-Quarantine No. 70, revised, effective January 1, 1935:
Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus
Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scions of elm or related
plants, defined to include all species and genera of the family Ulmaceae; logs of
elm and related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present
on them; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers, and other
articles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related
plants if not free from bark.
Coffee.-Quarantine No. 73, effective April 1, 1940: Prohibits the importa-
tion into Puerto Rico from all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds
or beans of coffee which, previous to importation, have not been roasted to a
degree which, in the judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agri-
culture, will have destroyed coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or
fruits, and (3) coffee plants and leaves, on account of an injurious coffee insect
known as the coffee berry borer (Stephanoderes [coffeat Hgdn.] hampei Ferr.)
and an injurious rust disease due to the fungus Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.
Provision is made for importations of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations
other than Puerto Rico.
OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the
United States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. The
act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or
plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the
plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation.
Nursery stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicated above
under "Foreign plant quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37.)
Potatoes.-The order of December 22. 1913, and the regulations issued there-
under, revised, effective March 1, 1922, and amended, effective. December 1,
1936, restrict the importation of potatoes from all foreign countries and locali-
ties except the Dominion of Canada and Bermuda, on account of injurious







92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTIN [Oct.-De

potato diseases and insect pests. The importation of potatoes is now authorized
from Bermuda, Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Estonia, Lata, Spain
(including the Canary Islands), and the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, and
the northern territory of Baja California, Mexico.
Cotton and cotton wrappings.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and
regulations issued thereunder, revised, effective February 24, 1923, amended
effective May 1, 1924, December 15, 1924, December 11, 1937, and July 1, 1938, re-
strict the importation of cotton and cotton wrappings from all foreign countries
and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.
Cottonseed products.-The two orders of June 23, 1917, and the rules and reg
lations issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended, effective August 7,
1925, restrict the importation of cottonseed cake and meal and all other cotton-
seed products except oil from all foreign countries and localities, and the impor-
tation of cottonseed oil from Mexico, on account of injurious insects, including
the pink bollworm: Provided, That these commodities which originate in and
are shipped directly from the Imperial Valley, Baja California, Mexico, may
-enter without restriction.
Plant safeguard regulations.-These rules and regulations, revised, effective
December 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for trans-
shipment and exportation and for transportation and exportation in bond of
restricted or prohibited plants and plant products when it is determined that
such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the
United States and also provide for the safeguarding of such plant material at a
port or within the territorial limits of the United States where entry or landing
is not intended or where entry has been refused.
Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products
into and out of the District of Columbia.-These rules and regulations, revised
effective April 30, 1938, are promulgated under the amendment to the Plant
Quarantine Act of May 31, 1920. They provide for the regulation of the move-
ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the
District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect
pests within the said District.
MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS
Mexican border regulations.-These regulations, effective September 28, 1942,
were promulgated under the act approved January 31, 1942, entitled, "To provide
for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico"
(Public Law 426, 77th Congress), and supersede the rules and regulations pro-
Thibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed from Mexico into the United
States and governing the entry into the United States of railway cars and
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materials from Mexico at
border points, promulgated June 23, 1917, and amended effective January 29,
1920. They are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollworm of cotton,
which is known to exist widely in Mexico. They provide for the examination
of passengers' baggage, for the disinfection of railways cars and other vehicles,
freight, express, and other shipments, and for the cleaning of domestic cars
handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for disinfecting railways cars and
other vehicles are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous
receipts.
The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border
points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants
and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.
Regulations governing sanitary export certification.-These regulations, revised
,effective September 21, 1936, were promulgated pursuant to authority granted in
the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17, 1935 (49 Stat. 268), and repeated
in subsequent appropriation acts. They provide for the inspection and certifica-
tion of domestic plants and plant products intended for export to countries
requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are deposited in
te United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.