Service and regulatory announcements

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Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288977
oclc - 14207732
lccn - sn 86033973
Classification:
ddc - 632.9 U54
System ID:
AA00023076:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    No. 134 (January-March 1938)
        Page 1
        Page 2
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    No. 135 (April-June 1938)
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
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        Page 45
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    No. 136 (July-September 1938)
        Page 75
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        Page 118
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        Page 120
        Page 121
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    No. 137 (October-December 1938)
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
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        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    List of intercepted plant pests, 1938
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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        Page 62
    Index, 1938
        Index 1
        Index 2
        Index 3
        Index 4
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text













State of Florida
Department of Agriculture DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY







00DR.E


LIBRARY







UBRARY
,il"ATE PLANT EK)ARD




















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013














http://archive.org/detaiIs/servicereg38unit






S. R. A., B. E. P. Q. Issued September 1939

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1938





These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a permanent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations






WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS












4w




2














UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1939












tLo OF PLAWt.
IDU STRY
m8RAR.


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations. C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BIsHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).
II






TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 134 (JANUARY-MARCH 1938)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements .------------------------------------------------ 2
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the Un.ited States --------------------------------------------2
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49398) -------------------------------------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)------------------------------ 2
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 395, revised; superseding B. E. P. Q. 383)---------------------------------2
Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------------------- 3
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. .52) ----------------------------- -3
Instructions to postmasters -------------------------------------------------------- 3
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products -------------------------------------- 3
Revocation of certain Oregon plant quarantines ---------------------------------------- 3
Miscellaneous items ------------------------------------------------------------------- 4
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supplem en t N o 2) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4
Plant-quaran tine import restrictions, Presidency of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
British West Indies (B. E. P.. 381, revised)------------------------- --------------- 4
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, revised) 6 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 2)_ 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement
No. 1)--------------------------- ------------------------------------------ ------ 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
No. 3)-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
No. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------- ----- it
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
No. 1)---------------------------------- -------------------------------------- 11
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
Nos. 2and 3) -------------------------------------------------------------------- 11
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supplement No. 1)---------------------------------------------------------------- --- -13
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
445, supplement No. 2)------------------------------------------------------------ 13
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
No. 3)-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 1) ----------- 13
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supplement No. 1)--------------------------------------------------------------------- 14
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Australian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467) --------15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468) ------------------- 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, superseding P. Q.
C. A. 289)----------------------------------------------------------------------- -22
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum
to inspectors in Charge, dated August 22, 1934) -------------- I-------------------- -27
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, superseding
P.9q. C. A. 297)------------------------------------------------------------------ 30
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-------------------------------- 36
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine------------------------------- 37

CONTENTS OF NO. 135 (APRIL-JUNE 1938)
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------ 39
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41) ------------------------- 39
Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomeorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
474; supersedes H. B. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309)-------------------------- 39
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ----------------------------- 40
Revision of regulations ------------------------------------------------------------- 40
Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------------------------- 51
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------ 52
Administrative instructions-f umigation of potatoes by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5
of quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 473) ---------------------------------------- 52
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)---------------------------- 53
Administrative instruct ions-steril izat ion of grapefruit and oranges by heat under theMxi
can fruitfiy quarantine (B. E. P.. 472-, superseding P. Q. C. A. 329)----------------- 53
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 6:3) ----------------------- 54
White-pine blister rust quarantine regulations modified ----------------------- --------- 54
Revision of regulations -------------*------------------------------------------------- 55
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------ 60
Instructions to postmasters ------------- --------------------------------- 6 1
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations ------------------- -- 62
District of Columbia plant regulations modified,.------ ------ (12
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
out of the District of Columbia----------------- ----------------------- 62
Notice to general public through newspapers------------------- 615
Instruct ions to Ipostniasters ---------- --.. --------- ---Announcement relating to rules andI regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the Un itedI S te i s - ------------------6--Modification of cotton regulations (revi,-ion of regulation 13)---------------------- 6
Terminal inspection of plants and lant products-- - ------------------- 67
Arkansas State plant quarant ine, (sh i pent of swewt potato plants restricted 67,
Additional plant inspection plIaces in CAliforniia ----------------- ----------6
Miscellaneous items -Plan t-quarantine import restrictions, Itepu hl i of B~razil (B. E. 1. Q. 3;79. sutppleminen t N o. 2)Plant-quarantine import restrictions, 1 epubI lic, of Framnce it. F, -1'. 9. 403, s;Upp100MOTnt N0. 3)
Plan t-q uarantine import restrictions, Reulicuh of (11ny(. 1,. P. Q. 405I, Supplement
No. 4) --------------- -------------------- --------- -171401-39







IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official ann oun cements- Continued.
Miscellaneous items- Continued. Page,
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
supplement No. 3)------------------------------------------------------------------ 69
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2) 70
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------------------------- 70
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -------------------------------- 73

CONTENTS OF NO. 136 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938)

Quarantine and other official announcements-------------------------- ------------------------ 75
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) --------------- 75
Gypsy moth quarantine revised ------------------------------------------------------- 75
Revision of quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------------------- 76
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------------------------- 84
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)--------------------------- ------ 84
Administrative instructions-Fumigation of onions by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 475)----------- ---------------- -- ------------------ 84
Administrative instructions-Fumigation of tomatoes by methyl bromide as a condition jf
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 480) ------------------------- --- --------------------- 85
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments-------------------- 86
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions -under Japanese beetle quarantine advanced to September 20 for the year 1938 --------------- ------- ----- ----------------- 86
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the United States -------------------------------------------------------- 87
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49666)-------------------------- -------------- 87
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products-------------------------------------------- 87
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine ---------------------------------- ---------------- 87
Miscellaneous items--------------------------------- ------------------------- 87
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white-fringed beetle -------87
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle ------ ---------- 88Plan t-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 306, supplement No. 5) 88 Plant-quarantine import restrictions. French zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised) 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement
No. 1)-------------- ------------------ ------------ ----- --- --- -------------- 99
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 1) 99 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476)---- 100
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, superseding
Memorandum to Chief Inspectors September 1, 1931)-------------------------------- -- 110
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q. 458)_ 112 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479) --116
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------------------------- 119
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-------------------------------- 121

CONTENTS OF NO. 137. (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1938)

Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------------- 123
Announcement relating, to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45) --------------- 123
Instructions to postmasters----------------------------------------------------------- 123
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ------------------------------ 124
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 395, 3d revision)-------------------------------------------------------- 124
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------- 124
Announcements relating to MNediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13) ------------125
Hawaiian fruits and vegetables to be admitted to mainland after sterilization- - --_---------125
Administrative instructions-The shipment of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii to the
mainland subject to sterilization under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 481) ---------125
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)------------------ 126
Rescind order requiring treatment for narcissus bulbs from the Netherlands----------------- 126
Treatment requirement of noninfested Netherlands narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry
revoked (B. E. P. Q. 482)----------------------------------------------------------- 127
W1allace permits importation of increased numbers of begonia and gloxinia tubers ----------- 128
Entry requirements of foreign begonia and gloxinia tubers modified----------------------- 128
Modification of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3)~ 128
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ------------------------------ 130
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations amended ---------------------------------------- 130
Modification of pink bollwormn quarantine regulations (amendment No. 5) ------------------ 130
Notice to general public through newspapers---------------------------------------- 131
Instructions to postmasters-------------------------------------------------------- 132
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)-------------------------- 132
Quarantine issued to prevent spread of white-fringed beetle in four of Southern States --------132 White-fringzed beetle quarantine ------------------------------------------------------- 133
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------------------------- 137
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products------------------------------------------- 138
Florida State ulant quarantine (citrus canker disease) ----------------------------------- 138
Miscellaneous items --------------------------------------------------------------------- 133
The Plant Quarantine Act and Quarantine No. 37 (address by Lee A. Strong) -------------- 138
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413, revised) -- 142
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
No. ) ------------------------------------------------------------------ ---------- 147
Plan t-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supplement No. 1) -- ------------------------------------- ----------------------------- 148
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Regency of Tunisia (B. E. P. Q. 483) -----------148
Penalties imnosed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------------------------- 153
organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -------------------------------- 156

0







S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 134 Issued June 199S







United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE




SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1938




CONTENTS
Pacre
0
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 2
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the United States ------------------------------------------------------------- 2
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. 1). 49398) ------------------------------------------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) --------------------------------- 2
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 395, revised: superseding B. E. P. Q. 383) ------------------------------------ 2
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 3
Announcement relating To pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ---------------------------------- 3
Instructions to postmasters ----------------------------------------------------------------- 3
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------------- 3
Revocation of certain Oregon plant quarantines --------------------------------------------- 3
Miscellaneous items ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4
PlaDt-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supplement No. 2) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 4
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
British West Indies, (B. E. P. Q. 381, revised) -------------------------------------------- 4
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q 391, revised) 6
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 2)_ 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement
No. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
No. 3) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
No. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 11
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
N 0. 1) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1
Plant -quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
Nos. 2 and 3) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11
Plant- quarantine import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supplement No. 1) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13
Plan t-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
445, supplement No. 2) ------------------------------------------------------------------ 13
Plant- quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yucroslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
No. 3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13
Plant- quarantine import restrictions. Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 1) ----------- 13
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supplement No. 1) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 14
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, kustralian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467) ------ 15
Plant-quara u tine import restrictions, K ing(lom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 408) -------------------- 19
Plant- quadrant i ne import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, Superseding 11. Q.
C. A. 289) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum
to Inspectors in Charge, dated August 22, 1934) ------------------------------------------- 27
Plant-quaran tine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, superseding
P. Q. C. A. 297) -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 00
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ----------------------------------- 36
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- ;7
71071-38- 1 1







2 BUREAU OF ENTOMO LOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March,

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTOTHE UNITED STATES
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS-APPLICATION FOR PERMITS

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTT*~ AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES (T. D. 39645 AND T. D. 40573) (T. D. 49398)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER. OF CUSTOMS, Washington, February 7, 1938.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by the Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United States of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal referencefor articles 579, 580, 581 (e), and 583 of -the Customs Regulations of 1937.
JAMES H. MOYLE,
Commissioner of Customs.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
B. E. P. Q. 395, Revised; superseding B. E. P. Q. 383.
MARCHE 18, :1938.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In accordance with the third proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised, the following articles, being considered innocuous as carriers of infestation, are exempted from the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto:
1. Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.
2. Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.3. Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials.
4. Floral designs or "set pieces," including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and all formal florists' designs. Bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are not exempted.
5. Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials.
6. Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials.
7. Manure, peat, compost, or humus (1) when dehydrated and either shredded, ground, pulverized, or compressed, or (2) when treated with crude petroleum or any other product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled on the outside of each commercial container of such materials, or (3) peat when imported and shipped in the unopened original container and labeled as to each container with the country of origin. (See also item 15.)
8. Moss, sheet (Call jergon scliri beri) and (Th uridi u n recogn itum). 9,. Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form. 101. Orchids, cut.
11. Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber. 12. Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmtcnda cinnanmorea, and
0. clayton jana).
13. Resurrection plant or birdsnest moss (Selaginella lepidophyila). 14. Silica sand or similar material, when processed by crushing, grinding, and dehydrating silica or other rock, and when so labeled on the outside of each,






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

container of such material, or when so designated on the waybill accompanying bulk carload shipments of the material.
15. Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) when dried and baled. (See also item 7.)
16. Submerged aquatic plants, including Cryptocoryne spp.; Eelgrass or tape grass (Vallisneria spiralis) ; false loosestrife (Ludwigia minulcerttii) ; fish grass, Washington plant, or fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana); hornwort or coontail (Ceratophyllum demersunt) ; water milfoil (MyriophyllUumt spp.) ; water weed, ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Elodea canadensis).
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE NO. 48, U. 8.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

THIRD AssISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, March 30, 1938.
Referring to Quarantine Order No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, notice is given to postmasters in the regulated area in the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. that effective March 18, 1938, the following articles, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute a risk of Japanese beetle dissemination, are exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:
(Then follows the enumeration of the articles listed above.)
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, WIashington. January 10, 1938. Postmaster.
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of Plant Quarantine No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on account of the pink bollworm of cotton, and also a copy of revised regulation 3 in connection therewith, effective January 3, 1938, by which you will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
The revision extends the regulated area, adding the county of Santa Cruz and portions of the counties of I'ima and Pinal in Arizona to the area designated as lightly infested by the pink bollworm.
Very truly yours,
Roy '1. NORTH,.
Acting Third Assistant Postmaster General.


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
REVOCATION OF CERTAIN OREGON PLANT QUARANTINES
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER R GENERAL.
11ashj Igton. March 2, 19S.
Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 10 -A Series), pertaining to gladiolus thrips in other States and Oregon Plant Quarantine (No. 16-A Series), pertaining to holly scale in Oregon, have been revoked, effective at once.






4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE Van.-March

This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937, published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1937, and on -page 44 of the August 19,37 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the Oregon restrictions on the acceptance of parcels containing holly and gladiolus corms or cormels.
Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be governed accordingly.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT, RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT

MARCH 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF DRIED FRUITS RESTRICTED

According to Booklet No. 20 of July 1937, crop protection section, Ministry of Agriculture of Egypt, the import restrictions indicated in B. E. P. Q. 375
-are applicable to the following dried fruits as well as to the fresh fruits, therefore the words "(fresh or dried)" should be added to the following items:
Fruits, stone, including apricot, cherry, peach, plum (p. 8).
Grapes (Vitis spp.) (p. 9).
Leguminous fruits and seeds (p. 9).
"Nuts, green, including almonds" should read "Nuts, including almonds (fresh or dried)."
Correction: Item (b) of paragraph 1 of article 2 of law No. 1, of 1916 (p. 2 of Supplement No. 1, B. E. P. Q. 375), should read "kaki fruits or persimmons (Diospyros kaki)" instead of "cactus fruits."
LEE A. STRONG,
0iief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 381, revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES
JANUARY 14, 1938.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Presidency of Saint Christopher and Nevis has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that Presidency.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of foreign service information of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of ordinance No. 2 of May 11, 1923, and proclamation No. 12 of July 2, 1937, and reviewed by the agricultural superintendent of the said Presidency.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES (INCLUDING THE ISLAND OF ANGUILLA)
BASIC LEGISLATION
[Plant Protection Ordinance No. 2, May 11, 1923]

SEC. 5. (1) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, prohibit the importation into the Presidency of any plants, parts of plants, seeds, fruits,






193S] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5


soil, or any class of goods. packages, coverings. or other articles or things named and specified in such proclamation.
(2) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, order that the articles mentioned in the preceding paragraph shall not he imported into the Presidency except upon such conditions as may be specified in such proclama tion.
(3) Every plant, article, or thing named in any proclamation in force under this ordinance coming into the Presidency or any pairt thereof by sea may be deemed to have come from a place the introduction thereof from which is prohibited by this ordinance and may be treated accordingly, unless the importer satisties the treasurer. or the principal treasury or revenue officer at the port of arrival, of the contrary.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
[Proclamation No. 12. July 2. 19371
(a) Banana fruit (i usa spp.) : Importation prohibited from all countries and places except the United States of America and the other islands of the Colony of the Leeward Islands, to prevent the introduction of insect pests of the banana.
b ) Citrus fruits and plants or parts thereof : Importation prohibited from Cuba. Haiti, Jamaica, Santo Doimingo. and the Guited States, to prevent the introduction of citrus canker (Bactcriumi citri (iHasse) IoDidge) and insect pests.
(c) All other fruits except plautains, nuts. dried. canned, candied, or other preserved fruit: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, Venezuela, and- other countries and places except the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies,. and the United States. to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruittly (Ccratitis cupitata Wied.).
(d) Vegetables except onions, potatoes. canned or preserved vegetables front Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, and all other countries and places except the British Isles, Canada. British West Indies, and the United States. to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruittly (Ceratitis capituta Wied.).
The importation is also prohibited of the products named in items (c) to
(k) from Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo:
(e) Agricultural produce in bags.
( f) Cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, cottonseed meal, and other products of cottonseed, see(d cotton, cotton lint, cotton plants and any plarr thereof. and other ialvaceous plants and any part thereof.
(g) Fertilizers and stock feed containing cottonseed meal.
(h ) Second-hand bags and baling material.
(i) Packages and containers which contain or are reasonably suspected of having contained any of the articles specified in iten (f).
(j) Pillows and bedding material containing seed cotton, cotton lint, or any part of the cotton plant.
(k) Personal baggage and effects of any description which contain or are reasonably suspected of having contained any of the articles specified in item (f).
(1) Articles that have formed part of the cargo of a ship another part of the cargo of which is infested or is reasonably suspected of being infested by the cotton boll weevil (A nthw oinus grandis Bob.) : importation prohibited from all countries and places.
(In) Personal hugage and effects of any descriptionn that have bon in contact with or close proximity to any other baggage, car, or a articles of any description infested or reasonably suspected of being infested by the ot ton boll weevil : Importa tion prohibited from all counties anl plaes, to prevent the introduction of the colon boll weevil (Anthnmus g2rqndis !!nh.)
(n) Soil: Importatin rh11 ibite front lbliumus. ri ti.h Vuian, Tl'riidad, and all other countries and places except the British isles. Canada. the Tnited States of America, and other islands of the British West Indies not spelled in this item, to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases.

IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL
(a) Sugarcano. sugarcane seedlings and plants. and all paut< of the suarcane1: IayV be ill)orted from ay lly country in( l:ae only tialer a license






6 BUREAU OF E-NTOMOLOGY ANDXI PLANT QUARANTINE [JTan.-M8arch

granted by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases that do not already exist on the island.
(b) Banana plants and parts thereof : May be imported from any country and place only under a license granted by the Governor, to prevent the introduction of Panama wilt disease (Fusarivm. cutbevse E. F. Sm.) and insect pests.
(c) Cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton, and all packages, coverings, bags, and other articles and things that have been used as packages, coverings, or bags for cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton: May be imported from any country and place except Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo under license granted by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests not already established on the island.
(d) Sprouted coconuts: May be imported from Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Trinidad under license granted by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of the red ring disease (Aphelencho ides cocoph ilus (Cobb) Goodey).
(e) Soil and plants growing in soil: May be imported from any country or place only after fumigation and under license granted by the Governor, to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plaint diseases.
(f) Fruit except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other preserved fruits from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and United States of America: Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority in the country of export that the fruit does not originate in a prohibited country. Precautions against the introduction of the Mediterranean fruitify (C eratitis capitata Wied.).
(g) Vegetables except onions, potatoes, and canned or preserved vegetables from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and the United States: Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority in the country of export that the vegetables do not originate in a prohibited country.


B. E. P. Q. 391, revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

FIBRuARY 19, 1938.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Gold Coast Colony has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
-that country.
The present revision of the original summary of March 19, 1936. became neces-sary to embody the provisions of new legislation, namely, the Importation of Plants Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of March 28, 1936, and the Importation of Plants Regulations. No. 25 of May 6, 1936. This digest has been reviewed by the director of agriculture of the Gold Coast Colony.
The information herein contained is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is -not intended to be used independently of, nor As a substitute for, the original texts and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STEoNG,
Chief, Butreau of Entomology and Plant Quarantinec.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY
(Applicable also to British Togoland)

BAsic LEGISLATION
[Importation of Plant Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of 'March 28, 1936]

SECTION 1. This ordinance may be cited as the Importation of Plants Regulation Ordinance, 1936, and shall apply to the Gold Coast.
SEC. 2. Definitions.
"Plant" includes everything in the nature of a plant, and the fruit, leaves, cuttings, bark, or any part thereof whatsoever, living or dead, severed or attached, but does not include seed, unless specifically mentioned, nor manufac-






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

tured products of plants, nor anything.mentioned in this definition that has been cooked.
"Pest" means any insect or other invertebrate animal that may be injurious to agricultural or horticultural crops.
"Plant disease" means any disease caused by fungus, bacterium, virus, or other organism that may be injurious to agricultural or horticultural crops.
SEc. 4. Empowers the governor in council to make regulations for:
(a) Prohibiting, restricting, or regulating the importation into the Gold Coast of plants, seeds, soil, manure, containers, straw, and other packing material or any other similar goods or things.

REGULATIONS
(No. 25 of May 6, 1936)

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Importation of Plants Regulations, 1936.
PLANT INTERCHANGE SCHEDULE

ART. 2. (1) In these regulations "The Plant Interchange Schedule" means a list of West African countries in respect of which agreements have been made with the Government of the Gold Coast concerning the making and enforcement in such countries and the Gold Coast of regulations governing the interchange of plants and seeds of plants.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 3. No person shall import or cause to be imported into the Gold Coast any plant or seed except by mail or through the following ports of entry: Accra, Winneba, Cape Coast, Saltpond, Takoradi.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ART. 4. The following plants, produce, and seeds shall not be imported into the Gold Coast:
(a) All plants in soil or in any material of which soil forms a part.
(b) All plants from Central America, South America, and Trinidad. and other countries in which witches'-broom disease of cocoa (Marasni ius perviciosus) is known to occur, which are specified by the Governor by a notice in the Gazette, except plants required and imported by the Department of Agriculture for scientific purposes.
(c) All coconuts in husk from Central America, South America, Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent (West Indies).
(d) All coffee in cherry unless accompanied by a certificate of freedom from mealy pod disease issued by the Government agricultural authority of the country of export.
(e) All cottonseed except such as may be required and imported by the Department of Agriculture for scientific purposes.

PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO EXAMINATION

ART. 5. (1) Any plant or seed, except seeds, bulbs, tubers, or acorns of vegetables or ornamental plants from temperate count ries, or dry hulled rice, coffee, or pulses (legumes) for consumption, and any accompanying container brought to the Gold Coast by steamer, mail, or any other channel may, before being delivered to the consignee or addressee, be examined by a customs officer to determine whether the plant or seed appears to be one whose importation is forbidden or subject to precautions in accordance with these regulations.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED PLANTS

ART. 5 (3) Any plant or seed fond actually infected by any pest or plant disease shall, together with all other articles in the same receptacle, aniid all packing material, be destroyed by the inspector without (leliay, but if the inspector considers that such plants, seeds, etc., can be so t reIted as entirely to eradicate the pest or plant disease he may cause such treatment to be applied at the consignee's expense.






BUREAU OF, E NTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE tVan.-AMarcli

PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE IMPOCTATI0N 3F PLANTS AND SEEDS

ART. 6. Subject to the provisions of the regulations, the importation of plants and seeds of plants shall be governed by the following provisions:
(a) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule I, group A, namely, cocoa, cotton, cassava, oil palms, and all species of Mitsa and of Citrus shall be perniltted from, countries included in the plant interchange schedule only under permit signed by the director of agriculture first obtained, and in accordance with any special conditions which may be stated in such permit.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIED

(b) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule I, group A, namely, cocoa, cotton, cassava, oil palms, all species of Jfusa and Citrus and of schedule I, group B, namely, coconut, cola, coffee (except hulled and dried berries for cons umption), ground nuts (peanuts), yams, rice (except hulled rice for consumption), pulses (except dry shelled seeds for consumptionn. guinea corn (broomcorn), millets, maize, and rubber, from countries other than those of the plant interchange schedule, shall be permitted only under permit signed by the director of agriculture first obtained and in accordance with any special conditionsstated in the permit.
Such permit shall be granted for plants of cocoa. cotton, cassava, oil palms, and all species of Muisa and Citrus only when needed for special scientific purposes and when the director of ag riculture is satisfied that the plants will be. grown under the observation of a person with special knowledge of the pests and diseases of plants and under such conditions as should preclude any'possi-bility of the introduction of any dangerous pest or plant disease.
(c) Importations of plants and seeds of plants of group B, schedule I shall be permitted from countries included in the plant interchange schedule.
ART. 7. Applications for permits shall be made in writing to the director of agricdature in advance of the shipment in order that the conditions of entry may be ascertained and, where necessary, transmitted to the shipper.
ARTL. S. Pertains to the form in which permits are issued.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATES MAY BE PRESCRIBED

ART. 9. Health certificates required from Government agricultural authorities to accompany imports by any permit issued under these regulations shall so far as practicable be in the form set out hereafter, or in a form accepted by the director of agriculture as being substantially to the like effect.

Model certificate

This is to certify that the living plants or plant products ---------a representative sample of the living plants or plant products included in the consignment, of which particulars are given below were/was thoroughly examined on-------------------((late) by -------------------- (name) ------------ a duly authorized official of ---------------------------- and
found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect, pest, or disease (destructive to vegetation) (destructive to agricultural crops) having been found in/on then and that the consignment (including the packing) covered by this certificate has/has not been treated in ~the following manner (fumigated with (agent) or disinfected with (agent) prior/immediately subsequent to, inspection).
(Inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector) -7------------------(not inspected) -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
on (date) - - - -
Signature - - - -
Official title - - - -

Dcscriptli of S71ipiiicOt
Number and description of packages-------------------------------------Distinguishing marks --------------------------------------------------Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof -------Stated to be grown at--------------------------------------------------Exported by-----------------------------------------------------------Name and address of consignee-------------------------------------------





1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Name of vessel or particulars of route Date of shipment.........................
Port or place of entry
Additional certificate(s) attached
(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect of imports specifically scheduled by the importing country.)
NOTE.-Strike out the alternative words that are not applicable.

B. E. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

MARCH 8, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF SEEDS OF CONIFERS NOT PROHIBITED
According to the order of the direction-general of customs, No. 2505 2/2, of April 23, 1936, the Minister of Agriculture, in response to an inquiry concerning the applicability of the provisions of the decree of November 26, 1930 (p. 12, B. E. P. Q. 403) to seeds of conifers, decided that although the expression "parts of plants" of itself includes seeds, the seeds of the conifers in question remain exempt from phytosanitary inspection on importation, if the shipment is clean and the seeds have been sifted in such a manner that no foreign matter, particularly needles of conifers, are contained therein.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology anjd Phiat Quarantine.


B13. E. P. Q. 421, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF BULGARIA
MARCH 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS PLACED UNDER CONTROL
Article 4 of the decree of September 29, 1932 (B. E. P. Q. 421, p. 4) has been supplemented by decree No. 40 (Derzhaven Vestnik No. 232., October 20, 1937) by the addition of the following paragraph:
"All shipments containing oranges (Citrus aurantium--iC. si)ensis), mandarins (C. nobilis-=C. vobilis var. deliciosa),. lemons (C. medica var. limon unm C. limonia), grapefruit (C. dceumanv -C. paradisi),. bananas (Musa spp.), dates (Phoenix dactylifera), carobs or St. John's-bread (Ceratonia siliqua) pomegranates (Punica granatum) and other southern fruits, are permitted entry when the importer presents a certificate of health and of origin and when all the requirements of the regulation have been complied with."
LvE A. STRONG.
Chicf. Bureau of Entomiology and P!an t Quaran tine.


B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

JANUARY 18, 1938.

PASO DE LOS LiREs AN ADDITIONAL PORT OF ENTRY

Decree No. 116097 of October 20. 1937, designates Paso de los Libres as an additional port of entry for the introductioni of plants in general, subject to the provisions of decree No. 837:2 of June 3, ,1936. with the exception of sliga realie (art. 35, p. 10, B. E. P. Q. 426), cottonseed (art. 41, p. 13), potatoes (art. .51, p. 22), and grapevines (art. 60. p. 23).
Fresh fruits may enter that port only in transit to the Federal capital. Buenos Aires, where they will be entered at tihe Fed(erico Lacroze station subject to the regulations governing the importation of those products (see art. 37. p). 12).
71071-38-2






10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March


POTATOES MADE SUBJECT 'O MERCHANDISE MARKING Amr

Decree No. 116277 of October 9, 1937, effective January 1, 1938, places imported and domestic seed and consumption potatoes under the provisions of the Argentine Merchandise Marking Act (law No. 11275) and promulgates the following regulations governing the marking of potato containers.

POTATO CONTAINERS MUST MEET REQUIREMENTS OF LAW NO. 11275

ARTICLE 1. From January 1, 1938, all containers of potatoes must meet the requirements established by law No. 11275, the Merchandise Marking Act, its regulatory decrees of November 18, 1932, and November 26, 1935, respectively, and the provisions established by the present decree.

MARKING OF CONTAINERS

ART. 2. Potato containers must show whether potatoes for consumption or seed potatoes are concerned, the net weight of their contents, and bear the legend "Industria Argentina" (Argentine Industry) when they are domestic products, or the name of the country of origin if imported.
ART. 3. The containers of domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or as certified seed potatoes, must indicate the locality where grown, and the latter must also bear the name of the variety of the potatoes; with respect to imported seed potatoes, the indication of the place where grown will be substituted by the name of the variety to which the potatoes belong.

NET WEIGHT REQUIRED

ART. 4. The net weight of both domestic and imported potatoes must be marked on the containers in kilograms, a tolerance up to 2 percent being allowed between the weight marked on the containers and that due to the natural shrinkage of the product en route.

METHOD OF MARKING

ART. 5. All the legends and marks referred to in the preceding articles must be stamped, printed, or impressed clearly and legibly on the principal side of the container, namely, that bearing the name or mark of the grower or seller.

SIZE OF MARKS

ART. 6. The following scale of minimal heights is established to which the letters in the following expressions must conform: "Papa! para consumo" (potatoes for consumption), "Semilla certificada de papa" (certified seed potatoes), and "Peso neto" (net weight) ; 4 cm for boxes and 6 cm for bags; "Zona de produccion" (place where grown), and "Variedad" (variety) ; 3 cm for boxes and 5 cm for bags; "Industria Argentina" (Argentine Industry), and "Pais de origen" (country of origin) ; 2 cm for boxes and 4 cm for bags. The numerals indicating the quantity placed after "Peso neto" shall in no case be smaller than the letters of the words "Peso neto."

SIZE OF CONTAINERS FOR DOMESTIC POTATOES

ART. 7. Domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or planting, shall be packed in bags of 60 kilos net or in boxes of 50 kilos net; the latter shall have a partition in the middle.
ART. S. Imported certified seed potatoes will circulate in Argentina in the containers in which they were imported.

PROHIBITED MARKS
ART. 9. The use is prohibited on containers of potatoes for consumption of any label, ticket, or inscription employing the words "semilla" (seed), "certificada" (certified), "seleccionada" (selected), "hija de certificada" (products of certified material), "hija de importada" (products of imported material), or any other indication, whether or not derived from the above, that might lead to confusion as to the true condition or nature of the product.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

CORRECTION

The word "or" should be inserted between the words "*'net weight (metric)." and "number of units" in line 6 of the second paragraph under the caption "Packing of Fruit" on page 11 of B. E. P. Q. 426. Line 6 will then read: "contents, class, variety, net weight (metric) or number of units, name and."
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Pant Quarantitne.


B. E. P. Q. 428, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF CEYLON
JANUARY 14. 193S.
A regulation of February 27. 1937 (Ceylon Government Gazette, March 12. 1937). withdraws the itemn "inger" from article 4. paragraph (a) of the general regulations (see p. 3 of B. E. P1. Q. 428). Consequently. the word "ginger" should be stricken from the said paragraphs and also from the item "Living plants, trees. roots, bulbs or portions thereof under the caption "Importation Restricted" in the sununmmary onl page 1 of B. E. P. Q. 428.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 439, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF SWEDEN

AUGUST 18, 1937.
Through the courtesy of the Central Institute for Agricultural Research -of Sweden it is possible to make the following mnioditications in the text of circular B. E. P. Q. 439, necessitated chiefly by the lack of the original texts involved.
1. The words "Great Britain. Greece. and Portugal" in the first item of the summary, page 4 of B. E. P. Q. 4)9, are to be stricken out, because the provision in question no longer applies to those countries.
2. The following note applying to the "Restrictions on the Importation of Seeds," page 13 of B. E. P. Q. 439, should be added as a footnote:
"As a generally applicable rule it may be stated that a license from the Kungl. Lautbrukstyrelsen (Royal Department of Agriculture) is required for the importation of all seeds. except seeds of ornamental plants."
3. The item 90 F and 90 II of article 1. I)rocliamation of March 18. 1921, under the caption "Import Permits Required," on page 14 of B. E. P. Q. 439, should be corrected to read :
"90 F Rye grasses (Lolitm pcrenne and L. multifloru ) ;
90 H Turnips, carrots, swedes, and beets."
Item 90 I has been revoked and should be stricken out.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau( of Entomology and PlanIt Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JA.NU.\ARY 31, 1938.

RESTRICTION S ON TIiE IMPO.iTATION OF SFIn POTrAXTES
[Vizirial decree of September 25, 1935, promulgated October 1, 1933, as amended by that of May 27, 1)36]

PACKAGES TO BE SECUhELY FASTENEl) AND sEAltI)

ARTICLE 1. The importation into tlle Frewnch Zone of Moroncc of seed potatoes for sale or transfer is prohibited unless the tubers are cmun ailwd in a pakage






12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

that is completely closed by a sealed locking device and provided with a tag indicating in full:
1. The name and address of the seller.
2. The name of the variety of potatoes contained in the package.
3. A statement of the purity of the variety based on 100 tubers; the grading may not be less than 98 percent. The indication "selected" may be placed after the varietal name if the potatoes are accompanied by a certificate issued by a control station that supervised the growing crop.
4. The minimum weight of the tubers, which may not fall below 35 g.
5. The words "calibrated seed" or "seeds not calibrated" as the case may be. For so-called calibrated seed potatoes the variation in the weight of the tubers may not exceed 15 percent, and none of them may weigh less than 35 g.
6. The country of origin, with the name of the municipality and department where France is concerned and the name of the locality when other countries are concerned.
The above data must be repeated on all papers that concern the sale.
ART. 2. Forbids erroneous statements concerning the condition, origin, variety, and degree of purity of potatoes.

CATALOG NAME OF POTATO VARIETY TO BEL USED

ART. 3. The variety of seed potatoes is to be designated by the name under which they are borne in the catalog issued by the French Department of Agriculture or the central station of agronomic research. Each newly produced variety must be entered in one or both those catalogs before it can enter into traffic.
GENERAL IMPORT REGULATIONS REMAIN APPLICABLE

ART. 4. The foregoing regulations are without prejudice to those of the Dahir of September 20, 1927.
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

MARCH 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

The list of plant products named in the decree of the director general of February 19, 1931 (see p. 14, B. E. P. Q. 444), has been supplemented by the decree of May 5,, 1937.
The following items are added to the paragraphs correspondingly numbered on pages 15 and 16 of B. E. P. Q. 444:
1. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.). Broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.).
2. Chickpea or garbanzo (Cicer arietinum L.).
3. Cacao bean (Theobroma cacao L.).
5. Refuse (droppings) of roses (the flowers).
The following new paragraphs are added:
11. Sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.), and black cummin (Nigella sativa L.). Pistachio seeds (Pistachio vera L.), seeds of stone pine (Pinus pinea L.), shelled chestnuts (Castanca sativa Mill.), and shelled peanuts (Arachis 1iypogaea L.).
12. Plants and parts of plants, dried, so-called sterilized by heat or chemicals.
Paragraph 9, is amended to read as follows:
9. Industrially dried fruits and vegetables: flours, food pastes, brans, oil cakes, straw, and hay; excepting, however, rice straw, and such dried fruits as dried plums, figs, grapes, apricots, apples, pears, and peaches.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (SALVADOR) JANUARY 29, 1938.

PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT RAW OR GINNED COTTON

Legislative decree No. 208, published in the Diario Oficial of December 1, 1937, prohibits the importation of raw or ginned cotton into Salvador except under permit from the Ministry of Finance.
Permits for the importation of cotton will be issued only in the event that supplies of Salvadorean cotton are not available.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomiology a(nd Phtt Quaranti nc.

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (BRITISH HONDURAS)
MARCH 9, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 5, January 14, 1938, prohibits the importation into the colony, directly or indirectly, of any citrus fruit, seed, cutting, or plant, to prevent introduction of citrus canker (Bact rium citri (Hasse) Doidge).
The proclamation of March 11, 1936, which restricted the importation of citrus plants (see pp. 2 and 3 of B. E. P. Q. 443) was revoked by proclamation No. 5.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureaua of Entomiology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 447, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF YUGOSLAVIA
MARCH 8, 1938.

LIST OF COUNTRIES INFECTED OR INFESTED BY THE POTATO WART. COLORADO POTATO
BEETLE, POTATO TUBER WORM, AND SAN JOSE SCALE

Under date of February 21, 1938, the Royal Yugoslav legation in Washington transmitted a list, applicable for the year 1938, recently promulgated by the Yugoslav Ministry of Agriculture, of countries regarded as being infected or infested by potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticunm), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), potato tuber worm (Gnorintoschcma operculella), and San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus).
The list for 1938 adds the following names of countries to the list for 1937. (See B. E. P. Q. 447, p. 4) :
Under "Colorado potato beetle" Netherlands and Switzerland are added.
Under "Potato tuber worm" Sicily is added.
Correction in Supplement No. 2 to B. E. P. Q. 447:
Line 1 of paragraph 1, prohibiting the importation of seedlings of Douglas fir, should read:
"The Order of the Minister of Agriculture of Yugoslavia."
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomiolog!y and Plant Quarant tine.

B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA
JANUAIzY 29, 1938.
IMPORTATION PROJII;ITED

According to the Nachriehtenblatt filr den Deutschen Pflanze(nschut zdienst 18: 1, January 193S, the following plant pred(ucts are named inii a list of pIroutkis






14 BUREAU OF EN2\TOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

whose importatioll into Persia is prohibited during the administrative year 1316-1317 (June 22, 1037, to Jun-,e 22, 1938):
Castor beans as seeds (Ricinus sp.), grass seeds. sarcocolla seeds (Penaea f ca ta, L.), quince seeds (Cydon ia sp.), fodder, hay, alfalfa (fresh or dried), straw, potted flowers;
,Seeds of all kinds;
Plant food ~material, fruits, vegetables, and dried fruits.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 465, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONIES (OCEANIA)

FEBRUARY 19, 1938.
The order of the Governor, dated August 31, 1934, effective December 1, 1934, prohibits the importation into French -Oceania of fresh cabbage and cauliflower, in order to prevent the introduction of the common green cabbage worm (Ascia rapae L.) into that Colony. Any shipment of those products arriving in French Oceania will be destroyed.
[Superseding the Memorandum of November 26, 1934, to Inspectors in Charge]

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED INTO THE FRENCH SETTLEMENTS OF OCEANIA OF PLANTS,,
PARTS OF PLANTS, SEEDLINGS, SEEDS, FRUITS, AND PLANT PRODUCTS GENERALLY,
FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1 of a recent order, No. 1233, prohibits the importation of plants, parts of plants, seedlings, seeds, fruits, and plant products in general, as well ais their containers, proceeding from Samoa (eastern and western), the Tonga Archipelago, the Bismarck Archipelago, New Guinea, the Philippine Islands, Taiwan, Cuba, H1aiti, Sanl Domingo, and Puerto Rico, as a precaution against the introduction of coleQpterous parasites of the coconut palm especially Oryctes m-on oceros 01. (rhinoceros beetle).

IMPORTATION OF CRUDE FIBERS PROHIBITED

ART. 2. This prohibition applies also to copra and crude (raw) fibers, but not to parts of plants that have been subjected to any manufacturing process unless they are moist or rotten.

IMPORTATION OF SAND, SOIL, AND FERTILIZERS PROHIBITED

ART. 3. The importation of sand, soil, and fertilizers from the same sources, whether alone or accompanying other products, is also prohibited.
RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF OTHER PRODUCTS

ART. 5. Prescribes that general cargo, other than soils and plant products, laden at ports of the above-named countries, may not be unladen until an official certificate of the country of origin, affirming that the articles, packages, and materials constituting the cargo to be unladen were fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas for 1 hour immediately before the departure of the vessel, the dosage being a minimum of 50 grams of potassium cyanide per cubic meter of space, is presented to an inspector. Such articles shall not be landed until they have been inspected by an inspector, who may forbid the landing of such articles, or if permission be granted, only on condition of fumigation after unlading. No customs official shall permit the landing of such articles except onl the instructions of an inspector.
Personal effects, baggage, etc., also shall be inspected and, if deemed necessary, fumigated.
The following data should be inserted in B. E. P. Q. 465 as page 4 a:

GUJADELOUPE AND DEPENDENCIES

Banana plants (Musa spp.) : See order of December 7, 1926, as amended by that of February 9, 1935, p. 25.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

Cocoa plants (Thteobroma cacao L.): See order of December 3, 1925, as amended by that of February 13, 1932, p. 26.
Cotton (Gossypium spp.), plants or parts thereof in the dry or green state, ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost, packing or containers, and seeds, plants, etc., capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially Hibiscus cannabinus, H. esculentus, and Bauhiia: See order of February 22, 1926, p. 32.
Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), berries or seeds: See order of May 19, 1924, to prevent the introduction of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.), p. 20.
Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans, beans in parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, containers,. and plants capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer (Steph anoderes haipei Hag.), especially Hibiscus and Rubuts: See order of February 27, 1922, p. 28.
Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) : See order of December 3, 1929, p. 34.
Correction: Page 5, under the item "Cotton," the date of the order should be February 22, 1926.
Insert in "Contents" page after "Equatorial Africa" the item
"Guadeloupe --------------------- 4 a."
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 467.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA
JANUARY 14, 1938.
This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Australian Territory of Papua has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that Territory.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the Plants' Diseases Ordinance 1911, as amended, the Cotton Ordinance 1925, and proclamations and regulations promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the director of agriculture of Papua.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA
BASIC LEGISLATION

[Plants' Diseases Ordinance, No. 28, November 20, 1911. Plants' Diseases Ordinance, No.
17, November 25, 1913. Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925]

SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coffee seed (Coffea spp.) : Importation prohibited, except when obtained by or through the director of Agriculture. (Statutory Rules, No. 10, May 8, 1929, p. 7.)
Tobacco seed (Nicotiana tabacutm L.): Importation prohibited, except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. (Statutory Rule No. 4 of April 9, 1934.)
Bananas, banana plants (Mu.ta spp.) or parts thereof: Importation prohibited. (Proclamation of May 23, 1927, p. 8.)
Living palms, ornamentals, and fruit trees and any living part thereof except the seeds: Importation from the Malay Archipelago l)rohibited. (Proclaniation of February 8, 1932.)







16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants, including trees or plants, cuttings, slips, and all live parts of trees or plants the entry of which is not prohibited: Importer shall notify customs of intent to import; on arrival of the plants they shall be placed at disposal of customs for fumigation. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)
Cottonseed (Gossypium spp.) : Importer shall notify customs of intent to Import; he shall also furnish to customs a certificate from responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of Queensland that the cottonseed has been examined and fumigated by said Department, or that it has been examined and is found free from disease. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)
Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) : Importer shall notify customs of intent to import and shall produce to the director of agriculture the following certificates: (1) Fumigation certificate from Queensland Department of Agriculture; (2) certificate from properly qualified pathologist that the sugarcane proceeds from a disease-free area and is itself free from disease; (3) certificate from properly qualified entomologist that the sugarcane is free from injurious insects. (Statutory Rules, No. 11, July 21, 1930, p. 7.)

LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

Plants' Diseases Ordinance of 1911, as amended by ordinance No. 17, of November 26, 1913, authorizes the Lieutenant Governor of the Territory by proclamation, inter alia, to prohibit or restrict the importation of plants; to seize and dispose of every insect, fungus, tree, plant, or vegetable imported into the Territory contrary to the provisions of this ordinance or proclamations or regulations issued thereunder; to inspect imported trees, plants, or vegetables; to make regulations to control the importation of trees, plants, or vegetables.
The Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925, authorizes the Lieutenant Governor to regulate, prohibit, or restrict the importation into the Territory of the cotton plant or any variety thereof.
DEFINITIONS

The following definitions are included in ordinance No. 28, of November 20, 19,11:
"Disease": Any disease affecting trees, plants, or vegetables caused by or consisting of the presence of any insect or fungus, as well as any other disease affecting trees, plants, or vegetables which the Lieutenant Governor may from time to time, by proclamation in the Gazette, declare to be a disease within the meaning of this ordinance and whether or not so caused by or consisting of the presence of any disease or fungus.
"Insects" and "fungi" are those so declared by proclamation of the Lieutenant Governor in the Gazette within the meaning of this ordinance in whatever stage of existence they may be.

DECLARED DISEASES, INSECTS, AND FUNGI

Through the proclamation of January 26, 19,12, the Lieutenant Governor declared the following to be diseases, insects, and fungi within the meaning of ordinance No. 2.8, of November 20, 1911, namely:
DISEASES

Coconuts (Cocos nucifera L.) :
Leaf disease (Pestalozzia palm arum Cke.).
Root disease (Fomes sp.).
(Stein) bleeding disease (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Seyn.) v. Hoch.).
Bud rot (Phytophthora spp.) or (Pestalozzia palmarum Cke.).
Rubber (Hevea spp.) :
White root rot (Fomes lignosus Klotzsch).
Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.)
Leaf disease.
Red rust (Puccinia kuehnit (Kr.) Butl.).






1938]SERVICE: AND RtEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

I NSECT S
Coconuts:
Solomon Isliaud stag beetle ( Eitr~lracrih is ioi Waterhl..
Solomoni Island elephant beetle (A JV1otit N,, it imrodt Voet.=X. yid'oit L.).
Solomoni Island P-illocercs beetle (T'hopul ~u uluiJt.
Ceylon rhinoceros beetle (01-yecs r,'hiioccros L.).
Red beetle or Asiatic palmn weevil (RI' gu Hoph 0rtts feri'u ybn cus Guyv.).
Cane beetle ( SpliciiopliorusONI ui-R don(li C ob-cu ra Boisd. ).
Small palm weevil ((Ca1hudra ) Diocaiawdra taitcUiN~ Guerin)
Cabbage-palm beetle or leaf his,-pa I BroiitiN pa frogtly i Sharp).
Copra bug (N-ecrobio rufipe.s Degeeci'
Longicorns (a) Xixitita UN (ilati(. Montrouz.
Longicorns ( b) Olctliriu8 Iyl-auuU. Thoins.
Pliasiua or leaf insect ( Gracffo (-ro(j1iqii (Le Gillou) syn. Lopaphlus

Coccids (Coccidae).
Stinkbugs (Penlta tomidae).
Rubber:
White ants (Tcrnecs spp.). Sugarcane:
('ane b)eetle ( S'pI!Cic)iKio)I~. Rliabdoctinms obscutra Boisd.).
Leafhoppers (Pcrkivsc11a bicoiois Muir., P. lalolww'4.;s Muir., P. pa-pilusis
Muir., P. rtittlei Muir., P. vUJ'i' (ta Muir., tand P. vastatrix Breddin).

FUNGI

Coconut
Pcstalszzia palinariti Ceke., leaf disease and] bud rot of coconut.
Pyrh iuin jiabvi',rufl B-atler. Godatvari disettse of coconut.
Rubber:
Fomecs (sctifo~a ) ligqio.ax Klotz.sc,,li, root rot.
GENERAL REGULATION S
[Statutory Rules, Nc. 4 of 1923, February 28, 19231

CITATION

ARTICLE 1. These regulations mnay be cited as the Plants' (Imiportationi) Regulations, 1923.
DEFINITION S

ART. 2. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise Indicates:
"Importer" includes the iierson who iiitiroduce.s- any plant or the consignee of any plant.
"Planit.," means trees or' plhiits mand includes Cuttigs aInd slips of trees tand plants and all live part., of plants and trees.
ART. :3. Revokes previous regulation,,.

U)UTIL~S OF IMPORTER

ART. 4. (1) The inilporter 01r intcndli~g importer of ainy ph-i ts shall, before the plants are introdluced o1r hindedl in the Territory, notify the principal offiier of customs at a port (if entry of the fadic that suceh plaInts are inltendled to be inltrodulced( into the Trri1itory~ byv him.
(2) The impjorter shall thereafter cause the plants and thle boxes, bags, ald wrappings in which they are contained to be placeed in the tent provided foir the purpose of fuig-attion. or to such other structure as, the pricipal officer of customs may direct and inl such manner as such officer shall a pprove.

FUMIGATION OF PLANTS REQUIRED

ART. 5. Such plants, together withI boxes', bags. and1 wraippings ill which they are contained, shall then be fiuiigtted biy the me! hod provided by the diretor
71071-38--3






18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

of agriculture, under the supervision of the principal officer of customs or such officer as he may appoint, before the same are removed.
PLA'7','TS MAY NOT BE REMOVED BEFORE FUNUGATION
ART. 6. No person shall remove the plants, boxes, bags, or wrappings in which they are contained from the tent or structure in which they have been so placed for the purpose of fumigation, until after they have been fumigated, as provided by these regulations.
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTONSEED

ART. 7. No cottonseed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory unless:
(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the cottonseed is introduced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a port of entry of the fact that such cottonseed is intended to be introduced into the Territory by him.
(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes such principal officer of customs with a certificate from some responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Queensland:
(a) That the cottonseed has been examined and fumigated by expert officers of the department of agriculture concerned, or
(b) That the cottonseed has been examined by expert officers of the department of agriculture concerned and that it is free from disease.
Provided, that in cases where cottonseed is imported by and consigned to theGovernment, the director of agriculture, on being satisfied in such manner as seems to him sufficient that the cottonseed has been properly fumigated in Queensland before shipment, or that it is free from disease, may, in writing, authorize the principal officer of customs to permit the landing and delivery of the cottonseed without requiring the production of any such certificate.

RESTRICTIONS. ON IMPORTATION OF COFFEE SEED

ART. 7a. No coffee seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Any coffee Seed imported or introduced in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed by any officer of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 10, May 8, 1929.)
RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF SUGARCANE
ART. 7b. No sugarcane shall be imported or introduced into the Territory unless:
(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the sugarcane is introduced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a port of entry of the fact that such sugarcane is intended to be introduced into the Territory by him; and
(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes the director of agriculture with the following certificates:
(a) A certificate from a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the State of Queensland that the sugarcane has been properly fumigated under the personal supervision of a person properly qualified to carry out such fumgation; and
(b) A certificate from a properly qualified plant pathologist that the sugarcane is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, from a disease-free area and free from diseases; and
(c) A certificate from a properly qualified entomologist that thesugareane is free from injurious insects.
(3) The director of agriculture is satisfied with the certificates so furnished, whereupon the said director of agriculture may authorize the said principal officer of customs by wireless or in writing to permit the introduction into the Territory of the said sugarcane without observing the other conditions of these regulations. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 11, July 21, 1930.)

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPOWrATION OF TOBACCO, SEED

ART. 7c. No tobacco seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory', except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Tobacco seed






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19


imported in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed by any officer of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rule No. 4 of 1934.)

IMPORTATION OF ]BANANAS PROHIBITED
[Proclamation of May 23, 1927]

In this proclamation, the lieutenant governor, by and with the advice of the executive council,, prohibits the importation or introduction of any banana, banana plant (Musa spp.) or part thereof into the Territory.

B. E. P. Q. 468.
PLANT-QUARAN TINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

JANUARY 20, 1938.
This digest of the plan t-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of Iraq has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-qua ran tine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his translations of the Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1923, and c-ustoms law No. 56, May 7, 1931, and reviewed by the director of agriculture, Department of Agricultural Affairs, Baghdad, Iraq.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.
LEE A. STRONG,
CThief, Bureaa of Entom-ology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Importation of plants law, January 7, 1925. Customs code law, No. 56, of May 7. 1931]

Through the customs code law No. 56, of May 7, 1931, the King, of Iraq decrees (ch. 111, art. 13) that provisions may at any time be promulg,'ated whereby, for the public safety or for sanitary or moral reasons, or as preventive measures against animal and plant diseases, the importation, exportation, or transit of certain kinds of merercidise into or froml Iraq, or to a particular country or place outsidIe tile boundaries of Iraq, are restricted or prohibited.

SUM-MARY
IMPORTATION PROHIB ITED

Hemp seeds and plants (Carcrab.s satiUa L.. (Customs tariff law No. 11, April 29, 1933, art. 11, p. 5.)
Injurious insect pests and diseases. (Appendix to importation of plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

I MPORTAT ION R LSI RI CTED

Citrus fruits and stocks, grapes, andl grapevines: Must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate of the competent an thority of the country of origin. (Customs tariff law No. 11, April 29. 1933, art. 5, p. 5.)
Plants with woody stems, parts thereof, also bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers, except potatoes ; cot tonseedl and seed] cotton: ;Subject to inspect ion on arrival, but inspection may be waived if they are accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued-. by competent autbority oif the exporting country. (Arts. 3, 4, and 5, importation of lantq law of January 7, 1925, 1). 2.)






20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

Plants for scientific purposes: Unrestricted except that an import permit must be obtained from the director of agriculture. (Art. 12, importation of plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

EXPORTATION PROHIBITED

Palm tree shoots: Exportation from Iraq prohibited. (Law No. 1, February 11, 1935, p. 6.)
GENERAL REGULATIONS
(Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1925)

ARTICLE 1. This law may be cited as "The Importation of Plants Law, 1924."

DEFINITION

ART. 2. "Plant" means all plants with woody stems and all parts thereof, such as stocks, nursery plants, scions, layers, and cuttings thereof; cottonseed and seed cotton; bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers, except potatoes.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ART. 3. All plants imported into Iraq by mail or otherwise will be held for inspection by a Government inspector, as prescribed in article 5.

INFECTED PLANTS DISINFECTED OR DESTROYED

ART. 4. Should it be found that plants are attacked by any of the diseases named in the appendix hereto, or should a portion of the plants concerned be so attacked, the Government inspector may order their disinfection or destruction.

INSPECTION MAY BE WAIVED IF PLANTS ACCOMPANIED BY CERTIFICATES

ART. 5. The Government inspector may, in his discretion, pass without inspection any plants or consignments of plants which are accompanied by a certificate of a competent branch of the agricultural institute of the exporting country, affirming that they are free from the diseases named in the appendix.
ART. 6. All expenses involved in inspection, detention, disinfection, or destruction of plants shall be borne by the importer.
ART. 7. Provides for the inspection of plants for export.
ART. 8. Relates to fees for inspection, etc.
ART. 9. Provides for the promulgation or modification of administrative decrees.
ART. 10. The Minister of the Interior may order the destruction by burning of all plants in which epidemic diseases are found.
ART. 11. Relates to violations and penalties.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES NOT RESTRICTED

ART. 12. No provision of this law is applicable to plants imported for scientific research on the basis of a separate (special) permit of the director of agriculture. In this permit it will be expressly stated the plants shall not be inspected.

APPENDIX

Inspect pests:
Avtlon oius grandis Bob., boll weevil.
(Aspidiot is) Chrysomph alus aurantii, Mask., California red scale.
Aspidiotus p ,rniciosus Comst., San Jose scale.
Ceratitis capitata Wied., Mediterranean fruitfly.
C71ionaspis fwrfura Fitch, scurfy scale.
Conotrachelus nenuphar Hbst., plum curculio.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21


(Co, mopliila) A)ioi08 cro-l Him., okra, niallow, or cotton leaf caterpillar or cotton seniiloolwr.
Craponius ijw((juali. Say. grape curetilio.
Drow-phihi iiclavotia4cr -.Nlg.
Eai-ia ; fabia Stoll., cotton bollworm.
(Ellproctis ph (f, orrh c(-(t Don., brown-tail
(Gelc(Itia) Pectiiiopliora llfi Saund.. pink bollworm.
Heliotiiix ob. olcta Fab., bollworm, ( orn Ozir lWorni.
le(w!fa purchase Ma.sk., eottony-cushion scale.
Lcpido. applies uhiti L., oystorshell soi7o.
(LcucaW.a) ( 'irpltis wli-woota ff;cx., ariiivworm.
Ma lac(--mwita awici-ica)ia FzJi.. tt,, j,,t o;i-orpillar.
(Mayetiola) Phytopliaga dc-itructor Say, hessian fly.
Phylloxcra tra,,4atrix) ritifol;,w Fitcii, grape phylloxera.
Polychrosi-i rllcawi ('1eni.. grapt, berry inot.h.
Portlictria (7;. pa)- L.. ;%ypsy 111,411.
PsYllia, mali Schmid., apple sticker.
(Schizoiwura) Eriosowa Hausin., woolly apple aphid.
sylepta (1c)-orlatta nil).
Aphids. seale insects, and mites in general. Fu)?gous discases:
Tho ;(, cau-sed by any species of the following genera:
Ei-!j.0phc. powdery inildew.
Exoa. (ws, leaf curls.
Gloco. porhiw, zinthraciioses.
Gulq)tardia. rots.
'Ycctria (ditixxiwa) fla7li.(Poo Bres., ()f apple.
Pcrollo. pora, dowily nlil(lcws.
Pla"11101)(ow, downy 11111dew's.
Ploirrl'ybtia, black knot.
Pitocinia, rmsts.
Tillctia. sinus.
L-Stilaflo. smut's.
Ventitria. including apple and pear cab.

ADDiTioNAL IMI"ORT Ri--s'rRICTIONS AND PROMPITIONS

(Customs tariff law.N'o. 11, of April 29, 1933, abstracted)
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS; STOCK.- Pl'-' TRICTLD

ART. 71. The im1wrtation is ()f eitr-: fruil< '11A :11011
lemolls. pollielos. and Wher citrus fimit-, (Is veli 'nljws' "n1p."I"le
leaves. ,in(] stocks. ii-zilos-z those ore !,.,- ;I (vr1ifi(-i1T'c ;;f 1!"o
competent ,iuthoritits of the (--oiintr v )f origin, ;iffiriniu,-, r'I'lot t1w <;i (! had been '11](1 folind froo from diset- e. Tbi.s prohibiiiwi dm- not
appIv to such frilits if pre,,;vrved. c;i,-died. or (Iried. or to tlieir juice.

IMPORTATION OF 11KNIP PROHIBITFI)

ART. 11. The iml)ortation of lienip ,- eeds and plants Waiwab( ,s- ,odira, L.)
1.9 prohibited.

INSPECTION (YN AIMIVAL

ART. 19. The impirtotion ()f litiniely,
mid p irf.s thereof. sm-h :), Teins. stocks, scion -, ],,ivors, ind seed cotlml :111(l jh)vvor h'ilhs. t-orills, rhiz(1111(1s. ;111(1 tldwrs W her
th"111 lJot-'Itoes, ls si'lljorl I0 111Y '11'--ri('[;1t111A If I colit'l-iolls is f0mid. ihe Irf( ct(,d t will bc (!i (](- trop d. TheY cmi ho ele:lrod thl-w1uh Th1w I)IJ11v on pn-olitat-ion of
a -11o ()bjectioll" certifi(-'tte is"ned by Ow
pl"111t- 111av he i1111wrte(I ff r '-Zrielltific "'orm it fl-11111 the ]):,\I-4011 of A(fr:
g 1('1111111'e, Id the ".11m vi, 1H,
im ported oid iii w(-w-dance \vitit t1w provis'.,)ii- ()f tl ,- t 40'ilill I -(I, of 1927.







22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

EXPORTATION otF PALM TREE SHOOTS PROHIBITED
(Law No. 1, February 11, 1935)

ARTICLE 1. The exportation of palm tree shoots from Iraq shall be prohibited.
ART. 2. Penalty for violation.

B. E. P. Q. 469, Superseding P. Q. C. A. 289.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY

FEBRUARY .5, 19348.
This revised digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of Italy was rendered necessary by the abrogation of older legislation and its supersession by more recent enactments. It was prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country, by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of the various Italian laws and decrees concerned, and reviewed by the Italian Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The said laws and decrees should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomtology and Plant Quaratntine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY

BASIc LEGISLATION
[Law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, as amended by decree law No. 913, June 23, 1932, and decree law No. 1530 of June 12, 1936. International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3. 1881, and provisions adopted by the Italian Government]
[Powers under law No. 987 of June 18, 1931]

ART. 8. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (Ministero dell'Agricoltura e delle foreste), with the advice of the Ministry of Corporations (Ministero, delle corporazioni), can by decree:
(a) Suspend the importation into, and transit through, the Kingdom of plants, parts of plants, and seeds found to be infected.
(b) Establish frontier stations and ports through which the importation and transit of plants, parts of plants, and plant products may take place.
(c) Promulgate rules and regulations to be observed for the importation of the products referred to in the preceding paragraph.
ART. 9. Delegates of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry assigned for supervisory service at frontier stations and ports, according to the rules promulgated by the said Ministry, have the following functions:
(a) To impose the disinfection or destruction of plants, parts of plants, and seeds regarded as infected, as well as of materials, packing, containers, and such other articles as may serve as vehicles of infection.
(b) To prohibit the introduction into the Kingdom, and transit through it, of plants and seeds found infestel1 or bearing pathogenic organisms or parasites.
The provisions of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931. as amended, are administered under regulations promulgated under deec,,ec law' No. 9,13 of June 23, 1932, and law No. 1933 of December 2.-2, 1932.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION AND TRANSiT' PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES

Almonds in the shell (Am ygdalus cornin u'is L.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (i), p. 7.)
1Banana plants and fruits (Musa spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (g)-, p. 7.)






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

Cactus plants and fruits (Cactaceae). (AIMiisteriat order of December 20, 1932, p. 11.)
Citrus fruits and parts thereof, including fresh peel. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (d), p. 6.) (See items 3 and 4 of derogations f rom the decree of March 3, 1927, for exceptions; p. 8.)
Coniferous plants and parts of plants, including the genera Abies, Piceet, Pijus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga. (Ministerial order of December 20, 1932, p. 11.)
Elm plants and parts thereof (Ulmus spp.), except the seeds. (Ministerial decree of March 29, 1933, p. 12.)
Fermented grape marc, olive husks (Olea europaea L.) for the extraction of oil, mulberry leaves (Moru8 spp.). (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881.)
Palm and laurel leaves, fresh. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (j), p. 7.)
Pineapple plants and fruits (Anna~s sativus Schult.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (h), p. 7.)
Potatoes (Solarum tuberosum L.), including tubers and green parts; tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) and other Solana cea e, including fruits and green parts. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (e), p. 6.) (For exceptions see dere gations from the decree of March 3, 1927, p. 8.)
Vegetable manures and composts. (International Phylloxera (_ onvention of Berne and provisions adopted by the Italian Government.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM CANADA, FRANCE, SPAIN, AND THE UNITED STATES

Grapevines (Vitis spp.), European and American, incl ioing scions alnd cuttings. (Decree of March 3. 1927, art. 8 (a), p. 6.) Used props mid supports for grapevines. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne. November 3 1S'1

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM AFRICA

Corn (Zea mays L.), stalks and ears. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (f), p. 7.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM ARGENTINA, AUSTRALIA, BRAZIL, CANADA,
CHILE, CHINA, HAWAII, INDIA, JAPAN, MEXICO, SOUTH AFRICA, AND THE UNITED
STATES

Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of any kind. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (c), p. 6.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA, CHINA, AND THE ORIENT IN GENERAL

Chestnut (Castanea spp.), including trees, fruits, seeds, bark, branches, and trunks with bark. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (b), p. 6.) : Importation and transit prohibited also from countries that have not taken precautionary measures against chestnut-bark disease.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
Live plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other products intended for cultivation or propagation, not specifically mentioned in the prohibitions, and proceeding from permitted countries of origin: Importation subject to compliance with the effective provisions of the law of June 18, 1931, articles 8 and 9, and the decree of March 3, 1927, articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, and 12.
Seeds of forage-crop plants (legumes and grasses) : Importation subject to ifispection for dodder (Cuscuta spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, article 7, p 5.) The port of Ancona also is authorized for the importation of such seeds. The port of Messina also is opened for the entry of vegetable seeds. (Circular No. 44609, December 21, 1932.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRTh(-r,'D
Plant products intended for food and industrial purposes, not included among those indicated in article 8 of the decree of March 3, 1927, may be admitted through any customs port of entry.







24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
[Ministerial decree of March 3, 1927 (Gazetta Ufficiale No. 73, March 29, 1927), as.
amended by that of July 18, 1928 (Gaz. Uff. No. 191, August 17, 1928)]

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

AR TICLE 1. The importation of living plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other p!lnt products, from foreign countries, intended for breeding and propagation, may be effected through the following customs ports of entry: Brinqksi, Cagliari, Catania, Fiume, Genoa, Livorno, Milan, Naples, Palermo, Rome, Syracuse, Taranto, Trieste, Turin, Udine, Venice, Ventimiglia, and Verona.
The entry of forage-crop and grass seeds is authorized also through the port. of Ancona and the entry of vegetable seeds also through the port of Messina.
ART. 2. Packages containing the said plants must be refused entry when presented at other customs offices. However, such packages may be reshipped to the nearest customs office among those above named, when the interested person requests the customs authorities to do so and offers to pay the cost of reshipment.
If the railroad station of destination is situated between the frontier station and the place where one of the offices named in article 1 is located, or if it issituated on a railroad diverging from the normal itinerary which the shipment should follow to reach the customs office authorized for importation, the frontier customs office at which the shipment was presented is authorized, at the request of the interested person, to hold the shipment, fully informing the competent regional pathological laboratory. The latter will carry out the prescribed inspection in the manner and place deemed most convenient, at the expense of the interested person.
INSPECTION REQUIRED

ART. 3. Shipments of the plant material referred to in article 1 are admitted for importation after inspection by a phytopathologist designated by the Ministry of National Economy at the authorized customs office, in accordance with the provisions of articles 8 and 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931.
ART. 4. When a shipment is admitted for importation, the precautionarymeasures prescribed by article 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, and article 23 of the regulations under that law are to be applied by the designated phytopathologist at the expense of the interested person.
ARTS. 5 and 6. Revoked by the decree of July 18, 1928.

FORAGE-PLANT SEEDS MUST BE FREE FROM DODDER

ART. 7. Seeds of forage-crop plants are admitted for importation when the absence of any species of Cuscuta has been ascertained. That is accomplished by the phytopathological inspector, or by an authorized seed control laboratory from samples withdrawn by that inspector.

IMPORTATION AND, TRANSIT PROHIBITED

ART. 8. The importation and transit of the following plants and parts thereof are suspended:
(a) European and American grapevine (Vitis spp.) stocks and cuttings from Canada, France, Spain, and the United States, on account of the black rot, Guignardia bidwellii (Ell.) Viala aind Ravaz, the regulations against phylloxera remaining effective. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne.)
(b) Chestnut trees (Castanea spp.), including the fruits, seeds, bark, branches and trunks with bark, from North America, South America, China, and the Orient in general, as well as from any country which has not taken precautionary measures against the chestnut bark disease, Evndothia parasitica (Murr.) Ander. and Ander.
(c) Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of all kinds from Argentina. Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii, India, Japan, Mexico, Union of South Africa, and the United States, on account of the San Josescale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.; the oriental fruit moth (Laspeyresia), Grapholitha molesta Busck; foreign fruitflies; and the fungus Diaporth? perniciosa Marchal.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

(d) Citrus plants, parts thereof, fresh citrus fruits and peel (cortex) of such fruits, from all foreign countries, on account of Glover's scale. Lepidosaphes gloveri Pack.; the citrus whitefly (Alcyrodes) Dialeurodes citri Ashm. ; citrus canker, Bacterium citri Hasse; the pink disease, Corticium sahlmonicolor B. & Br.; Sphaeropsis tunifaciens Hedges; and lime withertip, Glocosporiumi limetticolunt R. F. Clausen.
(e) Potato tubers, fruit, and green parts of every species of the Solanaceae (tomatoes (Lycopersicumnt spp.), eggplants (Solan umn melongqcau L.), peppers (Capsicum spp.) ) from all foreign countries, on account of the potato wart disease (Synchytriumnt endobioti,(an (Schilb.) Pere.) ; potato tuber worm (Phthorimaca) Gnorimoschcma operculclla Zell.) : tie Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decenmlincata Say) ; and the potato flea beetle (Epitrix cucumcris Harr.).
(f) Stems and ears of corn (Zea nays) from every country in Africa, on account of the maize stalk borer (Acsait ia calamistis Hmps.).
(g) Banana plants and fruits (IMusa spp.), on account of Comstock's mealybug (Pseudococcus co)nstocki Kuwana) ; the Argentine ant (Iridomyrmex humnilis Mayr) ; black rot of sugarcane (Th icla riopsis paradoxa (De Sey.) V. Hoch.) ; and the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sin.).
(h) Pineapple plants and fruits (Ananas satirvu Schult), on account of the danger of introducing with them injurious foreign scale insects, as well as black rot of sugarcane (Thielariopsis patradoxa (De Sey) V. Hoch.); and the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubcnse E. F. Sin.).
(i) Almonds (Amygdalus conminunis L.) in the shell, on account of Eurytoma amygdala End. of the almond, and shot hole and fruit spot of Prunus, Ascochlyta chlorospora Speg.
(j) Fresh palm and laurel leaves, on account of the danger of introducing injurious foreign scale insects not at present existing in Italy.

REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO PLANT MATERIAL INTRODUCED BY TRAVELERS

ART. 9. The provisions of the preceding articles apply also to plants, parts of plants, and seeds intended for breeding, and to other plant products brought in by travelers from foreign countries.
ART. 10. The unlading on free points, from vessels arriving in ports of the Kingdom, of plants. parts of plants, and plant products the imp6otation and transit of which is suspended, is prohibited.
ART. 11. The preceding provisions are not applicable to importations made by the Ministry of National Economy.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED OF PLANT PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR FOOD AND INDUSTRIAL PURPOSES

ART. 12. Plant products intended for food and for industrial purposes, not included among those indicated in article S, are admitted for importation through any customs port of entry, the provisions of article 9 of law 987 of June 1, 1931, remaining effective. (See p. 5.)
ART. 13. This decree becomes effective May 1, 1927, and( revokes those of February 21, 1921, and August 4, 1921.

DEROGATIONxS FLot THE D ) 0? I MAi 3, 1927

POTATOES

1. Order No. 45012, October 18, 1927, provides for the transit solely throu4.h the port of Trieste and further shipment by sea of potatoes proceeding by land from Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Yugosllvini.
2. Order No. 7910. February 27, 1925, provides for the transit of potatoes from Malta through the territory of Italy.

CITRUS FRUITS

3. Orders No. 506. January 26,d. 1928. and No. 449. (Oc'tober 18, 1927. pI)'rovi4le that the transit of citrus fruits proceeding by sea from Palestine or the Aegean Islands may be effected only through the ports (of Trieste and Fiune,






26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT, QUARANTINE [Jan.-Marchi

4. Order No. 35166, July 18, 1928, provides for the transit of citrus fruits originating in other sources than Palestine and the Aegean Islands, solely through the ports of Genoa and Trieste.

PHYLLOXERaA RESTRICTIONS

Packages containing plants and plant products whose importation is authorized, are adm--itted to entry into the Kingdom on condition that they are free f rom animal or plant parasites and that they contain neither fragments nor leaves of the grapevine.

SHIPPER'IS DECLARATION AND PHYLLOXERA CERTIFICATE REQUIRE

If such packages proceed from foreign countries that have not adhered to the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, they must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and an attestation by competent authority. The first shall (a) declare that the contents of the shipment proceed exclusively from his establishment; (b) indicate the place of destination and the address of the consignee; (c) affirm that no grapevine stocks are included in the shipment;
(d) indicate whether the shipment contains plants with particles of soil; (e) bear the signature of the shipper.
The attestation of the authority of the country of origin shall be issued on the declaration of an official expert designated for research and supervision of phylloxera, and shall bear the following data: (a) That the plants proceed from ground at least 20 meters distant from any grapevine stock or otherobstacle, deemed by the said authority to be sufficient, to the propagation (spread) of the roots; (b) that the said ground contains no grapevine stocks;
(c) that no such plants are stored there; (d) that if phylloxerated grapevines bad been found there, their radical extirpation had been effected, by an insecticide, or other means, during a period of 3. years, with appropriate research to insure the complete destruction of insects and roots. The above attestation- (for countries that adhere to the Phylloxera Convention) is not necessary with respect to shipments of plants proceeding from an establishment registered in the list of establishments officially declared in accordance with the provisions of the International Convention of Berne.
The expenses involved in the inspection and storage are charged against the interested persons.
POTATO RESTRICTIOS,

The ministerial decree of March 3, 1927, article 8, (e), prohibiting the importation of potatoes from any source, remains effective, but by derogation from that decree, the importation of seed potatoes is permitted under prescribed conditions promulgated annually by ministerial decree.
That decree will prescribe the period of the year concerned during which seed potatoes may be imported, the variety and quantity, and the conditions under which they may be imported.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUTID

An import permit must first be obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.
FREEDOM OF ORIGIN FROM POTATO' PARASITES

The seed potatoes to be imported must originate in localities free from the following parasites: Leptinotarsa decemlineala Say (Colorado potato, beetle), Synchiytriurn endolioticum (Schilb.) Perc. (potato wart), Gnorimoschema opercuielia Zell. (potato tuber wormi), Heteroder~a rostochiensis (potato nematode (eelworm) ), and Epitrix cucurneris Harr. (potato flea beetle).
The potatoes must be taken from fields under the technical supervision of a Government institution of the exporting country, especially with reference to so-called virus diseases.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

The sacks in which the potatoes are shipped must be sealed by the plantprotection authorities of the country of origin and be accompanied by a phyto-






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

sanitary certificate indicating origin and affirming that the fields in which the potatoes were grown are free from the above-named parasites; that within a radius of 200 km of the place vIwhere the potatoes were grown the Colorado potato beetle has not been found, and that the presence of the other parasites has not been determined within a radius of 2 kin; that the potatoes are shipped in new containers; that each container was personally sealed by the inspector with the official seal of the plant-ilispetion service; and that the potatoes are free from earth. It must also be certified that the plants from which tile potatoes were harvested showed no visible symptoms of virus diseases.
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
The authorized ports of entry for seed potatoes during the prescribed period are Bari, Brindisi. Cagliari. Catania, (hiasso, Domiodossola, Fortezza (K.ausen) Genoa, Modane, Naples, Trieste, and Udine.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF CACTUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial order of December 20, 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy are I)rohibited of cactus plants and fruits proceeding from any country, onl account of the danger of introducing insects, fungi, or bacteria that are injurious to the pricklypear (Opuntia ficus-indica).

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS OF ABI.ES, PICEA. PINUS, PSEUD(YrsuGA, AND TSUGA PROHIBITED
[Ministerial order of December 20. 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into Italy of plants, and parts thereof, of conifers of the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudoitsuga, and TIsuga is prohibited.
The importation of plants, and parts thereof, belonging to other species of conifers is permitted oil condition that they are accompanied by a certificate, issued by the plant-protection service of the country of origin, in Italian or French, affirming that the plants or parts of plants included in the shipment are free from injurious pests and diseases and especially from Rhabdoclinc pseudotsugae.
The same certificate must also indicate the origin of the products ad the species of the products included in the shipment, as well as data necessary for the identification of the shipment.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF ELMS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial decree of March 29, 1933; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 104, May 4, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy from all foreign countries of plants and parts of plants of the genus Ulmus, except the seed. are prohibited on account of the danger of introducing foreign scale insects (Coccidae) which are very injurious to Italian fruit culture.


B. E. P. Q. 470, Superseding the Memorandum to Inspectors in Charge, dated August 22, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN
FEBRUARY 5, 1938.
This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Japan has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant l)roducts to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge, foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the Japanese regulations promulgated by ordnance No. 27 of October 13, 1914, as amended, under the authority of law No. 11 of March 25, 1914, and reviewed by the director of the Imperial Plant Quarantine Service, Yokohama.
The information included in this circular is believed to be correct anId coinmplete up to the time of preparation, but is not intended to be used inde-






28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The original ordnance should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Cliief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN
BASIC LEGISLATION-\
[Plant Quarantine Law No. 11, of M-arch 25, 1914]
This law prescribes the inspection of plants and packing materials thereof offered for export from or importation into Japan, but provides for the omission of inspection in certain cases. Plant diseases and injurious insects may be imported only with the permission of the respective Minister of State.
The law also provides for the disposal of plants infested by injurious insects or infected by plant diseases, and for the restriction or prohibition of entry of' certain plants or any other article.
DEFINITION

Article 10 of the law defines "plant diseases and injurious insects" as fungi and insects, respectively, that are injurious to plants. However, plants or animals which are not fungi or insects may be considered as plant diseases or injurious insects insofar as the application of this law is concerned, if the, Minister of State in charge of such affairs has reason to believe that they are actually injurious to plants or are suspected of being so.
GENERAL REGULATIONS UiNE THE PLANT QUARANTINE LAW
[Departmcent ordinance No. 27 of October 13. 1914. as amended by ordinance No. 24 of
June 1919; No. 21 of October 1933:. No. 23 of August 1934; No. 28 of October 1936,
and No. 14 of May 1937]
PLANTS THAT ARE TO BE IN1 SPECTED IN JAPAN
ARTICLE 1. Plants whose inspection is required in accordance with the provision of article 1 of the plant quarantine law shall be of the following classes:1. Plants to be imported from a foreign country or to be transported from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, under the following categories.
(a) Plants or any of their parts, seeds, and bulbs for planting. or cultivation; (b) Fresh fruits except those of pineapple (Anavas sativus L.), apples originating in Chosen (Korea), and the fruits of plants belonging tILo the families: Musaceae, Solanaceae, Leguminosae, Fagaceae, and Cucurbitaceae (except watermelons, Citrullus vulgaris. melons and muskmelons, Cucumis melo)
(c) Living potato tubers (Solavum tuberosum L.) ;
(d) Plant or plant material that is permitted by the Minister of Agriculture to be imported, which otherwise is prohibited;
(e) Any plant or plant material besides those mentioned in (a) to (d), that is suspected by plant inspection officials of being infested by plant diseases or injurious insects.
2. Plants to be exported, the importation of which the government of the importing country requires inspection certificates issued by the exporting country.
ART. 2. (a) Any person importing plants mentioned in paragraph 1 (a) to (c) of article 1 from a foreign country, or transporting the same from other parts, of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, shall, without delay, upon the arrival of the vessel carrying same on board, make application in writing to the customhouse on the prescribed form No. 1.
If the plants are being carried by a passenger, the person concerned may make a verbal application to the plant inspection officials or to the customs officials in the absence of the former.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ART. 2. (b) The importation or transportation of the following plants and plant materials are prohibited into Japan proper. However, exceptions are-






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

made when the Minister of Agriculture permits importation for experimental or research purposes:
(1) Fresh fruits originating in or landed in Africa, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Bermuda, Brazil, Cyprus, France. Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Malta, Palestine, Portugal, Spain, Syria, Turkey, and the West Indies to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruittly (Ccratitis capitata Wied.).
(2) Fresh cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins, and other cucurbittaceous plants, tomatoes, beans, catjain peas (Vi na catjan Walp.), and cowpeas (Vigna sinensis Endl.) originating in. or landed in Borneo, Celebes. Ceylon, China, Taiwan, Hawaii, Hongkoing, India (British), Indochina (French), Java, Malay Peninsula, New Guinea, Philippines, Siam, Sumatra, and other Malayan islands (except Formosan watermelons accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by the Government of Taiwan, which are accepted after inspection on arrival), to prevent the introduction of the melon fly (Chiactodac s ctcrbitae Coq.),.
(3) Fresh apples, pears, quinces, peaches, plums, apricots, and cherries, as well as walnuts (except without shells), originating in or landed in Africa, Argentina, Australia. New Zealand Brazil, Canada, China, Cyprus, Europe, Honk Kong, India (British), Mesopotamia (Iraq), Persia (Iran), United States, Uruguay, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Asiatic portion), to prevent the introduction of the codling moth ((Grapholitha) Carpocapsa pomoucIla L.).
(4) Fresh citrus fruits, mangoes, loquats, plums, peaches, persimmons (Diospyros kaki) ; rose apple or malabar plum (Eugenia jambos) ; large fruited rose apple or Malay apple (Eugenia walaccinsis) ; guavas, peppers (Capsicunt spp.) ; Solanim verbascifoliu, Link.. NXcphelium lon gana Camib., N. litchi Camb.Litchi chincisis Sonn.; and Carambola (Arcrrhoa cara(m bola L.), originating in or landed in Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, India (British), Java, Malay (Federated States), Philippines. South Sea Islands, Straits Settlements, as well as Sumatra and the other Malayan islands (except Formosan citrus fruits), to prevent the introduction of Chactodacus dorsalis Hendel.
(5) Live sweetpotato tubers originating in or landed in Africa. Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China, Taiwan (south of the Yang-Tse-Kiang), Guiana, Hong Kong, India (British), Indo-China (French), Java. Malay Peninsula, Oceania, Philippines, Siam, South Sea Islands, Sumatra and other Malayan islands, the United States, and the West Indies to prevent the introduction of the sweetpotato weevil (Cylas formicarius Fab.) and the sweetpotato vine borer (Omphisa anastonwsalin Guen.).
(6) Sugarcane and parts thereof, including seeds, to prevent the introduction of the downy mildew of sugireane (Sclcro.,pora cchari T. Mayake the Hawaiian sugarcane borer (Rhabdocienis obscirus Boisd.), and the sugarcane borer (Dialraca saccharalis Fab.).
(7) Potatoes, eggplants, tomatoes, peppers (Capcsionim anjumn L.), and other solanaceous plants, as well as parts, fresh fruits, and tubers thereof, originating in or landed in Africa, America (North and South), Australia, New Zealand, Cyprus, Europe, Guam, Hawaii, India (British). and Java, to prevent the introduction of the potato wart disease (S!ynchytrium cndobiosticnt Percival), the powdery scab (Spongospora subterranca Lang), the potato tuber worm ( (Ph thorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculclla Zell.), and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say).
(8) Plants with soil adhering, to prevent infection by cryptogams and infestation by insects injurious to plhints.
(9) Straw from wheat, barley, oats, and rye, with the exception of artificial products other than straw f)r ptickiniig, be(lding. and other articles of the same class originatin g in or Inded( in Asia Minor, (anada, Europe, New Zealald, Persia, the United States, and Union of Soviet Swalist Republics (Asiatic portion) to prevent the introduction of the hession fly. (1Ph ytophaga dcstrtiuctor Say).
(10) Fresh fruits of apple a d other species of 1lal.us and Cratajyn originating in China, the leased Territory of KwaWtng atd AMnchuria. or lu in that country or Territories (except fresh fruits f appie originaing in he leased Territory of Kwantung and Mainchuria. aocotIpanied by a certificate of disinfection issued by the Government of the leased Territory of Kwaintiiung, which are accepted on inspect i;n of 1 the plants on arrival) ,to prevent ilnfet ation by Grapholit ha ipinata Iieirich.
(11) Containers a id materials u;ed for picking the articles listed under Nos.
1 to 10.






30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JTan.-Mlarch

CONDITIONS ITNDER WHICH PLANT DISEASES AND, INJURIOUS INSECTS MAY BE IMPORTED
ART. 7. Any person importing plant diseases or injurious insects from a foreign country, or transporting same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, shall be required to make an application for inspection, in writing, to the customhouse, in accordance with the prescribed form No. 4, without delay, after the arrival of the vessel carrying such articles on board.
ART. 8. The plant-inspection officials may proceed to make the inspection previo-us to the application required in article 2! or in the preceding article.
ART,. 10. Importation fromn a foreign country, and transportation from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper of plants, or any other article. whose inspection is required, by mail, except by parcel post or small packet, is prohibited.
ART'. 10' (b). Any person receiving mail matter contrary to the provision of the preceding paragraph, is required to deliver such -mail matter without delayto the customhouse together with the, required written application form.
INSPECTION OF CERTIFIED PLANTS MAY BE WAIVED

ART. 14.1 Any person importing plants from a foreign country or transporting same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, which are certified by the authorities at their source of *exportation or transportation, to the effect that such plants are not infected by plant diseases or infested by injurious insects, shall report the fact to the customhouse. In this case the provisions of article 2 shall apply.
Plants certified as mentioned in the preceding paragraph may be exempted from the inspection required with their importation from a foreign country, or transportation from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper.

B. E. P. Q. 471, superseding P. Q. C. A. 297.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
FEBR.UARY 5,, 1938.
This digest of the rules and regulations promulgated under the Agricultural. Pests Act of 1911, and subsequent amendments thereof, has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, anid others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to South Africa.
The digest was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant- quarantine inspector incharge of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts and reviewed by the chief inspector, plant regulatory service, Department of Agriculture and Forestry of the Union of South Africa.
The information presented in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be, used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The proclamations and Government noticesthemselves should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Enitomology and Plant Quarantine.


PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
BASIC, LEGiSLATION
[Agricultural Pests Act (Act No. 11 of 1911 as amended]
DEFINITION S
SE~C. 2. In this act and the regulations m-ade thereunder, unless inconsistent with the context:
"Insect pest" shall mean any insect or other invertebrate animal that is. injurious to plants.

In other words, the fact that a shipment is accompanied by an inspection certificate, does not exempt it from the requirement of art. 2, namely, that the importer apply to the customhouse for inspection. Then, according to par. 2 of art. 14, inspection may be, waived.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

"Plant" shall mean any tree, shrub, or vegetation, and the fruit, leaves, cuttings, or bark thereof, and shall include any live portion of a plant, whether severed or attached, and any dead portion or any product of a plant which by proclamation under this act or any amendment thereof has been included in this definition, but shall not include any seed unless the seed has been specially mentioned in this act or has been included in the definition of plant by proclamation under this act.
"Plant disease" shall mean any bacterial or fungous or other disease that is injurious to plants.
"Exotic animal" shall mean any animal (other than man) and any bird, reptile, insect, or other member of the animal kingdom, including the eggs thereof, that is not indigenous or native to South Africa. Species of the following classes are included in this definition: Amphibia, Arachnidfl. Ayes, Crustacea, Insecta, Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Section 8 of the act, as supplemented by proclamation No. 2S3 of Uh36. prescribes that no person shall introduce or cause to be introduced from oversea into the Union any plant otherwise than by mail or through the authorized customs ports of entry: Cape Town, Durban, East London, Johannesburg, Nelspruit. Port Elizabeth, and Pretoria. Fruits, potatoes, and onions may enter also through Mossel Bay, Port Nolloth, and Sinonstown.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

Section 9 prohibits the introduction of certain plants, subjects other plants to restrictions, and requires an import permit from the Department of Agriculture and Forestry for all plants except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, tubers, and vegetables.

PROVISION FOR INSPECTION OF IMPORTED PLANTS

Section 10 provides for the inspection of all plants offered for entry into the. Union and their subsequent disposal.
TREATMENT OF INFECTED PLANTS

Sections 11 and 12 provide for the disinfection, cleansing, or destruction of infected plants when deemed necessary, and the issuance, upon request. of certificates for shipments that have complied with the provisions of the act aitd the regulations.

POWER OF GOVERNOR GENERAL TO EXTEND APPLICATION OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF ACT

Section 14 empowers the Governor General, by proclamation in the Gazette"
(a) To include in the definition of plant, the seed of any plant or any dead portion or product of a plant.
(b) To vary, by addition or withdrawal, the list of plants the introduction whereof into the Union is under section 9 prohibited, supervised, or restricted.
(c) To prohibit or restrict the introduction into the Union from anywhere, or from any specified country or place, of any plant, insect, or germ of any plant disease.
Section 21 prohibits the importation from oversea of live bees, honey, and apiary appliances, and empowers the Governor General to apply the provisions to other African territories. Live bees may be imported by the Government.
Section 22 enables the Governor General, by proclamation, to prohibit or restrict the importation from anywhere or from ainy specified country or place of any particular class of exotic animals.
Section 28 empowers the (Governor General to make regulations not inconsistent with the act prescribing:
(a) The manner and place in which any registration, insl action, disilifecting, cleansing, or destruction authorized under this act sha-ill be carried out.
( b) The conditions and restrict ions governing the importation aind keeping of plants, bees, articles, exotic "u.nitls, and anything whatsoever lealt with iiu(lr this act.






32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

SUMMARY
Applicable to countries oversea, and to Portuguese East Africa, mandated territory of South-West Africa, or any State or Territory in Africa north of the Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or in the case of plants other than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Acacia spp., wattle trees but not the seeds (Act No. 11 of 1911).
Alfalfa or lucerne (Medicago sativa. L.) hay, fresh or dried, to prevent the introduction of clover canker, crown gall, or crown wart (Urophlyctis alfalfa (v. Lagerh.) Magn. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.) Arctium spp., burdock, seeds, and flowering seed heads. (Proclamation No. 131 of 1937.)
Broomcorn (Sbrghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jay.), or articles made thereof containing unshredded broomcorn stalk, to prevent the introduction of the European corn borer (Pyrausta 'n ubilalis Hbn.). (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Chestnut (Castanea spp.) plants and seeds of any species from North America or any other country where the chestnut blight disease (Endothia parasitica (Murr.) Ander. and Ander.) exists. Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.) Citrus trees, except by the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, to prevent the introduction of citrus canker. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Coniferous plants but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)
Elm (Ulmus spp.) plants and seeds of any species from the continent of .Europe and any other country where the Dutch elm disease (Graphium ulmi Schwarz) exists. (Proclamation No. 286 of 19,36.)
Eucalyptus spp., gum trees, but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)
Fruits: Apples, pears, quinces, and loquats (Malus, Pyrus, Cydonia, Eriobotrya), from China, Chosen, East Siberia, Japan, and Manchuria, to prevent the introduction of such fruit pests as the oriental fruit moth ((Cydia) Grapho'litha molesta Busck), (Carposina sasakii Mats.), a fruit moth, etc. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Citrus fruits (Citrus spp.) and the peel thereof, whether fresh or dried,
but not candied peel, to prevent the introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge). (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)
Citrus fruits from southwest Africa are admitted without restriction and
from a portion of the territory administered by the Companhia de Mocambique under certain conditions. (Proclamation 201 of 1937 and 202
of 1937.)
Stone fruits, fresh: Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.), cherry (Prunus spp.),
nectarine (Amygdalus persica var. vucipersica), peach (Amygdalus persica), plum (Prunus spp.). (Proclamation No. 285 of 1936.)
Honey, jam, sirup, or malt, mixed with honey, medicines containing honey, fly tapes or fly papers containing honey, live bees, second-hand hives, and any container used for honey, bees, or beeswax. Medicines containing not more than 25 percent of honey may be passed. Precaution against the introduction of American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Act No. 11 of 1911, Government notices Nos. 1337 of 1925 and 2032 of 1930.)
Opuntia spp. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)
Peach stones (Amygadalus persica L.). (Act No. 11 of 19,11.)
Plants packed in soil other than special rooting compost, to prevent the introduction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases that occur in soil. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Sugarcane plants, rooted (Saccharum officinarum L.), to prevent the introduction of injurious pests and diseases of the sugarcane. (Government notice 1793 of 19,36.)
Trees and plants ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be easily procurable in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable condition to prevent the introduction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)
-Trees and fruit-bearing plants listed by nurserymen within the Union and procurable from them at or below the ordinary price for recent novelties of their class, unless the Department is satisfied that the strain of the variety procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue to type. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)





19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Backhousia citriodora F. Muell.: No limitation on number admissible, but must be grown in quarantine. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)
Bags, second-hand: No import permit required; subject to inspection on arrival to ascertain whether any had contained cottonseed, and, if any cottonseed present, may be refused entry or treated by heat at the expense of the owner.
Beeswax and foundation comb: Import permit and inspection on arrival; consignor's sworn declaration that the beeswax has been heated to 2120 F. for 30 minutes. No declaration is required for white beeswax. In the absence of the declaration for unmanufactured yellow beeswax, the wax may be heated at the expense of the owner under official supervision, or the Department may agree to the keeping and manufacture of the beeswax under conditions deemed to make special heating unnecessary. Precaution against the introduction of American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936.)
Broomcorn (Sorglhunm valgarc var. toch nicun (Koern.) Jay.) and brooms, brushes, and other articles made from broomcorn (except as prohibited) (see item under Importation Prohibited) : Import permit and inspection on arrival, to prevent the introduction of the Europeatn corn borer (Pyrausta iubilalis IIbn.) and other stalk borers. (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Cork, unmanufactured, derived from the cork oak tree (Quercus suber L.) Import permit and inspection on arrival, to prevent the introduction of the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar L.). (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Cotton (Gossypium spp.) unmanufactured, including linters and unspun cotton waste (but not including purified cotton wool (absorbent cotton) and cotton batting) is admissible only under special import permit. This restriction does not apply to kapok. The use of cotton waste as packing material for nierchandise is not permitted. (Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1036.)
Cottonseed: Permits will be issued only for seed intended for sowing, and only when its introduction is deemed desirable by the principal field husbandry officer. Cottonseed that is allowed to enter will be fumigated with carbon disulphid. Importations are restricted to official cotton breeders. Precautions against the introduction of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.). (Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Exotic animals of the classes: Amphibia, Arachnida, Ayes, Crustacea, Insecta. Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia: Imnportation subje to permit and such conditions as may be prescribed therein. (Proclamation 1 15 of 1937.)
Grapes: 2 May not be introduced into the district of Graaff Reinet. nor into the area in the Cape Province defined in paragraph 31 (1) of the schedule to proclamation No. 287 of 1936, but grapes may be landed at Cape Town, Siimonstown, and Mossel Bay and be consigned to destinations beyond. (Proclamiation 287 of 1936.)
Plants, living' (see definition of plants, p. 1) of all admissible kinds, except those specifically mentioned, and except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, and tubers: Importation subject to a permit issued l)y the Union Department of Agriculture and Forestry and inspection on arrival. (See rules governing the issuance of permits p. 7 et seq.)
Pome-fruit trees and all plants of the genera Malus, Pyrus, and Cydonia: Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be acmipanied by an olicial certificate from the Department of Agriculture or other recognized official institution of the country of origin affirminiiig that fire blight (Dacillus an 'ylorus (Burr.) Trev.) is not known to occur oii the premises where the plants, were grown. Entry is conditional also on the plants being cut back severely and subjected, without expense to the Government, at Cape Townii, Diurban, or IP'rtoria, or other approved place for special inspection and disinfection. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Potatoes (Nolanun tuhiberosus L.) : No import perminit required subject to inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by a shipper's sworn deelaration of the country of origin and of the locality where growlv, togeller with suilicient data clearly to establish the identity of the consignment; also an official certificate dated not more than 30() days before the dispah of the consign affirming that potato wart (Syhitlytrium cdO (Jbioticu(t ( Schilb. ) Pere,) has

2 See note, p. 36.





:34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

not been known to exist within 5 miles of the place or places where the potatoes are declared to have been grown, or an official certificate, dated not more than 9 months prior to the date of arrival of the potatoes, affirming that the said disease has not been known to exist within the shire, county, or other such territorial division comprising the declared place or places of origin.
The certificate is not required with potatoes from British East Africa and Western Australia.
A certificate will be accepted from the United Kingdom declaring that no cases of potato wart are known to have occurred at the place or places where the potatoes are declared to have been grown, that the only outbreaks of the disease within 5 miles of such places are trivial and without menace to land where potatoes are grown for sale, and that, on official inspection, the potatoes concerned were found to be apparently free from serious diseases and insect pests. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Roses (Rosa spp.) from Australia and North America and any other country in which a virus disease of roses is known to occur: An official certificate affirming that no virus diseases are present in the premises where they were grown. (Proclamation No. 286, 1936.)
Seeds: Import permits and inspection on arrival. This applies only to seeds of the plants named below, which have been included in the definition of "plant." (Act No. 11 of 1911, proclamation No. 282 of 1936, and Government notice No. 1793 of 1936.)
Alfalfa or lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) : Permits issued only to the Department of Agriculture and Forestry. (Proclamation No. 282, 1936, and proclamation 286 of 1936.) Grown in quarantine and produce released
if no disease discovered.
Chestnut (Castanea spp.) (except from North America and any other
country in which the chestnut blight occurs). (Proclamation No. 282
of 1936.)
Cotton: See also item "Cottonseed." (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Elm (Ulmus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Maize (Zea mays L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (except from territory administered by the Companhia de Mozambique) : Importation limited to 10 pounds of any variety. However, in times of shortage the Department may authorize the importation of maize in bulk under prescribed conditions. (Government notice No. 1793, of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.) Maize imported for planting is disinfected in a solution of mercuric bichloride.
Oak (Quercus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)
Tea (except from countries in which Exobasidium vexans Mass. occurs).
(Proclamation 282 of 1936.) See also item, Tea plants and tea seeds.
Tomato (for importation from countries in which Aplanobacter michiganense
E. F. Sm. occurs). (Proclamation No. 282, of 1936.) Importation from such countries is not exempt from permit. See item, Tomato seed from
Germany, etc.
Sugarcane cuttings: Import permit; fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas on arrival and disinfection with solution of copper sulphate. Permits issued only to South African Sugar Association; canes grown in quarantine greenhouse and then in open ground.
Tea plants and tea seeds (Camnellia thea-Tiea sinensis L.) from India, Japan, Chosen, and other countries where blister blight (Exobasidium vexans Mass.) occurs: Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by an official certificate from the Department of Agriculture, the Indian Tea Association, or other recognized institution of the country of origin, affirming that the disease is not known to occur within 10 miles of the place where the plants or seeds were produced. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
Tomato seeds (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) from Germany, Italy, North America, or any country where bacterial canker of tomato (Apianobacter michiganense E. F. Sm.) occurs: Import permit required: must be accompanied by an official certificate stating that the seed was produced by plants officially inspected in the field and found free from that disease. (Proclamation 286 of 1936.)
Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacun L.), unmanufactured or leaf tobacco: Import permit and inspection on arrival. Must be accompanied by an official certificate affirming that the tobacco has been inspected and found free from Ephestia elutella Hbn. At the discretion of the Union Department of Agriculture and






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

Forestry the certification requirement may be waived. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits, seeds (except those specially restricted or prohibited), bulbs, tubers, and vegetables. However, admissible fruits are inspected and may be rejected if any serious pest is found on them. Consignments of apples are refused entry if more than 5 percent are infested by codling moth or infected by one Fusicladium spot over one-eighth inch in diameter to 10 fruits. Affected fruits may be picked out and clean ones passed. Fruit will be fumigated if more than one San Jose scale or oystershell scale found per fruit.

RULES GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF IMPORT PERMITS
[Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677, April 30, 1937]

NUMBER OF PLANTS LIMITED

1. No permit shall be issued to any one person to introduce into the Union during any one calendar year from oversea or from Portuguese East Africa, the mandated territory of South West Africa or any State or Territory in Africa north of the Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or, in the case of plants other than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo:
(a) More than 10 plants of any 1 variety of:
(1) Rooted forest trees, ornamental trees, nut trees, rose trees, fruit trees, and fruit-bearing plants (not including strawberries).
(2) Ornamental shrubs,' including azaleas, rhododendrons, camelias, hydrangeas, spireas, lilacs, and oleanders.
(3) Climbing plants, including clematis, begonias, passifloras, wistarias, honeysuckles, jasminums, and solanums, or
(b) More than 100 plants of any 1 variety of:
(1) Strawberry plants.
(2) Scions or unrooted cuttings of any tree, woody shrub, or sugarcane, or
(c) More than 10 pounds of any 1 variety of maize or barley.
2. Nothing contained in the above regulation shall prevent the Department from:
(a) Introducing stocks, which it may consider of exceptional or special value, into the Union in excess of the number above stipulated for budding or grafting, or issuing a permit to any person for special reasons and subject to such conditions as it may determine, to introduce into the Union any stocks in excess of the number provided in this regulation;
(b) Issuing permits to any person to introduce into the Union Backhousia citriodora plants in excess of the maximum provided in this regulation, on condition that such plants be kept in quarantine, at a place approved by the Department, for a period of 2 years or such lesser period as the Department may direct: Provided, That the Department, if it (leems expedient, may destroy without compensation to the owner all the plants so introduced, together with the progeny thereof.
(c) Issuing permits for the introduction of maize in bulk in times of shortage, and subject to such conditions as the Depdlrtment may determine.
3. No permit shall be issued to any person to introduce into the Union:
(a) Any kind of tree or plant ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be easily procurable in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable condition.
(b) Any variety of tree or fruit-bearing plant or rose plant listed by nurserymen within the Union, and procurable from them at or below the ordinary price for recent novelties of its class, unless the Department is satisfied that the strain of the variety procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue to type.
(c) Any rooted sugarcane plants.
However, the Department may issue a permit for the introduction of any tree or plant specified in either sublaragr~aphs (a) or (b) of paragraiph (3) in any case where the Department is satisfied that 14r special rc:astis such introduction should be exempted from the prohibition of that pa ragralh.

3 Permits are not issued for species of Berberis that are intermediate hosts of Pl(ccitLia graminis Pers., black stem rust of wheat.







36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

PLANTS NOT LIMITED IN NUMBER

4. -Ornamental palms and florists' plants, such as violets, carnations, chrysanthemums, geraniums, pelargoniums, fuchsias, orchids, and ferns, shall not be subject to any limitation in regard to the number of such plants that may be. introduced into the Union.
NOTE.-All trees and other hardwood plants and fruit-bearing plants are fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas before importation is permitted. Herbaceous plants and ornamental palms are fumigated only when insect pests are present for which such treatment is deemed necessary. Grapevines are also disinfected in a solution of copper sulphate. All species of Ribes, Cas tanea, and Juglans are cut back and disinfected in a 2-percent solution of copper sulphate. Treatments are to be affected without expense. to the Government at Cape Town, Durban, Pretoria, or other approved center.



PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to March 31, 1938. penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. Jamnes Kookoolis, New Haven, Conn., in the interstate transportation of several bundles of laurel from a point in the quarantined area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification-, the defendant entered a plea of nobo contendere and was fined $25.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. Huigo Kind, of the Shady Lawn Nursery,. Hlammonton, N. J., in the interstate shipment o'L six lots of nursery and greenhouse stock from the regulated area to points outside thereof, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $100.
In the case of the United States v. Ha-rry Lavere, *\Voodside, Del., in the interstate transportation of a truckload of cantaloups from Woodside, Del., to Rochester, N. Y., without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following sports:

Name Port Contraband PenaltyMrs. Maria Valdez------------- Brownsville, Tex-------- 2 guavas -------------------------$
Francisco Salas --------------- ----- do---------------- 2 oranges ------------------------- 1
Martiano Garza---------------- Eagle Pass, Tex--------- 1 avocado------------------------- 1j
Mrs. Josefa Cervantes de Garza -----o----- ------------ 0.------- ----- CO ---------------------------- 1
Amparo Garza ---------------- ----- do--------------- ----- do --------------------------- 1
Jose Rubio-------------------- El Paso, Tex ----------- 4 pieces sugarcane----------------- 1
Julian Briccuo ---------------- ----- do---------------- 18 guavas------------------------- 1
Epitacio Molina ---------------ilidqlgo, Tex -----------1I cheriinoya----------------------- 1
Paul Rogers ------------------- Laredo, Tex----------- 4 plants -------------------------- 1
Francisco Mariel-------------- ----- do---------------- 2 oranges ------------------------- 1.
Mrs. Chas. Brulottz----------- ----- do---------------- 6 stalks sugarcane---------- ------- 1
Max Waenstok --------------- ----- do---------------- 2.apples and 2 tangerines----------- 1
Mrs. Latilda Hlernandez ------- ----- do---------------- 5 plants -------------------------- 11
Mrs. Nemicia Morales --------- ----- do---------------- 10 plants ------------------------- 1
Mrs. Dometilla de Arazon------ ----- do----------------1I guava------------------------- -1
Juan Calerillo ---------------- ----- do---------------- 2apples and 4 guavas-------------- 1
Juan Chavez ----------------- ----- do ----------------- 5 sweet limnes---------------------- 1
M. B. Guess------------------ ----- do---------------- 2 maypops, 2 sapotes, 1 tangerine, 1
1 plant.
Epigmenis Tuna-------------- ----- do ---------------- 15 sweet limes, 4 oranges, 6 guavas- 2
Mrs. Cecilia Ribion ----------- ----- do---------------- 5 oranges, 1 tangerine-------------- I
Mrs. E. E. Miller------------- ----- do---------------- 2 oranges ------------------------- 1
Alfonso Alonson -------------- ----- do---------------- 3 grapefruit----------------------- 1
Mrs. less Wort --------------- ----- do---------------- 24 oranges------------------------- 1I
Roquella Cuca---------------- ----- do---------------- 7 plants -------------------------- I
E. C. Waller--7---------------- ----- do---------------- 30 oranges and 18 tangerines --- 2












ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHwER, A.ssistanit Chief.
AvERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HysLrop, in Charge, Diui.Oion of Isect PeNt kA tirreq and InIformal ioil. J. 1. HAMBL TON, inl Chiarge, Dicision of Bce Culture fIn vestiga tionlS. D. L. VAN DINE, inl Cha rge, JDiis ion of Frutit ,In~wct In') vest igat ions. F. (C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, ivisiom of Forest insct Iivestigattiofls. W. 1-I. WNHITE. in Charge. 1)irisioii of Tia t Crop mid Gardeni Iasect it restigationis. C. M. PACKARD, inl Charge, IDiviNion of Cereal and Foraige Jiseet Ini rest igationis. R. WV. HAIRNED, inl Charge, Dirision of Cotton lInscct In restigations. F. C. BISHOPP, ini Charge, Divisiont of lItsects Atteetiiug -11m uoid An minis. L. A. HAWKINS, in Chargc, Divisiont of Control Investigatiwns. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of inseclicides an~d Fungicides. C. F. WV. MUESEBECK, 'in Charge. Division of Insc, ct Idenitificatiott. C. P. CLAUTSEN, in Charge, Division of i'orciga Parasite Introdlieti.. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quaranties. E. R. SASSCER, in Char-ge, IDivision of Foreign Plant Qutaranitines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Chairge, Gypsy Moth and Brownl-Tail Moth Control (headquarters, Green field, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownVI-Tail
Moth Qua ran tines, Eu ropea'n Cornt Borer Cert ifica tion, and Di) tIel Elmi Disea se Eradication (headquarters, Bloom field, N. J.) R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm~ and Thurberia Weevil Quarantine8 (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HoiDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quiaranitine headquartersr, Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, inl Field Charge, Fruiitfiy Ivestigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico) .
37



















U, S. GOVERNMENT PRNI' OFFICE 132










S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 135 Issued September 1938


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1938


CONTENTS
Page
#Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 39
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41) ---------------------------- 39
Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomcorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
474; supersedes ff. B. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309) ------------------------------- 39
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) --------------------------------- 40
Revision of regulations ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 40
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------------------- 51
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 52
Administrative instructions -fumigation of potatoes by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area histed in regulation 5
of quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 473) ------------------------------------------------- 62
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) --------------------------------- 53
Administrative instructions-sterilization of grapefruit and oranges by heat under the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 472; superseding P. Q. C. A. 329) ---------------- 53
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 63) -------------------------- 54
White-pine blister rust quarantine regulations modified ------------------------------------- 54
Revision of regUlUtiODS - -.- _W ------------------------------------------------------------- 55
Notice to general public t rough newspapers -------------------------------------------- 60
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations ------------------------------ 62
District of Columbia plant regulations modified -------------------------------------------- 62
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
out of the District of Columbia ------------------------------------------------------------ 62
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------------------- a
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------- 65
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the United States_, ---------------------------------------------------------- 66
Modification of cotton regulations (revision of regulation 13) --------------------------------- 66
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------------- 67
Arkansas State plant quarantine (shipment of sweetpotato plants restricted) ---------------- 67
Additional plant inspection places in California --------------------------------------------- 67
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q. 379, supplement No. 2) 68 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 3) 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405, supplement No.
4) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 69
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
supplement No.3) ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 69
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2) 70
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------------ 70
-Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------- 73



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORER
QUARANTINE (NO. 41)
MAY 7p 1938.
B. E. P. Q. 474 (supersedes H. B. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309).

METHOD USED FOR THE DISINFECTION OF IMPORTED BROOMCORN AND BROOMCORN BROOMS

Broomeorn and articles made of broomcorn which are required to be treated, under the provisions of regulation 5 of Quarantine No. 41, will be treated by one of the following methods:
1. Vacuum fumigation:
(1) The temperature of the stalks and of the fumigation chamber during the fumigation shall be not less than 600 F.
39
86995--38-1






40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) The dosage for the fumigation shall be 3 pounds of liquid hydrocyanic acid or its equivalent per 1,000 cubic feet of space.
(3) The air pressure in the fumigation chamber shall be reduced to the, equivalent of 2 inches of mercury (a 28-inch vacuum at sea level), after which the hydrocyanic acid shall be introduced and the low pressure held for the duration of the fumigation.
(4) The exposure shall be not less than 3 hours.
2. Steani sterilization:
(1) The air pressure in the treating chamber shall be reduced to the equivalent of 5 inches of mercury (a 25-inch vacuum at sea level).
(2) Steam shall then be introduced until a positive pressure of 10 pounds i& obtained.
(3) The exposure to the 10-pound positive pressure'of steam shall continue for a period sufficient to assure a constant temperature in all parts of the treating. chamber, after which the steam may be shut off and the treating chamber exhausted of the uncondensed steam.
AvERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Am important change in the following revision of the regulations of the Japanese beetle quarantine is the inclusion in the regulated areas for the first time of part of Schuyler County, N. Y., parts of the Ohio counties of Coshoctont Portage, and Summit, and parts of the West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson. This action is considered necessary because of the establishment of the JaDanese beetle therein. Areas were also added to counties, parts of which were formerly under regulation, in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to the special area (regulation 5, see. A (1) (ii)) from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated. Wheeling, W. Va., and Coshocton, Ohio, are brought under regulation and placed in the same category as Buffalo, Cleveland, and other outlying cities in that a certificate or permit is required in the movement of fruits and vegetables to these cities but no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement therefrom.
Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on the movement of aquatics except during the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.
The restrictions on the movement of sand are modified to exempt from certification silica sand, greensand, marl, "bird sand," "bird gravel," and pottery clay, when free from vegetable matter, and when labeled as to contents on the outside of each container.
Some outlying areas where Japanese beetle infestations have been found the past field season are not included in the regulated area because of assurance from the. States concerned that adequate measures will be taken to prevent the spread of the pest therefrom.
SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now revised prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries from the regulated areas, to. or through points outside; and also prohibit (unless a certificate or permit has been issued) the interstate movement of all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck from the District of Columbia, the State of Delaware, and parts of the States of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, to or through points outside the regulated areas as defined in regulation 3. Refrigerator cars used for loading fruits and vegetables, other than onions and potatoes, in such area must, prior to loading, be cleaned by the common carrier and kept tightly closed and sealed during the interval between






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

cleaning and loading. Onions and potatoes must be fumigated in the car when such action is deemed necessary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the cars must be closed or screened. For other details and exceptions see regulation 5.
The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or certificate has been secured. Portions of plants and cut flowers are restricted interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15, inclusive. For details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.
The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and parts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are shown in regulation 3.
These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and provide other safeguards and conditions as specified in regulations 8 to 13, inclusive.
To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest branch office listed in the appendix.
AvERy S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (TWELFTH REVISION)
(Approved March 1, 1937; effective March 1, 1937]
1, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, -New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 1, 1937. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and (3 ') sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Proviidedl, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Proviided filrthcr, That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing, such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agricultuire, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the Sta9te: And pro vided fur-ther, That certain articles classed as restricted herein many, because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructionIs iSSued by







42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered innocuous: as carriers of infestation.
Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of March 1937.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEA~L] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS (SIXTEENTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
[Approved April 6, 1938; effective April 11, 1938]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Japanese beetle.-The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.
(b) The terms "infested," "infestation," and the like, relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.
(c) Quarantined a rea.-Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.
(d) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State or District which is now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised.
(e) Fruits and vegetables.-For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables see regulation 5.
(f) Nursery and ornament al stock.-Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of -,plants.
(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so certified.
(i) Certified green house.-A greenhouse or similar establishment which has complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the inspector.
(j) Ins pector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common ,carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or 'Tefritory or District.

REGiULATION 2. LIMITATIoN OF RESTRICTIONS To REGULATED ARmAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision), the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limiAted to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns,, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits: Connecticut.-The entire State.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maine.-County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond, Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County; and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; election districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, and that portion of election district No. 8 lying south of Shawan, Beaver Dam, and Sherwood Roads, in Baltimore County; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hillsboro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4) ; the city of Westminster, and election district of Freedom (No. 5), in Carroll County; election districts of White Plains and La Plata, in Charles County; election district of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Buckeystown (No. 1), Frederick (No. 2), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and Brunswick (No. 25), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election district of Marshall (No. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City (No. 2), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard County, and the right-of-way of United States Highway No. 1 through the election district of Guilford (No. 6), in said county; all of Prince Georges County except the election districts of Nottingham and Aquasco; that part of Montgomery County located within the established boundaries of the so-called "Washington Suburban Sanitary District"; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County; election districts of Sharpsburg (No. 1), Williamsport (No. 2), Hagerstown (Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (No. 9), Sandy Hook (No. 11), and Halfway (No. 26), in Washington County; election districts of Pittsburg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5), Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters (No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar (No. 11), Camden (No. 13), Willards (No. 14), and Fruitland (No. 16), in "Wicoin co Col ty.
Massachusetts.-The entire State.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Columbia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Montgomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rensselaer, Richmond, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Rockland, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; towns of Tonawanda, Amherst, and Cheektowaga, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Erie County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector, Montour, and Reading, and the Borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County; towns of Caton, Corning, and Hornby, and the city of Corning, in Steubenv County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tontpkinis County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren Coun ty.
Ohio.-Counties of Columbiana and Mahoning; townships of Augusta, Brown, and East, in Carroll County; the city of Coshocton, in Coshiocton County; the city of Cleveland in Cuyahoga County; the city of Columbus in Franklin County; townships of Cros Creek, Island Creek, Knox, Saline, Steubenville, and Wells, and the city of Steubenville, in Jefferson County; the city of Toledo, in Lucas County; townships of Atwater, Brimfield, Cha restown, Deerfield, Edinburg, Franklin, Palmyra, Paris, Randolph, Ravenna, Rootstown, and Suffield, in Portage County; all of Stark County, except the townships of Lawrence, Sugar Creek, and Tuscarawas; and the townships of Bath, Copley, Coventry, Franklin,






44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Green, Northampton, Norton, Portage, Springfield, Stow, and Tallmadge, and the cities of Akron, Barberton, and Cuyahoga Falls, in Summit County. Pennsytvania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, and Venango Counties; Mercer Township in Butler County; Ashland, Beaver, Elk, Richland (including the boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg), Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County, and townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren County.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vernmwt.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpepper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in ChesterftEld County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; Camp Stuart, in Wariwick County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.
West Virginia.-Connties of Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, and Taylor; districts of Hedgesville, Falling Waters, and Opequon, in Berkeley County; the towns of Bolivar and Harpers Ferry, in Jefferson County; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; the city of Wheeling, in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, in Wood County.

REGuLATIoN 4. Ex=, siox OR REucTIoN or REGULATED Asis

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGuLATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABS

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive, of this section:
(i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits and vegetables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed below to or through any point outside of the regulated areas:
Delaware.-The entire State.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Maryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hillsboro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4) ; election district of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; and election districts of Pittsburg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5), Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters (No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar (No. 11), Camden (No. 13), Willards (No. 14), and Fruitland (No. 16), in Wicomico County. New Jersey.--Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union.
Peinsylvania.--Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery, and Philadelphia.
Virginia.-Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.
Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.
(b) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a cetificate is required for interstate movement to Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, N. Y., or to the other regulated parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, and Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, N. Y., or from other parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, and Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments of apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment or of bananas other than in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more.
(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially packed apples in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or motor vehicles from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in paragraph (1) (ii) of this section.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except that any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition
-of further transportation or delivery.

SE(TION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, under one of the following conditions:
(1) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated .area other than the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in paragraph 1 (i) of this regulation, or moving from such designated State, District, counties, election districts, or city other than by refrigerator car# have actually been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the supervision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any infestation.
(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unloading docks.
(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the fact has been established to the satisf ition of the inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.







46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June(5) When the fruits and vegetables other than onions and potatoes, moving via refrigerator car from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city -listed in paragraph I (ii) of this regulation, have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed. or adequately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to. loading has been determined by an inspector as thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in'a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between cleaning.and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.
(6) When the onions or potatoes moving via refrigerator car from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

REGuLATioN 6. REsTiticnoNs ON THE MOVEMENT oip NuRsERY AND1 ORNAMENTAL STOCK

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in regulation I shall not bemoved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, -unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector except as follows:
(1) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,, and when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification, except that this exemption does not apply to, dahlia tubers.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the, port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each container with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of portions of' plants without roots and free froin soil (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs, scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, and sphagnuin moss).
(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of' nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental I stock, nurseries,. greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will' be classified as-follows:
(1) Class I.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500 feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class 1. Upon compliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of this section, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries or greenhouses of class III.
(2) Class 111.-(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III. Such, classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., in localities known to be generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery properties, under single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector.' Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would other wise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose'of rating such'






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Provtided, That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.
(b) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Qua rantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or washing; or (Mi) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.
(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframnes
-on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive, or north thereof between June 1-5 and October 15. inclusive.
(W Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from ifested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October I, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv)
-shall comply with such other safeguards as mi-ay be required by the inspector.
(4) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be certified for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grown in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent inifestation. (See also sec. A (3) of this regulation.)
(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from 'unclassified premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b) that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the ispector, or
(c) that it shall be shown by evidence'satisfactory to the inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.
(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their classified status, (a) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within the regulated area to articles which have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the Saidl certificate shall accompany the articles when moved ; ( b) shall obtain approval of the inspector before such articles are received on their premises or moved from the open on their own premises into certified greenhouses;: and (c) shall also report immediately in writing aill lpurch~lses or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated a rea Numrs;eryien, florists, dea,,lers, anid others whose premises are classified as class II1 shall, in addition, report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipmnents of such articles both to points outside the regulated areas and to other class'-ified nur11ser-ies or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any
8t995-38--2






48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE (April-June

person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation, and such denial of certification shall continue until the information so, omitted has been supplied.
(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been. inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and certified stock original[ ng in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be, certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they originated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and when. found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.

RmGuLATioN 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF SAND, Som. EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE

SECTION A. CONTROL: OF MOVEMENT

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed, to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas t o or through, any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand for construction purposes, silica sand, greensand, marl, "bird sand," "bird gravel,"' and pottery clay, when free from vegetable matter; (b) such other sands a% have been treated or processed and subsequently handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese beetle could exist therein, provided, that each container of such, article shall be labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in case of bulk shipments such label shall-, accompany the waybill or other shipping papers; and (c) ground, dried, imported peat in packages of 5, pounds or less to the package.
(2) No, restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped, from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as toeach container with the country* of origin, and when the shipment is further protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.
(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through, a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to,, another regulated area.

SECTION R. CONDITIONS, OF CERTMOATION

Certificates for the movement of restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,. and manure may be issued under any one of the following conditions:
(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in, the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.
(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no, infestation could exist therein.
(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an. inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an! inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the, cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of' and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide Or otherwise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method' satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required. as a condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compose and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with parilp graphs (1). (2), or (3) hereof.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

IREXIULATION 8. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTIIIcTED ARTICLES FROM INFESTATION WIlLE IN TRANSIT

Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.
Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed by the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain intact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE TRAN SPORTATION

(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed, the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or )ermit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany the vehicle.
(d) (erthflatcs '_"shll be slirreLd, ercd to the consignee upon delivery of the shipment.

REGULATION 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable (late of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and address of the consignee.
(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assembled the articles at such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspection may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transportation of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.
(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be refused.
(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another regrulated area except that permits issued for the movement of fruits and vegetables from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), shall be limited to gren corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries. Fruits and vegetables other than the above-named coImmodities may be moved from the State, District, counties, election districtss, or city listed in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), only under certification.






,50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES

Certificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of
-compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector -has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. THoitoTTGH CLEANING REQumto OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CIARS..
BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination.

]REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS 13Y THE UNITED STATES, DEPARTMENT or AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 11, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated March 1, 1937, as amended effective May 10, 19,37.
Done at the city of Washington this 6th day of April 19-38.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


APPENDIX

PENALTIES

'The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport, from, any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds or any other article * specified in the notice of quarantine in manner
or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeartor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:
Thirteenth Floor, Custom House, Boston, Mass.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New Haven, Conn.
Room 918, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.
Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
P. 0. Box 1. Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.
Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.
Frankfort Arsenal, Bridge and Tacony Streets, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.
Warehouse No. 4, General Depot, United States Army, New Cumberland, Pa.
Room 438-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.
Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Baltimore, Md.
Room 202, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.
Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.
307 Mellett Building, Canton, Ohio.
1005 Grace-American Building, Richmond, Va.
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue, Norfolk, Va.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from the District of Columbia by calling District 6350, branch 2589, the inspection house of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston, Mass.
Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H. Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J. Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany, N. Y.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
Entomologist, Department of Agriculture; Montpelier, Vt.
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration, Richmond, Va.
State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Chaileston, W. Va.
[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all coinnion carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]



NoTrcE To GENERAL Pumic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT oiF AGRicu'LTUTtu, BUREAU w ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washinvto)i, D. C., April 6, 1398.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.






52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations (sixteenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle, effective on and after April 11, 1938. The purpose of the revision is to include in the regulated area part of Schuyler County, N. Y., parts of the Ohio counties of Coshocton, Portage, and Summit, and parts of West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson. There were also added areas in the following counties, parts of which were formerly under regulation: Frederick County, Md., Tompkins County, N. Y., Stark County, Ohio, Warren County, Pa., and Princess Anne County, Va. Wheeling, W. Va., and Coshocton, Ohio, are brought under regulation. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to the special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated. The restrictions on the movement of sand are modified. Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on the movement of aquatic plants except during the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.
Copies of the revised regulations, may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
rPublished in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., April 16, 1938; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., April 15, 1938; the Press-Herald, Portl ind, Maine, April 16, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md. April 16, 1938; the Post, Boston, Mass., April 16, 1938; the Union, Manchester, N. ff., April 16, 1938; the News, Newark, N. J., April 16 1938; the Times, New York, N. Y., April 16, 1938; the Press, Cleveland, Ohio, April 15, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., April 15, 1938; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., April 15, 1938; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., April 16, 1938; the News Leader, Richmond, Va., April 15, 1938; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., April 16, 1938; and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., April 16, 1938.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFTCE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, June 13, 1988.
Postmaster:
My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision of Quarantine No. 48 of the United States Department of Agriculture (effective April 11, 1938), extending the area and modifying the regulations in connection with the Japanese beetle quarantine, by which you will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLAcx,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 4T3.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-FUMIGATION OF POTATOES BY METIIYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF POTATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR CAI&
FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE No. 48
[Approved April 30, 1938; effective May 2, 19381

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of potatoes via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points outside the regulated areas between June 15, and October 15 when the potatoes have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the Japanese beetle and Such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification of






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

potatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the supervision of anl inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of potatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the potatoes and bunkers of the cars'. for a period of 2 hours during which time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place inl the ventilator hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less than 70 F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector. At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under standard ventilation.
In authorizing the movement of potatoes fumigated according to the requirements stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of injury.
CAUTION: Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of potatoes. It is a poison, and the operator should use ain approved gas mask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chijef, Bureau of Entomiology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

B. E. P. Q. 472 (Superseding P. Q. C. A. 329). A~L8 98
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-STERILIZATION OF GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGES
BY HEAT UNDER THE MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
[Approved April 5, 1938; effective April 8, 1938]
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Investigations in sterilizing fruit for the Mexican fruitfiy have shown that the holding period at 110' F. can be reduced from S to 6 hours provided the time for heating the fruit to this temperature is at least S hours, makilig a miniimum treating period of 14 hours. Inl order that shippers may take advantage of this reduction, the administrative instructions issued as circular P. Q. C. A. 329 on March 3, 1932, are modified and superseded by the followving in'st ructions.



Under the authority contained ill paragraph (e)~ of regulation 6 of the MNexican fruitfly quarantine regulations, as revised effective October 15, 193'7. and having determined that shipments of unisterilized oranges amnd grapefruit from infested areas might involve risk of spread of the Mexican fruit tly, iiot ice is hereby given that sterilization is required as a conditions of issuance of permits for the interstate movement of oranges and grapIefrui t produced in areas designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (as infested. Such sterilization shall be inl accordance with one of the following prescribed treatments:
(1) Heating the fruit to a temperature of 1.101 F. or above (not to exceed 1120 ) in the approximate center of the fruit and holding the temperature of 1100 or above (not to exceed 1120) for a period of 8 hours;
(2) Heating the fruit for a period of not less than 14 hours during which time the fruit shall be raised to a temperature of 110' F. at the approximate







54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-.Tune

center of the fruit and shall be maintained at or above that temperature for the last 6 hours of such treatment.
No specifications as to the exact methods and equipment for obtaining these conditions are prescribed. Available information clearly indicates that by the application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot be reached without injury to the fruit. To prevent such injury it is necessary to maintain a very high humidity throughout the period of treatment. In the tests where successful performance was obtained, live steams the source of heat was applied in such a way as to secure as nearly as possible a uniform distribution of steam-heated air so directed as not to discharge directly on the fruit. The air temperature ranged from 110' to 112' F., and the air was very moist. The fruit was held in field boxes stacked four boxes high and without special means of separating the boxes in each stack. The experiments indicate that the fruit should be sterilized after coloring, if this is necessary, and before pao-king for shipment, and then cooled down to a temperature around 45* as soon as possible after sterilizing. Wax or paraffin, either dry or in solution, should not be applied to this fruit either before or after sterilization.
Such treatment is authorized in sterilization plants in the regulated area which are approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The Bureau will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit. Such sterilization will be done -under the supervision of inspectors of the Bureau. These inspectors should at all times be given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise the movement of the fruit from the car to and from the sterilizing rooms.
While the results of the experiments so far conducted have been successful, it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in operation may result in injury to fruit. In authorizip-g the movement of fruit sterilized in accordance with the above requirements, it is understood that the Department does not accept responsibility for fruit injury.
AVERY S. HoYT9Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 63)
JUNE 3, 1938.
WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED
(Press notice)

All restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines--except to points in two pine-growiug regions in which the blister rust has not been found, one in the West and the other in the Southeast-will be lifted, it was announced by the Secretary of Agriculture today, in a modification'af the whitepine blister rust quarantine regulations, which becomes effective July :1.
An embargo is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into the Western States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and part of California, and into the Southeastern States of Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, from States other than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties.
When the earlier blister rust quarantines were enacted and for several years thereafter there were several additional regions with extensive areas of commercially valuable stands of five-leaved pines in which the rust had not appeared. The restrictions in effect were designed to prevent the artificial spread of the disease into such regions, and the quarantines, first enacted over 20 years ago, have been effective in delaying the spread of the rust while control measures were being developed and applied.
The rust has now become established, however, in most of the commercially valuable pine-producing areas of the country. It has been found in 25 States. Owing to this condition and the fact that the disease can, under favorable conditions, spread naturally from pines to Ribes for a distance of 150 miles or more, it is believed there is no biologically sound basis for continuing the former restrictions.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

The currant and gooseberry shipping regulations also are revised. The extensive Federal-State control work throughout the infected States is continued, and in order to protect accomplishments and to maintain sanitation zones around the valuable pine stands. the control-area permit requirement is extended to apply to shipmenIts to 23 States. The requirements as to dormancy, defoliation, or dipping of cmrratit and gooseberry plants. are continued in the case of shipments to the 12 pine-growing States to which pine shipments are prohibited. The embargo as to shipments of European black currants throughout the United States except into the 12 central States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas. Louisiana. Mississippi. Missouri. Nebraska, North Dakota. Oklahoma. South Dakota. and Texas is continued unchanged.
Copies of the regulations of the lquaranltinle. as revised. may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. United States" Dpartmient of Agriculture, Washington. D. C.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE

REvisloN OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Several important changes are made in the restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants in the following revision of the white-pine blister rust quarantine regulations. An embargo is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into two pine-growing regions. one in the West comprising the States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and part of California, and the other in the Southeast comprising the States of Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina. and Tennessee. The interstate movement of such pines from States other than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties into the regions described is prohibited. The new regulations are designed to protect these pine-growing areas in which the blister rust is not known to exist.
No other restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines unless they are visibly infected with the rust.
The dipping and dormancy requirements for currant and gooseberry plants which formerly applied only to shipments originating in the infected States, now apply to all shipments consigned to the States and counties listed above, from any State or District other than the 11 entire States and from the 10 northern California counties.
The control-area permit requirement now applies to currant and gooseberry plants consigned to 23 States as listed in regulation 3 (b). The aim of this requirement is to strengthen the Federal-State control activities carried on in areas surrounding valuable stands of five-leaved pine in these States.
No modification is made in the embargo as to all interstate movement of European black currant plants and of the wild native western currant plants (Ribes bracteosum and R. petiolarc) except as to unrestricted movement into and between 12 central States as heretofore.

SUMMARY

Fir -l(ar(d pin( shipments ( r cgulation 2)

Five-leaved pines are prohibited movement into the following regions. except that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such pines from or between any of these 11 entire States nor from the part of California described Arizona, California (that part lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen), Colorado. Georgia. Kentucky, Nevada. New Mexico, North Carolina. South Carolina. Tennessee. Utah, and Wyoming.
No pines or their parts visibly infected with blister rust may be shipped into(J any State or District unless shipped in a preservative or under special authorization of regulation 7.
For permit requirements in shipping five-leaved pines for planting on F(ederal lands in the above regions






56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Currant and Gooseberry Shipments (regulation 3)

Requirements as to shipments from any State or District into each of the
States, as follows:

Ribes n~iqrum (Euro- Other currant and gooseberry plants pean black currant);
Destination R. bracteostim and
(State) R. petiolare (wild, Control-area permit re- Plants must be either
western currants). Re- quired from State of dipped'I or- dormant striations destination and defoliated


Alabama --------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Arizona ---------------- Prohibited------------ No------------------- Yes, with exceptions.2
Arkansas--------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
California (that part south Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ Yes, with exceptions.2
of the southern line of
the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama,:
Butte, Plumas and
Lassen).
That part north of--do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
the above line.
Colorado -------------- ----- do---------------o---------------------- Yes, with exceptions.3
Connecticut----------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Delaware ------------- ----- do ---------------- No------------------- No.
District of Columbia --------- do ---------------- No------------------- No.
Florida ---------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Georgia ---------------- Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ Yes, with exceptions.2
Idaho----------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Illinois---------------- ----- do---------------- -N o------------------- No.
Indiana --------------- ----- do ---------------- No------------------- No.
Iowa------------------ ----- do ---------------- No------------------- No.
Kansas ---------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Kentucky-------------- Prohibited------------ No------------------- Yes, with exceptions. 2
Louisiana -------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Maine ----------------- Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ No.
Maryland------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Massachusetts --------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Michigan ------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Minnesota------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Mississippi------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Missouri -------------- ----- do---------------o---------------------- No.
Montana--------------- Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ No.
Nebraska--------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Nevada ---------------- Prohibited------------ No------------------- Yes, with exceptions.2
New Hampshire ------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
New Jersey------------ ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
New Mexico----------- ----- do ---------------- No------------------- Yes, with exceptions.2
New York------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
North Carolina--------- do----------------- Yes ------------------ Yes, with exceptions.2
North Dakota ----------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Ohio-------------------I Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ No.
Oklahoma-------------- None----------------- No------------------- No.
Orcegon ---------------- Prohibited------------ No------------------- No.
Iheslanda---------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Rheslana---------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
South Carolina-------- ----- do ---------------- No------------------- Yes, with exceptions.3
South Dakota ------None----------------- No------------------- No.
Tennessee-------------- Prohibited------------ Yes ------------------ Yes, with exceptions.2
Texas------------------ None----------------- No------------------- No.
Utah------------------- Prohibited------------ No------------------- Yes, with exceptions. 2
Vermont -------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Virginia -------------- ----- do ---------------- Yes------------------ No.
W~ashington----------- ----- do ---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
WVest Virginia---------- ----- do ---------------- Yes------------------ No.
Wisconsin------------- ----- do---------------- Yes ------------------ No.
Wyoming ------------- ----- do ---------------- No ------------ Yes, with exceptions.2

1Plants must be dipped immediately before shipment in a lime-sulphur solution of 4.50 B. Prepare this olution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur solution of 320 B. with 8 parts of water. 2 Plants originating in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, or in that part of California lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumnas, and Lassen, are not required to be dipped or dormant.
Applications [or control-area permits

Shippers should apply for control-area permits (Form 415) to the officer ,of the State to which shipments are to be made (addresses of officers are listed






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

below) stating the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses of the consignor and consignee.
Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is
State % to be made
California------- Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Sacramento. Calif. Connecticut----- State entomologist. Agricultural Experiment Station. New Haven, Conn. Georgia --------State entomologist, Atlanta. Ga. Idaho ----------Director, Bureau of Plant Industry. Boise. Idaho.
Maine--------- State horticulturist. Augusta, Maine.
Maryland------- State plant pathologist. < ollege Park. Md. Massachusetts_- Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, State House. Boston. Mass. Michigan ------- Inspector in charge, orchard and nursery inspection. Department of Agriculture, Lansing. Mich.
Minnesota ------Commissioner of conservation, State Office Building. St. Paul, Minn. Montana -------Chief, Division of Hlorticulture, Missoula, Mont. New Hampshire- State nursery inspector. Durham, N. H. New Jersey ----- Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry. Trenton, N. J. New York -------Director, Bureau of Plant Industry. Albany, N. Y. North Carolina-- State entomologist, Department of Agricultuie. Raleigh. N. C. Ohio -----------Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Columbus. Ohio.
Pennsylvania .. Chief, Division of Forest Protection. Harrisburg. Pa. Rhode Island .... State entomologist, 310 State House. Providence. R. I. Tennessee -------State entomologist and plant pathologist. 406 Morrill Hall. University
of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Vermont -------. Forest commissioner, Montpelier. Vt. Virginia -------- State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond, Va. Washington ..... Supervisor of horticulture, Department of Agri(ulture. Olympia. Wasi. West Virginia. Commissioner. Department of Agriculture. Charleston. W. Va. Wisconsin ------ State entomologist, Madison. Wis.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomiolo/y and Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 63
[Approved August 27, 1926; effective October 1. 1926; supersedes Quarantine No. 26, as amended, and Quarantine No. 54, as extended]

I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to .quarantine every State of the continental I United States and the District of Columbia, in order to prevent the spread of the white-pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer ), a dangerous plant disease not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout Ithe United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),. as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 11(5), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia, effective on and after October 1. 1926. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912. amended as aforesaid, no five-leaved pines (Pinh.us) or currant and gooseberry I)lants (Ribes and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts) shall be moved or allowed to be moved from any such State or from the District of Columbia into or through any other State in the continental United States or the District of Columbia, except in manner or method or under conditions prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto and in amendments thereof: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and the rules and regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infected when said State shall have provided for and enforced such control measures with respect to such designated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to effect the control and prevent the spread of the white-pine blister rust: Prorided furthicr. That. for the enforcement of the restrictions under this quarantine on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants, all interstate shipments of nursery stock or other plants shall )be subl)jec,t to inspection at place of shipment or destination or at any point en route, by duly authorized inspectors of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of August 1926.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of .Agriculture.






58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June
REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 63
[Approved June 1, 1938; effective July 1, 1938]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) White-pine blister rust, or blister rust.-The fungus disease caused by Cronartium ribicola Fischer.
(b) Five-leaved pines.-Entire plants with roots, of the following species belonging to the genus Pinus:
American species:
Ayacahuite pine (P. ayacahuite Ehrenb.).
Bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.).
Foxtail pine (P. balfouriana Murr.).
Limber pine (P. flexilis James).
Mexican white pine (P. strobiformis Engelm.).
Sugar pine (P. lambertiana Dougl.).
Western white or silver pine (P. moaticola DougI.).
Whitebark pine (P. albicaulis Engelm.).
White pine (northern) (P. strobus L.).
Foreign species:
Balkan pine (P. peuce Griseb.).
Chinese white pine (P. armandi Franch.).
Himalayan or Bhotan pine (P. excelsa Wall.).
Japanese white pine (P. parviflora Sieb. and Zuce.).
Korean pine (P. koraiensis Sieb. and Zucc.).
Swiss stone pine (P. cembra L.).
(c) Currant and gooseberry plants.-Plants, cuttings, or scions, belonging to the genera Ribes L., and Grossularia (Tourn.) Mill., including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts.
(d) European black currant plants.-Plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, seeds, or parts of plants of Ribes nigrum L.
(e) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(f) Dormant.-In a nonvegetative state, with inactive buds.
(g) Moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or District of the United States into or through any other State or District.

REGULATION 2. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF FIVE-LEAVED PINES

( a) Five-leaved pines shall not be moved interstate into any of the States of Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen: Provided, That no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such pines from or between any of the 11 abovenamed entire States nor from the part of California described.
(b) Five-leaved pines or parts thereof, when visibly infected with the whitepine blister rust shall not be moved interstate into any State or District unless such pines are shipped in a preservative or are authorized and labeled in accordance with the provisions of regulation 7.

RmULATION 3. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF CURRANT AND GOOSEBERRY PLANTS

(a) Embargo on European black currant plants.-No European black currant plants (Ribes nigrum) and no currant plants of the wild native western species known as R. bracteosumn and R. petiolare shall be moved interstate in the continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

(b Con trot-area permits required.-No currant or gooseberry plants of any species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of California," Connecticut, Georgia,' Idaho, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina,' Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee,' Vermont, Virginia, Washington, 'West Virginia, or Wisconsin, unless a Federal control-area permit has been Issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in such State (see addresses in Summary). Such
permit will not be' issued if the plants are to be shipped into or planted in areas in which five-leaved pines have been protected from white-pine blister rust or in which such protection is contemplated. The continuance of this requirement as to any State is conditioned on the State providing such legal or other control on the planting and movement therein of currant and gooseberry plants as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture may be deemed adequate to control white-pine blister rust in the protected areas.
(c) Dipping or dor'mancy reqitircd.-No currant or gooseberry plants of any species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of Arizona, Colorado, Georgia,' Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,' South Carolina, Tennessee,' Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California'2 lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, unless such plants have either been dipped (except the roots) immediately prior to shipment in lime-sulphur solution of a strength of 4.5' B.3, or are shipped in a dormant and defoliated condition. Such limesulphur dip shall be plainly visible on said plants and be easily detectable by odor* the judgment of the inspector to be final as to adequacy of the dip and as to the condition of the plants as to dormancy or defoliation: Provided, That no such dipping or dormancy restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of currant and gooseberry plants from or between any of the 11 above-named entire States, nor from the part of California described.

REGULATION 4. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

(a) Every box, bale, or other container of plants for which permits are required by regulations 3 and -7 shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and of the consignee, and shall bear the permit securely attached to the outside thereof.
Mb The permit in the case of carload shipments by rail, shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment. In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the permit shall accompany the vehicle.
REGULATION 5. INSPECTION IN TRAXNSIT

Every car, vehicle, box, bale, or other container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infected articles or articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 6. CANCELLATION OF PERMITS

Permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further permits refused, whenever in the judgment of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such permits nkight result in the dissemination of the white-pine blister rust. After any Such permit is withdrawn or has expired, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunider is prohibited.

REGULATION 7. SHIPMENTS; FOR REFORESTATION, ExPERIMENTAL, EDUCATIONAL, OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES
Plants subject to resthiction in these regulations may be moved interstate for reforestation purposes on Federal lands, or for experimental, educational,

I Dormancy and defoliation or lime-sulphur dip is also required for shipments to these States. (See par. (c)).
2 Control-area permits are also required] for shipments to fihese States.. (See par. (b).) a Prepare this solution by dilul ing 1 part of commercial content rated fino-sulphur solution of 321 B. with 8 parts of water.







60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

or scientific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of plants so moved, except when shipped to or in care of the Inspection House, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C., shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
Identifying tags to authorize the interstate movement of five-leaved pines for planting on Federal lands in any of the 11 entire -States named and part of California described in regulation 2, will be issued only on condition that such pines have been raised under such Sanitation conditions as in the judgment of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine are adequate to protect them from infection by white-plue blister rust: Provided, That no permit is required for shipping such pines from or between any of the 11 entire States named nor from the part of California described.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1938, and shall on that date supersede the rules and regulations promulgated February 16, 1937.
Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of June 1938.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAT H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]



NOTICE To GENERAL Puimic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNiTED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washington, D. C., June 1, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
-conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), ,as amended, has promulgated a revision, effective July 1, 1938, of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 63, on account of the white-pine blister rust. This revision makes extensive changes in the require-ments relating to the interstate movement of five-leafed pines and currant and gooseberry plants.
Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACEY
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The News, Birmingham, Ala.., June 10, 1938; the Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., June 13, 1938; the Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock, Ark., June 10, 1938; the Herald and Express, Los Angeles, Calif., June 13, 1938; the Post, Denver, Colo., June 10, 1938; the Times, Hartford, Conn., June 6, 1938; the Journal-Every Evening, Wilmin -ton, Del., June 9, 1938; the Star, Washington, D. C., June 9, 1938; the Florida Times-UnioD, Jacksonville, Fla., Jure 10, 1938; the Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., June 10, 1938; the Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, June 11, 1938; the Tribune, Chicago, Ill., June 11, 1938; the News, Indianapolis, Ind., June 9, 1938; the Reg' ister, Des Moines, Iowa, June 119 1938; the Beacon, Wichita, Kans., June 10, 1938; the Courier-journal, Louisville, Ky., June 10, 1938; the Times-Picayune. New Orleai)s, La., June 10, 1938; the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, June 10, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., June 9, 1938; the Post, Boston, Mass., June 9, 1938; the News, Detroit, Mich., June 9, 1938; the News, Jackson, Miss., June 10, 1938; the Journal, Minneapolis. Minn., June 10, 1938; the Star, Kansas City, Mo., June 9, 1938; the Montana Standard, Butte, Mont., June 11, 1938; the World-Herald, Omaha, Nebr., Jutie 10, 1938; the Gazette, Reno, Nev., June 11, 1938; the Union, Manchester, N. H., June 10, 1938; the News, Newark, N. J., June 9, 1938; the Journal, Albuquerque, N. Mex., June 11, 1938; the Times, New York, N. Y., June 9, 1938; the Observer, Charlotte, N. C'., June 9, 1938; the Forum, Fargo, N. Dak., June 10, 193S; the Press, Cleveland, Ohio, June 9, 1938; the Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, Okla., June 13, 1938; the Oregon Journal,. Portland, Oreg., June 13, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., June 8, 1938; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., June 9, 1938; the News, Greenville, S C. June 9, 1938; the ArgusLeader, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., June 10, 1938; the Comrniercl l A peal, Memphis, Tenn., June 10, 1938; the Chronicle, Houston, Tex., June 10, 1938; the Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, June 11, 1938: the Free Press, Burlington. Vt., June 9, 1938 ; the NewsLeader, Richmond, Va., June 8, 1938; the Times, Seattle, Wash., June 13, 1938; the Gazette, Charleston, W, Va., June 9, 1938; the Journal, Milwaukee, Wis., June 10, 1938; the Wyoming State
I
'Tribune-Leader, Cheyenne, Wyo., June 15, 1938.]






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

INSTRUcTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIID ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, July 8, 1938.
Quarantine Order No. 63 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the white-pine blister rust has been revised effective July 1, 1938, so as to modify the restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines, and to extend the control-area permit requirement relating to the shipment of currant and gooseberry plants.
Under the revision an embargo is placed on interstate movement of five-leaved pines into Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Wyoming, and into that part of California lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and JLassen, from all other parts of the continental
United States. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such pines from or between any of these 11 entire States, nor the part of California described, except that no pines or their parts which are visibly infected with blister rust may be shipped into any State or District unless in a preservative or under a special authorization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. United States Department of Agriculture.
With regard to currant and gooseberry plants, the requirements as to dormancy, defoliation, or dipping in the prescribed lime-suliphur solution" now
-apply in the case of shipments to the 12 protected pine-growing States as described above. An embargo is placed on shipments of European black-currant plants and currant plants of the wild native western species from any part of the continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana. Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.
No parcel containing currant or gooseberry plants of any species or variety shall be accepted for mailing interstate into any of the States of Californii, Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, 2!aine. Maryland. Ma ssach usetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermiont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, or Wisconsin unless accompanied with a Federal control-area permit issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology ,qnd Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in the State to which the parcel is sent.
Mailers desiring to secure control-area permits (Form 415) should apply to the officer of the State into which shipments are to be made stating the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses of the sender and addressee. The addresses of such officers are shown below:
Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is to
State be made
California --------Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Sacramento, Calif. Connecticut----_ State Entomohgist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn. Georgia--------- State Entomologist. Atlanta, Ga.
Idaho ------------ Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.
Maine -----------State Horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Maryland --------State Plant I'athologist, College Park, Md. Massachusetts ...D. Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, Statehouse, Boston, Mass. Michigan-------- Inspector in Charge, Orchard and Nursery Inspection, Department of Agriculture, Lansing, Mich.
Minnesota-------- Commissioner of Conservalion, State Office Building, St. Paul, Minn. Montana ---------Chief. Division of Horticulture. Missoula, Mont.
New Ilampshire___ State Nursery Inspector. I)urham. N. 1I. New Jersey ------- Chief, Bureau of Plant Induslry. Trenton, N. J. New York -------- Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany. N. Y.
North Carolina---- State Entomologist. Department of Auriculture. Raleigh, N. C. Ohio------------ Chief. I)ivision of Plant Industry. Columbus, Ohio.
Pennsylvania ----- Chief, Division of Forest Proteetion, lHarrisburg, Pa. Rhode Island---_ State Entomologist, 310 Statehouse, Providence, It. I. Tennessee --------State Entomologist an(1 Plant Pathologist, 406 Morrill Hall, University of 'Tennesszee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Vermont --------- Forest Commissioner. Montpelier, Vt.
Virginia ----------State Ent omologist. 1112 State Office Buildinig, Richmond, Va.
Washington ------- Supervisor of Ilorticulture, Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Wash. West Virginia-..... Comniissioner, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va. Wisconsin -------- State Entomologist, Madison, Wis.

4 Prepare this solution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime sulphur solution of 320 B. with 8 parts of water.






62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Jun&
Parcels containing any variety of five-leaved pines, or currant or gooseberry plants, or parts thereof, which may be offered for mailing shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the sender and a statement showing the contents and shall bear the control-area permit, when required, securely attached to the. outside.
This notice modifies instructions appearing on pages 24, 25, and 26 of th& April 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide.
RAMSEY S. 'BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS
APRIL 29, 1938.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS MODIFIED
(Press notice)

The Secretary of Agriculture has announced a revision of the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, effective April 30, 1938.
Shippers will find few changes in the shipping requirements. The definition of nursery stock is clarified to show that it includes woody plants and parts capable of propagation (except domestic-grown seeds and fruit pits), foreigngrown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (yetch, etc.), and of Lathyru& (sweet peas, etc.). AS heretofore, an inspection certificate is required in shipping nursery stock, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, and roots from the District of Columbia to points outside.
In shipping into the District of Columbia this certificate is required for nursery stock, and labeling as to contents is required for nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The supply of the last revised edition of the plant regulations relating to, the District of Columbia having become exhausted, advantage is taken of the necessity for a reprint of simplifying the form and wording of the regulations without material change in shipping requirements. The definition of nursery stoek as stated in paragraph (a) of regulation 1 is clarified. The list of domestic plant quarantines formerly published in the appendix is eliminated, since up-to-date copies of such quarantines are always available from this Bureau.
SuAf MARY

SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Woody plants and foreign seeds.-A valid nursery-inspection certificate of the State, Territory, or country of origin must be attached to the outside of each container of woody plants or parts thereof capable of propagation (except domestle-grown seeds and fruit pits) shipped into the District of Columbia, and the container must be marked to show the nature of the contents. Such certification and marking are also required for forei,, ,n-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, etc.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.).
Herbaceous plants.-The container of each shipment of herbaceous perennials (including strawberry plants), bulbs, and roots, consigned to the District of Columbia must be marked to show the nature of the contents. (Herbaceous plants from foreign countries must meet the certification and marking requirements of Federal plant quarantine No. 37.)






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

A certificate or permit issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine must be attached to the outside of each shipment of woody or herba-ceous plants, bulbs, roots, foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, etc.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas., etc.) consigned from the District of Columbia to points outside. Each shipment is also subject to the restrictions of any. Federal plant quarantine or order applicable thereto. To arrange for inspection, apply at the Plant Inspection House of this Bureau, Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. (District 6350, branch 4495), Washington, D. C.
AvEY S. IIOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
[Approved April 27, 1938; effective April 30, 1938]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, as required by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do order that no plants or plant products shall be moved into or out of the District of Columbia except in compliance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto which are hereby promulgated: Provided, That certain plants or plant products may be exempted from these rules and regulations by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as carriers of dangerous plant pests.


REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations, the following words, names, and terms
-shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Nursery stock.-All trees, shrubs, and plants having a persistent woody stem, and parts thereof capable of propagation, except fruit pits and seeds, provided that foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, etc.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.), are defined as nursery stock.
(b) Herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.-Plants whose roots persist 2 or more years but which lack persistent woody stems above the ground. This term includes fibrous-rooted perennials, such as strawberry plants and phlox; bulbs, such as narcissus and crocus; corms, such as gladiolus; tubers, such as dahlia; fleshy roots, such as peony; rhizomes, such as iris; and such greenhouse-grown plants as ferns, geraniums, orchids, etc.
(c) Annual plants.-Plants grown from seed for bloom or food the same season and living only 1 year. This term includes such plants as cabbage, tomato, .and aster.
(d) Inspector.-Plant quarantine inspector of the United States Department
*of Agriculture.
(e) Moved.-Offered for movement to or received for transportation by a common carrier or moved by any means whatever into or out of the District of
-Columbia.
() Certificate.-A certificate showing that the nursery or premises from which the plants or plant products were taken were inslected within 1 year prior to the date of shipment and were found to be free from injurious insect pests and plant diseases, or that the plants or plant products were inspected prior to shipment and found to be free from injurious insect pests and plant diseases.
REGULATION 2. UNRESTRICTED ARTICLES

No requirements as to certification or labeling are placed by these regulations5 on the entry into or moveluent out of the District of Columbia of (1)

sCompliance with any special plant quarantine or restrictive order whic may ho 8pplicable thereto is required. Information relative to such restrictions may 1be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.







64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Juneannual plants, cut flowers, or decorative plant material (such as branches and Christmas trees) ; (2) seeds, except certain foreign-grown seeds as defined in paragraph (a) of regulation 1; nor of (3) Other plants and plant products not included in the definitions in paragraphs (a) and (b) of regulation 1. The. requirements as to delivery of plant materials are stated in paragraphs (c) and (d) of regulation 3.

SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATION 3. REQUIREMENTs RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANT& AND PLANT PRODUCTS

(a) Certifteation and marking of nursery stock.-No nursery stock as defined 'in regulation 1 shall be moved into the District of Columbia -unless a valid certificate signed by the State nursery or horticultural inspector of the State orTerritory or country from which the stock is shipped is attached to the outsideof each package or other container. Each package or other container shall in addition be plainly marked with the names and addresses of the consignor and consignee.and with a statement showing the nature of the contents.
(b) Marking of herbaceous perennials, bulbs, or roots.-No herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, as defined in regulation 1, shall be moved into theDistrict of Columbia unless the container thereof is plainly marked with the names and addresses of the consignor and cansignee and with a statement show6
ing the nature of the contents.
(c) Delivery of plants and plant products.-No nursery stock, herbaceousplants, bulbs, or roots, originating outside of the District of Columbia shall be, delivered to the consignee in the District of Columbia by a common carrier orother person until such delivery is authorized by an inspector of the Bureau of' Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
(d) All nursery stock and herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots, annual plants, decorative plant material, and other plants and plant products,. whether restricted or unrestricted, addressed to the United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., shall be delivered only at the Plant Inspection House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW.).

REGurATioN 4. SHIPMENTS WHICH FAIL To COMPLY WITH REGULATIONS

Plants and plant products shipped into the District of Columbia, which ar& found to be infected or infested with any plant pest or disease, or which have, not been moved in full compliance with these regulations, may be disposed of' as authorized in the Plant Quarantine Act.

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATIJOW 5. CERTIFICATION OF NURSERY STOIC AND HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL.
PLANTS, BULBS, AND ROOT'S

(a) No nursery stock, or herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, as: defined in regulation 1, shall be moved out of the District of Columbia unless a certificate or permit has been issued therefor by the Bureau of Entomology and' Plant Quarantine. Each package or other container of such plants, bulbs, orroots shall have such a certificate or permit attached to the outside thereof.
(b) A certificate or permit may be issued for the movement out of the District of Columbia of the nursery stock covered by this regulation, when it has been examined by an inspector and found apparently free from dangerous plant diseases and insects and when such shipment is found to comply in full with, all Federal quarantine regulations.
(c) Nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, to be, shipped out of the District of Columbia must be presented at the Plant Inspection House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW.) for inspection at the time of shipment unless otherwise authorized by an inspector.

Herbaceous plants of foreign origin must be marked in accordance with the provisions of Federal Quarantine No. 37 (Nursery Stock, Plants, and Seeds).






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

When large shipments are contemplated. arrangements may be made for inspection at other places by telephoning District 6350, branch 4495, or writing the Bureau.
Application for inspection of articles the movement of which is restricted by quarantine regulations or other restrictive orders shall be made at a season of the year sufficiently in advance of the contemplated date of shipment to provide for compliance with regulations.
(d) No common carrier or other person shall accept for shipment or remove from the District of Columbia any nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, unless the required certificate or permit has been issued and is securely attached to the outside of each container.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 30, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, promulgated April 29, 1931.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of April 1938.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of the foregoing revised regniations were sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the District of Columbia.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, lVa-8hington, D. C., April 30, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the Plvt Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, effective April 80, 1938. This revision clarifis the definition of nursery stock and simplifies the wording of the regulations. Copies of the notice of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in The Evening Star, Washington, D. C., May 6, 1938.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, May 6, 1938.
POSTMAST t
Wa8hington, D. C.
My DE SIR: Attention is invited to the inclosed copies of Revised Rules and Regulations Governing the Movement of Plants and Plant Products into and out of the District of C'olumbia as promulgated by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture.
It is requested that these copies be distributed to the various stations and branches of your office for the information and guidance of employees handling parcels containing plants and plant material as contemplated in sections 595 and 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third A8istant Postmastcr (General.






66 6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND 'COTTON WRAPPINGS
INTO THE UNITED STATES
MODIFICATION OF COTTON REGULATIONS

AMENDMENT No. 4 Or RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES

[Effective on and after July 1, 1938]

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The Cotton Regulations revised effective February 24, 19,23, provided for the entry of cotton lint and cotton linters from Mexico via border ports only when they originated in the Imperial Valley of Baja California, Mexico. Effective December 15, 1924, the regulations were modified to provide for entry from other specified areas in Mexico through ports on the border. Since that date the Bureau has acquired a wider knowledge of pink bollworm control measures, and has been able, in connection with its administration of Quarantine No. 52, the domestic pink bollworm quarantine, to acquaint itself more thoroughly, through the cooperation of the Mexican Government, with the pink bollworm conditions in areas in Mexico adjacent to the border and with control measures carried on in such areas by the Ministry of Agriculture and Development of that country.
In the light of this wider knowledge a more liberal policy is adopted to allow the entry of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, subject to conditions of entry paralleling th e conditions under which cotton lint and linters, produced in the pink bollworm infested areas of the United States, may move interstate under the provisions of Quarantine No. 52.
Regulation 13 of the Cotton Regulations, as hereby amended, is predicated upon a continuance of the enforcement, in cotton-producing areas of Mexico, of measures of suppression and of measures to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm which are deemed by the United States Department of Agriculture to be equal in effectiveness to measures enforced in cotton-producing areas of the United States having a similar status with respect to the pink bollworm. The importation of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, as provided in regulation 13, as amended, is further contingent upon the determination, from time to time, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the' Department, of the status of Mexican cotton-producing areas with respect to the pink bollworm and upon the determination, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the Department, of suppression and control measures enforced in Mexican cottonproducing areas.
AvmY S. HOYT
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that regulation 13, of the Rules and Regulations Governing the Importation of Cotton and Cotton Wrappings into the United States, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 13. PROVISION FOR THE. ENTRY VIA BORDER PORTS OF COTTON LINT AND LINTERS FROM MEXICO

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in Mexico may be imported into pink bollworm infested areas of the United States through border ports approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose, subject to such treatment on arrival as is required under the regulations of the domestic Pink Bollworm Quarantine No. 52, for the interstate movement of cotton lint and liners produced in those areas: Provided, however, That no cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine as heavily infested with the pink bollworm may enter the United States under the provisions of this regulation unless such areas are adjacent to heavily infested areas of the United States.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to be uninfested with the pink bollworm may be imported through border ports approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose subject to compression at compresses designated in the permit.
This regulation leaves in full force and effect the provisions of regulation 10 affecting the entry of cotton grown in the Imperial Valley in the State of Baja California, Mexico.
Regulation 13, as amended herein, shall be effective on and after July 1, 1938.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of June 1938.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] HARRY L. BROWN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to American diplomatic and consular officers through the State Department.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARKANSAS STATE PLANT QUARANTINE (SHIPMENT OF SWEETPOTATO PLANTS RESTRICTED)

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washbigton, May 6, 1938.
The State of Arkansas has established at Little Rock, Ark., a place for terminal plant inspection under the provisions of the law embodied in section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products: Sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, draws, and slips.
All postmasters are therefore informed that packages containing any plants or plant products addressed to places in the State of Arkansas may be accepted for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.
The State of Arkansas has also issued a State plant quarantine on account of the sweetpotato weevil, pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, embodied in amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, which prohibits the shipment into that State from any other part of the continental United States of sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants. vines, draws, and slips, known to be hosts of this pest, unless accompanied with an inspection certificate issued by the State of origin, showing the plants and plant products to be free of infestation.
Postmasters are therefore requested to observe the restrictions of the Arkansas quarantine when the host plants and plant products named above are offered for mailing and will also invite the attention of mailers to these provisions.
Postmasters within the State of Arkansas receiving parcels containing the plants named, which are not accompanied with the required certificate, should be guided by paragraphs 3 and 6, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, obtaining the necessary forwarding postage, and forward the parcels to the postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., endorsed in the prescribed manner. Parcels containing these plants which are accompanied with a proper certificate may be delivered to the addressees without being submitted for terminal inspection.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ADDITIONAL PLANT INSPECTION PLACES IN CALIFORNIA

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Vabisi ton, May 16, 193S.
Postmasters in the State of California are informed that provision has been made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at 1he ldlaes named below, and they should, therefore, be added to the list of places within







68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the State of California to which plants and plant products subject to terminal inspection may be sent by postmasters for inspection under the provisions of section 596, Postal Laws And Regulations: Alameda, Alvarado, Berkeley, Centeryille, Hayward, Irvington, Livermore, Mission San Jose, Mount Eden, Newark, Pleasanton, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Sunol.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assist ant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 379, Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

APRIL 5, 1938.

CERTIFICATE NOT REQUIRED FOR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS
[Order of February 10, 1938; Diario Oficial, February 17, 1938]

ARTICLE 1. The certificate of origin and plant health for imported plants or parts of plants that have been processed, dried, manufactured, or which have undergone any treatment that devitalizes them, may, in the terms of the said regulations, be dispensed with.

SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ART. 2. The products included in the preceding article are subject to inspection on arrival in ports where phytosanitary inspection is provided for, and will be released by the customs only by authorization of the technical expert of the phytosanitary service.
The required inspection of products recognized as being incapable of harboring parasites may, at the discretion of the director, phytosanitary service, be dispensed with.
The order of February 10, 1938, amplifies paragraph (c) of article 5 of decree No. 24114 of April 12, 1934 (see p. 5 of B. E. P. Q. 379).
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

JUNE 8, :1938.

B3ULBS, CORMS, TUBERS, AND RHIZOMES REGARDED AS; PLANTS

The French decree of March 8, 1932, prohibits the entry into and transit through France of living plants, and living parts of plants (trees, shrubs, nursery products, cuttings, and other parts of plants) * originating in or proceeding from the United States of America, as a precaution against the introduction of 'San Jose scale (see p. 6, B. E. P. Q. 403).
Uncertainty existed as to whether this prohibition was applicable to bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes, therefore the question was submitted to the French Ministry of Agriculture. The said Ministry states that the prohibition does apply to bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes. -LEA TOG

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

33. E. P. Q. 405, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

JUNE 9, 1938.
CUT CARNATION FLOWERS NOW ADMITTED

The decree of March 28, 1929, as amended by that of September 30, 1932, prohibits the importation into Germnany of rooted plants, cuttings, and cut flowers of the carnation, to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf folder (Tortric pronubana Hbn.).
According to the Nachrichitenblatt fiir dlen deutschen Pfianzenschutzdienst 17: 12, December 1937, the Minister of Food and Agriculture so far relaxed the provisions of those decrees as to permit the importation of carnation cut flowers, effective November 15, 1937 (R. F. M. Nov. 10, 1937-Z1505f-1 II).
Consequently the words "and cut flowers" should be stricken from the first line of the item "Rooted Carnations" on page 2 of B. E. P. Q. 405. However, since carnations are dicotyledonous plants and their cut flowers are parts of such plants, the importation into Germany of carnation cut flowers grown in the United States still is prohibited under the provisions of the decree of November S, 1931, with the exceptions indicated in Note 1 (a) and (b), page 8, of B. E. P. Q.
-405.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (BRITISH HONDURAS)

APRIL 6, 1938.
All the proclamations set forth on pages 2, 3, and 4, and in Supplement No. 2,
-of Circular B. E. P. Q. 445 are. revoked and superseded by proclamation No. 10 of February 12, 1938, as follows:
The importation into the colony, directly or indirectly, of the fruit, seeds, cuttings, plants, etc., enumerated in schedules A and B, save with the exceptions :stated, is prohibited.
SCHEDULE A

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Citrus spp. All parts, including fruit, seeds, cuttings, plants, buds, and grafts: lImportat ion prohibited from all countries except in cases of imnportations, made by the agricultural officer for scientific propagation.
Coconut palms (Cocos nucifera). coconut,,, in husk, any part of the palm, including plants, leaves, and leaflets : Inmportation prIolhibited from all countries except in cases of importations made by the Department of Agriculture for experimental purposes.
SCHEDULE B

IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

All fruits except green bananas, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other processed fruits : Imiportation prohibited except from the United States, United Kingdom and Ireland, Canada. and Jamiaica. P~rovidled that in the caeof Jamaica a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection.
All vegetables except potato, onion, dried be-ans, peas, and grains, canned or processed vegetablee., and seeds : Inportat ion prohibited froin all count ries except Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland, Jamaica, and United States. Provided that in the case of Jamnaica a certificate of introduction is granited by the agricultural officer after inspection.







70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Tobacco seed from all countries: May be imported only under license issued by the agricultural officer and which shall prescribe such treatment of the seed as he may consider necessary.
Cotton (Gossypiurn spp.), including seeds, cuttings, plants, seed cotton, lint, or any articles packed therewith, or any covering or thing in which they may be packed,, from all countries: May be imported under license issued by the agricultural officer on the occasion of each importation.
Sugarcane (Sq charum offiinarum) : Seedlings and plants, and all parts of the sugarcane, or any articles packed therewith, from all countries: May be imported under license issued by the agricultural officer.
Banana plants and plants of any other species of Musa, including suckers and every part of the plant except green fruit from Canary Islands, Costa Rica,. Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, South America, West Africa, West Indies, together with any article or soil packed therewith, or any packager covering or container thereof: May be imported under license issued by the agricultural officer or by the agricultural officer for experimental purposes.
All earth or soil of any description and any living plants not otherwise speci-fled in schedules A and B, including plants growing in earth or soil or shipped. bareroot, and including articles, covering, or packages in which they may be packed, from all countries: May be imported provided a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection an.d, if necessary, fumigation.
AvERfY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA (IRAN)

JUNE 6, 1938.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Article 3 of the decision of the Council of Ministers, No. 7876, January 1-2, 1936, stated that the frontier offices at which plant material will be inspected and through which it may be imported will be designated by the Department of Agriculture (see p. 1, B. E. P. Q. 449).
According to a despatch from the American charge d'affaires a. i., dated April 1, 1938, the Department of Agriculture of Persia has designated Bandar Pahlevi, Khorramshahr, Bushire. and Khosrovi as frontier ports of entry and inspection for plant material under the provisions of the said article 3.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June 30, 1938, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States V. John Ranbone, Newfield, N. J., in the transportation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to Rochester, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.
In the case of the United States v. Charles Bogutz, Bridgeton, N. J., in the transportation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to Rochester, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.







1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imiposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name I- Port Contraband Penalty


Miguel Saldana ---------------- Brownsville, Tex 1 mango --------------------------- $1. 00
Mrs. Antonia Balli------------ ----- do ------------- 3 plants---------------------------- 1.00
Enedina Martinez------------- ----- do ------------- 2 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Catalina Castillo-------------- ----- do -------------i1mango----------------------------1.00
Sara Castillo------------------ ----- do ----------- ----- do----------------------------- 1.00
Manuela Sanchez ------------- ----- do-------------- 7peaches--------------------------- 1.00
G. B. Powe------------------- ----- do -------------i1mango---------------------------- 1.00
Ruben Infanta---------------- ----- do -------------l1avocado -------------------------- 1.00
Maria de J. Villalpondo-------- ----- do ------------- 7 peaches--------------------------- 1.00
fleta Smith------------------- ----- do ------------- 2 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Antonio Y-barra -------------- ----- do -------------l1oranige---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. F. H. de Carlaga ----------- Eagle Pass, Tex--2 plants ------------------------------ 1.00
Maria Ponce------------------ ----- do ------------- 5figs ------------------------------ 1.00
Concepcion Velasquez de Rodri- El Paso ,Tex-------- 1 flower bulb ----------------------- 1.00
quez.
Josefina Reynosa-------------- ----- do ------------- 2 mangoes ------------------------ .4
Jesus Maldonado-------------- ----- do ------------- 24 apricots ------------------------- 1.00
Ernestina M. Caraveo --------- ----- do ------------- 2mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Refegio Rosalez ---------------- Hidalgo, Tex-------- 6 orp~ges--------------------------- 1.00
Pancho Moreno -------------- ----- do ------------- 8 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00y
Pedro Vela------------------- ----- do ------------- 4 avocados ----------------------- 10
Juan Perez ------------------- ----- do------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
E. M. Sanchez---------------- ----- do------------- 12 avocados ------------------------ 3.00
Rafael Salazar ---------------- ----- do-------------I1 avocado, 1 mango ------------------ 1.00
Eusebio Cantu --------------- ----- do------------- 10 avocados ------------------------ 2.50
Gonzalo Zapata --------------- ----- do------------- 1 mango---------------------------- 1.00
Florentina Garza-------------- ----- do------------- 2 mangoes -------------------------- 1.00
Bonifacio C. Reyes------------ ----- do------------- 6 peaches--------------------------- 1.00
Isabella Hernandez------------ ----- do------------- 3 mangoes-------------------------- 2. 00
Telesfero Mendoza ------------ ----- do------------- 4 mamneys, 4 mamey seed-------------- 3.00
Maria Cortez----------------- ----- do-------------1 nmango------------------------------ 1.00
Felipa Navarro ---------------- Laredo, Tex --------1I pound orchid seeds------------------ 1.00
Manuel Navarro -------------- ----- do------------- 16 orchid plants----------------------- 1.00
H. Irwin --------------------- ----- do------------- 21 tangerines, 15 oranges, 11 grape- 5.00
fruit, 1 sweet lime, 4 plants.
Candalaria Martinez----------- ----- do------------- Imamey--------------------------- 1.00
D. C. Eaton------------------ ----- do------------- 3 orange's, 7 apples------------------- 1.00
M. Cruz --------------------- ----- do------------- 6mameys -------------------------- 1.00
Chris Rieger------------------ ----- do-------------18 oranges -------------------------- 1.00
Thomas M-%oreno -------------- ----- do------------- 2 cherimoyas ----------------------- 1. 00
C. A. Langhurst -------------- ----- do------------- 4 oranges--------------------------- 1.00
C. L. Rush------------------- ----- do------------- 1 orange---------------------------- 1.00
Maria Gonzalez --------------- ----- do 1------- mango---------------------------- 1.00
A. C. Jaurez ----------------- ----- do ------------- 3 tangerines ------------------------ 1.00
Mrs. Aurelia Torres----------- ----- do-------------- 11 sweet limes, 1 mamey, 3 mamney 1.00
seed, 3 oranges.
0. Garcia -------------------- ----- do------------- 5 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Benj. Abramson -------------- ----- do------------- 6 iangovs ---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Julia Pena -------------- ----- do------------- 3 avocados, 1 plant ------------------- 2.00
Pedro Morales ---------------- ----- do------------- 6 mangoes, 7 oranges------------------ 1.00
Benito Morales --------------- ----- do------------- imango---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Francisca, Rodriguez------ ----- do------------- 12 plants, I sweet lime, 1 mango, 1 1. 00
marricy seed.
Ambrose Gaspar -------------- ----- do------------- 1 mango --------------------------- 1.00
Tomasita Zuniga--------------- ----- do ------------ -- 5 plants ------------------------------ 1.00
Isabella Mendiola de Longoria --------- do --------------1I avocado seed------------------------ 1.00
Mrs. J. J. Winslow------------- ----- do -------------- I avocadlo---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Refuigio Montes---------- ----- do -------------- 10 avocados--------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Francisca Sanchez--------- ----- do -------------- 1 avocado, 1 mango-------------------- 1.00
Mrs. M. G. Trujello ----------- ------ do -------------- 3 oranges, 2 avocados, 8 sweet limes.---. 3.00
Manuel Avila------------------ ----- do -------------- 4 ruamey seed------------------------- 1.00
Jesus Pinon-------------------- ----- do -------------- 30 plants, 1 pound tree se-ed, 3 avo- &.00
cadlos, 6 avocado seedl, 17 inameys,
24 mangoes.
Elena Martinez --------------- ----- do------------- 1 mamney seed --------- --------------- 1. 00
Domingo Cortez -------------- ----- do------------- 2 oranges -----------------------------1. 00
Simona Ronnano ------------- ----- do------------- 10 mangoes ------------------------- 1.00
Josefina Gonzales ------------- ----- do------------- I avocado -------------------------- 1.00
Jesus Saenz------------------- ----- do------------- 15 plants ----------------------------- 1.00
L. G. Benevides. .--- ---------do------------- 2planits---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Maria Arambula --------- ----- do------------- 2 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
L. S. Allen ------------------- ----- do------------- 3mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Margarita Solalinde Garcia ----------d(o------------- 1 man11go---------------------------- 1.00
[gnacio Vasquez -------------- ----- do------------ ----- do..----------------------------- 1.00







72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June


Name Port Contraband PenaltyMatilda de Garcia-------------- Laredo, Tex-------- 2 plants ---------------------------$1 o
Juanita Coronado---------o------ ano---------------------$1. 00
Fernando Martinez------------ ----- do-------------2 3aocaos-------------------------- 1.00.
Ignacio Fernendez------------- ----- do-------------1 anods-------------------------- 1.00,
Eloisa Villenueva ------------- ----- do ---------------dno ---------------------------- 1. 0a
F. J. Barron------------------ ----- do-------------2-- mne,avdo ------------------------- 1. 0&
Gabriel Flores ---------------- ----- do-------------12 mangoes,------d------------------ 1. 0a
Ramon Perez----------------- ----- do-------------41mangoes-------------------------- -1.00G
Francisco Moreno------------- ----- do-------------2 4mangoes --------------------------- 1.0W
Mrs. Bibioria de Esquivo ------ ----- do-------------42 naods------------------------- 1.00
Pedro Omaya----------------- ----- do-------------i4maoadsy------------------------- 1.00
Roberto Zuniga --------------- ----- do-------------91 aocados------------------------- 1. 0&
Miss L. 0. Tamez------------- ----- do-------------i anods-------------------------- 1.00G
Ernestina Guerara------------- ----- do-------------3 1aodos------------------------- 1.00
Picosa Dumnas ---------------- ----- do-------------1 anods-------------------------- 1. 0a
Julio Munoz------------------ ----- do-------------lavmcao seed------------------------ 1.00
Andres Flores----------------- ----- do-------------3 images avocados ------------------ 1. oo)
Ramona Munoz ----------------- o----- ------ 1 ag--------- 3mnos vcd----------------- 1.00
Pablo de Jesus Garza ---------- ----- do-------------2 1aodos------------------------- 1.00
E. Riviera-------------------- ---- -do-------------1 2aoage -------------------------- 1.00o
Bargoza Rate-near------------ do 2------- 1at lants-------------------------- 1.0o0
Gewnimo Martinez --------------do--------- poanes-------------------------- 1.0oo
Anton-io Compos -------------- ----- do---------------one---------------------------- 1.00
J. R. Wallace----------------- ----- do ------------12 ---onges------------------------- 1.0oo
H. P. Stewart----------------- ---- do-------------7 12loans--------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Jessie F. McDonA d ------ ----- do..------------- 1 cactus plant----------------------- 1.00
A. G. Barrera----------------- ----- do -------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00
Regina Cadena --------------- ----- do------------- 4 mameys -------------------------- 1.0oo
Mrs. Felipe Lozano de Botello --------- do------------- 4 avocados ------------------------- 1. 00
Petra S. de Cardinas----------- ----- do------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1.00)
ACop---- ------- -----o--------------- cacti plants ----------------------- 1.00
Mrs Hazel C. Dunning -------- ----- do------------- 14 grapefruit------------------------ 1.0oo
Senon Ornelas ---------------- ----- do ------------- 4 avocados, 20 lemon grass plants, 25 9.75
rose cuttings, 125 tuberose bulbs, 6
M. S Cobett----------------guavas, 5 oranges.
MS.Cret----- -----o---------------1I coconut--------------------------- 1.00
Alpedo Munoz---------------- ----- do------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Aurora Martinez Garcia -------- do------------- 1 mamey--------------------------- 1.00
Anestacio Barrazan------------ ----- do------------ ----- do ----------------------------- 1.00
Benalde Ramon -------------- ----- do------------- 1 plant----------------------------- 1.00
Juan Charles ----------------- ----- do------------- 9 avocados ---------------------- --- 1.00
C. K. Sibley------------------ ----- do------------- 7 plants---------------------------- 1. 00
Juan Garcia------------------ ----- do------------- 3 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Evan Edwards --------------- ----- do------------- 2 papayas, 3 mangoes ----------------- 1.00
D. E. Morin------------------ ----- do------------- 2 avocados ------------------------- 1.00
Josefa Martinez --------------- ----- do------------- 14 mangoes ------------------------- 1.00
Maria Helena Longoria -------- ----- do------------- 5 mangoes ------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Anita Aldajase----------- ----- do------------- 1 avocado -------------------------- 1.0
Mrs. H. M. Martinez----- -do-----2 mnos- -----------------.. 1. 00
Mrs. Hermendez Rameriz------ ----- do-------------1 plmantos -------------------------- 1.00
Rafaela Rendon -------------- ----- do------------- 4 plants ---------------------------- 1.00
Chester N. Smith ------------- ----- do------------- 5 avocados ------------------------- 1. 00
Mrs. R. W. Lawson----------- ----- do------------- 1 mango---------------------------- 1.00
Mrs. Olivires de Laures -------- ----- do ---------do--------------- ------------------ 1.00
Mrs. Esther'Lawson --------------do----- ----------do ----------------------------- 1.00
Fred Solirio ------------------ ----- do------------- 2 mangoes-------------------------- 1.00
Alfredo Macias --------------- ----- do------------- 14 pomegranates--------------------- 1.00
Mary Louisa Ramivez--------- ----- do------------- 1 mango---------------------------- 1.00
Lorenza Aguilar --------- I------ Mercedes, Tex------ 1 plant----------------------------- 1. 00
Estravel Tamez--------------- ----- do------------- 5 corms---------------------------- 1.00
Joseph Sauriquez--------------- San Ysidro, Tex--4 sugarcane stalks, 8 pears------------- 1.00
M. D. Broyles---------------- ----- do------------- 5 tangerines, 5 apples ----------------- 1.00












ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.
P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant. F. H. SPENcER, Business Manager. ROLLA P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL CoLcom, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMnBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigatians. D. L. VAN DINE, inr Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, inr Charge, Division of Cotton Inscct Investigations. F. C. BIsHoPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, D)ivison of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge. Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GAnDDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCmER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge. Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters, Harlingen, Tex.).
A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).
73



















U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 19358











S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 136 Issued December 1938


United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine another official announcements ------------------------------------------------ 75
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)--------------- 75
Gypsy moth quarantine revised ----------------------------------------------------- 75
Revision of quarantine and regulations------------------------------------------------ 76
Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------------------------- 84
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ------------------------------ 84
Administrative instructions- Fumigation of onions by mrethyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator carfrom the area listed in regulation 5 of quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 475)------------------------------------------------------------ 84
Administrative instruct ions-Fun] igat ion of tomatoes by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 480)------------------------------------------------- 85
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments------------------ 86
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions under Japanese beetle quarantine advanced to September 20 for the year 1938 --------------------------------------------86o
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappings into the United States------------------------------------------------------ 87
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49666) -------------------------------------- 87
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products------------------------------------------ 87
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine----------------------------------------------- 87
Miscellaneous items------------------------------------------------------------------- 87
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white-fringed beetle -------87
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle---------------- 88
Plant-quaran tine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 306, supplement No. 5) --- 88 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French zone of -Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised) --- 88 Plant-quaran tine import restrict ions, I? epublic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement No. 1)- 99 Plan t-q uaran tine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 1) 99 Plan t-quarantine import restrict ions, Coim onwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476) --------- 100
Plan t-quarantine import restrictions, fiepublic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 47-7, superseding
Metporandum to Chief Inspectors September 1, 1931)---------------------------------- 110
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q. 45S) 112 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479))-- 116
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -------------------------------- 119
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-------------------------------- 121



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

GYPSY MOTH QUARANTINE REVISED

(Press notice)
SEPTE3,1n 30. 1938.
The quarantine and regulations relating to gypsy moth and lu'uwi-tniil moth infestations in New England have been revised, effective September 29, the Acting Secretary of Agriculture, Harry L. Brown, -anniouniced today.
The principal changes are the release of certain areas froiii rcg',tll;tionl and the change in designation of certain other areas from that of lightly iiifested to generally infested.
As a result of scouting of tile past three season,., condlitions along the itortliern border of the regulated area were found to lbe such that certain town,--, in Coos County, N. H-., and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lainoihle, and Rutland, in Vermont, including a granite and( nlarlble district -.111d anl area from which quantities of Christmnas trees are shipped, could be relca-sed from regulation.
104498-38-1 75






BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE EJUIY-SePt.

The increased numbers of gypsy moth egg clusters found in parts of Maine have been sufficient, however, to justify classifying as generally infested, parts of the six counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, in that State, as well as parts of the counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor, in Vermont, and a district in Coos County, N. H., formerly found to be lightly infested.


GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE NO. 45)
REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS


INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The principal changes in this revision of the quarantine and the regulations are (1) the release from regulation of certain towns in Coos County, N. H., and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of Coos County, N. H., parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor. The quarantine as revised provides for modifications. of its restrictions in accordance with facts as to pest risk found by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and set forth in administrative instructions..
Former regulations 2 and 4 have been discontinued and the present regulations have been renumbered.

SUMMARY
The regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont. The restricted articles, unless exempted by administrative instructions, are as follows: (1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known as Christmas trees, and parts thereof, and evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and their parts; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products (regulation 1).
Under these, regulations no restricted articles shall be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested area to the lightly infested area, except under a certificate or permit (regulation 3).
Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infested area are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of tbat area, and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement unless such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and are certified under the provisions of regulation 4.
Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed to be moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points without a certificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificate may be substituted in the case of certain classes of movement within the gypsy moth regulated areas (regulation 3).
Woody plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on condition that each box or package is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking requirements, and similar details, see regulations 4 to 10, inclusive.
To arrange for inspection and certificates, address Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.
S. A. RoHwim,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45 (REVISED)
(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)
I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it Is necessary to quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, to prevent the spread of two injurious insects-the gypsy moth (Portlictria dispar L.) and the brown-tail moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea Don.)-not herefore widely distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under the authority conferred by section S of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do hereby quarantine the States of Mlaine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known and described as "Christmas trees," and parts thereof, and evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts thereof, known and described as "'Christnmas greens and greenery"; (2) forestplant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles. car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants excepting seeds and fruit ; and (4) stone and quarry products, shall not be shipped. offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved. or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas, in a quarantined State, now or hereafter designated b)y the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when said State shall have provided for and enforced such control and regulatory measures with respect to such designated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deenied adequate to prevent the spread of the gypsy mnoth and brown-tail moth : Awl pro ridled further, That, whenever, in any year. the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the articles enumerated in the regulations supplemental hereto, making it safe to modify, by making less stringent, thle restrictions contained in any such regulation, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in which the a pplicable regulation should be made less stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and a copy thereof shall be mailed to the common carriers doing business in the quarantined area affected and eve~rv reason, Ilile effort shall be made to give publicity to the said modification of the regulation in the area affected.
Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of September 1938.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] HARRY L2. BROWN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS (EIGHTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45

(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)

REGULATION 1. DEMNrnowNS
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Gypsy rnotl.-The insect known as the gypsy moth (Portheftria disp ,r L.
(M Brown-fail nioth.-The insect known as the browii-tail moth (Ni/f/in i4L phaeorrhioca Don., formerly referred to as Etiproctis cli ry.sorrh oca). I(c) Quarantined area.-Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Arcl ture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the browNN1-tail moth, or both, exist therein.






78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(d) Regulated area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy mofh or brown-tail moth, or both, therefrom.
(e) Generally infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as generally infested with the gypsy moth.
(f) Lightly infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as lightly infested with the gypsy moth
(g) Brown-tail moth infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions ,of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infested with the brown-tail moth.
(h) Restricted articles.-(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known and described as "Christmas trees," and parts thereof, and evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts thereof; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants, excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products.
(i) Moved interstate; interstate movement.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGIJLATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRITONS TO REGULATED AREAS. DESIGNATION
OF REGULATED AREAS; GENERALLY INFESTED AREA; LIGHTLY INFESTED AREA;
BROWN-TAIL MOTH INFESTED AREA
Conditioned upon maintenance on the part of the State concerned of action deemed adequate by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, or both such moths, from the regulated area or areas to other parts of the State, the restrictions of these regulations are limited to the following areas:
(1) REGUTLATED AREAS

Connecticut.-Counties of Hartford, Middlesex, New London, Tolland, and Windham; towns of Barkhamsted, Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County.
Maine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Greenvale, Industry, Jay, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and townships D and E, in Franklin County; all of Hancock County except plantations 3, 4, 35, and 41; .all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including the towns of Magalloway and Richardsontown; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie, and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations, .town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield, Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations 18 and 24, in Washington County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester;
-all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos County lying south of and including the towns of Stratford, Odell, Dummer, and Cambridge.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham, Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Concord, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County; town of Elmore, in Lamoille County; towns of Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, and Wallingford, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.

(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREA
For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territory designated above is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the generally infested and lightly infested areas, respectively, and part of such regulated area is also designated as brown-tail moth infested.

(3) Lightly Infested Area
The following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightly infested area:
Connecticut.-County of Middlesex; towns of Avon, Berlin, Bristol, Burlington, Farmington, Marlboro, New Britain, Newington, Plainville, Rocky Hill, Southington, and West Hartford, in Hartford County; towns of Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County; towns of East Lyme, Lyme, and Old Lyme, in New London County.
Maine.-Towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Freeman, Greenvale, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, and Weld, and townships D and E, in Franklin County; towns of Amherst, Aurora, Iiucksport, Dedham, East)rook, Franklin, Gouldsboro, Hancock, Lamoine, Mariaville, Orland, Osborn Plantation, Otis, Penobscot, Sorrento, Sullivan, Trenton, Verona, Waltham, city of Ellsworth, and townships or plantations numbered 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, 22, 28, 32, 33, 34, 39, and 40, in Hancock County; towns of Andover, Andover North surplus, Byron, C., C. surplus, Grafton, Hanover, Magalloway, Newry, Richardsontown, Riley Grant, Roxbury, and Upton, in Oxford County; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, D)ixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Hol(len, Hudson. Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Stetson, Sunmmit, and Veazie, and cities of Bangor, BIrewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot Coutnty; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxeroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, I'arkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piseataquis County ; towns of Anson, Athens, Bingham, Brighton Plantation, Ca mbridge, Concord, Cornville, Enmbden, Hiarmony, Hartland, Highland, L(ex ingiton, Madison, Mayfield, Moscow. New Portland, Palmyra, Pleasant Ridge Plant tion, I ipley, St. Albans, and Solon, in Somerset County; towns of Irooks, Frankfort, Jackson, Knox, Monroe, Prospect, Searsport, Stockton Springs, Swanville, Thorndike. Waldo. Winterpo rt, and the city of Belfast, in WalVdo Country; towns of IHeddington, ("'herryfield. ('olumbia, Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and plantations 18 and 24, in Washington County.
Massachliusetts.-Towns of Charlemont, HIawley, IIe:n ik and Howe. in Franklin County; towns of (Chester and Toll nd, in lampden Colunty: townts4 of ('ummington, Huntington, Middlefield, P'lainfield, and Worthingt on, in 11ipshtire County.
New Hampshire.-Town of Harts Location, in Carroll County; towns of Beans Grant, Cambridge, Carroll, Chandler Purclhase, Crawford Grant, (rwford P'uirchase, Cutts Grant, Dalton, Dummer, IIadleys Purchase, Jefferson, Kilkenny,






80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Lancaster, Low & Burbank Grant, Milan, Nash & Sawyer Location, Northumberland, Odell, Randolph, Sargent Purchase, Stark, Stratford, Success, Thompson & Meserve Purchase, and Whitefield, in Coos County; towns of Bath, Bethlehem, Franconia, Landaff, Lisbon, Littleton, Lyman, and Monroe, in Grafton County.
Rhode Island.-Town of New Shoreham (Block Island). in Newl)ort County.
Vermont.-Towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham, Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Concord, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County; towi of Elmore, in Lamoille County; towns of Braintree, Brookfield, Chelsea, Corinth, Orange, Randolph, Topsham, Strafford, Tunbridge, Vershire, Washington, West Fairlee, and Williamstown, in Orange County; towns of Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, and Wallingford, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County; towns of Brookline, Dover, Halifax, Jamaica, Londonderry, Marlboro, Newfane, Somerset, Stratton, Townshend, Wardsboro, Whitingham, Wilmington, and Windham, in Windham County; towns of Andover, Baltimore, Barnard, Bethel, Bridgewater, Cavendish, Ludlow, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, Rochester, Royalton, Sharon, Stockbridge, Weston, West Windsor, and Woodstock, in Windsor County.

(4) Generally Infested Area
All parts of the regulated area not designated as lightly infested in section
(3) hereof, shall comprise the generally infested area.

(5) Brown-tail Moth Infested Area
The following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated as the brown-tail moth infested area:
Maine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry, Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County; towns of Bar Harbor, Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hancock County, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county; towns of Albany, Bethel, Brownfield, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark, Dixfield, Fryeburg, Greenwood, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, Mason, Milton Plantation, Norway, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Rumford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner, Sweden, Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; cities of Bangor and Brewer, and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Hermon, Newburgh, Orrington, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County; and towns of Canaan, Fairfield, Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittsfield, Skowhegan, Smithfield, and Starks, in Somerset County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin, Blackstone, Bolton, Boyleston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Menden, Milford, Millbury, Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royalston, Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city of Worcester, in Worcester County.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County except the town of Jackson; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.
Verrnont.-Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns of Bradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County; towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and Westminster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Springfield, Weatherford, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.

REGULATION 3. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
Certification required.-Except as otherwise provided in this regulation:
(1) No restricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor






19381 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

from the generally infested area to the lighly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.
(2) Christmas trees and evergreen boughs.-Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known and described as "Christmas trees," and parts thereof over 1 foot in length, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 4 hereof), shall not be moved interstate to any point outside of such area and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement. Such articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be moved interstate from the generally infested area under the inspection and certification prescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.
(3) Shipments from brown-tail moth infested area.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or other parts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved interstate from the area designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point outside thereof unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector, except that as to such movement wholly within the generally infested gypsy-moth area or wholly within the lightly infested gypsy-moth area, or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy-moth area, a valid State nursery inspection certificate of the State from which the shipment is made may be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.
(4) Shipments within regulated areas unrestricted.-Other than as prescribed in paragraph (3) hereof, and in regulation 7, no restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of restricted articles wholly within the generally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area or from the lightly infested area to the generally infested area.
(5) Cut flowers and greenhouse-grown plants.-In the case of woody plants which are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselves and the cut flowers thereof may be moved interstate without inspection or
-certification' under these regulations on condition that each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
(6) Herbaceous plants unrestricted.-No restrictions' are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of strawberry plants, or of other herbaceous annual or perennial plants or parts thereof.

REGULATION 4. CONDITIONs GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES OF INSPECTION

(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.-Persons intending to move restricted articles interstate shall make application therefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products or stone and quarry products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location, and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be moved interstate so that they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspection will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and in condition to make inspection easily practicable.
(b) Nursery-grown stoek.-AVith respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the pi-esentation of a valid State certificate stating that the nursery or lot of nursery stock in question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and ce-t i fying that it is apparently free from infestation with gypsy and brown-tail m ntls. Such State certification shall be renewed each year, shall be Nase(1 on aII inspection made as promptly as practic-able after tile egg-haying period of the trypsy moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certifica tion, until tihe following egg-hatching period, excelut thai, pending reinspection Ali1lIlents may be inspected and certified for int(,rsta to movement on the basiss of the State certification of the preceding year. Whenever any n rsery or independent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipment tll(, rfroln, is
Shipments of such plants and flowers from the area regulated under the T:i:mnese beetle quarantine are subject to the certification requirements of that quarantlne.






82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE EJUIY-SePtreported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is determined by a Federal inspector, further certification for interstate movement from such nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has, been freed from infestation and has been again inspected-and certified by the State to be apparently clean except that during such periods of refusal, Federal inspection and certification of individual shipments of nursery stock from nurseries being freed from infestation may be given, provided a special certificate showing freedom from infestation has been issued therefor by a, State inspector after examination of the material in each such shipment. During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by him as free froin any infestation, either by egg masses or larvae, it may then be lined up and thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in manner and method satisfactory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been thus inspected and treated.
(c) Native trees and shrubs.-With respect to living trees and plants notgrown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant specifying.the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement, if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the, owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is, required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation with either the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification may be refused as to the intended shipment and as to other similar shipments of trees orplants originating on the same property or in the same locality.
(d) Forest products and stone and quarry products.-Certificates of inspection authorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone and, quarry products may be issued under either of the following conditions: (1) When the articles to be moved interstate have actually been inspected and' found free from infestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of infestation. With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards orother places where forest products are assembled for shipment, as a condition of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such placesshall be cleaned up and kept free from gypsy moth infestation.
(e) Charges for storage, etc.-All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection or disinfection other than the services. of the inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.
(f) Use of certificates.-Certificates of inspection will be issued only forplants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are free from, infestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so, determined by all inspector. The use of such certificates -in connection with plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are not in compliance with these regulations is unlawful.
(g) Report of certiflcates.-Persons to whom certificates are issued shall report at time of shipment on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles to points outside the regulated area.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS, GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS. WITHOUT
INSPECTION, AND THE REPORTING OF SHIPMENTS
Permits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may be issued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed, and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of the infested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and safeguarded in such manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are not- infested with thegypsy moth or brown-tail moth.
Persons to whom permits are issued shall report at time of shipment on forms
provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles to points outside the regulated area.





1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83


RIDGULATION 6. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION
(a) Every box, basket, bale, or other container of the articles restricted for which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and the shipper shall securely attach to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate ,or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany the vehicle.
(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the shipment.

REGULATION 7. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE
Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting restricted articles within the regulated areas shall not be moved interstate until the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regulated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such restricted articles shall be moved interstate.

REGULATION 8. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT
Every car, vehicle, basket, box, bale, or other container moved interstate which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 9. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS
Certificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 10. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMI NTAL, SCI:NIFIC, OR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental, scientific, or educational Irl p )oses, oni such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescrilled by the Bureau of Iitolnbdogy and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology anti Plant Quarantine.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after September 29, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated November 4, 1935.
Done at the city of Washiington this 2Sth day of Septemler 19,3S.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Departmient of Agriculture.
[SEAL] II.\IRY L. I ,ROWN,
Acting Secretary of AgriduhtUrc.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. #35), :)s amended, provides that no person shall ship or offer for slhipment to any conmoii carrier,
104498-38--2






84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE I-TuIY-SePt.

nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds or any other article * specified in the notice of quarantine in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the. provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, -upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment Dot exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
[The foregoing revision was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

NOTICE To GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH 1ZEwSPAPERS

UNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, TVashington, D. C., September 28, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 45 on account of the. gypsy moth and brown-tall moth, and of regulations supplemental thereto,. effective September' 28, 1938. The principal changes effected by this revision are
(1) the release from regulated area of certain towns in Coos County, N. H., and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of' Coos County, N. H., and parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor.
Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations may be obtained from the. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department ofAgriculture, Washington, D. C. HARRY L. BRowN,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
B. E. P. Q. 475.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-FUMIGATION OF ONIONS BY METHYL BROMIDE'
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF ONIONS MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR,
CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
(Approved July 14, 1938; effective July 19, 1938)

Regulation' 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine(No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of onions via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points, outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when the onions have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of' the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened tinder the supervision of an inspector.

TRE ATMENT AUTHORIZED
The treatment described herein has been f ound to be effective against the Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification of onions moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under thesupervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

TREATMENT METHOD
Fumigation of onions in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the onions and bunkers of the cars. for a period of 2 hours, during which time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less than 700 F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector. At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under standard ventilation.
In authorizing the movement of onions fumigated according to the requirements stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of injury.
Caution.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of onions. It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q. 480.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-FUMIGATION OF TOMATOES BY METHYL BROMIDE AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF TOMATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
(Approved August 18, 1938; effective August 22, 1938)

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (2) of the Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 13 when they have been handled or treated under the supervision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any infestation.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED
The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification of tomatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 13 and October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD
Fumigation of tomatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a dosage of 2 pounds per 1.000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the tomatoes and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours, during which time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less than 70' F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector. At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall he opened, the plugs removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under standard vent ila t ion.
In authorizing the movement of tomatoes fumigated according to the requirements stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States )Department of Agriculture or to aiy of i1s employees inll the event of injury.






,86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE 1Ju1Y-SePt

Caution.-Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of tomatoes. It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches tor ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.
AvERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 20, 1938.
Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations were removed for the season at midnight, Mon, day, September 19, the Secretary of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain in force through October 15.
Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables from the entire regulated area and on interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables of any kind via refrigerator car or motortruck from certain sections of the regulated area. The order, issued today, releases the fruits and vegetables from that requirement nearly 4 weeks earlier than is provided in the regulations.
Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when adult beetles are in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period, which is now apparently over throughout the regulated area. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other parts of plants will remain in full force and effect through October 15.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers, aquatic plants, and portions of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are
-not affected by this amendment.
'TERMINATION DATE ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE RESTRICTIONS UNDER JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE NO. 48) ADVANCED TO SEPTEMBER 20 FOR THE YEAR 1938

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
-relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (sixteenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the entire regu-lated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations; therefore,
-it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 20, 1938. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 20, 1938, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 1-9th day of September 1-938.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
rThe foregoing notice was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the ,quarantined areaj






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS-APPLICATION FOR PERMITS (T. D. 49666)

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON
WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES (T. D. 39645, T. D. 40573, and T. D.
49398)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOM.NS, Washington, D. C., July 29, 1938.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by the Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United States of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference for articles 579, 580, 581 (c), and 583 of the Customs Regulations of 193T.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs[Then follows the text of the amendment.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
REVOCATION OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, August 1, 1938.
Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 15-A series) pertaining to the whitepine blister rust in Oregon has been revoked, effective May 24, 1938. This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937, published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1937, and onl page 44 of the August 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the restrictions previously imposed on the acceptance for mailing of parcels containing five-leafed pines and currant and gooseberry plants intended for shipment within the State of Oregon.
Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be governed accordingly. The removal of the Oregon quarantine, however, does not in any way affect the provisions of Federal Quarantine No. 63 on account of the white-pine blister rust.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Th ird Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER UNITED STATES QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
(Press notice)
AUGUST 19, 1N'18.
A public hearing to consider a Federal quarantine because of whitefringed beetle infestations in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, anid Mississippi was announced today by Secretary Wallace,. Thie hearing will be iii ourt Room 206 of the Post Office Building, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. in., September 15, 1938.
The white-fringed beetle, known to occur iii South Amierica, has hecoiiees tablishied in several areas in the four Southern States, where ail exicusi-e' survey in the current season has resulted in newv findings.






88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE 1Ju1Y-SePtThis insect may be carried from place to place through commerce, especially that involving agricultural products and used implements. The eggs are deposited in soil and on various articles that may be moved in commerce, and may remain viable more than 5 months, hatching when conditions are favor.able. The, larvae can be transported with products which carry small quantities of soil. Adults may be carried attached to almost any object within
-their reach.
Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae have ,caused serious damage to numerous field and garden crops, and are exceedingly destructive to several important crops. It is reasonable to assume that
-the larvae and adults will attack many plants that are widely grown in ,other sections of the country and, if allowed to spread, may become a serious pest in other agricultural regions of the United States, the Secretary said.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING THE STATES OF ALABAMA, FLORIDA, LOUISIANA, AND MISSISSIPPI ON ACCOUNT OF THE WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
AUGUST 18, 1938.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the white-fringed beetle (Naupactus leacoloma Boh.), an insect pest dangerous to agriculture, and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exists in the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and that a closely related species of Naupactus exists in the State of Mississippi.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and of restricting or prohibiting the movement from these States, or regulated portions thereof, ,of the following articles:
(1) Soil as such or in connection with nursery stock, plants, or other products, articles, or things; and (2) farm products and such other articles as may be deemed necessary to prevent the dissemination of these insects in any stage of development. I
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with the Plant Quarantine Act of -'Lugust 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134. 1165), a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in Court Room No. 206 of the Post Offlee, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. m. September 15, 1938, in order that any persons interested in the proposed quarantine may appear .and be heard, either in person or by attorney.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

P. Q. C. A. 306, Supplement No. 5.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND

SEPTEMBER 10, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS AND BANANAS PROHIBITED

NeW Zealand Customs Import Prohibition Order No. 3 of May 11, 1938, gazette May 12, 1938, prohibits, save with the consent of the Minister of Customs, the importation of fresh fruit of any of the following kinds, namely, oranges, mandarin oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and bananas.
Lim A. STRONG,
Chief, Burcatt of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 444, Revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JULY 1, 1938.
The revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the French zone of Morocco has been prepared for the information of nurserymen,






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by hIarry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge, Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his translations of the French texts of the dahirs and decrees promulgated by the Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and Colonization, and more recently from those of the Director of Economic Affairs of the French zone of the Sherifian Empire (Morocco), and reviewed by the Direction of Economic Affairs.
The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The original dahirs and decrees should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

BASIc LEGISLATION
[Dahir of September 20, 1927: Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 13, 1928. Dahir of April
29, 1933; Bulletin Officiel No. 1076, June 9, 1933]
SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Live insects and, unless preserved in liquids, their eggs, larvae, nymphs, or pupae, cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; dodder seeds (Cscudta spp.), may not be imported except for scientific or official technical purposes. (Dahir of September 20, 1927, articles 1 and 2.)
Plants or parts thereof used as packing material, prohibited unless industrially processed, except those named in the vizirial decree of September 13, 1933.
Living plants, culms, straw, leaves, roots, husks, rachises, and infloresences of Zea mnays L., Sorghum rvuigaure Pers., including all cultivated species of Sorghum or Antdropogon, Pan icum m iliacuin( L., Chactochloa italica) Setaria italica (L.) Beauv., and other species of Panicunlm; any part or residue of Cannabis sativa L. except seeds, liber, and inflorescences; whole plants, living or dead, of Arundo donax L., except peeled or sawn stems used in making packings. (Viziriul decree of August 31, 1932-,'" as amended by vizirial decree of September 3, 1934, and July 12, 1935.)

I MPORTATION RIESTRICI ED
Insects of economic importance: Certain honey-producing and silk-producing insects may be imported into the French zone subject to inspect in (n arrival if properly marked. (Decree of the Director General, March 1, 1928, as amended by decree of May 12, 1937.)
Fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria of economic or sanitary interest may be imported into the French zone subject to examination on arrival. (Decree of the Director General of March 1, 1928.)
Forage-crop seeds of the genera Medicago, Trifoliumn, Lotus, and Ainthyllis, subject to examination for dodder seeds (Cuseuta spp.). (Vizirial decree of May 8, 1933.)
All plants or parts of plants, including seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions, bulbs, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, rhizomes, roots, grain, seeds, and in general, all plant wastes:; manures, fertilizers, containers, and packing materials; lumber and bark, industrially processed plant products,' bran2 straw,2 hay (see below for restrictions on hay), oil cakes; are subject to the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927.
Potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants: Phytosanitary certificate which must attest their freedom from potato wart; in addition, a certificate of supelrvision is required for such products originating in countries invaded by the ('olorado potato beetle, and the products must be packed in new containers which are

s Unrestricted entry authorized by the decree of February 19, 1931, as amended.






90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JulY--SePt.

then officially sealed. (Vizirial decree of August 1, 1936, amended by Vizirial decree of January 23, 1937.)
Hay: Importation subject to the phytosanitary regulations and those relat. ing to the control of parasites and importation permitted only in the form of mechanically compressed bales bound with iron wire. (Vizirial decree of Septemper 13, 1933, article 4.)
Auth orized ports of entry for plant products: Casablanca, Port-Lyautey (Kenitra), and Oujda. (Article 6 of dahir of September 20, 1927, and decree of September 10, 1936.)

IMPORTATION 'UNRESTRICTED
Cereals: Wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize, rice, soybean, and millet; beans, peas, lentils, vetches, garbanzos, coffee, spices, and dried herbs; gums and resins; dried medicinal plants in packages; lumber and bark; industrially dried vegetables, flours, food pastes, brans, oil cakes,- straw, and hay. (Decree of the Director General, February 19, 1931, amended by decrees of November 23, 1934, and May 5, 1937.)
Dried herbarium specimens: Importation not restricted. (Dahir of September 20, 1927, art. 12.)
PHYTOSANITARY REGULATIONS OF THE FRENCH ZONE, SHERIFIAN EMPIRE (MOROCCO)
[Promulgated by the dahir of September 20, 1927; Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 13, 1928]

GENERAL REGULATIONS
DEFINITION OF PLANT PARASITE
ARTICLE 1. The term "plant parasite" designates any animal or plant organism, at any stage of development, that can effect lesions or other injury to wild plants of economic importance, to cultivated plants, to plant products belonging to those categories, or is of such a character as to cause their death or modification.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF INSECTS, FUNGI, BACTERIA, AND DODDER PROHIBITED
The entry into or 'transit through the French zone is prohibited of live insects, the eggs, larvae, nymphs, or pupae of such insects, when not preserved in liquids; cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; and dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.).ENTRY PERMITTED FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

ART. 2. When the articles named in article 1 are intended for scientific purposes or for official technical purposes, they may be admitted to entry if so packed as to prevent their dispersal.
ART. 3. A decree of the Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and Colonization (now Director of Economic Affairs) will determine what species of insects, myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria may be admitted to entry or transit for economic or sanitary interests and the conditions under which they will be admitted.
ART. 4. The Director General and the Director of Public Health and Hygiene may likewise grant temporary derogations from the provisions of article 1.

ENTRY AND TRANSIT CONTROLLED
ART. 5. The entry into, transit through, and movement within the French zone, and the exportation beyond that zone, of the following-named products or articles, are regulated by the provisions of the present dahir:
1. All plants, or parts of plants such as seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions, grafts, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, roots, grain, and seeds, and in general all plant waste.
2. Manures, vegetable fertilizers, composts, soil, even when the latter forms a portion of a package of live plants.
3. Cases, baskets, sacks, wrappers, packing, used props and supports, and any other article or material that has been used for the transportation or handling






1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91

of the products or articles above mentioned, the utilization of which might involve pest risk to crops.
4. Logs, cork, bark, tan, posts, poles, railroad ties, and cordwood.
5. All products of plant origin, such as fruits and vegetables industrially dried, flours, food pastes, bran, oil cakes, straw, and hay.3
6. Plants in pots or balls of earth; potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants. (Decree of the Director General, March 27, 1931; Bulletin Officiel No. 962, April 3, 1931.)
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 6. The ports of entry for the importation or transit of the products named in article 5 are designated in orders of the Director General.
The decree of September 10, 1936, designates the ports of Casablanca and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.
The decree of the Director General of September 10, 1936, authorizes also the' entry of potatoes through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, and Magador, when shipments weighing not less than 20 metric quintals of 100 kilograms are concerned, and through the port of Agadir when shipments weighing not less than. 100 metric quintals are concerned. This decree authorizes also the entry of* used bags through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, Magador, when shipments; weighing less than 20 metric quintals are concerned, and the frontier post of Martimprey du Kiss whatever the weight.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL
ART. 7. The products named in article 5 will be inspected by officials of the Director General of Agriculture on their entry into the French zone and dealt with in accordance with the findings: Release for entry, treatment, relading, or destruction. Inspectors are authorized to withdraw samples from shipments for detailed examination.
This inspection may be extended to other products if the inspector has reason to suspect that they carry plant parasites. Products intended for propagation may be placed under observation for variable periods. The Director General may determine, if occasion requires, the products that, by derogation, shall not be subject to the provisions of this article.

PHYTOSANITkRY CERTIFICATE MAY BE REQUIRED
ART. 8. The list of products named in article 5, shipments of which shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and documents attesting their origin, as well as the conditions according to which these documents must be established, are declared by decree of the Director General. These are potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants.
Compliance with the provisions of this article does not exclude the phytosanitary inspection prescribed by article 7, with all the consequences involved: Refusal of entry, destruction, disinfection, or fumigation, etc.
PACKING AND MARKING

ART. 9. The packing of the products named in article 5 shall be done in such a manner as to permit their inspection and, if necessary, their disinfection or fumigation.'
It should be possible to identify the packages with certainty, failing which, they will be reloaded or destroyed at the option of the consignee.
The opening of containers will be at the expense and risk of the consig-neeo.
SAMPLING SEEDS
ART. 10. The conditions for sampling seeds on their entry into the Frellch zone to disclose the presence of dodder (Cuscuta spp.) will be determined by a decree of the Grand Vizir. In-transit shipments are excepted. Sanplinig is

'The decree of February 19, 1931, amended by those of November 23., 19:4. and May 5, 1937, enumerates the products which shall not fall under the provisions of articles 6, 7, and 9 of the present dahir.
'For approved packing materials see the decree of September 13, 1933, and vizirial decree of August 31, 1932.
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92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

done at the expense of importers in accordance with rates established by the same order. The withdrawal of samples gives no right of indemnity.'

PRODUCTS AFFECTED BY THE LAW
ART. 11. The preceding provisions apply to the products mentioned in article 5 whatever be the means of transportation, even if brought in by members of ships' crews, or by the personnel of railroad or steamship companies, or any other transportation services.
ART. 12. The importation and transit of certain products mentioned in article 5, or of certain others among them from specified countries or localities, may be prohibited by a decree of the Grand Vizir.

BOTANICAL SPECIMENS UNRESTRICTED
The preceding provisions do not apply to dried plants intended for botanical collections.
The Grand Vizir, by decree, may make provisions to facilitate in frontier
localities of the French zone, the exchange of plants with frontier localities.
ARTS. 13 to 35. Domestic procedure.

PHYTOSANITARY CONTROL OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL
The decree of September 10, 1936, as amended by decree of October 16, 1936, Bulletin Officiel No. 1242, September 18, 1936, revokes those of March 1, 1928, February 19, 1931, March 27, 1931, March 31, 1933, and March 19, 1936, of the Director General, and promulgates the following regulations for the enforcement of the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927:

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
ARTICLE 1. The importation and transit of the products named in article 5 of the dahir of September 20, 1927, may be effected only through the ports of Casablanca and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.
ART. 2. Relates to inspection on arrival, etc.

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED VITH EACH SHIPMENT
ART. 2A. Shipments of seedlings (stocks), layers, cuttings, scions, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, roots, cut flowers, must be accompanied by:
1. A copy, certified as correct, of the invoice of the shipment, indicating:
(a) the botanical species and varieties included in the shipment; (b) the name and address of the shipper and of the establishment from which the plant material proceeds; (c) the name and address of the consignee; and
(d) the weight of the packages, as well as their marks and numbers, and their contents.
IMPORTATION PERMITTED OF INSECTS OF ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE
[Decree of the Director General of March 1, 1928: Bulletin Officiel No. 803. March 13,
1928, as amended by the decree of the Director General of May 12, 1937; Bulletin Officiel No. 1282, May 21, 1937]

ARTICLE 1. The insects hereafter named are admitted to entry into and transit through the French zone:
Honey-producing insects: Apis ligustica Spin.; A. mellifica (mellifera) L., honeybee.
Silk-producing insects: Antheraea mylitta Drury, Tasar silkworm; A. pernyi var. yama-mai Guer.; Attacus atlas L.; (Sericaria) Bombyx mori L., silkworm; Philosamia cynthia Drury; (Attacus ricint' Hutton) -Philosamia lunula Walk.; Attacus (Rothschildi) orizaba Westw.; (Platysania) Samia. cecropia L.; Telea polyphemus Cramer.
Cocoons or pupae of Formica rufa L., commonly known as ants' eggs.
The entry of the honey-producing insects is permitted only in (oeufs -de f.ourmis) the adult stage and only in egg and pupal stages of the silk-producing insects.
ART. 2. The entry of these insects may be effected only through the, ports of Casablanca and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

5 See vizirial decree of May 8, 1933, on the importation of forage crop seeds.