Service and regulatory announcements

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288977
oclc - 14207732
lccn - sn 86033973
Classification:
ddc - 632.9 U54
System ID:
AA00023076:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Full Text











































9'












Si
State of Florida
Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY










LIBRARY





IJBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013













http://archive.org/details/servicere41 unit






S. R. A., B. E. P. Q. Issued November 1942

United States Department of Agriculture
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine




SERVICE AND

REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

1941




These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations




WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
























UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRTITING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1942














FLA. DEPT. AG,
DIV. OF PLANI
INDUSTRY
.JBRAWR'

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.
F. C. BISHOPP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.
W. L. POPHAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.
F. H. SPENCER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
E. C. CUSHING, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.
C. F. W. MIUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. MI. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-
field, N. J.)
R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge. Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, MIexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, M1exico City,
Mexico).
II












488289-42












CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 146 (JANUARY-MARCH 1941)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements .----------------------------------------------- -. 1
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71) ---
Dutch elm disease quarantine for area in Pennsylvania is considered (press notice) --. -------
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the Dutch elm disease
quarantine to the State of Pennsylvania ------------------------------------------
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Rico (No. 58) ----------- 3
Quarantine restrictions lessened on Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables (press notice)--------
Revision of fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Rico-----------------------------------
Notice to general public through newspapers .-----_ ---------------------------------.
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ---------------------------------
Japanese beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) --- -------------------------
Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine------ ------------------------------------- ---_
Notice to general public through newspapers ----------------------------------------
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)-----------. ----------- 2
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice) 2:
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine
by extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941
(B. E. P. Q. 512) -----------....-------------------------------------------------- ----- 2
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)-------------------------- 2
Administrative instructions-Removal of certification requirements for specified articles for
a limited period (B. E. P. Q. 485, seventh revision) -----------..-------------------------. 24
Instructions to postmasters -- ----------------------------- -------- -- ---------- 24
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
by authorizing treatment by methyl bromide solution of balled nursery stock of specified
thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503, second revision) .-----------------------------------------. 2
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
by authorizing alternative treatments by methyl bromide fumigation of plants in pots or in
soil balls (B. E. P. Q. 486. revised) -----------------.--- ---------------------------- 2
Administrative instructions modifying white-fringed beetle quarantine regulations authoriz-
ing treatment of potting soil (B. E. P. Q. 489, revised) .---------------------------------- 27
M iscellaneous items --------------------------------------------------------------- 2
Importation of fruits, vegetables, plants, and meats into the United States (Circular No. 178,
U. S. Coast Guard) ------------------- -- -- -------------...---- --------.. 2
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q. 379, revised) ..- .. 29
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement
No. 3) .---.-------.------... --..- ----------------- -- --------------------
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised,
supplement No. 1) .-------------__------------------------------ -------- .
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Free City of Danzig (B. E. P. Q. 409, supplement
No. 1) ---- 9
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ....- - -------------.... .. ... 40
Minnesota State plant quarantines and terminal inspection ..-----.---.-----I-------I----
Modification of Mississippi State plant quarantines ------------------------------.--- 41
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -----.--------------.-------------- 41
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -----------------.---------------- 43

CONTENTS OF NO. 147 (APRIL-JUNE 1941)
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------.....--------------------....- .. 4.
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 4S) ------------------------------ 45
Instructions to postmasters ---------- ---- 45
Japanese beetle administrative strtructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 49, sulpplement No. 1.
third revision) .----------- ..... 4
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499 supplement No. 4) 47
Administrative instructions amending the restrictions of the JapTanese beetle quarantine by
lifting certification requirements on certain shipments of fruits and vegetables (B. E. P. Q.
513) . 49
Announcements rlating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantin ( 13)... 4
Inspection of Hawaiian ve sscls authorized during night hours (press notice) ..... 49
Revision of regulation t effective Mav 12, 1911 .- .0
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (\o. ) ....... .. ...
Texas grap'fruit harvest extended thr moh May 31 (press notice) 51
Mexican fruitfly regulTtions modifiel (B. E. P. Q. 5Q. revise 1)
Announcement relating to white-fringed b7(*le -quara'-tine (IN. 72
White-fringed beetle regulations modifie (. E. PI. Q. 485, eighth r eisi on-) --- --- -
Miscellaneous items .53
Lee A. Strong dies in Arizona (presS n tic) ...
Amendment of cert i n Army reenulitions with rtestpect to the enforcement of plant quarantinel
restrictions of the UInited States )Departnment of Agriculture (Circular No. 3, \War Depart-
ment) 54t
Revision of Orc)on plant quarantire relasin7 to granevines m nd cuttings 4.
Customs regulations amnended- P'lant Quarantine TI. 1). 5041 55
Plant-quarantine import restrict ions,. Iminion of C(anada ( B. E. P. Q. 5!4) 55
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, I ominion of Canala (B. E. P. Q. 51t, suppllemnent
No. 1) t..
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. British India (B. E. IP I404, revisel supplement
No.4) ..... 61
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ....... ..... 2
Organization of the Bureau of Entonmloty and Plant Quarantine .... 64
III







JIV CCONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 148 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1941)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements.-------------.--------------- _--------_ --- ----- 65
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71) -------.----------------- 65
Dutch elm disease quarantine revised (press notice) ---------------------------------------. 65
Dutch elm disease quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective October 1, 1941) 66
Notice tq general public through newspapers--------------- -------------------------- 69
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)------------------------------ 70
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
fourth revision)---------- -------------------------------------------------------- 70
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments end of season (press notice) ------------ 71
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under
301.48-5 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to September 8 for the year 1941 (B. E. P. Q. 516) 71
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------- 72
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) ------------ 72
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth
quarantine by authorizing the issuance of limited permits for certain restricted articles
(B. E. P. Q. 515)------------------------------------------------------- 72
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)-------------------------- 73
Low-temperature treatment authorized for Mexican fruitfly in Texas counties (press notice)_ 73
Treatments authorized (B. E. P. Q. 472 revised, superseding P. Q. C. A.'s 329 and 330) 73
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)----------------------- 75
Suggestions for construction of plunging and growing beds and their maintenance under
beetle-free conditions in accordance with regulations of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 496, revised) -----_---------------------------------------_. 75
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 503, third revision,
superseding Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486 and 489)----- -------------------------------- -- 75
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products -------------------------.-------------------- 78
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine relating to strawberry plants from California-------- 78
Modification of Mississippi State plant quarantines -------------------------------- 78
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------- --------- 79
Annand named chief, Hoyt, associate chief, of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Bureau
(press notice) ------- --------------------------------------------- 79
Designating chief and associate chief of Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Memo-
randum No. 931, Office of the Secretary) ---------------------------------------- 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised,
supplement No. 1) ---- ---------------------------------------------------- 80
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement
No. 3) -------------- _---------------------------------------------.. -- 80
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony of British Guiana (B. E. P. Q. 442, supple-
ment No. 1) -----------------------------------------------------------------------. 81
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Bermuda (B. E. P. Q. 455,
revised, supplement No. 1) ----- ---------------------------------------------- 81
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, supplement
No. 3) -------------. -- ----------------------82
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------ 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----- ------------------- 85

CONTENTS OF NO. 149 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1941)
Quarantine and other official announcements ....-.-------------------.---------------.----. 87
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71) ----. -------------------- 87
Instructions to postmasters --------------------------------------------------- 87
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Dutch elm disease quarantine
by authorizing the reshipment from points within the regulated area of elm plants received
from nonregulated area and reshipped during the dormant period of the insect vectors of
the disease (B. E. P. Q. 517) ... .------------------ ----------------------------------. 88
Instructions to postmasters ----------------- ------------------------------------ 88
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) ------- 88
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, sixth
revision) -------. .. ------- ---.....-.--- -----------------------------------. 88
Instructions to postmasters -------------- ------------------------------. 89
Announcement relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) ------------. 90
Treatment prescribed for certain Puerto Rican vegetables (B. E. P. Q. 518) --------------- 90
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products_ _------- ------------------------------------- 90
Arizona State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated August 7, 1939) -- ---------- 90
Instructions to postmasters-Plant quarantine and terminal inspection regulations appli-
cable to fruits and other plant products sent to military camps --------------------- 94
Miscellaneous items 9--------------------------------------------------------------- 4
Bishopp and Spencer to be assistant chiefs in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
(press notice)--------------------------------------------------------------------- 94
Cushing name head of Entomology and Plant Quarantine division (press notice) -------- 95
Rohwer in charge of Entomology and Plant Quarantine regulatory work, Popham new
assistant chief (press notice) ------ ------------------------------------------------- 95
United States Department of Agriculture discontinues European corn borer certification
(press notice) 9------------ ---------------------------------5----------- 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised, supple-
ment No. 2) --------------------------- -------------------- --------- 96
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406, revised,
supplement No. 3) - -------------------------------------------------------- 96
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
No. 6) ----.---- --------------------------- ------7-------------------- 97
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supersedes
P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, and all supplements) ----------------- ------------------- 97
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---------------------------- 103
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -- ----------.-------------_ 104


0






S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 146 Issued June 1941



United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1941


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements------------------------------------------.--.-- 1
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71) -----------------------....... 1
Dutch elm disease quarantine for area in Pennsylvania is considered (press notice)--------- 1
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the Dutch elm disease
quarantine to the State of Pennsylvania- -.------------- ---- --------------------- 2
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Rico (No. 58)------------- 3
Quarantine restrictions lessened on Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables (press notice)-------- 3
Revision of fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Rico--- --------------------- ------ 3
Notice to general public through newspapers ----------------------------------
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)------------------------------- 8
Japanese beetle quarantine revulations revised (press notice) ------------------------------ 8
Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine ----------------------------------------------- 9
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------------- 22
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) ----------- ---------------- 23
Fruitily quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice). 23
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine
by extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B.
E. P. Q. 512)------------------------------------------------------------------ 23
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ------------------------ 24
Administrative instructions-Removal of certification requirements for specified articles for
a limited period (B. E. P. Q. 485, seventh revision) .-----.------------------------------. 24
Instructions to postmasters -- ---------------------------------------------------- 24
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
by authorizing treatment by methyl bromide solution of balled nursery stock of specified
thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503, second revision) ----------------------------------------- 25
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine
by authorizing alternative treatments by methyl bromide fumigation of plants in pots or
in soil ba:ls (B. E. P. Q. 485, revised) .... -.---------------------------------------------- 26
Administrative instructions modifying white-fringed beetle quarantine regulations authoriz-
ing treatment of potting soil (B. E. P. Q. 489, revised) -------------------------------- 27
M iscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------- 29
Importation of fruits, vegetables, plants, and meats into the United States (Circular No. 178,
U. S. Coast Guard)--------.-... --- --------------------------------------------------. 29
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q. 379, revised) --------- 29
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement
N o. 3) ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised,
supplement No. 1) ------------. ---- ------------------------------------------- 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Free City of Danzig (B. E. P. Q. 409, supplement
No. 1) ..--..-- .---------------.------------------------------.----.----------.... 39
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ------------------------------------------ 40
Minnesota State plant quarantines and terminal inspection ----------------------------- 40
Modification of Mississippi State plant quarantines ---------------------------- 41
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act .-------------------..------------- 41
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ---------------- ...------------.. 43



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)

DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE FOR AREA IN PENNSYLVANIA IS CONSIDERED

(Press notice)

APRIL 1, 1941.

A public hearing at Washington, D. C., on April 9 has been announced by
the Secretary of Agriculture to consider extending the Dutch elm disease
quarantine to include the 9 counties of Montgomery, Luzerne, Bucks, Sus-

31469 41 11
314679-41-1






2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

quehanna, Lehigh, Northampton, Wayne, Philadelphia, and Monroe in Penn-
sylvania. The conference will be held before officials of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine in the auditorium of the Department of
Agriculture, South Building, Independence Avenue and Fourteenth Street,
S.W., at 10 a. m. Any person interested may appear and be heard, either in
person or by attorney.
Since 1935, because of the existence of the Dutch elm disease in New York
City and surrounding area in New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, elm
trees and parts, and any lumber, boxes, crates, or other containers with elm
bark attached, have been prohibited movement from the regulated area in
those States to points outside the area. When in July 1938 the disease was
found in eastern Pennsylvania adjoining the infected area in New Jersey, a
quarantine covering the infected area in Pensylvania, paralleling the require-
ments of the Federal quarantine, was promulgated by the State Department
of Agriculture.
It is believed that extension of the area under Federal regulation to cover
the infected portions of Pennsylvania will facilitate the movement of restricted
articles between points within the regulated areas of the quarantined States.
Since the Dutch elm disease was first discovered in this country in 1930,
incipient infections have been found in limited localities in Maryland, Ohio,
Indiana, Virginia, and West Virginia. However, prompt destruction of infected
trees has been so effective that only slight recurrence of the disease has been
found in some of these localities, and they are therefore not now under
consideration for Federal quarantine.


TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III.--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EXTENDING
THE DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE TO THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA

MARCH 31, 1941.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Dutch' elm disease,
a dangerous plant disease not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States but known to exist in parts of Connecticut,
New Jersey, and New York, was found in 1938 to extend into Pennsylvania from
the contiguous area under regulation in the above-named States. While the
area in question has been under Pennsylvania State quarantine in the mean-
time, it is necessary to consider the advisability of extending the Federal
quarantine ( 301.71 Notice of Quarantine [Notice of Quarantine No. 71])
to the State of Pennsylvania for the purpose of placing area in that State
under regulation and of prohibiting or regulating the interstate movement
therefrom of the following articles: Elm plants or parts thereof of all species
of the genus Ulrus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown
including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings,
and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3)
lumber, crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured
in whole or in part from such plants (unless the wood is entirely free from
bark).
Consideration will also be given to the advisability of prohibiting or regulat-
ing certain types of movement of restricted commodities interstate from point
to point within the regulated area.
Notice is therefore hereby given that, in accordance with Section 8 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315; U. S. C. 161), as
amended, a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture, Wash-
ington, D. C., in the South Building, Independence Avenue and 14th Street,
SW., at 10:00 a. m., April 9, 1941, in order that any person interested in the
proposed quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
PAUL H. APPLEBY,
Under Secretary.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register March 31, 1941, 11:38 a. m.;
6 F. R., 1726.]






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
QUARANTINE OF PUERTO RICO (NO. 58)

QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS LESSENED ON PUERTO RICAN FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES

(Press notice)
JANUARY 28, 1941.
Considerable lessening of restrictions affecting movement of fruit and vege-
table shipments from Puerto Rico will result from approval given by the
Secretary of Agriculture to a revision of Quarantine No. 58 and its regulations,
governing the movement of fruit and vegetable products from the Island.
According to the terms of this revision, which became effective January 22,
a lengthy list of products shipped from the Island, including many of com-
mercial importance such as tomatoes, cucumbers, pineapples, bananas, papayas,
and avocados, will be relieved of existing marking and certification require-
ments. Unless inspection reveals infestation conditions, there will be no
return to certification for these products. Some fruits and vegetables, such as
citrus fruit shipped to ports on the Atlantic coast south of Baltimore, peppers,
and corn, still require certification.
According to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, which recom-
mended liberalization of restrictions, studies of insect pests in Puerto Rico,
as well as records of many years of inspection there, indicate that the modifi-
cation can be allowed without appreciably increasing any danger that might
exist from the comparatively few injurious insects that may be carried from
the Island on these products.
Quarantine No. 58 as originally established July 1, 1925--because of the
presence on the Island of the West Indian fruitfly, bean pod borer, and other
insects-permitted shipment to the mainland of only a few well-known prod-
ucts under a system of inspection and certification. Several years of study and
inspection permitted many additions to the original list of products authorized
for movement, and these were included in a revision of regulation 3 dated
December 13, 1932.
The present revision represents still further liberalization. In addition to
exempting numerous products from the certification and marking requirements
of the quarantine, it further increases the number of fruits and vegetables
that may be shipped, and provides as well for future additions when these are
requested and their movement can be considered safe.



TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
[FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE OF PUERTO RICO]


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The considerable fund of knowledge accumulated from insect studies and in-
spection records during the last decade in Puerto Rico and elsewhere now per-
mits a still further liberalization of the regulations governing the movement of
fruits and vegetables from the Island ~mider the subpart entitled, "Hawaiian and
Puerto Rican Fruits and Vegetables", of Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58, as a mended]. It is believed that the
protection afforded by this quarantine will not be lessened by these modifica-
tions, the principal effect of which is to remove a considerable list of products
from the certification aind marking requirements. Exemption from these require-
ments will be continued unless infestation conditions should make it necessary to
restore this procedure for specific products or individual lots or shipments.
In addition, fumigation for pod beans and pigeonpeas will now be required ; pep-
pers and green corn will still require certification; and certification will likewise
be required for citrus fruits when destined to ports other tlhan those on the






4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Atlantic seaboard north of and including Baltimore. Among other modifications
it is to be noted that okra will not now be included in the admissible list. This
is on account of evidence recently obtained indicating that infestations of pink
bollworm have occurred in commercial shipments of okra. Fresh banana leaves
free from stalk and midrib will now be allowed to move without certification;
yam, mangosteen, papaya, and apio (celery root), which have been brought up
for consideration since the first amendment of these regulations was issued on
December 13, 1932, will now be included among the products exempt from cer-
tification; and, in the interest of clarity, a few minor changes in product names
are made herein.
Finally, provision has been made to authorize inclusion of other requested
additional products for shipment when it can be established that, under suit-
able treatment, or as packed and shipped, their movement can be safely permitted.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having determined that it was necessary to
quarantine Puerto Rico, in order to prevent the spread therefrom of certain in-
jurious insects, including the West Indian fruitfly (Anastrepha fraterculus Wied.)
and the bean pod borer (Maruca testulalis Geyer), not theretofore widely prev-
alent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and having given
the public hearing required by law, promulgated Notice of Qaarantine 301.58,
Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, and rules and regu-
lations supplemental thereto governing the movement of fruits and vegetables
from Puerto Rico, 301.58-1 to 12, inclusive, Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58, effective July 1, 1925, as amended].
I have now determined that the West Indian fruitfly, designated in the afore-
said Notice of Quarantine and rules and regulations as Anastrepha fraterculus
(Wied.), includes several distinct species, recognized as A. suspensa (Loew) and
A. mombinpraeoptans Sein and probably still other fruitfly species. For this
reason and for the reason that it appears that the provisions of the rules and regu-
lations supplemental to the said Notice of Quarantine may safely be liberalized,
I have further determined that the said Notice of Quarantine and rules and regu-
lations should be revised.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
Section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), the subpart, entitled, "Hawaiian ahd Puerto Rican Fruits and Vegetables,"
of Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58,
as amended], is hereby revised, effective January 22, 1941, to read as follows:

SUBPART-PUERTO RICAN FRUITS AND VEGEITABLES

QUARANTINE

301.58 Notice of Quarantine.-Under the authority conferred upon the Secre-
tary of Agriculture by Section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912,
as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), Puerto Rico is quarantined effective on and after
January 22, 1941, in order to prevent the spread therefrom of certain injurious
insects, including the fruitflies Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), and A. mom-
binpraeoptans Sein, and probably still other fruitfly species, and the bean pod
borer Maruca testulalis (Geyer), not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States. As provided in the said Plant Quar-
antine Act, fruits and vegetables shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a
common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier,
transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from Puerto Rico into or through
any other State or Territory or District of the United States, in manner or method
or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations
supplemental hereto and in amendments thereof: Provided, That whenever the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts
exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the articles
to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to modify,
by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regulations, he
shall set forth and publish such findings in administrative instructions, specifying






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

the manner in which the applicable regulations should be made less stringent,
whereupon such modification shall become effective.
This section leaves in full effect 301.30 [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 30, revised effec-
tive October 10, 1934], which prohibits the movement from Hawaii and Puerto
Rico into or through any other State, Territory, or District of the United
States of all varieties of sweetpotatoes (Ipomoea batatas).

RULES AND REGULATIONS

301.58-1 Definitions.-(a) Fresh fruits and vegetables.-The edible, more
or less succulent, portions of food plants in the raw or unprocessed state, such
as bananas, oranges, grapefruit, pineapples, tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, etc.
(b) Plant litter.-Leaves, twigs, or other portions of plants, or plant re-
mains or rubbish as distinguished from clean fruits and vegetables, or other
commercial articles.
(c) Inspector.-An inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine, United States Department of Agriculture.
301.58-2 Fruits and vegetables the movement of which is prohibited.-
Movement from Puerto Rico into or through any other State. Territory, or
District of the United States of fruits of mango (Mangifera spp.). jobo (Spon-
dias spp.), guava (Psidium guajava), and pomarrosa or rose apple (Eugenia
jambos), and all other fruits and vegetables for which movement is not au-
thorized in 301.58-3 hereof, is prohibited: Provided, That any fruit or vege-
table the movement of which is thus prohibited may be removed from a pro-
hibited status and included in the list for which movement is authorized in
301.58-3, by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when evidence satisfactory to him is ob-
tained that the movement of the product in question, either subject to a
specified treatment, or as packed and shipped, will not result in the dissemi-
nation of injurious insects.
301.58-3 Fruits and vegetables the movement of which is authorized.
--(a) Subject to the conditions and limitations noted herein, and to such
treatment as is herein or may hereafter be prescribed by the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the following fruits and vege-
tables may be moved or allowed to be moved from Puerto Rico into or through
any other State, Territory, or District of the United States when such fruits
or vegetables are free from plant litter, are marked in compliance with
301.58-6, and have been inspected by an inspector and certified by him to
be free from injurious insect infestation, including the West Indian fruitfly
and the bean-pod borer, or to have been given the prescribed treatment:
String beans, lima beans, faba beans, and pigeonpeas. in the pod, will be
certified for movement only when they have been treated as prescribed by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and under the
supervision of an inspector.
Citrus fruits (orange, grapefruit, lemon, citron, and lime).
Corn (sweet corn on cob).
Peppers.
(b) The following fruits and vegetables are subject to inspection, either
in the field or when presented for shipment, as the inspector may require,
but unless found by him to be infested shall be free to move without certifica-
tion, marking, treatment, or other requirements of these regulations, except
that they must be free from plant litter and soil: Provided, That if the in-
spector shall find any field, grove, lot, shipment, or container of such fruits
and vegetables infested with injurious insects, he shall notify the owner or
person in charge, in writing, of the existence of the infestation and the ex-
tent thereof, and thereafter movement of the fruit or vegetable so specitied
shall be prohibited while the infestation persists, unless in tile judgment of
the inspector movement may be safely allowed subject to certification after

1The following are not interpreted as fresh fruits and vegetables within the meaning of
g 301.58 [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58, revised] : Coconuts, breadnuts, dried peas and beans. dried
seeds, dried or cured medicinal plants and herbs, anatto seeds (achiote), gourd (hiuero),
cannon-ball fruit (Couroupita guianensis), and cut flowers.







6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

having been given an approved treatment, or after sorting, conditioning, or
other effective safeguard measures:
Algarroba pods (Hymenaea cowrbaril). Dasheen, malanga, taro (Colocasia and Ca-
Allium spp. (onion, chive, garlic, leek, scal- ladium spp.).
lion, shallot). Eggplant.
Anise (Pimpinella anisum). Fennel.
Apio, celery root (Arracacia xanthorrhiza). Ginger root (Zingiber officinale).
Arrowroot (Maranta. arundinacea). Kudzu (Pueraria thutnbergiana).
Artichoke, Jerusalem (Helianthus tube- Lerens, sweet corn root (Calathea allouia).
rosuts). Lettuce.
Asparagus. Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana).
Avocado. Mustard greens.
Balsamapple, balsam-pear (Momordica bal- Palm hearts.
samina ; M. charantia). Papaya, lechosa (Carica papaya).
Banana and plantain (fruit). Parsley.
Banana leaves (fresh, without stalks or mid- Parsnip.
rib). Peas (in pod) (Pisnum sativumn).
Beans (fresh shelled lima and faba beans). Pigeonpea (fresh shelled).
Beet, including Swiss chard. Pineapple.
Brassica obleracea (cabbage, cauliflower, Potato.
Brussels sprouts, broccoli, collard, kale, Quenepa (Melicocca bijuga).
kohlrabi, Savoy). Radish.
Breadfruit, jackfruit (Artocarpuzs spp.). Rhubarb.
Cacao bean (Theobroma cacao). Rutabag.
Carrot. Spinach.
Celery. Squash, pumpkin, watermelon, vegetable
Chayote (Sechim edule). marrow, cantaloup, calabaza.
Chicory, endive (Cichorium intybus). Trmand beanpod (Tramrindus indica)
Citrus fruit (citron, grapefruit, lemon, lime, Toma eaod (atous ).
and orange) destined for ports on the Turnp.
Atlantic seaboard north of and including Wateracess.
Baltimore. Waterlily root, lotus root (Nelumbium ne-
Cucumbers, including Angola cucumber (Si- lumbo).
cania odorata). Yam, name (Dioscorea spp.).
Culantro, coriander (Eryngium foetid.um; Yautia, tanier (Xanthosoma spp.).
Coriandrum sativu-m-). Yuca, cassava (Manihot esculenta).

301.58-4 Application for inspection.-Persons intending to move any of the
fruits or vegetables for which certification is required under 301.58-3 from
Puerto Rico into or through any other State, Territory, or District of the
United States shall make application for inspection thereof as far as possible
in advance of the probable date of shipment. The application shall show the
quantity of the fruits or vegetables which it is proposed to move, their iden-
tifying marks and numbers, their exact location, and the contemplated date of
shipment. Forms on which to make application for inspection will be furnished
upon request, by the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
301.58-5 Certification of shipments.-Fruits and vegetables for which cer-
tification is required under 301.58-3 shall not be moved from Puerto Rico into
or through any other State, Territory, or District of the United States, by ship,
vessel, aircraft, or otherwise, unless each shipment is accompanied by a cer-
tificate issued by an inspector showing that such fruits or vegetables have been
inspected and pronounced free from injurious insect infestation, including the
West Indian fruitfly and the bean pod borer, or that the required treatment has
been given. Copies of inspection certificates shall accompany the manifests,
memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments.
No charge will be made for the inspector's service in inspection and certi-
fication, but all costs for labor, cartage, storage, packing and unpacking, and
other expenses incidental to inspection shall be borne by the shipper. Appli-
cants for inspection shall place the fruits or vegetables to be inspected so that
they can be readily examined; if not so placed, inspection will be refused.
301.58-6 Marking of con tainers.-No fruits or vegetables for which certifica-
tion is required under 301.58-3 shall be moved from Puerto Rico into or
through any other State, Territory, or District of the United States unless the
crate, box, bale, or other container thereof is so marked with the marks and
numbers given on the application that it may be identified at the port of
first arrival.
301.58-7 Fruits and vegetables as ships' stores or in the possession of
passengers and crew.-The movement of fruits and vegetables is permitted
from Puerto Rico as ships' stores or in the possession of passengers and crew
on ships, vessels, or aircraft plying between Puerto Rico and any other State,
Territory, or District of the United States: Provided, That all such products,
on arrival in the United States must be submitted for inspection and disposition
as provided in 301.58-8 and 301.58-11 hereof, and (1) they must be free






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

from infestation with injurious insects; (2) those fruits and vegetables not
listed in 301.58-3 shall not be landed; (3) prohibited fruits and vegetables
retained aboard shall be subject to the safeguards provided in 352.8 [regula-
tion 6 of the Plant Safeguard Regulations].
301.58-8 In.pection of ressels.-Inspectors are authorized to enter upon
ships, vessels, and aircraft from Puerto Rico at any time after they come within
the territory or territorial waters of any other State, Territory, or District of
the United States, whether in the stream or at the dock, wharf, mole, or land-
ing field for the purpose of ascertaining by inspection whether any of the
fruits and vegetables covered by this quarantine are contained in such ships,
vessels, or aircraft as cargo or ships' stores, or whether there remains any
infestation from such fruits or vegetables.
301.58-9 Di. infection of ressels.-Disinfection under the direction of and
in the manner prescribed by the inspector of any ship, vessel, or aircraft
plying between Puerto Rico and any other State, Territory, or District of the
United States upon arrival at the dock, wharf, mole, or landing field may be
required if the ship, vessel, or aircraft is found to contain or to be con-
taminated with any of the fruits or vegetables infested with injurious insects.
Such disinfection shall be performed by the person having charge or possession
of the ship, vessel, or aircraft and at a place satisfactory to the inspector.
When such ship, vessel, or aircraft has been disinfected in a manner satis-
factory to such inspector, he shall immediately issue and deliver to the person
having charge or possession thereof a certificate to that effect.
301.58-10 Inspection of cargo.-Inspectors are authorized to ascertain by
inspection of the cargo of any ship, vessel, or aircraft plying between Puerto
Rico and any other State, Territory, or District of the United States at the
port of first arrival, that each lot or shipment moving under certification agrees
in nature and amount with the certificate, and that all shipments of fruits and
vegetables for which a certificate is required are duly certified; to determine.
in the case of fruits and vegetables the movement of which is not authorized,
if infestation is present: and to require for such unauthorized shipments safe-
guards, treatment, return, or destruction, as may be necessary to prevent the
dissemination of injurious insects.
301.58-11 Inspection of baggage.-Inspectors are authorized to ascertain
by inspection whether any of the fruits or vegetables covered by this quaran-
tine are contained in the baggage or other personal belongings of pnssengers
and members of the crew on ships, vessels, or aircraft plying between Puerto
Rico and any other State, Territory, or District of the United States, to deter-
mine whether the same are infested with injurious insects, and in the case of
infested or unauthorized products to require such safeguarding, treatment, or
destruction as in the judgment of the inspector may be necessary. For the
purpose of such inspection an inspector is authorized to open any box, bale,
crate, bundle, or other package, including trunks, which may contain or be
liable to contain any of the fruits or vegetables covered by this quarantine.
Such baggage inspection shall be made at the dock, airport, or landing field
at the port of debarkation within any State, Territory, or District of the United
States other than Puerto Rico, as the inspector may require, and no such bag-
gage or personal belongings of passengers or crew shall be removed from such
dock, airport, or landing field until the same have been inspected and passed
by an inspector.
301.58-12 Baggage declarations.-Before any ship, vessel, or aircraft from
Puerto Rico arrives within the boundaries of any other State, Territory, or
District of the United States, the master, captain, or other person having charge
or possession of any such ship, vessel, or aircraft shall cause to be distributed
to each passenger thereon a baggage declaration 2 to be furnished by the United
States Department of Agriculture, calling attention to the provisions of the
Plant Quarantine Act, the foregoing quarantine, and these regulations. These
baggage declarations, after being executed and signed by the passengers, shall
be collected and delivered to the inspector at the port of debarkation.
301.58-13 Parcel post inspection.-Inspectors are authorized to inspect, with
the cooperation of the United States Post Office Department, parcel post pack-
ages placed in the mails in Puerto Rico, to determine whether such packages
contain fruits or vegetables the movement of which is not authorized under

SForm EQ-911.






8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

this quarantine, to examine fruits and vegetables so found for insect infestation,
and to notify the postmaster in writing of any violation of the said quarantine
in connection therewith.
301.58-14 Movement by the Department of Agriculture.-The foregoing
quarantine and regulations shall not apply to movement of fruits and vegeta-
bles from Puerto Rico by the United States Department of Agriculture for
experimental or scientific purposes.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 22d day of January 1941.
Witness my hand and the seal of the Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] CLAUDE R. WICKAD,
Secretary of Agriculture.
The foregoing quarantine and regulations supersede the quarantine and regu-
lations embodied in B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58 (effective July 1, 1925) and the amend-
ment thereof effective January 1, 1933, and are adopted effective January 22, 1941.
[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent to all common carriers plying between
Puerto Rico and the mainland.]
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 22, 1941, 3 :47 p. m.; 6 F. R.,
582.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., January 22, 1941.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended
(7 U. S. C. 161), has promulgated a revision of the subpart entitled "Hawaiian
and Puerto Rican Fruits and Vegetables" of Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 58, as amended], effective on and after
January 22, 1941. The purpose of this revision is to modify the restrictions on
the movement of certain fruits and vegetables shipped from Puerto Rico;, to
require the fumigation of string beans, lima beans, faba beans, and pigeonpeas;
to authorize the movement of several additional products; and to provide for
further authorization for the movement of other products after it has been
determined that such movement may be safely permitted.
CLAUDEI R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agrioulture.
[Published in El Mundo, San Juan, P. R., February 12, 1941.]



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED

(Press notice)

FEBRUARY 13, 1941.
The United States Department of Agriculture announced today that the Japa-
nese beetle quarantine and regulations have been revised, effective February
12, 1941.
The regulated territory has been extended to include new areas in Maryland,
New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. The new areas brought
within the regulations include parts or all of the following counties: Baltimore,
Carroll, Charles, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, Montgomery, Washington, and
Wicomico, Md.; Cayuga, N. Y.; Butler, Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Venango,
and Warren, Pa.; Chesterfield, Greensville, and Rappahannock, Va.; and Marshall
and Ohio, W. Va. The cities of Petersburg and Winchester, Va., are included
also. These additions to the regulated area are made because scouting in 1940
showed that beetles were present there in large numbers.
The portion of this area subject to special regulations on the movement of
fruits and vegetables that might carry beetles from the more heavily infested
territory to uninfested territory has been extended to include additional areas
in Baltimore and Howard Counties, Md., and Berks, Lehigh, Northampton, and






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

York Counties, Pa., and to bring in part of Cumberland County, Pa. Metropolitan
New York localities and adjoining territory in Fairfield County, Conn., have
been dropped from this area.
In addition, a few minor changes have been made in the Japanese beetle
quarantine regulations. These cover modifications of the regulations for fruit and
vegetable shipments to isolated points and of requirements as to certification
of bananas.



TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

REVISION OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The current revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine adds a proviso under
which the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine may, when
the facts as to pest risk so warrant, modify the requirements, by making them
less stringent, as to one or more of the restricted articles, or as to certain
periods of the year, or certain parts of the regulated areas.
In the revision of the regulations, nominal extensions of regulated areas are
made in Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Counties newly added in part or in entirety include Cayuga in New York;
Crawford and Forest in Pennsylvania; Greensville and Rappahannock in Vir-
ginia; and Marshall in West Virginia. The cities of Petersburg and Winchester,
in Virginia, are also brought under regulation. Discovery of substantial infesta-
tions of the Japanese beetle in these sections warranted their addition to the regu-
lated areas. Additional enlargements of the regulated areas have been
made to include the entire Maryland counties of Baltimore, Howard,
Montgomery, and Wicomico, and additional areas in the counties of Car-
roll, Charles, Dorchester, Frederick, and Washington; the entire Pennsylvania
counties of Butler, Venango, and Warren, and parts of Erie and Mercer Counties;
additional area in Chesterfield County, Va.; and all of Ohio County in West
Virginia.
The area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables is regulated
( 301.48-5) has been extended to include additional areas in Baltimore and
Howard Counties, Md., and Berks, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties,
Pa., and to bring in part of Cumberland County, Pa. The metropolitan New
York localities and adjoining area in Fairfield County, Conn., are no longer
included in this area.
Previous quarantine regulations required a certificate or permit for movement
of fruits and vegetables from the area designated in 301.48-5 to several iso-
lated points in Maine, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania. Vermont, and West
Virginia. This requirement as related to isolated points has been removed with
the exception that a certificate is required for such movement to Toledo, Ohio,
and Winchester, Va., when consigned via refrigerator car or motortruck, or in lot
shipments of three pieces or more by common carrier. This section has been
further revised to remove the exemption in regard to baannas. Bananas in any
form moving from the area designated in 301.48-5 via refrigerator car, or
motortruck, or by common carrier in lot shipments of three pieces or more,
require certification during the period specified.
Current regulations require that refrigerator cars originating in the area
designated in 301.48-5 into which fruits or vegetables are to be loaded for
interstate movement from any regulated area must be swept, cleaned, or fumi-
gated by the common carrier prior to loading, and if used for loading fruits
and vegetables in the area designated in that section, such cars must also he
kept tightly closed and sealed during the interval between fumigat ing or clean-
ing and loading. Fruits and vegetables consigned from the iarea designated in
314679-41- 2







10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

301.48-5 by refrigerator cars must be fumigated in the car, when such action is
deemed necessary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the cars must be
closed or screened.
Minor changes have also been made in 301.48-6, 7, 10, 12, and 13.
This revision supersedes the twelfth revision of Notice of Quarantine No.
48, approved March 1, 1937, and the seventeenth revision of the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto, as amended effective May 27, 1940.
SUMMARY

Unless a certificate has been issued, these regulations as now revised, pro-
hibit the interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 (between June
1 and October 15 in the case of Accomac and Northampton Counties, Va.) of
all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car, motortruck, or in lot shipments of
three pieces or more by common carrier, from the District of Columbia, the
State of Delaware, and parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vir-
ginia, as defined in 301.48-5, to or through points outside the regulated areas
as defined in 301.48-3.
The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to or
through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or
certificate has been secured. Cut flowers are restricted interstate movement
only between June 15 and October 15 inclusive. For details and exceptions
see 301.48-6 and 7.
The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, as described in 301.48-3.
These regulations also specify the conditions governing the protection of re-
stricted articles from infestation while in transit ( 301.48-8), require thorough
cleaning of vehicles, containers, and refrigerator cars which have been used in
transporting restricted products ( 301.48-5 and 13), and provide other safe-
guards and conditions as specified in the regulations.
To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest branch
office listed in the appendix.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having determined that it was necessary to
quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a
dangerous insect new to and not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States, and having given the public hearing
required by law, promulgated the Twelfth Revision of Notice of Quarantine
301.48, Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, and rules
and regulations supplemental thereto, governing the movement of (1) fruits
and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other
plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from any of the
above-named States or the District of Columbia, into or through any other
State or Territory or District of the United States, 301.48-1 to 14, inclusive,
Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q., 48,
effective on and after March 1, 1937].
For the reason that it appears that the provisions of the quarantine may
be safely extended to authorize the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine to modify, by making less stringent, the requirements of
the rules and regulations supplemental to the said Notice of Quarantine, I
have further determined that the said quarantine should be revised. I have
further determined that it is necessary to revise the regulations for the pur-
pose of extending the regulated areas owing to the discovery of substantial
infestations of the Japanese beetle in additional sections, and to make other
modifications.






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20. 1912. as amended (7 U. S.
C. 161), the subpart entitled "JAPANESE BEETLE" of Part 301. Chapter III,
Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 48. as revised] is hereby
amended effective February 12, 1941, to read as follows:

SUBPART-JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

QUARANTINE

301.48 Notice of Quarantine.-Under the authority conferred by section 8
of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
I do quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine. Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York. Ohio, Pennsylvania. Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle. Hereafter, (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants: and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, shall not be shipped, offered
for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by
a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other State or
Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under con-
ditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter
made and amendments thereto: Prorided, That the restrictions of this quaran-
tine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to
the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated
by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of
the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regula-
tions as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the
Japanese beetle: Provided further. That such limitations shall be conditioned
upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with
respect to such regulated areas as. in the judgment of the Secretary of Agri-
culture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle
therefrom to other parts of the State: And prorided further', That certain
articles classed as restricted herein may, because of the nature of their growth
or production or their manufactured or processed condition, be exempted by
administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered
innocuous as carriers of infestation: A:ind provided furtlir, That whenever,
in any year, the (hief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or
more of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making
it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any
such regulations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative
instructions, specifying the manner in which the applicable regulation should
be made less stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for
such period and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified
in said administrative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall be made
to give publicity to such administrative instructions throughout the affected
areas.

RULES AND RMGULATIONS

301.48-1. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Japanese beetle.-The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.
(b) Infested, infestation.-The terms "infested," "infestation," and the like,
relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.
(c) Quarantined area.-Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.






12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(d) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos of 301.48, as revised.
(e) Fruits and vegetables.-For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see 301.48-5.
(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.-Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.
(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in con-
nection with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earun,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.
(i) Certified greenhouse.-A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
301.48-6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds,
coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores
treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the
inspector.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(k) Moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, trans-
ported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District
of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.
(1) Certificate.-A valid form evidencing compliance with the requirements
of these regulations as to movement of restricted articles to points outside the
regulated areas.
(m) Permit.-A valid form authorizing movement of restricted articles from
a regulated area to a restricted destination in a separate regulated area.
301.48-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.-Conditioned upon
the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to 301.48,
the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of
plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said 301.48 will
be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter
designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.
301.48-3. Regulated areas.-In accordance with the provisos to 301.48,
the Secretary of Agriculture of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for
the purpose of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns,
cities, election districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all
cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:
Connecticut.-The entire State.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kenneeec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
Maryland.-Counties of Baltimore, Caroline, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Kent,
Montgomery, Queen Annes, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico. and Worcester; the
city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and election
districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis, and election districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in
Anne Arundel County; all of Carroll County except the election districts of
Middleburg (No. 10), and Union Bridge (No. 12) ; election districts of La Plata
(No. 1), Pomonkey (No. 7), and White Plains (No. 6), in Charles County;
election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), Church Creek (No. 9), East New
Market (No. 2), Fork (No. 1), Hurlock (No. 15), Vienna (No. 3), and
Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election districts of Ballenger
(No. 23), Braddock (No. 24), Brunswick (No. 25), Buckeystown (No. 1), Burk-
ittsville (No. 22), Emmitsburg (No. 5), Frederick (No. 2), Hauvers (No. 10),
Jefferson (No. 14), Middletown (No. 3), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No.
12), Thurmont (No. 15), and Woodville (No. 18), in Frederick County; all of
Prince Georges County except the election districts of Aquasco (No. 8), and
Nottingham (No. 4) ; election districts of Boonesboro (No. 6), Cavetown (No.
7), Clear Spring (No. 4), Conococheague (No. 13), Funkstown (No. 10),






1911] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

Hagerstown (Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Halfway (No. 26), Leitersburg
(No. 9), Ringgold (No. 14), Sandy Hook (No. 11), Sharpsburg (No. 1), and
Williamsport (No. 2), in Washington County.
Massachusetts.-The entire State.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack,
Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton. Effingham,
Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro,
Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in Carrol County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland,
Bridgewater, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover,
Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx. Broome, Chemung. Chenango, Co-
lumbia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondago, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens,
Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland. Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk,
Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House
and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; city of
Auburn and the towns of Fleming, Owasco, and Sennett, in Cayuga County;
towns of Amherst, Cheektowaga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo
and Lackawanna, in Erie County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield. Frank-
fort, German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport,
Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls,
in Herkimer County; town of Watertown and city of Watertown. in Jefferson
County; town of Mount Morris and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston
County; city of Rochester and town of Brighton, in Monroe County; towns
of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector. Montour, and Reading, and the borough
of Watkins Glen, in Schluyler County; towns of Caton, Corning, Erwin, Hornby,
and Hornellsville, and the cities of Corning and Hornell, in Steubre County;
towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of
Ithaca, in Tompkins County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city
of Glens Falls, in Warren County.
Ohio.-Counties of Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus,
and villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff,
and Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and
Willoughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-
the-Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County;
the township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the city of
Toledo, in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield,
in Richland County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville. Brookfield, Champion,
Fowler, Hartford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, South-
ington, Warren, Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren,
and the villages of Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and
Orangeville, in Trumbnull County.
Pennsylvania.-The entire State except the townships of Athens, Beaver,
Bloomfield, Cambridge, Conneaut, Cussewago, East Fairfield, East Fallowfield,
East Mead, Fairfield, Greenwood, Hayfield, North Shenango, Pine, Randolph,
Richmond, Rockdale, Sadsbury, South Shenango, Spring, Steuben, Summerhill,
Summit, Troy, Union, Venango, Vernon, Wayne, West Fallowfield, West Mead,
West Shenango, and Woodcock, the boroughs of Blooming Valley, Cambridge
Springs, Cochranton, Conneaut Lake, Conneautville, Geneva, Linesville, Saegers-
town, Springboro, Townville, Venango, and Woodcock, and the city of Meadville
in Crawford County: the townships of Amity, Conneaut, Elk Creek, Fairview,
Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield, Harborcreek, Lawrence Park, Le Boeuf.
McKean, North East, Springfield. Summit, Union. Venango, Wnshiington. and
Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranesville, East Springfield, Edinboro,
Fairview, Girard, Middleboro, Mill Village, North East, North Girard. Platea,
Union City, Waterford. Wattsburg. and Wesleyville, in Eric County: the town-
ships of Deer Creek. Delaware. Fairview. French Creek, Greene. Itempfield,
Lake, Mill Creek. New Vernon, Otter Creek. Perry, Pymatuning, Salem. Sandy
Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning. Sugar Grove, and West Salem, and the
boroughs of Clarksville. Fredonia, Greenville. Jaimestown, New Lebanon, Sandy
Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in Mercer County.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham. and Windsor; and the
"own of Burlington, in Chittenden County.






14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess
Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Bermuda, Dale, Manchester and
Matoaca, in Chesterfield County; town of Emporia, in Greensville County; magis-
terial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; magisterial districts of
Hampton, Jackson, and Wakefield, in Rappahannock County; magisterial district
of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick County; magis-
terial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County; and the cities of Alex-
andria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Ports-
mouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, Suffolk, and Winchester.
West Virginia.--Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, Ohio, and Taylor; districts of Arden, Falling Waters, Hedgesville,
and Opequon, and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the city of
Charleston, in Kanawha County; districts of Sand Hill, Union, Washington, and
Webster, in Marshall County; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in
Mineral County; and the city of Parkersburg, and districts of Lubeck and
Tygart, in Wood County.
301.48-4. Extension vor reduction of regulated areas.-The regulated areas
designated in 301.48-3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable
by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and
the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the r arsportation com-
panies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located
and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of
Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.
301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables. (a) Con-
trol of movement.-(1) Unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor, by
an inspector, except as provided in subdivisions (i) to (iv), inclusive, of this
section, no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved interstate via refrig-
erator car, or motortruck, or in lot shipments of three pieces or more by common
carrier, from any of the areas listed below to or through any point outside the
regulated areas:
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maryland.--Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and
Worcester; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County; the city of Balti-
more; all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, and 7; all
of Caroline County except election districts of American Corners (No. 8), and
Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market
(No. 2), Hurlock -(No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12) in Dorchester County;
election districts of Elk Ridge (No. 1) and Ellicott City (No. 2), in Howard
County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6),
Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salis-
bury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14),
in Wicomico County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth,
Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck,
Rochelle Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield,
and Hackensack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East
Paterson, East Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview,
Fort Lee, Glenn Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood,
Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro,
Wallington, and Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester,
Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Menham, Morris, Morristown, Par-
sippany-Troy Hills, Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of
Chatham, Florham Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris
Cunty; township of Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and
the boroughs of Haledon. Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa,
and West Paterson, in Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopat-
cong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the boroughs of
Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon,
Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglass, Earl, Exeter, Hereford, Longswamp,
Lower Alsace, Maidencreek, Maxatawny, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike,
Richmond, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscombmanor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union,






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

and Washington, the city of Reading, and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtels-
ville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Fleetwood, Kutztown, Lyons, Mohnton, Mount
Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, Topton, West Lawn,
West Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; township
of Lower Allen, and borough of New Cumberland, in Cumberland County;
townships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and
Swatara, the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown,
Paxtang, Penbrook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County; townships of
Hanover, Lower Macungie, Lower Milford, Salisbury, South Whitehall, Upper
Macungie, Upper Milford, Upper Saucon, and Whitehall, the city of Allentown,
and the boroughs of Alburtis, Catasauqua, Coopersburg, Coplay, Emaus, Foun-
tain Hill, and Macungie, in Lehigh County; townships of Forks, Hanover,
Lower Nazareth, Lower Saucon, Palmer, and Williams, the cities of Bethlehem,
and Easton, and the boroughs of Glendon, Tatamy, West Easton, and Wilson
in Northampton County; townships of Chanceford, Conewago, East Hopewell,
East Manchester, Fairview, Fawn, Hellam, Hopewell, Lower Chanceford, Lower
Windsor, Newberry, and Peach Bottom, and the boroughs of Cross Roads, East
Prospect, Fawn Grove, Goldsboro, Hallam, Lewisberry, Manchester, Mount
Wolf, Stewartstown, Wrightsville, Yorkana, and York Haven, in York County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, 'and Northampton.
Provided, That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from
the area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to other points in the
regulated area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area,
shall be regarded as direct shipments from the point of origin. As such they
require certification:
Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas
specified in this section when in his judgment such action is considered
advisable.
(i) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case
of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only
during the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:
Virginia.-The counties of Accomac and Northampton.
(ii) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill
of lading either from a point outside the area designated in this section through
that area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this section
through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate
is required for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (a)
(1) of this section to Toledo, Ohio, and Winchester, Va.
(iii) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a
manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be trans-
mitted.
(iv) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables from the area listed in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to the
remainder of the regulated area, other than as specified in subdivision (ii)
of this section.
(b) Conditions of ccrtification.-Certificates may be issued for the inter-
state movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive (or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from
Accom'ac County or Northampton County, Va.) under one of the following
conditions:
(1) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck or in lot ship-
ments of three pieces or more by common carrier, have actually been inspected
by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infest:a-
tion. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on
the establishment at such points of provisions satisfact ory to the inspector
for the handling and safeguarding of such shipmentts during inspection. Such
inspection may be discontiinued land certification withheld by the ins)pe(ctlor
during periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under
the observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from
any infestation.






16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas desig-
nated in this section, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards,
transfer points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satis-
factory to the inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certifica-
tion and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without in-
spection only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments
concerned have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight
yards, transfer points, or unloading docks.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the areas designated in paragraph (a) (1) of this section, or are shipped
from infested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of
the inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this section have been inspected and loaded in a manner to
prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened
doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspec-
tor as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a
manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or
cleaning and loading, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.
(For further requirements on the cleaning of refrigerator cars, see 301.48-13.)
(6) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this section have been fumigated in the car, when deemed
necessary in the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors and hatches
of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision
of an inspector.
301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental stock.
(a) Control of movement.-Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in
301.48-1 shall not be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point oatside thereof, unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:
(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are therefore exempt from the requirements of certification:
(i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil; and single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions
when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers
or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require certification.
(ii) Cut orchids; orchid plants when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber;
Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnanomea and 0.
claytoniana).
(iii) (a) Floral designs or "set pieces," including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists' designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared
are not exempted; (b) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Epigaea repens), when
free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16 and
June 14, inclusive.
(iv) (a) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so
labeled on the outside of each container of such materials; (b) mushroom
spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.
(v) (a) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum) ; (b)
resurrection plant or bird's-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla) ; (c) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) ; (d) dyed moss, when heat treated
and appropriately labeled.
(vi) Soil-free, dried roots incapable of propagation, when appropriately
labeled.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soil-free
aquatic plants, and of portions of plants without roots and free from soil,
except that a certificate is required for the movement of cut flowers during the
period June 15 to October 15, inclusive.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carr.er on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area, except that a certificate is required between June 15 and Octo-
ber 15, inclusive, for interstate movement of cut flowers from the main regu-
lated areas to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville,
Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown,
and the town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y.; or to other regulated
parts of Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton,
Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and
Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; Winchester, Va.;
and Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the
interstate movement of cut flowers from the above-named isolated points.
(b) Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and pcrmits.-For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:
(1) Class I. Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has beeen found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b) (7) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
scribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III.
(2) Class III. (i) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided (a) there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas,
certified houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas, or (b) there is a
legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock. Such
classification will not be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises
that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent
certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where one
or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approx-
imately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties.
In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and management but
represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be inde-
pendently classified either as class I or class III upon compliance with such
conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly,
unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to
subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III, when
in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by scanty infestation
limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision
containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent
nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the in-
festation occurs.
(ii) Upon compliance with paragraphs (b) (3), (6), and (7) of this section,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (a) That the
roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspec-
tion may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by
shaking or washing; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to
the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.
(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all
the following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to
all potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(i) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the
northern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
814679--41- 3






18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(ii) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contami-
nated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken
from infested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must
be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in
manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such green-
houses, it must be protected from possible infestation in manner and by
method satisfactory to the inspector.
(iii) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (a) shall be
potted in certified soil; (b) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and Octo-
ber 1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October
15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (c) shall, if grown
outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil
or other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation;
and (d) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the
inspector.
(4) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (i) when they have
been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (ii) when
they have been grown in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse of
class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment
of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (a) (3) of this
section.)
(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassi-
fied premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the fol-
lowing conditions: (i) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock,
or (ii) that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector, or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to
the inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and
under such conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
III status shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all
their sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contam-
inated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both
to points outside the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or
greenhouses within the regulated area. Certification may be denied to any
person who has omitted to make the report required by this section, and such
denial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been
supplied.
(7) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
I status, or to maintain in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision, a
certified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (i) shall restrict their purchases or
receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vege-
table matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the reg-
ulated area and intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles
which have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and
the said certificate shall accompany the article when moved; (ii) shall obtain
approval of the inspector before such articles are received on class I or certi-
fied premises or are taken into certified greenhouses; (iii) shall report imme-
diately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articles secured from
within the regulated area for use on such premises; and (iv) shall also re-
port immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or ship-
ments of such articles both to points outside the regulated areas and to other
classified nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification
may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports
required by this section, and such denial of certification shall continue until
the information so omitted has been supplied.
(8) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they orig-
inated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and
when found advisable by the inspector after reinspection and determination
of freedom from infestation.
301.48-7. Restrictions on the morement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure. (a) Con trol of morement.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure shall not be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to
or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have
been issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (i) sand and
clay when free from vegetable matter; (ii) greensand marl; and (iii) such
other sands and clays as have been treated or processed and subsequently
handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese
beetle could exist therein, provided that each container of such article shall be
labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in the case
of bulk shipments such label shall accompany the waybill or other shipping
papers.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate )morement of malnure, peat,
compost, or humus (i) when dehydrated. shredded, ground, pulverized. or com-
pressed, or (ii) when treated with crude petroleum or any other product hav-
ing high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled on the outside of each
commercial container of such materials.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interestate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when re-
shipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is
further protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area. or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to an-
other regulated area.
(b) Conditions of certification. Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of
the following conditions:
(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.
(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.
(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an In-
spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (i) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(ii) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an in-
spector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (iii) when the
cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of
and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a con-
dition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs
(b) (1), (2), or (3) hereof.
301.48-8. Conditions gorerning the protection of restricted articles fromn
infestation while in tra(sit.-Fruits aull vegetables, nursery and ornamental
stock, and sand, soil, earth. peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from
or through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and
October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas
be screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory
to the inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.
Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain
intact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.






20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transporta-
tion.-(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed
in 301.48-5, 6, and 7 shall be plainly marked with the name and address of
the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have
securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued
in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight,
one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached
to the waybill -will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall
accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading
pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely
attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the cer-
tificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.
301.48-10. General conditions governing inspection and issuance of certifi-
cates and permits.-(a) Persons intending to move interstate any of the articles
the movement of which is restricted in 301.48-5, 6, and 7, shall make
application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of
the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and
quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the con-
signor, and name and address of the consignee.
(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that in-
spection may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than
the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transpor-
tation of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.
(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be
refused.
(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated
area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, via truck or
other road vehicle, of articles the interstate movement of which is restricted
in 301.48-6 and 7.
301.48-11. Cancelation of certificates.-Certificates issued under these regu-
lations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification
refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regula-
tions or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the
further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.
301.48-12. Inspection in transit.-Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other con-
tainer moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate,
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infestations, infested articles, or articles the movement of which is re-
stricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at
any time or place, and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination
of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may
be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.
301.48-13. Thorough cleaning required of trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and
other vehicles and containers before moving interstate.-Trucks, wagons, cars,
boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting
any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not there-
after be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned
by the carrier at a point within the regulated area. Refrigerator cars originating
in the area designated in 301.48-5 into which fruits or vegetables are to be
loaded for interstate movement from any regulated area shall be thoroughly
swept or cleaned or fumigated prior to loading as may be required by the
inspector.
301.48-14 Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.-Articles sub-
ject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental
or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of
articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identify-






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

ing tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance
with such conditions.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 8th day of February 1941.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common car-
rier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport,
nor shall any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or
Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion
thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class
of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots,
bulbs, seeds * or any other article * specified in the notice
of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other
than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides
that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act,
or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate
provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof,
be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding
1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION
Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to
the Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation
with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine
orders may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agri-
culture, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:
Connecticut: Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street,
New Haven, Conn.
Delaware: Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.
Maryland:
Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Balti-
more, Md.
Japanese Beetle Inspection, Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale,
Md.
Washington County Annex Building, IIagerstown, Md.
Room 202, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.
Massachusetts: 144 Moody Street, Waltham, Mass.
New Jersey:
Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.
P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.
New York:
Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.
Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
Ohio: 21065 Euclid Avenue, Euclid, Ohio.
Pennsylvania:
Room 303, Post Office Building, Harrisburg, Pa.
6905 Torresdale Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.
Room 43S-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Virginia:
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Ave-
nue, Norfolk, Va.
17 North Boulevard, Richmond, Va.
West Virginia:
County Agent's Office, Courthouse Building, Clarksburg, W. Va.






22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling Republic 4142, branch 2598, inspection house
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 224 Twelfth Street SW.,
Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
Conn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Bos-
ton, Mass.
Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Al-
bany, N. Y.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration, Rich-
mond, Va.
State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.
[Copies of the foregoing revision were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area.]
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register February 10, 1941, 3: 09 p. m.; 6 F. R.,
909.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., February 8, 1941.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended
(7 U. S. C. 161), has promulgated a revision of the Japanese beetle quaran-
tine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48) and the regulations supplemental thereto,
effective on and after February 12, 1941. New areas brought within the regu-
lated areas include parts or all of the following counties: Baltimore, Carroll,
Charles, Dorchester, Frederick, Howard, Montgomery, Washington, and Wicomico,
Md.; Cayuga, N. Y.; Butler, Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Venango, and
Warren, Pa.; Chesterfield, Greensville, and Rappahannock, Va.; Marshall and
Ohio, W. Va. Also the cities of Petersburg and Winchester, Va. The area from
which the movement of fruits and vegetables is regulated (regulation 5), has
been extended to include additional areas in Baltimore and Howard Counties,
Md., and Berks, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa., and to bring
in part of Cumberland County, Pa. Metropolitan New York localities and
adjoining area in Fairfield County, Conn., are no longer included in this special
area. There are modifications with reference to fruit and vegetable shipments
to isolated points, and requirements as to certification of bananas, and other
changes. Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,
Washington.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Press, Cleveland, Ohio, February 19, 1941;
the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., February 19, 1941; the News Leader Richmond, Va.,
February 18, 1941; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., February 19, 1941; the Bulletin,
Philadelphia, Pa., February 18, 1941: the Times, New York, N. Y., February 19, 1941;
the News, Newark, N. J., February 19, 1941; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., Feb-
ruary 19, 1941; the Post, Boston, Mass., February 20, 1941; the Sun, Baltimore, Md.,
February 19, 1941; the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, February 19, 1941; the Journal-
Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., February 18, 1941; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I.,
February 19, 1941; the Times, Hartford, Conn., February 18, 1941; and the Evening
Star, Washington, D. C., February 19, 1941.]






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY
QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

FRUITFLY QUARANTINE MODIFIED TO EXTEND VALENCIA ORANGE HARVEST IN
TEXAS AREA
(Press notice)
JANUARY 10, 1941.
To provide for more orderly marketing of this year's large crop of Valencia
oranges in Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo Counties, Tex., the United
States Department of Agriculture today announced the extension of the harvest
season to May 31, from April 30, the date set in the Department's Mexican
fruitfly quarantine regulations. These regulations require a fruit-free period
between harvests to prevent fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande
Valley. April 30 had been set as the date when all citrus fruit must be off the
trees. It remains the date for the closing of the grapefruit harvest season.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, said that extension of the harvesting season for Valencia oranges will
not increase the hazard of fruitfly infestation in the United States. Valencia
oranges are not preferred hosts of the fruitfly and seldom are infested by it.
Plant quarantine inspectors will make an extensive inspection of the groves
during the extra month the oranges are allowed to remain on the trees. Should
this inspection reveal any fruitfly infestation, Dr. Strong said, steps necessary
to prevent its dissemination through interstate movement of the fruit will be
taken.
The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State Depart-
ment of Agriculture, which concurred. Quarantine officials of the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture of Texas and of the United States Department of Agriculture
count on the cooperation of growers and packers that has been extended in the
past.

B. E. P. Q. 512

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BuREU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PlANT QUARANTINE

PART 3i01. DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE MEXICAN
FRUITFLY QUARANTINE BY EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON VALENCIA
ORANGES FROM APRIL 30 TO MAY 31, 1941

301.64--5c Administratire instructions; modifying tfhe restrictions of the
Mejxican fruitfly quarannnntine by ctctldig the harretNting xscrson on Valeneci
oranges from April 30 to May 31, 19'f1. Pursuant to the authority conferred
upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third
proviso of Section 301.64, Chapter III. Title 7. Code of Federal Regulations
[Notice of Quarantine No. 641, it having been determined by me that a modifica-
tion may be safely made without increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican
fruitfly, Section 301.64-5 (a) [subsection (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this
quarantinel is hereby modified to extend the harvesting season for Valencia
oranges for the Texas Counties of Brooks, Willacy. Cameron, and Hidalgo to
the close of May 31 for the year 1941, provided conditions of infestation do not
necessitate an earlier closing date.
The host-free period for Valencia oranges, under this modification, will begin
June 1 and continue to August 31, 1941, inclusive.
This modification does not affect or alter the harvesting season for grapefruit
which closes, under the conditions of the above regulation, on April 30.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 30th day of Decemnber 1940.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureaut of EntomUology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 6, 1941, 11:43 a. m.;
6 F. R., 120.1






24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Seventh Revision.

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301.-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES FOR A LIMITED PERIOD

301.72a. Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements
for specified articles for a limited period. (a) Pursuant to the authority con-
ferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by
the second proviso of 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regula-
tions [Notice of Quarantine No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle],
all certification requirements are hereby waived during the period specified
below for the following articles enumerated in 301.72-3 [regulation 3] when
free from soil and when sanitation practices are maintained to the satisfaction
of the inspector.
(1) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification require-
ments are waived from February 1, 1941, until May 1, 1941, for potatoes and
sweetpotatoes.
(2) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification require-
ments are waived from February 1, 1941, until June 1, 1941, for the following
articles:
Bird sand and bird gravel in packages of 5 pounds or less.
Ground peat in amounts not to exceed 5 pounds per package.
Orchid plants growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.
Osmunda fiber (commonly known as Osmundine, or orchid peat).
It has been determined that the methods under which such articles and
materials are produced and handled, or the application of control measures and
the maintenance of sanitation practices, eliminate risk of spread of the white-
fringed beetle, thereby justifying the removal of certification requirements as
set forth above.
(b) Except as specified in paragraphs (1) and (2) above, all soil, earth, sand,
clay, peat, compost, and manure whether moved independent of, or in connec-
tion with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or things,
shall remain under the restrictions of 301.72-3 [Regulation 3] throughout
the year.
This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 485.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 24th day of January 1941.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 28, 1941, 11:23 a. m.;
6 F. R., 645.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 5, 1941.
POSTMASTER :
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Seventh Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with
Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


B. E, P. Q. 503 February 28, 1941
Second Revision
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301--DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

REGULATIONS MODIFIED

301.72-5c Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine by authorizing treatment by Cl ethyl bromide
solution of balled nursery stock of specified thickness. Introductory note. The
instructions in circular B. E. P. Q. 503 authorizing the treatment of nursery
stock by a solution of methyl bromide, as last revised (March 15, 1940), pro-
vided for specified treatments of larvae of each of the species of white-fringed
beetle, Pantomorus leucoloma Bob., the more common species, and P. peregrinus
Buch., the new species. As a result of further investigations, the instructions
are revised to provide for a modified treatment applying to both species and to
all regulated areas other than in New Orleans and vicinity. The treatment
authorized in the last revision of the circular is continued for the New Orleans
area for the reason that the consistency of the soil in that area is such that
the treatment can be used effectively only on soil balls not greater than 7 inches
in diameter. In other areas, effective results are obtained on soil balls up to
8 inches in diameter. The specifications for treatment in the New Orleans area
are brought forward in the instructions which follow.
(a) Treatment authorized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by subsection (a)
of 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations (Regulation
5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-fringed beetle), the
following method of treatment for balled plants is hereby authorized when car-
ried out under the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States
Department of Agriculture.
(b) Type of material authorized. (1) In Orleans Parish, including the city
of New Orleans, and Saint Bernard Parish, La. The treatment shall be applied
only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter nor greater than
7 inches in thickness when not spherical.
(2) In all regulated area other than the parishies of Orleans and Saint Ber-
nard, La. The treatment shall be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater
than 8 inches in diameter nor greater than 8 inches in thickness when not
spherical.
(c) Treatment method. (1) In all regulated areas.
(i) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays approximately 1 foot deep, which are watertight.
(ii) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls,
also above and beneath them.
(iii) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent de-
natured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by
first mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this
mixture to the water and mixing thoroughly.
(iv) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be applied
evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40 gallons
per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or sprayer.
(2) Exposure and temperature. (i) In Orleans Parish including the city of
New Orleans, and Saint Bernard Parish, La. After the required dosage has






26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period of
8 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 65 F.
(ii) In all regulated areas other than Orleans Parish and Saint Bernard
Parish, La. After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall
remain embedded in the sand for a period of 8 hours. The temperature of the
soil balls during the treatment shall not be lower than 550 F.
(d) Disclaimer. There has been opportunity to test this treatment on only
relatively few varieties of plants, and it is understood that no liability shall attach
either to the United States Department of Agriculture or its employees in the
event of injury to either plants or operators.
(e) Caution. Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is color-
less and practically odorless, and in preparing the solution the operator should
wear an approved gas mask.
This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 503.

AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register February 28, 1941, 11: 36 a. m.;
6 F. R. 1207.]

B. E. P. Q. 486, revised. March 21, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
301.72-5b Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine by authorizing alternative treatments by methyl
bromide fumigation of plants in pots or in soil balls. Introductory note.--The
instructions in circular B. E. P. Q. 486, issued January 28. 1939, provided for
treatment of balled and burlapped nursery stock by methyl bromide fumigation
for larvae of the white-fringed beetle and limited the treatment to plants in
3-inch pots or in 3-inch soil balls, and provided for an exposure of 4 hours
with a dosage of 1 pound of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet at atmospheric
pressures and a temperature of not less than 850 F. As a result of more
recent investigations, the instructions are now revised to provide also that soil
balls not greater than 11 inches in diameter, nor thicker than 11 inches if
not spherical, may be fumigated under partial vacuum, equivalent to at least
24.5 inches of mercury, with a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per
1,000 cubic feet of chamber space, with an exposure of 11/2 hours, at a minimum
temperature of 750 F. These treatments are applicable to both species of the
white-fringed beetle, Pantomorus lencoloma Boh. and P. peregrinus Buch.
(a) Treatments authorized.-Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by subsection (a)
of 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations (Regulation 5
of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-fringed beetle), the
following methods of treatment for certain kinds and sizes of potted and
balled and burlapped plants are hereby authorized, when carried out under
the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States Department
of Agriculture.
(b) Fumigation treatment at atmospheric pressures.-(1) Fumigation must
be done with methyl bromide at a dosage of 1 pound per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the plants, for a period of 4 hours, the soil
masses and the air in the fumigation chamber to be at a temperature of not
less than 85 F.
(2) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or
smaller, or in soil balls not larger than those which would be contained in
3-inch pots, and the plants shall be stacked on racks so that the gas mixture
can have access to all sides of the pots or the soil balls.
(3) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gas-tight doors.
(4) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of
methyl bromide shall be volatilized therein, and the air-gas mixture shall be






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation
period.
(5) The use of a fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout
and with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in
place by refrigerator door fasteners, is recommended.
(c) Fumigation treatment under partial vacuum.-(1) Fumigation under a
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury must be done
with a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber
space, including the space c;ccupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 1%/
hours, the vacuum to be maintained throughout the entire period.
(2) The temperature of the soil balls shall be 750 F. or above, and the
diameter of the soil balls shall be not greater than 11 inches if spherical, or
thicker than 11 inches if not spherical.
(3) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the
vaporized fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in
col;tact with the surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with
one or more changes of air at the end of the exposure period.
(4) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and
will withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A
vacuum pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum
chamber to the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea
level) in not more than 20 minutes is necessary.
(d) Disclaimer.-In authorizing the movement of potted plants or nursery
stock fumigated according to the requirements stated above, it is understood
that no liability shall attach either to the United States Department of Agri-
culture or to any of its employees in the event of injury resulting from the
use of the fumigant.
(e) Caution.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is
colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation of
plants. It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when
exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation. The plants in -the
fumigation chamber should be well aerated by blowing air through them and
the room adequately ventilated before it is entered.
This circular supersedes all instructions set forth in circular B. E. P. Q. 486
dated January 28, 1939.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register March 21, 1941, 11: 37 a. m.;
6 F. R., 1572.]
B. E. P. Q. 489, revised. March 21, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOIOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOM.IESTIC QUARANTINE NOTIES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
301.72-5a Administrative instructions modifying whitte-fringed beetle quaran-
tine regulations authorizing treatmen t of potting soil. Introductory note.
Further experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
of the United States Department of Agriculture indicates that complete mortality
of the various stages of the white-fringed beetles (Pantomorus lteuolooma Boh.
and P. peregrin1us Buch.), in potting soil, can be obtained by fumigating the soil
at a dosage of 2 pounds of carbon disulphide per cubic yard. The instructions
in Circular B. E. P. Q. 489, issued on January 28, 1039, which authorized treat-
ment of potting soil either by fumigation with methyl bromide or by heating,
as a prerequisite to certification are herein extended to provide that c(arhon
disulphide fumigation may also be employed as a methhod of treatment of potting
soil for control of the white-fringed beetles. The specifications for the two treat-
ments formerly authorized are brought forward unchanged in the instructions
which follow and this circular supersedes all instructions set forth in Circular
B. E. P. Q. 48' dated January 28. 1939.
(a) Treatments authorized.-Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by subsection (a) of






28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations (Regulation 5 of
Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-fringed beetle) any one of the
following methods of treatment for potting soil is hereby authorized when car-
ried out under the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States
Department of Agriculture.
(b) Carbon disulphide fumigation.-(1) Potting soil shall be treated in a con-
tainer with carbon disulphide at a dosage of 2 pounds per cubic yard of soil for a
period of 48 hours.
(2) The grade of carbon disulphide shall be comparable to U. S. P. grade having
a specific gravity of 1.25 at 680 F.
(3) The container shall be tight, preferably lined with sheet metal, and shall
have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin immediately after the fumigant
is applied. The container shall not be more than 36 inches deep.
(4) The soil shall be friable, and wet soil shall not be treated by this method.
The fumigant shall be applied to the soil in holes 3 inches deep, the dosage to be
evenly divided among holes 1 foot apart over the surface of the soil, and the
fumigant shall be covered with soil as soon as it is applied.
(5) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 40 F. during the
entire time of treatment.
(6) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of applica-
tion of the fumigant must meet with the approval of an authorized inspector
of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(c) Methyl bromide fumigation.-(1) Potting soil must be treated in a con-
tainer with methyl bromide in a dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl bro-
mide per cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.
(2) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably lined
with sheet metal, and shall have a cover or be covered with a tarpaulin imme-
diately after the fumigant is applied.
(3) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
cation of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector of the
United States Department of Agriculture.
(d) Heat treatment.-(1) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more
per square inch, shall be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the bot-
ton of the sterilizing box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of 45
minutes or until all parts of the load reach a temperature of 2000 F.
(2) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes 1s2
inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at one end to a manifold into
which the steam is introduced.
(3) The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet, 6
inches deep.
(e) Disclaimer.-In authorizing the movement of potting soil treated according
to the requirements stated above, it is understood that no liability shall attach
either to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees
in the event of injury resulting from the use of these treatments.
(f) Caution.-(1) The vapor of carbon disulphide is inflammable and ex-
plosive. At a temperature of 2970 F. it may take fire spontaneously and in the
presence of certain metals, particularly copper, it may ignite at considerably lower
temperatures. It must be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as
electric light bulbs, unprotected brush-type motors, steam pipes, etc. Lighted
cigars, cigarettes, or pipes must never be brought near carbon disulphide.
Carbon disulphide is a blood poison, but poisoning by this chemical is rare.
Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and headache. When these symptoms
develop. the individual should get into the open air.
(2) Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and
practically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation of plants. It is a
poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed to the
gas at concentrations used in fumigation. After fumigation of potting soil by
that method, the cover should be removed and the soil allowed to become aerated.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register March 21, 1941, 11:37 a. m.;
6 F. R., 1571.]






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
IMPORTATION OF FRUITS, VEGETABLES, PLANTS, AND MEATS INTO THE
UNITED STATES
Circular
No. 178.
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
UNITED STATES COAST GUARD,
Wlashington, D. C., 25 March, 1941.
1. The entry into the United States of certain foreign-grown fruits, vegetables,
plants, and plant products is controlled by quarantine or other restrictive
orders issued by the United States Department of Agriculture to reduce or
eliminate the danger of introducing insect pests and plant diseases into this
country.
2. Importation in this case is construed as bringing into the waters of the
United States, whether actually landed or not, and applies to small quantities
as well as large, even to one fruit or vegetable.
3. In order that the regulations of the Department of Agriculture may be
fully complied with and no prohibited or infested articles brought into the
United States aboard coast guard vessels or aircraft, it is directed that the
commanding officer of a coast guard vessel or the pilot of a coast guard air-
craft arriving at a United States port from a port outside the continental limits
of the United States (Hawaii and Puerto Rico particularly)-
(a) Communicate without delay with the district commander (by radio, if
possible, before entering the waters or the air over the waters of the United
States) regarding the regulations governing the importation of these items
and insure that no prohibited fruits or vegetables are on board;
(b) Then report to the district commander (by radio, if possible, before en-
tering the waters or the air over the waters of the United States) what
remaining fruits and vegetables taken from foreign ports are on board;
(c) Afford the facilities for and permit a thorough examination of the ship
or aircraft by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture who may come aboard
to determine whether infestation exists on the ship or aircraft.
4. District commanders will keep themselves informed of the regulations
and procedure of the Department of Agriculture relative to the subject matter
and cooperate to carry out the provisions of this order.
5. In view of the prevalence of rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease among
cattle in foreign countries, fresh and frozen meats procured by vessels or air-
craft in foreign ports shall not be landed in United States ports either as
meat or garbage. Commanding officers of coast guard vessels and pilots of coast
guard aircraft are strictly enjoined to see that these regulations are carried out.
R. R. WAESCHE,
Commandant.

B. E. P. Q. 379 (Revised).
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

MARCH 10, 1941.
NoTICE.-The supply of circular B. E. P. Q. 379, issued July 19, 1935, was
exhausted and this revision is merely to replenish the supply of the original
circular into which Supplement No. 1, dated September 1, 1936, on the required
disinfection of chestnuts, and Supplement No. 2, dated April 5, 1938. on the
waiving of the certificate of origin and plant health for processed plant products.
have been incorporated into the body of the circular.
B. E. P. Q. 379, Superseding P. Q. C. A. 294.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

JULY 19, 1935.
This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Brazil has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to






30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

that country. It includes the regulations of chapters I and II of Brazilian decree
No. 24114 of April 12, 1934, pertaining to the importation of plants and plant
products (superseding decree No. 15189 of Dec. 21, 1921, and those of the resolu-
tion of Nov. 19, 1934).
The summary was compiled by Harry B. Shaw, Plant Quarantine Inspector
in charge of Foreign Service Information of the Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from his translations of the original texts, and reviewed by Ing.
Agron. Eugenio G. Bruck, Assistant, Brazilian Plant Protection Service (Servico
de Defesa Sanitaria Vegetal).
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of publication, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consulted
for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

BASIC LEGISLATION

Decree No. 14356, September 15, 1920 (Art. 10), Regulations of the Biological
Institute of Agricultural Protection.
Decree No. 15189, December 21, 1921, Regulations of the Plant Protection
Service.
Decree No. 24114, April 12, 1934, Regulations of the Plant Protection Service.

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION, COMMERCE, TRANSIT, AND EXPORTATION PROHIBITED

(Decree No. 24114, of Apr. 12, 1934, art. 1, p. 3)

Plants and parts of plants including stocks, scions, cuttings, layers, fruits,
seeds, roots, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, leaves, and flowers, if they are carriers of
injurious diseases and pests.
Live insects, mites, nematodes, and other harmful plant parasites, in any stage
of development.
Cultures of bacteria, and fungi injurious to plants.
Cases, boxes, sacks, or other packing materials that may have served for the
transportation of the products named in this article.
Soils, composts, or plant products That may contain cryptogams, insects, or
other harmful plant parasites in any stage of development, whether or not they
accompany live plants.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES
(Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 1, p. 10)

Banana (Musa spp.) : Seedlings and pseudo-bulbs (bits).
Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) : Stocks, fruits, and seeds.
Coffee (Coffea spp.) : Stocks berries, and seeds; seedlings of other Rubiaceae.
Cottonseed and seed cotton (Gossypium spp).
Rutaceae: Including stocks, seeds, and buds of the genera Citrus, Poncirus,
Fortunella, Evodia, Melicope, Casimoroa, and Toddalia.
Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) : Seedlings, cuttings, and seeds.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM PARTICULAR COUNTRIES

Eucalyptus: Seeds and stocks produced in Argentina, Australia, New Zealand,
and the Union of South Africa.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants and plant products otherwise prohibited may be imported by the Ministry
of Agriculture for experimental purposes. (Decree No. 24114, Apr. 12, 1934, art.
1 (2) ; Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 1 (1).) See p. 10.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

Useful insects, bacteria, and fungi: Importation may be permited by the
Ministry of Agriculture through an order. (Decree No. 24114, Apr. 12, 1934, art.
1 (3).) Seep. 4.
Alfalfa (Medicago spp.), and clover (Trifoliunm spp.) seeds: Federal phyto-
sanitary certificate, also declaring freedom from dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.).
(Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 2.) See p. 10.
Chestnuts (Castanea vulgaris) : Certification of disinfection required. See
p. 14.
Cotton (Gossypiun spp.), and broomcorn, Holcus (Andropogon) sorghum var.
technicus L.: Federal fumigation certificate required. (Resolution of Nov. 19,
1934, art. 5.) See p. 11.
Corn (Zea mays L.) : Federal phytosanitary certificate affirming that the corn
included in the shipment originated in a region free from European corn borer
(Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.). (Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 4.) See p. 11.
Potatoes (Solanum tuberosumn L.) : Federal certificate affirming freedom from
Synchytriurn endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc., Spangospora subterranea (Wahr.)
Johnson, Gorimnoschema operculella Zell., and Leptinotarsa. decemlineata Say.
(Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 3.) See p. 10.
Seed potatoes: To be officially certified also as to the freedom of the crop from
virus diseases and that the tubers have been disinfected. (Resolution of Nov. 19.
1934, art. 3 (1) ; Decree No. 21734, Aug. 16, 1932.) See p. 13.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Almonds, Primuus (Amygdalus) conu n ,tis L.: anise (Pimpinell ainisum L.),
bird seeds, cloves, India (Eugenia aromatica (L.) 0. Kze.), cumin (Cumeinum
cyminum L.), garlic (Allium satirurm L.), millet (Chactochloa italica (L.)
Scribn.) nuts, hazel (Corylus spp.). onions (Allium ccpa L.), and pepper,
black (Piper nigrun L.). (Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, art. 6.) See pp.
11 & 12.
Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Arena satira L.), rye (Sccale cereale
L.), wheat (Triticum aestirum L.), and flax seed (Linum uisitatissinum
L.) for human consumption and industrial purposes. (Resolution of Nov.
19, 1934, art. 6 (1).) See p. 12.
Processed plant products may be imported without certification, subject only
to inspection upon arrival. The inspection may be dispensed with in case
the products are recognized as incapable of harboring parasites. See p. 15.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

(Promulgated by Decree No. 24114 of Apr. 12, 1934, superseding those of Decree No. 15189
of Dec. 21, 1921)

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. Under the conditions hereinafter prescribed, the importation,
cemmerce, transit, and exportation are prohibited of:
(a) Plants and parts of plants, such as stocks, scions, cuttings, layers, fruits,
seeds, roots, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, leaves, and flowers, when they are carriers
of injurious diseases and posts;
(b) Live insects, mites, nematodes, and other harmful plant parasites, in
any stage of development;
(c) Cultures of bacteria and fungi in jurious to plants:
(d) Cases, sacks, or other packing materials which niay have served for
the transportation of the prioducts named in this article:
(e) Soils, composts, or plant products that may contain cryptogtms, insects.
or other harmful plant parasites in any stage of development, whether or not
they accompany living plants.

PL.\NTS WITH SOil. TO HE DISINFECTEI)

(1) Certain species if plants, according to the judgment of tle Plant Pro-
tection Service (Servi(o 1le I)efesa Sanitari Vegetal, maiv he admit led toA
importation with soil subject to obligatory disinfectin' and tihe substitution
of the soil on arrival.






32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

IMPORTATION OF PROHIBITED PLANT MATERIAL FOR EXPERIMENTAL PURPOSES

(2) The Ministry of Agriculture may permit the importation of the plant
material named in paragraphs a, b, c, and e of this article, only for ex-
perimental purposes in scientific establishments of Brazil, subject to preventive
measures which will be prescribed in each case by the National Council for
Agricultural Protection (Conselho Nacional de Defesa Agricola).

USEFUL INSECTS, BACTERIA, AND FUNGI ADMITTED

(3) The Ministry of Agriculture may permit, by Order, after hearing the
National Council for Agricultural Protection, the introduction into the country
of species of insects, fungi, bacteria, etc., recognized as useful, to which the
prohibitions under letters b and c of this article do not apply.

SPECIAL RESTRICTIONS OR PROHIBITIONS MAY BE ESTABLISHED

ART. 2. Independently of the provisions of article 1, the Ministry of Agricul-
ture may prohibit, or establish special conditions for the importation of any
plant, part thereof, or agricultural product which proceeds from any country
suspected of being or which actually is invaded by diseases and pests whose
introduction into the country may constitute a menace to the national cultures.
The Ministry of Agriculture will determine, by Order, which products and
respective countries of origin are comprehended within this article.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED OF PLANTS AND PARTS OF PLANTS

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 3. The importation of plants and parts of plants will be permitted only
through ports and frontier stations in which the Plant Protection Service shall
have been established.
The Ministry of Agriculture will determine periodically, by Order, which
ports and frontier stations have been equipped for the purposes of this article.
(See article 7, Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSULAR VISA
ART. 4. Brazilian consuls in foreign countries will not legalize invoices for
plants or parts of plants unless all the requirements of Brazilian phytosanitary
legislation have been complied with.
ART. 5. Besides other measures that have been taken by the Ministry of
Agriculture, consuls must observe the following:
(a) Require, for the legalization of invoices, that there be presented to him
for visa the official certificate of origin and plant health issued by the competent
authority of the Plant Protection Service of the country of origin.
(b) Require with the phytosanitary certificates the special declarations estab-
lished by Orders of the Ministry of Agriculture for the importation of certain
species and plant products.

CERTIFICATES NOT REQUIRED WITH PLANT PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR FOOD, MANUFAC-
TURING, AND MEDICINAL PURPOSES
(c) Dispense with the phytosanitary certificate only when products intended
for food, manufacturing, medicinal, and ornamental purposes are concerned,
which in the terms of article 13 have unrestricted entry into Brazil, in virtue
of Orders of the Ministry of Agriculture.
(d) Ascertain, in accordance with article 3, whether the products to be ex-
ported (to Brazil) are intended for a port or frontier station at which the Plant
Protection Service is established.
(e) Determine whether or not the plants or parts of plants are included in
prohibitions established by these regulations or by Orders of the Ministry of
Agriculture.
(f) Grant invoices for products whose importation is prohibited only when
authorized to do so by the Ministry of Agriculture, through the intermediary of
Foreign Relations.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL
ART. 6. For the purposes of these regulations, the Ministry of Finance, through
its customhouses and stations, will immediately notify the technical official of
the plant protection service having jurisdiction in the port or frontier station,
of the arrival and foreign source of origin of any plants or parts of plants.
Identical notification will be made by the Ministry of Supervision and Public
Works (Ministerio da Viacio e Obras Publicas), through the Department of
Posts and Telegraphs (Departamento dos Correios e Telegrafos), with respect
to plants and parts of plants imported by mail.

NO RELEASE OF PLANT MATERIAL WITHOUT TECHNICAL AUTHORIZATION
ART. 7. In no case will the Departments referred to in the preceding article
permit the clearance of plants or parts of plants without the respective authori-
zation of the technical official of the Plant Protection Service.
(1) That authorization will be obtained through an application by the im-
porter or his broker, who will furnish the following to that official:
(a) The certificate of origin and plant health of the country of origin, legalized
by the Brazilian consul;
(b) Complete information on the products to be cleared, including that neces-
sary to establish their identity.

CHARACTER OF PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE 3

(2) The certificate in question must be signed by the competent authority of
the plant protection service of the exporting country and indicate:
(a) Quantity and kind of containers;
(b) Weight and marks;
(c) Vessel and date of sailing;
(d) Description of plants and parts of plants;
(e) Place where grown;
(f) Name of exporter;
(g) Name and address of consignee;
(h) Date of inspection;
(i) Attestation that the products exported are deemed free from diseases and
pests injurious to crops.

CERTIFICATE NOT OBLIGATORY FOR SMALL MAIL OR BAGGAGE SHIPMENTS
ART. 8. The certification requirements of the preceding article may be dis-
pensed with for small shipments of plants and parts of plants imported by mail,
including mail orders, registered mail. samples without value, etc.. or those
carried in the baggage of passengers from foreign countries; meanwhile such
products are not allowed to be disembarked without competent inspection by
the Plant Protection Service. (Circular No. 51, of August 30. 1930. makes the
provisions of this article applicable to shipments of plant products imported by
air mail.)
(1) The Ministry of Agriculture can limit the quantity and establish condi-
tions under which it will permit the c:.ertificate to be dispensed with under the
terms of this article.

PASSENGERS MUST DECLARE PLANT MATERIAL IN BAGGAGE
(2) Passengers from foreign countries who carry plants, seeds., cuttings.
rhizomes, tubers, fruits, etc., in their baggage are required to declare them to the
customs authorities for the purpose of a phytosanitary inspection, holding such
material until competent inspection and release have been efftcted by technical
officials of the Plant Protection Service.

The Brazilian phytosanitary certificate is identical with ithat approved by the Inter-
national Convention for Plant Protection and a certifia te based upon ftht is a ceptable
to the Brazilian )epartment of Agriculture. Only certificates issued by the United States
Federal Department of Agricultunrre e acceptable. The essential part of the text of the
certificate adopted by the Convention, as as applicable to Brazil. is: '"The undersikned ( nane
and official title) certifies, in conformity with the results ofl the inspectin of products
included in the shipment, trhat the plants or parts of planis contained in the shipment
described below are doerned free from injurious diseale and pets.~ "







34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

(3) In case of concealment or false declaration, the violators are subject to
the confiscation of the products, in addition to other penalties provided by law.
ART. 9. The requirements of the preceding articles having been met, the tech-
nical official of the Plant Protection Service will proceed to inspect the imported
products, authorizing their release on confirmation of compliance with the
provisions of articles 1 and 2.
Live plants and plant products which rapidly deteriorate will have precedence
in inspection on arrival.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED PLANT MATERIAL
ART. 10. On inspection upon arrival, if it be found that the plants or parts of
plants are included in the prohibition of articles 1 and 2, they will be at once put
under the supervision of the Plant Protection Service in a place indicated by
that Service.
(1) Such products will be reembarked within 15 days, and if not exported
within that period, they will be disinfected or destroyed.
(2) The expense involved by the requirements of this article shall be borne
by the interested person without right of indemnity.
(3) If injurious pests or diseases, or those which are easily distributed,
are concerned, the Plant Protection Service will immediately seize and destroy
the condemned products.
(4) The disinfection, removal, and destruction of condemned products will
be effected by the Plant Protection Service or, in ports where that Service
is not represented, by the customs.

CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH DISINFECTION IS REQUIRED
ART. 11. Imported plant products, infected or infested with fungi, insects,
or other parasites, or even suspected of being carriers of such parasites, which
already exist or are distributed in Brazil and are regarded as of secondary
importance, may be released after being disinfected or sterilized in accordance
with conditions prescribed by the Ministry of Agriculture.
If the infection or infestation referred to in this article is of great intensity,
the plants or parts of plants will be subject to the provisions of article 10.

PLANTS FROM SUSPECTED COUNTRIES TO BE HELD IN QUARANTINE
AET. 12. Plants or parts of plants from suspected countries or localities, or
whose sanitary condition on arrival is doubtful, may be planted in quarantine
in an official establishment, or in a place offering the necessary guaranties, in the
judgment of the Plant Protection Service, which will keep them under super-
vision and will not permit their removal without previous authorization.
ART. 13. The Ministry of Agriculture will determine, by Order, which plant
products intended for food, manufacturing, medicinal, or ornamental purposes,
whose unrestricted entry into Brazil does not constitute a menace to the national
cultures, may be exempted from some or all of the requirements of the present
regulations.
DEFECTIVE CERTIFICATE INVOLVES BOND

ART. 14. For errors or imperfections in the phytosanitary certificates required
by these regulations for the importation of plants or parts of plants, the importer
may be allowed, at the discretion of the Ministry of Agriculture, to give a bond
of responsibility and cash security under conditions to be fixed later and within
a predetermined period and certified accordingly.
(1) The permission referred to in this article will be granted only for prod-
ucts which do not fall within the provisions of article 1 or within measures
of exclusion in force.
(2) The conditions and fees required for the concession referred to in this
article will be regulated by special orders.
ART. 15. Penalties.
SPECIAL QUARANTINES

The special quarantines of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture were codified
by the Resolution of November 19, 1934, as follows:







1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMTENTS 35

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited from any country, into any part of
the national territory, of the following plants and parts of plants:
(a) Cottonseed and seed cotton (Gossypium spp.) ; to prevent the introduction
of the boll weevil, Aidth-.ioinus Urandis Boh., and other pests.
(b) Banana (Musa spp.) seedlings and pseudo-bulbs (bits) ; to prevent the
introduction of the Panama disease. Fu.sarium eubense E. F. Sm.
(o) Coffee (Coff0a spp.): Stocks (seedlingfl), berries, seeds; seedlings of
other Rubiaceae: to prevent the introduction of the rust, Hemilcia vastatri.r B.
and Br. and Hypothenemus sp., a beetle.
(d) Stocks, fruits, and seeds of cocoa (Threobronia cacao L.) : to prevent the
introduction of witches' broom, Exoascuus thcobromae Ritz. Bos, and Marasmius
perniciosus Stahel, etc.
(e) Seedlings, cuttings, and seeds of sugarcane (Saiccharum officinarum L.);
to prevent the introduction of virus diseases, the European corn borer, Pyra usta
nubilalis Hbn., etc.
(f) Seeds, buds, and stocks of the genera Citrus, Poncirus. FortuInlla, and
other genera of the family Rutaceae, as well as of the genera Evodia, Mclicope,
Casimoroa. and Toddalia. also of the same family : to prevent the introduction
of citrus canker, Bacterium eitri Hasse.
(g) Seeds and stocks of Eucalyptus produced in Argentina, Australia, New
Zealand, and the Union of South Africa.

PROHIBITED PLANTS M.AY BE IMPORTED BY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

(1) The Ministry of Agriculture reserves the right to import the plants and
parts of plants mentioned in this article in small quantities, or to authorize
State governments to import them for cultural experiments in their tecmhico-
experimental establishments, observing, however, protective measures prescribed
by the Plant Protection Service (ServiQo de Defesa Sanitaria Vegetal).
(2) The Ministry of Agriculture may import plant species mentioned in this
article on the application and for the account of private persons, the importa-
tions being subject to conditions prescribed by the Plant Protection Service.
Such plants will be grown in quarantine in official establishments of the Min-
istry, and only the respective progeny of the planting may be delivered to the
interested person.

ALFALFA ANDI) CLOVER SEEDS MUST BE FREE FROM DODDER

ART. 2. The importation is prohibited, under the provision of article 2 of
Decree No. 24114, of April 12. 1934, of seeds of alfalfa (Medicaflo satira L.)
and of other leguminous forage-crop seeds if the required phytosanitary cer-
tificate does not include a declaration that such seeds are free from dodder
(Cuscutta seeds).
CERTIFICATE REQ UIRED FOR POTATOES

ART. 3. Under the terms of article 2 of the above-mentioned decree, importa-
tion is prohibited of potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) that are not ac-
companied by a phytosanitary certificate affirming that they originated in a
locality free from the following parasites: Potato wart, S!ynJchytriulm endobio-
ticum (Schilb.) Perc.; Ipowdery scab, Sppo0gospora sutbterranea (Wahr.) John-
son; potato tuber worm (Phthorimaea) (GnorimoSehema operculella Zell.; and
the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

SEED POTATOES MUST BE CERTIFIED AS FREE FROM VIRUS DISEASES

(1) Where seed potatoes are concerned, in addition to the above-mentioned
phytosanitary certificate, they must be accompanied by a certificate issued by
the Ministry of Agriculture of the producing country, declaring that they :proceed,(
from an establishment that grows seed potatoes, officially controlled (super-
vised) against the so-called degeneration or virus diseases. (See Deree No.
21734 of Aug. 16, 1932, pp. 15 and 16.)






36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

PORT OF ENTRY FOR POTATOES FROM SPAIN AND PORTUGAL

(2) The importation of potatoes from Spain and Portugal exclusively for
consumption will be permitted through the port of Rio de Janeiro alone.
(3); For the purposes of the preceding paragraph, in addition to the phyto-
sanitary certificate, the presentation of a certificate of disinfection is indis-
pensable; both certificates must be visaed by the Brazilian Consulate at the
port of embarkation, to prevent the introduction of the potato tuber worm,
Gnorimoschema operculella, and powdery scab, Spongospora subterranea.

EUROPEAN CORN BORER CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR SEED CORN

ART. 4. Under the terms of article 2 of Decree No. 24114 the importation of
corn seed (Zea mays L.) is prohibited in the absence of a declaration on the
required phytosanitary certificate that the corn included in the shipment origi-
nated in a region free from the European corn borer, Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn.

FUMIGATION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED WITH COTTON AND BROOMCORN

ART. 5. Under the terms of article 2 of the above-mentioned Decree No. 24114,
the importation of raw cotton and cotton wastes, as well as of straw and panicles
of broomcorn, Andropogon sorghum var. technicus, is prohibited, unless accom-
panied by a fumigation certificate.
In the absence of this Certificate, or if the certificate does not offer the neces-
sary guaranty, fumigation may be effected at the port of arrival if a properly
equipped station or post exists at the port of arrival.

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN PLANT PRODUCTS UNRESTRICTED

ART. 6. Under the terms of article 13 of the above-mentioned Decree No.
24114 a phytosanitary certificate is not required for the importation of the fol-
lowing products: Almonds (Amygdalus communis L.), anise (Pimpinella anisum
L.), bird seeds, cloves, India (Eugenia aromatica (L.) O. Kze.), cumin (Oumi-
num cyminum L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), millet (Chaetochloa italica (L.)
Scribn.), nuts, hazel (Corylus spp.), onions (Allium cepa L.), pepper, black
(Piper nigrum L.).

CEREALS FOR CONSUMPTION AND MANUFACTURE UNRESTRICTED

(1) The cereals, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena sativa L.), rye
(Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and flax seed (Linum
usitatissimum L.), are included in the concession established by this article
when imported for human consumption or for industrial purposes (stock feeds,
industrial ferment products, etc.).
(2) Persons interested in the concession prescribed by the preceding para-
graph shall sign an undertaking to the Plant Protection Service at the port
through which entry is made that the grains and seeds above referred to
will not be used for planting.
(3) The products mentioned in this article shall be released from the cus-
toms only on the authorization of the Plant Protection Service.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 7. The importation, under the terms of article 3 of Decree No. 24114,
of plants and parts of plants from abroad will be permitted only through the
ports of Balem, Corumba, Mangos, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Rio
Grande, Santos, Sio Francisco, and Sio Salvador.
ART. 8. Quarantined areas of Brazil.
ART. 9. Approved form of certificate for plant material intended for export.
ART. 10. Prohibiting the maintenance within economic crops of plants which
may serve as hosts of parasites of those crops.

BOND REQUIRED FOR PRODUCTION OF CERTIFICATES

ART. 11. In accordance with the provisions of the second paragraph of ar-
ticle 14 of Decree No. 24114, a bond is established in cases of the straying of,
or irregularities in, phytosanitary certificates required for the importation of
plants and parts of plants, under the following conditions:







1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37

(a) The period for the presentation of the certificate shall be 30 days for
the preceding products proceeding from countries of the American continent,
and 60 days for other countries, counting from the date of the signature of
the bond.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL
(b) Imported products are subject, in addition to thorough inspection on
arrival, to disinfection, fumigation, or quarantine, at the discretion of the
Plant Protection Service.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SELECTED SEED POTATOES
(Decree No. 21734, Aug. 16, 1932)
ARTICLE 1. The importation of selected seed potatoes, with exemption from
customs imports (in the terms of article 3, No. XIII-3. Law No. 1616 of Dec.
30, 1906) is subject to previous authorization by the Ministry of Agriculture.
(a) This authorization will be granted only to growers or syndicates and
agricultural cooperatives registered in the Service of Inspection and Agricul-
tural Protection (Servico de Inspeco e Fomento Agricolas), and to commer-
cial firms regularly established and registered in Brazil for the seed business.
(b) Importation shall be made only through ports or localities where there
is a representative of the Biological Institute of Agricultural Protection (Insti-
tuto Biologico de Defesa Agricola) authorized to carry out phytosanitary in-
spection. (See article 7, Resolution of Nov. 19, 1934, p. 12.)
(c) The Ministry of Agriculture will publish the names of the authorized
ports or localities through which importation will be permitted.
ART. 2. Seed potatoes may be imported into Brazil only from countries
where technical experimental establishments specializing in the culture of this
plant exist, according to the criterion of the Servico de Inspeciio e Fomento
Agricolas, in order to prevent the importation of unfit varieties into regions
for which the tubers are intended, and to prevent the introduction of in-
jurious or exotic diseases, and the importation will be subject to all the pro-
visions and instructions concerning phytosanitary protection, applying to the
case the judgment of the Superior Council of Agricultural Protection insti-
tuted by article 90 of the regulations approved by Decree No. 15189 of
December 21, 1921.
(a) The phytosanitary certificate indicating origin referred to in article 2
of the resolution of May 26, 1928 (superseded by article 3 of the resolution
of Nov. 19, 1934) ; shall affirm that the tubers proceed from regions free from
the parasites Synchytrium endobioticumn (Schilb.) Perc., Spongospora subter-
ranea (Wahr.) Johnson, and (Phthorimaea) Gnorimo.sehi eu operculella Zell.,
and Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, and that the imported tubers are free
from those and other parasites.
(b) In addition to this certificate, each shipment must be accompanied by a
statement of the Minister of Agriculture of the producing country affirming
that selected seed potatoes are concerned.
(c) If, upon inspection on arrival, the tubers indicate need of disinfection
by immersion in insecticidal and fungicidal solutions, this precaution will be
required at the expense of the importer.
ART. 3. Tubers which may be deemed by the Servico de Inspecao e Fomento
Agricolas unfit for planting may be used for consumption. provided that the
competent sanitary authorities are not opposed, and that the importer pays
the imposts required by law.
ART. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities unfit for planting or for
food shall be destroyed under the supervision of the same at the expense of
the importer.
ART. 5. Concerns the storage of imported seed potatoes.
ART. 6. Concerns the requirements to be met by the importer in applying for
a permit to import seed potatoes.
ARTS. 7, 8, and 9. Concern importers of seed potatoes.
DISINFECTION OF CHESTNUTS IEQUIRED
(Resolution of Jan. 25, 19306 Diario Oficial, Jan. 29, 1936)
ARTICLE 1. The obligatory certification of the disinfection of chestnuts
(Castanea rulgaris) imported from any source, is hereby established.






38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

The presence of the lepidopteron Laspeyresia sp., and of the coleopteron
Balaninus sp., in any stage of development, being verified by inspection in the
port of destination, the Servico de Defesa Sanitaria Vegetal, at the request
and expense of the consignees, will subject the shipment to a new disinfection,
providing that the infestation does not exceed 2 percent, the interested persons
being subjected to other precautionary measures deemed necessary.

CERTIFICATE NOT REQUIRED FOR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS

(Order of February 10, 1938: Diario Oficial, February 17, 1938)
ARTICLE 1. The certificate of origin and plant health for imported plants or
parts of plants that have been processed, dried, manufactured, or which have
undergone any treatment that devitalizes them, may, in the terms of the said
regulations, be dispensed with.

SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL
ART. 2. The products included in the preceding article are subject to inspec-
tion on arrival in ports where phytosanitary inspection is provided for, and will
be released by the customs only by authorization of the technical expert of the
phytosanitary service.
The required inspection of products recognized as being incapable of harbor-
ing parasites may, at the discretion of the Director, Phytosanitary Service,
be dispensed with.


B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement No. 3.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

MARCH 3, 1941.

NOTIFICATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, HEALTH AND LANDS, NO.
46-29/38-A, DATED UNDER AGRICULTURE, NEW DELHI, OCTOBER 9, 1940
This Notification advises that Port Blair should be substituted for Rangoon
in clause (iii) of paragraph 1 of the Order published in Notification No. F.
320/35-A, dated July 20, 1936. Accordingly, the above substitution should be
made in paragraph (c) of article 1 on page 5 of B. E. P. Q. 404, revised.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



B. E. P. Q. 444, revised, supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JANUARY 22, 1941.
Dahir of March 21, 1933; Bulletin Officiel No. 1069, April 21, 1933, p. 373.

FORM OF CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL

In addition to the regulations given on page 7 of B. E. P. Q. 444, revised, un-
der the heading "Phytosanitary Control of Imported Plant Material," as to
ports of entry and the required copy of a shipper's invoice, the Dahir of March
21, 1933, requires that all shipments into the French Zone of Morocco of
seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions, grafts, cut flowers, pits of fruits, tubers,
bulbs, rhizomes, roots, and seeds, must be accompanied by a certificate of
sanitary inspection conforming to the model appended hereto.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chiief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

CERTIFICATE OF SANITARY INSPECTION

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

Indication of Official Service of Plant Protection

I, the undersigned --------------- certify, according to the results:'
Of the supervision of plants at origin;
Of the inspection of products comprising the shipment;
That the plants or parts of plants contained in the invoice described below,
are deemed free from injurious insect pests and plant diseases, especially
those enumerated hereafter:



Description of the invoice:


Number, weights, and nature of the packages:


Marks on containers:


Description of the plants or parts of plants and place where grown:


Name and address of shipper:


Name and address of consignee:


Place and date:

SEAL Signature:

B. E. P. Q. 409, supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FREE CITY OF DANZIG

MARCH 24, 1941.

The International Bulletin of Plant Protection, Year XIV, No. 12, December
1940.
ABROGATION OF PHYTOSANITARY MEASURES

"The former Free City of Danzig being, by virtue of the Law, dated Septem-
ber 1, 1939, incorporated into the Reich, all legislative regulations, including
phytosanitary measures taken previous to this date, have been abrogated.
(Nachrichtenblatt fur den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst, Berlin, Anfang Sep-
tember 1940, 20. Jahrg., Nr. 9, S. 56.)"
The above action apparently revokes the Plant-Quarantine Import Restrictions
of the Free City of Danzig, as issued in B. E. P. Q. 409, July 20, 1936.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaranttine.

4 Name, first name, and rank of official of the certifying service of the country of origin.
5 Strike out line which does not apply.






40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan-March

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
MINNESOTA STATE PLANT QUARANTINES AND TERMINAL INSPECTION
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 7, 1941.
(1) The State of Minnesota has established terminal plant inspection
within the provisions of the law embodied in section 596, Postal Laws and
Regulations, to prevent the introduction and dissemination of certain insects
into Minnesota, such as San Jose scale, oyster-shell scale, root lice-such as
strawberry root lice, and other plant pests of economic importance, with respect
to the following plants and plant products:
All wild and cultivated trees, shrubs, and woody vines; perennial roots,
such as peonies and iris; small-fruit plants, such as strawberries and
raspberries; herbaceous perennials, such as hollyhocks and other hardy
flowering plants; cuttings, buds, grafts, and scions for or capable of
propagation.
(2) Facilities for terminal plant inspection are being provided and will be
maintained at Saint Paul, Minnesota. Parcels containing articles subject to
terminal inspection addressed for delivery in Minnesota, including those orig-
inating in Minnesota, are, therefore, to be accorded the treatment prescribed
by section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and transmitted to the plant in-
spector at Saint Paul. However, the Minnesota arrangement permits the
delivery of parcels containing the above-named plants and plant products to
the addresses in all cases when accompanied with a valid certificate of in-
spection issued by a plant inspector of the State of origin certifying the articles
contained in the individual packages are free of harmful diseases or insect
infestation, with the exception that in case of shipments of materials restricted
under the provisions of Minnesota State quarantines listed below, the nursery
or premises inspection certificate (usually issued once a year) as required under
paragraph 2, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, will not be satisfactory
for such purpose. In such cases a special certificate indicating compliance with
the restrictions of the quarantine involved is required.
(3) Packages containing any plants or plant products addressed to places in
Minnesota may be accepted for mailing only when plainly marked so that the
contents may be readily ascertained by an inspection of the outside. The law
makes failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not
more than $100.
(4) Pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, embodied in amended section 596,
Postal Laws and Regulations, the State of Minnesota has also issued State
plant quarantines on account of the alfalfa weevil and on account of "orange
rust" and "virus diseases" of the mosaic type affecting raspberry plants, pro-
hibiting or regulating the entry into Minnesota of certain plants and plant
products as follows:

(A) QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF THE ALLFFA WEEVIL
California-Counties of Alameda, Alpine, Contra Costa, Lassen, Merced, Mono,
Plumas, San Joaquin, Santa Clara, Sierra, Siskiyou, and Stanislaus.
Colorado-Counties of Delta, Garfield, Gunnison, Mesa, Moffat, Montrose,
Ouray, Rio Blanco, Routt, and San Juan.
Idaho-All that part lying south and southeast of the south boundary of
Idaho County.
Nevada-Entire State.
Oregon-Counties of Baker, Harney, Jackson, Josephine, Malheur, and Union.
Utah-Entire State.
Wyoming-Counties of Albany, Carbon, Converse, Fremont, Goshen, Hot
Springs, Laramie, Lincoln, Natrona, Niobrara, Platt, Sweetwater, and Uinta.
Plant material affected: Alfalfa hay as such or other hay of any kind, cereal
straw-acceptance for mailing entirely prohibited.
Alfalfa meal prohibited during April, May, June, July, August, September,
and October.
Alfalfa meal accepted during January, February, March, November, and
December, when accompanied with approved certificate.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

(B) QUARANTINED ON AOCOUNT OF ORANGE RUST AND VIRUS DISEASES

All States.
Plants affected: Raspberry plants-accepted for mailing only when accom-
panied with approved certificate.
Under the provisions of paragraph 2 (b), amended section 596, Postal Laws
and Regulations, postmasters should not accept such plants and plant products
when presented for mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regu-
lations and should invite the attention of the mailers thereto.
Parcels inadvertently accepted in the mails in violation of these quarantines
and quarantine regulations are subject to the treatment prescribed by paragraph
4 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmtaster General.


MODIFICATION OF MISSISSIPPI STATE PLANT QUARANTINES

(Amending Notices Issued April 7, 1937, and May 7, 1940)

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 28, 1941.
Mississippi plant quarantines have been modified, effective at once, so as to
prohibit entirely the entry into that State of sweetpotato seed and sweetpotato
plants from the entire State of Tennessee. This is in addition to the restrictions
previously imposed, set forth in notices published in the May 1937 and June
1940 Supplements to the Postal Guide.
Postmasters will, therefore, please make the proper correction and be governed
accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1
to March 31, 1941, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were im-
posed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

H. M Yoder .---------------------. Brownsville, Tex..-- 1 orange -------------........... $1.00
Ignacio Gonzalez. -----------------.. ----_ do...----------- 2 oranges---------.---.....------. 1.00
Cesario Hernandez----------------- do ------------- 6 avocados with seed.....------- 1.00
Marie Castillo-.--.- --------------- Del Rio, Tex -.. 4 avocados ........... ....... 1.00
Rosa Castaneda ---------------------- __do ------.- -.... 1 orange -- .. .......... 1. 00
Maria Jiminez Garza --------------- Eagle Pass, Tex .. 1 apple and 1 orange 1.00
Juan Zuniga ---------.---------------- do .... .. 2 oranges and 4 nodes sugarcane 1.00
M atilda E. Garcia --..--...-- --------. ... do.---.-. .... .. 14 plants .. .......... 1.00
Dimanthia Gonzales.. .-- --- ... ----- .. do-----. ---. .. 2 avocados.. 1.00
Mrs. Maria Jesus de Coleman-------. El Paso, Tex...... 2 guavas ........... 0
Mrs. Ramona Armendariz Moneida.-- .---do -------------. 4 ounces acorns .......... 1.00
Felipe Galvis. -------------------- ---..do--...-- . ... 2 pl)ants in soil .........._.. 1, (1
Herminia Pena de Gutierrez ---------. .do ..- ... 1 1plant in soil and 1 plant cutting 1. (00
Petra Delgado de Macias -----..-.. -- .... do- ...- ------.. 17 gladiolus corns, t6 ounces tree 1. 00
seed, and 6 Mexican oranges.
Ascencio Mendez ...... ...... -.. idalgo, Tex.... 5 plants... 1.00
Tomas Vasquez ---... .... -- .. do ... ...... 1 avocado ... 00
Juana Cavazes-... ... ...---. ------ -..... do --.. .- ....do... . .. 1.00







42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March



Name Port Contraband Penalty

Tomas Pena------------------------ Hidalgo, Tex ------ 6 plants---------------------- $1.00
Mrs. Antonio Rocha -------------- Laredo, Tex------- 5 guavas ------_------------ 1.00
Mrs. F. Ramirez-------------------do------------ 10 plants---------------------- 1.00
M. Cardona-----------------------do---------------do-----------------1.00
Henry Rose-----------------------do------------ 6 mamey seed and 3 nodes sugar- 1.00
cane.
Ana M. Perigrina -------------------do------------ 2 oranges ---------------------- 1.00
Maria Delgado ---------------------do----------- 5 avocado seed ------------------ 1.00
Juana S. Aguierre -------------------do------------ 1 plant__ ------ ----------- 1.00
David Moises Patino -----------------do------------ 1 orange ----------------------- 1.00
Louie J. Kalschmar ------------------do------------ 5 oranges---------------------- 1.00
R. Gomez-----------------------do------------6 oranges_---------------------- 1.00
Isidra Limon _- ------------------ -----do .------- 6 -guavas ----------------------- 1.00
Jose Refugio Sanchez -------- ----------do ------------ 5 oranges ---------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Otto Ludeke -------------------do ------------5 Irish potatoes -------------- 1.00
Mrs. Mercedes Mendoza ------------. do--- 1 guava ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Alma Kujath------------------do ------------ 10 tangerines, 3 oranges, 1 apple, 2.00
and 5 nodes sugarcane.
Juana Solis Vda. de Luna ---------------do------------ 2 avocado seed ------------------ 1.00
Jose San Roman -------------------- do------------ 4 avocados with seed, 2 sweet 2.00
limes, 6 plants, 12 haw apples,
and 2 pounds seed with pulp.
Juana Ontureras --------------- ---do------------ 6 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Sarah Schapeno ----------- -----do------------ 2 oranges---------------------- 1.00
M. F. Noack -------- --------- ---do ---------- 3 oranges ---------------------- 1.00
E. R. Johnson ----------------------do---------------do ------------------1.00
Mrs. Antolina Sadres_ --------------Laredo, Tex-------4 plants with soil---------------- 1.00
Jose Ruiz Perez ---------------------do------------ 2 oranges---------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Ballema Ruiz ------------------do------------ 5 plants and 2 mamey seed------ 1.00
Felix Trevino -- ------------ ----- do------------ 4 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Peter J. Dooley .---------------- ----- do .-----------6 oranges---------------------- 1.00
Romona Gonzales -------------------do ----------- 4 mameys and 9 nodes sugarcane_ 2.00
Librada Sanchez --------------- -----do ------------ pound papaya seed----------- 1.00
Elena Contreras -------- -------------do-..-------- 1 orange----------------------- 1.00
J. E. Williams ----------------- -----do------------ 1 mamey and 1 orange ---------- 1.00
A. R. Juarez---- ----------------------do----------- 1 orange----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Fannie Carmin ----------------- do------------4 oranges and 6 tangerines----- 1.00
Maria A. Varga --------------- ----- do------------ 9 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Jesse Ortiz -------------------- do----------- 5 guavas and 2 sweet limes------ 1.00
Miss Conception Ortiz --------------do---------- 5 guavas and 7 sweet limes------ 1.00
Jose T. Estrada-- ---------------- -----do ----------- 1 avocado with seed ------------- 1.00
Jose Estrada-----------------------do --------- ----do------------------------ 1.00
Miss Josefina Perez --.----- --------do-- ------- 14 geranium cuttings------------ 1.00
Alfonso Torres ---------------------do------------4 oranees---------------------- 1.00
Leonard Gonzales --- --------------do-- ------- 4 cactus plants _-------------- 1.00
Matilde Ouinones -------------- -----do- -------- 32 plants----------- -------- 1.00
Mrs. Garcia de Hernandez ------ -----do------------ 3 plants with soil ----------- -- 1.00
Henry T. Danforth ----------------do------------ 4 avocados --------------------- 1.00
















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE


LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.
J. C. HOLTON. Agent. Cooperatire Field Relations.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
3MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Surrey and Information.
J. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Inaestigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect In restigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE. in Charge, Dirision of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge. Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in. Charge, Division of Insecticides a.nd Fungicides.
C. F. W. !UESEBECK, ill Charge. Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge. Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER. in Charge, Dirision of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quaranrtines.
E. R. SASSCER. in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS. inM Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail M1th Control
(headquarters, Greenfield. Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle annd Gypsy Mloth. and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines. European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters. Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thiurberia Weeril Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Te..).
P. A. HOIDALE. in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER. in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
43












U. S GCVERNMENT PR NTING OFFCE: 941












S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 147 Issued September 1941


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1941


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------. .-----.-------.--.------ -- ---.--.-----.-_ 45
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48).--- -------------45
Instructions to postmasters- -------.-------------..---....._---.... .--------------------- 45
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 459, supplement No. 1,
third revision)- ------ -- ------------------------------------------... 46
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4). 47
Administrative instructions amending the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
lifting certification requirements on certain shipments of fruits and vegetables (B. E. P. Q.
513) .._ --------------------------------------------------------------_-__--..-- 49
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13) -.---------._ 49
Inspection of Hawaiian vessels authorized during night hours (press notice) ---------------- 49
Revision of regulation 8 effective May 12, 1941... ------ --------------------------.. 50
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) _------------------------------- 51
Texas grapefruit harvest extended through May 31 (press notice) ..--- ------------------ 51
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 512, revised) ----- ------------------ 51
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ---------------------------52
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eighth revision).--...------------. 52
Miscellaneous items.-------------------------------------------- -------------- ----------- 53
Lee A. Strong dies in Arizona (press notice)-- ----------------------------.. -- ---- ----..- 53
Amendment of certain Army regulations with respect to the enforcement of plant quarantine
restrictions of the United States Department of Agriculture (Circular No. 83, War Depart-
ment) .-------.- -----------------. ----------- -- . -------------------------..--... 54
Revision of Oregon plant quarantine relating to grapevines and cuttings ------------------ 54
Customs regulations amended-Plant Quarantine (T. D. 50394) -.--------- ..------------- 55
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of Canada (B. E. P. Q. 514) ..--------------. 55
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of Canada (B. E. P. Q 514, supplement No. 1)_ 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement No. 4). 61
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act..--.-----------------........---.--.. 62
Organifatiornof the-Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -----.---..... ---------..--------. 64



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 2S, 1941.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision of
Federal Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, issued by the
United States Department of Agriculture, which became effective February 12,
1941, and which increases somewhat the area previously under quarantine and
also modifies slightly the restrictions formerly imposed. You will please be
governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postnmsitcr Oenertl.
406905- -41--1 45





46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 1, Third Revision.
APRIL 11, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

It has been found as a result of further experiments with treatments for freeing
nursery stock and potted plants from the immature stages of the Japanese beetle,
that 21/ pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet applied for a period of
3% hours at a temperature of not less than 57 F., or for 3 hours at not less
than 600 F., is. sufficient to kill such larvae. These instructions are accordingly
revised to authorize the use of such treatments in addition to the four schedules
heretofore provided for in the second revision of supplement No. 1 to this circular.
301.48-b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treatment author-
ized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 48] subsection (1) (5) of 301.48b' [on page 13 of the
mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939] is hereby
further modified to read as follows:

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.-An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation. during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber
must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. :ThNp ven-
tilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period
of removal of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.-The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:

Dosage Dosage
Period of (methyl Period of (methyl
Temperature at least bromide Temperature at least trtm bromide
treatment per 1,000 per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)

Hours Pounds U' Hours Pounds
1. 70 F 2% 2 4. 570 F 3------------------ 2V
2. 630 F----------------- 2V2 2 1 5. 54o F--------------- 4 2
3. 600 F_ --------------- 33 212 6. 50 F----------------- 4% 2


The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied
by the load.
Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare
roots or in 12-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should not

SThis section was originally issued as 301.48a.





19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

be puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of
the inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks
or separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces
of pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other they should not be jammed tightly together. Treatments 1
and 2 may be employed in fumigating packaged plants prepared in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.
Varieties of plants.-The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.
The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subsec-
tion (1) (5) (ii) of 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular
B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.
This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1-revised, dated September
27, 1940.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register April 12, 1941, 11 :12 a. m.; 6 F. R.,
1919.]

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 4). Effective May 1, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Euto-
mology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice
of Qaarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], subsections (i) (4),
(k) (1), and (m) (2) of 301.48b [see pages 6, 8, and 15, respectively, of the
mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939,] are
hereby modified, effective May 1, 1941, to read as follows:
301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatmient of nur.ery
produ,'ts, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.

(1i POTTING SOIL



(4) Lead ar.senate treatme(nt

SeaonL.-The treatment must be applied before August 1.
Condition and type of soil.-The soil must be friable. Wet soil must never
be treated. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid
or neutral in reaction. Any type of soil may be treated provided it meets these
requirements.
Dosage.-Two pounds to 1 cubic yard.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed with the soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated iln the
above manner, by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following
October 1 and June 15, inclusive.
Handling of potted plants.-When pla:nts potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil
are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil
of these beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsemnale
at the rate of 1,100 pounds per acre.
Treated plants carried after June 15.-When plants potted in soil treated as
prescribed are carried after June 15, they may be again eligible for certification
between October 1 and June 15, inclusive, of the second year if, oil August 1
of the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate
of 2 pounds per cubic yard.
* *





48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(K) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS
* *

(1) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.-The treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be
used in the fall.
Condition of-soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Dosage.-Twenty-six pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,100 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,100 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
1,000 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.
Application.-The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 inches of soil.
Period of treatment.-Plants must not be placed on or in the soil thus treated
until after October 1.


(M) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
* *

(2) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.-Treatment must be applied by July 1. Plants may be certified-when
the period of treatment is completed, and until the following June 15.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth. This treatment
is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Dosage.-Twenty-six pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,100 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a con-
centration of 1,100 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
1,000 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.
Period of treatment.-Plants in plots treated initially must not be dug until
October 1; those on re-treated plots may be dug on September 20.
Application.-Lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with
the upper 3 inches of soil. The ridge of soil between the plants in the rows and
the soil about the base of the plants must be removed to a depth of 2 inches and
placed in the space between the rows of plants. Lead arsenate may be applied
with a suitable distributor, or broadcast by hand, before or after the hoeing
operation is completed. Then the soil between the rows of plants must be cul-
tivated three times. On the last cultivation, the cultivator is adjusted in such
a manner that the treated soil is thrown toward the rows of plants. At least 3
inches of treated soil must be placed in the rows about the bases of the plants.
Varieties of plants.-The varieties of plants, which have been treated success-
fully by this method are given in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-
Circular E-418:
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in (k).
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in (k).
Done at Washington, D. C., this 25th day of April 1941.
[SEAL] LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.
I Filed with the Division of the Federal Register May 1, 1941, 11 :17 a. m.; 6 F. R. 2225.1






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

B. E. P. Q. 513. Effective April 21, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS AMENDING THE RESTRICTIONS OF TH ESITIS F E JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE BY LIFTING CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS ON CERTAIN SHIP-
MENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by the fourth proviso of 301.48, Chapter III, Title
7, Code of Federal Regulations [Japanese Beetle Quarantine (No. 48)], the first
subparagraph of paragraph (1) of subsection (a) and paragralh (1) of sub-
section (b) of 301.48-5 of said Chapter III, are hereby amended, effective
April 21, 1941, to read as follows:
" 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and Cregetables (a) Control
of movement.-(1) Unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor, by an
inspector, except as provided in subdivisions (i) to (iv), inclusive, of this section,
no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved interstate via refrigerator car
or motortruck from any of the areas listed below to or through any point outside
the regulated areas:
* *
"(b) Conditions of certification.-(1) When the fruits and vegetables moving
by motortruck have actually been inspected by the United States Department of
Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points
for such certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping
needs and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions
satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments
during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued ard certific'ation with-
held by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles."
The effect of the amendment is to waive all certification requirements on fruits
and vegetables in lot shipments of three pieces or more by common carrier.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of April 1941.
AVERY S. IIOYT.
Acthiug 'h ief of ]Bur au.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register April 21, 1941, 11 :34 a. m.; 6 F. R. 2048.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY AND
MELONFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 13)

INSPECTION OF HAWAIIAN VESSELS AUTHORIZED DURING NIGHT HOURS

(Press notice)
MAY 13, 1941.
To aid emergency shipping needs, plant quarantine inspection for vessels ar-
riving at mainland ports from Hawaii has been made possible during night as
well as daylight hours, by a revision of Regulation 8 of Quarantine No. 13, the
Department of Agriculture announced today. The change was effective May 12.
Heretofore boarding and inspection of these vessels at mainland ports was
from sunrise to sunset, primarily because of the additional load which night
inspections placed on a limited personnel.
Under the revised regulation, it will he possible 1to arrange for ilnslection
between sunset and sunrise, provided the inspection service is notitied sufficiently
in advance, so that the required number of inspectors c1an ie notiied and
assigned to this special duty.
Thorough inspection of vessels arriving from Hlvwnii is to Iprevent establish-
ment in mainland fruit areas of the Mecditerranean fruitfly and the melomly,
both of which are found in Ilawaii. In this inspection the vessel itself, its
cargo, and passengers' baggage are carefully examined to prevent the landing
of any fruits or vegetables which might carry these pests from HawNaii. The
frequent discovery in these vessels of Hawaiian products carrying these live
insects emphiasizes the imlprtance of this inspecItion, thie I)elprtimnent said.






50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY AND MELONFLY QUARANTINE

REVISION OF REGULATION 8



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In regulation 8 of this quarantine, relating to the inspection of vessels, boarding
and inspection of vessels arriving from Hawaii has heretofore been restricted to
daylight hours, primarily because of limitations in inspection personnel. In
order to expedite movement under existing emergency shipping conditions it is
now considered desirable to modify this restriction, and the present revision
permits boarding and inspection of vessels arriving from Hawaii during the
night period, on condition that notice of the arrival of the vessel is given to the
inspector far enough in advance to enable him to make the necessary arrange-
ments for the inspection.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
Section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), Section 301.13-8 of the subpart, entitled "Mediterranean Fruitfly and
Melonfly" of Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[B. E. P. Q.-Q. 13] is hereby revised, effective May 12, 1941, to read as follows:



301.13-8 Inspection of vessels.-Inspectors of the United States Department
of Agriculture are authorized to enter upon ships or vessels from Hawaii at any
time after they come within the territorial waters of any State, Territory, or
District of the United States other than Hawaii, whether in the stream or at
the dock, wharf, or mole, for the purpose of ascertaining by inspection whether
any of the fruits or vegetables covered by the foregoing quarantine are con-
tained in such ships or vessels as cargo or ships' stores, or whether there remains
any infestation from such fruits or vegetables. All ships or vessels plying be-
tween Hawaii and any State, Territory, or District of the United States other
than Hawaii, upon coming within the boundaries of any port within the United
States other than Hawaii, must stop in the quarantine area of such port to per-
mit boarding by inspectors of the United States Department of Agriculture for
the purpose of making such inspection, and such ships or vessels must remain in
the quarantine area until such inspection is completed. Such boarding shall
be done only between the hours of sunrise and sunset, and any such ship or
vessel arriving after sunset must remain at anchor in the quarantine area until
boarded and released by an inspector of the United States Department of Agri-
culture the following morning: Provided, That boarding and inspection between
the hours of sunset and sunrise may be done when notice in advance, giving the
approximate hour of arrival and the number of passengers carried, if any, is
furnished in time to permit satisfactory arrangements therefor by the inspector.
When such ship or vessel has been inspected in a manner satisfactory to the
inspector making the inspection and is found to be apparently free from the
articles enumerated in this quarantine, such inspector shall immediately issue
and deliver to the person having charge or possession of such ship or vessel a
certificate evidencing such inspection, which shall permit such ship or vessel
to proceed from the quarantine area to anchorage or to dock, wharf, or mole.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 10th day of May 1941.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register May 12, 1941, 11: 41 a. m. ; 6 F. R., 2374.]
[Notice to general public published in Honolulu Star, May 30, 1941.]






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)
TEXAS GRAPEFRUIT HARVEST EXTENDED THROUGH MAY 31

(Press notice)
APRIL 4, 1941.
Because of heavy rains which have greatly hindered the harvesting of grape-
fruit, regulations of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine have been modified to extend
the harvesting season to the close of May in the Texas counties of Brooks, Cam-
eron, Hidalgo, and Willacy-provided conditions of infestation do not necessitate
an earlier closing-Dr. Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, announced today (circular B. E. P. Q. 512 revised).
The harvesting season normally closes, under the regulations, on April 30
except that in the counties of Dimmit, La Salle, and Webb, it closes on the last
day of February, and no extension of the season was granted to these latter
counties.
The season for harvesting Valencia oranges in the counties of Brooks, Cam-
eron, Hidalgo, and Willacy was, last December, extended from April 30 to the
close of May for the year 1941. Under the present order, no sterilization of the
fruit is required. However, should conditions of infestation develop which would
warrant the sterilization of citrus fruit shipped from the four counties, such
action will be taken, Dr. Strong states.
The extension of the harvesting season for these fruits was announced after
consultation with the Texas State Department of Agriculture.


B. E. P. Q. 512, revised. April 2, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

MEXICAN FRUITFLY REGULATIONS MODIFIED



INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Circular B. E. P. Q. 512, dated December 30, 1940, extended the harvesting
season for Valencia oranges from April 30 to the close of May, for the year 1941,
for the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy, provided con-
ditions of infestation did not necessitate an earlier closing. This revision of
the above circular extends the season on grapefruit also to May 31, 1941, for
the above-named counties under the same provision as to conditions of infestation.
301.64-5c Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Mexi-
can fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on Valencia oraiqges
and grapefruit from April 30 to May 31, 1941/-Pursuant to the authority conferred
upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third
proviso of 301.64, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations INotice of
Quarantine No. 64], it having been determined by me that a modification may be
safely made without increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly,
301.64-5 (a) [subsection (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this quarantine]
is hereby modified to extend the harvesting season for Valencia oranges and
grapefruit for the Texas Counties of Brooks, Willacy, Canieron, and Hidalgo to
the close of May 31 for the year 1941. provided conditionw' of infestat-ion do not
necessitate an earlier closing date.
The host-free period for Valencia oranges :nd grapefruit, under this modifica-
tion, will begin June 1 and continue through August 31, 1911, inclusive, in the
above-named counties.
In the counties of Dimmit, La Salle, and Webb. the grapefruit hnrvesting
season closed on February 28, 1941. under the regulations. aind the orwmge blir-






52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

vesting season closes on April 30 as to these three counties and the portion of
Jim Wells County which is under regulation. No modification is made as to the
harvesting seasons in these counties.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register April 3, 1941, 11: 35 a. m.; 6 F. R. 1783.]


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Eighth Revision. Effective May 1, 1941.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
301.72a-Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements
for specified articles. (a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements are
hereby waived effective May 1, 1941, for the periods specified below, for the fol-
lowing articles enumerated in 301.72-3.
(1) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification requirements
are waived throughout the year for the following articles when free from soil
and when sanitation practices are maintained to the satisfaction of the inspector:
Bird sand and bird gravel in packages of 5 pounds or less.
Ground peat in amounts not to exceed 5 pounds per package.
Orchid plants growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.
Osmunda fiber (commonly known as Osmundine, or orchid peat).
Unused lumber.
Baled cotton lint and linters.
Cottonseed when free from gin trash.
(2) When moved interstate from regulated parts of the following counties or
parishes: In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County; in Louisiana,
East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, Orleans (including the city of New Orleans),
Plaquemines, and Saint Bernard Parishes; in Mississippi, counties of Jackson,
Hinds, and Pearl River; certification requirements are waived until February 1,
1942, for the following articles when free from soil and when sanitation practices
are maintained to the satisfaction of the inspector:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.
Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
Cordwood, pulpwood, stump wood, and logs.
Used -;r unused timbers, posts, poles, cross ties, and other building materials.
Used lumber.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, and straw.
Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.
Seed cotton, and cottonseed when contaminated with gin trash.
Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or con-
tainers coming in contact with the ground.
Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.
Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.
It has been determined that the methods under which such articles and ma-
terials are produced and handled, the maintenance of sanitation practices, or the
application of control measures and natural conditions, have so decreased the
intensity of infestation in certain parts of the regulated areas as to eliminate
risk of spread of the white-fringed beetle, thereby justifying the removal of
certification requirements as set forth above.






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

(b) Except as specified above, all soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and
manure, whether moved independent of, or in connection with or attached to
nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or things, shall remain under the restric-
tions of 301.72-3 throughout the year.
This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 485.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 21st day of April 1941.
[SEAL] AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief of Bureau.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register April 24, 1941, 11:41 a. in.; 6 F. R.,
2119.]

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

LEE A. STRONG DIES IN ARIZONA
(Press notice)

JU.NE 2, 1941.
The United States Department of Agriculture today (June 2) received word of
the death this morning of Dr. Lee A. Strong, chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, in Tucson, Ariz. Doctor Strong had been chief of the
Bureau from the time it was created, in 1934, by the consolidation of the Bureau
of Entomology and the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Previous to that he had
been chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine and later chief of the Bureau of
Entomology. For 30 years he fought the pests that attack plants and animals,
and cause annual losses of many millions of dollars in the United States.
Informed of Doctor Strong's death, Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard
said, "In the death of Lee Strong the Department has lost one of its best bureau
chiefs. He was a natural leader, a good administrator, and a fine servant of the
people of the United States."
Doctor Strong was born in Russell, Iowa, in 1886, but spent much of his early
life in California. There he was connected with plant quarantine and inspection
work for the State Department of Agriculture from 1910 to 1929, except for a
year overseas, in 1918-19. with the 537th Engineers, U. S. Army, and for two
years (1923-1925), when he was in charge of port inspection for the Federal
Horticultural Board of the United States Department of Agriculture in Wash-
ington, D. C. From 1925 to 1929 he was Assistant Director of the California
Department of Agriculture.
In 1929 Doctor Strong accepted an appointment as chief of the Plant Quaran-
tine and Control Administration, later reorganized as the Bureau of Plant
Quarantine, of the United States Department of Agriculture. In 1933, upon
the retirement of C. L. Marlatt, he became chief of the Bureau of Entomology,
and a year later, when the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine was
set up, he was made chief of the consolidated bureau, a position which be held
until his death.
Doctor Strong took a prominent part in the preliminary work that led to the
organization of the National Plant Board and served as its chairman from 1924
to 1929. He was a member of the American Association of Economic Entomolo-
gists, being president in 1935; of the Entomological Society of Washington; and
of the Cosmos Club. In 1938 he received the honorary degree of Doctor of
Science from Louisiana State University.
Surviving Doctor Strong are his wife, Mrs. Edith Strong, and three, children,
Madeline, Lee A., Jr., and Helen.
Secretary Wickard said that A. S. Iloyt, who lias been acting chief of th,
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine during Doctor Strong's illness, will
continue in that capacity.








406905-41 ---2






54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

AMENDMENT OF CERTAIN ARMY REGULATIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE ENFORCE-
MENT OF PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES DEPART-
MENT OF AGRICULTURE
Circular No. 83.
WAR DEPARTMENT,
Washington, April 28, 1941.
Changes in AR 30-1105, 30-1210, and 95-15.-Pending the revisions of AR
30-1105, July 30, 1932; AR 30-1210, July 23, 1932; and AR 95-15, April 21, 1930,
the following changes in those regulations are published:
1. AR 30-1105.-Paragraph 7 is added as follows:
7. Plant quarantine.-a.-The entry into the United States of certain foreign-
grown plants and plant products is controlled by quarantine or other restrictive
orders issued by the Department of Agriculture to reduce the danger of intro-
ducing insect pests and plant diseases into the United States.
b. All surface vessels of the War Department arriving at a United States
port from a port outside of the continental limits of the United States are sub-
ject to inspection by the Department of Agriculture. Port commanders will
report all ship arrivals to the nearest Plant Quarantine Inspection Office of the
Department of Agriculture.
2. AR 30-1210.-Paragraph 15 is rescinded and the following substituted
therefor:
15. Inspection of baggage and personal belongings of troop class passengers on
Army transports.-a.-Prior to arrival at a port in the United States, the com-
manding officer of troops on a transport from any port outside the continental
limits of the United States will cause the baggage and other personal belohgings
of all troop class passengers to be inspected for prohibited fruits and vegetables
which, if not consumed, must be destroyed before arrival.
b. The commanding officer of troops will certify in writing to the inspector of
the Department of Agriculture who boards the vessel at quarantine that the
inspection required by a above has been made and all prohibited fruits and
vegetables disposed of as therein prescribed.
c. Baggage so inspected is exempt from further examination for the same
purpose, but the foregoing requirements have no application to the baggage of
first- and second-class passengers, which is always examined on the dock by the
inspectors of the Department of Agriculture.
(A. G. 570 (2-20-41).)
3. AR 95-15.-Paragraph 3b is added as follows:
31. Plant quarantine.--a.-The entry into the United States of certain for-
eign-grown plants and plant products is controlled by quarantine or other re-
strictive orders issued by Department of Agriculture to reduce the danger of
introducing insect pests and plant diseases into the United States.
b. No plant or plant product will be carried by any Army airplane into the
continental limits of the United States unless a permit has been secured pre-
viously from the Department of Agriculture.
(A. G. 580.2 (2-20-41).)
BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR :
G. C. MARSHALL,
Chief of Staff.
Official:
E. S. ADAMS,
Major General,
The Adjutant General.


REVISION OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE RELATING TO GRAPEVINES AND
CUTTINGS

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, April 14, 1941.
Oregon Plant Quarantine Order No. 17 (A series) pertaining to grape phyl-
loxera in other States has been modified effective March 24, 1941, so as to
permit entry into Oregon from other States of grapevines or cuttings when
accompanied with a certificate showing satisfactory disinfection treatment of
the vines or cuttings under the supervision of a qualified plant inspector of
the State of origin.






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS O

This modification will amend article 6, column III, of the instructions relating
to Oregon State plant quarantines published in the Postal Bulletin of September
17, 1940, and on page 17 of the October 1940 Supplement to the Postal Guide, so
that the same will read when revised:
"Grapevines and cuttings accepted with State of origin certificate that ship-
ment is from an area or premises free of phylloxera, or certificate that shipment
has been given an approved treatment under the supervision of a qualified
inspector of State of origin."
Postmasters will, therefore, please make the necessary correction and h,
governed accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster Genc ra'.


CUSTOMS REGULATIONS AMENDED-PLANT QUARANTINE

ARTICLE 580 (a) (2), CUSTOMS REGULATIONS OF 1937, RELATING TO THE TRANS-
MISSION TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS BY IMPORTERS OF NOTICES OF ARBIVAL OF
PLANTS OR PLANT PRODUCTS, AMENDED (T. D. 50394)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
Article 580 (a) (2) [sec. 10.11 (b) (2)] of the Customs Regulations of 1937.
is hereby amended to read as follows:
(2) The importer or his representative will submit to the collector at the port
of first arrival for any type of entry, except rewarehouse and informal mail
entries, a notice of arrival. The collector at the port of arrival will compare
the notice which he receives from the importer or his representative with thl
shipping documents, certify to its agreement therewith, or note any discrepancies.
and transmit it to the Secretary of Agriculture. The merchandise is not t,,
be released until the said notice has been submitted. (R. S. 161, sec. 624, 46 Stat.
759; 5 U. S. C. 22, 19 U. S. C. 1624.)
W. R. JoHNsoN.
Commissioner of Customs..
Approved May 17, 1941:
HERBERT E. GASTON,
Acting Secretary of the Treasury.


B. E. P. Q. 514.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINION OF CANADA

SMAY 12, 1941.
This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Dominion of
Canada has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plaint
products to that country and plant-quarantine officials.
The circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certification
for Export. Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the Destructive Inspce
and Pest Act and Regulations Thereunder. Edition of 1936, Customs MnIemoranda.
Series D, No. 37 with supplements, and No. 49, and the Fruit, Vegetables, and
Honey Act and Regulations. It was reviewed by the Secretary of the Destruc-
tive Insect and Pest Act Advisory Board, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa,
Canada.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and sutli-
ciently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not to
be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

B. E. P. Q. 514.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINION OF CANADA

MAY 12, 1941.
BASIC LEGISLATION

[The Destructive Insect and Pest Act: Revised Statutes of 1927, Chapter 47 Amended;
Statutes of 1932, Chapter 19 Amended: Statutes of 1934, Chapter 13, An Act to Prevent
the Introduction or Spreading of Insects, Pests, and Diseases Destructive to Vegetation]

The General Regulations provide that no pest or disease, or plant infested
with any pest or disease, shall be admitted into Canada. All plants are subject
to inspection on arrival. Further provisions refer mainly to domestic matters
relating to inspectors' authority, certification of nursery stock, and other plant
products, methods of enforcing control measures, promulgation of Orders in
Council, etc.
CONCISE SUMMARY

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

Certificates of inspection are required for the following:
Nursery stock (based on inspection at time of packing).
Alfalfa meal from States infested with alfalfa weevil.
Shelled corn, cut flowers, and entire plants, certain vegetables, and oat and
rye straw, from States infested with European corn borer.
Hawaiian fruits and plants.
Forest products, stone and quarry products from States infested with gypsy
and brown-tail moths.
Potatoes from California (fumigation certificate).
Potatoes from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Maryland (wart certificate).
The certificates of inspection may be issued by either Federal or State officials
unless one or the other is specifically designated to do so in the regulations.
Certain fruits and vegetables from the United States must be certified as
meeting Canadian import requirements by the Agricultural Marketing Service.

PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED SEEDS

The importation of seeds in general, seed potatoes, and mushroom spawn into
Canada is not restricted as a rule. However, the importation of the following
seeds into Canada is prohibited or restricted: Black currant, rust barberry and
European buckthorn, corn on the cob, seed potatoes, and tobacco.
The importation of peach seeds into British Columbia from States in which
the Oriental fruit moth and peach yellows occur, is prohibited.

PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED PRODUCTS

The following products are prohibited entry into Qanada or British Columbia,
or are restricted:
Alfalfa hay: Prohibited from States infested with alfalfa weevil.
Barberry (rust-carrying) and European buckthorn: Prohibited.
Black currants (except fresh fruit) : Prohibited.
Chestnut and chinquapin: Restricted.
Conifers. Christmas trees and greens: Prohibited from States infested with
gypsy and brown-tail moths.
Corylus sp.: Prohibited entry into British Columbia from States infected with
filbert blight.
Elm logs, wood, and burls: Prohibited.
Living insects (except honeybees), pests, bacteria, and fungus diseases de-
structive to vegetation: Prohibited, except under permit from Ottawa.
Nursery stock from brown-tail or gypsy moth infested States: Restricted.
Peach and nectarine stock: Restricted.
Peach stock and fresh peaches: Prohibited entry into British Columbia from
States in which the Oriental fruit moth and peach yellows occur.
Pines, 5-leaved: Prohibited.
Potatoes from Maryland, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia: Restricted.
Products liable to carry Japanese beetle: Restricted.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

FOREIGN REGULATIONS (NURSEBY STOCK)

[Regulation No. 1 (Foreign), 2nd Revision, Governing the Admission of Nursery Stock
into the Dominion of Canada]

The term "nursery stock" includes all living plants or portions of plants im-
ported for ornamental purposes, propagation, or cropping. Seeds, seed potatoes,
and mushroom spawn are not included.

PERMIT NECESSARY TO IMPORT NURSERY STOCK

Importers of nursery stock in Canada are required to apply to the Department
of Agriculture in Ottawa for a permit. Detailed information must be given in
the application regarding the proposed importation. In case a permit is issued
to the importer, he is required to send the number of his permit to the shipper
of the stock in the foreign country. The permit is retained by the importer
for use in connection with the arrival of the shipment.

CERTIFICATION OF INSPECTION

Every shipment of nursery stock originating in the United States and entering
Canada either by freight, express, or mail, must be accompanied by a certifi ate
of inspection issued at the time of packing by an authorized official, either State
or Federal. So-called blanket certificates, issued by State inspectors, based on
field inspection only and issued for varying periods of time, are not cceptable.
The original certificate must accompany the waybill or bill of lading and be fur-
nished to the inspector at the port of importation by the transportation company.
A copy certificate of inspection must be attached to each container. In the case
of mail shipments the original certificate may be attached to the container.

MARKING OF CONTAINERS

Each container of nursery stock, in addition to bearing a copy certificate of
inspection, must be clearly marked with the name and address of both consignor
and consignee, the permit number, the port of importation, and a declaration
showing the kinds of nursery stock contained therein. The permit number may
be written on the label giving the other required information and should also
appear on the invoices.
PORTS OF IMPORTATION

Nursery stock may enter Canada only through one of the following Customs
ports of importation:
Halifax, Nova Scotia. Niagara Falls, Ontario.
Saint John, New Brunswick. Windsor, Ontario.
Montreal, Province of Quebec. Winnipeg. Ma-nitoba.
Ottawa, Ontario. Estevan, Saskatchewan.
Toronto, Ontario (parcel post only). Vancouver, British Columbia.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Nursery stock entering Canada shall be subject to inisnection before delivery
to the consignee, preferably at the port of importation. If carrvina any vest or
disease it may be treated or destroyed as determinied by the inspector. In some
cases condemned nursery stock may be returned to the shipper with the expense
involved borne by the importer or shipper.

IMPORTATION BY M AIL

Parcel-post importations of nursery stock must be routed via a plort of ilmnor-
tation for inspection. When granted a permit the imnorter i4 furnisihed with a
mailing label, which he is reouired to forward to the shi-ner to :flix to the
package of stock. No other address is necessary on the outside of the i'alcie
as the label will direct the package to the proper port for examinaiti,. The
shipper should place the ultimate consi nere'" 1name nnd .ddress on the inside
of the package. After insnection a reforwarding lhal will be att ahelfd which
will direct the package to the importer.






5)8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF MISCELLANEOUS PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS

falfafa hay.-The importation into Canada of alfalfa hay from California,
Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming is prohibited on account
of the afallfa weevil (Phytonomus posticus Gyll.). Shipments consigned on
through bill of lading via above-listed States are not affected. All shipments
consigned to .Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, or British Columbia must be
accompanied by a certificate of origin signed by the consignor. (Regulation
No. 11 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)
Alfalfa meal.-Importations into Canada of alfalfa meal from the same above-
listed seven States shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by an authorized
official of the State in which the meal was ground, to the effect that the contents
of the shipment were ground in and shipped from an area known to be free
from the alfalfa weevil, and further that the alfalfa hay, from which the meal
was prepared, was grown in an area free from the alfalfa weevil. (Regulation
No. 11 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)
Barberry and European buckthorn.-Importations into Canada from all coun-
tries are prohibited of all species, hybrids, and horticultural varieties, including
the seeds, of the following:
(a) European buckthorn, Rhamnus cathartica L.
(b) Barberry, genus Berberis, except in the case of species, hybrids, and
horticultural varieties which have been determined as immune to black stem
rust of wheat (Puccinia graminis Pers.). There is no restriction on the impor-
tation of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii D. C.). (Regulation No. 9
(Foreign), 1st Revision.)
Black currants.--Importations into Canada of rooted plants, grafts, cuttings,
or seeds of cultivated black currants from all countries are prohibited, as their
presence is a serious obstacle to the control of white pine blister rust (Cronartium
ribicola J. C. Fischer). However, there is no restriction on the importation of
fresh fruit of black currants. (Regulation No. 8 (Foreign) 3d Revision.)
Chestnut and chinquapin.-The importation into Canada of all species, hybrids,
and horticultural varieties of the genus Castanea from Asia and the United
States is prohibited, unless each importation is accompanied by a certificate,
issued and signed by an authorized officer of the country of origin, stating that
the stock originated in a district which has been free from the chestnut bark
disease (Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) for the last 10 years, and
has been inspected and found free from the disease. (Regulation No. 7 (Foreign)
1st Revision.)
Conifers, Christmas greens and greenery.-The importation into Canada of
conifers, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper, and arborvitae or the
foliage thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly, laurel, etc., known and
described as "Christmas greens and greenery," is prohibited from Maine, New
Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, on ac-
count of the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar L.), and the brown-tail moth (Nygmia
phaeorrhoea Don.). (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) 1st Revision.)
Corn.-(a) On the cob.-The importation of corn on the cob into Canada is
prohibited from Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachu-
setts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin, on account
of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.).
Corn.- (b) Shelled.-The importation of shelled corn into Canada is pro-
hibited from the above 17 States (a) unless accompanied by a certificate of
inspection issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of
Agriculture, or a State Department of Agriculture, which states that the ship-
men't is free from European corn borer.
Corn.-(c) Broom.-The importation of broomcorn, all sorghums, and Sudan
grass into Canada is prohibited from the above 17 States (a). There is no re-
striction on importations from other States when shipped on a through bill of
lading via the quarantine States or in case of a reshipment from a listed State
when accompanied by a certificate of origin signed by an authorized State or
Federal inspector. (Regulation No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)
Corylus spp.-The importation into British Columbia of plants or cuttings of
all species, hybrids, and horticultural varieties of the genus Corylus (hazel, cob,
or filbert) is prohibited from the States of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New
Mexico, and all States east of these on account of the filbert blight (Crypto-
sporella anomala (Pk.) Sacc.). (Regulation No. 15 (Foreign).)






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

Cut flowers and vegetables.-During the period June 1 to December 31, the
importation into Canada of cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum,
aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, gladiolus, and dahlia, and celery, green beans
in the pod, beets with tops, and rhubarb, is prohibited from the States of Con-
necticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, unless
accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by a Federal or State inspector,
declaring the shipment to be free from European corn borer. (Regulation
No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)
Elm logs, elmu wood, elm burls.-The importation into Canada of all species
and varieties of the genera Ulm us and Zelkova, including elm logs and eln burls
of any description, from all countries, is prohibited on account of the iDutcb elm
disease (Ceratostomella ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman). (Regulation No. 17 (For-
eign) 1st Revision.)
Forest products-logs, tan bark, cordwood, posts. poles, railway ties. lumber.-
Importation into Canada from the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont.
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, is prohibited. unless accompanied
by a certificate issued by an officer of the United States Department of Agricul-
ture, declaring the shipment free from brown-tail or gypsy moth, or both.
(Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) 1st Revision.)
Hawaiian fruits and plant.s.--The importation into Canada of all no:iclianed
fruits and plants from Hawaii is prohibited, except ginger root, taro, and the
fruits of pineapple, banana, and coconut, which may be imported provided they
have been inspected by an officer of the United States Department of Agriculture
and have been certified to be free from infestation by the Mediterranean fruitfly
(Geratitis capitata Wied.). (Regulation No. 4 (Foreign) 3d Revision.)
Living insects (except honeybees), pests, bacteria, and fungus diseases destruc-
tive to vegetation.-Importation into Canada is prohibited from all countries
unless a permit has been procured from the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
(Regulation No. 21 (Foreign).)
Nursery stock from brown-tail and gypsy moth infested area.-The importation
into Canada of nursery stock, including all plants for the purpose of propaga-
tion, except conifers, etc., and seeds and seed potatoes, is prohibited from Maine,
New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, un-
less accompanied by a certificate issued by an officer of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, showing that the stock has been inspected and found free
from brown-tail or gypsy moth, or both. (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) 1st
Revision.)
Peach and nectarine stock.-The importation of peach and nectarine stock
(trees and roots), and any tree or shrub grafted or budded on such stock, is
prohibited from the United States, unless each importation is accompanied by a
certificate issued and signed by an authorized Federal or State official, stating
that the stock comes from a nursery on which the phony peach disease does
not occur nor within 1 mile of its boundaries; and that each piece of stock has
been examined by an authorized inspector and found free from the peach tree
borer (Aegeria exitiosa Say). (Regulation No. 14 (Foreign) 5th Revision.)
Peaches-fresh, peach seeds, andt peach nursery stock.--The imI 'ortation of
fresh peaches, peach nursery stock, and peach seeds or pits into British Columbia
is prohibited from the States of Wisconsin, Illinois, MiA'souri, Arkansas, a!nd
Texas, and all States east thereof on account of the Oriental fruit moth (Uraph-
olitha molesta Busck) and the peach yellows. A certificate of origin. signed by
the consignor, must accompany these products into British Colunmbia from
States west of, but not including, the fii-e above-mentioned States. (Regulation
No. 14 (Foreign) 5th Revision.)
Pines, 5-leaved.-The importation iito Canada of all five-leaved species of the
genus Pinus and their horticultural varieties is prohibited from all countries
on account of the white pine blister rust (Cronwrtium ribicola J. Fischer).
(Regulation No. 6 (Foreign) 2nd Revision.)
Potatoes.-The importation of potatoes into (Canawda is prohibiled from Eurlop',
Azores, Canary Islands, Newfoundland, St. Pierre, and Miquelon.
Importation from California is prohibited unllss shipment are ;ectmpanied
by a certificate of fumnigation issued by the (Calitornia 1)(eirtmnt of Agricul ture.
The following fumigation methods have been authorized:
Seventy-five minutes in not less than a 20-minute mwrcuril vteiruum with a
dosage of not less tlha 2N8 pounds of cwrbon bisullphide and carbon dioxide in
combination, per 1,0(00 cubic feet of space. (Itegulation No. : I oreign) 4th
Revision.)





60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Vacuum fumigation in not less than a 27-minute mercurial vacuum with dosage
schedule of not less than 2 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet for
a period of 90 minutes. (Supplement No. 2, Customs Memorandum, August 11,
1936. )
Vacuum fumigation in not less than 27-minute mercurial vacuum with a dosage
schedule of not less than 35 pounds of methyl bromide and carbon dioxide in
combination per 1,OCO cubic feet for a period of 90 minutes (not less than 7
percent of this mixture shoulr he methyl bromide). (Supplement No. 2, Customs
Memorandum. August 11, 1936.)
Potatoes fumigated as above must not be exposed to reinfestation by the potato
tuber moth (Phthiorimaea operculella Zeller).
Importations from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Maryland shall be accom-
panied by a Federal or State certificate declaring that the potatoes were grown
outside any area quarantined on account of the potato wart disease (Synchytrium
endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.). (Regulation No. 3 (Foreign) 4th Revision.)
Certified seed potatoes.-Each bag or other container must have attached
thereto a certified seed potatoes tag issued by the proper authority of the State
or District in which the potatoes were grown, certifying that they have been
grown and approved especially for use as seed, in accordance with the official
rules and regulations of the Government of the country of production. (Customs
Memorandum, Series D No. 49-T. M. R. 12.)
Stone and quarry products.-The importation of stone and quarry products
into Canada is prohibited from the States of Maine. New Hampshire, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, unless certified to be free from
gypsy and brown-tail moths by an officer of the United States Department of
Agriculture. (Regulation No. 5 (Foreign) 1st Revision.)
Stram'-oat and rye.-During the period June 1 to December 31, the importa-
tion of oat and rye straw into Canada is prohibited from the States of Con-
necticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island, unless accom-
panied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized State or Federal
officer declaring the shipment to be free from European corn borer. Shipments
passing through these States from other States on a through bill of lading, or
reshipments from the listed States when accompanied by a certificate of origin
issued by an authorized State or Federal inspector, are not affected. (Regulation
No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision.)
Tobacco seed.-The importation of tobacco seed (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in-
cluding all hybrids and varieties, into Canada, is prohibited from Australia and
the United States on account of the blue mold disease (Peronospora hyoscyami
DeBy.). (Regulation No. 20 (Foreign).)

IMIPORTS FR\OM AREAS IN THE UNITED STATES INFESTED WITH THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Although no special regulations have been established under the Destructive
Insect and Pest Act governing the importation of products liable to carry the
Japanese beetle from the infested areas in the United States, it is required that
any importations of products affected by the Japanese Beetle Quarantine, main-
tained by the United States Department of Agriculture, conform with the provi-
sions of that ouarantine. Any importations which are not accompanied by the
required certificate will be refused entry into Canada. Such action is in accord-
ance with the provisions of the General Regulations under the Destructive Insect
and Pest Act and also in conformity with the Japanese Beetle Quarantine as
applying to cases where shipments involved are transported from a quarantined
area through a nonregulated area en route to Canada.

CERTIFICATION BD AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE

Fruits and regetables.-The following fruits and vegetables are required to
be accompanied by a Government Insnection Certificate stating that at the place
and time of direct shipment to Canada the produce "meets Canadian import re-
quirements :" Apples, apricots, asparagus, beets or carrots without tops. cabbaee,
cantaloupl, celery, cherries, grapes, head lettuce, onions without tops. parsnins,
peaches, pears. plums, prunes, potatoes, rbubarb. rutabagas, and tomatoes. The
above-noted "Government inspection certificate" is issned by the Agricultural
Marketing Service: an export certificate (Form EQ-375) is not required.
(Refulations under the Fruit. Vegetables. and Honey Act. Acts, Orders and
Regnlations No. 35 Revised 1940, Administered by The Dominion Department
of Agriculture, Marketing Service-Fruit and Vegetable Division.)





19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

B. E. P. Q. 514, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINION OF CANADA

JUNE 26, 1941.

[Customs Memorandum, Series D No. 37, Supplement No. 4, Ottawa, May 22, 1941
Destructive Insect and Pest Act]

ADDITIONAL TREATMENT FOR CALIFORNIA POTATOFS ATTHOLIZFD

Atmospheric fumigation with methyl bromide has been authorized for potatoes
from California imported into Canada in addition to the vacuum fumigations
previously authorized. (See "Potatoes," p. 8, B. E. P. Q. 514.) This addition
to Regulation No. 3 (Foreign) provides that potatoes from California may be
imported when accompanied by a certificate signed by an authorized inspector
of either the United States or California Departments of Agriculture, indicating
that the potatoes covered by the certiticate have been subjected to atmospheric
fumigation in an airtight fumigating chamber or refrigerator car with methyl
bromide at one of the following dosages:
At not less than 650 F.-2 pounds methyl bromide per 1(.0 ) cubic feet for not
less than 3 hours.
At not less than 70 F.-2 pounds methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet for
not less than 2 hours.
A recognized chemical test must be used to determine freedom from leaks of
methyl bromide in the chamber or car used for fumigation.
The certificate is to include the dosage used, a statement that the chamber or
car was found free from leaks of methyl bromide, the shipping point, date of
fumigation, car name and number, the number of containers in the consignment,
and the name and address of the shipper and consignee.

BROOMCORN ADMITTED UNDER CERTIFICATION
[Regulation No. 10 (Foreign) 7th Revision, Section II]

(a) Broomcorn for manufacturing, and clean seed of broomcorn, may be
imported from the 17 States listed under "Corn.--(a)," page 6 of B. E. P. Q. 514,
provided such shipments are accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by
an authorized officer of the Federal or State Departments of Agriculture, which
states that the shipment is free from infestation by the European corn brrer.
(Add to "Corn.-(c) Broom," p. 6. B. E. P. Q. 514.)
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

JUVNE 2-4 1941.

(Department of Education, Health rnd Lands. Notification No. F. 193/40-A, Agriculture.
New Delhi. February 3, 1941]

IMPORTATION OF LIVE INSECTS

The following Order is for the purpose of prohibiting, regulating, and re-
stricting the import of live insects into British India :
1. In this Order "insect" means a living insect, and includes eggs of an insect.
2. No insect shall be imported into British India unless it is accompanied
by-
1.3--
(a) A special permit authorizing such importation issued by the (entral
Government or by an fftieer anthorized by the C(entral Government in this behalf':
(b) A certificate of freedom from disease granted by an Enutonmlogist of the
Government of the country of origin.
3. The provisions of paragraph 2 of this Order shall not apply to---
(a) Bees and silkworms;






62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(b) Parasites and destroyers of injurious insects or other pests intended
for the control of such insects or pests, when imported by the authorities of
the institutions named below:
The Imperial Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi.
The Imperial Veterinary Research Institute, Mukteswar.
The Forest Research Institute and College, Dehra Dun.
The Public Health Commissioner with the Government of India.
The Indian Research Fund Association.
The Departments of Agriculture, Madras, Bombay, Bengal, United Prov-
inces, Punjab, Bihar, Central Provinces and Berar, Assam, North-West Fron-
tier Province, Sind, Orissa, and Mysore.

[Notification No. F.-43-15 (16)/40-A, Agriculture, New Delhi, February 4, 1941. Further
amends Notification No. F.-320/35-A, dated July 20, 1936]

IMPORTATION OF UINMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

Under the provisions of this Order (1) the words "unmanufactured tobacco
imported from Burma" are to be inserted after "other than" in article 5 on
page 6 of B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised. Article 5 should, therefore, now read as
follows:
"No plants, other than unmani.factured tobacco imported from Burma, fruits
and vegetables intended for consumption, and potatoes, shall be imported into
British India by sea, unless accompanied by an official certificate in the form
prescribed and unless they are free from injurious insects and diseases."
(2) In paragraph 8 B (see Supplement No. 1, February 16, 1940) insert the
words "by sea" after "British India."
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaranti~e.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 30, 19-1, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port I Contraband Penalty

Josefa Cardero__ --------------- Lemon Grove, Calif 8 mangoes ----------------- $1.00
Mrs. Ma C. Cesena-.. -------------do ---------- 3 mangoes --------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Guadalupe R. de Don ---------- San Ysidro, Calif --- 8 mangoes and 1 mango seed_--_ 1.00
Mrs. Paula L. Reyna ----------------do------------ 2 mangoes and 2 mango seeds_ 1.00
Milton Garcia-_-------------- Brownsville, Tex____ 2 mangoes--------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Isabel Perez -----------------do------ 1 mango---- ------------ 1.00
Mrs. Trinidad Hernandez --------------do------------ 2 mangoes--------------------- 1.00
Josephina Zuniga ------------------Del Rio, Tex .----- 3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Eliza Lopez Vda. de Martinez -------Eagle Pass, Tex .- 1 orange ---------------------- 1.00
Juana Sierra de Reyes --------------do --.----------1 plant------------------- -- 1.00
Lilia Guajardo---------------------do ---------------do------------------------ 1.00
Alicia Carbajal ..----------- -----do -------_---_ 2 plants------------ 1.00
Barbara Lucero---------------- El Paso, Tex ------- 6 mangoes and 3 bulbs -----.. 1.00
Mariano Almanza --------------do ---------- 2 avocados --------------------- .30
Maria Staheli --------------- -----do.--- -.---- 4 plants with soil--------------- 1.00
Jovita Doria De Clark ------------- do------------ 1 avocado with seed ------------- 1.00
Albino Lopez ------------do.------------ 14 mangoes. ---- ---------- 1.00
Mrs. Luciana Adolfo Baca .--.---------- ..do--------- 2 plants in soil -------------- .50
Andres Garza. ------------------ Hiidalgo, Tex -------- 10 plants, 5 avocados with seed__ 3.50
Elocusie Villareal ----------------.. -do ------------ 6 plants ----------------------- 2.00
Jesus Garza de Lopez -------------- -----do ------------ 2 plants --------------------- 1.00
Tomas Auler ....--- ---------.. ... -----do------------ 2 mangoes --------------------- 1.00
Estaban Ramos ------------------do- do ------------ do -------- --- 1.00
Fraficisco Almanza ------------------- do ------------ 3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Felisa Chapa ---- ..--------------.I--_ do------------ 2 avocado seed ----------------- 1.00






19411 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 6i



Name Port Contraband Penalty

Enrique Vallejo .... . ...... ---- Hidalko, Tex -----. --_ mango -..------- $1.
Josefa Sierra ---....----------.. ------ ----do do ... 1.00
Melauiades Casares .. do ... .. 2 avocados .. .. I. ()
Adelina Rodriguez ..- do ... 1 anga arn 1 avocado seed -..
Manuela Tamez-...--. .----. ------.. .. do._ ... .. 3 mangoes. 1 each, and 3 avo- .00
ca)do seed.,
Prajedes Rangel .--- --- --..--------. ..--. -- :'voc:1Co and 3 i;nezoes I. 00
Jesus Hueto -- ----- --- ------. ---do...--- -- 2 avocados _.--- I.00
Mrs. Ellena Villerreal._ -------- Laredo, Tex 1 avocoo _------ ..... 1.
Mrs. Jacob Ayala Motia --..- -- ---.do......... 1 1nango .. ...... 1.00
Podolfo Cantu -- --------------- -----.-----.--. do ------ 1 I avca o withl seed .. 1.00
Juana Garcia---..--- ----------. ----do...-------. .. 5 avocado seed 1.00
Sally Ann Williarms. ----------------- --..do .... .... tulip bulbs and 1 avocado seed 1.00
Jesms Arredondo .. do -..... 1 I ts .
J. Soldana------- ------- ------- ----- -(o 3- o 1. 00
J- Soldana do :_ 3 oranges 1.00(
Josephina Ale-.. .----. ----do- ..... ...--.. 3 sweetpotatoes - - 1.00(
Geogaria Lozaro .------- -- .. o I 1 orange ..... ( o 1.00
Mrs. Felijsa Avila de Serna .do ....2 oranges ,
Manuel Escamilla. .... do ... 10 plants. .. .. i. 00
Mrs. Paula Brisingo- .. .------ .._ ....o r. ango 1.00
Mrs. Margarita Romero- ------------ do 2 manoes 1 00
N. C. Collins- ..----- _... -.. do ... 2 miangoes and 1 avocado ... 1.00
Maria A. Gutierrez .. .. ---------- do .... .. 1 plant.._ .--... ..--- 1.00
Mrs. Elvira Garza de Ranchez __ do do _..........- 1.00
Miss Felicitas Banda-- ..---.. ---- do 1 avocado with seed. 4i pound 3. 00
tree seed, and 13 plants.
Gabriel Picazo Jimeniz ..--- .. do -- ----- 2m nmys- 1 .00
Juana Dinos -.. -.....--- -_ -- do I apple, 2 manges. and 6 avo- 3. 00
Scados.
Mrs. G. H. Jones. ... .. d--o 4 plants . 1. C
Earvista Villegas ..-.. d------------ do........- .... 1 nmango .- -. .. ...... CO
Fred Shinn -----------. do 2 mangoes 1. CO
Manuel CGutierrez--- --------- do .------. -.. 4 avocados .....1.. tO
Delores Resendes de Lugo ---- .- do. --... 3 mangoes ..---. -1. 00
Elvida Caballero -. ---... do .-.. .- I man go- 1. 00
Alice L. Rastede .. do. 1 do I avocado seed and I nair7ey 1. 00
seed.
Longino Herrera .....do . ... .I 1 man go. .. ...... 1. 00
L. J. M atula ... .o... - ... ... I 1 plant ..... ... C0
Laida Gonzalez .-... ..-...- ----- -d... . do .. 2 inanoes. .... .1. 00
M aria M ontes .. .. ..--- ----. .. - do. . 7 apricots .. ...... 1. CO
Russell Keller--- o ...---... 1--- mango .-..-......... 1, C
Mrs. Emma Keller... ....... do .I sweet lime and 7planis 1. 00
Alice Davis -.... -......- -..----..-. .. do 3 mangoes 1. 0
Mrs. Arthur Frankel -- -. .-.do 6 mangoes .. 1.
Mrs. A. M artinez.--------.... .. I .... do --.. -. 2 plansi ------ ....1. 00
Elyira O. de Gonzalez .------- do 18 plants .
Miss Dora Garza.... ... ---.-.-. do. 7 pants 2.00
Margarita Smith ..... -....-.--... do .... I plants and !, pound tree sced 1. CO
Manuel Romero..----..---- .. ---- do -.. 2 mangoes . ... 0C
W. N. Blackwood .. .. -.. ... do 2 cacti pliants ... 1.00
Roquel L. de Lay.. .-. do. do--.. -- 1 sweet lime ... .. 1.00
Beatrice de la Rosa. ----. --.--.... .. do ..- ...- 1 plant ........... i 1.00
W 8. Stallings,-Jr ... ---- do- 2 mangoes .. 1. 0)
Genaro Ybarra -..--.. ....- ----.. do. .... 1 avoc;do -.--.---- i 1. 0
Julio C. Rodriue --..----.....------I do ..- 6 plants. ... 1. 00
















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL CGLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.
C. F.. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLA.USEN, in. Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS. in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, -in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japaqnese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
64















U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941







S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 148 Issued December 1941








United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1941


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements.. -------------------- -------------- ..------....65
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71) -.------------------------. 65
Dutch elm disease quarantine revised (press notice) ---.----- ----- ------------------ 65
Dutch elm disease quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective October 1, 1941) 66
Notice to general public through newspapers. ----- ----------------------------- 69
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) _--------------------------------- 70
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
fourth revision).-------------------- ---------- ------------- ------------------- 70
Beetle restrictions on ve!etable and fruit shipments end for season (press notice) ------------ 71
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under
301.48-5 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to September 8 for the year 1941 (B. E. P. Q. 516) 71
Instructions to postmasters -----.------------------------------------------------ 72
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) ----------------- 72
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth
quarantine by authorizing the issuance of limited permits for certain restricted articles (B. E.
P. Q. 515) -------------------------------------------------------------- 72
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) .__--.---------------.----------- 73
Low-temperature treatment authorized for Mexican fruitfly in Texas counties (press notice)__- 73
Treatments authorized (B. E. P. Q. 472 revised, superseding P. Q. C. A.'s 329 and 330). ------ 73
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_ _------------- ----------. 75
Suggestions for construction of plunging and growing beds and their maintenance under beetle-
free conditions in accordance with regulations of the white-fringed beetle quarantine (B. E.
P. Q. 496, revised)------------ --- ---. -. ----------------------- ------------ 75
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 503, third revision, super-
seding Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486 and 489)_ _-----------------..-----------------. --------. 75
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ------------------------------------------------ 78
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine relating to strawberry plants from California -------- 78
Modification of Mississippi State plant quarantines ------------------------------------------ 78
Miscellaneous items --- ---------------------------------------------------------- 79
Annand named chief, Hoyt, associate chief, of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Bureau
(press notice) -----------_------ --------------------------------.-- --------------.. 79
Designating chief and associate chief of Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Memo-
randum No. 931, Office of the Secretary) -------------------------. -------------------.... 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised,
supplement No. 1). ..------- ----------- ------------------------------------ ------. 80
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement
No. 3) .-------... _-- .- - -_ -.--------- --- ..--------------..- ---------.--------. 80
Plant- quarantine import restrictions, Colony of British Guiana (B. E. P. Q. 442, supple-
ment No. 1) -- ...---.-------- ---------.---------- .-------------...------..... 81
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Bermuda (B. E. P. Q. 455, revised,
supplement No. 1) ...- ...------------------. ..-......--------------- .. --.-.-----.. --.- 81
Plant- quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B E. P. Q. 471, supplement
No. 3) .--... ...---------------... --------.. ..... -------.. ---------------- 82
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act .-----------------------------. 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------..--.... ...... 85



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)
DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE REVISED
[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 25, 1941.
Revision of the Federal quarantine and regulations on Dutch elm disease was
announced today by the Department of Agriculture to be effective October 1.
This revision brings under regulation a few additional counties in New Jersey,
425176-41- 1 65







66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

New York, and Connecticut, States included under the quarantine now current.
It also places under Federal quarantine parts of Pennsylvania, where infection
had been found but heretofore included under State quarantine only. Placing
portions of Pennsylvania under Federal regulation will, it is believed, facilitate
the movement of restricted articles within regulated areas of the quarantined
States.
The revision provides for removing from the regulated area the town of
Huntington in Suffolk County, N. Y., and for adding to the area under regula-
tion parts of the counties of Berks, Bucks, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Mont-
gomery, Northampton, Philadelphia, and Susquehanna in Pennsylvania; New
London in Connecticut; Burlington and Ocean in New Jersey; and Albany,
Broome, Chenango, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, and Sullivan in New York.
Provision is made in this revision whereby the Chief, Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, may modify restriction of the regulations by making
them less stringent upon determination of safety as to pest risk.


B. E. P. Q. 71. Revision of Quarantine and Regulations
effective October 1, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
This revision of the quarantine and regulations extends the regulated areas
to include parts of nine Pennsylvania counties and additional sections in
Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York where the Dutch elm disease has
been located, including parts of the following newly added counties: New Lon-
don County, Conn., Burlington and Ocean Counties, N. J., and the New York
counties of Albany, Broome, Chenango, Delaware, Greene, Otsego, and Sulli-
van. The town of Huntington, Suffolk County, N. Y., has been removed from
the regulated area. The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine, under authorization contained in the present revision of the quarantine
notice, may modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions of the regulations.
SUMMARY
The areas covered by these regulations comprise parts of Connecticut, New
Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania as designated in 301.71-3.
These regulations prohibit the interstate movement from the regulated areas
of all parts of elms of all species, except that elm lumber or products manu-
factured from or containing elm wood, if entirely free from bark, are exempt
from restriction.
No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement wholly within the
regulated area.
Shipments originating outside the regulated area may be moved through the
regulated area only on through billing. Restricted articles trucked through
the regulated area in summer must be covered.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by
law and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States
of Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York, to prevent the spread of the Dutch
elm disease (Ceratostomella ulmi Buisman (Graphium ulmi Schwarz)), a dan-
gerous plant disease not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States, on February 20, 1935, promulgated Notice of
Quarantine 301.71, Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and the regulations supplemental thereto, governing the movement of elm
plants or parts thereof of all species of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of
whether nursery, forest, or privately grown, including (1) trees, plants, leaves,






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings, and scions of such plants; (2)
logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber, crates, boxes, barrels, packing
cases, and other containers manufactured in whole or in part from such plants
(unless the wood was entirely free from bark), from any of the above-named
States into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United
States, 301.71-1-6, inclusive, Part 301, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 71, effective on and after February 25, 1935].
The Secretary of Agriculture, having given a further public hearing in the
matter, has determined that it is necessary to revise the quarantine and regu-
lations for the purpose of extending the regulated areas owing to the existence
of substantial infections of the Dutch elm disease in Pennsylvania and in addi-
tional sections of Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York, and to make other
modifications.
ORDER OF THE SECRETARY Of AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7
U. S. C. 161), the subpart entitled "DUTCH ELM DISEASE" of Part 301,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.-Q. 71] is hereby
amended effective October 1, 1941, to read as follows:

SUBPART-DUTCH ELM: DISEASE

QUARANTINE

301.71. Notice of Quarantine.-Under the authority conferred by section
8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
the Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Connecticut, New Jersey,
New York, and Pennsylvania, to prevent the spread of the Dutch elm disease.
IHereafter, elm plants or parts thereof of all species of the genus Ulmus, irre-
spective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown, including (1) trees,
plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings, and scions of such
plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber, crates, boxes,
barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured in whole or in part
from such plants (unless the wood is entirely free from bark) shall not be
shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or
transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed
to be moved from any of said quarantined States into or through any other
State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or
under conditions other than those prescribed in the regulations hereinafter made
and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and
of the regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quaran-
tined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of
Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary, the
enforcement of the aforesaid regulations as to such regulated areas shall be
adequate to prevent the spread of the Dutch elm disease: Provided further,
That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for
and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas
as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate
to prevent the spread of the Dutch elm disease therefrom to other parts of the
State: And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted herein
may because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured
or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructions issued by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as carriers of infection: And
provided further, That whenever, in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to the pest risk
involved in the movement of one or more of the articles to which the regula-
tions supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to modify, by making less
stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regulations, he shall set forth
and publish such finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner
in which the applicable regulation should be made less stringent, whereupon
such modification shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated
area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions,
and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity to such administra-
tive instructions throughout the affected areas.






68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATIONS

301.71-1. Definitions.-For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Dutch elm disease.-The plant disease known as the Dutch elm disease
(Ceratostomella ulmi Buisman (Graphium ulmi Schwarz)), in any stage of
development.
(b) Quarantined area.-Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture to prevent the spread of the Dutch elm disease.
(c) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accord-
ance with the provisos of 301.71, as revised.
(d) Moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,
transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or
District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or
District.
(e) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
301.71-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.-Conditioned upon
the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the first and second pro-
visos to 301.71, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate
movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said
301 71 will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or
hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.
301.71-3. Regulated areas.-In accordance with the first and second provisos
to 331.71, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the
purpose of these regulations the counties, townships, towns, and cities listed
below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within
their limits:
Connecticut.-Fairfield County; towns of Bethlehem, Bridgewater, Harwinton,
Litcl field, Morris, New Milford, Roxbury, Thomaston, Torrington, Washington,
Watertown, and Woodbury, in Litchfield County; all of New Haven County except
the towns of Cheshire, Madison, Prospect, and Wolcott; and the town of Preston,
in New London County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Morris,
Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union, and Warren; townships of Bordentown, Ches-
terfield, Mansfield, New Hanover, North Hanover, Pemberton, and Springfield, the
city of Bordentown, and the boroughs of Fieldsboro and Pemberton, in Burlington
County; all of Middlesex County except the townships of Cranbury and Monroe,
and the boroughs of Helmetta, Jamesburg, and Spotswood; all of Monmouth
County except the townships of Freehold, Millstone, Neptune, and Wall, and the
boroughs of Avon-by-the-Sea, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Brielle, Freehold, Jersey
Homestead, Manasquan, Neptune City, Sea Girt, South Belmar, Spring Lake,
and Spring Lake Heights; and the township of Plumstead, in Ocean County.
New York.-Counties of Bronx, Dutchess, Kings, Nassau, New York, Orange,
Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, and Westchester; town of Bethlehem, in
Albany County; towns of Chenango, Colesville, Conklin, Fenton, Kirkwood, San-
ford, and Windsor, in Broome County; towns of Afton, Bainbridge, Coventry, and
Greene, in Chenango County; towns of Ancram, Claverack, Clermont, Copake, Gal-
latin, Germantown, Ghent, Livingston, and Taghkanic, in Columbia County; town
of Deposit in Delaware County; town of Catskill in Greene County; town of Una-
dilla, in O'sego County; town .of Mamakating, in Sullivan County; and all of
Ulster County except the towns of Benning, Hardenbergh, Kingston, Olive,
Shandaken, and Woodstock.
Pennsylvania.-Township of Amity, in Berks County; all of Bucks County
except the townships of Lower Southampton and Upper Southampton; townships
of Lower Milford, Salisbury, and Upper Saucon, and the borough of Coopersburg,
in Lehigh County; townships of Hanover, Pittston, and Plains, city of Wilkes-
Barre, and the boroughs of Ashley, Edwardsville, Forty Fort, Kingston, Larks-
ville, Plymouth, Sugar Notch, Warrior Run, and Wyoming, in Luzerne County;
townships of Middle Smithfield, Smithfield, and Stroud, and the boroughs of
Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, and Stroudsburg, in Monroe County;
townships of Franconia, Hatfield, Lower Merion, Lower Moreland, Marlboro, New
Hanover, Perkiomen, Salford, Upper Hanover, Upper Merion, West Norriton, and
that portion of Whitemarsh Township northeast of Stanton Avenue, and the
boroughs of Bridgeport, Bryn Athyn, East Greenville, Greenlane, Hatfield, Nar-






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

berth, Pennsburg, Red Hill, Souderton, West Conshohocken, and West Telford, in
Montgomery County; townships of Bethlehem, Hanover, Lower Mount Bethel,
Lower Saucon, Upper Mount Bethel, and Williams, the city of Easton, and the
boroughs of Freemansburg, Glendon, Heller own, Portland, West Easton, and
Wilson, in Northampton County; ward 35, in the city of Philadelphia, in Phila-
delphia County; and the townships of Harmony and Jackson, and the borough
of Lanesboro, in Susquehanna County.
301.71-4. Control of movement of elm plants and elm products.-Elm plants
or parts thereof of all species of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether
nursery, forest, or privately grown, including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs,
branches, bark, roots, trunks. cuttings, and scions of such plan s; (2) logs or
cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber, crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases,
and other containers manufactured in whole or in part from such plants, if the
wood is not free from bark, shall not be moved interstate from any regulated
area to or through any point outside thereof.
Plants and plant products enumerated in this regulation may be moved inter-
state from an area not under regulation through a regulated area to a ncnregu-
lated area only when such movement is on through billing: Provided, That such
movement by truck or other road vehicle may not be made during the period
from April 1 to October 31, inclusive, of any 12-month period unless the restricted
products contained therein while passing through any regulated area are
covered or otherwise protected, to the satisfaction of an inspector, from contami-
nation by insect vectors of the Dutch elm disease.
301.71-5. Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.-Articles sub-
ject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental
or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attac"ed to the outside
thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine showing compliance with such conditi ns.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of September 1941.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] GROVER B. HILL.
Acting Secretary.
[Copies of foregoing quarantine sent to all common carriers doing business in or
through the quarantined States.]
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 22, 1941, 11:30 a. m.;
6 F. R. 4834.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., September 20, 1941.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, unde- :nu h rity
conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after October 1, 1941 of the
Dutch elm disease quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 71) and rules and
regulations supplemental thereto. The purpose of the revision is to bring under
regulation parts of nine Pennsylvania 'counties, additional sections of Connecti-
cut, New Jersey, and New York, where the Dutch elm disease has been located,
and remove from regulation the town of Huntington, Suffolk County, New York.
The quarantine has been further revised to authorize the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to modify, by making less strii gent,
the restrictions of the regulations.
Copies of the quarantine as revised may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington,
D. C.
GnRovER B. HILL,
Acting Secretary.
[Published in the following newspapers: The New York Times, New York. N. Y.. Sep-
tember 30, 1941 ; the Newark News, Newark, N. .1.. September 30, 1941 ; Jhe Bulletin,
Philadelphia, Pa., September 29, 1941; the Times, lartford, Conn., September 29, 1941.]






70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
B. E. P. Q. 499,
Supplement No. 1-Fourth revision. August 6, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

It has been found as a result of additional experiments with treatments
for freeing nursery stock and potted plants from the immature stages of the
Japanese beetle that the methyl bromide fumigation treatments may be further
modified. Accordingly these instructions provide for a temperature of 670 F.
instead of 70 as heretofore, for the 21-hour treatment with a 2-pound dosage;
and for 730 under a 21/2-hour treatment with a 1-pound dosage. The diameter
of the soil balls in all treatments is placed at a maximum of 14 inches instead of
12 inches as heretofore.
301.48-b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nurs-
ery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treatment
authorized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental
to Notice of Quarantine No. 48] subsection (1) (5) of 301.48b1 [on page 13
of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939]
is hereby further modified effective August 9, 1941, to read as follows:

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.-An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be va-
porized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal
of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.-The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treat-
ment must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum
specified in the following table, or higher:

Dosage Dosage
Period of (methyl Period of (methyl
Temperature at least treatent bromide Temperature at least teent bromide
treatment pe 1,000 treatment per 1,000
per 1,000 per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)

Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
1. 730 F _--- ----------- 2 1 5. 570 F-- ......- 3Y 21
2. 670 F---------------.--- 2 2 6. 540 F---------------- -- 4 2V
3. 630 F ----------_. - 2 22 2 7. 500 F -------- 4j 2Y
4. 600 F ----------------- 3 22


The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.

1 This section was originally issued as 301.48a.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare
roots or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches
in diameter nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should
not be puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment
of the inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on
racks or separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom
surfaces of pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely
separated from each other they should not be jammed tightly together. Treat-
ments 2 and 3 may be employed in fumigating packaged plants prepared in
a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
Varieties of plants.-The list of plnts, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.
The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in sub-
section (1) (5) (ii) of 301.48b [p. 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular
B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.
This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated April 11, 1941.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of August 1941.
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register August 12, 1941, 1: 24 p. m.; 6 F. R.
4055.]

BEETLE RESTRICTIONS ON VEGETABLE AND FRUIT SHIPMENTS END FOR SEASON
[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 8, 1941.
Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season by an order
effective today, the Department of Agriculture announced. Restrictions on
cut flowers, however, remain in force through O:tober 15.
Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and vege-
tables of any kind moved via refrigerator car or motortruck from the are;as
of heavy beetle flight. The order, issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, releases the fruits and vegetables from this requirement
nearly 5 weeks earlier than is provided in the regulations.
The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and
parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight, and results of field surveys show that adults
of the Japanese beetle have decreased to a point where it does not seem ad-
visable to continue the fruit and vegetable inspection and certification require-
ment the rest of this season. There is no risk that such products will carry
the Japanese beetle after the active period, which is now apparently over
throughout the regulated areas.
There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers will
remain in full force through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year
and are not affected by this order.

B. E. P. Q. 516. Effective September 8, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE JAPA-
NESE BEETLE QUARANTINE BY ADVANCING THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF
RESTRICTIONS ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER 301.48-5 OF THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 8 FOR THE YEAR 1941
It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season
and that it is therefore safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits






72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

and vegetables from the regulated areas. Therefore, pursuent to the authority
conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
by the fourth proviso of 301.48, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regula-
tions [Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], it is
ordered that the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits ,nd vegetables
imposed by 301.48-5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, revised effective February
12, 1941, be removed effective on and after September 8, 1941. This order ad-
vances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided
for in 301.48-5 from October 16 to September 8, 1941, and applies to this
season only.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of September 1941.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1941, 11:10 a. m.;
6 F. R. 4653.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFTICE DFPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 22, 1941.
The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determined
that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and
vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore,
safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vcgetables listed in
regulation 301.48-5, rules and regulations, Notice of Quorantine BEPQ-48, on
account of the Japanese beetle, from the entire regulated area defined in
section 301.48-3 of the rules and regulations.
Postmasters may, therefore, until June 15, 1942, accept fully prepaid parcels
of fruits and vegetables, when properly packed, without being accompanied
with a certificate of inspection prescribed by that quarantine, except that the
certificate exemption applies to interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables
from Accomac and Northampton Counties in Virginia only until June 1, 1942.
The Department of Agriculture points out there is still d"nger, however,
that the beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on
interstate movement of cut flowers will remain in full force through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions of
plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)
B. E. P. Q. 515. July 8, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TA'L MOTH
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE GYPSY
MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE
OF LIMITED PERMITS FOR CERTAIN RESTRICTED ARTICLES
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of 301.45, Chapter III,
Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 45 on account
of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth], 301.45-4 is hereby amended, effective
July 15, 1941, by the addition of the following sentence to subsection (d) :
301.45-4 Conditions governing the issuance of certificates of inspection.
* *






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

(d) Forest products and stone and quarry products.

Forest products such as shavings or sawdust may be authorized interstate
movement to such processing or manufacturing plants in nonregulated areas
as may be designated by authority of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine for manufacturing or processing or treatment under
either of the following conditions: (1) Under a certificate of inspection issued
by the inspector upon determination that the materials do not represent a
hazard of spread of infestations; or (2) under a limited permit to the con-
signor, the issuance of which will be conditioned upon agreement that he will
comply with such sanitation provisions with respect to methods of handling at
point of origin and production, and conditions of shipment, as may be required
by an inspector, and upon agreement by the consignee that he will comply with
such sanitation provisions with respect to methods of handling at destination
as may be required by an inspector.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 8th day of July 1941.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register July 16, 1941, 11:49 a. m.; 6 F. R.
3512.]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)
LOW-TEMPERATURE TREATMENT AUTHORIZED FOR MEXICAN FRUITFLY IN
TEXAS COUNTIES
[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 26, 1941.
The Mexican fruitfly Federal quarantine on grapefruit and oranges in the
regulated area in Texas has been modified to allow treatment by a low-tempera-
ture process as a condition of certifi:ation for shipment out of the area, the
United States Department of Agriculture said today. The area includes the
counties of Brooks, Cameron, Dimmit, Hidalgo, LaSalle, Webb, Willacy, and
portions of Jim Wells County.
Owing to the wide acceptance by the citrus-fruit industry in Texas of the
vapor-heat method of treatment for the fruitfly there is little occasion for
the use of the low-temperature method.
For those who desire to employ that treatment, however, the administrative
instructions just issued by the chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine provide for cooling the fruit until the approximate center reaches
330 F. and holding it at or below that temperature for 18 days, or cooling it
to 340 for 20 days, or to 350 for 22 days.
The vapor-heat treatment method, authorization for which is continued in the
current instructions issued as Circular B. E. P. Q. 472 revised, effective Sep-
tember 25, provides for heating the fruit for 14 hours, during which time the
temperature shall be raised to 1100 F. and maintained at or above that tempera-
ture for the last 6 hours of such treatment.

B. E. P. Q. 472 revised,
Superseding P. Q C. A.'s 329 and 330. Effective September 25, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMO;LOGY AND PLANT QUAR \NTINE
PART 3O 1--DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
MEXICAN FRUITFLY
TREATMENTS AUTHORIZED
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
This revision of circular B. E. P. Q. 472 has the twofold puripe of bringing
the citations of authority into line with the current regulationls of tlie Mexican
425176-41--2






74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

fruitfly quarantine, and of providing authorization for the low-temperature
method of sterilization for the Mexican fruitfly for those in the citrus-fruit
industry in Texas who desire to employ that method. Of the two heat-treat-
ment methods authorized in the previous issue of the circular, only one is in
current use, and authorization for this treatment as specified below is therefore
continued with no change in method, other than the recommendation that in
the use of wax or paraffine, applications of such material be. made only after
sterilization.
301.64-4a Administrative instructions-Treatment of grapefruit and oranges
for the Mexican fruitfly. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by subsection (e) of
301.64-4, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 4 of
the regulations (third revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 64,
the Mexican fruitfly quarantine], the methods of sterilization specified below are
hereby authorized, effective September 25, 1941, as a condition of the issuance
of permits for interstate movement of grapefruit and oranges.
* (a) Vapor-heat method.-Heating the fruit for a period of not less than 14
hours during which time the fruit shall be raised to a temperature of 1100 F.
at the approximate center of the fruit and shall be maintained at or above that
temperature for the last 6 hours of such treatment.
While no specifications as to the exact methods and equipment for obtaining
these conditions are prescribed, the air within the room shall be maintained at
the temperature and under the humidity conditions required by the supervising
inspector. Available information clearly indicates that by the application of
dry heat the required temperatures cannot be reached without injury to the
fruit. To prevent such injury it is necessary to maintain a very high humidity
throughout the period of treatment. In the tests where successful performance
was obtained, live steam as the source of heat was applied in such a way as to
secure as nearly as possible a uniform distribution of steam-heated air so
directed as not to discharge directly on the fruit. The air temperature ranged
from 119 to 112 F. and the air was very moist. The fruit was held in field
boxes stacked four boxes high and without special means of separating the
boxes in each stack. The experiments indicate that the fruit should be steri-
lized after coloring, if this is necessary, and before packing for shipment, and
then cooled down to a temperature around 450 F. as soon as possible after
sterilizing. Wax or paraffine, either dry or in solution, should not be applied
to this fruit before sterilization.
(b) Low-temperature method.-(1) Cooling, until the approximate center of
the fruit reaches a temperature of 330 F. and holding the fruit at or below that
temperature for a period of 18 days.
(2) Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit reaches a temperature
of 340 F. and holding the fruit at or below that temperature for a period of 20
days.
(3) Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit reaches a temperature
of 350 F. and holding the fruit at or below that temperature for a period of
22 days.
Such treatments as specified in (a) and (b) above are authorized in steriliza-
tion or refrigeration plants in the regulated area which are approved by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The Bureau will approve only
those plants which are adequately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit.
Such sterilization will be done under the supervision of inspectors of the
Bureau. These inspectors should at all times be given access to fruit while
in process of sterilization.
While the results of the experiments so far conducted have been successful,
it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in operation may
result in injury to fruit. In authorizing the movement of fruit sterilized in
accordance with the above requirements, it is understood that the Department
does not accept responsibility for fruit injury.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 19th day of September 1941.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 25, 1941, 11: 03 a. m.;
6 F. R. 4897.]






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUAR-
ANTINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 496, Revised.
SUGGESTIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF PLUNGING AND GROWING BEDS AND THEIR
MAINTENANCE UNDER BEETLE-FREE CONDITIONS IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGU-
LATIONS OF THE WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE
AUGUST 25. 1041.
Nursery stock with soil attached is eligible for certification for movement
from areas under quarantine on account of the white-fringed beetle, provided
it has been grown and maintained under beetle-free conditions, or has been
otherwise treated, as specified in paragraph ( b) of regulation 5 of Quarantine"
No. 72.
The Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and cooperating State of-
ficials are attempting to reduce beetle populations as drastically as possible in
all infested areas by the application of intensive control measures in the vicinity
of nurseries and other establishments dealing in regulated products. However,
unless or until eradication is accomplished, such suppressive measures within
themselves do not and cannot adequately protect nurseries or other establish-
ments within a generally infested area from being exposed to infestation, and
additional action on the part of the nurserymen is necessary.
In order to establish and maintain an infestation-free status in nurseries or
units of nurseries located within a generally infested area. approved beetle-
proof barriers must be constructed by the nurserymen to protect plunging beds
and growing areas, and adequate sanitary and protective measures must be
taken to maintain such barriers in an effective status. Barriers must be sup-
plemented by precautionary measures against the artificial introduction of
beetles into such protected areas and insecticidal treatments as specified by
authorized inspectors should be applied.
B. E. P. Q. 496, issued April 28. 1939, provided information on the construe-
tion of barriers approved at that time. Subsequent research indicates that
barriers of a less expensive construction will furnish adequate protection.
The following types of units and barriers are therefore sugg sted as a means
of providing protection against natural infestation by the white-fringed beetle.

RAISED PLUNGING OR GROWING BEDS
Beds or benches, indoors or outside, must be used, which are at least 12,
preferably 18 inches, above the ground, the legs or supports of which are pro-
tected by approved oil or other barriers, and which are maintained in a manner
satisfactory to an authorized inspector. * *
GROWING BEDS INCLUDING ENTIRE NURSERIES OR PORTIONS THEREOF
Heeling-in or growing areas should be enclosed within approved barriers.
* * The areas contained therein must, at the time of erection of barrier, be
known to be free of infestation or must be treated in approved manner under
the supervision of an inspector.
No plants with soil, and no soil or other materials restricted by the regula-
tions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine which have not been produced
under approved sanitation conditions or which have not been given approved
treatment, may subsequently be placed in such protected areas.
P N. ANNAND.
Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 503, Third Revision, Effective September 11, 1941
Superseding Circulars
B. E. P. Q. 486 and 489.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III-BURE:A OF ENTOOLOY ANoD P LANT QUARANTINE
PART l301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINi NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED
INTRODU( TORY NOTE
Instructions as to various methods of treatment of plants in polts, or in soil
balls, and of potting soil, as previously authorized in 'irculars B. E. P. Q.






76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

486, 489, and 503, are brought together in the present revision of this circular.
In addition, the instructions as to treatment of balled nursery stock by methyl
bromide solution as specified in paragraph (ii) of subsection (b) are somewhat
modified as to treatments within the regulated areas other than New Orleans
and vicinity. All treatments apply to both species of white-fringed beetles,
Pantomorus leucoloma Boh. and P. peregrinus Buch., and are uniformly appli-
cable to all regulated areas except the methyl bromide solution treatment of
balled nursery stock, the specifications of which vary for the New Orleans
area because of the type of soil in that locality. This circular supersedes all
instructions in Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486 and 489, and previous issue of 503.
301.72-5c2 Administrative instructions-Treatments authorized.-Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine by subsection (a) of 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account
of the white-fringed beetle], the following methods of treatment for plants in
pots, or with soil balls, and potted soil, are hereby authorized effective Septem-
ber 11, 1941, when carried out under the supervision of an authorized inspector
of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(a) Plants in pots or in soil balls.-(1) Methyl bromide fumigation at at-
mospheric pressures.-(i) Fumigation must be done with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 1 pound per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space occupied by the
plants, for a period of 4 hours, the soil masses and the air in the fumigation
chamber to be at a temperature of not less than 850 F.
(ii) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or
smaller, or in soil balls not greater than 3 inches in diameter when spherical
or thicker than 3 inches if not spherical, and the plants shall be stacked on
racks so that the gas mixture can have access to all sides of the pots or the
soil balls.
(iii) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gas-tight doors.
(iv) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of methyl
bromide shall be volatilized therein, and the air-gas mixture shall be circulated
by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation period.
(v) The use of a fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout
and with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in place
by refrigerator door fasteners, is recommended.
(2) Methyl bromide, fumigation under partial vacuum.-(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury must be done with
a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber space,
including the space occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 11/2 hours,
the vacuum to be maintained throughout the entire period.
(ii) The temperature of the soil balls shall be 75.0 F. or above, and the
diameter of the soil balls shall be not greater than 11 inches if spherical, or
thicker than 11 inches if not spherical.
(iii) The fumig'ant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the
vaporized fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in
contact with the surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with
one or more changes of air at the end of the exposure period.
(iv) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and
will withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required.
A vacuum pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum
chamber to the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea
level) in not more than 20 minutes is necessary.
(3) Methyl bromide solution.-(i) Treatment method.-(Applicable to all
regulated areas.)
(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays which are watertight and approximately 1 foot deep.
(b) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls,
also above and beneath them.
(c) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent de-
natured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by
first mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this
mixture to the water and mixing thoroughly.

2 Superseding 301.72-5a and b.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be ap-
plied evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40
gallons per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or
sprayer.
(ii) Type of material, exposure, and temperature.-(a) In Orleans Parish,
including the city of New Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish, and regulated parts
of Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes, La., the treatment shall be applied only
to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter, nor greater than 7
inches in thickness when not spherical. After the required dosage has been
applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period of 8 hours.
The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be lower
than 650 F.
(b) In all regulated areas other than Orleans Parish, including the city of
New Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish, and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaque-
mines Parishes, La., the treatment shall be applied to soil balls not greater
than 8 inches in diameter nor greater than 8 inches in thickness when not
spherical. After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall
remain embedded in the sand for a period of 6 hours. The temperature of the
soil balls during the treatment shall not be lower than 620 F.
(c) Potting soil.-(1) Carbon disulphide funmigation. (i) Potting soil shall
be treated in a container with carbon disulphide at a dosage of 2 pounds per
cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.
(ii) The grade of carbon disulphide shall be comparable to U. S. P. grade
having a specific gravity of 1.25 at 68 F.
(iii) The container shall be tight, preferably lined with sheet metal, and
shall have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin immediately after the
fumigant is applied. The container shall not be more than 36 inches deep.
(iv) The soil shall be friable, and wet soil shall not be treated by this
method. The fumigant shall be applied to the soil in holes 3 inches deep, the
dosage to be evenly divided among holes 1 foot apart over the surface of the
soil, and the fumigant shall be covered with soil as soon as it is applied.
(v) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 400 F. during the
entire time of treatment.
(vi) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of
application of the fumigant must meet with the approval of an authorized
inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) Methyl bromide fumigation.-(i) Potting soil must be treated in a
container with methyl bromide in a dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl
bromide per cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.
(ii) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably
lined with sheet metal, and shall have a tight cover or be covered with a
tarpaulin immediately after the fumigant is applied.
(iii) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of
application of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector
of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(3) Heat treatment. (i) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more
per square inch, shall be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the
bottom of the sterilizing box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of
45 minutes or until all parts of the load reach a temperature of 200 F.
(ii) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes
1/32 inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at one end to a
manifold into which the steam is introduced.
(iii). The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet, 6
inches deep.
(c) Disclaimer.-There has been opportunity to test these treatments on only
relatively few varieties of plants and in authorizing the movement of potted
plants, nursery stock, or potting soil fumigated according to the requiremnnts
stated above, it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United
States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of
nijury to either plants or operators.
(d) Caution.-(1) Methyl bromide.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinnry
temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for
fumigation of plants or potting soil. It is a poison and the operators should
use approved gas masks when exposed to the gas in concenntrtions nieod in
fumigation, or while preparing the solution. The plants in the fumniatiiion
chamber should be well aerated by blowing air through them, and the room






78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

adequately ventilated before it is entered. After fumigating the potting soil
by methyl bromide the cover should be removed and the soil allowed to become
aerated.
(2) Carbon disulphide.-Carbon disulphide is a blood poison, but poisoning
by this chemical is rare. Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and
headache. When these symptoms develop, the individual should get into the
open air.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 4th day of September 1941.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1941, 11:10 a. m.;
6 F. R. 4653.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
REVOCATION OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE RELATING TO STRAWBERRY PLANTS
FROM CALIFORNIA

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT PO'STMASTER GENERAL, -
Washington, August 18, 1941.
Oregon Plant Quarantine Orders No. 13 and 14 (A series) pertaining to
Strawberry Yellows have been revoked, effective at once.
This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated September 11,
1940, published in the Postal Bulletin of September 17, 1940, and on page 16
of the October 1940 Supplement to the Postal Guide,3 and removes the Oregon
restrictions on the acceptance of parcels containing strawberry plants in the
State of California and Josephine County, Oreg.
Postmasters will please, therefore, make the necessary correction and be
guided accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MODIFICATION OF MISSISSIPPI STATE PLANT QUARANTINES

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 24, 1941.
The State Plant Board of Mississippi has established a quarantine under the
provisions of the law embodied in section 596, P. L. and R., designed to prevent
the dissemination of black rot, stem rot, nematodes, sweetpotato weevil, and
other injurious pests of the sweetpotato which restricts the shipment of the
hosts of these diseases and pests from one point to another within the State of
Mississippi.
Under the quarantine no shipments of sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants or
vines may be accepted for mailing unless there is attached to each container
a certificate tag and each bundle of one hundred plants is tied with a valid
certificate tape issued by the Mississippi State Plant Board showing compliance
with the State plant-quarantine laws or regulations pertaining to injurious pests.
You will please, therefore, take the necessary steps to prevent the acceptance
of such material except when having the required certificate tag or certificate
tape attached.
You are also reminded of the Mississippi State quarantine and regulations
relating to the shipment of sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, cuttings,
draws, and slips and morning-glory plants or parts thereof from other States
into Mississippi as set forth in the notices of this Bureau dated April 7, 1937,
May 7, 1940, and March 28, 1941, which have been published in the Supplements
to the Postal Guide.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

8 See S. R. A. No. 144, July-September 1940, pp. 73-76.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

ANNAND NAMED CHIEF, HOYT ASSOCIATE CHIEF, OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT
QUARANTINE BUREAU

[Press notice]
AUGUST 15, 1941.
Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard today announced the appoint-
ment of P. N. Annand as Chief and Avery S. Ioyt as Associate Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. BPoth appointments are effective
August 16. Dr. Annand succeeds Lee A. Strong, who died June 2, 1941.
Dr. Annand, who has been one of the assistant chiefs of the Bureau, was born
in Telluride, Colo., in 1898. He was graduated with a B. S. degree in 1920
from Colorado Agricultural College, where he special:zed in entomology. He
received an M. A. degree in entomology from Leland Stanford University in
1922, and a Ph. D. in zoology and botany from Stanford in 1928.
Before joining the Department of Agriculture staff in 192:), Dr. Annand did
research work on sugar beet insects for a sugar company from 1920 to 1921,
and was on the staff of San Mateo Junior College from 1922 to 1929. During
the latter part of that time he was head of the college's department of biologi-
cal sciences.
From 1934 until 1937 Dr. Annand was head of the Division of Cereal and
Forage Insect Investigations of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine. In 1937 he was appointed research assistant to the chief of the Bureau.
In April 1939 he was named an assistant chief of the Bureau.
Dr. Annand is a member of the American Association for the Advancement
of Science, the American Association of Economic Entomologists, the Entomo-
logical Society of America, and the Washington Entomological Society.
Mr. Hoyt also was an assistant chief of the Bureau. He was born in San
Diego, Calif., on September 16, 1888. He graduated with the B. S. degree from
Pomona College in 1910. He held various positions under the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture of California and was made Assistant Director in 1929 and
Director in 1931, in which year he severed his connection with the State De-
partment of Agriculture and, became assistant chief of the Plant Quarantine
and Control Administration, of the United States Department of Agriculture,
which position he held until the consolidation of that Bureau in 1934 with the
former Bureau of Entomology into the present Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine.

Memorandum No. 931. August 19, 1941

DESIGNATING CHIEF AND ASSOCIATE CHIEF OF BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE

Dr. P. N. Annand and Mr. Avery S. Hoyt have been appointed as Chief and
Associate Chief, respectively, of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine, effective August 16. Dr. Annand succeeds the late Dr. Lee A. Strong.
Dr. Annand, who has been one of the assistant chiefs of the Bureau since
1939, has been with the Bureau since 1929. He was born in Telluride, Colo.,
in 1898. He was graduated with a B. S. degree in 1920 from Colorado Agricul-
tural College, specializing in entomology, and with M. A. and Ph. D. degrees
from Leland Stanford university in 1922 and 1928. Before coming with the De-
partment he was engaged in sugar beet insects research work and later was a
member of the staff of the San Mateo Junior College.
Mr. Hoyt has been one of the assistant chiefs of the Bureau since 1934. He
was born in San Diego, Calif., in 1888. He graduated with a B. S. degree from
Pomona College in 1910. He held various positions in the State Department
of Agriculture of California.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Sccretary.






80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

B. E. P. Q. 382, Revised, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

AUGUST 28, 1941.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES

Decree No.'50:941, issued June 4, 1941, at Montevideo, and published in the
Diario Oficial June 27, 1941, changes the decree of January 10, 1934, regulating
the importation of seed potatoes, as follows:
Article 1. All shipments of potatoes which are imported into the country
for seed purposes must be accompanied by certificates of origin and health,
in which it shall be affirmed:
(a) That the tubers came from areas practically free from the following
diseases and insects: Synchytrium endobioticum Schilb., Spongospora subterranea
Johns., Phthorimaea operculella Zell., (Tina de la papa), and Leptinotarsa
decemlineata Say.
(b) That the tubers must be free from other serious parasitic diseases, al-
lowing a certain margin of tolerance for innocuous infections. In particular,
with reference to scab and potato tuber moth, distinction should be made
between:
(1) Powdery scab caused by Spongospora subterranea Johns., the presence of
which will render the shipment useless for seed.
(2) Black scab, Rhizoctonia violacea Tul., the presence of which will require
a previous disinfection of the tubers intended for seed.
(3) Common scab caused by Oospora (Actinomyces) scabies Thax., which
may be allowed in a small proportion, no greater than 5 percent of the number
of tubers, and not found infecting more than 10 percent of the surface.
(4) Potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella Zell., may be admitted when-
ever on arrival in the country, the number of tubers infested is no greater than
1 percent, and in such cases the tubers must be subjected to disinfection.
No changes have been made in the texts of articles 2, 3, and 4 of the decree
of January 10, 1934, and article 2 is again in force.
In accordance with the new decree, article 1 under "Regulations Governing
the Importation of Seed Potatoes," on page 5 of B. E. P. Q. 382, Revised,
should be replaced by the new article 1 as above, and the "Note" following
article 2 on page 6 should be stricken out, as the temporary suspension of
article 2 has been lifted.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 411, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

JULY 28, 1941.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINES No. 2 (COFFEE) AND NO. 7 (BANANA) REVISED

In two orders of the Secretary of Agriculture and Development, dated March
19, 1941, Exterior Quarantine No. 2 of July 17, 1927, and Exterior Quarantine
No. 7 of November 17, 1940, were repealed, and the following Exterior Quaran-
tines were substituted.
Exterior Quarantine No. 2.-Coffee plants, etc., on account of the coffee berry
borer, Stephanoderes coffeae Hag. (S. hampei Fen.).
ARTICLE 1. An absolute (prohibitory) quarantine is hereby established on
coffee plants, their parts, organs, and natural products, coming from foreign
countries.
ART. 2. Accordingly the entry of the aforesaid products is not permitted
either for consumption or for transit.
ART. 3. Entry of such products is permitted only for the purpose of scientific
investigation.
(Supersedes Exterior Quarantine No. 2-Coffee, page 13, B. E. P. Q. 411.)
Exterior Quarantine No. 7.-Banana plants, etc., on account of the Panama or
wilt disease, Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

ARTICLE 1. An absolute (prohibitory) quarantine is hereby established on
banana plants of any species, their parts, organs, and natural products, produced
in foreign countries.
ART. 2. Accordingly the entry into Mexico is not permitted of the aforesaid
products either for consumption or transit.
ART. 3. The above products are permitted entry into Mexico only for the
purpose of scientific investigation.
(Supersedes Exterior Quarantine No. 7-Banana Plants, page 16, B. E. P. Q.
411.)
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 442, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF BRITISH GUIANA

SEPTEMBER 17, 1941.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FROM THE UNITED STATES PROHIBITED
[Order in Council No. 862]

The importation of citrus material (including fruit) from the United States
of America is prohibited, due to the prevalence of citrus canker (Phytomonas
citri) in that country. (Governor in Council, June 8, 1937.)

IMPORTATION OF RAW COFFEE SEVERELY RESTRICTED

[Order in Council No. 646]

The importation of raw coffee from all countries on the continent of South
America is prohibited, and the importation of raw coffee from all other countries
is likewise prohibited, provided that the Director of Agriculture may authorize
the importation of any particular consignment from the latter countries, if
he is satisfied that it is the produce of a country in which the coffee berry borer
(Stephanoderes hampei Ferr.) is unknown. (Governor in Council, November
9, 1937.)
IMPORTATION OF PADDY RICE RESTRICTED
[Order in Council No. 422]

The importation of rice seed (padi) without written authorization of the
Director of Agriculture is prohibited. (Governor in Council, August 17, 1938.)
IMPORTATION OF BROOMCORN RESTRICTED
[Order in Council No. 247]

Due to the presence of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) in Canada
and the United States of America, the importation of broomcorn therefrom is
permitted only when accompanied by a fumigation certificate issued by an
authority approved by the Director of Agriculture. (Governor in Council,
August 14, 1939.)
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 455, Revised, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF BERMUDA
AUGUST 14, 1941.
AMENDMENT OF BANANA PROHIBITION
An amendment of Bermuda bylaws regulating the control of plant diseases
and pests ordered by the Board of Agriculture June 10, 1941, and approved
by the Governor-in-Council July 9, 1941, changes the import status of lhananas,
plantains, etc., from restricted to prohibited.






82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Consequently, the line beginning "Bananas" under article 12 on page 2 of
B. E. P. Q. 455, revised, should, in accordance with this amendment, be
changed to read as follows:
"Bananas, plantains (Musa spp.) : All parts including the fruit."
The other prohibited items remain unchanged.
The lines beginning "Banana fruit" under article 13 on the same page should
be deleted in view of the amendment to article 12.
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 471, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

JuLY 25, 1941.

REVISION OF REGULATIONS CONCERNING TOMATO SEED

By Proclamations No. 65 and No. 87, 1941, the Governor-General of the
Union of South Africa has amended the Schedule of Proclamation No. 286 of
1936 to provide for the entry of tomato seed from areas not infected with the
bacterial canker of tomato.
The paragraph entitled "Tomato Seeds" on page 8 of B. E. P. Q 471 should be
amended to read as follows:
"Tomato seeds (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) from Germany, Italy, North
America, or any country where bacterial canker of tomato (Aplanobacter
michiganense E. F. Sm.) occurs: Import permit required; must be accom-
panied by an official certificate stating that the seed was produced by plants
officially inspected in the field and found free from that disease, or that the
seed was produced in an area where the said disease does not occur."
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to
September 30, 1941, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Ana Arvizu------------------ Douglas, Ariz_------ 26 peaches ----------------- $0. 50
Mrs. Guadalupe Bergan---------- Nogales, Ariz -------- 2 mangoes and 1 papaya --------_ 1.00
Artemisa Arvizu de Gonzales ----------do------------ 9 mango seeds, 5 miscellaneous 2.00
plants, and 34 miscellaneous
bulbs.
Caolinia M. Lopez-------------- Calexico, Caiif------ 2 avocados ------------------- 1.00
Mrs. J. S. de Merdez Juana ------- San Ysidro, Calif ---- 3 mangoes --------------------- 1.00
Francisco H. Olivo ------------ ----- do ------------- 10 mangoes-------------------- 3.00
Mrs. Dolores M. de Valenzuella-- -----do-------------- 7 manaoes --------------------- 2.00
Teodoro Garza ----------------- Brownsville, Tex ----- 1 avocado with seed ------------- 1.00
Agusto C. Mascono ----------------do------------- 2 avocados with seed ------------ 1.00
Valeriono Silva ----------------------do ------------- 3 avocados with seed ---------- 1.00
Ernesto Romero ---------------------do------------- 12 mangoes -.------- ...------- 1.00
Romona Bernal de Cano -------------do------------- 2 oranges, 2 quinces, and 1 avo 1.00
i cado with seed.
Jose Martinez --------------------do .-------- 14 lily bulbs----------------- 1.00
Lorenzo Raiz ----------------- -----do -------------- 4 tuna fruit-------------------- 1.00
Ernesto Gonzales Salinas -------------do------------- 5 avocados with seed----------- 1.00
Valentine Llamos _------------- ----- do -------- 1 guava ------------------- 1.00
Gumercino Garcia -----------------do--------- 5 pears ------------------------. 1.00







1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Sanjuana Castro de Garcia------- Brownsville, Tex-- 1 pomegranate ---------------- (1)
Estaban Vela---- --------------------do ------------- 2 avocados with seed------------ $1.00
Matea Ramirez ----------------- Del Rio, Tex.------- 1 avocado ---------------------- 1.00
Catarino Arismendez ----------- -----do------------- 2 avocados.--------------------- 1.00
Nestora Martinez de Arrelano ---------do ------------- 13 peaches -------------------- 1.00
Maria Torres de Castaneda-------- Eagle Pass, Tex ------ 1 plant_ ------ ---------------- 1.00
Maria de la Luz ...----------- ----.----- do ---------------- do ------------------------ 1.00
Maria de Jesus Sanchez_ ------------ do -------------10 plants __ -------------------- 1.00
Luz Rivas de Elizondo ------------.--.do-------------- 4 avocados and 8 peaches---- 1.00
Eulalia Gonzales ------------------do------------- 27 figs ------------------------ 1.00
Josefa Mata Garcia -------------- -----do ----------- 6 pomegranates -- --- -------- 1.00
E. S. Lozano ---------------- -----do-------------- 5 oranges ----------------- 1.00
Josefa E. Zendeja-Avilis ------------ -----do ------------- 25 pomegranates and 1 quince___ 1.00
Eduardo Porter -------------------- -----do---------------- 2 oranges and 2 guavas ---------- 1.00
Gilberto Flores Chapa --------------- do --------- 4 pomegranates, 2 pears, and 2 1.00
quinces.
Maria de Jesus Estran --------------do--- -------- 6 avocado seed ------------------ 1.00
Genara Sustaita ------------------- do------------- 5 pears-_---------- ---------1.00
Jesus Borrego ------ -----------------do-------------- 2 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Francisca Garza de Cavazas -------- -do---------- 3 pomegranates ----------------- 1.00
Arredondo Epigmenio..--------- -----do-- -------- 22 peaches--------------------- 1.00
Siria Valdes Torres. ------------- -----do------------- 5 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Felis H. DeCastro --------- -----do ------------- 9 peaches --------------------- 1.00
Maria L. Garcia.-------------- -----do------------- 1 plant -------------------. ---- 1.00
Estella de la Rosa .--------. --- ----.-- do--------- 2 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Sacarro Renteris _-------------------.do -------------- 2 quinces---------------------- 1.00
Nicolassa Sanchez de Calderon --------do -------------4 avocados -------------------- 1.00
U. Pina Garcia -------------------- do------------- 2 apples ----------------- 1.00
Mauro Pedilla .---------------- -----do------ 1 quince----------------------- 1.00
Manuel Jimenez .-------------- -----do ------------- 14 nodes sugarcane -------------- 1.00
Petra Castro de Dominguez ------- El Paso, Tex --------- 1 mango, 1 pomegranate, and 1.00
80 figs.
Carmen Medina Solis---------------do ------------- 2 plants in soil and 18 canna 1.00
rootstocks.
Carmen Alvarez Arias..------------- ---do------ 1 mango------------------------ .10
Mrs. L. H. Moore---_ -------- Hidalgo, Tex -------- 4 mangoes---------------------- 1.00
Claudio Robledo -----------------do------------- 1 avocado ---------------------- 1.00
Higurio Almenderrez...--- ------- -----do---------- 3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Marie Torrez -------------- -----do -------------6 pomegranates and 3 quinces_-- 1.00
Gumoro Verver ....----------- -- do-------------- 6 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Eugenio Garza .------------------------- do --------------4 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Ignacia Moya -------- do-- -------- 3 avocados -------------------- 1.00
Gumecindo Zuniga-- -------- -----do -------------7 avocados ------------------ 1.00
Aulalio Villareal -------------------. do- --------2 avocados --------------------- 1.00
L. B. Rogers ..-.------------.--_ ---do ---------3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Pablo Angiano-------------- -----do ----------- 4 avocados ------------------- 1.00
Noe Pena ----------- -------. ---- do------------- 5 avocados ------------------- 1.00
Isabel Segura ---------------- -----do---------- 6 quinces, 5 peaches, and 1 1.00
pomegranate.
Eulogio Gonzales..----...------ ----- do------------- 1 peach and 1 apple------------- 1.00
Albina de Leon ----------.---------. do ------------- avocado --------------------- 1.00
Timotea Pena .--- ----- ........-----do ---- ------4 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Francisca Maldonado -.---..--... -----do ----------- 4 peaches---------------------- 1.00
Luz Garcia -------- --- ...do ------------1 avocado ---------------------- 1.00
Tomas Moroles-..---. ----.--- ---do .....----- -------- _do ---.---------------- 1.00
Herlinde Tovar -----.. -----..... -- do ---- ------5 avocados ----------------- 1.00
Maria de la Luz Gonzales .-------- ----. do.----------- 1 plant ..----------- ------ 1.00
Genoveva Herrera de Gonzalez ---... -- do --. -----3 plants----------------------- 1.00
Feliz Mazon .._.---.-- -----------. Laredo, Tex ----..... 4 peaches ---------..-.-------- 1.00
Josefina Robles .-- .---...-------.--. do --2 mangoes---.------------------ 1.00
Blanche Handy....----.. --..-- .. ----do------- 1 mango ------------_ -----1.00
Petra Gonzales Regina ----..---.. ----do ----------- 4 mangoes-- ---------------- 1.00
Amelia Trevino de Villalobos-----... ----do .-------------. 3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Maria Guadalupe Trevino- ........... do.------. ----- 2 avocados --.----------------- 1.00
Dolores Miranda Villalobos..-----. ----.. do__-------- 1 avocado --------------------- 1.00
Carmen Villalobos .-- -------...... ---do ----..---- -----do -------------------1.00
Guadalupe Zamora---............. .... do 1 mamey---------------- ---1.00
Refugio Morales..... ------------ do ............ 4 plants ---------------------- 1.00
Guadalupe Juarez_ ------ -----do............ 14 plants -----.--.------------ -- 1.00
Mercer Clinton ....------------......--- do..--- 2 oranges ---------------------- 1.00
Andrea G. de Galligos...--------- -... do 1 orange .... ---------------- 1.00
W. L. Esser ------.............. .. do 6 plants.-------------------. 1.00
Rosa S. Romeo-----................ -----do --22 figs --.----_----- -- 1.00
E. M. Villareal-----......._ ....... ----do 1 mango ----------------------- 1.00
G. M. Gilbert.--... -........-...... ...do ........ orchid plant --------------.--- 1.00
Marley Wolf...----.....----.......----- do .....-- 4 mangoes and 1 cotton bcll ..- 1.00
Margarita Costello................ -.... do..------------ 10 plants ....- __--.........- 1.00
Mrs. Lygia G. Quinones------...... -...do................ 4 avocado seeds_ _-----........ 1.00
Julio Martin--------.................... do ------- 5 sweet limes, 1 orange, and 1 1.00
mnango.
Juan Saenz -------------- ...............do-..-....-.. ..... 3 quinces ...................... 1.00
Rebecca A. de Arreola -........... .....do -............. 2 plants..----.---------------.. 1.00
I Released without payment of fine because she had no money.







84 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS [July-Sept.


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Mary Ramirez ---------------- Laredo, Tex ------. 3 plants ---------------------- $1.00
Aurelio Gonzalez------------_ ---- do----__ ------ 23 oranges and 34 avocados----- 2.00
Mrs. Petra Solis ----------------- do_ ------------ 3 avocados ---------------------- 1.00
Concepcion M. Marmoleto ---------- --do------------- 2 plants----------------------- 1.00
Carmela G. de Ramirez -------- ---do ------------ do ------ -------------- 1.00
Clotilde Martinez -----------do -------- 1 mango and 2 avocados -------- 1.00
Augustina Gonzalez ------------do -------------1 plant------------------------ 1.00
Guadalupe Cisernos --------- ---do --------- 2 oranges----------------------- 1.00
Guadalupe Santos ---------- ---do ----------- 2 avocados ----- ----------- 1.00
Refugio Osuma .------------.------- do-------------- 10 avocados ---- ----------- 1.00
Mrs. Maria Villarreal ------ ------do -------------- 6 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Angel Villarreal .-------- ---do ---------- 10 avocados -------------------- 1.00
Mr. Crisnin Villarreal _------_------- do- ----------13 avorados---------------- 1.00
Mrs. Dolores Belteron -------- ----do---------- 3 avocados -------------------- 1.00
Aurora Trevino-_---------- -----do ------------- 2 plants ---- ----------- 1.00
Francisco Estrada ------------ -- do -------26 plants-------------------- 1.00
Frederico Avila -------------------do --------- 1 mamey, 2 pears, and 1 mamey 1.00
seed.
Colestina Hernandez -------------- do------------ 1 plant ------------------------ 1.00
Bibiana Pequerro -------- ----do-------------- 2 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Elise Flores -------------------do------------- 12 plants and 2 avocado seeds__ 1.00
Eduardo Enriquez ----------------do---------- 1 quince ---------------------- 1.00
Andrew Aaya --------------do ------------- 4 plants and 25 avocados-------- 3.00
Augustine Gonzales --------- ---do ------------- 12 plants ---------------------- 1.00
Mrs. G. Gonzales -------------- do---------- 3 avocados --------------------- 1.00
Cira Perez ------------do------------- 1 plant --------------------1.00
Maria O. de Mendoza ----------_do -------- 22 avocados-------------------- 2.00
Mrs. Jessie Galvan -----_-------__ -- do --------- 4 plants ----- ------------ 1.00
Mrs. Swvpra Buena ------------ do ------- 4 sweet limes ---------------- 1.00
D. A. Will ----------do------ 4 plants ----- ----------- 2.00
Mrs. A. O. Sanchez--- ----------_ do------------- 2 plants -------------------1.00
Luis Deltoyos .-------------------- do ------------- 1 avocado---------------------- 1.00
Juana Yorra .------.----------- ----do ..----------- 7 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Arnulfo Aguirre -------------------do------------- 28 avocados -------------------- 2.00
Ienacio Cruz ------------------do ------------- 18 plants---------------------- 1.00
Mrs. John N. Ogden ------------ do ------ 4 plants ------------------------ 1.00
Elvira Taddi --------------------do ---------1 plant ------- ----------- 100
Celia Cantu --- ------------------do----------- 3 avocados-----------------_ 1.00
Mrs. Pedro G. Gonzales ------------- do---------------- 7 plants and 2.quinces ---------- 2.00
Mrs. Sofia Mata -- -------- -----do-------------8 plants. -------------------- 1.00
Salvador Frausto ------------------do -------------6 pomegranates ----------------- 1.00
A. M. Zeeda ---------------------do -------------3 plants_ ---------------------- 1.00
Maria Escorbar -------------------- do------------- 2 plants ------------------- 1.00
Beatriz Gorza de Uridales --_----------do -------------1 apple and 6 plums ------------ 1.00
Mrs. J. M. Valez ---------- -----do------------- 3 pomegranates----------------- 1.00
Juan Bravo ---------- do-------------3 bulbs -------------------- 1.00
Alma Conception Allen -------------do ------------- avocado ---------------------- 1.00
Juana Sandoval -----------------do------------- 2 plants ------ ----------- 1.00
Louis Mayers..- -------------. ----do --------------22 avocados -------------------- 4.00
Oscar Gonzalez Lugo ---------------- do --------------23 avocados-------------------- 1.00
Dolores Galacia Rodriguez ------- --- do ------------- 4 peaches ------ ----------- 1.00
Roberto Sanchez ---- ------ --do -------2 uavas ------------- 1.00
Mrs. Salas de Vasquez -------------- do ------------- 9 Irish potatoes and 1 quince---- 1.00
Isabel M. Brenenma -------- ---- do -------------2 guavas, 3 figs, 1 sweet lime, 1.00
and 1 apple.
Navidad Ramirez. ------------------ do -------------1 mango ---------------------- 1.00
GuadalunP F. Hernandez ----------- do-------------. 2 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Candida Ruiz ------------ ----do ---------- 22 plants ---------------------- 1.00
Jose Juarez ------------------do -------------2 sweet limes ------------------- 1.00
Dolores de Resendez -- ----------do ------- 20 plants and 3 bulbs ----------- 1.00
Aurora Brava -------------------.do----------- 3 plants and 8 cuttings ---------- 1.00
Beatrice Cuellar ---------------._ ---do ------------- 7 plants ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. J. V. Brava ------------------do------------- 5 plants ----------------- 1.00
Anastacia Vasquez ------------- do ------------- 4 avocados --------------------- 1.00
M. Castro ---------------------- Roma, Tex --------- 1 stalk of cotton with 3 green 1.00
bolls, 2 sweet limes, and 6
pomegranates.
.Jose Maria Chapa -------- ..-------do ------------- 18 avocados-------------------- 1.00



















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Associate Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.
J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Cultiure Invcstigations.
D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.
F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.
W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.
R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.
F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.
R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.
C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.
C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.
S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.
B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.
E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.
A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex..).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fii.itfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
85














U. S, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1941










8. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 149 Issued M1arch 1942


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1941



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements .----------------- ----_ .--------------------------- 87
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (No. 71)------------------------- 8 87
Instructions to postmasters ---------- .-----------------------.---------------------- 87
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Dutch elm disease quarantine
by authorizing the reshipment from points within the regulated area of elm plants received
from nonregulated area and reshipped during the dormant period of the insect vectors of
the disease (B. E. P. Q. 517) ----------------------------------------------------- 88
Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------- --------- -------- ---. 88
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) --.- --- .- 88
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, sixth
revision) .------------------------------------------------------------------------- 88
Instructions to postmasters .------------------------------------------------------... 89
Announcement relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) --------------- 90
Treatment prescribed for certain Puerto Rican vegetables (B. E. P. Q. 518) ----------------- 90
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products--. ---------- ---------------------------- 90
Arizona State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated August 7, 1939)------------_ .. 90
Instructions to postmasters-Plant quarantine and terminal inspection regulations appli-
cable to fruits and other plant products sent to military camps -------------------- 94
]Miscellaneous items ............... 94
Miscellaneous items-------------------- ------------------------------------------------ 94
Bishopp and Spencer to be assistant chiefs in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
(press notice) ---- ------------------------------- -------------------------------- -94
Cushing name head of Entomology and Plant Quarantine division (press notice)----------- 95
Rohwer in charge of Entomology and Plant Quarantine regulatory work, Popham new
assistant chief (press notice) -.----. -----.. ------- -----------------------------------------. 95
United States Department of Agriculture discontinues European corn borer certification
(press notice) ------------------------------------------------ -----.-------------- 95
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised, supple-
ment No. 2)----------- .. ---------------- ------------------. -------------------- 96
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406, revised,
supplement No. 3) _-------..-- ------------ --- .-------------. ----------------------- 96
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
No. 6). .- ---------------------------------- ---------------.-------.. ----------- 97
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supersedes P. Q.
C. A. 283, revised, and all supplements) .-.. ..-..- .....--------------------.---------..- 97
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --_ -------------------------.. -.. 103
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-------------.......---------------.. 104



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THiIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, October 10, 1941.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of a revision of
plant quarantine Order No. 71 of the United States Department of Agriculture
on account of the Dutch elm disease, by which you will please be governed.
This revision, effective October 1, 1941, removes from the regulated area the town
of Huntington in Suffolk County, N. Y., but extends the regulated area to include
parts of nine Pennsylvania counties and additional sections in Connecticut,
New Jersey, and New York where the Dutch eln disease has been located. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster Genera.
442712-42-- 1 87






88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

B. E. P. Q. 517 Effective November 10, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
DUTCH ELM DISEASE
301.71-4a ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE
DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING THE RESHIPMENT FROM
POINTS WITHIN THE REGULATED AREA OF ELM PLANTS RECEIVED FROM NONREGU-
LATED AREA AND RESHIPPED DURING THE DORMANT PERIOD OF THE INSECT
VECTORS OF THE DISEASE
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by the fourth proviso of 301.71, Chapter III,
Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 71 on account
of the Dutch elm disease], 301.71-4 is hereby modified, effective November 10,
1941, by providing that elm plants originating in nonregulated area and received
within the regulated area during the period from November 1 to March 31,
inclusive, of any 12-month period may be reshipped interstate to nonregulated
area during the period specified above when such plants have been handled under
conditions of sanitation and segregation as prescribed by the inspector to prevent
attack or infestation by insect vectors of the Dutch elm disease or accidental or
natural infection by the fungus causing the disease. Such shipments of elm
plants shall bear an identifying tag issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine showing compliance with these conditions. (7 C. F. R.,
301.71; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 8th day of November 1941.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register November 14, 1941, 11:35 a. m.; 6 F. R. 5799.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, December 30, 1941.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed circular relating to the
modification of the restrictions of Plant Quarantine No. 71 of the United States
Department of Agriculture on account of the Dutch elm disease.
The modification permits the acceptance of reshipment from points within the
regulated area of parcels containing elm plants received from the nonregulated
area provided the reshipped parcels are accompanied with a certificate or identi-
fication tag of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing the
plants have been handled under conditions of sanitation and segregation as pre-
scribed by the Inspector. You should be governed accordingly. See paragraph
1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)
B. E. P. Q. 386 (6th revision) Effective October 10, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
Introductory note.-This revision of circular B. E. P. Q. 386 adds to the list of
articles exempted from certification requirements, box shooks, when newly
manufactured; cuttings and branches (for ornamental use) of boxwood, of Cali-






1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

fornia peppertree, and of eucalyptus; cuttings of greenhouse-grown woody plants
when so labeled; and wood flour, pulverized wood, or ground wood sawdust
when sifted through a screen of at least 30 meshes to the inch.
301.45a. Administrative instructions; articles exempted from restrictions.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of 301.45, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 45, on account of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth], the following articles, the interstate movement
of which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are exempted
from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine, effective October 10,
1941:
Acacia cuttings (for ornamental use) (Acacia spp.).
Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.
Birch slabs for use as post cards.
Birch bark when waxed, polished, or otherwise treated to adequately elimi-
nate all risk of transmitting infestation and when used in the manufacture
of novelties.
Box shooks, when newly manufactured and planed on four sides.
Boxwood cuttings and branches (for ornamental use) (Buxus sempervirens).
Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.
California peppertree cuttings and branches (for ornamenital use) (Schinus
molle).
Clubmoss (sometimes called "ground pine") (Lycopodium spp.).
Cuttings of woody plants that have been grown in the greenhouse through-
out the year, when labeled on the outside of the container to show that
the contents were greenhouse grown.
Eucalyptus cuttings and branches (for ornamental use) (Eucalyptus globulus).
Evergreen smilax (Smilax lanceolata).
Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).
Galax (Galax aphylla).
Geranium (Pelargonium spp.).
Heather cuttings (for ornamental use) (Erica spp., Calluna spp.).
Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).
Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container.
Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, S. pseudocapsicum, S. hendersoni).
Leaves of deciduous or evergreen trees that have been treated or dyed.
Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, etc.).
Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatumn).
Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).
Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).
Trailing arbutus (Epigaea repens).
Verbena (Verbena spp.).
Wintergreen (Gaultheria spp., Pyrola spp.).
Wood flour, pulverized wood, or ground wood sawdust, when processed by
screening or sifting through a screen of at least 30 meshes per inch. (Issued
under 301.45.)
All previous lists of exempted articles are superseded by these instructions.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 2d day of October 1941.
P. N. ANNAND, Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register October 8, 1941, 11:04 a. in.; 6 F. R. 5131.1


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTM1ASTER GENERAL,
Washington, October 17, 1941.
Referring to notice of Quarantine No. 45 of the United States Department of
Agriculture on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, notice is given
to postmasters in the regulated area, which includes the entire State of Rhode
Island and parts of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts. New Hampshire, and
Vermont, that, effective October 10, 1941, the following articles, the interstate
movement of which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination,
are exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:
(For list of articles, see B. E. P. Q. 386 (6th revision), above.)






90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

All previous lists of exempted articles are superseded by these instructions.
(See Postal Bulletin of November 21, 1939, and page 10, December 1939 Supple-
ment to the Postal Guide.)
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PUERTO RICAN FRUIT AND
VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 58)
B. E. P. Q. 518.
Effective November 15, 1941
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III--BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301-DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
TREATMENT PRESCRIBED FOR CERTAIN PUERTO RICAN VEGETABLES
301.58-3b. Administrative instructions; treatment requirement for green string
beans, lima beans, faba beans, and pigeonpeas, in the pod, moving from Puerto Rico.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by paragraph (a) of 301.58-3, Chapter III, Title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [regulation 3 of the rules and regulations supplemental to
the Fruit and Vegetable Quarantine of Puerto Rico (No. 58)], treatment is pre-
scribed for green string beans, lima beans, faba beans, and pigeonpeas, in the pod,
moving by freight or express from Puerto Rico to any other State, Territory, or
District of the United States, effective November 15, 1941, as follows:
(a) Vacuum fumigation.,-Treatment is to be given in a standard vacuum
fumigation vault equipped with a blower, with a 15-inch vacuum maintained
throughout the period, at any temperature above 340 F., with a dosage of 3 pounds
of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the load, for 12 hours.
(b) Atmospheric fumigation.-Treatment is to be given in an approved at-
mospheric fumigation vault provided with a circulating fan, for a period of 2
hours, with dosages of methyl bromide as follows: (1) If the mass temperature is
between 50 and 700 F., the dosage shall be at the rate of 3 pounds per 1,000 cubic
feet of space, including the load; (2) if the mass temperature is above 700 F., the
dosage shall be at the rate of 12 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the
load. (NOTE.-Atmospheric fumigation is not recommended at temperatures
below 500 F.)
Treatment vaults and equipment will be approved for fumigation purposes by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine through the local plant quar-
antine inspector only when reasonably accessible for supervision purposes and
when properly constructed and equipped to carry out the treatment prescribed.
All costs of treatment other than the services of the supervising inspector shall
be borne by the owner of the products, or his representative.
While the prescribed treatment is judged from experimental tests to be safe for
use with these products the Department assumes no responsibility for any damage
sustained through or in the course of treatment.
Shipments of small lots of these products may be certified for shipment by
parcel post without fumigation when they have been examined by an inspector
and found free from infestation. (7 C. F. R., 301.58-3; 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44
Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 12th day of November 1941.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register November 19, 1941, 11.14 a. m.; 6 F. R. 5891.]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, November 10, 1941.
ARIZONA STATE PLANT QUARANTINES
(Revision of notice dated August 7, 1939)
Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Arizona, the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant materials, known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases, is subject to certain requirements, or entirely
prohibited.







1941] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91


The following table gives a summary of the Arizona quarantine laws and
regulations, showing the quarantined areas, the plants and plant produlcts
affected, and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts. Under
the provisions of paragraph 2 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations,
postmasters should not accept such plants and plant products when presented for
mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations, and should invite
the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Arizona
Plants and plant products affected
Acceptance for mail- Plant pests and
Area quarantined Acceptance for mailing ing only when ac- diseases
entirely prohibited compan ied with ap-
proved certificate or
Arizona permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)
(1) Entire United States-------- ----------------------- All grapevines and Grape mealy-
cuttings (rooted or bug and grape
otherwise) when ac- Phylloxera.
companied by prop-
er certificate of treat-
ment from state of
origin.
(2) Entire United States (except Citrus fruits and plants Citrus seed admitted Citrus can ier
California). and parts thereof, ex- under Arizona per- and species of
cept seed. mit. California cit- the frultfly
rus nursery stock family Try-
admitted underAri- petidae.
zona permit.
(3) a. Alabama-Counties of Bald- (a) Sweetpotato tubers ..---------------.-----. Sweetpotato
win, Conecuh, and Mobile. and parts thereof; (b) weevil.
Florida-Entire State. sweetpotato plants,
Georgia-Counties of Camden, vines, cuttings, draws,
Charlton, Glynn, and Thomas. slips, and morning-
Louisiana-Parishes of Acadia, glories; (c) yams in-
Allen, Ascension, Assumption, eluding the tubers and
Avoyelles, Beauregard, Calca- plants and parts there-
sieu, Cameron, East Baton of.
Rouge, East Feliciana, Evange-
line, Iberia, Iberville, Jefferson,
Jefferson Davis, Lafayette, La-
Fourche, Livingston, Orleans,
Plaquemines, Pointe Coupee,
Rapides, St. Bernard, St.
Charles, St. Helena, St. James,
St. John the Baptist, St.
Landry, St. Martin, St. Mary,
St. Tammany, Tangipahoa,
Terrebonne, Vermilion, Vernon,
Washington, West Baton
Rouge, and West Feliciana.
Mississippi-Counties of A mite,
George, Hancock, Harrison,
Jackson, Jefferson Davis, Jones,
Lawrence, Pearl River, Pike,
Stone, and Walthall.
Texas-Counties of Angelina, At-
ascosa, Austin, Bandera, Ba-
strop, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Blanco,
Bosque, Brazos, Brazoria,
Brewster, Burlington, Burnette,
Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron,
Chambers, Colorado, Cornal,
Concho, Coryell, Crane, Crock-
ett, DeWitt, Dimmnit, I)uval,
Edwards, Falls, Fayette, Fort
Bend, Frio, Galveston, Gilles-
pie, Goliad, Gonzales, Grimes,
Guadalupe, Hamilton, lHardin,
Harris, HIays, Hidalgo, Hill,
Irion, Jackson, Jasper, Jim
Hogg, Jim Wells, Jefferson, Jeff
Davis, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr,
Kimble, Kinney, Klebcrg, Iav-
aca, Llano, LaSalle, Lampasas,
Lee, Liberty, Limestone, Live
Oak, McCulloch, McLennan,
MeMullen, Madison, Mason,
Matagorda, M\averick, M1edina,
Menard, Milanm, Mills, Mont-







92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Arizona-Continued

Plants and plant products affected
Acceptance for mail- Plant pests and
Area quarantined Acceptance for mailing ing only when ac- diseases
entirely prohibited companied with ap-
proved certificate or
Arizona permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(3) Texas-Continued.
gomery, Nacogdoches, Newton,
Nueces, Orange, Pecos, Polk,
Presidio, Real, Reagan, Refugio,
Robertson, Sabine, San Augus-
tine, San Jacinto, San Patricio,
San Saba, Schleicher, Starr,
Sutton, Terrell, Travis, Tyler,
Upton, Uvalde, Val Verde,
Victoria, Walker, Waller, Wash-
ington, Webb, Wharton, Will-
acy, Williamson, Wilson, Za-
pata, and Zavala.
(3) b. All other parts of the United --------------------- Plants and tubers ad-
States. mitted to Arizona
when accompanied
with certificate from
State of origin show-
ing same originated
in area known to be
free from sweet-po-
tato weevil.
(4) a. Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Cotton, including all --------------------_ Cotton boll wee-
Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Lou- parts of the cotton vil.
isiana, Mississippi, Missouri,. plant either wild or
North Carolina, Oklahoma, South cultivated; cotton lint,
Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and linters, samples of cot-
Virginia. ton, seed cotton, cot-
tonsed, cottonseed
hulls, and Spanish
moss.
(4) b. Other parts of United States -------------------- Seed cotton, cotton-
except California. seed, lint, linters,
cotton samples, cot-
tonseed hulls, and
Spanish moss, ad-
mitted under Ari-
zona permit or U. S.
Department of Agri-
culture certification.
(5) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti- All species, including --------------------- Peach yellows,
cut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, the ornamental forms, peach rosette,
Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, of peach, apricot, al- and little-
Maryland, Massachusetts, Mich- mond, nectarine, and peach.
igan, Mississippi, Nevada, New plum trees, cuttings,
Jersey, New York, North Caro- grafts, scions, or buds,
lina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode or any trees budded
Island, South Carolina, Tennes- or grafted on peach
see, Virginia, West Virginia, and stock or peach roots.
District of Columbia.
(6) Arizona, California, Colorado, Plum trees and parts Peach and nectarine Peach mosaic
New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, thereof, except fruit trees, root stock, disease.
and Utah. pits. grafts, buds, or other
parts capable of
propagation, except
fruit pits, admitted
under proper certi-
fication from State
of origin.



(7) Entire United States ...------ ...-.--------------------- Strawberry plants ad- St ra w b e r r y
mitted if accom- root weevils.
panied with "certifi-
cate from State of
origin stating same
originated in area
free from strawberry
root weevils.