Service and regulatory announcements

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Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288977
oclc - 14207732
lccn - sn 86033973
Classification:
ddc - 632.9 U54
System ID:
AA00023076:00004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    No. 142 (January-March 1940)
        Page 1
        Page 2
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        Page 37
        Page 38
    No. 143 (April-June 1940)
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
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        Page 45
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        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    No. 144 (July-September 1940)
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
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        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    No. 145 (October-December 1940)
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
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        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    List of intercepted plant pests, 1940
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
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        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
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        Page 62
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        Page 64
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        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Index
        Index 1
        Index 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















S8






LbRARY
SI7ATh PLANT BOARD





State of Florida
Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY









LIBRARY






OARD



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013













http:Harchive-org/details/regulato40u nit







S. R. A., B. E. P. Q. Issued November 1941


United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND


REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


1940






These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per.
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations






WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

































UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : 1941













F1:A. DEPT. AG,
DIV. OF PLAN%
INDUSTRY
LIBRARY


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief. AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief. F. H. SPENCER, Business Managcr. ROLL P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HA-MBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations. C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BIsHoPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.)
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy M1oth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Distase
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).
II












408653-41













CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 142 (JANUARY-MARCH 1940) Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------- 1-
Announcements relating to coffee quarantine (No. 73) 1------------------------------------Hearing on coffee quarantine scheduled for Puerto Rico_ 1----------------------------Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry
into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,
plants, and leaves --------------------------------- ----------------------- 2
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee becomes effective April 1 ---------. 2
Coffee quarantine-Notice of quarantine No. 73 ..... ........... 3
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 36)----------------------Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50067) ------ --------------------------------- 4
Quarantine rules on Newfoundland fruits and vegetables modified --------------------Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations amendmentt No. 1, effective February 27, 1940) ------ -- - -- --- -- - - - --
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50017) -. ..---------------------------- -Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 4S) ........ ----- 7
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures ----------- 7
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United
States -.------------------ ------------------...------------------ ----- I
Administrative instructions to inspectorson the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1. revised) -_.
Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 5s) --
Administrative instructions-The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the
mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505)
Suggestions on treating citrus fruits by m ethods prescribed in (Circular B. E. P'. Q. 505 (B. E.
P. Q. 506) .---------------------------- - -- -- --------Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) -- 1___I--- :
Administrative instructions- Removal ot white-fringed beetle certification requirements for
a limited period tor potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under
quarantine No. 72 (B. E. P. Q. 485, fourth revision) .---- ---Instructions to pcstm asters ... .. .. .. ..-
Administrative instructions-Modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine by authorizing treatment by n ethyl bron ide solutions of balled nursery stock of specifled thickness (B. E. P. Q. 703. revised) ---------------------------Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --- 1:
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona
Miscellaneous items----------- ...1
Administrative instructions-Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foriegn countries via the
United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. 307, revised)
Present status of circulars of this (B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E. P. Q. 50 ; supersedes B. E. P'. Q.
461) .----------------------------Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Eritish India (B. E. P. Q. 404. revised, supplen ent
No. 1) --------------- ---------------------------------Plant-quarantine import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great lBritain (B. E. P. Q. 41C,
rev ised ) .-- - - I -. . ... .
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471. supleire nt
N o 2 ) - - --.- -. . ..Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarant ine ..- -CONTENTS OF NO. 143 (APRIL-JUNE 1940)
Quarantine and other official announcements --------------Announcement relating to coffee quarantine (No. 73). - -, -,--,- ,,I.
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50129) 3)
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) 4,
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D1). 5(161) 40
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) o.. o
Japanese beetle quarantine continued---Etensions of area announced as of April 5, 1940 41o Japanese beetle quarantine continued (l
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (anieudnient No. 2, effective April 3.
1910) II. .. 42
Notice to general public through newspapers
List of true bulbs, acorns, and tubers exemt ed from Japanese heetle certificate ion ( E.
P. Q. 394, revised)
Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified
Modifications of Japanese beetle qLuarant ine regulations amendmentt No. 3. effectli e .\lay
27, 1940) .
Not ice to general p bli c through newspapers
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the real ment of nursery products, fruit .
vegetables, and soil for the Jap aese beetle (1. E. 1P. Q. 199. supplement No. 2
Order amend(ing Section 301.1s 5,. (Chapter 111, Title 7. Code of FedJeral IUe lata .
and lmodlifying the J apanese beetle luarant in regulations as to shipllents of fruis
and v'egtabhles from certain areas in Virginia ( E. P'. Q. 0)
Announcement relating to pink hollworn quarantine (No. .52
Administrative instructions relatiing to pink )hol(lworm quar atine restorine the treat(, Imenit
requirements as to cotton linters, cott onse(d hulls, cake, and meal and ex\ltlend l t he ar:i a in which haled cot ton lint mnay be moved from certain libt1 y infested areas in Noex .Nlcxi'o
and Texas without treatment (B. E. P. Q. 193, revised)
II[







IV CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official announcements-Continued. Page
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ---------------------------- 58
Administrative instructions-Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. E. P. Q. 485, fifth revision) -------------------------------------------- 58
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 59
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------------- 59
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona ------------------------------------------------- 59
Miscellaneous items- -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, supplement
No. 7) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supplement No. 3) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement No. 2) 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. E. P. Q. 502, supplement
No. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 61
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------------ 62
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 64

CONTENTS OF NO. 144 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940)

Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 65
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) --------------------------------- 65
Instructions to postmasters ------------------- ----------------- ---------------------------- 65
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for season -------------------- 66
Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetle quarantine to September 19 for the year 1940 ------------------------------ 66
Instructions to postmasters ----------------------------------------------------------- 66
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3) - 67
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
2d revision) ---------------------------- ------------- -------------------------------------- 6 7
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melon fly quarantine (No. 13) - - - - - 68
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables ----------------- 68
Use of methyl bromide' authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from
Hawaii to the mainland -------------------------------------------------------- ------------ 69
Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetables
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl bromide under supervision
(B. E. P. Q. 510) ------------------------------------ ------------------------------------- 69
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ---------------------------------- 70
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940 ---- 70
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ---------------------------- 72
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision) ---------------------- 72
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 73
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------------- 73
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937) ---------------------- 73
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised) ----------- 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised) ------ 78
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------------ 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 84

CONTENTS OF NO. 145 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940)
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 85
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) -------------------------------- 85
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice) - 85
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.
Q. 512) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 86
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 86
Plant-quaran tine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.
348) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 86
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised.. supplement
N o. 2) ----------------------------------------------------- ----- ------------------------ 95
List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations -------- 95
Penalties imposed for violations oi the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------------ 101
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 103


0







S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 142 Issued June 1940


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1940


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to coffee quarantine (No. 73) ------------------------------------------- 1
Hearing on coffee quarantine scheduled for Puerto Rico ------------------- ------------------ 1
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry
into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,
plants, and leaves -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee becomes effective April 1 ------------------------- 2
Coffee quarantine-Notice of quarantine No. 73 --------------------------------------------- 3
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) ----------------------------- 4
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50067) ------------------------------------------- 4
Quarantine rules on Newfoundland fruits and vegetables modified -------------------------- 5
Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1, effective February 27, 1940) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50017) --------------------------------------- 7
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) --------------------------------- 7
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures --------------------------------------- 7
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United
States ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 8
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, revised) ------- 8
Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) --------------- 9
Administrative instructions-The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the
mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505) ---------- 9
Suggestions on treating citrus fruits by methods prescribed in Circular B. E. P. Q. 505
(B. E. P. Q. 506) ----------------- ------------------------------------------------------- 10
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (_" o. 72) ------------------------------ 11
Administrative instructions- Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements for
a limited period for potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under
quarantine No. 72 (B. E. P. Q. 485, fourth revision) -------------------------------------- 11
Instructions to postmasters -------------------------------------------------------------- 11
Administrative instructions-Modifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quarantine by authorizing treatment by methyl bromide solutions of balled nursery stock of specified thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503, revised) --------------------------------------------------- 12
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------------- 13
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona. ------------------------------------------------ 13
M iscellaneous items ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13
Administrative instructions-Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foreign countries via the
United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, revised) --------------------- 13
Present status of circulars of this (B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E. P. Q. 508; supersedes B. E. P. Q.
461) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement
N o. 1) -------------------- ---- ------- --- ----------------------------------- ---------- 23
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great Britain (B. E. P. Q. 416,
revised) ------- ------------------------------------------------- __ -------------------- 23
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, supplement
----- --- ____ --------------------------------------------- 36
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----------------------------------- 36
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 38



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
HEARING ON COFFEE QUARANTINE SCHEDULED FOR PUERTO RICO

[Press notice
JAN'UA11Y 17, 1940.
Secretary of Agriculture Heiiry A. Wallacv lia,- called a public waring to consider the desirability of establishing 1-1 quarantine to prohibit or restrict entry into Puerto Rico of coffee which might carry pests into the Island. This hearing will be held by tile Bureau of Enttmiology aml Mant. Quar-tilitine at 10 a. m., February 14, 1940, in the Templo &I Maestro, San Juan, 1'. R.
229841--40- 1 1






2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

"The long-established coffee industry of Puerto Rico fortunately has remained free from certain destructive insect pests, which have interfered seriously with the success of coffee growing in many other parts of the world,"' Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, who will preside at the hearing, said today. "To ensure the continuation of this freedom from insect attack, the United States Department of Agriculture proposes to consider the desirability of establishing a quarantine prohibiting or restricting entry into Puerto Rico of unroasted coffee beans, as well as fruits, plants, and leaves of coffee that might bring in, these pests."
A quarantine, if decided upon, probably would exclude commercial importations of unroasted coffee beans, as well as coffee fruits, plants, and leaves. It would, however, provide for entry, under safe regulatory procedure, of the usual coffee samples weighing a pound or less, and also for the safe handling of shipments entering at San Juan for immediate transshipment to foreign destinations or to the United States mainland.
The quarantine under consideration would affect only coffee imported into Puerto Rico from foreign countries. It would not restrict in any way coffee shipments from the United States mainland to Puerto Rico. These now are and would continue to be subject to the coffee quarantines long maintained by the Puerto Rico Department of Agriculture and Commerce.
Only in exceptional instances are public hearings like this held outside Washington, D. C., Dr. Strong said. In this case the Department recognizes that nearly all the interests concerned are centered in Puerto Rico and could be represented in Washington only at a considerable expenditure of time and money. It seems more consistent with the public interest to hold this hearing at San Juan.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITING OR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY INTO PUERTO RICO FROM ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD OF UNROASTED COFFEE BEANS, AND COFFEE FRUITS, PLANTS, AND LEAVES
JAN-UARY 15, 1940.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exist in various countries of the world where coffee is grown an- injurious insect, the coffee berry borer, Stephanoderes ham pei Ferr., of which S. coffeae Hgdn. is a synonym, and an injurious rust, Hemeleia vastatria, B. and Br., as well as other injurious Insects and plaint diseases, and that these pests, new to and hitherto not widely distributed within or throughout the United States, may be introduced into coffee-growing areas of Puerto Rico with importations of unroasted coffee beans, or coffee fruits, plants, and leaves from other countries and localities. It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of unroasted coffee beans as well as fruits, plants, and leaves of the coffee plant, Goffiea spp., from all foreign countries- and localities into Puerto Rico.
Notice is hereby given, therefore, that in accordance with the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture in the Temple del Maestro, in the city of San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 10 a. in., February 14, 1940, in order that any person interested in the establishment of such prohibition or restriction may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
[SEAL] GxovERx B. HiLm,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


QUARANTINE TO PROTECT PUERTO RICAN COFFEE BECOMES EFFECTIVE APRIL I

[Press notice]
MA~cH 22, 1940.
The Department of Agriculture today announced that Secretary Henry A. Wallace has signed a plant quarantine order prohibiting the shipment into Puerto Rico of unroasted coffee beans, coffee berries, or coffee leaves from foreign countries. The quarantine, which becomes effective Apr11 1, is designed






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

to protect the Puerto Rican coffee crop from insect pests, such as the coffee berry borer, and from plant disease, such as coffee rust, that are a serious handicap to the coffee industry in many countries. The quarantine applies only to commercial shipments. Small coffee samples may come in under certain regulations, and foreign coffee can be transshipped, also under regulation, at the port of San Juan.
This new quarantine, the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine explains, is largely precautionary. Little unroasted coffee has entered the Island for many years. Both Insular and Federal authorities are interested in the restoration of Puerto Rico's struggling coffee industry. Once a flourishing industry, it has fallen off because of international trade barriers and intense competition in world markets, and, in the last decade, because of hurricanes. The introduction of plant pests would be a disastrous setback, the Bureau says.


B. E. P. Q.-Q. 73. Effective April 1, 1940.
COFFEE QUARANTINE

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE 'No. 73


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The coffee industry in Puerto Rico established early in the history of the Island has fortunately remained free from at least two of the world's most destructive coffee pests, the coffee berry borer and the coffee rust. The object of the present quarantine is to ensure the continued freedom of Puerto Rican coffee cultures from these and other coffee insects and diseases by prohibiting or restricting entry into the Island of those coffee materials which, might be the means of introducing such pests. It is believed that the measures put into effect by this quarantine will attain this end and at the samne time provide for as much freedom of movement as would be consistent with safety.
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


SEC. 319.73-NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73 ON ACCOUNT OF COFFEE PESTS
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)
Having found that an injurious coffee insect (Stephanoderes [Co ifeac Hgdn.iI hampei Ferr.) known as the coffee berry borer, and an injurious rust disease due to the fungus Hem ilcia vastatrix B. & Br., not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in various countries and localities throughout the world, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, pursuant to the provisions of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C. 151-167), as amended, have determined that, in order to prevent the introduction of the said pests into the Island of Puerto Rico, it is necessary to prohibit or restrict the importation into that Island from all foreign countries and localities of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee (Go ffea spp.), coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants and leaves.
Now, therefore, by virtue of the said Plant Quarantine Act, the public hearing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given, first, that on and after April 1, 1M4, the importation into the Island of Puerto Rico f rom all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds5 or beans of coffee which, previous to importation, have not been roasted to a degree whichi, iii the judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agriculture, will have destroyed coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or fruits, and (3) coffee plants and leaves, is prohibited except by the Department of Agriculture for experimental and scientific purposes, and except for samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans, and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations other than Puerto Rico ; and, second, that the importation of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans, and iluportatious of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinaitionis other than Puerto Rico, shall be made only under the restrictions provided in the






4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

rules and regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That individual shipments of materials prohibited or restricted by this quarantine may be exempted from its provisions in whole or in part when it shall have been determined by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine that entry of the shipment in question may be made without risk of pest introduction.'
Done at the eity of Washington this 20th day of Mlarch 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)

REGULATION 1

SEC. 319.73-1. Permnit.-All importations shall be made under permit and only at the port of San Juan.'
REGULATION 2

SEC. 319.73-2. Inspection and safeguard provisions.-Coffee samples shall not exceed 1 pound in weight and may be imported by mail, freight, express, or baggage. They shall be subject on arrival to inspection and fumigation or such other treatment as the plant quarantine inspector may require.'

REGULATION 3

SEc. 319.73.-3. Restrictions on in-transit shipments.-In-transit shipments to foreign countries shall be subject to the Plant Safeguard Regulations issued October 4, 1932 (Secs. 352.2 to 352.8), or as hereafter revised. The same restrictions shall apply to shipments in transit to destinations elsewhere in the United States.'
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 1, 1940.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of March 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT-FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE-CONDITIONS
GOVERNING THE ENTRY OF CIrOraLINI, FROM MOROCCO (T. D. 50067)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMNMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, lVasftington, D. C., January 11, 1940.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504 entitled "Administrative Instructions; Conditions Governing the Entry of Cipollini from Morocco" issued by the Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, effective December 7, 1939, under authority contained in Regulation 2 of Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable quarantine) (T. D. 48728) is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.

Sees. 319.73 to 319.73-3 issued under authority contained in 37 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C.' 151-167.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal reference opposite articles 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner:
G. H. GRIFFI TH,
Acting Deputy Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the text of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504.)


QUARANTINE RULES ON NEWFOUNDLAND FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED [Press notice]
FEBRUARY 27, 1940.
The Department of Agriculture announced today that fruits and vegetables produced in Newfoundland, exclusive of potatoes, have been played onl the tame basis of importation into this country as those from Canada. The change became effective today.
For many years the comparatively few vegetable food products shipped here from Newfoundland, mainly berries, have entered this country under the restrictions of the general fruit and vegetable quarantine No. 56. Similar products from Canada have for some years enjoyed greater freedom from these restrictions. Avery S. Hoyt, Acting Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, said that inspection of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland indicates that these importations may safely be put on the same basis as those from Canada. He pointed out that although Newfoundland, with its adjacent strip of Labrador, is politically distinct from Canada within the British Empire, the two may be considered as almost identical from the point of view of plant pests which might affect our imports from them.
Potatoes from Newfoundland continue to be excluded because of potato wart.


MODIFICATION OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Inspection of fruits and vegetables offered for entry from Newfoundland during the period since the promulgation of Quarantine No. 56, the Fruit and Vegetable Quarantine, effective Novemiber 1, 1923, indicates that imlportations of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland can be safely permitted on a basis comparable to those from Canada. The present revision of the regulations supplemental to Quarantine No. 56 is made therefore to place the entry of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland amid its mainlandl territory of Labrador on the same status as those from Canada, with the exception of potatoes, which have long been and still are excluded from Newfoundland on account of potato wart.
Aviuay S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entaniology and Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 56, AS REVISED EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 1, 1936, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES INTO THE UNITED STATES (Approved February 24, 1940 ; effective February 27, 1940)
Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 (Sec. 319.543-2) of the Rules and Regul-ations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (See. 319.56), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the United States, as revised effective December 1, 1936, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 2
SEC. 319.56-2. Restrictions on entry of fruits and vc[/etalbles.-All imnportations of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or port ions of p~lanlts, as defined in regulation 1 (b) (Sec. 319.56-1 (b)).






6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND, PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mareh

Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables (except frozen fruits and vegetables), including cured figs, and dates, raisins, nuts, and dry beans and peas, may be imported without permit or other compliance with these regulations: Provided, That any such articles may be made subject, to entry only under permit and on compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein, when it shall be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture -that the condition of drying, curing, or processing to which they have been subjected may not entirely eliminate risk. Such determination with respect to any such articles shall become effective after due notice.
Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts,' by special quarantine and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as may hereafter be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from all countries under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas, pineapples, lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera type and any vegetable, except as restricted by special quarantine as indicated above, may be imported from any country under permit and on compliance with these regulations, at such ports as shall be authorized in the permits, on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruit and melonflies (Trypetidae), or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.
The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries concerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph: Provided, That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits may be conditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruitflies and melonflies; or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.
Frozen or treated fruits and vegetables from all countries.-Upon compliance with these regulations and with such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, fruits and vegetables
-which have been treated, or are to be treated, under the supervision of a plant quarantine inspector of the Department, will be permitted entry under permit at such ports as may be specified in the permit, when, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, such importation may be permitted without pest risk.
Commonwealth of Australia-States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tagmania.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from the States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
New Zealand.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from New Zealand under such conditions and'at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
Japan.-Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28 (See. 319.28), oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine varieties, may be imported from, Japan at the port of Seattle and such other northern ports as may be designated in the permits.
Mexico.-Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the regulations issued under the order of December 2, 1913 .(Sees. 321.1 to 321.8).
Argentina.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Argentina under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
Chile.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Chile under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
West Indie8.-Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits from the W(Ist Indies may be permitted entry at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
2See list of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

Jamaica.-Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port of New York or such other northern ports as may be designated in the permits.
Canada, and Newfoundland, including its mainland territory of Labrador.Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada and in Newfound3
land, including its mainland territory of Labrador, may be imported into the United States from these countries free from any restrictions whatsoever under these regulations.
General.-In addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothouse-grown
-fruits and other special fruits, which can be accepted by the; United States Department of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects, including fruitflies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.
This amendment shall be effective on and after February 27, 1940.
Done at the city of Washington this 24th day of February 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SFAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS 6F CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT-FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE-1NIODIFICATION OF
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY or FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
ExcLusm OF POTATOES, FROM NEWFOUNDLAND (T. D. 50017)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, March 22, 1940.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Amendment No. 1 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, as revised, effective December 1, 1936 (T. D. 48728), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the United States, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned. This amendment, which became effective February 27, 1940, modifies Regulation 2 by placing the entry of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland and its mainland territory of Labrador, with the exception of potatoes, on the same status as those from Canada, namely, free from any restrictions Whatsoever under Quarantine No. 56.
The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal reference opposite 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner:
W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the amendment.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE BEETLE CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS FUTURE MEASURES
[Press notice]
JANUARY 8, 1ID40.
A public conference to consider the advisability of withdrawing Federal quarantine against the Japanese beetle and ending Federal cooperation with the States for the suppression of the beetle, will be held at 10 a. m., February 27, in the auditorium of the United States National Museum, Tenth Street and Constitution Avenue, Washington, D. C.

&The Importation of potatoes Into the United States Is governed by the regulations issued under the order of December 22, 1913 (Sees. 321.1 to 321.8).






8 BUREAU OF ENTOkTOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

The Federal-State suppressive program, begun in '1919, has retarded the spread of the Japanese beetle, particularly long-distance jumps, through being carried from one place to another. It cannot, however, stop entirely the beetle's spread. The 1939 survey showed an additional spread of the beetle, especially in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, North Carolina, and Georgia. Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, has called the February meeting to allow those interested to express their opinions as to whether the benefits derived from the Federal quarantine and cooperation are worth the costs.
If the Federal quarantine is withdrawn and Federal cooperation ended, -Dr. Strong points out, States where the Japanese beetle is not yet established may take any measure they choose to prevent the entry of the beetle.


NOTICE OF CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS THE STATUS OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE INFESTATION IN THE UNITED STATES

JANuARY 6, 1940.
For the last several years it has been increasingly apparent that the Japanese beetle is gradually spreading into hitherto uninfected areas. While the jumps taken by the insect to points where new centers of infestation would result in the last several years have not been unduly alarming as compared with the progress it had made in previous years, nevertheless every one who has watched the Japanese beetle situation knows there is a continual expansion of the area under regulation on account of this insect. The results of the scouting program for 1939 indicate some additional expansions in a number of the States in which the Japanese beetle infestation occurs. If the suppressive measures are to keep pace with the constantly growing area, increased expenditures appear to be the only answer. The thought of increased 'expenditures leads to the question whether the benefits derived from the efforts to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle are now worth the price and particularly whether they justify the greatly increased cost which will be necessary to adequately deal with the situation in the larger area now involved. It seems advisable to obtain an expression of public opinion with respect to this situation and before amending the quarantine to take care of the points found infested during the past season, a public conference in the city of Washington is being called to consider the wisdom of the maintenance of the suppressive program directed against the Japanese beetle, the benefits derived under that program, the possible alternative measures that may be taken by the uhinfested States for their own protection if the Federal quarantine were revoked, and the additional areas that would need to be brought under the Japanese beetle quarantine before the adult beetle season of 1940 arrives. For this reason a public conference Will be held in Washington, D. C., in the Auditorium of the U. S. National Museum at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW., beginning at 10 a. M. on February 27, 1940.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. I-Revised). ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY
PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

MARCH 22, 1940.
Further experiments in the use of methyl bromide fumigation for Japanese beetle larvae indicate that the temperature in the dosage schedule provided in circular B. E. P. Q. 499 for fumigation of plants with or without soil may be lower than the minimum of 630 F. heretofore required, provided there is a longer period of exposure. The treatment schedules are therefore Widened in this'revision of Supplement No. 1, to provide for alternative treatments as specified below.






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modified by changing subsection (5) on page 13 of the mimeographed circular to read as follows:

(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.-A fumigation chamber, of approved design, equipped with vaporizing, air-circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.---After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vaporized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal of the fumigated articles.

(I) FUMIGATION OF PLANTS, WITH OR WITHOUT SOIL

Temperatures and periods of treatment.-The temperature of the soil (with bare root stock, the root spaces) and air must be at least:
1. 630 F. for an exposure period of 21,.2 hours, or
2. 540 F. for an exposure period of 4 hours, or
3. 50 F. for an exposure period of 4 hours.
Dosage.-Two and one-half pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space occupied by the load.
Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied only to plants with bare roots or in 12-inch pots, or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches in diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be puddled or saturated. With wet material, drying for a period of 12 hours is advisable before treatment. The plants should be stacked on racks or separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each other, they should not be jammed tightly together.
Varieties of plants.-The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and nursery stock types treated experimentally is subject to continual expansion and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, including also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied on request.
The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified on page 14 of circular B. E. P. Q. 499 remains the same as heretofore.
This supplement supersedes Supplenent No. 1, dated Novemnber 4, 1939.
(See. 301.48a, issued under Sec. 301.48)
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Burcaii of Entomnoiogy and Plant Quiarantitne.



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PUERTO RICAN FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 58)
B. E. P. Q. 505.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-THE SHIPMENT OF ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT FROM PUERTO RICO TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO TREATMENT UNDER SUPERVISION IS AUTHORIZED
JANUARY 4, 1940.
Investigations in treating frnit for the fruittly .41lastrcpdia souspwnsa Loew have demonstrated that the holding ,f the fruits at certain prescribed temperatures for certain periods will kill all stages of this iis(t.
The interstate shipiiit, subjecte to owe of the following prescribed treatlents, is therefore ait horized for P uerto Ricani ora Iges and gra pefi'ui[t otherwise ineligible for the usual certification given under the prove isins of Quarantine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58).
229841-40---2






10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

1. HEAT TREATMENT
Heating the fruit with air at 100 percent relative humidity for a period of not less than 16 hours during which time the temperature at the approximate centers of the fruits shall be raised to 110' F. or above and maintained at 110' F. or above for the last 8 hours of such treatment.

2. COLD TREATMENT
Cooling until the approximate centers of the fruits reach a temperature of 34' F. or below and holding the fruits -so that the inside temperature does not exceed 340 F. for a period of 15 days.
Either the heat treatment or the cold treatment may be employed at the shipper's option and at his expense provided that adequate facilities are available and arrangements for supervision can be made. Information on the application of the prescribed treatments may be had on application to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
While injury to the fruits is not expected to result from either treatment, Do liability shall be attached to the United States Department of Agriculture on account of any claim of damage to such fruits attributed to either treatment.
On and after January 15, 1940, certification for shipment to mainland destinations under Quarantine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58) will be given to Puerto Rican oranges and grapefruit which have been subjected to either of the above-prescribed treatments carried out under supervision of a plant quarantine inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture at a treating plant approved for the purpose. (,See. 301.58--3a, issued MdOr Sec. 301.58-3).

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 506.
SUGGESTIONS ON TREATING CITRUS FRUITS BY METHODS PRESCRIBED IN CIRCULAR B. E. P. Q. 505
JANuARY 4, 1940.
Circular B. E. P. Q. 505, which provides for the shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the mainland on the basis of heat or cold treatments, makes no specifications as to methods or equipment required.

1. HEAT TREATMENT
Available information with respect to the high-temperature treatment clearly indicates that by the application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot be reached without injury to the fruit. Experience has also shown that temperatures much above 110' F. may have injurious effect on the fruit. It is important therefore that the temperature be held very close to 1100 F. and that it at no time exceeds 112* F.
In successful treatments live steam as the source of heat was applied in such a manner as to secure a uniform distribution of steam-heated air introduced into the treating chamber so that it did not discharge directly on the fruit. Uniform and gradual heating of the fruit to the required temperatures was found necessary for the best results. A good method is to increase the air temperature with the fruit temperature, gradually raising it to 110' F. as the fruit temperature rises. In treating rooms properly equipped and operated commercial quantities of fruit can be heated to the prescribed temperature of 110' F. in not more than 8 hours, and this fruit temperature maintained for the required period by using air at a temperature not exceeding 110* F. and at a relative humidity of 100 percent.
After treatment the fruit should be well cooled before being packed. If fruit is to be colored by the use of gas, this should be done prior to treatment. Wax or paraffin should not be used on fruit either before or after treatment.

2. COLD TMATMENT
In successful treatments employing low temperature, experience has shown that satisfactory cooling can be accomplished in cold-storage chambers only






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1

when the chambers are provided with adequate refrigeration and positive, uniform circulation of the refrigerated air. In cold-storage rooms properly equipped and operated it is possible to cool the fruit to the required temperature and maintain this temperature with variations of 20 F. or less.
Attention is called to the fact that Puerto Rican fruits certified for shipment to the mainland under the provisions of circular B. E. P. Q. 505 are treated under supervision of a plant quarantine inspector of the Department of Agiculture in plants approved for the purpose by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision.'
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A LIMITED PERIOD, FOR POTATOES AND SWEETPOTATOES CONSIGNED FROM AREAS REGULATED UNDER QUARANTINE NO. 72
[Approved February 2, 1940; effective February 6, 1940]
Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, as revised July 28, 1939, waived certification requirements until February 1, 1940, for specified articles consigned from certain parts of the areas regulated under quarantine No. 72. The present revision exempts from -certification soil-free potatoes until May 1, 1940, and soil-free sweetpotatoes until June 1, 1940, consigned from any part of the regulated areas.
The restrictions on soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure remain in effect throughout the year when shipped interstate from any part of the regulated areas.

Under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72), all certification requirements are hereby waived until May 1, 1940, on potatoes, and until June 1, 1940, on sweetpotatoes when such products are free from soil, and are consigned interstate from any part of the regulated areas, it having been determined that sanitary measures and natural conditions have so reduced the risk of contamination with any stage of the white-fringed beetle as to render certification of the above products unnecessary during the periods stated.
No modifications are made by this revision in the certification requirements on the interstate movement, throughout the year, of other articles designated in paragraph (a) of Regulation 3 (Sec. 301.72-3), namely: Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure, whether moved independent of, or in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or things.
(SEc. 301.72a, issued under Sec. 301.72.)
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Busreauz of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


INISTRUR~rIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OM~rCE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Postmster:Washington, February 12, 1940.
My DEAR Sxn: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.
Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLAcKc,
Thtrd Assistant Post ma ster Genecral.

Supersedes revision of July 28, 1939.






12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

B. E. P. Q. 503 Revised.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE WHITE. FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING TREATMENT BY METHYL BROMIDE SOLUTION OF BALLED NURSERY STOCK OF SPECIFIED THICKNESS

INTRDUCORY OTEMARCH 15, 1940.

The instructions in circular B. E. P. Q. 503 issued on November 21, 1939, provided for treatment of nursery stock by a solution of methyl bromide for larvae of the white-fringed beetle and limited the treatment to balled and burlapped nursery stock with soil balls not larger than 6 inches in diameter, and provided for an exposure of 24 hours at temperatures of 700 or above. As a result of more recent investigations, the instructions are now revised to provide that soil balls 7 inches in diameter may be so exposed for 8 hours at a. minimum temperature of 650. The modification is restricted, however, to treatment for larvae of the more common species of the beetle, Pant omorus leucoloma Boh., and does not apply to such treatment for the new species, P. peregrinus Buch., known to exist at present at Gulfport and certain other points in Mississippi. The former specifications remain in effect for treatment of larvae of that species and are brought forward in the instructions which follow.
TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

Under the provisions of Regulation 5 (a) (See. 301.72-5) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72), the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine hereby authorizes as a prerequisite to certification, the following method of treatment for balled plants, when carried out under the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
TYPE OF MATERIAL AUTHORIZED
For t-he more common species, P. leucoloma.-The treatment shall be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter nor greater than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical.
For the new species, P. peregrinus.-The treatment shall be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater than 6 inches in diameter nor greater than 6 inches in thickness when not spherical.

TREATMENT METHOD
FOR BOTH SPECIES OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must -be buried in sand and plunged in boxes or trays approximately one foot deep, which are watertight.
(b) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls, also above and beneath them.
(c) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent denatured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by first mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this mixture to the water and mixing thoroughly.
(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be applied evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40 gallons per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or sprayer.

EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THE MORE COMMON SPECIES (P. LEUCOLOMA)
(e) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period of 8 hours.
(f) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be lower than 650 F.

ExP-OSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THE NEW SPECIES (P. PEREGRINUS)
(g) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period of 24 hours.
(h) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be lower than 700 F.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

Disc A ImER
There has been no opportunity to test this treatment on many varieties of plants, and it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States Department of Agriculture or its employees in the event of injury to either plants or operators.
CAUTION
Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and practically. odorless, and in preparing the solution the operator should wear an approved gas mask. (Sec. 301.72-5c, issued under Sec. 301.72-5.)
This revision supersedes circular B. E. P. Q. 5C3 dated November 21, 1939.
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Ch ief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL.
Washington, March 28, 1940.
Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and plant products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new inspection place established in lieu thereof at Bowvie, Ariz., where inspection will be made upon call. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article 62
(b), page 20 of the July 1939 Postal Guide, Part L.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Th ird Assistant Postm aster Gen eraL~



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 507. (Supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised) SEC. 352.9. ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CITRUS FRUIT FROM MEXICO IN
TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THE UNITED STATES
JANUARY 24, 1940.
Citrus fruit as referred to herein is defined as all citrus fruit other than lemons and sour limes.
To prevent the entry into the United States of an injurious insect known as the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens Loew) the importation from Mexico of citrus fruit, except lemons and sour limes, for consumption in the United States is not authorized under Quarantine No. 56 (Sec. 319.56), its governing quarantine, unless so treated as to eliminate pest risk.
However, in accordance with the Plant Safeguard Regulations (Sees. 352.2 to 352Z8), which provide for the entry'of prohibited commodities for immediate transportation ainq exportation in bond or for immediate export when such movement can be made without risk to the plant cultures of the United States, Mexican citrus fruit is authorized to enter for either of these purposes as follows:
A. Entry via ports on the Mcxican Bordcr.-I. Pcrinits.-Periuits shall be procured in advance of shipment from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C., by the forwarding agent or other repre-entative of the consignee or consignor in the United States. Application for liermlits shall indicate the proposed routing of the shipment. Separate Permits shall be procured for each port of entry and for each country of destination but permits as issued will be continuing for shipments over the approved routes designated therein.
2. Origin of citrus fruit.-Entry is limited to citrus fruit produced in and shipped from the State of Sonora, Mexico.
3. Auth orized ports Of cntrij.-Nogales and Naco, Ariz.
4. Period of entry.-Entry is authorized throughout the entire year.






14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

5. Notice of arrival.-Prior to entry, a notice of arrival shall be submitted to the Collector of Customs at the port of entry in duplicate on a form provided for that purpose giving the initials and number of the railroad car, and the authorized routing.
6. Ins pection.-Eaeh shipment shall be subject to inspection at the port of entry to determine the nature of the contents and freedom from pests.
7. Disinfection.-Each car shall be subject to such disinfection at the port of entry as the plant quarantine inspector shall require.
8. Authorized bonded rail movenient.-AlI shipments shall move in refrigerator cars from Sonora through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., by direct authorized rail routing in bond under customs seal without diversion from the port of entry to the port of exit as follows:
To Canada: Movement is limited to direct eastward rail routing to El Paso thence to Canada by any direct rail route which does not pass west of the direct rail routes through Salt Lake City, Utah, and Portland, Oreg., or southeast of the direct rail routes through San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo. (See accompanying map.)
To Mlex ico: Movement for return to Mexico is limited to direct eastward rail routing for export through border ports between and including Nogales and El Paso.
9. Cleaning of cars prior to return to the United States.--Cars conveying Mexican citrus fruit through the United States to Canada or Mexico shall be carefully swept and freed of all fruit, as well as boxes and other rubbish, by the railroad company involved prior to reentry into the United States.
B. Entry via North Atlantic Ports.-onditioias as. in A-i (Permits), 5 (Notice of arrival), 6 (Inspection), 9 (Cleaning of cars prior to return to the United States), and in addition as follows:
1. Origin of citrus fruit.-Citrus fruit produced in any part of Mexico.
2. Authorized ports of en try.-New York and Boston and such other northern ports as may later be approved.
3. Period of entry.-Entry is authorized only during the period October 15 to March 15.
4. Authorized routing.-AII. shipments shall move by water direct to New York or Boston or to such northern ports as may later be approved for immediate direct export or for immediate transportation and exportation in bond by direct approved rail route to Canada.
(Sec. 352.9, issued under Secs. 352.2-352.8)
LEE, A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



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thenc to aada biy anSalodwthi theunsae ra






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

B. E. P. Q. 508 (Supersedes B. E. P. Q. 461).
PRESENT STATUS OF CIRCULARS OF THIS (B. E. P. Q.) SERIES
MARCH 18, 1940.
Circulars containing information as to Federal plant quarantines have been issued from time to time since January 18, 1915, in a numbered series designated by the prefixes "H. B.. ".P. Q. C. A.. ".B. P. Q.," and B. E. P. Q.,".
These designations referred to the Federal Horticultural Board, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, respectively.
Many of the circulars contained information or instructions of transitory importance only; others were superseded by later circulars; in many instances changes in, or revocation of, quarantines have rendered the circulars of interest only as a record of Bureau activities; while in still other instances, changes in procedure, techinque, or other conditions have made them obsolete insofar as present practice is concerned.
Circular B. E. P. Q. 461, of August 31, 1937, gave a list of the circulars which had been issued up to that date, with information as to which were valid and which were obsolete. Circular B. E. P. Q. 508 brings that material forward, with such changes as are necessitated by subsequent quarantine action, or instruction, and gives a list of the circulars issued to date with information as to the present validity of each.
A circular may be herein indicated as obsolete insofar as its present status is concerned, although it may contain informative material that is still useful. For that reason, inspectors and others will wish to place the obsolete circulars in an inactive-file, available for reference if occasion arises.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
LEGEND
Column 1 :
D-Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with domestic
plant quarantine work.
F-Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with foreign plant
quarantine work.
Column 2:
R-Following the number of a circular, this symbol indicates the circular
has been revised; the latest revised edition only should be consulted. Column 3:
Act-Plant Quarantine Act of 1912.
Adm.-Admi nistrative.
C. 1.-Cotton regulations.
D. P. 1.-Domestic potato regulations.
E. C.-Export certification.
M. B. 11.-Mexican border regulations.
N. S. 1.-Nursery stock regulations.
P. L. & 1.-Postal laws and regulations.
P. R.-Potato regulations.
P. S. 1.-Plant safeguard regulations.
Q. 5, Q. 14, etc.-Notice of Plant Quarantine No. 5, No. 14, etc.

F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withDF H. B. 1------------ A--------------- Obsolete- Of transitory importance. (See current
Cotton Regulations and quarantine No. 47.)
F H. B. 2------------ N. S. R.---------- -do---- Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity; quarantine No. 37 superseded regulations referred to.
F H. B. 3------------ P. R ---- ----- do------- Of transitory imIportance. (See current
Potato eult ions.)
F H. B. 4------------ N. S. R -------- dAo------- Of importance only. as a record of Bureau
activity; quaratin res Nos. 20 and 37 proF H. B. 5------------ P. R------------- ------- Of transitory i mportance. (See current
Potato Rtegulations.)




I


16 BUREAU OF E__\7TO2V1OLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March


i
For Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D No' tion withD H. B. 6 -------------- D. P. R ----------- Obsolete Domestic potato regulations lifted Sept. 1
D H. B. 7 --------------- -------------------- --- do ------- Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.
DF H. B. 8 -------------- Act --------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance. (See current
Cotton Regulations and quarantine No.
47.)
D H. B. 9 -------------- Q. 14, 18, D. P. R_ ---do ------- Domestic potato quarantines and regulations lifted Sept. 1, 1915.
H. B. 10-1 ------------ C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
H. B. 18 ------------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by H. B. 42.
H. B. 19-23 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 24 ------------- Adm -------------- --- do--- ___ Do.'
F H. B. 25 ------------- C. R., P. L. & R__ ---do------ Supplemented by H. B. 26.
F H. B. 26 ------------ C. R., P. L. & R__ ---do ------- Supplemented H. B. 25; superseded by
H. B. 159.
F H. B. 27-30 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 31 ------------- P. R -------------- --- do ------- See current Potato Regulations.
D H. B. K ----------- Act --------------- --- do ------- Present practice is a modification.
F H. B. 32-40 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
D H. B. 41 ------------- Act --------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance; domestic Blister
Rust Quarantine promulgated effective
June 1, 1917.
F H. B. 42 ------------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 18; superseded by H. B.
164.
DF H. B. 43 ------------- Adm -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 44 ------------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Do.'
F H. B. 45 ------------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- See current Cotton Regulations and Plant
Safeguard Regulations.
F H. B. 46-48 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 49 ------------- E. C -------------- j_--do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 375 R.
F H. B. 50-52 ---------- C. R -------------- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
D H. B. 53 ------------- Q. 22 -------------- do ------- Of value only as a record of Bureau activity.,
F H. B. 54-71 ---------- C. R -------------- !---do ------- Of transitory importance.' ,
F H. B. 72 ------------- P. R -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented by H. B. 73. (See current
Potato Re-Wations.)
F R. B. 73 ------------ P. R --------------- --- do ------- Supplemented H. B. 72. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
F H. B. 74 76 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importaDee.1
F H. B. 77 ------------- -kdm--- --do ------- Do.
I ----------- iH. B. 18-80 ---------- C. R -------------- -- do ------- Do.'
D H. B. 81 ------------- Act --------------- --- do ------- Do.
H. B. 82-91 ---------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Do.'
H. B. 92 ------------- Adm. -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
H. B. 93 ------------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.,
D H. B. 94 ------------- Q. 3S -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
3S promulgated effective -May 1, 1919.
F H. B. 95-101 --------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importa-iace.1
F H. B. 102 ------------ N. S. R ----------- do------- Of transitory importance. (See quarantine No. 3"')
F H. B. 103 ------------ C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory' importance.'
F H. B. 104 ------------ N. S. R ---- Do.
F H. B. 105 ------------ Q. 37 ------ -do ------- Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 249.
F H. B. 106 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- ---do ------- Superseded by H. B. 132R.
F H. B. 1071-108 -------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
F H. B. 109 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- See regulation 7, quarantine No. 37.
F H. B. 110 ------------ 'NL B. R ----------- --- do ------- Superseded by H. B. 112.
F H. B. III ----------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 112 ------------ M. B. R ---------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 110; supplemented by
H. B. 118; superseded by instructions not
in this series.
F H. B. 113 ------------ C. R -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.,
F H. B. 114-115 -------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- See Plant Safeguard Regulations.
F H. B. 116 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ----- See current revision of quarantine No. 37F H. B. 117 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Of importance only as a record of formation
of Bureau policy; superseded by instructions not in this series (See quarantine
No. 37.)
F H. B. 118 ------------ M. B. R ---------- Valid ----- Supplemented.H. B. 112; as far as fee is
concerned, H. B. 118 is valid.
F H. B. 119 ------------ C. R ------ Obsolete-- Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 120 ------------ Q. 41 --- do ------- Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309.
1 Certain of the earlier H. B.'s issued in connection with the Cotton Regulations were modified or superseded by the several amendments to the Cotton Regulations which went into effect July 1, 1915, and by the revisions of the Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 1, 1916, and -kucr,. 1, 1917, and the amendments:.thereto; also by.the current Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 24, 1923, as amended. A number of H. B.'s were superseded or supplemented by other circulars which were later amended or invalidated. Therefore, insofar as they remain in effect, Cotton H. B.'s included in H. B.'s 10 to 163, inclusive, unless otherwise stated, are absorbed and superseded by the current Cotton Regulations, and are shown herein as "of transitory importance."







19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17



F or No Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withF I.B. 121 (R)...... C.R ------------ Valid Supplemented by H. 13. 191 (subject to
revision) .
F H. B. 122 -. C. R ------Obsolete Of trObItry importancee'
F H. B. 123-- --------- Q. 37 ------------ do ------Of transitory importance: see current
Quarantine No. 37.
F H.B. 124 C. R --- do u------ SuperseedI by H. B. 127.
F H. B. 125-126------- C. R ---do .------ Of transitory imry>rtance.1
F H. B. 127 ----------C. R .-------------- do ------Superseded II. B. 124; superseded by H. B.
___d ... ... 17 A

F H. B.128- Q.37_ --------------do ------Cf transitory importance. (See current
........... Revision quirant ie No. 37.)
F H. B. 129 C. R- --_ do --Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 130-131 ---- Q. 37 do-------------- Do.
F H. B. 132 ----------Q. 37 do ------ Superseded H.'B. 106; superseded by B. E.
P.Q. 369.
F IT. B. 133 ---------- Q. 37 -------------- do S------ee regulation 7, quarantine No. 37.
F H. B. 134.........----------. Q. 37 .....-------------- do ------ Notice of shipment is filed with notice of
arrival.
F H. B. 135 .....- ---------C. R ------- ----- do ------Of transitory importanee)
F H. B. 136 (R).. -------Q. 37, 56---------- Valid .. (Subject to revision.)
F H. B. 137-138 ...------- O. 37 ------------ Obsolete Of transitory importance.
F IH. B. 139 ----------Q. 37 do ------- Of transitory importance; see H. B. 155.
D H. B. 140 .. ---------- Q. 45 ------------- do ------Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 141 ---------- Q. 37 --------------do See current U. S. Official Postal Guide.
F HI. B. 142 ---------- C. R -------------- do ------ Of transitory importance.'
F H. B. 143 ---------- Q. 37 -------------- do Do.
F H. B. 144 ---------- Q. 37 -------------do ------ See current revision quarantines Nos. 37
and 56.
F H. B. 145 .----------Q. 37 ..------ do -Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 146--------- C. R ..--------------. do D 0
F H. B. 147--------- Q. 5 ..... --do ------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 305.
D H. B. 148 ---------- Q. 54 ...-------------- do ------Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.
F H. B 149-150 ..-------. O 7 -------------- do --- Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 151 ----------- E. C .-------------- do ------ Superseded by H. B. 160, P. Q. C. A.'s301
302, 03. 315.
F H. B. 152-154 ------ O. 37 do-------Of trsitory importance.
F H.B. 155 ...---------- Q.37 ..-------------- do Of transitory importance: superseded H. B.
1 139.
F H. B. 156-157 .------- Q. 37 .....-------------- do ------ Supe seded by current practices;
F H. B. 158 -- -------- Q. 37 -------------- do--- Of tr nsitory impor>nce.
F H. B. 159 (R) ------.... C. R., P. L. & R .-do ..------ Superseded H. B. 26. (See current U. S.
Official Postl Guide.)
F H. B. 160.........----------. E. C .....-------------- do ------ Superseded H. B. 151 in part: supplemented
1 y P. Q. C. A. 296; superseded by P. Q.
C. A. 327.
F H. B. 161 (R) .--.. Q. 41 ------------- do .. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309; B. E. P. Q.
474.
DF H. B. 162 ......... Act .......-- do .------ Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 163 .. ---------- C. R ----- -e, .. Do.
F H. B. 164 ----------... C. R ---------- Valid ... Superseded H. B. 42; formally superseded
by P. Q. C. A. 369, I ut pending revision
of the latter 11. B. IC4 is valid.
F H. B. 165-166 ... Q. 37 .... O------------ 1 solete See current revision Form EQ-207.
D H. B. 167 ....---------- Q. 48 ..--------------. do Superseded by 11. B. 17S.
F H. B. 168....... ---------- Q. 41 ..-------------- do See current quarantine No. 41.
F HIT. B. 169 .....----------. E. C ......----------- do .. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 327.
F H. B. 170 ........----------.. Q. 56 ...... ..------------ Vlid -.-- See current quarantine No. 56.
F HI. B. 171 -----------Q. 56 ......------------ Obsolete Do.
F H. B. 172---------- Q. 41 ------------- ------See current quarantine No. 41.
F H. B. 173-...--------.. Q. 37 ........-------------. do...... ------Superseded by instructions not contained
in this series.
D IH. B. 174........----------.. Q. 45...------------.......... .. do ...... ------Supplemented by IT. B.'s 179, 182; superseded by P. Q. C. A. 334.
D H. B. 175.......... ----------Act ------........... do.......------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 292.
F H. B. 176.. ----------........ C. R -----------............---..do. o.. Superseded H. B. 127; supplemented by
H. B.'s 184, 186: revised under same
number, 1925, 1926, 1927, 192, and 1929;
superseded by B. E. P. Q. 460.
DF H. B. 177----------........... Act .............---------------.. do- .....- Of value only as a record of Bureau activity.
D H. B. 178----------.......... Q. 48..............--------------..do...... ---Superseded H. B. 167; supplemented by
11. B. 180; superseded by 1'. Q. C. A 220.
D H. B. 179 ----------........... Q. 45...........-------------. -. do .....- Supplemented II. B. 174; supplemented by
H. B. 182; superseded by P. Q. C. A. 334.
D H. B. 180 ----------........... Q. 48-------------.............. ... do ....------ Supplemented 11. D. 178; superseded by
P. Q. C. A. 220.
F H. B. 181........... ----------Q. 41-------------.............. ... do...... See current quarantine No. 41.
D. H. B. 182----------........ Q. 45 ... ...-------------- do ..... Supplemented 11. B.'s 174, 179; superseded
by P. Q. C. A. 334.
F H. B. 183 ----------........... Q.137 .............. Valid-----..... Subject to revision.
I See footnote p. 16.
229841-40--- -a







18 BuREAU OF ENTO1\10LOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March



F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withF H. B. 184 ------------ C. R -------------- Obsolete-- Supplemented H. B. 176; superseded by
1925 revision of H. B. 176.
F H. B. 185 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented by H. B. 187.
F H. B. 186 ----------- C. R -------------- --- do ------- SupplemeDted H. B.'s 176,184; superseded
by 1925 revision of H. B. 176.
F H. B. 187 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- Valid ------ SupplemeDted H. B. 185 (subject to revision).
F H. B. 188 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- Obsolete See current revision quarantine No. 37.
F H. B. 189 ------------ E. C -------------- --- de ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 366.
F H. B. 190 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- d s # ------- Of value only a, record of Bureauacth ity.
F H. B. 191 ----------- C. R -------------- Valid----- Supplemented H. B. 121; (subject to re
vision).
F H. B. 192 ----------- E. C -------------- Obsolete Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 428.
F H. B. 193 ----------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q.'s 412, 482.
F H. B. 194 ----------- Q. 37 ------------- --- do------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 308.
F H. B. 195 ----------- Q. 37 ------------- --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q.'s 412, 482.
F H. B. 196 ----------- Q. 56 -------------- --- do------ Of transitory importance.
F H. B. 197 ----------- Q. 37 ------------- --- do ------ Supplemented by H. B. 207, superseded by
B. E. P. Q.'s 412,482.
F H. B. 198 ----------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Of transitory importance; superseded by
B. E. P. Q.'s 412, 482.
F H. B. 199 ----------- E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 304.
D H. B. 200 ----------- Q. 62 ------------- --- do------ Superseded by H. B. 203; quarantine No
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
F H. B. Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 285.
F H. B. 202 ----------- Q. 37 ------------- --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q.'s 412, 482.
D H. B. 203 ----------- Q. 62 -------------- --- do------ Superseded H. B. 200; quarantine No. 62
lifted effective A-Dr. 1, 1935.
DF H. B. 204----------- Q. 37,62__________ ---do------ Superseded by H. B. 206.
F H. B. 205 ----------- Q. 56 ------------- --- do------ Supplemented by H. B. 208; superseded by
H. B. 215.
DF H. B. 206 ----------- Q. 37, 62 ---------- --- do------ Of transitory importance; superseded H. B.
204.
H. B. 207 ----------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Supplemented H. B. 197; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 412.
H. B. 208 ----------- Q. 56 -------------- --- do------ Supplemented H. B. 205; superseded by
H. B. 215.
D H. B. 209 ----------- Q. 48 -------------- --- do------ Of transitory importance.
H. B. 210 ----------- Q. ---do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.
H. B. 211 ----------- E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 284.
D H. B. 2)2 ------------ P. L. &. R -------- --- do ------ Superseded by B. P. Q. "D51.
F H. B. 213 ------------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.
DF H. B. 214 ------------ -------------------- --- do------ See departmental regulations par. 1547.
F H. B. 215 ----------- Q. 56 -------------- --- do------ Superseded H. B.'s 205, 208; superseded by
P. Q. C. A. 241.
F H. B. 216 ----------- Q. 56 -------------- --- do------ Of transitory importance; see current quarantine No. 56.
D P. Q. C. A. 217---- Q. 62 -------------- --- do------ Superseded by B. P. Q. 337.
F P. Q. C. A. 218 (R) Q. 37 -------------- --- do------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 278.
D P. Q. C. A. 219______ Q. 63 -------------- --- do------ See current revision quarantine No. 63.
D P. Q. C. A. 220 ------ Q. 48 -------------- --- do------ Superseded H. B.'s 178, 180. (See current
revision quarantine No. 48.)
D P. Q. C. A. 221______ Q. 66 -------------- --- do ------ Quarantine No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,
1930.
P. Q. C. A. 222 ------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------ See current revision Form EQ-208.
P. Q. C. A. 223 ------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q.'s 412, 482.
D P. Q. C. A. 224______ Q. 48, 66 ----------- --- do ------ Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.'s 239, 265,
293, 307, 322, 333; B. P. Q. 339; superseded
by B. P. Q. 359.
D P. Q. C. A. 225 ------ Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------ Of value as record only, quarantine No. 68
lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 226-228-- Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 229 ------ Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 240; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 230-232- Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 233 ------ Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 238; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective, Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 234-237-- Q. 68 -------------- --- do------- Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 238 ------ Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 233; quarantine
No. 69 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 239______ Q. 48,66___________ ---do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; supplemented by B. P. Q. 339; superseded by*
B. P. Q. 3 59.
D P. Q. C. A. 240______ Q. 68 ------------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 229: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F P. Q. C. A. 241 ------ Q. 56 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 2J 5; superseded by B. P.
Q. 344.
D P. Q. C. A. 242 ------ Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19



F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withD I P. Q. C. A. 243 .... Q. 68 ------------ Obsolete __ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 269; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 244-245-. Q. 68 ......-------------- do ------ Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 246...... ------Q. 68 --------------do ------Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 271; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 247 .... Q. 68 -------------- do ------ Explanatory of P. Q. C. A. 246, quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F P. Q. C. A. 248 ....------ Act --------------- do ------ Of transitory importance.
F P. Q. C. A. 249 .------ Q. 37 _--------------do ------Superseded H. B. 105; superseded by
B. P. Q. 340.
D P. Q. C. A. 250 ...------ Q. 68 .....-------------- do ------ Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 251 ------ Q. 68 .... -------------do ------Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 256; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15. 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 252 ------ Q. 68 ...-------------- do ------ Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 253 ------Q. 68 --------------. .... do ------ Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 263: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 254 ------Q. 68 .... .....--------------do ------ Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.'s 261, 262;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 255 ------Q. 68 .._-------------- do ------ Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 256 -- Q. 68 ...-------------- do ------ Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 251: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 257 -.. Q. 68 ..-------------- do ------ Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 258 ..------ Q. 68 ...-------------. do ....------ Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 266; quarantine No. 6S lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 259 .- Q. 66 --------------.. do ..------ Quarantine No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 260 ------Q. 48 ...-------------- do ...------ Of transitory importance.
D P. Q. C. A. 261-262- Q. 68 ------------ _do ------ Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 254; superseded
S P by P. Q. C. A. 272.
D P. Q. C. A. 263 -... Q. 68 --------... ..-do . Superseded P. Q. C. A. 253; superseded by
P. Q. C. A. 280.
D P. Q. C. A. 264 -- Q. OS ----- ---do------- Supers ede I, by P. Q. C. A.'s 269, 272.
D P. Q. C. A. 265 --- Q. 48, 66 -----------do ------ Suipplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; suppleD P. Q. C. A. 266 0. 68-------------- do ------ Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 25.D P. Q. C. A. 267-268 Q. 68 --------------do ---- Quramitine No. (S lifted effective imovem*
ner 15. 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 269 ------Q. 68--------------do------ Superseded P. Q. C. A.'s 241, 264, supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 272: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 270 ----- Q. 68 do ------Quarantine No. 6 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 271 .. Q. 68 ------------- do Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 2146; quarantine
No. ts lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 272 --- Q. 68 ------------ ___do ------ Supersoed P. Q. C. A.'s 251, 261, 262, 214;
suptlnemented P. Q. C. A. 269; supplein ted by P. Q. C. A.'s 273, 279, 210, 282,
2S6, 2 I; quarantine No. t( lifted elective
Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 273 ____ Q. 68 ------------ do -Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; qurantine
No. (: lifted effective Nov. 1'. 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 274 Q. 44 .do .(10Superseded by B. ,. P'. Q.: 3.:
D P. Q. C. A. 275-276 Q. (8- .-do ... Quirantine No. S lifted detective Nov. 15,
193 0.
F P. Q. C. A. 277 -- Q. 37 ------------ d ... Su)perseded b)y B. E. P. Q. 376.
F P. Q.C.A. 27S (R) Q. 37 i------------ V Superseded P. Q. C. A. 218.
D P. Q. C. A. 279 .. Q. 6 -------- Obsolete Supple meneit P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. ts lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 280 ..------ Q. 68 o-----. __(1o --- Supersded P. Q. C. A. 263; supplemented
P. Q. ( \. 272; quarantine No. 6$ lifted
effei) ye Nov. ")i0.
D P. Q. C. A. 281 -- Q. 52 o ------------- __.do Supplemented by P1. Q. C. A.'s 29s, 300.,
D P. Q. C. A. 282 Q. s ..- ..---------- -do ------ Su ieteplwte.d i'. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
by P. Q. C. A. 2; quaranltinle No. 68
lifted effeIe Novi\ i. 15 1930.
F P. Q. C. A. 283 (1) E. C .- Valid F P. Q. C. A. 284 .. E. Obsolete Supersed--d 1I. B. 211; superseded by B. E.
1,). t-il1t.
F P. Q. C 2. 5 A . Q. 37-............ ...----... .. Supersede I 1, 1. 201: SO l~crseded by 1, Q.
P P.Q. A.286 Q. 6------------------ A, 30s.
D P.,Q.C.A. 286 Q. .. o Supplemented Q. C. A. 272: uarantine
No. A lited1 etective Nov. 15, 1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 27 ..... Q. ( ..............-------------do .. Quarantine No. lifted el'e 1930.







20 BUREAU OF ENTO-MOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March


F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withD P. Q. C. A. 288 ------ Q. 68 -------------- Obsolete-- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
P. Q. C. A. 282; quarantine No. 68 lifted
effective Nov. 15,1930.
F P. Q. C. A. 289 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 469.
D P. Q. C. A. 290-291-- Q. 68 -------------- --- do ------- Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D P. Q. C. A. 292 ------ Act --------------- Valid Superseded H. B. 175.
D P. Q. C. A. 293 ------ Q. 48 -------------- Obsolete Supplemented P. Q. C. A.'s 224, 239;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 322.
F P. Q. C. A. 294 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 379.
D P. Q. C. A. 295 ------ Act --------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 410.
P. Q. C. A. 296 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented H. B. 160; superseded by
P. Q. C. A. 327.
P. Q. C. A. 297 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 471.
D P. Q. C. A. 298 ------ Q. 52 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
F P. Q. C. A. 299 (R)_ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 476.
D P. Q. C. A. 300 ------ Q. 52 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
F P. Q. C. A. 301 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. E. P. Q. 403.
F P. Q. C. A. 302 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. E. P. Q. 405.
F P. Q. C. A. 303 ------ E. C -------------- Valid----- Superseded H. B., 151, in part.
F P. Q. C. A. 304 ------ E. C -------------- Obsolete- Superseded H. B. 199; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 407.
F P. Q. C. A. 305 (R)_ Q. 5 --------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 147; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 507.
F P. Q. C. A. 306 ------ E. C -------------- Valid -----D P. Q. C. A. 307 ------ Q. 48 -------------- Obsolete Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; superseded
by B. P. Q. 359.
F P. Q. C. A. 308 ------ Q. 37 --------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B.'s 194, 285; superseded
by B. P. Q. 341.
DF P. Q. C. A. 309 ------ Various quaran- ---do ------- Supplemented by B. E. P. Q. 474.
tines.
F P. Q. C. A. 310 ------ E. C --------- ---- Valid -----DF P. Q. C. A. 311 ------ Q. 5, 13, 56, 58 ----- Obsolete-- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 462.
D P. Q. C. A. 312 ------ Q. 62 -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
D P. Q. C. A. 313 ------ Q. 45 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 386.
P. Q. C. A. 314 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 445.
P. Q. C. A. 315 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. E. P. Q. 437.
D P. Q. C. A. 316 ------ Q. 48 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by Department Circular 373.
See B. E. P. Q. 499.
D P. Q. C. A. 317 ------ Q. 48 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. P. Q. 359.
D P. Q. C. A. 318 ------ Q. 52 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. P. Q. 342.
D P. Q. C. A. 319 ------ Q. 62 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. P. Q. 337; quarantine
No. 62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
D P. Q. C. A. 320______ Q. 38 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 385.
F P. Q. C. A. 321 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 439.
D P. Q. C. A. 322 ------ Q. 48 -------------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; superseded
P. Q. C. A. 293; superseded by B. P. Q.
359.
F P. Q. C. A. 323______ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance
DF P. Q. C. A. 324______ Q. 37,62___________ ---do ------- Do.
D P. Q. C. A. 325-326-- Q. 64 -------------- --- do ------- Do.
F P. Q. C. A. 327 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B.'s 160, 169, 296; superseded
by B. E. P. Ws 408, 416.
D P. Q. C. A. 328______ Q. 43 -------------- --- do ------- Quarantine No. 43 lifted effective July 15,
1932.
D P. Q. C. A. 329 ------ Q. 64 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 472.
D P. Q. C. A. 330-"31-- Q. 64 -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance.
D P. Q. C. A. 332 ------ Q. 62 -------------- --- do ------- Do.
D P. Q. C. A. 333 ------ Q. 48, 66 ----------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A.'s 224, 265; superseded by B. P. Q. 359.
D P. Q. C. A. 334______ Q. 45 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded H. B.'s 174, 179, 182; superseded
by current regulations of quarantine
No. 45.
D P. Q. C. A. 335______ Act --------------- Valid----- Legal data re quarantine litigation.
D B. P. Q. 336a-336b Q. 63 -------------- Obsolete-- See surnmary published with quarantine
No. 63 is revised effective July 1, 1938.
D B. P. Q. 337 --------- Q. 62 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A.'s 217, 319; supplemented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine No.
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
D B. P. Q. 338 --------- Q. 62 -------------- --- do ------- Suppleinented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine
No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
D B. P. Q. 339 --------- Q. 48, 66 ----------- --- do ------- Supplemented P. Q. C. A.'s 224, 239; superseded by E. P. Q. 359.
B. P. Q. 340 --------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 249; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 384.
B. P. Q. 341 --------- Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 308; see current
revision Form EQ-208.







1940] SERVICE AN-*\D REGULATORY AN-NOUNCE'ME-NTS 21


F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withD B. P. Q. 342---------- Q. 52 ------------- Obsolete~ Superseded P. Q. C. A. 31S.
D B. P. Q. 343_________Q. 61 ------------- -- (10---- Of transitory importance.
F B. P. Q. 341 -------- Q. 56------------- --- do------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 241; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 501.
D B. P. Q. 345-------- Q. 52----------- --- do------- Florida removed from under restrict irns of
quarantine No. 52, effective Oct. 14, 1936. D B. P. Q. 346 --------- Act------------- --- do---F B. P. Q. 347--------- E. C_. _---------do------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 438.
F B. 1). Q. 318--------- E. C ------------- ValidD B. P. Q. 349--------- Q. 62 ------------- Obsolete~ Quarantine -No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.
F B. P. Q. 350---------FE. C-------------- Valid-
D) B. P. Q. 351 --------P. L. & R --------- -do ----Superseded IT. B. 212: (subject to revision).
D B. P. Q. 3,52------ -- Q. 48 --------0bsolet c Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 49S.
D B. P. Q. 353--------- Q. 62------------ --- do ------ Supplemented B. P. Q.'s 337, 338; quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
F B. P. Q. 354--------- Q. 37 ----------- --- do------- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.
F B. P. Q. 355 (R--- E. C ------------- Valid-
F B. P. Q. 356 -------- Q. 70 ------------- Obsolete- 1 See quarantine 'No. 7P, revised.
F B. P. Q. 357 -----F. C------------ --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 4263.
D B. P. Q. 358--------- Q. 62------------ --- do------ Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.
ID B. P. Q. 359--------- Q. 48 ------------- --- do------ Superseded P. 0. C. A 's 224, 239. 265, 307,
317, 322 333, B. P. Q. 339; superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.
F B. P. Q.360 --------j E.C ------------- Valid--D B. P. Q. 361--------- Q. 64 ----------- Obsolete-- Of transitory importance.
F B. P. Q. 362--------- Q. 56------------ --- do------ Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 417.
F B. P. Q. 363--------- E. C ------------- Valid--F B. P. Q.364 -------- E. C -----------do--I
F B. E. P. Q. 365____Q 7------ ---------d------ !
F B. E. P.Q. 366----- ------------ -----Superseded H. B. 189.
D B. E. P. Q. 367 -------IQ. 64---------Obsolete Of transitory importance.
F B. E. P. Q. 368 F--- (----------- Valid- -F B. E. P. Q. 36 ---- Q. M3------------- --- do------Superseded H. B. 132R.
F B. E. P. Q. 370 (R) C------------- --- do.
D B. E. P. Q. 371-372-- Q. 64------------ Obsoletej___ Of transitory importance.
D B. E: P. Q. 373 ------ Q. 62------------..do------ Quarantine -No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.
F B. E.P. Q. 374-_-----. C -------- Valid---F B. E. P. Q. 375 (R) F. C --------------- do--- As revised, superseded H. B. 49.
F B. E. P. Q. 376 --- Q. 37 ------------- Obsolete- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 277; superseded by
F B F.P. 37-----he o B. F. P1. Q. 412.
F B.EI.Q 7 ---F -------- d --- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 425.
F B. E.P. Q.378 ------E. C -------- Valid-F B. E.P. Q.379 E. C------------- --do ---- Superseded P.Q. C. A. 294.
F B. E.P. Q.380 (R). E_.C--------------(10-d ---F B. E. P. Q.381 (1R) TE.C--------------- do.--F B. E. P. Q. 382 ----F. C ------------ ---do --D B. E. P. Q. 3S3 ------ Q. 48 ------------- Obsolete- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 395R.
F B. E. P. Q. 384----Q. 37 ------------- Valid------ Superseded B. P. Q. 340.
D B. E. P. Q. 385 (R) -Q. 38 ---------- ---do ------Superseded P. Q. C. A. 320.
D B. E. P. Q. 386 (R) Q. 45------------ --- do --- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 313.
D B. E. P. Q. 387 ------ Q. 64-------------- Obsolete- Of transitory importance.
D B. E. P. Q. 388 ------ Q. 52------------ --- do------- See current revision of regulations under
I ~quarantine No. 52. F B. E. P. Q. 3S99 F--- C-------------- Valid..
F B. E. P.Q.390(R)__ E.GC--------------- do.--F B. F. P. Q. 391 (R F C ---------------d(o.--F B. E. P. Q. 392 ----- Act ---------------- (o --D B. E. P. Q. 393----Q. 52 ------------- Obsolete-.- Florida removed from under restrictions of
qua1rantine No. 52. elffective Oct. 14, 1936. D B. E. P. Q. 394 ------ Q. 48 ------------- Valid-----Supersteded 1P. Q. C. A. 27.
D B. E. P. Q. 395 (R) Q. 48------------- Obsolete- SupersedeI (d B. E. P. Q. :1-:i incorporated in
F B.E. Q E. ----------- ali ----- current regulations of quarantine N o. 48.
F B.E. P. Q.397-----.GC-------------V-(lid.--F B. E. P. Q. 398 ------ E.G. ------------- Obsolete- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 45
F B.E. P. Q. 399 ------ F.G Valid- ---F B. E. P. Q. 400 ------FE. C> -------- 1
F B. E. P.Q. 401 ,--E. C___--------- -- o
F B. E. P. Q. 402 (R) -E.GC------------I(t
F B. E. P. Q. 403 F.-, --- .__------- -(IoI------ Superse led Pt Q. C. A. 301.
F B E. P. Q 404 (R) E. C -------------- d-(o .- - -e e P .C .3 2
F B. E. P. Q. 405 _,- F. C -------------do Sup~ersee .Q C .32
F B. E.P. Q.406 (R) E.GC -------- do.--F B. E. P. Q. 4(17_ F. C ------------ --(o ------Supejrseoded P. 0. C. A.3:044.
F B. E. P. Q. 408----, -F. C -------------(10o------ Supcrsede(d P). Q. C. A. 327, in part.
F B. E. P.0. 409 -- E.G.C ----------- d'o---D B. E. P. Q. 410 ------ Act --u---rse--ed -Po----1. Q. C. A. 295; (subject to
revsn.
F B. E. P. Q. 411 ------FE. C-------------- -do-------uprdd 1'. Q& C. A 2M4.







22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March


F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withF B. E. P. Q. 412 ------ Q. 37 -------------- Valid in Superseded H. B.'s 193, 195, 197, 198, 202,
part. 207, 210, 213; P. Q. C. A. 223; B. P. Q.
F B. E. P. Q. 413 (R) E. C -------------- Valid ----- 354; B. E. P. Q. 376; see B. E. P. Q. 482.
D B. E. P. Q. 414 (R) Q. 52 -------------- Obsolete - Superseded -by B. E. P. Q.'s 492, 493.
D B. E. P. Q. 415 ------ Q. 64 -------------- --- do ------- Of transitory importance
F B. E. P. Q. 416 (R) E. C -------------- Valid----- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 327, in part.
F B. E. P. Q. 417 ------ Q. 56 -------------- Obsolete-- Superseded B. P. Q. 362; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 463.
F B. E. P. Q. 418 ------ E. C -------------- Valid--,--F B. E. P. Q. 419 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 420 ------ E. C -------------- --- do -----F B. E. P. Q. 421 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 422 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 423 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 424 (R) E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 425______ E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded B E. P. Q. 377.
F B. E. P. Q. 426 ------ E. C ---------- ---- --- do------ Superseded B. P. Q. 357.
P B. P. E. Q. 427 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----i' B. E. P. Q. 428 (R) E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded H. B. 192.
F B. E. P. Q. 429______ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 430______ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 431 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 432______ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. P. E. Q. 433 ------ Ez C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 434 (R) E. 0 -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 435 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----D B. E. P. Q. 436 (R) Q. 61 -------------- --- do-----" B. E. P. Q. 437 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------ Superseded P. Q. C. A. 315.
B. E. P. Q. 438______ E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded B. P. Q. 347.
B. E. P. Q. 439______ E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded P. Q. C. A. 321.
F B. E. P. Q. 440 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. P. E. Q. 441 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 442 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 443 ------ E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 444 (R) E. C -------------- --- do-----F B. E. P. Q. 445______ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 314.
F B. E. P. Q. 446 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 447 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 448 E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 449 ------ E. C_ ------------- --- do ------D B. E. P. Q. 450 ------ Q. 52 -------------- Obsolete- Superseded by current revision of regulations of quarantine No. 52.
F B. E. P. Q. 451 ------ E. C -------------- Valid----F B. E. P. Q. 452 ------ E. C -------------- - do ------F 773. E. P. 0. 453 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 454 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------" B. E. P. Q. 455 (R) __ E. C -------------- --- do ------" B. E. P. Q. 456______ E. C -------------- --- do ------" B. E. P. Q. 457 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------" B. E. P. Q. 458 ------ E. C -------------- Obsolete - Superseded by B. E. P. Q 478.
D B. E. P. Q. 459 ------ Q. 52 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded by current revision.of regulations of quarantine No. 52.
F B. E. P. Q. 460 ------ C. R -------------- Valid----- Superseded H. B. 176.
DF B. E. P. Q. 461 ------ All quarantines --- Obsolete - Superseded by B. E. P.. Q. 508.
DF B. E. P. Q. 462 ------ Q. 13, 56, 58 ------- Valid----- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 311.
F B. E. P. Q. 463 ------ Q. 56 -------------- --- do ------ Superseded B. E. P. Q. 417.
F B. E. P. Q. 464 ------ Q. 56 -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 465 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded B. E. P. Q. 398.
F B. E. P. Q. 456 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 467 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 468 ----- E. C -------------- --- do-----" B. E. P. Q. 469 ------ E. C -------------- --- do------ Superseded P. Q. C. A. 289.
B. E. P. Q. 470 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------ Superseded memorandum to inspectors,
Aug. 22,1934.
B. E. P. Q. 471______ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 297.
D B. E. P. Q. 472______ Q. 64 -------------- --- do ------- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 329.
D B. E. P. Q. 473 ------ Q. 48 -------------- Obsolete- Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.
F B. E. P. Q. 474 ------ Q. 41 -------------- Valid ------ Superseded H. B. 161; supplemented P. Q.
C. A. 309, in part.
D B. E. P. Q. 475 ------ Q. 48 -------------- Obsolete Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.
B. E. P. Q. 476______ E. C -------------- Valid ------ Superseded P- Q. C. A. 299R.
B. E. P. Q. 477 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded memorandum to chief inspect.
tors, Sept. 1, 1931.
B. E. P. Q. 478 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------- Superseded B. E. P. Q. 458.
F B. E. P. Q. 479 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------D B. E. P. Q. 480 ------ Q. 48 -------------- Obsolete- Superseded by D. E. P. Q. 499.
D 2 B. E. P. Q. 481 ------ Q. 13 -------------- Valid -----F B. E. P. Q. 482 ------ Q. 37 -------------- --- do ------- See B. E. P. Q. 412 -----------------------F B. E. P. Q. 483 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------F B. E. P. Q. 484 ------ E. C -------------- --- do ------D B. E. P. Q. 485(R) - Q. 72 --------------- --- do ------2 Enforced by Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.







19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23


F or No. Issued in connec- Status Remarks
D tion withD B. E. P. Q. 486 Q. 72 ------------ValidD B. E. P. Q. 487 ----- Q. 64 .. Obsolete Expired June 15, 1939.
D B. E. P. Q. 488 ----- Q. 72 ..... Valid. .
D B. E. P. Q. 489 ------Q. 72 ....... .do
F B. E. P. Q 490 ------ E. C --- do- ---F B.E.P. Q 491 ------E. --------doD B. E. P. Q. 492 ------ Q. 52....... Obsolete Expired Apr. 30, 1939.
D B. E. P. Q. 493 ------ Q. 52 ------------ Valid
D B. E. P. Q. 494------ Q. 52 --------------do
D B. E. P. Q. 495 ------ Q. 64 -------- -do -------As to sterlization requirements only.
D B. E. P. Q. 496 Q 72 ------------do-.
F B. E. P. Q. 497 ... E.C ----------- _do
D B. E. P. Q. 498 ------Q. 48-------------- do - Superseded B. P. Q. 352.
D B. E. P. Q. 499 ------ Q. 48 ----------- do ------Superseded P'. Q. C. A. 316; B. P). Q. 359;
B. E. P. Q.'s 473, 475. 480.
F B. E. P. Q. 500 ------E. C -------------do
F B. E. P. Q.501 -------Q. 56 ------------ o ------Superseded B. P'. Q. 344.
F B. E. P. Q. 502 E. C ------- -------do ...
D B. E. P. Q. 503-- Q. 72 do --F B. E. P. Q. 504 ------ Q.56 ------ do ...
D 2 B. E. P. Q. 505 ------Q. 58 ------------ --do ------ Supplemented by B. E. P. Q. 506.
D 2 B. E. P.Q. 506 ------Q. 58 -------------- do ------ Supplemented B. E. P. Q. 505.
F B. E. P. Q. 507 ... P.S. R ---------- do ------ Superseded P. Q. C. A. 305R.

2 Enforced by division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised, Supplement 1.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

FEBRUARY 16, 1940.
[Amendment of the Order No. F. 320/3 5--A of July 20. 1936. by Notification of Department of Education, Health and Lands, No. F. 30-33/39-A dated December 7, 1939, and effective February 15, 1940]

CERTIFICATION OF UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

8B. Unmanufaetured tobacco. either raw or cured, shall not be imported into British India, unless, in addition to the general certificate required under Rule 5 it is accompanied by an official certificate, that it is free from Eplihs('tia elutella or that the pest (does not exist in the country of origin.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief. Bureau, of En tomology and Plant Quatran tine.


B. E. P. Q. 416, Revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN

FFMIUARY 6, 1940.
This revision of the digest of plant-quarantine import restrictions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain was rendered necessary 1by the pro(inulgation of the Importation of Plants Order of 193. dated May 10, 19:9, and detective June 1, 1939. This order co(nisolidates and amends the hithert( existing regulations and revokes those which it superseded. The regulations of the ('hanel1 Islands remain unchanged.
This circular was prepared by IIirry B. Shaw, plant quarantillne inspector, inll charge of foreign service information, Division of Foreign Pilant Qua0 rant ines, from the text of the importation of plants order of 1939, of EI'ngland aind the correspomdling orlerS of Scotbhilid, Northern Ireland, and the channell Islands.
The information herein contained is believed to be ('correct llid complete u) to the time of 1)reparation, but it is not intended to) be used indepelndently of. nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
AVERY S. IhoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entonology and Plant OQtiarantinc.






24 BUREAU OF ENTOMAOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ENGLAND AND WALES
BASIc LEGISLATION
[The Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927]
SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Coniferous trees:5 Importation prohibited from all foreign sources of living plants of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larix, Picea, Pimis. Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuija, and Tsuga, to prevent the introduction of diseases and pests likely to prove injurious to forestry undertakings in the Unite t Kingdom. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibition] order of 1133, p. 10.)
Elm trees (Ulmiws spp.) : Importation prohibited from all foreign sources to prevent the introduction of the Dutch elm disease Graphium ulti (Ceratostonella iulmi (Schwarz) Buisman). Licenses may be issued for importation for scientific purposes only. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibition] order of 1933, p. 11.)
Potatoes (Solanzin titberosumb L.) Importation prohibited of potatoes grown in Canada, the United States of America, and European France, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decewlineata Say). Transshipment is also prohibited except under license. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 3, p. 4.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
Apples grown in the United States: 5 Shipments landed between July 7 and November 15 must be accompanied 'by a certificate of a duly authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture in the form set out in the fifth schedule. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 7 (4), p. 8.)
Chrysanthemum plants: The landing in England and Wales of any chrysanthemum plant is prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries or by an inspector. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 4 (2), p. 5.)
Plants, living, or parts thereof (except seeds) for planting,5 except those whose importation is prohibited: Phytosanitary certificate in duplicate in form prescribed in Second Schedule (p. 9), issued by competent authority of the country of origin. For shipments from the United States the certificate must be issued by an official duly authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture. The certificate must also include a statement that the consignment does not include any plant of sugar beet or mangold, of Ufn us, or of conifers of the prohibited genera of the order Pinaceae, or any chrysanthemum plant. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 5, pars. 1 and 2, pp. 5 and 6.)
Sugar beets and mangolds (Beta vtulgaris L.) living plants: 5 Importation from all foreign sources prohibited, except under license issued by the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, to prevent the introduction of virus diseases. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 4 (1), p. 5.) Vegetables (not including cucumbers or mushrooms for which no certificate is required) grown in any other country than Belgium, European France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands or Switzerland: A certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority of the country of origin, during the period April 21 to September 30. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 6 (3), p. 7.)
Specific restrictions are applied to the importation of cider apples, cherries, living plants and parts thereof, potatoes, and other vegetables grown in France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and various other European countries.
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Seeds: The first schedule excepts seeds from the provisions of article 5 (1) of the importation of plants order of 1939. (See p. 5.)

5 Indicates products of the United States.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

SUGGESTIONS TO CERTIFYING INSPECTORS

Under date of August 1935 a joint memorandum in the following sense was issued by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, England; the Department of Agriculture, Scotland; and the Ministry of Agriculture, Northern Ireland:

CHARACTER OF INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DESIRED

The required phytosanitary certificate must be based on an examination made not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment and it must state that the plants (or in certain cases, a representative sample of the plants) have bee-n thoroughly examined and "found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to horticultural crops having been discovered in them." This form of words implies that the examining officer has done everything that is reasonably possible to assure himself that the material examined is free from pests and diseases; it does not involve him in anly personal guaranty that the plants are absolutely and completely free from ,Ill ylant diseases and pests-a guaranty which could seldom conscientiously be given.
REIN SPECTION ON ARRIVAL

All shipments of plant material are subject to reispection on arrival at a port of Great Britain and the action taken will depend on the findings. The action taken on imported plants found to be infected by some disease or pest is based upon a recognition of the difference in degree of importance to be attributed to diseases and pests that have already become established in Great Britain and those that have not. The action taken in the case of a post or disease new to Great Britain will be drastic, regardless of the extent of infestt~tion. For example, the action taken with respect to infections of common scab. Actinomyces scabies, on potatoes, or of the oystershell scale, Lelfidosaplues tlmai
(L.), on apples or other fruit stocks, would depend on the degree of infection or infestation. On the other hand, the finding of plant material infested with San Jose scale (Aspidiotus pervicio, us Comst.'), which does not occur in the United Kingdom, or the discovery of even a single potato infected with wort disease, Syncliytrium evdobioticum., a disease from which wide areas of Great Britain are still free, would result in the exportation or destruction of the shipment concerned. Plant quarantine inspectors, therefore, are requested not to certify for export to Great Britain plant products infested or infected by injurious pests or diseases not known to occur there, and, in instances where inspection cannot be depended on to determine freedom from plant pests, plant products which, on account of their origin, are likely to be infested or infected therewith.
FREEDOM FROM SOIL

Although no regulation specifically prohibits the importation of soil, the certification that plants have been "thoroughly examined" implies that the roots, as well as other parts of plants, have been inspected, consequently, that adhering soil (if any) has been reduced to a minimum. In other words, plants should be practically free from soil and should be packed in such a mnanlier as to facilitate inspection and to prevent spoilage or injury in transit.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE I-MPORTATION' OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS INTO ENGLAND AND WALES
[The importation of plants order of May 16, 193091

DEFI NITI ON S

ARTICLE 1. In this order, un1leISS the context otherwise requires:
"Plant" includes tree and shrub, and the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, cornis, rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other parts of a plant.
"Raw vegetables" includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw egpatand raw salads, but does not include mushrooms or cucumbers.
"Unhealthy" means affected with any insect, fungus, bacteria, or other vegetable or animal organisms or any agent causatilve of a transmnissible, crop disease.
ART. 2. Refers to products grown in thle United Kingdom.






26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

PROHIBITION AGAINST LANDING AND RESTRICTION ON THE TRANSSHIPM]UNT OF POTATOES FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES
ART. 3. (1) The landing in England or Wales of any potatoes grown in the United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, and European France, is prohibited.
(2) The transshipment in England or Wales of any of the potatoes specified in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries or by an inspector.
(3) In this article "potatoes" includes potato haulmns, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF PLANTS OF SUGAR BEET, MANGOLD, AND CHRYSANTHEMUM
ART. 4. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar beet and mangold, the landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet or mangold of the species Beta vulgaris L. (except the seeds thereof) is hereby prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister or by an inspector.
(2) For the prevention of the introduction of the chrysanthemum midge (Diarthronom~yia hypogaea F. Loew.), the landing in England or Wales of any chrysanthemum plant (except the seeds thereof) is hereby prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister or by an inspector.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND POTATOES
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 5 (1) The landing in England and Wales of any of the plants mentioned in the first schedule to this order, and of potatoes, is hereby prohibited, unless each consignment is accompanied. by two copies of a certificate of a duly authorized official of the phytopathological service of the country in which the plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second schedule to this order. The inspection referred to in the certificate shall be carried out not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The original of the certificate shall be forwarded by mail by the exporter to the horticulture branch of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, 10 Whitehall Place, London, S. W. 1. before the plants or potatoes are shipped. Except in the case of consignments imported by mail, a copy of the prescribed certificate shall be delivered to an officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with, the entry relating to the consignment. In the case of consignments imported by mail, a copy of the prescribed certificate shall be affixed to each package. (See also art. 3 of the importation of elm trees and conifers [Prohibition] order of 1933, p. 7.)
FEDERAL CERTIFICATE REQUIRED8
,ART. 5. (2) In the case of any of the plants mentioned in the first schedule to this order and grown in the United States of America the certificate required by paragraph .(1) of this article shall be the certificate of an official duly authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture.

SPECIAL NOTATION REQUIRED ON CERTIFICATE
ART. 5. (3) The certificate prescribed in this article shalf, except in the case of a consignment consisting wholly of potatoes, include a statement to the effect that the consignment does not contain any plants of sugar beet or mangold or any chrysanthemum plant, or any plant of the genus Ulmus or of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larix, Picew, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thu ja, and Tsuga, except the seeds thereof. ART. 5. (4) Pertains to certification of plants from European France.
ART. 5. (5) Relates to certification of plants and potatoes from Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

6 Hitherto both State and Federal certificates have been acceptable, but article 5 (2), now in effect, prescribes a Federal certificate for plant material from the United States.






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

CERTIFICATION OF ABSENCE OF ELMS
ART. 5. (6) The reference in article 3 of the importation of elm trees and conifers (prohibition) order of 1933 to the certificates prescribed in article 4 of the importation of plants order of 1933, shall be read and have effect as a reference to the certificate prescribed in paragraph (1) of this article.
ART. 5. (7) Paragraphs (4) and (5) of this article shall not apply to flower bulbs, corms, tubers, or rhizomes.
ART. 5. (8) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit(a) The landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of which the landing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3 hereof;
(b) The landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet or mangold of the species Beta vulgaris L. or of any chrysanthemum plant of which the landing is prohibited or restricted under article 4 hereof.
ART. 6. (1) Refers to raw vegetables grown in European France or Switzerland.
ART. 6. (2) Refers to raw vegetables grown in Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg, or the Netherlands.

CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED FOR RAW VEGETABLES
ART. 6. (3) The landing in England or Wales between April 21 and September 30 in any year of any raw vegetables grown in any country other than Belgium, European France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, or Switzerland is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority in the country of origin stating the country and place where the raw vegetables were grown.
ART. 6. (4) The certificate prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with, the entry relating to the consignment.
ART. 6. (5) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of which the landing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3 hereof.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING IN ENGLAND OR WALES OF CERTAIN RAW APPLES
ART. 7. (1) Relates to cider apples from European France on Switzerland.
ART. 7. (2) Relates to cider apples from Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg, or the Netherlands.
ART. 7. (3) Relates to cider apples from European countries other than Belgium, France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

APPLES FROM UNITED STATES MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A GRADE CERTIFICATE
ART. 7. (4) The landing in England or Wales between July 7 and November 15 of any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of a duly authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture in the form set out in the fifth schedule to this order.
ART. 7. (5) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with, the entry relating to the consignment.
ARTS. 8, 9, and 10 relate to the disposal of plants and plant products landed in England and Wales in contravention of this order, and other administrative details.
SPECIAL IMPORT LICENSES
ART. 11. Notwithstanding any provisions of this order, any plants, potatoes, raw apples, or raw vegetables may be landed in England and Wales under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the minister or by an Inspector.
ART. 12. Service of notices.
ART. 13. Information to be given as to plants, potatoes, raw apples, or raw vegetables landed in England or Wales.
ART. 14. Penalties.
ART. 15. Revocation of previous orders.






28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

EFFECTIvE DATE OF ORDER
ART. 16. This order shall come into operation June 1, 1939.

SHORT TITLE OF ORDER
ART. 17. This order may be cited as the importation of plants order of 1939.

FIRST SCHEDULE
All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND SCHEDULE
PRESCRIBED CERTIFICATE FORMS
This is to certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living plants7" included in the consignment, of which particulars are given below, were/was thoroughly examined on the (date), by (name of inspector), a duly authorized official of the (name of organization), and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to agricultural or horticultural crops having been found in them.

ADDITIONAL STATEMENT FOR ALL SHIPMENTS EXCEPT POTATOES
It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of the genus Ulmus, or of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larix, Picea, Pin us, Pseudotsugqa, Sequoia, Thu ja, and Tsuga, nor any plant of sugar beet or mangold (Beta vulgaris L.), nor any chrysanthemum plant.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES
It is further certified that no case of the disease known as wart disease (Synch ytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any time on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in the consignment were grown nor within 2 kilometers thereof.
Signature - - - - - - -
Official title - - - - - - -
0 ~Date................................--Number and description of packages. Distinguishing marks.
Description of living plants or parts thereof. Stated to be grown at.
Exported by.
Name and address of consignee. Name of vessel.
Date of shipment.
Port of landing in England or Wales.

THIRD SCHEDULE
FORM A
This form applies only to shipments from Belgium, France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.
FORM B
Certificate Required under License
In accordance with the authorization contained in the general license number of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of England and Wales, this is to certify that the plants included in the package or consignment described below have been examined and have been found to be of the following species

SStr ike out words not applicable.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEIE\NTS 29

or kind: ---------------------------, and that the conditions prescribed in
the above general license have been complied with.
Signature---------------------------Official title-------------------------Date -------------------------------Followed by description of shipment.

FOURTH SCHEDULE
This form applies to certain shipments of vegetables from France.

FIFTH SCHEDULE
CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR APPLES FROM UNITED STATES
This is to certify that the raw apples included in the package or consignment described below are of one of the following grades as recognized by the Department of Agriculture of the United States of America.
"U. S. Fancy" "Extra Fancy"
"U. S. No. 1" "Fancy"
Signature ....
Official title-------------------------Date

DESCRIPTION OF CONSIGNMENT
Number and nature of packages. Distinguishing marks.
Variety of apples.
Name and address of consignee. Name of vessel.
Date of shipment.
Port of shipment.

IMPORTATION OF ELM TREES AND CONIFERS PROHIBITED
[The Importation of Elm Trees and Conifers (Prohibition) Order, Oct. 24, 1933]
ARTICLE 1. This order shall come into operation December 1, 1933.
ART. 2. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of diseases and pests injurious to elm trees and forest trees, the landing in England and Wales from any other country than Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland (Eire), the Isle of Man, or the Channel Islands of any living plant of any of the genera mentioned in the schedule to this order is hereby prohibited.
(2) In this article "plant" includes tree and shrub, and the roots, layers, cuttings, and other parts of a plant.
ART. 3. The certificates prescribed in article 5 (1) of the importation of plants order of 1939 shall, except in the case of a consignment consisting wholly of potatoes, include a statement to the effect that the consignment does not contain any plant of any of the genera mentioned below.
All species of the genus Ulmus.
The following genera of the order Pinaceae. Abie.s, Larix, Picca, PiillUs, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thiuja, and Tsiuga.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, SCOTLAND
Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Scotland) order of May 24, 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those unler the importation of plants order of May 16, 1039, and other orders of England, it is nlnCeessary ev en to recapitulate them.
In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Scotland, the original certificate should he mai, I th the I)epartinent ,f Agriculturc. York Buildings. Queen Street, Edinburgh, 2, Scotlanid.
Nlo-rTE.-See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 awal 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NORTHERN IRELAND

Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Northern Ireland) order of 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those under the importation of RIlants






30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

order of May 16, 1939, and with orders of England, it is. not necessary even to make a recapitulation of them.
In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Northern Ireland, the original certificates should be mailed to the Ministry of Agriculture,, Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
NomE.-See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 and 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, THE STATES OF JERSEY (CHANNEL ISLANDS)
BAsic LuGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Potatoes, Sotanum tuberosum L.: Importation of varieties susceptible to attack by the wart disease, Syncftytrium~ endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc., from any source is prohibited. (Act No. 34 of April 28, 1930, p. 17.)
Potatoes: Importation prohibited from Great Britain and Ireland of tubers grown in any district in which wart disease is known to exist. (Act No. 31 of April 28, 1930, p. 16.)
All products of the soil: Importation from the mainland of France prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemli. ,neata Say. (Act No. 38 of August 7, 1931.)
Peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources, except the product called "bacterized peat" from England and Scotland under certification as to its character. (Act of April 6, 1935, p. 17.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
The plant material listed in the first schedule of the act of April 5, :1933, 'may be imported only when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in the form prescribed in the third schedule. (See p. 16.)
Raw apples from the United States may be imported between July 7 and November 15 of each year only when accompanied by a grade certificate in the same form as prescribed by England and Wales. (See p. 17.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Seeds and herbaceous or succulent-stemmed plants: Importation not restricted by the act of April 5, 1933, except that the entry of seeds and plants from France is prohibited by the act of August 7, 1931.
[General regulations under the Act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 28, 1930, as amended by that of April 5, 1933]

IMPORT REQUIREMENTS
ARTICLE 1. The landing in the island of Jersey of any of the plants -mentioned in the first schedule to this act from any country other than Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the other Channel Islands, is prohibited except in accordance with the following provisions:

AUTHORIZED PORT OF ENTRY
(a) The plants may be landed in the port of St. Hlelier only.

PHYTO SANITARY CERTMflATE REQUIRED
(b Each consignment must be accompanied by two copies of a certificate issued by a duly authorized official in the country whence the plants are exported, in the form prescribed in the third schedule of the act. One copy must be produced to the harbor master and the other copy must be forwarded by the importer to the consignee. In the case of mail shipments a copy of the certificate need not be produced to the harbor master, but a copy must be affixed to each package. The original of the certificate must be mailed to the Committee of Agriculture by the exporter before the plants are shipped.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

INSPECTION MAY BE REQUIRED
(c) The Committee reserves the right to cause any package or parcel containing plants imported or believed to have been imported into the island to be opened and examined whether or not the provisions of this act have been complied with.
INSPECTION REQUIRED IN THE ABSENCE OF CERTIFICATES
(d) In the case of importations of plants from a country in which there is no official duly authorized to issue the certificate mentioned above, and of consignments which are not accompanied by the copy certificate required by this act, and in the case of plants sent by mail to which such copies are not attached, the plants shall be retained by the harbor master until such time as the Committee of Agriculture shall have caused them to be examined.
PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES EXEMPT ART. 2. The provisions of this act do not apply to plants the landing of which is authorized by a general or special license issued by the Committee or to consignments of plants to the Committee for experimental or scientific purposes.
SCHEDULE I
RESTRICTED PLANT MATERIAL
(a) All living plants with a persistent woody stem above ground, and parts of the same except seeds, when for use in propagation, such as fruit trees, stocks and stools, forest trees, and ornamental shrubs, and grafts, layers, and cuttings thereof.
(b) All potatoes; and all tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, corms, and hop stocks for planting.
(c) Seeds of onions and leeks for sowing.
(d) All unrooted cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums.
SCHEDULE II
PLANT PARASITES
Fungi:
Black-knot of plum and cherry, Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sacc.
Fire blight of apple and pear, Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev.
Chestnut blight or canker, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.
Wart disease of potatoes, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.
Smut of onion and leek, Urocystis cepulae C. C. Frost.
Downy mildew of hops, Peronoplasmopara humuli, Miy. and Taka.
Insects:
Grape phylloxera, Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae (Planch.) Fitch.
An American apple capsid, Heterocordylus nmalinus Reut.
Apple redbug, Lygidea mendax Reut.
Pear tingid, Stephanitis pyri Fab.
Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.
Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hbst.).
Potato tuber worm, (Phthorinaea) Gnorimoschema operculella (Zell.).
Eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americana (F.).
Forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hbn.
Oriental fruit moth, (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta (Busck).
San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.
White peach scale, (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona (Targ.).
Apple fruitfly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh).
European cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cerasi L.
Cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cingulata (Loew).
Black cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis fausta 0. S.
Currant fruitfly, Epochra canadensis Loew.
Chrysanthemum gall midge, Diarthronomyia hypogaea Loew.
SCHEDULE III
PRESCRIBED INSPECTION CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the plants included in the package or consignment described below were thoroughly inspected by ----------------, a duly author-






32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

ized official of---------------------------------- on (date) ---------- and
were found or believed by him to be healthy and free from any of the plant diseases or pests named in the second schedule to the act of the Committee of Agriculture of the States of Jersey of April 28, 1930.
It is understood that all cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums imported from abroad must be accompanied by the certificate prescribed in this Schedule.
ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES

Further, it is hereby certified that no case of the disease known as wart disease or black scab of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in this consignment were grown, nor within 500 yards (about 1/2 kilometer) thereof.
Signature - - - - - - -
Official title-- - - - - -

Description of Shipment
Number and kind of packages. Marks.
Description of plants.
Grown at.
Name and address of exporter. Name and address of consignee. Name of vessel.
Date of shipment.
Port of shipment.
Port of landing.
Approximate date of landing.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES
Potatoes from all sources except Great Britain and Ireland: The act of the Committee of Agriculture, No. 34, of April 28, 1930, prohibits the importation of potatoes susceptible to the wart disease, Synch ytriurn endobioticum, from whatever source. This is based upon the official list of varieties of potatoes, with their synonyms, immune from and susceptible to wart disease, published under the authority of the National Institute of Agricultural Botany, in England.
GRADING REQUIRED OF APPLES FROM THE UNITED STATES
As applying to the Channel Islands, the act of the Committee of Agriculture, No. 35, of July 24, 1930, places the same restrictions upon the importation of apples from the United States as are imposed by the "Importation of raw apples order of June 21, 1930, of England and Wales" (see pp. 8 and 10).

IMPORTATION OF PEAT PROHIBITED
The act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 6, 1935, prohibits the importation of peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources, except the product called "bacterized peat" from England and Scotland, under certification as to its character.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, STATES OF THE ISLAND OF GUERNSEY
BASIC LEGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]

SUM~rMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Potatoes (Solanurn tuberosum, L.) :Importation from United States, Canada, European France, and European Belgium prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinance No. IX, February 15, 1936, art. 3, p. 20.)






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

Agricultural and horticultural products of the soil (including seeds and plants, fruits, and vegetables): Importation directly or indirectly from Belgium and France prohibited, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinance No. XXIV, August 31, 1931, as supplemented by Ordinance No. III, January 20, 1936.)
Plants of sugar beet and iangold (Beta vulgaris L.) : Importation prohibited from any country except Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Irish Free State, Isle of Man, Island of Jersey, Island of Alderney, or any other of the Islands, to prevent the introduction of virus diseases of those plants. (Ordinance No. IX, February 15, 1936, art. 4, p. 21.)
Cider apples grown in European France or European Belgium: Importation into Guernsey prohibited. (Ordinance IX, art. 7 (2).)
Grapevines (Vitis spp.) : Importation prohibited of grapevines and stocks, cuttings, and scions thereof: Prorided. that any person desiring to introduce a new variety of grape into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit. The court may authorize importation under prescribed conditions. Precaution against the phylloxera of grapevines. (Ordinance of September 30, 1935, p. 21.)
Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings prohibited in any manner or by any route, to prevent the introduction of gooseberry mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.). (Ordinance No. XIV, October 5, 1931.)
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting, except those which are prohibited, as indicated above: Phytosanitary certificate required in prescribed form issued by competent authority of country of origin. (See the First and Second Schedules.) (Ordinance No. IX, 1936, art. 5, p. 21.)
Vegetables not grown in European France or European Belgium: Landing prohibited unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority of the country of origin, indicating country and place where the produce was grown. (Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936, art.
6 (2).)
Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Lawful for the Administrative Council of the States of Guernsey to permit the importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings from the United Kingdom if accompanied by a certificate of origin declaring that gooseberry mildew (Sphacrotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.) does not exist in the place where they were grown. (Ordinance No. XIV, October 5, 1931.)
Apples from the United States: When accompanied by prescribed grade certificate. (See p. 22.)
IMPORTATION TNRESTRICTED
Seeds from all sources, except from France and Belgium: (Ordinance IX, art. 5 (1), and the First Schedule. See pp. 21 and 22.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936. of the Royal Court of Guernsey]
DEFINITIONS
ARTICLE 1. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise requires:
"Board" means the Board of Administration of the States of Island of Guernsey.
"Islands" means the islands of Guernsey, Sark, Ierm, and Jethou.
"Plant" in the case of sugar beet and inangold includes living plants and parts thereof except seeds, an( in all other cases includes tree and shrub, and the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, corins, rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other parts of a plant.
"Raw vegetables" includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw eggplants, and raw salads.
"Unhealthy" means affected with any insect, fungus, or other pest destructive to agricultural or horticultural crops.

APPLICATION OF THE REGULATIONS
ART. 2. Nothing in these regulations shall be deemed to prohibit or restrict the landing or transshipment in the islands or any of them of any plant or






34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

produce (other than potatoes) grown in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Irish Free State, the Isle of Man, the island of Jersey, or the island of Alderney, or in any other of the islands.

POTATO RESTRICTIONS
ART. 3. (1) The landing in the islands of any potatoes grown in the undermentioned countries is prohibited:
The United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, European France, and European Belgium.
(2) The transshipment in the islands or any of them of the potatoes specified in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Board.
(3) In this article "potatoes" includes haulms, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION OF SUGAR BEET AND MANGOLD PROHIBITED
Aw. 4. For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar beet and mangolds, the landing in the islands or any of them from any country other than the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Irish Free State, the Isle of Main, the island of Jersey, the island of Alderney, or any other of the islands, of any living plant of sugar beet or mangold (Beta vulgaris L.) is hereby prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Board.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR PLANTS
ART. 5. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any of the plants mentioned in the first schedule to these regulations, and of potatoes (other than potatoes grown in any other of the islands) is hereby prohibited, unless such consignment is accompanied by two copies of a certificate of a duly authorized official of the Phytopathological Service of the country in which the plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second schedule to these regulations. The inspection referred to in the certificate shall be carried out not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The original of the certificate shall be mailed by the exporter to the States Supervisor, States Office, Guernsey, before the plants or potatoes are despatched. Except in the case of shipments imported by mail, a copy of the certificate shall be delivered to a Guernsey customs officer at the same time as and together with the entry relating to the shipment. In the case of shipments imported by mail, a copy of the certificate shall be affixed to each package.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF RAW VEGETABLES
ART. 6. (1) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables grown in European France or European Belgium is prohibited,
(2) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables not grown in European France or European Belgium is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority in the country of origin, indicating the country and place where the produce was grown. The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to a Guernsey customs officer at the same time and together with the entry relating to the consignments.
(3) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the landing or transshipment in the islands of any potatoes of which the landing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OP RAW APPLES
ART. 7. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples grown in any European country other than France or Belgium is hereby prohibited unless accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority of the country of origin, indicating the country and the place where the apples were grown.
(2) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples grown in European France or European Belgium is hereby prohibited.






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

(3) The landing in the islands or any of them between July 7 and November 15 in any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate signed by a duly authorized inspector of the Federal Department of Agriculture In the prescribed form. (See pp. 8 and 10 of this circular.)
(4) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to a Guernsey customs officer at the same time and together with the entry relating to the consignment. ,
ART. 8. Prescribes the procedure in the event that plants and plant products are landed in the islands in contravention of these regulations.
ART. 9. Defines the powers of an inspector, and the remaining regulations do not concern the exporter.
FIRST SCHEDUTZ

All plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND) SCHEDULE

This is to.certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living plants$ included in the consignment of which particulars are given below were/wasg thoroughly examined on (date) by (name of inspector), a duly authorized official of the (name of the plant protection organization), and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to horticultural crops having been found in them.
The following additional certificate must be furnished for all potatoes:
It is further certified that no case of the disease known as "wart disease" or "black scab" of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any time on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in the consignment were grown nor within 2 kilometers thereof.
The following additional certificate must be furnished in the case of every consignment not consisting wholly of potatoes:
It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of sugar beet or mangold.
Signature -----------------------------Official title ---------------------------Date ----------------------------------Number and description of packages.
Distinguishing marks.
Description of living plants or parts thereof. Stated to be grown at.
Name and address of exporter.
Name and address of consignee.

IMPORTATION OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED
[Ordinance of September 30, 1895, relating to the grapevine phylloxera]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of grapevines, stocks, cuttings, or scions thereof Into Guernsey is prohibited under penalty of their CODfiscation and immediate destruction and a fine imposed upon importer, consignee, or possessor of such plants.
PROVISIONS FOR INTRODUCTION OF NEW VARIETIES

ART. 2. However, any person desiring to introduce a new variety of grape into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit. That Court may authorize the importation of scions of the new variety, in the quantity determined by the Court, in hermetically' closed boxes consigned to a person designated by the Court for inspection and cleaning at the expense of the importer, before delivery to the latter. Diseased scions will be destroyed.

8 Omit what Is not applicable.







36 B3UREAUJ OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

B. E. P. Q. 471, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY 23, 1940.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES

By proclamation No. 155 the Governor-General of the Union of South Africa has amended the Schedule of Proclamation No. 286 of 1936 by the insertion of the following paragraph:
"(c) A certificate from the Department of Agriculture of the declared country of origin, or a certificate from some official institution in that country which the Minister has agreed to recognize, stating that the crop from which the potatoes were derived was officially inspected in the field and that the degree of freedom from virus diseases was sufficiently high to ensure the suitability of the progeny for seed purposes, and stating f urther that the said crop was not grown in the vicinity of any unhealthy potato crops or other plants infected with potato virus diseases."~
Effective February 1, 1940.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomiology andt Plant Quarantine.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE
PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

C. Martinez ----------------- San Ysidro, Calif------ 2 avocados------------------------- $1.00,
Mrs. V. M. Schott----------- ----- do -------------- 3 cactus plants---------------------- 1.00
Mrs. A. Crist ---------------- Brownsville, Tex------ 300 chrysanthemus and 2floral wreaths- 5.00
David Gornez --------------- ----- do -------------- 29 guavas -------------------------- 1.00
Maria Najar ---------------- ----- do -------------- 3 oranges and 1 pear ------------------ 1.00
Samuel Garcia -------------- ----- do --------------l1orange---------------------------- 1.00
Luis Villagran -------------- ----- do--------------1I mamey--------------------------- 1.00
Juan Sauceda --------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00Maria E. Najar ------------- ----- do-------------- 4 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Roy Lucas------------------ ----- do -------------- 3 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Carolina Cruz --------------- Eagle Pass, Tex------- 4 guav-as and 4 cherimoyas ------------ 1.00
Bartolo Espinosa------------ ----- do -------------- 2 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Damas Gonzalez------------- ----- do -------------- 1 orange---------------------------- 1.00
Juan Perez ----------------- ----- do ------------ ----- do ----------------------------- 1. 00
Gilberto Benavides ---------- ----- do -------------- 2 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Jose Ozuna ----------------- ----- do -------------- 7 oranges--------------------------- 1. 00
Clara Hlernandez ------------ ---do -------------- 22 plants--------------------------- 1.00Ignacio Reyes --------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1. 00
Maria Luisa Gonzales---------- El Paso, Tex --------- 4 bulbs ---------------------------- 1.00
Ramon E. Navarez---------- ----- do -------------- 5 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
R. L. Miller ---------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00
LeRoy Nigra --------------- ----- do -------------- 11 avocados ------------------------ 1.00,
Marcial Sanchez------------- ----- do -------------- 4 plants and 2 sapotes----------------- .70Thomas Martinez -------------iidalgo, Tex --------- 2 apples---------------------------- 1.00
Mariano Yanez ------------- ----- do ------------- ----- do ----------------------------- 1.00
Luciano Garza -------------- ----- do -------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1. 00
Simona Sandijo ------------- ----- do -------------- 1 avocado -------------------------- 1.00
Florentino Laredo----------- ----- do -------------- 2mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Julio Reyna ---------------- ----- do --------------1I mango---------------------------- 1.00
Esteban Ramirez-------------- o------- ------ 2mangoes-------------------------- 1. 00
A. Martinez ---------------- ----- do ------------- ----- do ----------------------------- 1.00
Rafael Torres ---------------- Laredo, Tex ---------- 4 jobo plums, 2 haw apples, 3 guavas, 5.00
3 sweet limes, 1 orange, 2 tangerines,
14 lb. green orange leaves.
Dolores Reyna -------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant-----------------------------LOG0
Mrs. Ricarda Llanas ---------.-*--do -------------- 2 plants---------------------------- 1.00
Dolores'Montenegro --------- ----- do -------------- 5 cactus plants---------------------- 1.00
0. Kuenne------------------ ----- do -------------- 4 plants---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Antonio Volpe --------- ----- do -------------- 2cherimoyas ----------------------- 1.00
John Martinez -------------- ----- do -------------- 5stalks sugarcane -------------------- 1.00
L. Gonzalez----------------- ----- do -------------- 4joints sugarcane and 5plants-------- 1.00
Rene Trevino --------------- ----- do -------------- 8 stalks sugarcane -------------------- 1.00







19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY AN-NOUNCEMENTS 37


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Laredo, Tex.
Mrs. James Russo----------- ----- do -------------- 1 guava---------------------------- 1.00
Catherine Carr-------------- ----- do -------------- 1 apple----------------------------- 1.00
Donald Gabbert------------- ----- do -------------- 12 grapefruit------------------------ 1.00
Mrs. S. Rios ------------------do--------------I 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Taylor E. Newman----- ----- do -------------- 2 tangerines ------------------------ 1.00
Miss Clotilde Newman------- ----- do ------------- ----- do ----------------------------- 1.00
JTose Nieto ----------- -- do 1-------- plant----------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Ronaana Flores--------- ----- do --------------- 2 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Francisco Guiterrez---------------do -------------- 3 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Jacob Bergstrom------------- ----- do -------------- 2 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
John Zuckerman ------------ ----- do -------------- 1 orange---------------------------- 1.00
Abe Lon Miguel------------- ----- do -------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Salvador Capetillo----------- ----- do -------------- 4 oranges, 10 plants, 3 avocados-------- 1.00
Mrs. Edw. Lassater --------- ----- do -------------- 4 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Eloy Martinez -------------- ----- do -------------- 5 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
D. Eberson----------------- ----- do --------------1I orange and 2 apples------------- 1.00
Mrs. W. C. Nicholas -------- ----- do -------------- 7 plants, '/ lb. tree seed, and lb. 1.00
seed cotton.
Guadalupe Rios------------- ----- do -------------- 11 plants --------------------------- 1.00
R. Caballero---------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00
N. N. Cooper --------------- ----- do -------------- 3 apples and 5 oranges----------------- 1.00
,Caterina Gallegos------------ ----- do -------------- 1 avocado -------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Maria Esguivel -------- ----- do -------------- 18 plants --------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. D. A. Munoz ---------- ----- do -------------- 1 mango seed and 1 orange ------------ 1.00
Marie Rodemaker----------- ----- do -------------- 2oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Miss Rora Idar ------------- ----- do -------------- 4 mangoes -------------------------- 1.00
Maria Valdez --------------- ----- do -------------- 6plants---------------------------- 1.00
M. F. Vda de Zutuche -------- ----- do -------------- 2oranges--------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Rosa S. Romero -------- ----- do -------------- 1 orange and 2 plants ----------------- 1. 00

















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AvERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.
ROLLA P. CuEE, Editor.
MABEL, CoLcoRD, Librarian.
J. A. HYsLoP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WmrE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BISHoPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters. Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tem.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters
Harlingen, Tem. ).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico.).
38














U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940







S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 143 Issued September 1940


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1940


CONTENTS
Page
Q u a r a n t in e a n d o t h e r o ffi c ia l a n n o u n c e m e n t s - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 9
Announcement relating to coffee quarantine (No. 73) ------------------------------------------- 39
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50129) ------------------------------------------ 39
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) ----------------------------- 40
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 50161) -------------------------------------- 40
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 43) ------------------------------- 40
Japanese beetle quarantine continued-Extensions of area announced as of April 5, 1940 ..... 40 Japanese beetle quarantine continued ----------------------------------------------- 41
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 2, effective April 5,
1910) ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 42
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------------- 51
List of true bulbs. corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese beetle certification (B. E.
P. Q. 394, revised) --------------------- ------------------------------------------- 51
Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified --------- --------------------------- 52
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3, effective May
27. 194)) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 52
Notice to general public through newspapers ----------------------------------- 55
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 2) ------ 56
Order amending Section 301.48-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and modifying the Japanese beetle qua-antine regulations as to shipments of fruits
and vegetables from certain areas in Virginia (B. E. P. Q. 599) .... 57
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) --------------------------------- 57
Administrative instructions relating to pink bo llworm quarantine-restoring the treatment
requirements as to cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake. and meal and extending the area in which baled cotton lint may be moved from certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico
and Texas without treatment (B. E. P. Q. 493, revised) ------------------------------ 57
Announcements reading to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ----------------------5
Administrative instructions--Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. E. P. Q. 4S5, fifth revision) -------------------------------------------- 58
Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------------- 59
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ---------------------------------------------- 59
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona .. . ..------------------------------------------ 59
Miscellaneous items ------------------------..---------------------------------------------- 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, supplement
No. 7) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supplement No. 3) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 69
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement No. 2) 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. E. P. Q. 502, supplement
No. 1) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------.--------------------- 62
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ------------------------------- 64



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT-COFFEE QUAIANTINF--No'ICE OF QUARANTINE No. 73,
PROHIBITING IMPORTATION INTO PUERTO Rico OF (' IIWIAl- $ IIPMENTS OF
UNROASTED SKEDS OR BEANS OF COIi.E,. (CovFEE FRUITS OR BERRIES, AND COFFEE
PLANTS AND LEAVES (T. D. 50129)

TRVASUIty DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF TIlE COMMISSIONERR OF CUStIOMS, W( ily ington, D. C., April 10, 190.

To Collcctors of Customs and 0th ers Coniccrnied:
The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. 73, Notice of Quarantine No. 73 (Cof'fee Quarantine), effective April 1, 1940, prohibits the iniportation int, the I41and of
251222-40---1 39






40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Puerto Rico from all foreign countries and localities of commercial shipments of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee, coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants and leaves, to guard against the entry of the coffee berry borer and the coffee rust.
The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal referience opposite articles 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner:
W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the text of the quarantine.)

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
PLANT QUARANTINE A(yr-FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE-CITRUS FRUIT
FROM MEXICo IN TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THE UNITED STATES (T. D.
50161)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C., May 31, 19,40.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 507, entitled "Administrative Instructions; Citrus Fruit from Mexico in Transit to Foreign Countries via the United States" issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, effective January 24, 1940, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned. This circular supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised, which was not published as a Treasury decision.
The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal reference opposite articles 578 (a) and (b) (1), and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner:
W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the text of the circular.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED-EXTENSIONS OF AREA ANNOUNCED AS OF APRIL 5, 1940
ARIL 5, 1940.
After careful consideration of information developed at the public conference held in Washington on February 27, 1940, with respect to the Federal Japanese beetle quarantine, the Secretary of Agriculture has signed a revision of the quarantine, effective April 5. Some additional territory is being brought under the quarantine. The additions are as follows:
Maryland-All of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot Counties not heretofore under regulation; election districts Nos. 4, 7, and 10 in Baltimore County; the city of Westminster, and the election districts of Mount Airy (No. 13), Taneytown (No. 1), and Uniontown (No. 2), in Carroll County, election district of Woodville (No. 18), in Frederick County; election district of Funkstown (No. 10) in Washington Couvty; election district of Sharptown (No. 10) in Wicomico County.
New York-Erwin Township in Steuben County.
Ohio-Entire Counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and the townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Willoughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills,






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County.
Pemnsylvan ia-All of Clarion County not heretofore under regulation; the townships of Millcreek, Erie, Wayne, and the borough of Corry in Erie County, placing Erie and Corry under regulation as isolated points; all of Venango County except the townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin, Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Oilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville.
West Virginia.-All of Brooke County and all of Jefferson County not heretofore under regulation; districts of Lubeck and Tygart in Wood County and the city of Charleston, the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought within the main regulated area.
The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City and surrounding area and additional territory as specified in the quarantine regulations. Since the effective date of this change does not take place until later the particulars are not being included in this advance notice.
Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virginia will find that the season during which certification is required for such produce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated areas the season remains the same as heretofore-from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.
Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is still required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.
It is anticipated that within a few days revised copies of Quarantine No. 48 will be available in order that you may become familiar with all provisions contained therein. This is intended to serve in the meantime for those who need this information more promptly than the full text of the quarantine as revised can be made available.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Buireau of Entoology aUd Plant Quarantine.


JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED
WASHINGTON, D. C., April 5.
Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace today signed an order calling for the continuance of the Federal Japanese beetle quarantine under the supervision of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The same order enlarges the regulated area which goes under quarantine today (April 5).
At a public conference in Washington, February 27, 1940, representatives of nurserymen and plant-quarantine officials from 18 States and Canada discussed the advisability of revoking the Federal quarantine. With one exception, all favored its continuance.
Officials of the Bureau said the regulated area will be extended to include all of Caroline, Ilarford, and Talbot Counties, and some additional townships. Carroll, Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico Counties, and Baltimore, all in Maryland; all of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and a part of Lake Counties in Ohio; all of Clarion, and parts of Venango and Erie Counties in Pennsylvania; all of Brooke and Jefferson and part of Wood Counties in West Virginia; Erwin Township in Steuben County, New York. The newly added area also includes the outlying cities of Corry and Erie, Pa., and Charleston. W. Va.
The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City and surrounding area imwluding the town of &reenwich. in Fairtield ( county Conn., and more area in Maryland, New Jersey. -ml Pennsylvainia.
Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virgin)ia will find that the season during which certification is required for such produce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated areas the season remains the same as heretofore-from Jnie 15 to October 15, inclusive.
Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is still required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October r 15, inclusive.






42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Extensions of the regulated areas in Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,, and West Virginia are made in the following revision of regulation 3. In Maryland, the entire counties of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot are brought under regulation, and minor extensions have been made in the counties of Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico. In New York, but one community is; added, Erwin Township in Steuben County. The newly added Ohio area includes the entire counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and part ofLake County. The area in Pennsylvania has been extended to all of Clarion County and parts of Venango and Erie Counties, placing Corry and Erie under, regulation as isolated points. West Virginia extensions include Brooke County,, the whole of Jefferson County, area. in Wood County, and the city of Charleston, the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought within the main regulatedarea.
Under regulation 5, the special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated has been extended to New York City and surrounding area, including one town in Connecticut, as well as additional area in Maryland. New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.
The season during which fruits and vegetables are required to be certified whenshipped from the regulated area remains the same as heretofore, from June 15 to, October 15, except that in the case of a small area in Virginia, designated in subsection (A) of regulation 5,, certification is required beginning June 1.
Certification requirements are lifted as to portions of plants without roots and, free from soil, such as branches, twigs, and Christmas trees, and also. as to soilfree, dried roots incapable of propagation and appropriately labeled. The certification requirements remain in effect as to cut flowers shipped from June 15 to October 15, inclusive. Plants of trailing arbutus, heretofore exempted part of* the year when shipped without primary roots and soil-free, are now exempt fromcertification from October 16 to June 14, provided they are soil-free.
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Butreau of Entom~ology and Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO 2 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION),
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
[Approved, April 4, 1940; effective April 5, 1940]
Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 191T (39, Stat. 1134, 1164), it is ordered that regulations 3, 5, and 6 (secs. 301.48-3., 5, and 6) of* the rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sec. 301.48) on. account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated February 16, 1939, as amended, are hereby further amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 31

SEci. 301.48-3. Regulated areas.-In accordance with the provisos to Notice of' Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48), the Secretary of Agriculture, designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magisterial districts. listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions. within their limits:
Connecticut.-The entire State.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Coiumbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin. County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond, Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and Windham, in Cumnberiand County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
31laryland.-Counties of Caroline, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somnerset, Talbot, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the-






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, -5. 6, 7, 11, 12. 14, 22. 203. 24, 26, 2.9, 31, and 62 in Allcganiy Coutt'y; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel Couinty; all of Baltfinore Coun11ty except election districts Nos. 5 and 6: the city of Westminster, and the election districts of Freedom (No. 5), Hampstead (No. 8), Mount Airy (No. 13),. New Windsor (No. 11), Taneytown (No. 1.), Uniontown (No. 2), and lWestmninster (No. 7) in Catrroll Couinty; 'election districts of La Plata aind White Plains, in ClIarl-C. County; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12) in Dorchicstcr Cotoity; election districts of Brunswick (No. 25) Buckeystown (No. 1). Frederick ( No. 2). Jeffersoin (No. 14), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and Woodville (No. 18), in Frederick Conty: election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City (No. 2), Guilford (-No. 6), and West Frien&dhip (No. 3)1 in Jhoiard County: election districts of Colesville (_No. 5), and Rockville fNo. 4), in Monwtgomcryq County, and those p~ortion,,- of the election, districts of ethe.s-da (No. 7). and Wheaton (No. 13), in said counity located within the established boundaries of the so-called Washington Suburban Sanitary District aill of P'rince Gcorgc.s Count.1 except the election districts of Aqua sco (No. ) avid Nottinghami ( No. 4)elec-tion, districts of Funkstown (No. 10). Hzlagerstown (_Nos,. 3. 17. 21, 22. 24, and 25), Halfway (No. 26). Leitersburg (No. 1). Sndy hloolk (No. 11), Sharpsburg ( No. 1), and Willi in-sport (No. 2). in 11 t'xliin!/toi Coitty election districts, of Camden (No. 13 ), Delmar (No. -111) Denis -No. 6). Fruifland (_No. 16),
-Nutters (No. 8) Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (N(-. 4). Szalisbuiry (No. 9) aind the( town of Salisbury. Sharpt-own (No. 10),. Traippe (No. 7), and Willards (No. 141), in Wicomnico Countty.
Afa~su~i wtt~.-heentire State.
Xclw 11a mpidil ire.-Counl ties of Iielknap. Ches, hire. Hill sboro. Merrimack, Rockinghamji. Straffoid, aind Sullivan : townvs of 'A->rookfield. Eaton. Ettingham., Freedom, Ma~r-dis:on, Moultonboro. Ossip~ee, Salndwich. Tamnwortlh. Tuft onboro Wakefield. and Al~ olfeboro, in Crolout:owsof Alexandria, Ashlaild. 11rid',ewiter, Briktol, Canaain, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton01. Hanover. Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, zand Plymouth, in Graftoni Coitntty.
Newr 'Jcr-.(.y.-The entire State.
New- York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx. Broome. Chei ingi, Chenaniigo. Columbia, Cortl nid, Delaware, Dutchess Fuilton., Greene. Kings, 'Madison, M-Nontgoinery, Ns saim, New York, Oneida, ()nondaga, Orange. ( )tsego. I'utni1. Queens, Rensselaer. RiZchniond, Ro(4kland, Saratoga, 'Schenectady, Schoia rie, 8~uffolk, Sullivan. Tiogoa, Ulster, 'Washington, and W~estchester : towns of Red Housze and 8; .laiminca. and the city of Salamanca, ifl Cattrigi119U Counity towns: of Amhers~t, Cheektowaga. land Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lzickvaaii, in Eric Cout!':tl towns of Coluiai, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, Gerni Flats. Hlerkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Ma nheiim. Newport, Salisbury, Schuyl er, 'Stark. Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls. in Jlcrkhocr ('oanty : town of 'Watertown and city of Watertown. in Jcffcrsov Counity; town of M\ount Morris and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston Couinty ': city of Rochester and town of Brighton. in Monroe Countq; towns of Catherine, CayuttA, Dix. Hector, MINontour, and Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Se/iiylcr Couinty: townvs of ( Iaton, Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville. and the cities of Cornling, and Hornell, in Steuiben County; towns of Caroline, Danby. Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newvfield, and thie city of Ithaca. in Tonipl,-iiix County; towns, of Luizerne and Queenshury and the city of Glens Fa lls, in 1Va )cn Coii at!/.
Oh. io.-Coun ties of Belmont, Carroll, 'olilinbiia vi, Cuya lio 'ga, Gnernsey. Hiarrison, Jefferson, MNalioiiig, M.ed mia. Portaige, Stalrk, Suini iit, Tusca ra was, and Wayne : the city of ('oshocton, ini Cosh octon Coun)ty: the city of 01oh1imbu. and villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, IHaniford, Ma1:rble Cliff, and Ulppert Arlington, in Franklin Countq ; townishipis of Kirtland, McNlntscr, and 'Willoughiby. and the villages of Kirtland Ilills, Likeline. M.Nentor. Mlentor-on-theLake, 'Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Will oughby, andl Willuoick. in Lakc Couty:h the townshlip of Newark and city of Newark, in Lickingi C,)onty '?: the city of Toledo, in Luew County;I/ tihe township) of Madison11 'and the( c-ityN f Mnsie in hRiclild County .1: townships of Baizett, Braceville,' Brookficld, I 'hanipiun1, IFowNNler. har11tford, lowland. Hubbard, Liberty, LordistownNto, Sou iiugt unIi11 W'1rreni,
Weathersfield. and Vienna, thle cities oft Nsamid A rrcn, an1d tIlie, villages of Gortlaind, Gira-rd. Hubbard, Mch~onild, Newt on Falls, and Oramigevile, in Trumbuell County.






44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Penv sylvania.-The entire State, except Crawford and Forest Counties; Mercer Township in Butler County; townships of Amity, Concord, Conneaut, Elk Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield, Harborcreek, Le Boeuf, McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit, Union, Venango, Washington, and Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranesville, East Springfield, Edinboro, Elgin, Fairview, Girard, Lawrence Park, Middleboro, Mill Village, North East, North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville, in Erie County; townships of Coolspring, Deer Creek, Delaware, East Lackawannock, Fairview, Findley, French Creek, Greene, Hempfield, Jackson, Jefferson, Lackawannock, Lake, Liberty, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry, Pine, Pymatuning, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Springfield, Sugar Grove, West Salem, Wilmington, Wolf Creek, and Worth, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Grove City, Jackson Center, Jamestown, Mercer, New Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in Mercer County; townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin, Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Oilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville, in Venango County; and the townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren Coutnty.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Verinont.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the town of Burlington, in Chittenden- Cou.nty.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in Chesterfield County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Natsccenond County; magisterial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvaia County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
West Virginia.-Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion, Monongalia, and Taylor; districts of Arden, Falling Waters, Hedgesville, and Opequon, and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the city of Charleston in Kanawha County; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; the city of Wheeling, in Ohio Coitnty; and the city of Parkersburg, and districts of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.'

REGULATION 5
SEC. 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.-A. Control of movement.- (1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a,) to (e), inclusive, of this regulation: (i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State, District, counties, election districts, townships, towns, or cities listed below to or through any point outside the regulated areas.
Connecticut.-Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
M1laryland.-Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County: the city of Baltimore; all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10; all of Caroline County except election districts of American Corners (No. 8), and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), in Wicomico County.

1 Secs. 301.48-3. 5. 6, 7, and 9 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318; 39 Stat. 1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer. Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck. Rochelle Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield and Hackensack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park. East Paterson, East Rutherford, Edgewater. Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glen Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, -Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgetield. Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Mendham, Morris. Morristown, Parsipany-Troy Hills, Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains. in Morris County; township of Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich. Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.
New York.-Counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens. and Richmond; town of North Hempstead, in Nassa County; towns of EIastchester, Harrison, Mamaroneck, Pelhamin, Rye. and Scarsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, New Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in Wsc.tchlester Countoy.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, ('hester, Delaware. Lancaster, Montgomery, and Philadelphia; townships of Alswe. Amity, Bern, Brecknock. Caernarvon, Colebrookdale, Cumiru, District, Douglass, Earl, Exeter, Hereford. Lower Alsace, Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaune., Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscombmanor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city of Reading, and the boroughs of Bally. Bechtelsville. Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohuton, Mount Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shiillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyonissing Hills, in Berks County: townships -of Londonderry, Lower Paxton. Lower Swatara. Susquehanna, and Swatara, the city of Harrisburg. and the boroughs of Highspire. Middletown. Paxtang, Penbrook, Royalton. and Steelton, in Dautphin Co-unty: townships of Lower Macungie, Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon. and the boroughs of Coopersburg, and Emaus, in Lehigh County; townships of Lower Saucon and Williams, in Northampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach Bottom, in York County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampi on.
Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:
Virginia.-The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton, and Princess Anne: the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nan second County, Camp Stuart in Warwick County,. and the cities of Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required for interstate movement from the main regulated area to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine;: Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the town of Ilornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield. Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movenwnt of fruits and vegetables from the above-named isolated points.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.






46 BUREAr OF ENITOAKOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments of (1) apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment; (2) bananas in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (3) bananas singly, or in individual hands.
(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially packed apples or commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or motortrucks from the area listed in paragraph
(1) of this regulation.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfected localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.
B. Conditions of certification. -Certificates may be issued for the interstate moveineut of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive (or between June I and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation) under one of the following conditions:
(3) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated area other than that specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or moving from such designated area other than by refrigerator car, have actually been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping iieeds and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any infestation.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside' of the regulated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks.
(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists and are to be shipped directly from the faring where grown to points outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or cleaning and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.
(8) When the fruits and vegetables inoving via refrigerator car from the ,rea listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector!
RIDGULATioN 6
SM 301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental stock.-A. Control of moveinent.-Nursery and ornamental stock as defined*in

See footnote 1, p. 44.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

regulation 1 (see. 301.48-1) shall not be m-oved or allowed to be, moved interstate from, the regailated areas to or through anay point outside hlereof, unless a certificate or permit sh,1ll have been issued therefor by the inspetor except as follows:
(1) The following -articles, because of their growth or production, or their manufactured or processed condition, arecon C~i de re d inn1ocuouis as carriers of infestation aiid are therefore exemt from the requirements of cortifilatioil
(a) (i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant. excoeut ii or storage growth, and when free from soil, and (ii) single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from stems, cavities, and soil. 1)ah1ia tubers, other than Single tubers or sna 11 root divisions meethmg these( ,oiidlitlolis, require certification.
b) (i) Cut orchids., (ii) orchid plants, when '-rowing exclusively ill .smulnda fiber, (Wi) 0smunda fiber, Osmuiidiiie. or orchid pet ().,a'da cia liiofica, and 0. claytoniana.)
(e) (i) Floral designs or "set piecess" including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and all formal florists' designs; bouquets, and (cit flowers not so prepared are not exempted; (ii) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Epiyaa~ rcpens), when free from soil, and when shipped during the period betweeii October 16 anud June 14, inclusive.
(d) (i) Herbarium specimens, when dIried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials, (ii) mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.
( e) ( i) Sheet moss (Callieryo wli riberi and Tli inidinin r-cognititm ) (ii) resurrection plant or birds'-iiest moss (S'lagio-lia lepidoiphylli) (Mi) sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss Sphagnacea ), (ir- dyed mnoss,, when heat.
treated and appropriately labeled.
f) Soil-free, dried roots incapable of pr() pagation. wben ;ippropriitely labeled.
(2) No restrictioPns are placed onl the iterstate movement ot nursef'y andI ornamental stock impo~rted1 from foreign counitries whieii reshippedl from the port of entry in the unopened origial container andT labeled as to each -onltainer with a copy -er-titicate ol the c'ouwntry from wlihich it was exp orted. a statement of the general natulre and hina iiity of thle contents. the i1011W -11(1 ad(dress of the osare.and( the ciouitry anrd loco i? where "'rwo'v.
3) No restrictions are placed onl the jinterstate ina venoerii of s il-free aquatic plants, and of portions of phi ;IrS witiont roots a 111d frueA from Soil, except that a certificate is, required for the movement of cut flowers during the period June 15 to October 15, inclu sive.
(4) No certificate or permit will 1)e required for the interstate movement of nursery and1 ornament ail stock when I rcalsportned by a common carrier on a through bill of lading eit her from anl area not under regulation through a regulatedl area, or from a regulated area I brotigh a nonregfulated area to another regulatedl area. (*xcoptI 1 a a ceii ificate is required between J.Jun. 15 and October 15~ for interstate miovemnt, of o-ut flowers,, from the main regulated areas to the fol lowinlg-nalledl isolated points : Brewer anid Waterville, 'Mainie ]Brighton, Buffalo. H-orniell, Mount M4 ,ri, Rces r anad Wattertown, and the town of Horlneilsvi I hel, Stouibeii (,Ifoiliy, N. Y.. w, to ot her regula ted parts of Erie, Jeffersoni, anid Liingston Counties, N. Y. ;(Columbuhis, Co'shocton, Mansfield, 'NewNark. tid Tj( J r()lt( O hio. (ir to o ther regru] ated part'is of Lickinig and Thela m ("'win ties, ( )hhi() Corry aow! Erie. P a. : Br i ng.rt 'n, Vt.; anld ( harlest on and 1 'a rkerslw rg. W'. V'a. No rest rictbins'- are, placed oil the inteorsta te oemn of (.,lt flower's fromn the above-namned iso la ted poinhtS.
B. (Thnditio. qo?1-(-rvl h~w the ?( uIac of ccrt iflcu tes aiad peri it..-lor thle purpose o)f certi fic t it01 of 111rsery a411(1 ofl ia mciii a stock, inilr'eries greenh 11150, and other prli s c emicciiied inl the mm vemient, of su~ch stock NvIl Is e clas-siliedl as follows:
(5) (11q.s J.-Nirseries. grve P(11 4 Iies nd (ii hem preliises ( Icernedl inl the movement of iiurs;erv and] orlaieil; sok ) or xviti i approx inlatelv 510 feet of which no infestation has heeti I'ound m!'Ay be classified tas ('las 1. pon0 coniIplia ce wvithI the ucu re( eil s of a11 4& r ~tlD~ t iiis regiu at ion. nursery aiid] oirnamilenl stock iliay be( (Prtificd by ifhe i uspeci ir Th '1 shipinent from such proinises wi thnout furtwi heri sjlit 4 ai and wit i~ wt Iln'et inmg the so feguards prescribed is a conmdiionn ()f ut ersI ate sl ip iiWent of p l a iiis niill ini g in nurseries or' geeilioise-s of (class 111.




251222 ~-40-2






48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(6) Class III.-(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III, provided, (i) there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas, certified houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas, or (ii) -there is a legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock. Such classification will not be granted to nurseries., greenhouses, and other premises that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. in the case of nursery properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in class I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.
(b) Upon compliance with paragraphs (7), (10), and (11) of this regulation, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or washing; or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.
(7) Greenhouses of Class III may be certified upon compliance with all the following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive, or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October 1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.
(8) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grown in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (3) of this regulation.)
(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the follow-






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

ing conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b) that the roots shall be treated by means aproved by the Bureau of Entomoloy and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector, or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence -satisfactory to the inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(10) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class III status shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside the regulated areas and to other ciassitied nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the report required by this regulation, and such denial of certitincation shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(11) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class I status, or to maintain, in a class IIi establishment, a class I subdivision, a certified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (a) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated witNh vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated area and intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate shall accompany the article when moved; (b) shall obtain approval of the inspector before such articles are received on class I or certified premises or are taken into certified greenhouses: (c) shall report inmmediately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area for use on such premises; and (d) shall also report inmediately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points outside the regulated areas and to other classitied nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation, and such denial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(12) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may he certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(13) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they originated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.'
REGULATION 7

SEc. 301.48-7. Restrictions on the morcientit of sand, soil. earth. peat, coinipost, and manure.-A. Con trol of movement.-Sand. soil, earth. peat,. compost., and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand and clay when free from vegetable matter; (b) greensand marl: and (c) such other sands and clays as have been treated or processed and suib.-equeint ly handled in such mnner that in the judgment of the inspector no lpanese beetle could exist therein, provided that each container of such art icle shall be labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in the case of bulk shipments such label shall accompany the waybill or other shipping papers.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the in tcrstate moremn(t of manurc, p at. compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either shreldd ed(, ground, pulrc rized, or compressed, or (b) when treated with (.rude petfroleu/ or anitY otller

3 See footnote 1, p. 44.






50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

product having li igh potency as an insecticide, and when 'so labeled on the outside of each commercial container of such materials.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certiflcates for the movement of restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of the following conditions:
(5) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the regulated area, but in which neither beetles n~or grubs in soil have been found.
(6) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.
(7) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction 'of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(8) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or otherwise treated -under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs
(5), (6), or (7) hereof."
REGULATION 9

SEC. 301.48-9. Marking and certification, a condition of interstate tramnporta, tion.- (a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in regulations 5, 6, and 7 (secs. 301.48-5, 6, and 7) shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number 'of the certificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the sbi-pment.4
This amendment supersedes amendment No. 1, promulgated June 22, 1939, and shall be effective on and after April 5, 1940.
Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of April 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] HENRtY A. WALLAcE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]I
4 See footnote 1., p. 44.






1940] SERVICE A'N1. REGULATORY ANNOUNCEME NTS 51

NOTICE TO ("ENERA1. Pi'iwj~lc THRO17Gi- NEwSPAPERIS

UNITY'D STATEs T)EPARrI.NiENT OF AGRICULTURE, Waisi!tonf, D). C., April e 19Q40.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agri cultu re, under authority conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 21), 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
-is imnended, has -pronmgated Anmew(Iment No. 2 to the revised regulations suppinuental to the .Japiiiiese beetle quaranti ie (Notice of Quiaranitine No. 48), effective on and after April 5, 19-40. The pur-pose of the aiendiiient is principally to bring under regulation considerable adldional area in Maryland and Ohio, niom~inal extensions ill PennsyVVlvaial a nd West \Xirgil l, and one mloreC township) ( Erwin) in St euben County, N. Y. TJhe area fromi which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor'truck or refrigerator car is regulated has been extended to New York City ,Ind stirrou ending -area icluding the town of (G'reenwich, in Fairfield County. Co~m., anid also area in Maryland, New Jersey, and~ Pennisylvania. Fruits- an111 vegetables shiippe'd during the period from .June 15 to October 15, inclusive, are requi red to be certilied, as heretofore, and, wheni shipped from a designated area~ Ini southierni Virginia, certification is advanced to cover the period from June 1 to October 15, inclusive. Minor modifications have beeni made iii the certificaitioii requirements for plants shipped from the regulated areas.
H. A. WALLACE,
A&ceretary of Agricultutre.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, 1 lart ford, (1onu., Ap~ril 18, 1940; the Journal-Every Eveniiw, Wilmington, I )el., April 1S, 19401; the Press-Ieraild, Portlanid, Maine, April 19, 1940 ; the' Sun, Bali imore. Md.April 19., 19410; the Post Boston, Mass., April 19, 1940 ; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., April 19, 1940 ; the News, Newvark, N. J., April 19, 1940 ; the Tunies, NewN York, N. Y., April 191. 1940o; the Press, C'leveland, Ohio, April 19, 1940 ; the Bulletin, Phliladelphiai, Pa., Akpril 18, 1940 ; the Bulletin, Providence, Rt. L., April 18, 1040: the Free Press, Burlingrton, Vt.. April 19), 1940 ; the News Leader, Richmond, Va., April 18, 1940 ; the ( lazett9., ( harlest# on, W. Va., Akpril 19, 1940-; and the Evening Star, W~ashington, D. C'., April 19, 19-1(.]


B. E. P. Q. 394, revised.

LisT OF TRUE BULBS, ('owMs, AND rTuBERs ExE.iMP*IEI) FRO-l JAPANESE BEETLE CERTIFICATION

Ay 5, 1940.
Under regulation 6, A (1) of quarantine No. 48 ( See. 301l.48d-6), true bulbs, corms, and tubers arie exeniplt ed from JTapanese beetle Certification when dormant, except for store growth h, and when fr-ee from soil. The exemption includes single dahhak tubers orI small dahlia root divisionss when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia taubors, other thlan sigle tubers meeting these conditions, require certification.
The following list of bulbs, ct rnis, anid tumber's, issued for the if oria tion of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers within the regulated areas, is revised to include Gloriosa roth. ;cli lirii anid two specie,, (of C orydalis, aInd to list the species of bulbous A J1('iitow
The key letter in parent hes4es before each inme indicates whether the variety inl question is a, true bulb, t-orlil, or tuber, ( B) stand for t rue bullb, (() for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature iot given on this list are, inl most cases. fleshy r-hizonmes, aInd are t herefore niot exempt from certification. ((1) ,I cifl it lb ('Hi, ('I")A .lX/4)( iili (l' (1) An, ur111ixo. ((' .4mo-rph ophliii ( devilsi otgue I, (B) .1 ftiJiowJ1' (flclorow, A1. i ii lilidos. .4. trifolia, ( C) An fhlyIi, (C() B(i bifiIH ( T) Bcfjonia (1 ulerous-rooted I, (T) Rouss,',jauitia ( M;Ueiria vinie) ( C) Brodliaca. (1B) I? ilbocod'iiii, ((11) Cabochortits (XMariposa lily orI glove-I ulip I. (11) 01('a,,.sia ( wild hyaicitit hI, (18) Cli 01(1dojia (gl oy-of-the-snow), (1 ) ) cotoleitn ( antlluti-cro wus I, Tr I (oiocasXUI ( CaiaijiWI cscalI ilt)~ and~ fancy-lea'ved va"rieties), I8) (1ooperi (evening-star and rainlily ), (11) (1oryiduli8 hllo.wi, ('. Ilbcrwa, (18) ('ri u, (C) (1rocus, (C) ('cacimii, cII)(aiia I see stat enient inl juit I'4duct ory' para.gra.ph I
(C) JDieranta, (T) IDio.'cor'q bqitalu~i (cinnan ivinte), (T) Eroiit/h i (winiteratconite ), (B) ErY! h)-oiim (1 rotidlily or dog;-tooth violet I, ( B ) Eiiclwris ( Ana zonlily) (C) Frccsia. (1H ) Fritillaria I fritilla i ,) (11) (,'ii,il s i swdrop) (BL~) Galtonia (Ilteihit 11$(Uidjiais ( sunmnier i*yacinit i), (c (Polaioluis, (,,)






52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Gloriosa rothschildiana, (T) Glowinia (see Sinningia), (B) Hippeastrum (house-amaryllis), (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch and Roman), (B) Hymenocallis (spiderlily), (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B) Ismene (See Hymenocallis), (B) Ixia, (B) Ixiolirion, (B) Lachenalia (Capecowslip), (B) Lapeyrousia (Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) Lycoris (cluster-amaryllis),
(B) Milla (Mexican-star), (B) Muscari (grape and feathered hyacinths), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B)Nerine, (B) Orinthogalum (Star-of-Bethlehem), (B) Oxalis, (B) Pancratium, (B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Puschkinia, (T) Ranunculus, (B) Scilla (squill, star-hyacinth), (T) Sinuingia speciosa (Gloxinia), (C) Sparaxis (wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (St. Jameslily),
(B) Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerflower or shellflower), (C) Tritonia (Montbretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia (buglelily), (T) Zantedeschia (Rickardia) (calla, white, yellow, spotted; arumlily), and (B) Zephyranthes (zephyrlily).
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON JAPANESE BEETLE MODIFIED

MAY 25, 1940.
The Department of Agriculture today announced the removal, May 27, 1940, of all restrictions under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables, except by refrigerator car and motortruck from the areas of heavy beetle flight. The Department will discontinue, temporarily at least, much of its inspection at highway stations of passenger vehicles that may be carrying fruits and vegetables in small lots. It will continue to require certificates of freedom from beetles for all refrigerator car and motortruck shipments of fruits and vegetables moving out from the areas of heavy beetle flight.
It has been possible to remove these restrictions under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations because the chances of spreading an infestation from small, noncommercial shipments of fruits and vegetables seem remote at this time, according to Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The Department still has authority to inspect, at any point, any shipment or vehicle that might spread the beetle from infested to noninfested territory.
The areas of heavy Japanese beetle flight are:
Connecticut-Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.
Delaware-The entire State.
District of Columbia---The entire District.
Maryland.-Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester Counties, the city of Baltimore, most of Baltimore and Caroline Counties, and parts of Anne Arundel, Dorchester, and Wicomico Counties.
New Jersey-Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union Counties, large parts of Bergen, Morris, and Passaic Counties, and part of Warren County.
New York-Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, and a few towns and cities in Nassau and Westchester Counties. Pennsylvania-Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties, many towns and cities in Berks and Dauphin Counties and several in Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties.
Virginia-Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton Counties.


MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following revision of regulation 5 removes all restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the regulated areas, except that restrictions still remain in force on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

tables by refrigerator caj or motortruck from designated area in which heavy flights of beetles occur to points outside the regulated areas. However, fruits and vegetables shipped by motortruck or refrigerator car from the area designated in paragraph (1) of regulation 5 to the city of Buffalo and other regulated parts of Erie County, N. Y., and to Brighton and Rochester, N. Y., formerly designated as isolated points in the regulated area, are not subject to certification requirements.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entonology and Plant Quarantine.



AMENDMENT NO. 3 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
[Approved May 22, 1940; effective May 27, 1040]
Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 5 (see. 301A4S-5) of the rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Not ice of Quarantine No. 48 (see. 301.48) on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated February 16, 1939, as amended, is hereby further amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 5
SEc. 301.48-5. Restrictions o n the more(imntct of fruits and regetab1es.-A. COntrol of inmouenent.-(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive, of this regulation, no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State, District, counties, election districts, townships. towns, or cities listed below to or through any point outside the regulated areas:
Connecticut.-Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Colunibia.-The entire District.
Muryland.-Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes. Somerset, and Worcester; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel Ceoity;: the city of Baltimore; all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7. 8, and 10; all of Caroline County except election districts of American Corners (No. 8), and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Camnbridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg No. 12). in Dorchester County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 3). Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), in Wicomico County.
New Jersey.-Counties of Atlantic. Burlington, Camden, Cape May. Cumberland, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson. Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union;: townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle Park, Saddle River. and Toaneek. the cities of Englewood. Garfield. and Hackensack, awd the boroughs of Bogota, (Carlstadt, Cliffside Park. East Paterson, East Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glen Rock, Hashbrouck Heiglihts, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi. Maywood. Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park. Ridgefield, Rutherford, Telerboro, Wallington, and Wood Ridge, in Jrgen County: townships of Chatham, 'hester. Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Hairding, Mendham, Morris. Morristown, Parsippany-Troy Hills, Passaic, RandolI)ph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County; township of Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Hlaledon. Hawthorne, North Haledon. Prospl)ect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in Passai County: townshi)ps of Frankliin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipshurg, Pohatcong. and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washiigton. in Warrn Count! y.
New York.-Counties of Broux. Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond: town of North Hemipstead, in Naxsaua County: towns f Eastchester, HIarrison. Mamaroneck, Pelham, Rye, and Sc arsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, Newv Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in VWestchcster County.






54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Pennsylvania.-Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delawar 3, Lancaster, Montgomery, and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon, Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglas, Earl, Exeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace, Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscombmanor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city of Reading, and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtelsville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; townships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara, the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Penbrook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Daupitin Couuty; townships of Lower Macungie, Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs of Coopersburg, and Emaus, in Leh igh County; townships of Lower Saucon and Williams, in Northampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach Bottom, in York County.
Virgiia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton: Provided, That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the area specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation to other points in the regulated area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be regarded as direct shipments from the point of origin. As such they require certification: Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:
Virginia.-The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton, and Princess Anne; the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; Camp Stuart in Warwick County; and the cities of Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of lading either from a point outside the area designated in this regulation through that area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this regulation through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Hornell, Mount Morris, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Jefferson and Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.: Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments of
(1) bananas in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (2) bananas singly, or in individual hands.
(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation to the remainder of the regulated area, other than as specified in paragraph (b) of this regulation.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.
B. Conditions of certification.-Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive (or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation), under one of the following conditions:






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

(3) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the observation of an inspector in mailier and by method to free them from any infestation.
(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas designated in this regulation, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks within such areas, mundler provisions satiisfactory to the inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks.
(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact is been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the areas designated in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or are shipped from infested districts where the fact has been establi.shed to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area designated in this regulation have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent infestati on, in a refri gerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the c()onnmmon carrier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or cleaning and loading, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and so l ed.
(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area designated in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervisin of an inspector5
This amendment supersedes regulation 5 of amendment 2 promulgated April 4, 1940, and shall be effective on and after May 27. 1940.
Done at the city of Washington this 22d day of May 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] II. A. WALLACE,
Secretary i of Ayriciltur.
[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all conmmnon carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUNBI'C Tiiou'(;H NVWSPAPFVRS
UNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRI(C'JLT'VI E.
W1as.hington, ). C., May 2., I.0.
Notice is hereby giv''n that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority t oiferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20), 1912 ; 7 Stal. 315), as amended, has promulgaled Amendm(ent No(. 3 to the revised regulations supplemental to the Japanese beelhe (iquarantine (Notice, of Quarantine No. 48), effective on and after May '27. 1940). The purIpose of the anmendnent is to remove the restrictions onil the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the regulated areas, except that restrictions still remain in force (oI the interstate movement of fruits awd vegetables by refrigerator cr or niotortriick from designated area in which heavy flights of beetles occ r to points outside tie regulated areas. Fruits an id vegeta l ds shipped b)y motortrut k or refrigerator car from that area to Buffalo, either regullated parts of Erie (',muntty. Ri(chester, and Brighton, N. Y., formerly designated as isolated reg lated points. are not sub5See. 301.48-5 issued under authority of sec. 8. "'T Stat. 318; Stat. 11 . 41 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.






56 BUREAU O-F ENTOMOLOGY AN D PLANT QUARANTINE LAprfi-Jun6

ject to certification requirements. Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
HI. A. WALL ACE?
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford. Conn., May 28, 1940; the journal-Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., May 27, 1940; the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, May 2S, 1940; the'Sun, Baltimore, Md., May 28, 1940, the Post, Boston, Mass., May 28, 1940; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. U1., May 28, 1940; the News, Newark, N. J., May 28, 1940; the Times, New York, N. Y., May 27, 1940; the Press, Cleveland, Ohio, May 28. 1940; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., May 27, 1940; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., May 28, 1940; the Free Press, Burling-ton, Vt., May 28, 1940; the News Leader, Richmond, Va., May 27, 1940: the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., May 28, 1940; and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., June 3, 1940.]

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 2.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE METHYL BROMIDE TREATMENT SCHEDULE FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED [Approved June 1, 1940; effective June 4, 1940] Results of further experiments in methyl bromide fumigation of produce for compliance with certification requirements of Quarantine No. 48 indicate that the dosage may be reduced from 5 pounds to 4 per refrigerator car at a temperature of 800 F. and retain effectiveness~ of the treatment against adult Japanese beetles. The modified treatment will, it is believed, reduce the cost of fumigation as well as the possibility of injury to certain fruits and vegetables. Circular B. E. P. Q.- 499, issued June 9. 1939, is accordingly hereby modified by changing subsection (q) on page 19 of the mimeographed circular to provide for alternative treatments as follows:
(q) MIrNIETH. BROMIDE FUMIGATIONL\
(1) REFRIGERATOR CARS
Equipment.-Refrigerator cars must have sound, well-fitting doors and hatches, and be ini condition satisfactory to the inspector. Standard cloth screens for covering the hatches and a temporary cloth screen for covering one door during ventilation are essential. A-n electric blower of not less than 750 CFM capacity against i/4-inch water pressure, equipped with devices for lowerIng into the bunker and securing, so that the blower outlet butts against the bunker screen unimpeded either by studs or burglar bar.
Temperatitre and dosage.-The temperature in the car during the treatment must be at least:
(i) 800 F. with a dosage of 1.6 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 4 pounds per refrigerator car; or
(ii) 700 F. with a dosage of 2 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 5 pounds per refrigerator car.
Period of treatimen t.-Two hours from the end of the fumigant release period. Application,.-T he doors must be closed tightly and the ice drips properly plugged. The methyl bromide may be either weighed or measured and released through a copper or brass applicator tube of 1/1-inch bore. This tube must be fitted with a disc-type spray nozzle and must be bent in a "U" shape at the end, so that the spray nozzle is directed upward toward the center of the bunker and not less than 1 foot below the ceiling during the release of the fumigant. The blower must be in continuous operation during the release of the fumigant, and for 5 minutes thereafter. At the end of this period the blower may be removed and transferred to the next car. The fumigant must be released in a split dosage. When a 5-pound dosage is applied, 3 pounds must be released in the bunker through the hatch across from the blower, and 2 pounds in the bunker at the opposite end of the car and in line with the blower. When a 4-pound dosage is applied, 2 pounds must be released in the blower end, and 2 pounds at the opposite end of the car as described above.
Modification of this method of application may be made upon authorization of an inspector.
'Ventiktiov.-At the end of the exposure period, all hatches must be immediately propped open and screened, and the drip plugs removed. One door must be opened and screened for a period of 20 minutes, following which it should be closed and sealed. If the car is to be moved within half an hour, the opening of the door may be omitted.






1940J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

Cmimuodities treated.-The treatment is approved for the following fruits and vegetables: White potatoes, sweetpotatoes, onions, tomatoes, snap beans, lima beans, sweet corn, cabbage, carrots, beets, apples, and peaches.

(2) FUMIGATION HOUSE, ROOM, AND BOX

The commodities listed above may be fumigated in approved fumigation chambers. The same requirements as to dosage, circulation period, exposure, temperature, and screening of doors listed under refrigerator car fumigation apply. The chamber must be ventilated with the ventilating equipment in continuous operation for half an hour. All ventilator intakes must be protected
-ith 8-mesh wire screen. The ventilating fan must run during both the placing and removal of the load. In addition, the requirements for screened loading facilities and the subsequent certification of loads must be met.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



B. E. P. Q. 509.
ORDER AMENDING SECTION 301.48-5, CHAPTER III, TITLE 7, CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND MODIFYING THE JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS AS TO SHIPMENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM CERTAIN AREAS IN VIRGINIA

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of paragraph (1) of subsection A of Section 301.48-5, Chapter Iii, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (17th revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, as amended], as amended by the order of the Secretary of Agriculture dated May 22, 1940 (5 F. R. 1847 et scq.), subdivision (a) of said paragraph is hereby amended to read as follows:
"(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the period from October 1ti to May 31, inclusive:
"Virgima.-The counties of Accomac and Northampton."
The infestation in the rema inder of the area formerly designated in subdivision (a) is of such a nature that it is considered to be of no hazard in the spread of Japanese beetles through shipments of fruits and vegetables. Therefore, it is considered advisable to reduce the area specified in the subdivision.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of June 1940.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomnology and Plant Quaraitine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE

(NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, revised.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINERESTORING THE TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS AS TO COTTON LINTERS, COTTONSEED HULLS, CAKE, AND MEAL, AND EXTENDING THE AREA IN WHICH BALED COTTON LINT MAY BE MOVED FROM CERTAIN LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS IN NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS WITHOUT TREATMENT
MAY 1, 1940.
I NTIODUCTORY NOTE:
Administrative instructions issued 11trch 30, 1919 (circular B. E. P. Q. 4193) modified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to baled lint and linters and products thereof, and also as to cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal when moved interstate from certain counties in northwestern Texas and from






58 BUREAU OF EllrTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Lea and Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. At the time this action was taken, it was hoped that climatic conditions unfavorable to the development of the pink bollworm, plus control and regulatory activities, would result in elimination of the pink bollworm in northwest Texas and adjacent areas in New Mexico. However, infestations have persisted in such areas and spread to additional counties to the south and southeast. Therefore, it is considered necessary to restore the restrictions previously in effect. so that linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal shall be produced, as a condition of interstate movement from such areas, from sterilized seed, or in the case of linters, otherwise treated as specified in quaran-Line regulations. Baled cotton lint, however, may, under the current instructions, continue to be shipped from the designated area, without the treatment formerly required.
The purposes of the present revision of the administrative instructions are therefore (1) to return to the treatment requirements of paragraphs (a) and
(c) of regulation 4, in shipping cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal, and (2) to extend the area from which it is considered safe to remove treatment requirements for baled cotton lint, by adding the Texas counties of Concho, Irion, Mitchell, Sterling, Tom Green, and the regulated part of Coke County.

MODIETCATION OF RESTRICTIONS

Under authority contained in the second proviso of Notice of Quarantine No. 52, revised (Sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the pest risk involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in paragraph (a) of regulation 4 (See. 301.52-4) of the pink bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that baled cotton lint and products thereof may be moved interstate without restriction from the following area:
New, Mexico.-Lea and Roosevelt Counties. Texas.-Counties of Andrews, Cochran, Concho, Dawson, Ector, Gaines, Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion, Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Stering, Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated parts of Bailey, Coke, and Lamb Counties: Provided, (1) That the products have been produced in an authorizeO gin and subsequently protected from contamination, and (2) that a certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached to the containers or shipping papers in accordance with the requirements prescribed in regulation 11 (See. 301.52-11) of said quarantine.
These instructions supersede and cancel those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493 dated March 30, 1939.
AvERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entoinology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 485 (fifth revision).
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES CONSIGNED FROM DESIGNATED PORTIONS OF THE REGULATED AREAS
MAY 24, 1W.
It has been determined that the application of control measures, the continuation of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so decreased the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle in certain parts of the regulated areas, as to eliminate the risk of contamination with the egg or adult stage, thereby justifying modification of certification requirements. Therefore, under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (See. 301.72) all certification requirements are hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the following articles enumerated in Regulation 3 (a) and (b) (See. 3-01.72--3), when free from soil and when moved interstate from the regulated parts of the areas listed below:
1. -When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following counties: In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambi'a County: in Louisiana, East Baton Rouge Parish; in Mississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl River; certification requirements are waived for the following articles:






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.
Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.
Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building materials.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.
Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.
Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.
Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or containers ,coming in contact with the ground.
Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.
Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.
2. When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans (including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the parishes of Jefferson and Plaquemnines in Loutisiaa, certification requirements are waived for the following articles:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.
Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.
Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.
Peas, beans, and peanuts in the shells, or the shells of any of these products.
Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.
All articles designated in paragraphs (a) and (b) of Regulation 3 of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72-3) for which certification requirements are not herein:above waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation during the periods covered therein.
(Issued under Sec. 301.72) [B. E. P. Q. 485. Fifth Revision, effective June 1, 1940.]
This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 485.
AVERY S. HoYT,.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomololy and Plant Quarantine.


INSTRUCTORS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
THIRD ASSISTANT PoSTMIASTER GENERAL, Washington, June 10, 19'0.
POSTMASTER :
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 485, Fifth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.
Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postm steer General.


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA
PosT OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD AsSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL .
ll'asihington. April 2, 19'i0.
Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and plant products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new insl)ection place established in lieu thereof at Bowie. Ariz., w-here inspect ion will be made upon call. See section 596. Postal Laws and Regulations. and article G2 (b), page 20 of the July 1939, Postal Guide, Part I.
L \aMsEY S. i L. 'r.
Third As.xisltait l'o-slmostcr Gcitcral.






60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
P. Q. C. A. 283, Revised, Supplement No. 7.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

APRIL 8, 1940.

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE RESTRICTIONS
[Resolution No. 253, March 27, 1939]

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS PROHIBITED FROM INFESTED AREAS

ARTICLE 1. The following products are deemed possible carriers of the insect pest known as the white-fringed beetle (Pantomorus leucoloma (Boh.)) and another closely related species of Pantomorus, namely, potatoes, sweetpotatoes, and other tubers, peas, peanuts in the shell, unginned cotton, cottonseed, earth, and turf (sod).
ART. 2. The importation into Cuba of any of the above-mentioned products is strictly prohibited from the infested (regulated) areas 6 of the States of Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and similar regions in the United States where the above-mentioned insects may become established in the future. Other products which, in the opinion of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, may be deemed possible carriers of the above-mentioned insects, may be prohibited entry from such infested areas in the future.

PRODUCTS FROM UNINFECTED AREAS MUST BE CERTIFIED

ART. 3. When these products which are the subject of quarantine action by Cuba, originate in uninfested areas of the above-mentioned States, or from like areas in States which may become infested in the future, it will be necessary, in order to permit their entry into Cuba, that they be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, visaed by a Cuban consul, issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, affirming that the areas from which the products proceed are free from the dbove-mentioned insects.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ART. 4. The products referred to in this resolution whose importation is not prohibited, will be subjected on arrival in Cuba to inspection by the Bureau of Plant Quarantines of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, and if they are found without the aforesaid certificate when such certificates are required, or if inspection shows them to be infested, they will be disposed of by reexportation or by burning, as the consignee may elect.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 375, Revised Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT
APRIL 8, 1940.

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN FRUITS AND PLANTS PROHIBITED
[Order of May 29, 1939, of the Ministry of Agriculture Notice in "Journal Officiel,"
No. 71 of July 20, 1939]
INFESTATION BY CERTAIN SALE INSECTS PROHIBITED ENTRY
ARTICLE 2. The entry into Egypt of all fruits, plants, and parts of plants will.be prohibited if, after inspection by agents of the Ministry of Agriculture, they are shown to be infested with Aspidiotus destructor Sign., Pseudococcus nipae Mask., or Pseudococcus comstocki Kuw. It has been demon, strated that these insects cannot be controlled effectively by fumigation.
6 See Notice of Quarantine No. 72, the White-Fringed Beetle Quarantine.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

LIST OF PLANTS REQUIRING AUTHORIZATION EXTENDED
ART. 3. The following list of plants, including also the fruits and parts of plants, is added to those which may be imported into Egypt only by an authorization granted by the Ministry of Agriculture and the importation must conform to the conditions of the authorization:
Palmaceae. Amaryllidaceae.
Pandanaceae. Myrtaceae.
Bignoniaceae. Cleaceae.
Anonaceae. Lauraceae.
Musaceae. Caricaceae.
Anacardiaceae. Ebenaceae.
Rubiaceae.
The application for the authorization should be addressed to the Crop Protection Section, Ministry of Agriculture, Cairo.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 411, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO
APRIL 8, 1940.

AMENDMENT TO EXTERIOR QUARANTINE No. 12 ABROGATED [Resolution published October 11, 1939]

THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT
ALFALFA SEED FROM YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA


Whereas, the insect found in Yuma County, Ariz., corresponds to the species Iypera brunneipennis Boh. which is not found in the fields during the harvesting of alfalfa seed and, therefore, cannot contaminate it:

This Ministry has seen fit to issue the following Resolution.
1. There is abrogated hereby the Addition to Exterior Quarantine No. 12, promulgated on June 16, 1939, because it is not applicable.
2. Alfalfa seed harvested in the County of Yuma, Ariz., U. S. A., may be imported into the Republic of Mexico, provided that it is covered by a certificate of soundness (sanitary certificate) issued by the competent authorities of the neighbor country of the north, in which it is stated that it (the seed) is free from the insects Hypera posticus and Hypera brunncipennis and, in addition, it is packed in new and closed sacks.
This supplement cancels B. E. i'. Q. 411, supplement No. 1.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 502, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PARAGUAY
MAY 9, 1940.
CURCULlo ADD) TO LIST OF DE( LARED PESTS
[Decree No. 165, published in Gaceta Oficial of Paraguay. March 8, 1910]
The President of the Republic of Paraguay decrees: In ncor(dance with Article 11, division B of the law 672. the curculio. Cotorachlu. denied lust., is added to the list of agricultural insect pests.
LE A. STRuoNo.G,
Chief, Bureau of Entomologu and Plant Quarantine.







62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April; 1 to Junie 30, 1940. penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

P. Vasquez ------------------- San Ysidro, Calif -------1 papaya ------------------------- $1
Jesus Eato-------------------- ----- do ---------------- 98 plants-------------------------- 1
Mrs. W1. A. Joplin------------- ----- do ---------------- 20plants-------------------------- 1
Roy Lucas -------------------- Brownsville, Tex-------- 3 mangoes------------------------- 1I
Apolonjo MNartinez ------------ ----- do ---------------- 4 avocado seed -------------------- 1
Proxedio Orihe---------------- ----- do ---------------- 2 mangoes------------------------- 1
Mrs. Rivas Castillo------------ ----- do ---------------- 4 rmangoes---------------------1
Juana Avila ----------------------- do ---------------- 1 avocado seed -------------------- 1I
Benita Reyes ------------------ Del Rio, Tex ----------- 5 sweetpotatoes------------------- 1
Agiiedits Va-ldez de Bermea----- ----- do ----------------1I mango -------------------------- 1
Refugio B. Rodriguez ----------- Eagle Pass, Tex -------- 3 mangoes------------------------- 1I
Margarita Banda ------------- ----- do ---------------- 6 plants -------------------------- 1
Mrs. Maria A. de Beltran------ -----do ----------------1I mango -------------------------- 1
Roniana Alvarado------------- ----- do ---------------- 15 apricots ------------------------ 1I
Maria Cantu------------- ---- ----- do ---------------- 12 apricots ------------------------ 1
Benedicta urando ----------- ----- do ---------------- 2plums -------------------------- 1I
Gabina F. Faris-------------- ----- do---------------- 16 plants-------------------------- 1I
Tiburejo Medinilla------------- El Paso, Tex ---------- 2 avocados------------------------ 1
Maria Murillo ---------------- ----- do---------------- 6 plants -------------------------- 1
-Margarita Pinon de Contreras --------- do---------------- 8 mangoes------------------------- 1
Felipe Valadez-----------------iidalgo, Tex -----------1I mango -------------------------- 1I
Laura Gomez------------------ ---- do------------------ 2 avocados------------------------ 1
Marcus Sanchez -------------- ----- do---------------- 5 plants -------------------------- 1I
Teresa Ramirez --------------- ----- do---------------- 1 mango seed---------------------- 1I
Salvador Escato -------------- ----- do---------------- 3 avocados------------------------ 1
MTaria Rosales de Gonzales- -- -__-----do---------------- 1 plant --------------------------- 1
M. D. Cavazos --------------- ----- do---------------- 1 mango and 1 mango seed ---- 1
Felistas Aguillar -------------- ----- do---------------- 1 mango -------------------------- 1
Florencia Reyas -------------- ----- do---------------- 5 plants -------------------------- 1
Juanita Besera---------------- ----- do---------------- 2mangoes------------------------- 1I
HI. Juninez------------------- ----- do---------------- 3 pounds husk tomatoes------------ 1
Amaria G. Barrera ------------ ----- do---------------- 2 plants -------------------------- 1I
Floa Cardenas --------------- ----- do---------------- 1 plant --------------------------- 1I
Rosa Bosanegra --------------- ----- do---------------- 3 plants -------------------------- 1
Maria, Ruiz------------------- ----- do---------------- 2 plants ----------------------- --- 1
Juan Almaraz ---------------- ----- do---------------- 2 avocados------------------------ 1
E. C. Adame----------------- ----- do---------------- 13 avocados and 5 mangoes ---- 5
Manuela Pruneda------------- ----- do----------------i1plant --------------- ------------ 1
Julia Trevino----------------- ----- do -------------- ----- do --------------------------- 1
Librada Casas ---------------- ----- do--------------- ----- do --------------------------- 1I
Juana Rodrigues -------------- ----- do -------------- ----- do --------------------------- 1I
Guadalupa iRamirez----------- ----- do----------------1I avocado------------------------- 1I
Maria Tamez------------------ Laredo, Tex ----------- 2 mangoes------------------------- 1
Rebecca Tamez-------------- ---- --- ---------------im a ngo -------------------------- 1I
Maria de Jesus Martinez------- ----- do -------------- ----- do --------------------------- 1
Ofilia Martinez --------------- ----- do---------------- 2mangoes------------------------- 1I
Enrique Aldope--------------- ----- do----------------12 avocados----------------------- 1
Miguel Hlernandez ------------ ----- do---------------- 3sweet limes---------------------- I
Divencea Vda. Rodriquez ------- ---do---------------- 1 guava -------------------------- 1
Maria Rodriquez-------------- ----- do---------------- 2guavas-------------------------- 1
Aurelia Guardado------------- ----- do----------------i1plant --------------------------- 1
Mrs. Oliv-a Rodriquez --------- ----- do----------------1I plant and pound tree seed..---Oscar Carabello --------------- ----- do---------------- 2 avocados------------------------ 1
Valentine Hlernandez ---------- ----- do----------------1I plant --------------------------- 1
Cesario Ramos --------------- ----- do---------------- 2mameys------------------------- 1
Felicita Pena----------------- ----- do----------------1I plant --------------------------- 1
Elena Bacanegra-------------- ----- do----------------1I mamey ------------------------- 1
.Jesus Valdez --------------- ----- do----------------- 4avocado3 ----------------------- 1
Elias Y Lopez ---------------- ----- do---------------- 2 avocados------------------------ 1
Juan Martinez--------------- ----- do---------------- 19 plants ----------------------- 1
Nazario Galvan --------------- ----- do---------------- 24 sweet limes,10 plants,lIavocado- 1
Joe Ochoa-------------------- ----- do---------------- 9 plants -------------------------- 1
E. Placencia ------------------ ----- do---------------- 29 plants ------------------------- 1
Elvira Saenz------------------ ----- do---------------- 10 plants ------------------------- 1
Rose Siedman ---------------- ----- do---------------- 4 oranges ------------------------- 1
Emilio D. Hernandez---------- ----- do---------------- 2mangoes and 4sapote seed---- 1
John L. Bossi----------------- ----- do----------------1I mamey ------------------------- 1







19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63



Name Port Contraband Penalty

Julia Padilla-------------------- Laredo, Tex ------------ 3 mangoes ---------- $1
Adela N. Mleave --------------- -----do-- ---------- 2 mangoes~ ---- ....1.
Lusiana V. Rodriguez---------- ----- do----------------- 4rmangoes, 4 inanieys, and 4sapote1
seed.
Anna Gutierrez---------------- ----- do-----------------Irma ngo seed and 4plan ts --------- 1
Enrique 13arrera ------------------- do---d- 5 avocados ------ - -- --- 1
Alfonso Chevez ------------------ --- do----------------- 2mango seed------------------ 1
Al. W. Zeissler----------------- ----- do-----------------4 ran(ges -------------1
Manuel Torres --------------------(10- d ----- ------ 2 avocados ----------------- I
R. Kennings-------------------- -_--do----------------- 6 maileys an(1 1 mango------------- I
Estrada de Rojas -------------- ----- do----------------- 3 mnangoes andi 1 orange------------- 1
Dario Gutierrez---------------- ----- do ----------- I avocado -Mrs. Maria Ramirez -------- -- ---- do---------- 4 avocados and 1 mango -----Pedro iRamirez---------------- ----o----------------- 2 mianugoes---------------------- 1
Mrs. Carmen Aguilar----------- ----- do------------------ 1 mango ---------------------------- 1
Jesus Rodriquez --------------- ----- do ------------------ icos-------------------- ----- I
Miss Amelia Bacanega---------- ----- do----------------- 3 mnngoes ----------- -------- -1
I. Ml. Oleander--------------- -----o------------------- 10mangoes and 25 avocados---------- 3
Mrs. Max Figueroa ------------ ----- do----------------- 2 plants--------------------- 1I
Mrs. Josefa Valdez ------------- ----- do---------------- ----- do -- ------------- 1
Donicano Corba --------------- ----- do----------------- I manyo ------------------- ---- 1
Mfrs. S. W. Garza--------------- do ---------2 plants ---------- ----David Elizondo---------------- f~cds Tex---------- 3 avocados----------------------- 1














ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWF-R, Assistant Chief.
AvERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.
F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. ROLL P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAiIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investig.tions.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBEOK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BroumTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Teax.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Teo.).
A. C. BAKEB, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
64



















U. S. GOVERNME NT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940






.R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 144 Issued I)ecember 1940








United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------------------- 65
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ---------------------------------- 65
Instructions to postmsters --------------------------------------------------- 65
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for season ----------------------- 66
Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetle quarantine to September 19 for the year 194 ----------------------------- 66
Instructions to postmasters --------------------------------------------------------------- 66
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3) ------- 67
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, 2d
revision) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 67
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13) ------------ 68
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables ------------------ 68
Use of methyl bromide authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from Hawaii
to the mainland ---------------------------------------------------------- 69
Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetables"
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl bromide under supervision
(B. E. P. Q. 510) -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 69
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ----------------------------------- 70
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940 ------ 70
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) ------------------------ 72
Administrative instructions-removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision) ----------------------- 72
Instructions to postmasters ...---------------------------------------- 73
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products -------------------------------------- 73
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937) ---------------------- 73
Miscellaneous items ----------------------------------------------------------- 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised) ------------ 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised) --------- 78
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------------ 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ------------------------------------ 84



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE 1 DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER (W NERAL.
Wa.4lifl!gto., u,ug t 940.
POSTMASTER:
My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision of the regulations supplemienital to Notice (of Quarantine No. 4s of the U. S. Department of Agriculture on account of the Jalpalese beetle, effective April 5, 1940, extending the area under quarantine and modifying slightly the restrictions previously imposed. by which vo will please be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY 8, BLACK.
Third Assimau statcttuster General.
273058-40






66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JUIY-SePt.

JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS ENDS FOR SEASON
(Press notice)
SETEMPER 21, 1940.
Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese, beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the Department of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain in force through October 15.
Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required untilQctober 16 onl interstate shipments of fruits .and Vegetables of any kind moved via refrigerator car or mnotortruck from the areas of heavy beetle flight. The new order, however, releases the fruits and vegetables from that requirement nearly four weeks earlier than is provided in the regulations.
The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and parts of Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.
Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when the beetles are in active flight. Officials of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine said that there is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period, which is now apparently over throughout the regulated areas. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and
-other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this order.

ORDER ADVANCING DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON FRUIT AND VEGE-. TABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 19 FOR THE YEAR 1940

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables from the regulated areas. Therefore it is ordered that the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and- vegetables ,imposed .by 'Sec. 301.48-5 xegulain*"fth ue n ~glations -(17th- -revisioni) "as amendedS supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48] are, hereby removed effective on and after September 19, 1940. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 19, 1940, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] IPAUL H. APPLEBY,
Acting Secretary of Agricultu~re.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 19, 1940, 11:01 a. in.; 5 IP. R., 3745.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
.Washington, September 26, 1940.
The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determinede. that the active period of ,the. Japanese beetle in, its relation'to -fruits" and- vege.+a.ble,,,.has ready '.c eased for the present season -and that it is, therefore, safe to" permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 (sec. 301.48-5), Rules and Regulations (17th revision), supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle from the entire regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may. therefore, until June 15, 1941, accept fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vegetables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of inspection prescribed by that quarantine, except that in the case of the movement interstate from certain areas in Virginia-section 301.48-5 )paragrapi
(a)-the exemption will apply only until June 1, 1941.
There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, oinaniental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this notice.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistantt Postm aster Geteral.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 3.
ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, as amended], the paragraph reading "Period of treatinet.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours," under subsection (in) (1) of Sec. 301.48b [Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], is hereby deleted. The paragraph quoted above appears on page 15 of the mimeographed edition of said circular.
Results of further experience in treatment of plants in the field with carbon disulphide emulsion for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec. 301.48 [Notice of Quarantine No. 48] indicate that the existing requirement that soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment may be safely eliminated.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 19th day of September 1940.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Aeting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Qu(Irantinc.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 24, 1940, 11: 46 a. m.;
5 F. R., 3791.1

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 1, Second Revision).
ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL. FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, as amended], subsection (1) (5) of Sec. 301.48b' on page 13 of the miimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modifled to read as follows:
(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION
Equipment.-An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, aircireulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.
Application.-After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vaporized withinn it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during the perod of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventitating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal of the fumigated articles.
This section was originally issued as Sec. 301.48a.






68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July7-Sept.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.-The temperature of the soil (with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified in the following table, or higher:


Dosage
Temperature at least treatient of r(miepyl
treament1,000 cubic
feet)

Hours Pounds
1. 700 F----------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Y 2
2. 630 F- -- -- -- -- -- -- ---------- --- --- --- -- 7-- --- --- --- --- --- --------2 2 2 Y
3. 540 F ---------------------------------------------------------------- 4 2Y2
4. 500 F ---------------------------------------------------------------- 4Y2 2Y2


The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by the load.
Preparation of plants.-The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare roots or in 12-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches in diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not* spherical. The soil should not be puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each other they should not be jammed tightly together. Treatments I and 2 may be employed in fumigating packaged plants prepared in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
Resul ts of further experiments in treatment of plants with methyl bromide for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec. 301.48 [Notice of Quarantine No. 48] indicate that the additional authorized method- of fumigation is effective in destroying the Japanese beetle.
Varieties of plan ts.-The list of plants,* including greenhouse,* perennial, and nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is. subject to continual expansion and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, including also those which have been injured by the treatment, -will be supplied on request.
The schedule for the fumigation of str awberry plants as specified in subsection (1) (5) (ii) of Sec. 3.01.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.
This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised,. dated, March 22, 1940.
Done at the city of Washington -this 27th day of September 1940.
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1940, 11: 56 a. in.; ~ 3871.]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY
AND MELONFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 13)

USE OF A NEW FUMIGANT T APPROVED'FOR CERTAIN HAWAIIAN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
(Press notice)
JULY 19, 1940.
Certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables, entry of which to the continental United States is restricted by Federal plant quarantine, may now come in, provided they have received a treatment under supervision and safeguards that makes it impossible for them to spread two destructive insect pests-the Mediterranean fruitfiy and the melonfly-which made the quarantine necessary.' Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entoimology and Plant Quarantine, United States






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

Department of Agriculture, authorizes, effective August 1, 1940, a method of treatment by methyl bromide and special handling of these certain fruits and vegetables as a condition for certification for their movement from Hawaii to the mainland.
The Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine developed this treatment after extensive research, during which tests were made with thousands of insects. The results of these tests show conclusively that fumigation with methyl bromide, properly done under the supervision of trained inspectors, will kill the Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly in all stages of their life cycles in these certain fruits and vegetables-guavas, papayas, bell peppers, bitter melons, cucumbers, summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes. This, together with safeguards to prevent infestation after treatment, will prevent the entry of these pests and make it possible to ship the fruits and vegetables to he mainland.
Doctor Strong points out that the requirements as to the possible use of this new method involve many details and that those interested may get full information and detailed instructions from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in Washington, D. C.

USE OF METHYL BROMIDE AUTHORIZED FOR TREATING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
FOR MOVEMENT FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND2
JULY 19, 1940.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, announced today that he has authorized, effective August 1, 1940, a method of treatment, under supervision, of certain fruits and vegetables with methyl bromide as a condition for certification for their movement from Hawaii to the mainland. In making this announcement, Strong stated that extensive experiments by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine have demonstrated that the fumigation of guavas, papayas, bell peppers, bitter melons, cucumbers, summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes with methyl bromide under prescribed temperature, dosage, and exposure conditions will kill all stages of the Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly. As an added safeguard in connection with this treatment the instructions require that the fruits and vegetables so treated shall be handled subsequent to treatment in a manner which will preclude infestation until they are dispatched to the mainland.
In authorizing this method of treatment Strong says the information available suggests that the fumigation of papayas and tomatoes can be accomplished without affecting their palatability. He states, however, that information is not now available as to the possible effect the treatment will have on guavas, bell peppers, bitter melon, summer squash, and string beans under the conditions that prevail in Hawaii. Ile adds that the data obtained in experimental work elsewhere indicate that cucumbers fumigated with dosages of methyl bromide even lower than that authorized for Hawaiian fruits and vegetables may result in severe injury.
In making this announcement Strong emphasizes that inexactness or carelessness in the application of the fumigant may result in injury to 1he fruits and vegetables which will cause their rejection. Ile also emphasized that evidence based oil trial shipments under conditions of transportation from Hawaii is not available to demonstrate that the fruits and vegetables the movenient of which is now authorized will be marketable oH the mainland after the application of the treatment here authorized. He suggests that those interested in using this treatment now approved should miake small trial shipments.

B. E. P. Q. 510.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS AMENDING AUTHORIZATION OF THE SHIPMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO FUMIGATION WITH METHYL BROMIDE UNDER SUPERVISION
Pursuant to the authority contained in the first pnHiviso of Swetlon :101.13-2. Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 2 of the rul'cis and regulations supplemental to Notice of Qn ranti e N,. 12, on account of the Mediterranean fruittly and melonfly ill Ilawaii prIovisiion is liertl Iy illade, eflee2 Special statement prepared for Ilawaiian newspapers.






70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

tive August 1, 1940, for the certification of guavas, papayas, bell peppers, bitter melon, cucumbers, summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes for movement from the Territory of--Hawaii into or through any State, Territory, or District of the United States, when the prescribed fumigation with methyl bromide is applied in Hawaii at plants designated for this purpose by the United States Department of Agriculture and under the supervision of the inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology alid Plant Quarantine. Any fruits or vegetables treated and shipped under the provisions of these instructions are so handled at the risk of the shipper, and no liability shall attach to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any officer or representative of that Department in the event of injury resulting to the fruits and vegetables named.
Required fumigation eqiiuient.-Fumigation must be performed in a gastight fumigation chamber. This chamber shall be lined with sheet metal, with locked and soldered seams. and fitted with a tight mietal-clad door which closes against gaskets so that it is gastight at ordinary atmospheric pressures. The fumigation chamber shall be equipped with a blower-type fan having a capacity of at least one-third the volume of the room per minute for stirring the gas mixture in the chamber. A method for ventilating the fum-igation chamber and removing the fumigant from the commn-odity after fumigation shall also be provided. The fumigation equipment and method of application of the fumigant shall be satisfactory to the inspector charged by the Department with the supervision of the treatment.
Method of fitm igation.--The commodity to be treated shall be stacked in the chamber in a manner satisfactory to the supervising inspector and fumigated for a period of 31/ hours at a dosage of 2 pounds of methyl. bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space occupied by the commodity. The temperature of the commodity within the fumigation chamber shall not be lower than 80' F. throughout the period of fumigation. Throughout the exposure the fanl referred to above shall be operated. After the fumigation has been completed the "Commodity shall be ventilated by drawing fresh air over and through the load-for a period of at least 20 minutes.
Ca-utio'.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation purposes. It is a poison and the operator should, as a measure of safety, -use an approved gas m~ask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation and when opening the door to ventilate the fumigation chamber. The fumigation chamber should not be entered without a gas mask until it has been thoroughly aerated.
Certification .-T he certification of the fruits and vegetables enumerated will be contingent upon the surrounding of the products so treated with safeguards which, in the judgment of the inspector, will preclude infestation of the treated fruits and vegetables from the time they leave the fumigation chamber until loaded for dispatch to the mainland.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of July 1940.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Butreau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[ Filed with the Division of the Federal Register July 18, 1940, 10 : 13 a. mn.; 5 F. R., 2608.]


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
STATEMENT REGARDING COOPERATIVE PINK BOLLWORM CONTROL PROGRAM FOR THE CROP SEASON 1940
JTuiy 5, 1940.
On December 15. 1939, a public conference was held in San Antonio, Tex., to discuss the status of the pink bollworm infestation in the United States with particular reference to the situation in the lower Rio Grande Valley. At that conference it was developed that no immediate recommendation would be made for the establishment of a noncotton zone in that section of the United States and -that for at least the crop season 1940 it appeared desirable to continue a cooperative suppressive program along the lines followed during the 1939 season. Following the conference and with the submission of a special report to Congress it was pointed out that a supplemental estimate would be sub-






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

mitted requesting additional funds to provide for part of the cost of continuing the cooperative field clean-up in south Texas. Such supplemental estimate was in order since in accordance with required practice anid before the results of clean-up were available the Depaitmient had submitted its regular estimates of funds required for the fiscal year 1941.
The President's annual Budget estimates for the fiscal year 1941 requested $526,800 for the regular work associated with control and prevention of spread of the pink bollworm. This was $77.192 more than provided for these purposes for the fiscal year 1940. This increase in the amount needed for regular activities was approved because of the additional work involved in connection with the enforcement of the Federal quarantine and related operations. Since the regular Budget estimate did not provide special funds for field clean-up in Texas for which $460,000 had been provided for the fiscal l year 1940 the amount of the estimate for pink bollworm control was $382,S0S less than the appropriation for that year.
When Congress considered the Agricultural bill which was based on the regular estimates an unsuccessful effort was made in both the House and the Senate to increase the amount to be provided for pink bollworm control in order to provide funds for clean-up and other suppressive measures in the lower Rio Grande Valley.
On May 31, 1940. the I'resident submitted a supplemental estimate requesting $380,000 additional for pink bollworm cont, ol to provide for suppressive and clean-up work in south Texas. This amount together with $526,800 included in the regular estimate would have provided for the fiscal year 1941 the same appropriation as that available for the fiscal year 1940. This additional supplemental estimate was considered by Congress in connection with the Second Deficiency bill but was not approved.
Since final action has now been taken on the amount of funds that will be available to the Department for the control and prevention of spread of the pink bollwormn for the fiscal year 1941, it is necessary that the program for the season 1940 he determined on the basis of funds available, namely. $526,800. It is proposed to use this money, first, for the continuamnce of enforcement of the Federal domestic quarantine on account of the pink bollworm in all known infested areas. This involves the sterilization of seed and of lint aInd other cotton products originating in all heavily infested areas, and in certain of the lightly infested areas. It involves work in Arizona, New Mexico. Texas, and that part of south Florida where wild cotton infested with pink bollworm has been found, and scouting to determine the distribution of the pink bollworm in additional cotton-producing States.
After carefully reviewing the situation, it is believed the program in these various States should not be appreciably modified but should even be strengthened where possible in order to reduce. wherever possible, the danger of additional spread of pink bollworm. There would be no financial point to sacrificing the efficiency of the work elsewhere to increase the scope of the operations in the Rio Grande area, since the amount that could thus be raised would be not only entirely inadequate to meet the requirements of the situation inll the lower Rio Grande Valley, but might conceivably result in spread from less heavily infested areas. The ID)epartment is therefore calling upon fhe farmers of south Texas to cooperate even more vigo rously than they have in the past with the effort to supply suI)pressive measures (during this crop season.
It is expected that with the cooperation (of those concerned, it will be possible to clean the fields effectively and thoroughly at the earliest possible moment following the completion of the harvest. To this end, representatives of the State Department of Agriculture, cooperating with those of the lIureau, will contact the growers and give advice and assistance in every way practicable. It is believed the growers will furnish every possible a ssistance to the end that prompt (destruction of thie crop) residues may be accollplished as soon as possible after cotton picking this fall. Thie recoinnendation of' the Department is that this work be done as thoroughly alnd as plrompl)tly a possible in the lower Rio Grande Valley and the Coastal Bend counties of Texas. lin this program, we are assured of having the sane co)qoration fv*om the Republic of Mexico as we have had heretofore.
L,:E A. STICoNG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomologn anud Plant Quarantie.






72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED. ARTICLES

(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of Section 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine N-1-. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements are hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the following articles enumerated in Section 301.72-3 [Regulation 3 (a) and (b) ] when free from soil and when sanitation practices are maintained t-o the satisfaction of the inspector and when moved interstate from the regulated areas, or parts of the areas listed below:
(1) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification requirements are waived for the following articles:
Baled-cotton lint and linters.
Cottonseed when free from gin trash.
(2) When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following counties: In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County;, in Louisiana, E~ist Baton Rouge Parish; in iississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl River; certification requirements are waived for the following articles:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.
Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
Cordwood, pulpwood, stuinpwood, and logs.
Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building
materials.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.
Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.
Seed cotton.
Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or
containers coming in contact with the ground.
Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.
Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from. soil.
(3) When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans (including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the parishes of Jefferson and Plaquemines in Louisiana, certification requirements are waived for the following articles:
Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.
Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.
Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.
Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.
Peas, beans, and peanuts in the shells, or the shells of any of these
products.
Seed cotton.
It has been determined that the application of control measures, the maintenance of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so decreased the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle as to eliminate the risk of contamination with the egg or adult stage, thereby justifying modification of certification requirements as set forth above.
(b) All articles designated in Section 301.72-3 [paragraphs (a) and (b) of Regulation 3 of Quarantine No. 72] for which certification requirements are not hereinabove waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation during the period covered therein.
This revision supersedes all previous issues of Circular B. E. P. Q. 485.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 9th day of August 1940.
L~z A. STrRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register August 13, 1940, 3: 36 p. in.; 5 F. R., 2850.1






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, Au ust 23, 1940.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Attention is invited to the enclosed administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.
Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAiMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postnutsfder General.



TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES
(Revision of notice dated June 23, 1937)
THIRD ASSiSTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, September 11, 1940.
Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions or entirely prohibited.
The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and regulations, showing the quarantined areas, the plants and plant products affected. and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts. Under the provisions of paragraph 2 (b), amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, postmasters should not accept such plants and plant products when presented for mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations, and should invite the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Plants and plant products affected

Area quarantined Accepted for mailing Plant pests
Area quarantined Acceptance for mailing only when accom- and diseases entirely prohibited panied with approved from quarantined area certificate or Oregon permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(1) Counties in Oregon: Baker, .------.Potatoes and potato tops Colorado poGrant, Malheur, Morrow, Unma- require State of origin tato beetle.
tilla, Union, and Wallowa. certificate showing
All States except California and they were grown and
Nevada. packed in noninfested
areas; or, screened and
packed as prescribed
by Oregon law.

(2) All States and all counties in .-.--.. .. ... Narcissus bulbs, includ- Narcissus bulb
Oregon. ing daffodils, jonquils, fly, eelwvorin,
and Chinese sacred or nematode. lilies- require satisfactory State of origin
certificate as to field
and storage inspect ion
andi freedom from infest at ion.

273058-40- 2







74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.


Plants and plant products prohibiited or regulated entry into Oregon-Continued


Plants and plant products affected

AreaquaantnedAccepted for mailing Plant pests
Are qaratiedAcceptance for mailing only when accom- and diseases
entirely prohibited pan jed with approved from quarantined area certificate or Oregon permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(3) Counties in Oregon: Benton,------------------------ Fresh cherries and cher- Cherry fruit
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, ry lug boxes-fresh fly.
Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, cherries accepted only
Multnomah, Polk, Tillamook, with State of origin
Union, Washington, and Yamhill. certificate they are
from a county free
All counties in Idaho except Benewah from cherry fruit fly.
and Latah. Lug boxes from quaranCounties in Washington: Clallam, tined area must be
Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, steam or hot-water
Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, treated and so certiLewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, fied. Cherries can
San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Sno- be shipped from inhomish, Spokane, Thurston, fested into infested
Wahkiakum, Whatcom, Whit- territory.
man.

(4) State of California and Josephine Strawberry plants pro- Plants may be moved S t raw b er ry County, Oregon. hibited from Cali- from disease-free fields yellows.
fornia. in Josephine County
with certificate.

(5) Counties in Oregon: Benton,------------------------ Poplar and willow trees Satin moth.
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, and parts capable of
Douglas, Hood River, Lane, propagation-must
Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, carry State of origin
Washington, and Yamhill. certification they were
States of Connecticut, Maine, Mas- grown in a county
sachusetts, New Hampshire, free from satin moth
Rhode Island, Vermont, and and have not been
Washington. stored where poplar or
willow trees from infested areas are or have
been stored.

(6 All States----------------- -------------------------- Grapevines and cuttings Grape phylaccepted with State of loxera.
origin certificate that
shipment is from an
area or premises free
of phylloxera.

(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti- All varieties and species, Scions or budwood ad- Oriental fruit
cut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, including the flower- mitted under Oregon moth.
Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ken- ing forms of the peach, permit from Nov. 1 to tucky, Louisiana, Maryland, nectarine, almond, Mar. 15. Bare-rooted
Massachusetts, Michigan, Missi- apricot, plum, cherry, plants allowed entry sippi, Missouri, New Jersey. chokecherry, quince, from Nov. I to Mar. 15, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, pear, and apple trees after fumigation as rePennsylvania, Rhode Island, and plants and parts quired, provided with South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, thereof and the fresh satisfactory State of
Virginia, West Virginia, and Dis- fruit, origin certificate.
trict of Columbia.

(S) California, Florida, Louisiana.------------------------ Potatoes-accepted only Potato tuber
North Carolina, South Carolina, with certificate of moth.
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and State of origin show-lHawaii. ing area free of infestation; or that shipment
was fumigated according to Oregon specifitions.

(9) All States east of and including All trees, plants, cut ------------------------ Filbert blight.
the States of Montana, Wyoming, tings, and scions of the Colorado, and New Mexico. cultivated and wild
filbert and hazel.






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75


Plants and plant products prohibited or regudated entry into Oregon-Continu d


Plants and plant products affected


Area quarantined f Accepted for mailing Plant pests
Acceptance for mailing only when accom- and diseases entirely prohibited panied with approved from quarantined area certificate or Oregon permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV)

(10) All States and all counties in Red raspberry, logan- New and desirable varie- Virus diseases Oregon. berry, dewberry, or ties for trial plots may of the genus
blackberry plants and be shipped into Ore- Rubus and
their horticultural va- gon provided accom- red raspberry
rieties. panied with Oregon mosaic.
permit. Shipments within Oregon require certificate showing area free of disease after two field inspections.

(11) Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Corn, broomcorn, sor- European corn
Massachusetts, Michigan, New ghums, Sudan grass, borer.
Hampshire, New Jersey. New except clean seed and
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode shelled grain. lima and
Island, Vermont, and West Vir- green beans in pod,
ginia. beets with tops, rhubarb, and cut flowers or entire plants of mums, asters, dahlias, and gladiolus (except corms and tubers without stems)-admitted only with special certificate of United States Department of Agriculture.

(12) California, Delaware, Florida, ---------------------Tomatoes and tomato Tomato pin
New Mexico, Mississippi, Penn- plants require certifi- worm.
sylvania, Virginia, and Hawaii. cate of State of origin
showing fruit or plants were grown and shipped from a free area, or treated with Oregon approved formula.

(13) All States east of and including Chestnut and chinqua- Foreign-grown chest- C h e s t n 11 t
Montana, Wyoming, Colorado. pin trees, nuts, cut- nuts and chinquapins blight.
and New Mexico. tings, grafts, or scions. not restricted when
reshipped into Oregon in the original unopened containers.

(14) Territory of Hawaii ---------- Maunaloa flowers ------------ East Indian
bean borer.

(15) Counties in Arizona: Apache, All trees, cut t i n gs, --------------Peach mosaic.
Cochise, Coconino, Graham, grafts, scions, or buds
Maricopa, Pima, Santa Cruz, and of the peach and neYavapai. tarine, including the
Counties in California: Imperial, flowering forms.
Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego. Counties in Colorado: Delta, G arfield, Mesa, and Montezuma.
Counties in New Mf exico: Bernalillo,
Dona Ana, Lincoln, Otero, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Taos, and Valencia. County in Oklahoma: Bryan. Counties in Teas: Bowie, Brown,
Callahan, Cherokee, Comanche, Denton, Eastland. El Paso, Erathi, Floyd, Grayson, Gregg, Hopkins, Jones, Mills, Palo Pinto, Rusk, San Saba, Smith, Tarrant, and
Wilbarger.
Counties in Utah: Grand and Washington.






76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon-Continued

Plants and plant products affected

Araquarantined AcetnefrmiigAccepted for mailing Plant pests
Areaac frmaln only when accom- and diseases
entirely prohibited panied with approved from quarantined area certificate or Oregon permit
(Column I) (Column II) (Column III) (Column IV

(16) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti- Peach, nectarine, or----------------------- Peach yellows,
cut, Delaware, District of Column- apricot trees; cuttings, little peach,
bia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, grafts, scions, buds, or and peach
Kentucky, Maryland, Massa- pits, including any rosette.
chusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, trees budded or graf ted New Jersey, New York, North on peach stock or Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Penn- peach roots-from sylvania, Rhode Island, South areas where any of Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, these diseases are and West Virginia known to exist.

(17) All of Oregon -------------------------------------- Gladiolus bulbs ac- Gladiolus
cepted only when ac- thrips.
companied by special
gladiolus permit.


Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct to the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem, Oreg.
Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and plant products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should take the action prescribed by amended paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, if parcels sent to such offices for terminal inspection are found to be in violation of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.
RAMSEY S. BLAcii,
Th ird Assistant Postmaster General.



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 468, Revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

AUGUST 5, 1940.
This revision of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of Iraq has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that country and plant-quarantine officials.
The English text of the Importation of Plants Law No. 31 for 1938 was published in Iraq Government Gazette No. 7 of February 18, 1940, and became effective on that date. 'This text was forwarded to the Department of Agriculture by the American Legation at Baghdad.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct arid complete up to the time of pr-eparation, but it is not intended to be used indepenidently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of En tom ology and Plant Quarantine.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ
NOTIFICATIONS, ETC. BY THE COUNCIL OF M MINISTERS
[103a-Importation of plants law No. 31 for 1938]

We, KING OF IRAQ, with the approval of the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies, do hereby order the enactment of the following Law:
ARTICLE 1. In this Law, the following expressions shall have the meanings hereinafter set out.
(a) Plant: All living or dead plants or any part thereof, whether growing above or underground as roots, bulbs, tubers, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds, cottonseed, or cotton lint.
(b) Citrus: Cuttings, parts or fruits of any variety of plants of the family Rutaceae such as oranges, sweet lemons, limes, tangerines, mandarins, etc.
(c) Vines: Cuttings, parts, leaves, and fruits of the genus Vitis or other members of the family Vitaceae.
(d) Pests: I. All species of the Insecta in any of their different stages; II. Arachnida (spiders, etc.) ; III. Fungus diseases of the Thallophyta in general.
(e) Government Inspector: The official who shall be appointed by the Department of Agricultural Affairs for the fulfillment of the purposes of this Law.
ART. 2. All plants arriving in Iraq by sea, air, or land route, whether by post or otherwise, shall be examined by the Government Inspector in the places defined in a notification published by the Minister of Economics and Communications.
ART. 3. (a) The Government Inspector may order the destruction of the whole or any part of a consignment if, on inspection, it be found infected with any pest to a degree incurable by disinfection by fumigation or other method.
(b) If the Government Inspector considers that treatment in a suitable manner of such infected plants eradicates the pest in question, lie shall detail and apply such methods.
ART. 4. (a) The importation into Iraq of citrus plants, vines, and cottonseed, shall be prohibited, unless accompanied by an official certificate from tile competent authority of the country of origin, to the effect that they have been examined and found free of pests.
(b) All plants imported into Iraq in accordance with paragraph (a) of this article, shall, though they may be found free from pests, be either fumigated or treated in suitable ways to ensure this being the case, before being allowed to enter or delivered to the consignee.
(c) If the inspector finds on examination that the imported Ilants (h) not fulfill the required standard of cleanness, despite the contents of the certiticate, he shall order the consignment to be incinerated together with its covering, unless the consignee wishes to reexport the same within 10 (lays of the order being given by the inspector.
ART. 5. If dispute shall arise between the inspector and the importer as to the validity of the certificate, the importer may refer the matter to the Director of Agricultural Affairs, whose decision shall be considered final.
ART. 6. No compensation whatever shall be granted in lieu of plants destroyed by order of the Government Inspector, or Director of Agricultural Affairs.
ART. 7. The restriction mentioned in article 3 of this Law, shall neither apply to the juices of citrus fruits, nor to preserved, dried, or crystallized fruits.
Awr. 8. Living or dead insects of :iny species shall not be imported into Iraq for any purpose unless a license is obtained front the I)irector of Agricultural Affairs, prior to importing, by a period of 50 (lays at least. The said license shall enumerate the species anIAd lminber of insects and the purpose for which they are intended.
ART. 9. The following shall be prescribed by regulation.
(a) Fees to be charged and collectecd from the imnrter for the exalmination, detention, or disinfection of the plants.






78 BUREAU OF ENTOMA1OLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(b) The practical methods for the proper execution of the provisions of this Law.
ART. 10. A penalty, not exceeding 75 dinars or an imprisonment for a period not exceeding 6 months, or both, is imposed on:
(a) Persons who remove any plant from a place of detention without a written permit from the Government Inspector.
(b) Persons evading or attempting to evade the examination of plants.
(c) Persons obstructing or attempting to obstruct the Government Inspector in the execution of his duties as prescribed in this Law.
AT. 11. The Importation of Plants Law of 1924 and the regulation issued under article 13 of Customs and Excise Law No. 10 of 1932 shall be canceled.
ART. 12. This Law shall come into force from the date of its publication in the Official Gazette.
ART. 13. The Ministers of Economics and Communications and Justice are charged with the execution of this Law.
[Made at Baghdad this 28th day of Mhuarram 1357, and the 30th day of March 1938.]



B. E. P. Q. 382, Revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

SEPTEMBER 14, 1940.
This digest of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the Republic of Uruguay is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, formerly in charge of Foreign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of 'the Law of October 21, 1911, and decrees promulgated thereunder.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Law of October 21, 1911]

Article 4 of this law authorizes the Executive Power to prohibit the introduction into Uruguay of seeds, plants, fertilizers, etc., that favor the development of pests.
SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

According to information supplied by the International Institute of Agriculture of Rome, Italy, the importation of the following plants into Uruguay is prohibited: Acacia, Actinidia, Akebia, alder, almond, Alpelopsis, apple, apricot, ash, beech, birch, blackberry, boxwood, catalpa, cherry, chestnut, citron, cornus, cotoneaster, deutzia, Eleagnus, elder, elm, fig, forsythia, gooseberry, grapevine, honeysuckle, horsechestnut, Jersey tea, Kahnia, Kerria, lignumvitae, lilac, linden, locust, maple, marshmallow, medlar, mountain ash, mulberry, orange, Oxyacanthus, peach, pear, Photinia, plum, poplar, privet, quince, Rhodotypus, rose, sassafras, Spirea, spruce, sumac, Symphoricarpos, Thuya, Viburnum, walnut, and willow.
Seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and forage crop seeds containing more than 20 grains of Cuscuta seed per kilogram will be rejected, but may be cleaned and offered again for entry. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11
(3), p. 3.)






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

IMPORT_\ 1ION RESTRICTED
Seeds: Consignee must apply for import permit and present documents attesting their origin and purpose for which imported. Samples will be taken fo r analysis. An excess of dodder (more than 20 grains p er kilogram) will cause rejection of shipment. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11 ( 1) and (3 1 p. 3.
Phlnts from countries free from San Jose scale (A.pidiotu.s pcrniciosit.s Conist.) : Consignee must apply for an import permit and must indicate the permit number when making the customs entry. The plants will be inspected on2 arrival, with disposal according to the findings. Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11 (6) to (12), pp. 3 and 4.)
Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, etc., which may carry pests: Will be inspected on arrival with disposal according to the findings. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11 (14), p. 4.)
Plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits from countries infested by San Jose scale (Aspidiotu.s pcrinieiosios Comst. ) : Phytosanitary certificate issued hy competent authority of the country of origin attesting freedom from injurious plant diseases, must accompany each shipment; inspection on arrival at the expense of the interested persons. (Decree of March 24, 11922, as amended, article 1 (a),
(b), and (c), p. 4.)
Seed potatoes: Phytosanitary certificate indicating origin must accompany each shipment. This must be issued by competent authorities of the country of origin and it must declare that the potatoes proceed from localities free from potato wart, powdery scab, potato tuber worm, and Colorado potato bwetle. A tolerance of not more than 5 percent of tubers infected by common scale) is allowed. (Decree of January 10, 1934, article 1 (a), pp. 5 and 6.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decree of March 9, 1912, issued under the provisions of the law of October 21,1911]
IMPORTATION OF SEEDS, PLANTS. FERTILIZERS. ETC.
ART. 11. The importation of seeds, plants, fertilizers, and other vehicles for the distribution of pests may be effected only through the port of Montevideo, until the Executive Power authorizes others, and it will be subject to the following regulations:
IMPORTATION OF SEEDS
(1) In order to be able to import seeds, the interested person must make an application to the Plant Protection Service (Direccion de la Defensa Agricola) indicating therein the name and address of the iml)orter, the name of the seed, its origin and the documents attesting the origin and the purpose for which the seeds are intended-sale, sowing, or consumption.

SAMPLES WILL BE TAKEN FOR ANALYSIS
(2) A representative of Defensa Agricola will draw samples at randond which will be analyzed. According to the results of the analysis their entry will )e permitted, or refused, in the latter (ase requiring their iliedte relating or destruction without indemnity, at the choice of the interested person.

EXCESS OF DODDER WILL CAUSE RE E(T:'ION
(3) Seeds of alfalfa and other forage crop seeds that contain more than 20 grains of Cuseuta per kilogram will be rejected.

CLEANING OF SEEDS PERMIT'I'l)
(4) The cleaning of forage crop seeds which contain more than the allowable amount of dodder seeds will be permitted. The seeds will he cleaned under the supervision designated by Defensa Agricola. The refuse will be completely destroyed by fire. The insIpector will take care that the entire shipment is cleaned and require the submittal of samples for a new analysis. In ml cas, will entry be permitted if the results of the analysis (1o not show that the required condition has been attained.
(5) When the analysis is favorable a certificate will be issued to the interested person; without it a customs permit will not be granted.






80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

(6) For the introduction of p~lanlts, an application must be made to the Plant Protection Service, indicating the name and address of the importer, species, quantity, and destination of the plants.
(7) The number of the respective permit must always be indicated. The inspection having been made, Defensa Agricola will, in each case, notify the customs, indicating the permit number referred to in the entry papers.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

(8) Inspection will be made at Montevideo if possible.
(9) If plants are infected in such a way as to constitute a risk for the national agriculture and their efficacious disinfection is not possible in the opinion of the inspector, a period of 48 hours in which to effect reembarkation or destruction by fire, will be fixed without right of indemnity.
(10) When plants to be imported, on account of their packing and quantity, cannot be inspected in that port without serious injury to the plants, the owner will be permitted to carry them to his agricultural establishment under control of Defensa Agricola, whose representative will be present and supervise the opening of the packages.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED SHIPMENTS

(11) Every shipment or part thereof that shows signs of infection shall be destroyed at once, except in cases where, on account of the character of the disease, disinfection can be carried out which will completely sterilize the plants attacked.
(12) Shipments will be regarded as cleared through the customs only when the importer receives the corresponding, inspection certificate from the Plant Protection Service.
NOTICE OF ARRIVAL REQUIRED

(13) Importers or owners of plants will furnish a notice of arrival in ad-vance, indicating the day and hour when unlading will be effected.
(14) Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, etc., that may be vehicles for the distribution of pests will be cleared only after inspection and issuance of the certificatee establishing their freedom from pests.
(15) Refers to fertilizers.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The importation of plants, parts of plants, and fresh fruits, except as provided in Decree No. 2086 of September 23, 1921, may be effected through the ports of Montevideo, Salto, Santa Rosa del Guareim, Rivera, and Paysandu. 'The port of Carmelo is authorized for the entry of fresh fruits only.

REGULATION S GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FROM COUNTRIES NOT FREE FROM SAN JOSE SCALE
[Decree of March 24. 1922, as amended by that of December 22, 1922]

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation through the Port of Montevideo is authorized of plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits proceeding from countries that are not free from San Jose scale under the following conditions:
(a) Every shipment of plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits must be accompanied by a phytosanitarv certificate from the exporting country, issued by competent authority, which afflirms that it has been inspected and found free from injurious plant diseases.
(b) The interested persons shall present the phytosanitary certificate idicating origin to Defensa Agricola with the application, indicating the name, business, and address of the importer, kinds of plants, parts thereof, and fresh






19401 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

fruits that they desire to import and the quantity in detail of each, purpose for which the products are intended, place of planting in case they are to be cultivated, and port of embarkation and name of ship.
(c) Defensa Agricola will proceed to inspect the products to be imported and if on inspection they are found to be infected or are suspected of being so, will require their disinfection in a manner indicated by Defensa Agricola, at the expense of the interested persons.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES
[Decree of January 10, 1934]

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. Every shipment of potatoes imported into Uruguay for planting shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin which shall affirm:
(a) That the imported tubers proceed from localities free from the following diseases and parasites: Synchytrium endobioti cum (Schilb.) Perc., Spongospora subterranea (Walls.) Lang., (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell., and (Doryph ora ) Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Say.
(b) That the tubers intended for exportation are free from other serious parasitic diseases, a certain margin of toleration being allowed of relatively innocuous infections.
With respect to scab, distinction should be made between:
(1) Powdery scab caused by Spongospora subterranca which, as mentioned above, renders the shipment useless for seed purposes.
(2) Black scab caused by Rhizoctonia viiolacea,, the presence of which necessitates the disinfection of tubers intended for seed purposes.
(3) Common scab caused by Actinomyces (Oospora) scabies, which may be tolerated when found only in a small proportion, for example, when not more than 5 percent of the tubers are affected, and of these not more than 10 percent of the surface.
ART. 2. In addition to a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin, each consignment of potatoes must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the Government of the exporting country to the effect that the tubers were especially selected for seed and that the farms on which they were grown have been under official supervision and inspection; also that in the course of the official inspections it was ascertained that there was no evidence of "degeneration" (virus diseases) such as leaf roll, mosaic, etc., which lower the vitality of the tubers.
(No E.-The decree of July 4, 1935, temporarily suspends the provisions of art. 2. In other words, until further notice, the certification that the potatoes concerned were selected seed potatoes and that the cultures from which they were obtained had been officially inspected and found free from the so-called degenerative diseases, is not required.)

UNFIT SEED POTATOES 'MAY BE CONSUMED

ART. 3. If the tubers, on arrival in Uruguay, are deemed by the experts of the Agronomic Board (Direccion de Agronoinia) to be unsuitable for seed, they may be utilized for consumption unless for a special reason they are unfit for this purpose also.

TOTALLY UNFIT POTATOES MUST BE DESTROYED

ART. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities to be unsuitable either for planting or consumption shall be destroyed under the supervision of those authorities, the importer having to pay the expenses involved thereby.
Tubers imported by commercial firms for planting in Uruguay will remain subject, even after release from the customs, to supervision by technical officials of the Division of Agricultural Encouragement and protection (Seccion Fomento y Defensa Agricola), the importers being resp,)ntsible for the maintenance of the tubers in good condition.







82 BURE AU OF ENTOMTNOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to September 30, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for- .atte~mpting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indica ted were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Francisco M. Esperanza ----------- Nogales, Ariz--------- 195 bulbs ----------------------- $3.90
Rodolfo Guerrero -------------- ----- do--------------- 2pounds acorns------------------- 1.00
Consuclo Roe------------------- San Ysidro, Calif------ 2mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Fred Salazar ------------------ ------ do ------------- ----- do--.------------------------ 1.00
J. E. Rogers------------------- ----- do -------------- 7cactus plants-------------------- 1.00
Joe Charles--------------------- Brownsville, Tex------ 1 mango------------------------- 1.00
Maria Alejandro --------------- ----- do -------------- 2 peaches and 3 guavas------------ 1.00
Beatriz Garza ------------------ ----- do--------------- 2avocados ----------------------- 1.00
C# ,z---------- agl jass',Tex ------- 1 mavney ------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Santos Ramon de Moreno --------- do -------------- 14 apples and 7 avocados---------- 1.00
Maria Antonia de Pallos -------- ----- do -------------- 1 mango..------------------------- 1.o00
Maria Guajardo --------------- ----- do --------------1 avocado----------------------- 1.00
Maria Guadalupe Rodriguez ---------- do -------------- 2cactus plants-------------------- 1.00
Herlinda Trevino de Perez ------ ----- do -------------- 2 avocado seeds------------------- 1.00
Mrs. A. A. Escobar.-------------- El Paso, Tex --------- 1 mango and 19 bulbs------------- 1.00
Zenon Gonzalez-----------------iidalgo, Tex --------- avocado seed-------------------- 1.00
Rita Guajardo----------------- ----- do -------------- 5avocados ----------------------- 1.00
Marcel Perez------------------ ----- do -------------- 2avocado plants------------------ 1.00
Inocenta Perez----------------- ----- do -------------- 2mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Maria Mata------------------- ----- do -------------- 15 plants------------------------ 1.00
Francisco Paula Castillo -------- ----- do--------------- 3mangoes----------------------- 1.00
-Salvador Reyas ---------------- ----- do -------------- 2mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Agueda Gonzalez -------------- ----- do -------------- 3mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Josa Cantu-------------------- ----- do -------------- 4mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Paula Lopez------------------- ----- do. -------------l1avocado----------------------- 1.00
Lucinda Rodriguez------------- ----- do -------------- 2pomegranates ------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Pabla A. Barrios ------------ Laredo. Tex ----------i1plant and pound tree seed ~ 1.00
Ramon Lesa------------------- ----- do -------------- 1 mango------------------------- 1.00
Lena Villareal ----------------- ----- do-------------- ----- do -------------------------- 1.00
R. A. Vidaurri ---------------- ----- do------------- ------.do..------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Dorotea Ramirez---------- ----- do ------------- ----- do -------------------------- 1.00
Adela Fana-------------------- ----- do ------------- ----- do -------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Maria -Q. de Garza-------- ------ do--------------- 2 j1ongoes ---------------1. 00
M .ArdA bd i 06 ------ ------o------ jati----------------------- 1,oo
Mrs. Julia Vargas -------------- ----- do --------------i1mango----------------- ------- 1.00
Mrs. Manuela Carnero de Villarreal _-do------------- ------do -------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. ilortensia Longoria -------- ----- do -------------- 4mango seeds -------------------- 1.00
Joseferia Combrono ------------ ------ do -------------- 3plants------------------------- 1.00
Esperonza Fernandez----------- ----- do ------------- ----- do -------------------------- 1.00
Roberto Nova----------------- ----- do -------------- 4 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Adula Garza-------------- ----- do -------------- 2 plants------------------------- 1.00
Arturo Lozano----------------- ----- do -------------- 14 peaches----------------------- 1.00
Esperanza Rancel -------------- ----- do -------------- 3sweet limes and 2mamey seed -- 1.00
Severa Gonzalez --------------- ----- do -------------- 2 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Eudelia Guerra Reyes ---------- ----- do ------------- ----- do -------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Josefa Lopez-------------- ----- do -------------- 2 peaches------------------------ 1.00
Mrs. Esperanza Ramos ----------- ---do -------------- 2 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Salia Sanchez ------------- ----- do -------------- 1 mango------------------------- 1.00
M. IHerniandez----------------- ----- do -------------- 4 avocados ----------------------- 1.00
Edwarda Do La Rosa----------- ----- do--------------- 1 pound tree seed and 12 plants -- 1.00
Jose Ramirez------------------ ----- do -------------- 3 plants------------------------- 1.00
Teresa Agala ------------------ ----- do -------------- 8 plants------------------------- 1.00
Joe Garza --------------------- ----- do --------------- 4 plants ------------------------- 1.00
Romulo Munos---------------- ----- do --------------- 3 avocados----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Josepha Alvarez----------- ----- do.. ------------- 2 plants ------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Sara Gomez de Pedrosa ---------- do --------------- 2 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Elije Castillo------------------ ----- do -------------- 2 avocados..----------------------- 1.00
Rudencio Munoz -------------- ----- do -------------- 2marney seed------------------ 10
~efltt~t~ter~y----------------d--------- ag ----------------------- 1.00
P ilar J im'i'e z -------------------------------do ---------------- 1 avocado and 3 plants ------------- 1.00
M 'rs. Lidia Bermal ------------- ----- do -------------- 9 figs --------------- 1.00
Mrs. Merced Montelongo ------- ----- do -------------- pound tree seed----------------- 1.00
G1. Martinez------------------- ----- do -------------- 6 avocados ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs. F. X. Fernandez ---------- ----- do -------------- 45 mamey seed-------------------- 1.00
'Philip Hernandez -------------- ----- do -------------- 9 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Antonio Garza----------------- ----- do -------------- 4 quinces------------------------ 1.00
Guadalupe A. de Blanca -------- ----- do -------------- 4 mangoes----------------------- 1.00
Maria Trevino----------------- ----- do -------------- 1 peach ------------------------- 1.00







19401 SERVICE A-ND REGULATORY A- NNOU-NCEMIENTS 83



Name Port Contraband Penalty

W. A. Hooper------------------- Laredo, Tex----------- 1 avocado and 2 avocado seeds --- $1.00
S. Mendez --------------------- ----- do--------------- 2 mangoes---------------------- 1 1.00
Mrs. Maria Don Miguel--------- ----- do--------------- 5 avocados ------------------------ 1.00
Mrs. Cruz Ruiz----------------- ----- do--------------- 2 mangoes------------------------- 1. 00
Mrs. Celia Rumsey -------------- ----- do--------------- 3 avocados--------------------- 10
Mrs. Margarita Jiminez--------- do ---------------- 1 plant---------------------------- 1.00
Petro Trevino --------------d -------- 2 mangoes--------------------- 1.001
Julia Ramos-------------------- ----- do--------------- 4 plants --------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Maria de la Luz Mendoza --------- do--------------- 6 plants--------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. S. G-oizales---------------- ----- do ---------------1I quince--------------------------- 1.00
W. W. Gray-------------------- ----- do--------------- 5 avocados with seed--------------- 1.00
Mrs. H. Rameriz --------------- ----- do--------------- 2 quinces-------------------------- 1.00)
Tamasa de la Ruiz -------------- ----- do---------------18S avocados------------------------ 1.00
Rosalie Benavides -------------- ----- do ---------------- 18 plants -------------------------- 1.00
Juan Pena --------------------- ----- do--------------- 5 avocados ------------------------ 3.00
Camalia H. Leon --------------- ----- do--------------- 1 quince--------------------------- 1.00
D. C. Raemer------------------ ----- do--------------- 1 plant---------------------- I 1.00
Arthur PadilIla------------------ ----- do--------------- 8 plants--------------------------- 1.00


















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. RoHwEm, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.
J. C. HOLTON, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden, Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BisHoPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign, Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.). R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworn and Thurberia Weevil Quarantivnes (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.). P. A. HOIDALE, in, Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Frztitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
84













U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940












S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 145.

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------------------- 85
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) --------------------------------- 85
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice)--. 85
Administrative instructions-modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.
Q. 512) ------------------------------------------------------------------- 86
Miscellaneous items ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 86
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.
348) -. . . . . . . . . . .. ..------------------------------------------------------------- 86
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised supplement No. 2)_ 95 List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations -------- 95
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----------------------------------- 101
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 103



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE (No. 64)
FRUITFLY QUARANTINE MODIFIED TO EXTEND VALENCIA ORANGE HARVEST IN TEXAS AREA
(Press notice)
JANUARY 10, 1941.
To provide for more orderly marketing of this year's large crop of Valencia oranges in Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo Counties, Tex., the United States Department of Agriculture today announced the extension of the harvestseason to May 31, from April 30, the date set in the Department's Mexican fruitfly quarantine regulations. These regulations require a fruit-free period between harvests to prevent fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande Valley. April 30 had been set as the date when all citrus fruit must be off the trees. It remains the date for the closing of the grapefruit harvest Season.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, said that extension of the harvesting season for Valencia oranges will not increase the hazard of fruitfly infestation in the United States. Valencia oranges are not preferred hosts of the fruittly and seldom are infested by it. Plant quarantine inspectors will make an extensive inspection of the groves during the extra month the oranges are allowed to remain on the trees. Should this inspection reveal any fruitfly infestation, Dr. Strong said, steps yto
prevent its dissemination through interstate movement of the fruit will be taken.
The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas S ate Departmnent of Agriculture, which coneurred. Quarantine oflicials of the State Department of Agriculture of Texas and of the United States lepartlment ,f Agriculture count on the cooperation of growers and pickers that has been extended in the past.
85
290314-41-1






86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

B. E. P. Q. 512.
TITLE 7-AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III-BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE BY EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON VALENCIA ORANGES FROM APRIL 30 TO MAY 31, 1941
301.64-5c. Administrative ins tructio'ns; modifying the restrict ions of the Mexican fruit fty quaranttine by extending the harvesting season on Valenca oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941.-Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third proviso of Section 301.64, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it having been determined by me that a modification may be safely made without increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, Section 301.04-5 (a) subsection (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this quarantine] i's hereby modified to extend the harvesting season for Valencia oranges for the Texas Counties of Brooks, Willacy, Cam,eron, and Hidalgo to the close of May 31 for the year 1941, provided conditions of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing date.
The host-free period for Valencia oranges, under -this modification, will begin June 1 and continue to August 31, 1941, inclusive.
This modification does not affect or alter the harvesting season for grape-fruit which closes, under the conditions of the above regulation, on April 30.
Done at Washington, D. C., this 30th day of December 1940.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 6, 1941, 11 : 43 a.- in.;
6 F. R., 120.]


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 511 (Supersedes B. P. Q. 348).
NOVEMBER 28 1940.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE.
This revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Chile has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that country and plant quarantine officials.
This circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certification for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation Of "Leyes y Reglamentos en Vigencia sobre Sanidad Vegetal 1925 a, 1938" received from the Ministry of Agriculture, Santiago, Chile, dated 1939, and later decrees, and was reviewed by the Chief of the Department of Plant Sanitaton, Santiago, Chile.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the -originalI text, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
BASIC LAW
[Decree-Law No. 177, Plant-Quarantine Law (Ley de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) of December 31 1924]
DECREE-LAW
ARTICLE 1. For the purposes of the present law it is hereby declared that weeds, injurious animals and in general, diseases of cryptogamic or animal origin, especially dangerous insects, will be deemed plant pests and will be the objects -of sanitary measures.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENT 87

ART. 2. The importation of plants, cuttings, seeds, f ruits, or any other plant products will only be authorized through ports determined by special decrees in accordance with the regulations prescribed to that effect.
The same regulations will prescribe the procedure to be followed in case of mail importations.
ART. 3. Such plants and plant products offered for importation shall be inspected in the Customs by the Plant Quarantine Service (Servicio de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal), and in case they are infected or are suspected of being infected, any of the following measures may be ordered: Disinfection, quarantine, return to port of departure, confiscation, or destruction.

CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Seeds, plants or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insects named in Decree No. 105. article 5 (a) and (b). (See p. 5.)
Rooted grapevines from any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (d), and Decree No. 2921, May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)
Peach trees from the United States. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (e). See p. 6.)
Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (f ). See p. 6.)
Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (g). See p. 6.)
Fresh plant products capable of introducing fruitfiies. (Decree No. 105, art.
5 (h), and Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930. See pp. 6 and 7.)
Fruits infested with Aspidiotus perniciosus or Diaspis pentagona. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (i). See p. 7.)
1Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, August 28, 1928. See p. 9.)
Potatoes. (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931. See p. 13.)

IMPORTATION RESTRIOYTED-INSPECTION CER~TIFICATE REQUIRED
Seeds if not infested by any of the insects named in article 5 (a) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 192-5. (See p. 5.)
Soybeans for industrial purposes, subject to fumigation if slightly infested. (Decree No. 298 of April 9, 1935.) (See pp. 15 and 16.)
Plants or parts thereof if not infested by any of the insects named in article
5 (b) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 5.)
Bulbs, tubers, or roots free from parasites deemed injurious. (Art. 5 (g) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. See p. 6.)
Fresh fruits from the United States if free from the scale insects Aspidiotus pern.iciosus and Diaspis pentagov.a, and if accompanied by a certificate attesting origin in a district free from Mediterranean fruitfiy and visaed by Chilean Consul. (Decree No. 10.5, art. 5 (i), February 11, 1925, and No. 12, September 4, 1930. See pp. 7, 10, 11, and 13, and following.)
Alfalfa, clover, and other forage seeds containing less than 10 seeds of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1939. See p. 7.)
Straw packing to be sterilized and certified accordingly. (Decree No. 2526, August 28, 1928. See pp. 9 and 10.)
Grapevine stocks of varieties resistant to phylloxera. (Decree No. 2921 of May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)
Peach trees from the United States in conformity with the provisions of Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935. (See p. 6.) 1Clean shelled corn and sorgo seed. (Decree No. 2526 of August 28, 1929. See p. 9.)
Cottonseed for the production of oil, and unmginned cotton, subject to fumigation and other provisions. (Decree No. 2296 of March 31. 1936. See 1)1. 16 and 17.)
Wheat for milling purposes must be free from Angouinois grain moth and so certified. (Decree No. 4, January 4, 1934. See pp. 14 ,a nd 15.)
Seed wheat must be certified as coming from a district free from loose smnut of wheat. (Decree of January 31, 19:39. See p. 15.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, ciaiiiaon. cloves, cumin, peanuts, cacao, and pepper : No inspection certificate required. If






88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

imported in tin cans may enter any port without inspection. If found infested with pests, subject to the general regulations of Decree No. 105. (Decree No. 450, August 6, 1936. See pp. 8 and 9.)
Wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark and roots for medicinal and industrial purposes through the port of Cliacalluta. (See p. 10.),
SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL REGULhATIONS
[Decree No. 105, sec. 1, February 11, 1925]
DECLARATION OF PLANT PESTS
ARTICLE 1. Plant diseases of cryptogamic or animal nature, as well as injurious animals and weeds, which can be regarded as plant pests, will be so. declared by decree. The office of the Plant Quarantine Service will indicate the procedure to be followed in each case.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
ART. 2. (a) The importation of plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and other plant products capable of introducing any agricultural pests into the country may be permitted through the ports of Valparaiso, Talcahuano, and Los Andes.
(b) The importation by mail of the products above mentioned may only be made through those ports and Santiago.
(c) The imported products are subject to the jurisdiction of the Plant Quarantine Service who are entrusted with the task of preventing the introduction, of plant pests.
(d) Other ports of 'entry may be either limited or authorized in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Agriculture.

DECLARATION AND CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 3. The importer in Chile shall furnish to the Customs a written declaration indicating:
(a) Name and address of importer;
(b) Purpose for which material is intended;
(c) Country of origin;
(d) Locality where the material will be planted or sown.
The declaration shall be accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by the competent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective consul of Chile.
INSPECTION OF PASSENGERS' BAGGAGE
ART. 4. Passengers who carry in their baggage any plants, seeds, fruits, orany other product subject to inspection, are required to declare them to there Captain of the vessel, who in turn shall notify the customs authorities.
Custom inspectors shall confiscate all plant products whose clandestine importation is attempted.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ART. 5. The importation is prohibited of:
(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested. by any of the following-named insects: Sit otroga cerealela, Bruchus obtectus,, B. quadriinaculatus, B. ruflmanus, B. chinensis, B. signaticornis, B. lentis, Spermophagus pectoralis.
(b) Plants or parts thereof upon which the following-named insects arer shown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pentagona, Euproctis chrysorrhoea, Porthetria dis par.
(c) Potatoes (So tanum tuberosum). (See Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931.)
(d) Rooted grapevines whatever their origin may be (as modified by Decree No. 2921 of May 27, 1929), except as follows:
1. The importation of grapevine stocks will be authorized when the varieties are known to be resistant to phylloxera and when application is made in conformity with the requirements determined by the Plant Quarantine Service and the Services of Viticulture and Oenology.
2. The Customs will exercise special supervision to prevent the importation of plants from countries infested with phylloxera and will extend such supervision to baggage and cargo.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

(e) Peach trees originating in the United States of America which are infected with the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little peach. (As modified by Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935.) Those not showing signs of these diseases may be imported in conformity with the following provisions:
1. Compliance with the general requirements of the Laws and Regulations of the Plant Quarantine Service.
2. In case the importation consists of several varieties, only 10 plants of each variety are allowed, and 20 plants in case only one variety is involved. The plants shall be subjected to quarantine or isolation during a growing season in the Experimental Field of the Plant Quarantine Service of the Ministry of Agriculture.
3. At the expiration of this period the plants will be returned to the importer provided they have not shown any signs of the diseases indicated in the preamble, or of any other dangerous diseases not yet established in Chile or which cannot be controlled by the known methods of treatment.
(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. To permit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all their soil for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.
(g) Bulbs, tubers, or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shown to exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.
(h) Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonly known as "fruitflies :" Rhagoletis pomontella, R. cin gulata, Contarinia pyrirora, Epochra canadensis, Ortalis (Tephritis) cerasi, Ceratitis capitata, Dacus oleae, Trypeta ludens, T. acidusa, Tephritis tryoni, and others.
A decree shall determine the cases and the classes of fruit deemed to be comprehended in the prohibitions referred to in the preceding section. (See Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)
(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus perniciosus and Diaspis pentagona. (See Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)
(j) Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Clover (Trifolium sp.) or other seeds which contain more than 10 seeds of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (As modified by Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1939.)
The certificate of inspection issued by the official authorities of the exporting country shall have a statement to the effect that this provision has been complied with.
On its arrival in Chile, alfalfa, clover, or any other seeds subject to the contamination of Cuscuta sp. seeds, shall be inspected by the Plant Quarantine Service and shall be refused entry if found to contain more than 10 seeds of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram.
The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is not limited and, consequently, others may be added in subsequent orders.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED MATERIAL
ART. 6. If, upon inspection by the Plant Quarantine Service, any of the conditions set forth in article 5 or in any of the special prohibitions promulgated in accordance with paragraph (h) or in any other necessary prohibitions, are found to be violated, the Chief of the Plant Quarantine Service is authorized to order the return or the destructionn of the plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits offered for importation. Where the value of the consignment exceeds 5,000 pesos, authority for the application of those measures may be obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture.
Such destruction does not entail any indemnity and if relating of the refused products is resorted to, it shall take place immediately, or else shall be subject, pending reshipment, to such conditions of isolation as the Plant Quarantine Service may determine.
ART. 7. Not applicable.

TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMED NECESSARY

ART. 8. Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the ilnlport ation of which is not prohibited by article 5, may be released after having passed inspection and other requirements having been fulfilled, in accordance with the following provisions:
(a) Quarantine of suspected or infected consignments pending final decision.
(b) Disinfection in the manner prescribed by the Plant Quarantine Service.






90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

The expenses incurred, including the cost of ingredients for disinfection, will be borne by the importer.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, peanuts, cacao, and peppers:
Since these products are exclusively for food purposes no. inspection certificate is required. They may be imported in tin cans through any port of Chile without inspection.
Rice, cumin, peanuts, and cacao may be imported without restriction through the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, and Taltal, but shipment thence to southern ports is prohibited. These products may be imported through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and Corral subject to inspection. If any of these products are found to be infested with pests, whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general provisions of the respective law and, regulations. (Decree No. 450, August 6,' :1926.)
Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to, inspection. (Decree No. 143,
March 16, 1927.)
The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestricted entry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, etc., is the Department of Chanaral and the unrestricted reshipment of these products is permitted between the ports included in this zon (Decree No. 1080, April 25, 1928.)

STRAW, PACKING, CORN ON THE COB, AND BRooMCORN
[Decree No. 2526of August 28, 1928]
ARTICLE 1. The importation of corn on the cob or parts thereof is prohibited.
ART. 2. The importation of broomcorn for manufacturing purposes ig equally prohibited.
ART. 3. The importation of clean shelled corn and sorgo seed, if thoroughly clean and free from fragments of cobs. and stalks, may be allowed.
ART. 4. Except for the dispositions of articles 5 and 6 of this decree, no goods of whatever origin may be imported if packed in straw, grasses, or stems of any class of plants.
ART. 5. The importation of spirits, wines, or other bottled liquids shall not be allowed, when packed in straw jackets, unless the consignments are accompanied by a certificate issued by authorized officials of the exporting country attesting that the jackets have been sterilized with steam for at least 15 minutes at 115' C., or disinfected in a closed chamber at a temperature of not less than 200 C.y with a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall contain at least 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde and shall be -used at the rate of 500 cc. per 20 cubic meters of space, in a hermetically closed chamber. The straw to be disinfected shall remain there for at least 8 hours. ,
ART. 6. The importation'. of glass, glassware, chinaware, etc., if packed with straw, shall be allowed provided the shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the exporting country and visaed by the corresponding Chilean consul attesting that the straw used for packing has been disinfected by one of the processes outlined in article 5.
ART. 7. Goods arriving without the above-mentioned certificate of disinfection shall be treated as prescribed under article 5.
ART. 8. All expenses incurred in order to comply with the provisions of the present decree shall be charged against the person directly concerned.

CHACALLUT AN AUTHORIZED PORT OF ENTRY
[Decree No. 1555 of May 28, 1930]
ARTICLE 1. Authorizes the importation of wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark and roots for medicinal and industrial purposes, through the Customs at the port of Chacalluta, without an inspection certificate.
ART. 2. Cereals, including clean shelled corn, are allowed provided they are accompanied by a certificate of inspection to the effect that they are not infested with the Angoumois grain moth (Sitoh-oga cerealella) or with any other insects or plant diseases.






1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91

ART. 3. Through the ports of Ollague and San Pedro de Atacama only the following products are allowed entry without a certificate: Wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, and dried leaves, bark, and roots for medicinal or industrial purposes.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING FRLTITFLIES
[Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930]
ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant products, whatever their origin, which are capable of carrying fruitfies. Especially Included in this prohibition are all kinds of fresh fruits, and the following vegetables: Tomatoes, eggplants, squash, string beans, and peppers.

ENTRY PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING IN A DISTRICT FREE FROM FRUITFLIES
ART. 2. Fresh fruits from the State of California are excepted from the above prohibition.
ART. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zone free from fruittly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine authorities of the country of origin, w-Nhich certificate shall accompany the shipping papers or bill of lading, and which will indicate in each case the kind, quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree. This certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chilean consul in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shall accompany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruit while it remains on board.
ART. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, indicated in article 2, is subject to the following conditions:

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaral entry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitary certificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also stated that the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by comnpetent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respective Chilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3, and it will also be required that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the Plant Quarantine Service of Arica, after inspection made on board by the official.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
The inspection made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports where there are no inspectors of the Plant Quarantine Service; but in ports where there are officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection has been made at the place where the products were unladen.
(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decree may be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intended exclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region included between Pueblo Hundido and the northern boundary.
(c) The products named in article 2. with tile exception of avocados, watermelons, and cucumbers, may be enlteredl South of Chanaral only through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Los Andes, San Antonio, Talcahuano, and Valdivia, after the inspection established by the Law of the Plant Quarantine Service and upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.
ART 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables of whatever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirement than the certificate prescribed by article- 3, p provided that those products are intended for Consumption in the* Departments of M agu.ella nes, Nat ales. and Tierra del Fuego, their relading being., definitely prohibited for the north of these Departments.
ARTS. 6 to 10. Not applicable.
ART. 11. Steamship companies are prohIlbitedl from transporting to any port of the country fresh fruits and the other products named in article1 1 of the present decree, and the crew and passengers shall not be allowed to have or to embark those products;: but the transportation of the products exceptedl from the prohibition in article A2 may be effected.






92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.

ARTS. 12 and 13. Not applicable.
ART. 14. Vessels that embark fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products whose importation is prohibited by article 1 shall not keep these products on board if they have to call at any port south of Taltal; but if those products should be intended exclusively as food for their passengers and crews they may be retained on board provided that they be kept in locked inclosures while the vessels remain in port. In no case may tomatoes, mangoes, cherimoyas, guavas, or other tropical fruits be kept on board, unless expressly excepted from the prohibition to enter, as ordered in 'the present decree.
An inspector of the Plant Quarantine Service will confirm compliance with this provision and the vessel shall not be received if this requirement is not complied with.
ARTS. 15 and 16. Not applicable.

FRESH FRUITS FROM THE UNITED STATES
Fresh fruits may be imported into Chile from any State of the United States, provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the competent American authorities, affirming that the fruit originated in a distric *t free from the Mediterranean fruitfiy (Geratitis capitata), the certificate to be visaed by a Chilean Consul. (Mi1nister of Agriculture of Chile through the American Consul, Santiago, Chile, October 28, 1930.)

IMPORTATION 0OP POTATOES PROHIBITED
From the date of this decree the importation is prohibited of potatoes from foreign sources, to prevent the introduction of the wart disease (G1hrysophlyctis endobiotica). (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931.)

ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZED PORTS
[Decree No. 336 of July 24, 1933]
Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of San Antonio: Fruits, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, and any other plant products.
[Decree No. 270 of March 28, 1934]
Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of Antofogasta: Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and any other plant products.
[Decree No. 553 of August 18, 1934]
Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of Arica: Plants, cuttings, fruits, and any other agricultural products.
[Decree No. 708 of November 30, 1934]
IMPORTATION OF FRUIT THROUGH THE PORT OF ARICA FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION
ARIrCLE 1. The importation of fruit for local consumption is hereby allowed through the port of Arica, provided it originates in national or foreign territories free of the fruitfiy. The fruit must be accompanied by a certificate of inspection stating that it is free- of the fruitfiy. If the fruit is of foreign origin, the certificate must be visaed by the corresponding Chilean Consul.
Fruit imported into Mrica for local consumption is not allowed to proceed to the valleys of Azapa and Codpa.

USE OF WHEAT IMPORTED FOR MILLING
[Decree No. 386 of September 30, 1932]
ARTICLE 1. The use for planting purposes of wheat imported for milling is hereby prohibited. All wheat so imported must be milled in its entirety.
WHEAT INTENDED FOR. MILLING
Chilean Decree No. 4 of January 4, 1934, extends the prohibitions of article 5 of Decree No. 105 of February 11, 1925, to wheat intended for milling. The text of Decree No. 4 follows: