Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory annoucements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
8 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 112 (July/Sept. 1932)-S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 119 (Apr./June 1934).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288972
oclc - 12903553
lccn - sn 86033972
System ID:
AA00023075:00003

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Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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State of Florida
Department of Agriculture DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY










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S.R.A., B.E.P.Q. Issued September 1935

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND


REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


1934





These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per.
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations





WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
































UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1935
11324---35










E A. DEPT. Ai.
L. OF PLANt
fODUSTRY



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. RoiiwE, Assistant Chief.
Av RY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. R. P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLor, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. IIAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WnEIITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Inves:igations. F. C. BISIOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. C. H. HADLEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. RI-ARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. HAnoIaD .ioIniIsoN, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CIUATSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. 'I. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. It. SASSCEu, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTILEY, in, Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Wlhi'e Plains, N. Y.).
R. E. McI)oNALD, in Field Charge, Pink BoliEorm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDE;N, in, Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).







TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 118 (JANUARY-MARCH 1934)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements 1---------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ------------- 1
Instructions to postmasters___------------ 1
Instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. P. Q.-359) 1
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ---------_ 12
Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5 ----------------------------- 12
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B. P. Q.-361) 12
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) --------------- 12
Narcissus inspection records for 1933 (B. P. Q.-358) ----------------- 12
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------- 15
Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection ---------------------------- 15
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------- 15
PlInt-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.283, supplement no. 2) ------------------------------------------- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P. Q. C. A.-303,
supplement no. 1) ------------ ------------ ---------- 15
Plant-qiuarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,
supplement no. 8) ----------------------------------------------- 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348,
supplements nos. 1 and 2) --------------------------------------- 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B. P. Q.-360) 17
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,
supplement no. 4) ------------------------------------ -----22
European corn borer-State regulations (B. P. Q.-346, re-ised March 15,
1934) ---------------------------------------------------------- 23
Penalties imposed for viol:itions of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 30
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------------------------- 31

CONTENTS OF NO. 119 (APRIL-JUNE 1934)

Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------- 33
Announcement relating to black stem-rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------- 33
Revised list of barberries and Mahonias classified under black stem-rust
quarantine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-320, second revision) -------------- 33
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) ----------- 35
Sterilization of imported vinifera granes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362)__ 35
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ------------- 36
Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1,
1934_ ----------------------------------------------------------- 26
Miscellaneous items----- ----------------------------------------------- 38
Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged------ 38
Plant-iouarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. I'. Q.-57,
supplement no. 1) ----------------------------------------------- 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Philippine Islands (B. P. Q.-363)___ 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B. P. Q.364) ----------------------------------------------------------- 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,
su plements now 5. (, and 7-.... 4!)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P. Q.-347,
supplement no. 2) ----------------------------------------------- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P.
Q.-355, revised) ----------------------------------------------- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B. P. Q.-350,
supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------- 52
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A.-310,
supplement no. 1) 53
supplement no. 1)-------------------------------------------------53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supplement no. 2) -------------------------------------------------- 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Commonwealth of Australia (P. Q.
C. A.-299, supplement no. 2) 55
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 55
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------------------------- 57

CONTENTS OF NO. 120 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1934)

Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------- 59
Announcements relating to citrus canker quarantine (no. 19) ----------59
Revision of quarantine --------------------------------------------- 59
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47254) -------------- 60
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) -------- 61
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362,
: supplements nos 1 and 2). ----- ------------------ 61
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no.
45) --------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Revision of regulations -------------------------------------------- 61
Notice to general public through newspapers --------------------- 69
1







2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

Quarantine and other official announcements--Continued Page
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ------------ 69
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments 69
Removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables---....---------------- ------------Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------- 70
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ----------- 71
Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to begin September 26 (B. E. P. Q.-367) ------------------------------- 71
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant. and seed quarantine (no. 37)_ 71
Notice to permittees and others interested-willow withes as plant ties
prohibited on plants for entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.365) ----------------------------------------------------------- 71
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -------------- 72
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1). 72
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------- 74
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------ 74
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ----------------------- 74
Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1)-------- ---------------- 74
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47229) --------------- 76
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 15)----------------- 76
Sugarcane quarantine revised-------------------------- ------------- 76
Revision of quarantine ----------------- ----------------------------- 76
Miscellaneous items --------------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P. Q.-347,
supplement no. 3) ----------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies
(B. E. P. Q.-355, revised, supplement no. 1) ------------------------ 78
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenoneproducing plants (P. Q. C. A.-310, supplement no. 2) --------------- 78
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283,
revised, supplement no. 3) ------------------------------------ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.284, supplement no. 9) ------------------------------------------ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised,
supplement no. 2) ---------------------------------------- --80
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.
P. Q.-366) ------------------------------------------------------ 80
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 89
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -------------- 92
CONTENTS OF NO. 121 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1934)
Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------- 93
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70) ----------- 93
Revision of quarantine------------------------------ ----- ---------- 94
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no.
45) --------------------------------------------------------------- 94
Instructions to postmasters --------------94
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)------------- 95
No extension of Japanese beetle regulated area this year------------ 95
Developments in the Japanese beetle situation during 1934 ------------ 95
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------- 98
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 2)_ 98
Notice to general public through newspapers --------------------- 100
Instructions to postmasters------------- -- ------------------ 100
Announcement relating to sugarcane quarantine (foreign) (no. 15) --------- 101
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47298) ------------------- 101
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (domestic) (no. 16) ----- 101
Revision of quarantine_ -------------------------------------------- 101
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------ 102
Announcement relating to sweetpotato quarantine (domestic) (no. 30) ------ 102
Revision of quarantine --------------------------------------------- 102
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------- 103
Calls conferences to consider control of three plant pests ---------------. 103
Fracker and Gaddis to head plant-pest-control division_ -----------------104
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants (P. Q. C. A.-310. supplement no. 3)-__---------- ------ 104
Plant-quarantine export re-trictions. Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283,
revised. supplement no. 4) --------------------------- 105
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q.36-) --- 105
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised,
supplement no. 3) ----------------------------------------------- 112
Pla nt-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.
P. Q.-366. supplement no. 1) ------------------------------------- 112
I'lant-quarantine import restrictions. British Mandate of Palestine
(B. E. P. Q.-370) ---------------------------- 113
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,
supplement no. 10 ----------------------------------------------115
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---------------- 116
Iist of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous
regulations ---------------------------------------------------------- 117
Organizationr of the tsureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. --------------- 24








S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 118 Issued May 1934

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1934



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements-----......---------------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ----------------------------.... 1
Instructions to postmasters............................................................... 1
Instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil
for the Japanese beetle (B.P.Q.-359) ---------------- --------------------------............. 1
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)............................... 12
Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5----------------------------------------.............. 12
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B.P.Q.-361)....................... --------------------12
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62)-----------------------------............................ 12
Narcissus inspection records for 1933 (B.P.Q.-358) ......................................... ----------------------------------12
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ............------------------------------------.................................. 15
Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection ...------------------------------------.............. 15
Miscellaneous items --------------------------.------------------------------------------ 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P.Q.C.A.-283, supplement
no. 2) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P.Q.C.A.-303, supplement no. 1).. 15 Plant-quarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 8). 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.-348, supplements nos.
1 and 2)..----------------------------------------------------------------................. 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B.P.Q.-360).....-----------------.......... 17
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 4).. 22 European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised Mar. 15, 1934) ---------------................. 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act----........-------------------------............ 30
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------ ----------------------------...... 31



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, February 20, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the twelfth revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (Quarantine Order No. 48, U.S. Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be governed. The important changes and features are indicated in the Introductory Note and Summary. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



B.P.Q.-359 MARCH 14, 1934.

INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS,
FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Existing disinfection and fumigation methods authorized for elimination of the Japanese beetle from nursery stock and other plant materials, as well as from sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, have been revised and consolidated
54156-34- 1





2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

in these instructions. Methods outlined herein are to be employed as a basis of quarantine certification under regulations 6 and 7 of Quarantine No. 48, Revised.
Issuance of these instructions cancels the methods of treatment prescribed in P.Q.C.A.-224, P.Q.C.A.-239, P.Q.C.A.-265, P.Q.C.A.-307, P.Q.C.A.-317,
P.Q.C.A.-322, P.Q.C.A.-333, and B.P.Q.-339.
A. S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
i. Treatment of soil in the absence of plants---------................----------------------------------- 2
A Potting soil ................----------------------------------------------------------------........ 2
1. Carbon disulphide----------- ---------------------------------------------....................... 2
2. Naphthalene .............................................------------------------------------------------------------ 3
3. Steam .........................................................----------------------------------------------------------------- 3
4. Lead arsenate ...................................................----------------------------------------------------------- 3
B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments ..................................------------------------------ 4
1. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusive ---------------------.. 4
2. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusive---------------------........................ 4
C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, ete -----------------------------------....... 4
1. Lead arsenate-----------------------------------------------------------..................... 4
2. Carbon disulphide ------------------------------------------------------.......... 5
3. Carbon disulphide emulsion---------------..--------------------------------------------- 5
4. Naphthalene-- ----------------------------------------------------------------......... 6
2. Treatment of soil about the roots of plants --------------------------------------------.......... 6
A. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with water-------------...................--------- 6
B. Treatment with hot water-------------------------------------------------------........................................ 6
C. Carbon disulphide dip...............................................................------------------------------------------------------- 7
D. Carbon disulphide emulsion, field treatment---------------------------------------............................................... 7
E. Lead arsenate, field treatments---..................---------------------------------------------........................................... 10
3. Miscellaneous treatments--------------------------------------------------------.................................................. 10
A. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acid.................... -----------------10
B. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanide............................ 11
C. Fumigation of berries with carbon disulphide--------------------------------------............................................. 11
D. Fumigation of berries with ethylene oxide-----------....................----------------------------.............................. 11

1. TREATMENT OF SOIL IN THE ABSENCE OF PLANTS
A. Potting soil
Potting soil may be treated by the use of carbon disulphide, naphthalene, heat treatment, or lead arsenate. All of these treatments are effective and do not impair soil fertility when applied as recommended.
A. 1. Fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used to fumigate soil in which plants are to be grown. Caution: Carbon disulphide is a dangerous chemical. The vapor is inflammable and explosive when mixed with air at concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 parts of carbon disulphide to 99 to 50 parts of air. At these concentrations any spark is liable to cause an explosion. At a temperature of 2970 F. it may take fire spontaneously, and it may ignite spontaneously in the presence of certain metals, particularly copper, at considerably lower temperatures. It should be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric light bulbs, heating coils, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, cigarettes, or pipes should never be brought into the same room. These facts must be brought to the attention of a responsible person at the nursery before the fumigation is applied to the soil.
Equipment.-The fumigation must be done in a tight box or bin, which may be made of metal, wood, concrete, brick, stone, or other material, providing the top, sides, and bottom are gas proof. It should be of a size adapted to the quantity of soil to be treated.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated with carbon disulphide, providing the soil is friable and is thrown loosely into the box. It should be dry or only moist. Wet soil must never be fumigated.
Temperature.-The effectiveness of fumigation with carbon disulphide depends, to a large extent, upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperature the more readily the vapor diffuses through the soil, and the more easily the immature stages of the beetle are killed by its action. The temperature must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied and it must not fall below 400 during the course of the treatment; otherwise, it will be necessary to fumigate the soil again to insure destruction of the immature stages of the beetle.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 350 cubic centimeters (1 pound) to 1 cubic yard of soil.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

Application to soil.-Any quantity of soil may be fumigated, providing the carbon disulphide is distributed uniformly throughout. One method is to fumigate the soil while the box is being filled. Place 18 inches of soil loosely in the box. Inject carbon disulphide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for each square yard of surface, distributing the material uniformly in holes 2 inches deep and 18 inches apart, 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soil immediately after the liquid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil has been treated, put in 18 inches more, and fumigate it the same as the first. This can be repeated until the container is filled.
Another method is to fumigate the soil after the box has been filled. This is done by making holes from the surface to the different levels, so that the carbon disulphide can be applied in the same positions as by the other method. The liquid, in this case, must be poured into the deep holes through a tube, or injected to insure its reaching the proper level.
Period of fumigation.-The container must be sealed, and left undisturbed for at least 48 hours.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 2. Fumigation of potting soil with naphthalene
Material.-Flake naphthalene free from tar must be used for fumigation.
Caution.-Naphthalene will burn. It must be kept away from fire.
Equipment.-It is not necessary to have a special fumigation box in which to fumigate soil with naphthalene.
Condition of soil.-Dry or moist soil of any type may be fumigated with naphthalene. Wet soil cannot be fumigated satisfactorily.
Temperature.-The effectiveness of the treatment depends to a large extent upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperature the more effective is the fumigation. The temperature must never be allowed to fall below 500 F.
Dosage.-Five pounds of flake naphthalene must be used to a cubic yard of soil.
Mixing.-The success of the fumigation depends to a large extent upon the thoroughness with which the flakes are mixed with the soil. Spread the flakes on the soil and mix thoroughly by shoveling over at least three times.
Period of fumigation.-Soil must be left undisturbed for a week after fumigation.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 3. Treatment of potting soil with steam
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a boiler that will generate an ample supply of steam, and equipment for properly dispersing the steam throughout the soil.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated with steam, providing it is friable.
Temperature.-The soil must be heated throughout to a temperature of 1300 F.
Period of treatment.-The soil temperature must be maintained at 1300 F. for 30 minutes after it has reached this temperature throughout the mass.
Storage of soil.-After treatment with steam, soil must be so stored and handled as to prevent reinfestation.

A. 4. Treatment of potting soil with lead arsenate
Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil to be treated must be in a friable condition. Wet soil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The treatment is recommended only for soils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Season.-Lead arsenate must be applied before August 1. When plants potted in soil treated as prescribed are carried over until the following year,. they may be again eligible for certification between October 1 and the following June 15 of the second year if, on August 1 of the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of 2 pounds per cubic yard. This treatment cannot be relied upon to eliminate the infestation in the soil if applied in the fall or in. the spring when the larvae are fully developed. It is important to have poison in the soil at the time the eggs are hatching.
Dosage.-Acid lead arsenate must be used at the rate of 2 pounds to each cubic yard of soil.
Application to soil.-The lead arsenate must be uniformly mixed with the soil This may be accomplished either by hand shoveling or by the use of a machine






4 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

mixer, such as a concrete mixer. Plants must be free from soil when potted in soil treated in this manner.
Period of treatment.-Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in the above manner by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following October 1 and the subsequent June 15.
Handling of treated soil.-When plants, potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil, are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of these beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at the rate of 1,300 pounds per acre.

B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments
Regulation 7, quarantine no. 48, authorizes certification of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, providing it has been treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If the carbon disulphide method is used, follow the detailed instructions given for the fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide (1, A. 1). The only other method which may be used is steam, in which case the instructions for steam treatment should be followed (1, A. 3).
Top soil or other materials from within 12 inches of the soil surface, to receive certification, must be treated throughout the year.
Pit sand, from infested areas, must be treated during the period June 15 and October 15, inclusive, since infestation is likely to occur between the time of removal from the pits and loading in the cars.
B. 1. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusive
Type of car.-Tight box cars must be used during this period. Open cars may be used providing they are protected from reinfestation while within the regulated area.
Doors.-The doorways of box cars must be boarded up and covered with heavy paper up to a point beyond the height of the sand or soil in the car.
Depth of soil or sand.-The sand or soil must not be loaded in the car to such a depth as would restrict the overhead working space and hamper the work of the men performing the fumigation.
Keeping doors closed.-Certified cars must have doors closed and fastened while en route within the regulated area.

B. 2. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusive
Type of car.-Open freight cars may be used during this period of the year, but they must be of steel gondola type. In cars with dump bottoms, planks must be laid across the bottoms and these covered with heavy paper to cover the openings. Where this is necessary, the inspector must give his approval before the sand or soil is loaded.
Depth of soil or sand.-The soil or sand must not be piled above the level of the sides of the car.
Covering with canvas.-When open cars are used canvases or heavy paper must be used for covering the surface as it is fumigated. These canvases or covers must be free from holes and a foot or more wider than the width of the car. Where several pieces of covers are used they must be large enough to allow for overlapping of at least a foot where they meet. The covers must be fastened down at the sides of the car and weighted on the surfaces, particularly where they overlap.
C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc.
Soil in and surrounding plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., which is used for plunging pots or heeling-in plants, must be disinfected by treatment with lead arsenate as precribed in section C. 1. Under special conditions or specific authorization from the inspector, fumigation with carbon disulphide, carbon disulphide emulsion, or naphthalene may be substituted for the temporary elimination of infestation.
C. 1. Treatment with lead arsenate
Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Season.-Treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be used that autumn.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds to each acre, or 35 pounds to each 1,000 square feet. For subsequent re-treatments, lead arsenate must be applied in sufficient quantity to restore the original concentration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticide per acre. The quantity to be added in the re-treatment will be determined by analyses.
Application.-The lead arsenate may be applied with a suitable distributor or broadcast by hand. The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with the upper 3 inches of soil.
Period of treatment.-As lead arsenate is a stomach poison which has to be eaten by the larvae, it may take several weeks before all the infestation is eliminated. Do not plant, heel in, or plunge plants in soil thus treated until after October 1.
Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified, there shall be treated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldframe, hotbed, etc. No plants may be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, thus preventing larval movement into the frame, no such safety zone is required.
Marking.-Nurserymen shall be required to furnish suitable stakes at least 4 inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on the boundaries of certified plots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by the Department. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper designation will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and no stakes will be required.
C. 2. Fumigation with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, U.S.P., or C.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used. Carbon disulphide is explosive. Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-A tarpaulin or other gasproof cover must be provided to cover the soil after fumigation.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated providing it is friable. Wet soil must not be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 45' F. when the fumigation is applied. If the temperature falls below 400 before the fumigation is complete, the treatment must be repeated.
Weather conditions.-The ideal conditions for fumigation are a warm, humid atmosphere without wind.
Season.-The fumigation must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 6 pounds, or 2,100 cubic centimeters, to 100 square feet of soil surface.
Application.-Carbon disulphide must be uniformly distributed over the surface of the soil. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1 to 2 inches deep, putting 21 cubic centimeters in each hole. Fill each hole with soil immediately after the liquid is poured in. Complete the fumigation as quickly as possible, covering each section with tarpaulin as soon as it is fumigated.
Period of fumigation.-The soil must remain covered for at least 48 hours.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
C. 3. Treatment with carbon disulphide emulsion
Material.-Carbon disulphide emulsion consists of a dilution of the stock solution known as "50 percent miscible carbon disulphide." The stock solution is composed of equal parts of carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsifier. The castor-oil soap emulsifier must be prepared according to the directions published in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, volume 20, pages 849-850, August 1928.
The component materials, carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsion, are supplied in separate containers-the carbon disulphide in one container and the emulsified castor-oil soap in another. Equal parts of each by volume must be used in preparing the stock solution or miscible carbon disulphide. The stock solution when diluted with water forms carbon disulphid.e emulsion.
The miscible carbon disulphide should be prepared in the field as it is used. It should not be prepared in quantity before use.
Caution.-Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are inflammable. Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.






6 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Equipmen-t-Twenty-four-gage galvanized-iron collars 10 inches wide and not more than 4 feet square are needed for applying the emulsion. Suitable tanks, barrels, or tubs for preparing the solution must be provided.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil, providing it is friable, may be treated by this method. Wet soil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The surface must be level and not disturbed by recent cultivation. The drainage conditions of the soil are important. The solution must not disappear from the surface in less than 10 minutes, and must be absorbed by the soil within 5 hours.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature falls below 400 before the treatment is finished, the soil must be treated again.
Season.-Treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-The dilution depends on the soil temperature; follow table 2 of section 2, D. Use 2/ gallons of the dilute emulsion to each square foot of soil, as in table 4 of section 2, D.
Application.-Level the surface of the ground, removing weeds and debris. Force a galvanized-iron collar 3 inches into the soil, and firm the soil against the metal. Place another collar next to the first, and so on. When enough collars are in place, pour the dilute carbon disulphide into the basins formed within the collars. As soon as the liquid has disappeared from the surface, the collar may be lifted and set in another position.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
C. 4. Fumigation with naphthalene
Material.-Flake naphthalene free from tar. Caution: Fire should be kept away from naphthalene.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil may be treated with naphthalene provided it is friable and in good tilth. Wet soil must not be treated.
Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Temperature.-To be effective the temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must not be less than 500 F. for a week after fumigation.
Dosage.-Naphthalene must be used at the rate of 2,000 pounds per acre, or approximately 46 pounds per 1,000 square feet.
Application.-The naphthalene must be uniformly distributed over the surface, worked in, and thoroughly and uniformly mixed with the soil to a depth of 3 inches.
Period of fumigation.-The land must not be disturbed for 1 week after fumigation.
Safety .one.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
2. TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS
A. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with water
The roots of some plants can be made entirely free from soil, either by shaking or washing.
Washing all soil from the roots of the plants with water is probably one of the most simple methods for removing the infestation from certain varieties of plants. The method has certain disadvantages in that it is dependent for its effectiveness almost entirely upon the vigilance and the determination of the inspector in making sure that all soil is washed from the roots and that no tangled mass of roots or cavity hides a larva.
Condition of plants.-The plants should be in a dormant or semidormant condition. Only such root masses as can be thoroughly examined and the absence of infestation verified should be certified under this procedure. Plants must be protected from possible reinfestation.
B. Treatment with hot water
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a water tank equipped with a suitable heating device, and a system for circulating the water in order to maintain a uniform temperature.
Condition of plants.-Plants are usually most resistant to hot water when they are dormant, and most susceptible when they are growing vigorously. It is






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS I

therefore recommended that treatment be applied only when the plants are dormant or semidormant.
Temperature.-The water must be maintained at a temperature of 1120 F. for the entire period of treatment. If the temperature falls below 111.50 the infestation may not be destroyed; if it rises above 112.50 the plants may be injured.
Period of treatment.-The treatment must be continued for 70 minutes after the root masses are heated throughout to 1120 F.
Preparation for treatment.-Before being tendered for treatment, plants shall have all excess soil removed and the roots pruned. Large clumps should be divided as much as possible without injuring the roots.
Small plants and root stocks may be packed loosely in wire baskets or in other containers providing water can circulate through the masses. Large plants must be placed individually in the water.
Before the plants are immersed, thermometers must be inserted with the mercury bulbs in the center of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets, or root masses, and placed at each end of the tank and in the center. In addition, three thermometers, with the mercury bulbs in the water, must be placed in the same relative positions as the thermometers in the root masses.
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely. Temperature readings should be recorded on form no. 91. These temperatures should be taken at each end of the tank and in the center with individual thermometers.
Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment by hot water is complete when the plants are removed from the tank. The way plants are handled after treatment may seriously affect subsequent growth. Tubers should be dry when packed for shipment. Plants should be cooled slowly to room temperatures. Plants should not be removed from the hot water and heeled in cold soil. Pot the plants, or set them in the ground as soon as possible after cooling to room temperature. They should be protected against reinfestation.

C. Carbon disulphide dip
Material.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. Fully described in 1, C. 3.
Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-Metal or wooden tanks or tubs in which the plants can be treated at a temperature of 700 F. should be provided.
Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide emulsion is least injurious to roots when they are dormant or semidormant. Treatment should be applied during the dormant period of the variety to be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the dilute emulsion must be maintained at approximately 700 F. If the temperature falls below 650 the treatment may not be effective; if it rises above 700 the plants may be injured.
Dosage.-Miscible carbon disulphide (50 percent) must be mixed with water at the rate of 45 cubic centimeters to 10 gallons.
Period of treatment.-The roots must be immersed for 24 hours.
Preparation of treating bath.-Determine the capacity of the container and use 45 cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide for each 10 gallons of water. There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon. Pour into tank and stir until mixed, which operation should be done just before using. Do not mix with a mechanical agitator or stir too violently.
Preparation of plants.-This treatment is not effective when the soil about the roots is too wet or when the diameter of the soil ball is more than 6 inches. The temperature of the plants should be at least 600 F. at the beginning of the treatment.
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely.
Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment is complete when the plants are removed from the solution. The suggestions regarding handling of plants after treatment with hot water should be followed. Plants should be protected from reinfestation.

D. Carbon disulphide emulsion, field treatment
The basis of certification of field nursery plants treated with miscible carbon disulphide shall be: (1) That the concentrated stock solution shall be freshly mixed carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap in the proper concentration. (2) That all five conditions, subsequently mentioned, governing the application of the treatment have been met.
Material.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. (See 1, C. 3.)






8 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE Jan.-Mar.

Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Season.-This treatment must not be used when adult beetles are present.
Equipment.-Strips of 24-gage galvanized iron, 10 inches wide and of the proper length, are required. (See table 1.)

TABLE 1.-Size of collar

Diameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of Diameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of (inches) of collar collar (inches) of collar collar

Inches Feet Inche Feet
12 or less...................... 18 54 24............................ 36 104
14 ..............-------------------------- 21 60j 25-27 ------------------------......................... 39 11
18-............................ 27 8 28-30....................... ---------------------- 42 12
20......-------------------------- 30 9 33--------------------------............ 45 13
22 ----------------------33 9 36-.......-------------------------.................... 48 14


Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide is least injurious to roots when the plants are dormant or semidormant, and treatment should be applied at that time.
Dosage.-The dilution depends upon the probable temperature of the soil during the 48 hours following application, and must be determined by the Treating Division in accordance with table 2.

TABLE 2.-Dilution schedule

Miscible
carbon diMinimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface (O F.) sulphide per 10 gallons
of water

Cc
Schedule no. 1-40-50...................................................................... 68
Schedule no. 2-50-60...................................................................... 57
Schedule no. 3-60-70 ..................................................................-------------------------------------------------------------... 45


The concentration of the emulsion must not be greater than is necessary, as this may injure the plants.
The dosages which must be applied under different conditions are given in table 3 or table 4.

TABLE 3.-Dosage for circular collars

Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulphide phide Diameter of col- Diametr of colD iameter of col-hes) Water Sched- Sched- Sched- a r of col- Water Sched- Sched- Schedlar (inches) ule ule ule lar (inches) ule ule ule no. 1- no. 2- no. 3- no. 1- no. 2- no. 340-500 50-600 60-700 40-500 50-60 60-700 F. F. F. F. F. F.

Gallons Cc Cc Cc Gallons Cc Cc c
12---------------................ 2.0 14 11 9 33................ 15. 0 102 85 68
15--------------.............-- 3.0 20 17 14 36...............-------------- 17.5 119 99 80
18...............---------------- 4. 5 31 26 20 39_.-------------- 21.0 143 119 95
21................ 6. 0 41 34 27 42....---------------24. 0 164 136 108
24---------------................-- 8. 0 55 45 .36 45----............---------.... 27. 5 187 156 125
27................ ---------------10. 0 68 57 45 48...............--------------. 31.5 215 179 143
30--------------- 12. 0 82 68 54






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

TABLE 4.-Dosage for square collars

Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulphide phide
Length of side of Water Sched- Sched- Sched- Length of side of Water Sched- Sched- Schedcollar (inches) ule ule ule collar (inches) ule ule ule no. 1- no. 2- no. 3- no. 1- no. 2- no. 340-500 50-600 60-700 40-500 50-600 60-700 F. F. F. F. F. F.

Gallons Cc Cc Cc Gallons Cc Cc Cc
12-----..............-----.. 2. 5 17 14 11 33___--------------- 19.0 129 108 86
15...............------------. 4. 0 27 23 18 36-.....-------------22. 5 153 128 102
18....---------------5. 5 37 31 25 39-------------- ............... 26. 0 177 148 118
21 --------------- 7. 5 51 43 34 42--------------30. 5 208 173 139
24....-------------- 10. 0 68 57 45 45............... 35. 0 238 199 159
27................ -------------12. 5 85 71 57 48 ------------- 40. 0 272 227 182
30................ 15. 5 106 88 70

Temperature of soil.-Begin treating in the spring when the minimum soil temperature at a depth of 6 inches remains above 400 F., using schedule no. 1. When the minimum soil temperature at this depth remains above 500 decrease the concentration to meet schedule no. 2. When the minimum soil temperature remains above 600 decrease the concentration to meet schedule no. 3. In the autumn, as the minimum temperature of the soil decreases, it is necessary to increase the schedule in the opposite order. Treatment must be discontinued when the minimum soil temperature at the 6-inch depth is below 400.
For treatment to be successful, the temperature of the soil during the 48-hour period of the treatment should never fal! below the minimum temperature for the schedule used.
Preparation of plant for treatment.-Remove all weeds and debris from the soil about the plant. Tie low-hanging branches so they will not dip into the solution. Level the soil. After the size of the soil ball to be lifted has been determined, place a galvanized-iron collar about the plant and force it 3 inches into the soil. The size of the collar to be used is shown in table 1. Firm the soil carefully on each side of the metal.
Application.-Measure the diameter of the collar, find from table 3 or table 4 the number of gallons of water and the cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide required; and mix well. Pour into the collar, avoiding splashing or unnecessary disturbance of the soil. If the solution is poured on a spade it will help considerably.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours, but the plant must be dug between 2 and 5 days after treatment.
Handling after treatment.-The plant may be dug and handled according to the usual nursery practice, except that the ball must be of a diameter which corresponds to the diameter of the collar mentioned in table 1.
Conditions under which the carbon disulphide treatment may be applied
(1) The minimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface in the nursery must be 400 F. or higher for the 48-hour period immediately following the application of the carbon disulphide emulsion.
(2) The surface of the soil around the base of the plant to be treated must be level and the treatment must not be applied where the ground has a slope of more than 1 inch in 10 inches.
(3) The collars must be carefully placed in strict accordance with the directions in order to assure that no seepage occurs. Especial care must be taken on plowed and stony land to prevent loss of the solution.
(4) A record must be made of the time of penetration of the solution on each plant treated. If the solution disappears from the surface in less than 10 minutes or requires more than 5 hours, the treatment will not be successful.
(5) An examination must be made during the treatment and after the solution has disappeared to determine the uniformity of penetration. Uniform penetration must be obtained.
54156-34---2






10 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

E. Lead arsenate, field treatments
.Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Season.-When the treatment is to be used as a basis for certification between September 20 (re-treatment) or October 1 (initial treatment) and the following June 15, the treatment must be completed by July 1. Because of differences of seasonal conditions it may, in other years, be necessary to modify these dates.
Dosage.-For initial treatments lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds per acre, which is equivalent to approximately 35 pounds per 1,000 square feet.
For subsequent re-treatments, lead arsenate must be applied in sufficient quantity to restore the original concentration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticide per acre. The quantity to be added in the re-treatment will be determined by analyses.
Application. (1) Plants growing in rows.-The ground must be in good tilth. Lead arsenate may be applied by either of the following methods: (a) The lead arsenate may be broadcast or applied with a suitable distributor. At least 2 inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and from about the base of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows of plants.
(b) At least 2 inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and from about the base of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows of plants. The lead arsenate may then be broadcast or applied with a suitable distributor. After either procedure has been completed, cultivate at least three times, adjusting the cultivator for the third operation so that the soil will be thrown toward the rows of plants to obtain at least 3 inches of poisoned soil about the base of all plants.
(2) Individual plants.-The treatment of individual plants is essentially a hand operation. The soil must be treated in a manner to obtain the same conditions as are required for trees planted in rows. The area to be treated must never be less than 10 feet in diameter and must be at least 6 feet greater in diameter than the diameter of the soil ball to be removed with the tree.
Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified there shall be treated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldframe, hotbed, etc. No plants may be certified from this strip.
Marking.-Nurserymen shall be required to furnish suitable stakes at least 4 inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on the boundaries of certified plots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by the Department. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper designation will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and no stakes will be required.
3. MISCELLANEOUS TREATMENTS
A. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acid
Material.-Liquid hydrocyanic acid.
Caution.-Hydrocyanic acid gas is very poisonous and because of the readiness with which it is liberated, care should be exercised during the entire process of fumigation not to breathe the fumes. Gas masks must be used when applying the liquid.
Equipment.-Two metal trays having an area of about 2 square feet, equipped to be suspended about 24 inches below the hatch openings. Two tin cups with a capacity of 3 ounces each. Four screens made of cotton netting on light wooden frames which will fit tightly in hatch openings.
Condition of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used to insure against leaks.
Temperature.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigation must be at least 750 F.
Dosage.-Six ounces of hydrocyanic acid per car.
Application.-The doors should be closed tightly and the ice drip plugged. Remove one insulating plug from each ice bunker and suspend a tray therein. Place on tray a tin cup of 3-ounce capacity with string attached to handle and long enough to fasten at the top of the bunker. Fill each cup with 3 ounces of liquid hydrocyanic acid and pour into trays by tipping with string. Replace plug and close hatch covering tightly.
Period of fumigation.-The car must be kept sealed for a period of 2 hours after the liquid hydrocyanic acid has been applied.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

Handling after fumigation.-Remove pan and cup from ice bunkers. Replace plug with screen, leaving hatches open for aeration. Remove plugs from ice drips. Doors must be kept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfestation.
B. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanide
laterial.-Calcium cyanide (88 percent).
Caution.-Observe the same precautions as outlined for liquid hydrocyanic acid treatment (3, A).
Equipment.-Two trays of light wooden construction, 6 to 8 feet long, 2 feet wide, and about 2 inches deep. Sufficient building paper to cover the trays and hatch openings. Four screens made of cotton netting on light wooden frames which will fit tightly in hatch openings.
Condition of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used to insure against leaks.
Temperature.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigation must be at least 750 F.
Dosage.-Three pounds of calcium cyanide per car.
Application.-Remove plugs from the ice bunkers and insert screens. Cove the hatch openings with paper and close the hatches tightly on the paper. Plug ice drip openings. Cover the trays with paper and apply 1% pounds of calcium cyanide as uniformly as possible in each of the trays and place them on the load in the doorway of the car. Close door tightly.
Period of fumigation.-The car must be kept sealed for a period of 1V2 hours after the calcium cyanide has been applied.
Handling after fumigation.-Remove trays and dispose of residue. Open screened hatches for aeration. Remove plugs from ice drips. Doors must be kept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfestation.
C. Fumigation of berries with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used to fumigate berries.
Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a gastight room, equipped with a hotwater heating system to volatilize the carbon disulphide over copper coils, and fans to keep the air-and-gas mixture in circulation. A supply of heat should be available to keep the room at the required temperature on cool days.
Temperature.-The water in the coil used for vaporizing the gas must be at least 1480 F. and should not exceed 1800. The room must be at a temperature of 800, or above, during the period of fumigation.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be applied at the rate of 1 pound per 100 cubic feet of space in the room, including the space occupied by the berries.
Period of fumigation.-The berries must be exposed to the gas for a period of
2 hours.
Application.-Crates may be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowing ample space between crates for circulation of the gas. The temperature of the room should be taken before and after fumigation. When the' water in the boiler has reached the proper temperature, close all doors. Start water circulating through coils of vaporizing pan and turn on the fans. Pour the required amount of carbon disulphide through the funnel outside, into the vaporizing pan, and make sure valve is closed. Keep the water circulating throughkthe coils of vaporizing pan for 60 minutes after carbon disulphide has been applied. Keep doors closed for 2 hours. Aerate the house before allowing anyone to enter.

D. Fumigation of berries with ethylene orzide
Material.-Ethylene oxide in cylinder.
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a gastight room.
Temperature.-The temperature of the fruit and the room during the fumigation shall be 750 F. or above.
Dosage.-Ethylene oxide must be applied at the rate of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the berries.
Period of fumigation.-The berries must be exposed to the gas for a period of
2 hours.
Application.-Crates may be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowing ample space between the crates for circulation of the gas. Means should be available for the introduction of the gas into the room in the required amounts.






12 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Caution.-This fumigation has been effective in destroying the Japanese beetle and no injury has been noted in raspberries, blackberries, and dewberries fumigated experimentally by this method. Some injury has been observed in blueberries fumigated with ethylene oxide in the concentrations required to destroy all the beetles.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
TEXAS CITRUS SHIPPING SEASON ENDS APRIL 5
(Press Notice)
MARCH 26, 1934.
Shipment of citrus fruit from the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas will cease for the season on April 5, 1934, Avery S. Hoyt, the Acting Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, announced today. Under the Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations, a period of from 6 to 7 months without any fruit on the trees is maintained in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy Counties, in Texas, in order to prevent the establishment of the Mexican fruit fly, which occurs in Mexico and reaches the Texas citrus orchards from time to time.
Each year the State of Texas requires all fruits susceptible to attack by the Mexican fruit fly to be removed from the trees by the end of the shipping season. The closing date is fixed by the Federal and State Departments of Agriculture after consultation. J. M. DelCurto, entomologist of the Texas State Department of Agriculture, concurs in the present order closing the shipping season on April 5, says Mr. Hoyt.
SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT TO END ON APRIL 5 (Approved Mar. 24, 1934; effective Apr. 5, 1934)
B.P.Q.-361 MARCH 24, 1934.
Announcement is made that the shipping season for citrus fruit under the Federal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the counties of Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy, in Texas, will close for the season on April 5, 1934. The host-free period required under the regulations to be enforced by the State of Texas will for the year 1934 begin on April 6.
Under the provisions of the quarantine it is required that prior to the beginning of the host-free period each year all citrus fruit except lemons and sour limes shall be removed from the trees for shipment, storage, or sale, and all other host fruits shall be destroyed either following removal from the trees or by destruction of the trees themselves. Permits will not be issued for the interstate shipment of citrus fruits after the close of April 5 except as to such fruits shipped from approved storage.
This order modifies an announcement made by the Department on July 31, 1933, when the current shipping season was extended to include April 30, 1934. The modification is necessary owing to the discovery of Mexican fruit flies within the regulated area during the past several weeks and the importance of instituting the host-free period without delay in order to avoid the establishment of infestations in the groves. The findings consist thus far entirely of the capture of adult flies in traps. No infested fruit has been discovered this season, but the presence of such flies either may indicate an undiscovered infestation or may threaten to result in the local establishment of the pest. The present action is taken to avoid that danger.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE (NO. 62)
NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORDS FOR 1933 B.P.Q.-358. MARCH 15, 1934.
The following table (table 5) gives a record of the narcissus plantings inspected during the calendar year 1933 under the Federal quarantine for the prevention of spread of bulb pests. The figures given are summarized from the reports sent to this Bureau by the nursery inspectors of the various States who act as Federal collaborators in making such inspections.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

Similar tables have been issued in previous years, that for 1932 being given on pages 143 and 144 of no. 114 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
The number of narcissus bulbs of all types reported as inspected in 1933 totals 305,875,898. This is an increase of about 1 percent over the number reported the previous year. About 59 percent of the bulbs reported for 1933 are Paper Whites and other polyanthus varieties commonly grown in the South, an increase over 1932; and about 41 percent are of the daffodil type produced in the Northern States, a decrease from 1932. In this series of tables the only varieties considered as of the polyanthus type are Paper White, Soliel d'Or, Chinese Sacred Lily, Grand Monarque, Aspacia, Elvira, and a few uncommon varieties grown in small numbers. The figures therefore differ to some extent from the census totals, since the Census Bureau accepted the reporting growers' division into "narcissus (polyanthus)" and "narcissus (all other)" and many growers customarily include within the polyanthus group numerous important hardy Poetaz varieties, such as Laurens Koster.
The figures given in the table showing "bulbs certified", whether on the basis of freedom from infestation or on account of treatment, indicate supplies available for shipment so far as adequate inspection and freedom from pests are concerned. The greater proportion of such bulbs are, however, replanted by the growers on their own premises for the purpose of securing increase in future years. Growers estimate that only from 20 to 30 percent of the total number of bulbs inspected is available for interstate movement during any one year.
Infestations with the bulb eelworm (Anguillulina dipsaci, formerly called Tylenchus dipsaci) were reported in 1933 as to one or more plantings in each of the following States: California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. In addition to the records for the year 1933, this species had previously been reported on properties in Alabama, Indiana, Kansas,, Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin. Some of these properties have not since been reported as inspected, and infestation may possibly still be persisting in some of them.
Greater bulb flies were reported in California, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington. They have also been found in previous years in Illinois, Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia.
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.










14 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.



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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARKANSAS DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, March 30, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: The chief plant inspector of Arkansas has advised that the State of Arkansas desires to discontinue the terminal inspection of nursery stock and all other plants. Therefore, parcels of such matter arriving at the office of address may be delivered to the addressees without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations. Please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
P.Q.C.A.-283, Supplement No. 2 JANUARY 25, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBA
FRUITS AND OTHER PLANT PRODUCTS, CERTIFICATION OF TRANSSHIPPED OR RESHIPPED CONSIGNMENTS
The Cuban decree of May 28, 1933, prescribes:
1. That consignments of fruits and other plant products transshipped or reshipped to Cuba, whose entry into that country is permitted under a certificate of origin, shall bear the original certification of the country of origin, or in lieu thereof, a copy of the same certified by the chief of the plant inspection service of the port where reshipment is effected, and the copy shall be visaed by the Cuban consul at that port.
2. Fruits and other plant products, the containers, wraps, or labels of which indicate that they are from countries from which certificate of origin is required, must bear the said certification or a certified copy of the same, even when issued as of other origin.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-303, Supplement No. 1 FEBRUARY 19, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS
IMPORT AND TRANSIT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOES
The law of July 7, 1932, prohibits the importation and transit of potatoes and fresh vegetables from countries designated by the Minister of Agriculture of the Netherlands. It also prohibits the importation and transit of fresh vegetables from such countries during the period March 15 to October 14, inclusive, unless each shipment is accompanied by a written declaration of the phytopathological authorities of the country of origin, affirming that the fresh vegetables are not infested with the Colorado beetle, and that they were grown in and proceed from a locality where that beetle does not occur, and so far as known, does not occur within a distance of 200 kilometers.
The Minister of Agriculture may grant exemption from the foregoing provisions under certain conditions.
Order No. 11319 of the same date designates France as a country from which the importation and transit of potatoes are prohibited. -Consequently, the above provisions at present apply only to potatoes and fresh vegetables from France.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.





16 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

P.Q.C.A.-284, Supplement No. 8 FEBRUARY 28, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE EXPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO
EXPORTATION OF CERTAIN CACTI PROHIBITED
The decision of the Mexican Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento of December 20, 1933, supplements the regulations of June 28, 1930 (see Supplement No. 6 to P.Q.C.A.-284) by prohibiting the collection of the following-named cacti for exportation from Mexico:
Ariocarpus fissuratus, A. kotschoubeyanus, A. retusus, A. trigonus, Astrophytum capricornis, A. mnyriostigma, Cephalocereus senilis, Coryphantha (Neomammillaria) poselgeriana, C. (Neomammillaria) valida, Echinocactus grusoni, E. horizonthalonius, Echinocereus conglomeratus, E. delaeti, E. pectinatus, E. rigidissimus, Leuchtenbergia principis, Lophophora williamsi, Neomammillaria candida, N. chinocephala, N. elegans, N. grahami, N. lenta, N. leona, N. micromeris, N. parkinsoni, N. rhodantha, Neolloydia (Echinocactus) beguini, Obregonia denegri, Opuntia cereiformis, O. microdasys, Pachycereus chrysomallus, Pelecyphora aselliformis, Solisia pectinata, Thelocactus (Echinocactus) bicolor-tricolor, T. (Echinocactus) bicolor-bolansis, and T. heterochromus.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-348, Supplement No. 1 MARCH 14, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
Chilean decree no. 4 of January 4, 1934, extends the prohibitions of article 5 of decree no. 105 of February 11, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-348, p. 3) to wheat intended or milling. The text of decree no. 4 follows:
ARTICLE 1. Only wheat intended for milling which is absolutely free from the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella, may be admitted into Chilean territory.
ART. 2. Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate issued by competent authorities of the exporting country, visaed by the respective Chilean consul, affirming that the region in which the wheat was grown is free from the insect mentioned in article 1.
ART. 3. Shipments of wheat and their containers proceeding from regions where this insect exists shall be fumigated or treated with heat before shipment in such a manner as to insure the total destruction of insects which may infest the wheat.
ART. 4. A single proof of the presence of live insects in the shipment offered for importation will be sufficient cause for the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal to prevent its unlading.
ART. 5. Sacks containing wheat shall be strong enough to withstand the ordinary operations of lading and unlading without being torn.
ART. 6. Wheat imported for seed purposes shall be subject to the general provisions of the regulations governing the importation of seeds.
ART. 7. Violations of the foregoing provisions will be subject to the sanctions of decree no. 177 of December 31, 1924.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-348, Supplement No. 2 MARCH 15, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF COTTONSEED PESTS
The following is the text, in translation, of decree no. 671, of October 30, 1933: ARTICLE 1. The importation is permitted only of cottonseed contained in sacks.
The sacks shall be of material sufficiently strong to prevent their being. stretched open or torn during the trip. Unlading of torn sacks will not be permitted.
ART. 2. Cottonseed from regions where the pink bollworm exists shall be fumigated or treated by heat before embarkation, which fact shall be accredited by a certificate issued by a competent official authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective Chilean consul.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

ART. 3. If it be determined that the seeds on arriving in the country carry live insects, the shipment shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of article
3 of the law of plant sanitary police. (See B.P.Q.-348, Basic Law, p. 1.)
ART. 4. Fumigation or treatment will not be required prior to the embarkation of cottonseed from countries in which pink bollworm does not exist; these being subject to the general provisions of the regulations on the importation of seeds.
ART. 5. Cottonseed from countries in which Disdercus ruficollis exists must come in sacks and the importers shall be required to transport them, immediately after their discharge, to hermetically closed warehouses, all the windows of which shall be completely protected by fine wire screens.
ART. 6. If it be determined by the service of plant health that live insects infest the seeds, the fumigation of the shipment shall be required in the warehouse in which the seed was placed.
ART. 7. When it is desired to import cottonseed for planting, application must be made to the service of plant health for the respective authorization. That service will investigate the origin of the seed, which will remain at the disposal of the said service pending verification of its sanitary condition. This procedure having been completed, it will be delivered to the interested person.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-360 MARCH 14, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ISLAND OF CYPRUS
This summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of Cyprus has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that island.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of this Bureau, from orders of the Governor in Council, No. 1054, of May 13, 1925; No. 1305, of May 20, 1929; and No. 1421, of April 23, 1931.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consulted for the exact text.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
BASIc LAWS
Customs and Excise Regulation laws, 1879 to (no. 3) 1930; Diseases of Plant Prevention law, 1893; Customs Excise and Revenue law, 1899; Phylloxera Prevention law, 1890.
CONCISE SUMMARY
Importation prohibited
Potatoes for consumption. (Order-in-Council No. 1305, May 20, 1929.)
Hay or straw, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.
Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter, used as packing, from any place not mentioned in article 1, Order-in-Council No. 1421, April 23, 1931, except as manufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.
Grapevines, including fresh or dry parts thereof, but excluding raisins and currants, except under special permission of the Governor. (Order-in-Council No. 1421, Apr. 23, 1931.)
Importation restricted
Cottonseed, seed cotton, raw cotton, any living or dry parts of cotton plants, and packing material used in the transportation or storage thereof: Must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration of origin and shall be disinfected on arrival or placed in quarantine. (Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925.)
Potatoes for seed purposes: Shipper's declaration and inspection certificate of competent authority in the country of origin, affirming freedom from potato tuber worm, wart disease, and Colorado potato beetle. (Order-in-Council No. 1305 of May 20, 1929.)





18 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [an.-Mar.

Bananas and tomatoes from Palestine: Certificate of competent authority in prescribed form attesting fumigation.
Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state.
Trees and plants, and every living part thereof, including seeds.
Flowers, cut or otherwise.
Dried plants and flowers.
Staves which have been used as grapevine props or for similar purposes.
Binding that has been used for grapevines or other plants.
Earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold.
Animal and vegetable manures, except guano, bone meal and other fossil or chemically prepared manures: Must be imported directly from any place named in article 1 and must be accompanied by a certificate of competent authority in the form prescribed in article 2 (1) (a). (Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931.)
Importation unrestricted
Cereals and all dry seeds, except cottonseed, free from husk, straw, and earth; acorns and valonia.
Almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free from outer husks, leaves, stalks, and branches.
Preserves, crystallized fruits, bottled and canned fruits, and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles.
Flour and meal of all kinds and preparations thereof.
Tamarind; saponaria wood.
Vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and inclosed in packages.
Dry and aromatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if free from earth.
Dried fruits and vegetables; carobs, if free from earth. (Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931.)
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON
(Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925)
ARTICLE 1. This order is cited as the Importation of Cotton Order, 1925.
ART. 2. (a) Raw cotton, cottonseed, seed cotton, any living or dry part of the cotton plant, and packing material which has or is suspected of having been used in the transportation or storage thereof, may be imported into Cyprus directly or indirectly from the American Continent (including Canada, the United States, South America, and The West Indies), China, Cochin-China, Greece, India, Turkestan, Turkey, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and any country not possessing a government entomological service, under the following conditions:
(1) Through the port of Famagusta only;
(2) When accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the following form:
I, the undersigned, member of the firm of consigner of
cases of each containing and marked to be shipped by S.S. from (port of departure) to (port of arrival) do hereby declare that the herein referred to was all grown at (locality), in the district of in (country).
(Signature) .
Declared at this day of -- before me.
(Name and title of officer administering oath)

(3) Forthwith on importation they are disinfected in such a manner as the Director of Agriculture shall prescribe: Provided, That in lieu of disinfection the Director of Agriculture may order that such articles be placed in quarantine in such place and for such period as he shall deem fit;
(b) If such articles have been imported from a country other than those above mentioned:
(1) Importation takes place through the port of Famagusta;
(2) Each shipment must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the form set forth above.
ART. 3. Provides for an importer's notice of arrival for any article it is desired to import under the provisions of article 2 (a).
ART. 4. Any article offered for importation under the provisions of article 2
(a) shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material. The package shall be clearly labeled on the outside with identification marks, the name of the article contained, and the country of origin, and such packages shall be opened






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

only in the presence of the official and in the place appointed by the Director of Agriculture.
ART. 5. All expenses incurred in connection with the foregoing matters, including cost of disinfection or quarantine and cost of transport to and from the place of disinfection or quarantine, shall be at the charge of the importer, and in no case shall compensation be payable to the importer in respect to any loss or damage consequent on any action taken by the Director of Agriculture in accordance with the provisions of this order.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES
(Order-in-Council No. 1305 of May 20, 1929)
Only seed potatoes may be imported into Cyprus
ARTICLE 1. Potatoes for seed purposes only may be imported into Cyprus. Their importation may be made through the ports of Famagusta, Larnaca, Limassol, or Paphos only, and in such quantities and from such countries only as shall be specially authorized beforehand in writing by the Director of Agriculture. The potatoes shall be imported direct from the country of origin: Provided, That they may be transshipped if they remain in customs charge while at the transshipping port.
ART. 2. All potatoes imported for seed purposes must be the produce of crops inspected while growing by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture or equivalent authority of the country in which they were grown, and must have been found by these inspectors to be not less than 97 percent pure.
ART. 3. No bag of potatoes imported for seed purposes shall contain more than one hundredweight (112 pounds).
Shipper's declaration and inspection certificates required
ART. 4. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be accompanied by the following documents:
(a) A shipper's declaration in the following form: Address:
I, the undersigned, member of the firm of consignors of
cases/bags containing a total of net weight of potatoes for seed purposes and marked to be shipped per S.S. from (port of departure)
t9 (port of arrival) do hereby declare that:
(1) These potatoes were grown by ,of at
(2) They are of the variety (3) Their size and grade is
(4) The number of the certificate or inspection report issued by a duly authorized inspector of the Department of Agriculture or equivalent authority of the country in which they were grown, following the inspection of the crop during growth is
(5) These potatoes were not grown in land infested with potato tuber worm (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella, Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), or infected with wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum).
(Signature)
Declared at this day of 19-, before me.
(Name and title of officer administering oath)
(b) A certificate from the department of Agriculture or other equivalent authority of the country from which the potatoes are imported, certifying at a date not more than 30 days before the time of dispatch of the consignment that the diseases referred to therein have not been known to exist, so far as it is aware, within 5 miles of the place or places in which the potatoes are declared to have been grown.
(c) A certificate from the source indicated in (b) certifying that the consignment has been inspected and found to be in good condition and free from diseases and insect pests.
Inspection on arrival required
ART. 5. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be subject to inspection by the Director of Agriculture or by an inspecting officer acting in his behalf.






20 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar..

Disposal of infected shipments
ART. 6. If on such inspection as in article 5 the potatoes are found to be not free from disease or should the inspector have reason to suspect them of being diseased they may at the discretion of the Director of Agriculture be ordered to beeither:
(1) Destroyed by the importer or his agent under the supervision of the inspector; or (2) subjected to such process of disinfection or treatment as the inspector may prescribe, the expenses of such process being paid by the importer; or (3) reexported.
Provided always that in no case shall compensation be payable to the importer in respect of any loss or damage consequent on any action taken by the Director of Agriculture or any inspecting officer in accordance with the provisions of this clause.
ART. 7. If a consignment of potatoes for seed purposes does not conform to the conditions of articles 2 and 3, or is unaccompanied by the documents required in article 4 hereof, or if such documents do not conform to the shipper's declaration prescribed by this order, the consignment shall be dealt with as if it had been inspected as provided for in article 5 and found to be not free from disease.
ART. 8. Concerns the sale of imported seed potatoes.
ART. 9. Revokes previous potato orders.
ART. 10. Makes the effective date of the order May 27, 1929.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
(Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931)
Products and countries of origin
ARTICLE 1. Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state; trees and plants, and living parts thereof (inlcuding seeds, save those specially excepted); all flowers, cut or otherwise; all dried plants and flowers; staves that have been used as grapevine props or for similar purposes; all binding that has been used for grape-vines or other plants; earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold; animal and vegetable manures, except guano, bone dust and other fossil or chemically prepared manures, may be imported from: Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Irish Free State, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Norway, Sweden, and any other country possessing a government phytopathological service, subject to prior permissionfrom the Director of Agriculture.
ART. 2. (1) The plants and plant products mentioned in article 1 may be imported into Cyprus from the countries named in that article under the following. conditions:
Inspection certificate required
(a) Each consignment of such plants and plant products shall be accompanied: by a certificate in the form set forth below, a copy whereof shall be delivered to the Director of Agriculture 7 days before the arrival of the consignment to which the certificate refers. A certificate in the same form shall be attached to theoutside of any mail package of such plants and plant products.
Prescribed inspection certificate
This is to certify that the plants included in the consignment/package described below were thoroughly inspected by me, a duly authorized official of the Government of (name of country) on (date) and were found or believed by me to be healthy and free from plant diseases and insect pests, especially from the following:
Insects: (Aleurodes) Dialeurodes citri, citrus whitefly; Anthonomus grandis, boll weevil; Aspidiotus perniciosus, San Jose scale; Chionaspis furfura, scurfy scale; Chrysomphalus aonidum, Florida red scale; Conotrachelus nenuphar, plum curculio; (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta, oriental fruit moth; (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona, white peach scale; Epochra canadensis, currant fruit fly; Eriosoma lanigerum, woolly apple aphid; Heliothis obsoleta, corn ear worm; Heterocordylus malinus; Icerya aegyptiaca; 1 Icerya purchasi, cottony-cushion scale; Ihidomyrmex humilis, Argentine ant; Lepidosaphes beckii, purple scale; L. gloverii, Glover's scale; L. ulmi, oyster-shell scale; Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Colorado potato beetle; Lygidea mendax, apple redbug; Malacosoma americana, eastern tent caterpillar; M. disstria, forest tent caterpillar; Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae, grapeSNot recorded as occurring in the United States.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

phylloxera; Prodenia litura; 1 Pseudococcus comstocki; Rhagoletis cerasi, 1 European cherry fruit fly; R. cingulata, cherry fruit fly; R. fausta, black cherry fruit fly; R. pomonella, apple maggot; and Saissetia oleae, black scale.
Fungi: Bacillus amylovorus, fire blight; Bacterium tumefaciens, crown gall; Endothia parasitica, chestnut blight; Plasmopara (Peronoplasmopara) humuli, hop downy mildew; Plowrightia morbosa, black knot; Synchytrium endobioticum, potato wart; Urocystis cepulae, onion smut.
Signature --------------------------Title ------------------------------Date -----------------------------------------------------Number and description of packages ----------------------------Distinguishing marks---------------------------------------Nature of contents -----------------------------------------Grown at -------------------------------------------------Name and address of exporter ---------------------------------Name and address of consignee -------------------------------Name of vessel ----------------------------------------------Date of shipment ------------------------------------------Port of shipment. ------------------------------------------Port of landing in Cyprus ----------------------------------Approximate date of landing ---------------------------------Inspection required
(b) They shall be subject to inspection by any official of the Agricultural Department duly authorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.
(c) They shall be subject to any treatment which the inspector may require.
Notice of arrival required
(2) Importers of such goods, articles, or merchandise shall inform the Director of Agriculture in writing of the arrival or the expected arrival of any such materials.
Packing
(3) Such materials shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material, which shall be clearly labeled on the outside with the identification marks and the name of the goods, articles, or merchandise therein contained, and shall be
-opened only in the presence of an officer of the Agricultural Department duly .authorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.

Expenses charged to importer
(4) All expenses incurred with the foregoing matters, including cost of transport to and from the place of disinfection, shall be at the charge of and payable by the importer of the goods.
No compensation for damage
(5) No action shall be and no compensation will be payable in respect of any loss or damage consequent upon any action taken by the Director of Agriculture or any authorized official, in accordance with the provisions of this order.
Tomatoes and bananas from Palestine
ART. 3. Tomato and banana fruit may be imported from Palestine into Cyprus under the following conditions only:
(a) They shall be imported directly from Palestine.
(b) Each consignment shall be accompanied by a certificate from the competent authority of the country of origin in prescribed form, certifying that the consignment has been fumigated and stating the kind and quantity of chemicals used, the duration of treatment, the space occupied during treatment, and whether the treatment was carried out under single or double fumigation sheets, in an airtight chamber or in a vacuum apparatus.
ART. 4. The importation of hay or straw other than hay or straw imported under the provisions of the Importation of Fodderpacking Order, 1926, is prohibited, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.
1 Not recorded as occurring in the United States.






22 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

ART. 5. Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter used as packing for goods imported from any place not mentioned in article 1 shall be destroyed at the customhouse at the port of arrival, except when such packing is in the form of manufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.
Importation of grapevines prohibited
ART. 6. The importation of the grapevine, including the fresh or dry parts thereof, but excluding raisins and currants, is prohibited unless the special permission of the Governor is first obtained.
Unrestricted products
ART. 7. Nothing contained in this order shall be deemed to prohibit the importation of the following: Wheat, barley, and other cereals, and all dry seeds (except cottonseed) properly cleaned from the husk, straw, and earth; acorns, valonia; almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free from the outer husks, leaves, stalks, and branches; preserves, crystallized fruits; bottled and canned fruits and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles; flour and meal of all kinds, and every preparation thereof; tamarind, saponaria wood; vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and enclosed in packages; dry and aromatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if free from earth; dried fruits and vegetables, provided the proper officer of customs is satisfied that they are bona fide dried fruit and vegetables, and subject to inspection by any officer of the Agricultural Department and to any treatment at the expense and risk of the importer which may be required by such officer; carobs, if free from earth.
ART. 8. No articles, goods, or merchandise, the importation of which is in any way prohibited or restricted under the provisions of this order, shall be allowed to be imported from any place or country from which the importation of such articles, goods, or merchandise is not prohibited or restricted, unless the proper officer of customs is satisfied that such articles, goods, or merchandise do not originate in any place or country from which the importation of the same is prohibited or restricted, and that the other requirements of the order have been complied with in respect of such articles, goods, or merchandise.
ART. 9. Nothing contained in this order shall prevent the importation by the Director of Agriculture on behalf of the Government of any articles, goods, or merchandise dealt with under this order for the purposes of experimental cultivation or scientific investigation.

P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 4 MARCH 20, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
Proclamation no. 19, of July 21, 1932, superseding proclamation no. 3, of May 27, 1931 (see Supplement No. 1 to P.Q.C.A.-314), and effective July 23, 1932, declares:
The importation prohibited into British Honduras from all sources except Canada, the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the United States of America, of fruits (except green bananas, nuts, and dried or processed fruits); and vegetables (except potatoes, onions, canned or processed vegetables, grains, seeds, dried beans, and peas).
Each shipment of fruits and vegetables from Canada and from the United Kingdom and Ireland shall be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the products are of home origin.
Fruits (except bananas and plantains) grown in Jamaica may be imported only when each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin and inspection issued by the agricultural officer.
Plants packed or growing in soil (except citrus plants) may be imported only when a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection and, if necessary, fumigation.
All such plants and plant products, offered for entry into the Colony, which do not comply with the above regulations, shall be destroyed by the Government.
This proclamation shall not apply to materials required by the Agricultural Department.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

B.P.Q.-346 (Revised Mar. 15, 1934) MARCH 15, 1934.

EUROPEAN CORN BORER
STATE REGULATIONS
The following is a summary of the current quarantines relating to the European corn borer, of which notices have reached this Bureau from the various States.
Since the summary was revised in March 1933 new regulations on the part of Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and revisions of former regulations on the part of Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin have been issued, which place no requirements on vegetables and floral plants shipped from Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. The regulations of these eight States, with the exceptions of Kansas and Nebraska, also exempt from any requirements, during a part of the year, green corn and certain floral plants from any of the infested States. The part-year exemption also applies to beans, beets, and rhubarb in the regulations of Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. A recent revision of the Utah quarantine places a complete embargo on the restricted articles from the infested States, and a quarantine by Idaho dated February 15, 1933, has reached this Bureau, which provides for acceptance of State certification of such articles.
This compilation is not intended to be used independently of or as a substitute for the quarantines and is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. It should also be understood that the Bureau is not in a position to give explanatory information concerning State quarantines. Inquiries as to the interpretation of such restrictions, or requests for the full text of orders, should be addressed to the appropriate official of the State concerned. (See list of State officials on p. 29.)
To secure a Federal certificate required under regulations of certain States as shown in the summary, inspection may be arranged by addressing the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 2101 North Sixth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. For the State certificate, address the plant quarantine officer or State nursery inspector of your own State.
Wherever the term "certificate" is used in the following summary, it refers to a special certificate showing that the articles have been inspected and found free from the European corn borer. A general State nursery inspection certificate does not fulfill the requirements with respect to these quarantines.

SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS
Method of use.-In using the following summary it is suggested that the shipper mark in the second column (with a colored pencil or otherwise) the State from which he ships, wherever it occurs in the column. Also in column 3 the group number of the articles he expects to ship wherever he finds they are entered.
Column 4 shows whether a State or Federal certificate may be used, and the nature of other restrictions or exemptions. For example, it will be seen that a Connecticut florist shipping cut flowers of gladiolus must attach a certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture for shipments to Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, and Oregon; that a State certificate is acceptable for shipments to a number of other States; that a part-year exemption from any certification or other requirement is provided in shipments to Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio; and that these flowers are not admissible to Utah or Wyoming from the quarantined States under any condition.
The kinds of articles restricted vary somewhat and they are accordingly arranged in groups in a list given at the top of each page. The designation of the classes of beans covered, however, shows so much diversity among the different State orders that the exact phraseology is given in the third column after each State name.







24 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.


Restricted articles
Group 1.-Corn, broomcorn, sorghums, Sudan grass; (debris, cobs, and parts of plants in this group except
clean shelled corn and seeds).
Group 2.-Aster, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, dahlia (cut flowers or entire plants except bulbs or tubers
without stems); beans in the pod (see below); beets with tops, rhubarb. Group 3.-Celery.
Group 4.-Oat and rye straw; cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock (cut flowers or entire plants). Group 5.-Spinach. (Only South Dakota places requirements with respect to spinach. See p. 27.)

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirement quarantines)Arizona ......- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsyl- "Lima beans in the pod; vania, Maine, New green shell beans in the Jersey, Rhode Island, pod (of the variety Massachusetts, New known as Cranberry or York, Vermont, West Horticultural)." Virginia.
Arkansas--------......... Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1.................--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania.
Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2,3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- of beans under regula- required. chusetts, New York, tion:"Beans in the pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
California........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ---------------................... Federal certificate required,
Rhode Island, Indiana, which must show disinNew Hampshire, Vir- fection. ginia, Kentucky, New
Jersey, Vermont, Maryland, New York, West
Virginia.
Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin, Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required, Massachusetts, Penn- underregulation: "Lima showing disinfection or sylvania. beans in the pod, green inspection.
shell beans in the pod of
the variety known as
Cranberry or Horticultural."
Colorado--------......... Connecticut, New Hamp- Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
shire, Rhode Island, beans under regulation: Indiana, New Jersey, Lima beans in the pod, Vermont, Maine, New green shell beans in the York, West Virginia, pod of the variety known Massachusetts. Ohio, as 'Cranberry or HortiMichigan, and Penn- cultural'." sylvania.
Florida---------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. KiLdsof State or Federal certificate
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Green and lima beans nia, Maine, New Jersey, in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia,
and others becoming infested.
Georgia...... --------- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod, nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the Rhode Island, Massa- pod (of the variety chusetts, New York, known as' Cranberry or Vermont, West Virginia, Horticultural')." and others becoming infested.
Idaho----------............. Connecticut, New Hamp- Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. State or Federal certificate
shire, Rhode Island, Kinds of beans under required. Ear corn in small Indiana, New Jersey, regulation: "Lima beans quantities for exhibition Virginia, Maine, New in the pod, green shell purposes is admitted if York, Vermont, Massa- beans in the pod." treated with heat and so chusetts, Ohio, West certified. Virginia, Michigan,
Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
Illinois---------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn may be Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped without a certifinia, Maine, New Jersey, cate or other requirements, Rhode Island, Massa- from Jan. 1 to June 14. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West Virginia.







1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements quarantines)Illinois ........-------- Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, and West Vir- may be shipped without a ginia. certificate or other requirements, from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
Group 1.................--------------- Entirely prohibited except
Indiana.......... ---------Connecticut, New Hamp- that green corn may be
shire, Pennsylvania, shipped without restriction Maine, New Jersey, from Jan. 1 to June 1. Rhode Island, Massa- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate chusetts, New York, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Virginia, and Vermont. beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, a s t e r, shell beans in the pod."' dahlia, cut flowers of gladiolus without old stalk, and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirements, from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Iowa -----------............. Connecticut, Michigan,
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1 ---------------............... Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, and West Virginia.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ................--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maine, New Jersey,
Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West VirKansas----------........... ginia.
Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required. Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." chusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West Virginia.
Kentucky ------- Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Group 1 ---------------.................. Entirely prohibited.
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2 and 4. Kinds of State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- beans under regulation: required. chusetts, New York, "Beans in the pod." Vermont, and West Virginia. I
Louisiana......... --- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required,
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: except that rhubarb is exHampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod; empt from certification or nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the other requirement. Rhode Island, Massa- pod (varieties variously chusetts, New York, known as Cranberry or
Vermont, West Virginia, Horticultural shell and others becoming beans)." infested.
Group 1 ---------------.... Entirely prohibited except
that green corn may be shipped without a certificate or other restriction Michigan-------......... Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans Stfroma1 to June 1.ertificate
sire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Rhodaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster, chusetts, New Yaork, shell beans in the pod."2 dahlia, cut flowers of gladiVirginia, Vermont. olus without any old stalk, and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to June 1.
I This term includes varieties variously known as "Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does not include dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.
2 This term includes varieties known as "Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does not include dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.







26 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Restricted articles-Continued


To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements quarantines)Mississippi ....... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, and 3. Kinds State or Federal certificate Ohio, Indiana, New of beans under regula- required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- tion: "Green and lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont,West Virginia,
and others becoming
infested.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ..---------------................ Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn maybe Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped from Jan. 1 to June nia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate or Rhode Island, Massa- other requirement. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, WestVirginia.
Missouri --------Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
u......... shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maine, New Jersey,
Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Nebraska--------..... Vermont, West Virginia.
Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required. Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." chusetts, New York,
SVermont, West Virginia.
Nevada........... Connecticut, Michigan, Grp
ohi, I ia Group 1 ..--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- under regulation: "Lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod chusetts, New York, (of the variety known Vermont, West Virginia, as Cranberry or Hortiand others becoming cultural)." infested.
New Mexico...... -----Connecticut, Michigan,
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1..---------------................ Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine. New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- I tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited except
that green corn may be shipped without a certificate or other restriction from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Ohio.............. -----------Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Maine, New Jersey, basi h ogen rqie xetta on MaRhode, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster, chusetts, New York,Massa- shell beans in the pod."3 dahlia, cut flowers of gladichusetts, New York, olus without any old stalk, Virginia, Vermont. and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Oklahoma ------...... Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
Indiana, New Jersey, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited.
Vermont, Maine, New Groups2, 3, and4. Kinds State or Federal certificate York, West Virginia, of beans under regula- required. Massachusetts, Ohio, tion: "Beans in the Wisconsin, Michigan, pod." Pennsylvania, and
others becoming infested.
SSee footnote 2.







1934J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted Nature of requirements quarantines)- States)- above groups) quarantines)Oregon --------- Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ................. ---------------Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- under regulation: "Lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, shell beans in the pod, green Rhode shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa-New York, (of the variety known as
cVuet, ew Vigk. Cranberry or HorticulVermont, West Virginia. tural)."
South Carolina... Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Group 1 ............---------------.. Entirely prohibited.
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- of beans under regula- required. chusetts, New York, tion: "Beans in the Vermont, West Virginia, pod." and others becoming
infested.
South Dakota.... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Do.4 Ohio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans under Hampshire, Pennsylva- regulation: "Green nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia.
Tennessee........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Do.
Pennsylvania, Indiana, Kinds of beans under New Hampshire, Rhode regulation: "Lima Island, Kentucky, New beans in the pod, green Jersey, Virginia, Maine, shell beans in the pod." New York, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Ohio,
West Virginia, Wisconsin.
Texas. ----------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Do.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod, nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the Rhode Island, Massa- pod (of the variety varichusetts, New York, ously known as CranVermont, West Virginia, berry or Horticultural)." and others becoming infested.
Utah------.......-..... ---Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans restricted: "Lima Hampshire, Pennsylva- beans in the pod, green nia, Maine, New Jersey, shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa- (of the variety known as chusetts, New York, Cranberry or HorticulVermont, West Virginia. tural)."
Group 1 ---------------Entirely prohibited except
Virginia ..--........ ------Connecticut, Michigan, that small quantities of ear
Ohio, Indiana, New corn are admissible for exHampshire, Pennsylva- hibition purposes when Hampshire, Pennsylva- treated with heat and so nia, Mamne, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, New Group I ---------------Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ---------------Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn may be Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped from Jan. 1 to June nia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate or Rhode Island, Massa- other requirement. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia.
Wisconsin........ Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
4 Shelled corn and seeds of plants in group 1 require certification under South Dakota regulations.






28 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements uaatns-States)- above groups) quarantines)Wyoming........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans restrictHampshire, Pennsylva- ed: "Beans in the pod."
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, West Virginia.

Processed articles exempt
Articles which are processed or manufactured in such manner as to eliminate all danger of carrying the corn borer are exempt from certification or other requirements, under the regulations of most of the States. The following States, however, make no exception to processed articles in the certification requirements or embargoes: Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina (articles in group 1 are exempt when processed or manufactured; those in groups 2, 3, and 4 are not so exempt), Utah, and Wyoming.
REGULATIONS WITH RESPECT TO CANADA

SHIPMENTS TO CANADA
(Canadian regulation 10 [foreign] sixth revision, effective July 21, 1931)
"The importation into the Dominion of Canada of the following plants or plant products from the areas hereinafter described is prohibited except under the conditions specified under Section II.
Section I(a) Corn and broom corn, including all parts of the plant, all sorghums and sudan grass from the following states of the United States of America: Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia;
(b) During the period June 1 to December 31, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia except the corms and roots thereof without stems, oat and rye straw as such or when used for packing, celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, and rhubarb, from the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island.
"Provided, however, the products listed above may be imported into Canada through the above mentioned states, from any other state of the United States, when shipped on a through bill of lading or when accompanied by a certificate signed by an authorized official of the United States Department of Agriculture or a State Department of Agriculture giving the name of the state in which the products originated.
Section II(a) Broom corn for manufacturing, clean shelled corn either for seed or feed purposes, and clean seed of broom corn, may be imported from the States listed in subsection (a) of Section I provided such shipments are accompanied by a certificate of inspection, issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, or by an authorized State official, which states that the shipment is free from infestation by the European corn borer.
(b) The products named above in Subsection (b) of Section I may be imported from the States mentioned within the dates specified, provided they are accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, which states that the shipment is free from infestation by the European corn borer. (No certificate is required for these products between January 1 and May 31.)
(c) This regulation shall not apply to the plants or plant products enumerated when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as to. eliminate all risk of carriage of the European corn borer."






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA
Federal Quarantine no. 41 (revised) prohibits the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, and certain other articles, with the following exceptions: 1. Entry allowed without permit of (a) green corn on the cob, in small lots for local use only, from areas in Canada adjacent to the United States; and (b) manufactured articles made of the stalks, leaves, or cobs of corn. 2. Entry allowed under permit of (a) broomcorn for manufacturing purposes; (b) brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn; (c) clean shelled corn and clean seed of the other plants covered by Quarantine no. 41; and (d) corn on the cob from Provinces of Canada west of and including Manitoba.
A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined, but reference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictions on foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional.
For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, apply to Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.
For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.

REFERENCES
The addresses of officers or organizations of the various States which have placed corn borer quarantines, and the designations of the quarantine orders, are given below.
Arizona-State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12 and
Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.
Arkansas-State Plant Board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 and Rule
No. 65, amended effective February 3, 1934.
California-Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif., Quarantine
Order No. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.
Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No. 4
(second series) as amended effective February 17, 1933.
Florida-State plant board, Gainesville, Fla., Rule 32 (revised), effective August
16, 1932,
Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., Regulation 36 (revised), effective
January 12, 1933.
Idaho-Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho, Order No. 2 and Amendment
No. 1, effective February 15, 1933.
Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., A Proclamation by
the Governor, effective May 1, 1933.
Indiana-State entomologist, Indianapolis, Ind., Quarantine No. 1, effective
May 12, 1933.
Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3, effective
July 25, 1932.
Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5
(revised), effective July 1, 1933.
Kentucky-Commissioner of Agriculture, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1,
effective October 10, 1932.
Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European Corn Borer Quarantine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.
Michigan-Bureau of agricultural industry, Lansing, Mich., Quarantine No. 534,
effective June 20, 1933.
Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., Rule 49, amended September 13, 1932.
Missouri-Plant officer, department of agriculture, Jefferson City, Mo., Quarantine No. 3, effective July 10, 1933.
Nebraska-State department of agriculture and inspection, Lincoln, Nebr.,
Quarantine No. 2 (first revision), effective January 15, 1934.
Nevada-Division of Plant Industry, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by the Governor, effective September 1, 1932. (A modification is pending, we are informed,
to permit Federal certification of articles in group 2.)





30 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE Jan.-M.lar.

New Mexico-Head of biology, college of agriculture and mechanic arts, State College, N.Mex., Quarantine No. 9, effective September 22, 1932.
Ohio-Division of plant industry, Columbus, Ohio, Regulation on account of European corn borer, effective July 7, 1933.
Oklahoma-State Plant Board, Oklahoma City, Okla., Plant Board Quarantine No. 9, amended effective September 14, 1930.
Oregon-Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., Quarantine Order No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932. (Arrangements have been made, administratively, we are informed, to accept Federal certification
of articles in group 2.)
South Carolina-State crop pest commission, Clemson College, S.C., Quarantine
regulation on account of the European Corn Borer, effective October 1, 1932. South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2
(revised), effective March 7, 1933.
Tennessee-Commissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenn., Notice of Quarantine
No. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.
Texas-Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency Quarantine
Proclamation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.
Utah-Commissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No. 6-A,
issued August 5, 1933.
Virginia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va., Quarantine No. 2, effective January 26, 1933.
Washington-Director of agriculture, Olympia, Wash., Quarantine No. 18 (new
series), effective July 11, 1933.
Wisconsin-State entomologist, Madison, Wis., Quarantine No. 4 (fifth revision),
effective June 16, 1933.
Wyoming-Commissioner of Agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine Order
No. 5, effective November 1, 1932.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to March 31, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Charles L. Evans....------------------............... Nogales, Ariz........... ----6 cactus plants................ --------------$25
B. V. Jones............................. ----------------------Brownsville, Tex........ ------3 oranges ....................-------------------- 5
Martin Hernandez-------------------..................... ..... do ---------------................. 1 mango----------------....................... 5
Felicetos Gonzales--------------------...................... ..... do ---------------................. 2 oranges----------------...................... 5
Mrs. Guadalupe O. Von Hattem------.......---.....do ---------------1 orange....................... 5
Jose A. del Castillo-------------------..........................do....---------------..............- 2 apples-------------------..................... 5
Felix Tellez............................. ----------------------El Paso, Tex............ ----------2 oranges--------------------...................... 1
Maximiana Hernandez Vda Gaitan..... .....----- --do.... ---------------............ 1 avocado and 1 guava --........ 1
C. G. Palacios.......................... --------------------Laredo, Tex----------............. 2 mangoes.... ------------------- 1
Agarito Rocha-----------------------...............................do--------------................... 3 avocados.................... 1
Leabardo Quevera--------------------...................... ..... do---------------................... 7 avocados.................... 1
Juan Hernandez ---------------------.............................do---------------................... 22 guavas, 2 sapotes, and 2 1
mamey seeds.
F. G. Gissler------------------------................................do---------------................... 2 avocados.................... 1
Jose Ramos----------------------.......................--- ......... do....---------------.............. 5 plants....................... 1
Maria Garcia------------------------................................do---------------................... 2 orange trees................. 1























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE
A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information officer.


E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle and Gypsy iloth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines and European Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge MIexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
31






















U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1934

























Orr






S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 119 Issued September 1934



LIBRARY

'TATE PLANT MW


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1934


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------.... 33
Announcement relating to black stem-rust quarantine (no. 38)------------------------------... 33
Revised list of barberries and Mahonias classified under black stem-rust quarantine regulations (P. Q. C.A.-320, second revision)................................ ----------------------------------------- 33
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------------------------------- 35
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B.P.Q.-362)------------------------ 35
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) -----------------------------.... 36
Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1, 1934 ------------------....... 36
Miscellaneous items------------------------------------------------------------------------.... 38
Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged --------------------.... 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B.P.Q.-357, supplement no. 1). 39 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Philippine Islands (B.P.Q.-363).-------------------- 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B.P.Q.-364) ---------------..... 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplements nos. 5,
6, and 7).....-------------------------------------------------------------------......... 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 2)----- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B.P.Q.-355, revised).... 50 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.-350, supplement no. 1) 52 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P.Q.C.A.-310, supplement no. 1).--. 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 2)------ 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299, supplement no. 2).-------------------------------------------------------------------.......... 55
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------...... 55
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine----------------------------------------------------- 57



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 38)

P.Q.C.A.-320 (Second Revision) MAY 15, 1934.

REVISED LIST OF BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACK STEM-RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

In the following revision of the classification of Berberis and Mahonia under Quarantine No. 38, Berberis gilgiana and B. sanguinea, which were formerly in the doubtful list (group D), have been transferred to the list of resistant species (group B). This change is based on experimental work carried on by the Bureau of Plant Industry which has shown that these two species are highly resistant to black stem-rust infection. Another change consists in the addition of Berberi8 buxifolia pygmea to group D, evidence having developed that this variety of buxifolia may possibly prove to be susceptible to rust attack. This and other species and varieties listed in group D will be transferred to their proper places in groups B and C as soon as sufficient experimental data are available.
The rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 38, revised, provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, or other plant parts capable of propagation, of the genera Berberis, Mahonia, or
80185---4- 1 33





34 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Mahoberberia, "shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any State Iinpntal United States or from the District of Columbia into any o r edStates, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan,
tm I, 1A North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, S" yoming, nor from any one of said protected States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) or any of its horticultural varieties." [Regulation 2 (a).]
The protected States referred to below under groups B, C, and D, are the 13 barberry-eradication States named in regulation 2 (a), quoted above.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

A.-BERBERIS THUNBERGII AND ITS RUST-IMMUNE HORTICULTURAL VARIETIES

Permits are not required for any interstate movement of Berberis thunbergii or of the rust-immune varieties thereof under the regulations of the black stemrust quarantine, revised. The varieties so far as tested by the Department are as follows: Berberis thunbergii, B. thunbergii atropurpurea, B. thunbergii maximowiczii, B. thunbergii minor, B, thunbergii pluriflora, and B. thunbergii pluriflora erecta.

B.-BERBERIS AND MAHONIA SPECIES OR VARIETIES SUFFICIENTLY RESISTANT TO
BLACK STEM RUST FOR SHIPMENT INTO PROTECTED STATES

Permits are required under the regulations of the black stem-rust quarantine for interstate movement of the following species or varieties into the protected States and for such movement from any protected State into any other protected State:
Berberis aemulans, B. aquifolium (Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. buxifolia (except var. pygmea), B. candidula, B. chenaultii (hybrid), B. circumserrata, B. concinna, B. darwinii, B. dictyophylla var. albicaulia, B. diversifolia, B. edgeworthiana, B. gagnepainii, B. julianae, B. koreana, B. nervosa. (Mahonia), B. ottawensis (hybrid), B. potanini, B. repens (Mahonia), B. sargentiana, B. stenophylla (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verruculosa, B. gilgiana, and B. sanguinea.

C.-BERBERIS, MAHONIA, AND MAHOBERBERIS; SPECIES OR VARIETIES WHICH ARE
SUSCEPTIBLE TO ATTACK OF BLACK STEM RUST

Interstate shipments of the following species or varieties must not be made into the protected States or from any protected State to any other protected State and permits will not be issued for such movement :
Berberis acuminata, B. aetensis, B. aggregata, B. aggregata prattii, B. alesuthiensis, B. altaica, B. amurensis, B. amurensis japonica, B. angulosa, B. aristata, B. arvensis, B. asiatica, B. atropurpurea, B. atrocarpa, B. bealei (japonica) (Mahonia), B. bergmanniana, B. brachybotrydis, B. brachybotrys, B. brachypoda, B. bretschneiderii, B. brevipaniculata, B. canadensis, B. oaroliniana, B. chinensis, B. coriuria, B. coryi, B. crataegina, B. cretica, B. declinata, B. declinata oxyphylla (hybrid), B. diaphana, B. dielsiana, B. dulois nana, B. durobrivensis (hybrid), B. emarginata (hybrid), B. emarginata britzensis (hybrid), B. fendleri, B. ftscheri, B. francisci-ferdinandi, B. fremontii (Mahonia), B. fwschioicdles, B. haeimatocarpa (Mahonia), B. hybrid serrate, B. ilicifolia, B. integerrima, B. japonica (bealei) (Mahonia), B. knightii (Xawthoxylon), B. koehneana, B. levis, B. laxiflora, B. leichklini, B. lucida, B. lycium (B. elegantissima), B. macrophylla, B. meehanii, B. morrisoneasis (Mahonia), B. nepalensis (Mahoia), B. neuberti (Mahobcrbcris), B. nevinii (Makonia), B. notabilis, B. oblonga, B. poiretii, B. poiretii latifolia, B. polyantha., B. pra-ttii, B. provin.cialis var. serrata, B. pruinosa, B. reyeliana, B. rugidicans, B. serotina, B. sibirica, B. sieboldii, B. sinensis, B. soulicana. B. stapfit"na, B. subcaulialata, B. sw,aseyi (Mahonia), B. thibetica, B. trifoliolata (Mahonia), B. umbellata, B. van fleetii, B. vernae, B. viridis, B. vulgaris, B. vulgaris alba, B. valgaris






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

asperma, B. vulgaris atropurpurca, B. vulgaris emarginata, B. rulgaris fructoviolacea, B. vulgaris japonica, B. vulgaris lutea, B. vulgaris macrocarpa, B. vulgaris mitis, B. v'ulgaris nigra, B. vulgaris purpurea, B. vulgaris sanguinolenta, B. vulgar spathulata, B. vulgaris sheyalle, B. rulgaris sulcata, B. vulgaris violacea, B. wilsonae, and B. xanthoxylon (knightii).

D.-SPECIES OR VARIETIES OF BERBERIS OR MAHONIA FOR WHICH REACTION TO
BLAOK STEM-RUST ATTACK HAS NOT BEEN DETERMINED

Interstate shipments of the following species or varieties must not be made into the protected States or from any protected State to any other protected State. Permits will not be issued for such movement this season pending final determination of the reaction of such species or varieties to black stem-rust attack.
Berberis acicularis, B. buxifolia pygmea, B. californica, B. dictyophylla, B. dulcis (buaxifolia), B. henryana, B. heteropoda, B. hookeri, B. insignis, B. parvifolia, B. pinnata = fascicularis (Mahonia), B. thunbergit X juliana (hybrid), B. tischleri, B. virescens, B. wilsonae Autumn Cheer, B. wilsonae Fireflame, B. wilsonae Firefly, and B. wilsonae Sparkler.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
B.P.Q.-362.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION
(Approved Apr. 19, 1934; effective May 1, 1934)
Regulation 6 of the Fruit and Vegetable Quarantine (Quarantine No. 56), as amended effective August 1, 1933, reads in part, as follows:
"All importations of fruits and vegetables shall be subject as a condition of entry to such inspection or disinfection, or both, as shall be required by the inspector of the Department of Agriculture."
Recent experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology of the United States Department of Agriculture has proved that all stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly in fruit will be destroyed if the fruit is subjected to the following treatment:
Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit in the package reaches a temperature of 30'-31 F. and holding the fruit at that temperature for 15 days."
Storage tests with some varieties of vinifera grapes, grown in the United States, have shown that the treatment can be applied to this fruit without danger of injuring it provided the requirements of the treatment as to temperature are carefully followed.
On the basis of the evidence secured provision is made for the entry, under permit and sterilization, of grapes of the vinifera type from regions in which the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs, at the port of New York and such other northern ports as may be subsequently approved, under the following conditions:
(1) The grapes must be packed in tight barrels or kegs or other approved containers so constructed as to prevent the escape from the container pending sterilization of any stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly, should they be present. Any broken containers wherever found must be immediately repacked under the supervision of an inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine or the contents shall be immediately destroyed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
(2) Within 24 hours from the time of unlading, the grapes shall be delivered for treatment to an approved sterilization plant.
To provide necessary safeguards for movement to and handling at approved sterilization plants, those concerns designated to sterilize fruit are required to file an application and complete a written agreement with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The Bureau will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit.






36 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Sterilization will be done under the supervision of plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. These inspectors shall at all times be given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise the movement of the fruit from the docks to and from the sterilization rooins.
Shipments offered for entry may be allowed to leave customs custody under redelivery bond for sterilization. Final release of the shipment by the collector of customs and cancelation of the bond will be effected after the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine has notified the collector of customs that the required treatment has been given.
In authorizing the entry of fruit into the United States, sterilized in accordance with the above requirements, it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in applying the treatment may result in injury to the fruit, but, in event of resulting injury, neither the Department of Agriculture nor its employees will be responsible.
E. R. SASSCEB,
Acting Ch ef, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
503 Rio GRANDE NATIONAL LIFE BUILDING, Harlingen, Tex., June 80, 1934.

CITRUS CENSUS OF THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS AS OF APRIL 1, 1934

In administering the provisions of the Mexican fruit-fly quarantine it is necessary to know from year to year the number of citrus trees planted in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. In response to requests from the citrus interests of this valley and of various other interested persons, this information is made available to the public.
A complete recheck of all groves was made necessary this year on account of the mortality among the trees as a result of the storm of September 1933. Included in these census figures are a total of 176,812 citrus trees which are considered noncommercial.
The census is presented in two arrangements, by counties and by districts. The 12 districts as shown in table 2 represent divisions of the territory which have been made for the convenience of administration. These divisions are designated by the names of the towns in which suboffices of the Mexican fruitfly project are located.
In explanation of the tables the following information is given:
Ages of trees: In the tables the ages of trees are classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Trees given under classification 0 were planted during the period from April 1, 1933, to March 31. 1934. Trees given under classification 1 were planted from April 1, 1932, to March 31, 1933. Trees given under classification 2 were planted from July 1, 1931, to June 30, 1932. The ages of trees designated as 3 and 4, respectively, will be understood in the light of this explanation. Trees given under classification 5 were planted previous to June 30, 1929.
Other citrus: Under this classification are included kumquats, limes, mandarins, satsumas, sour oranges, tangelos, lemons, etc.






34 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37


TABLE i.-Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 1934, by oousties


Number of growing citrus trees of age-County and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Hidalgo:
Grapefruit............ ------------198,605 286,671 567,057 521,988 501, 534 2, 104, 595 4, 180,450
Orange................ ------- 63,449 73,798 105,365 72,452 117, 705 776, 003 1,208,772
Other citrus------------........... 8,617 6,053 5,073 2, 990 6,875 70,630 100, 238
T otal ............... ------------- 270,671 366,522 677,495 597, 430 626, 114 2,951,228 5,489,460
Cameron:
rapefruit-------------.62, 046 98, 275 334, 711 195,358 177, 745 985, 216 1,853, 351
Orange...........----------------.. 19,355 29,843 42, 560 30,674 44,859 417, 254 584, 545
Other citrus. ---------- 545 1,500 2,089 1,292 5,080 50,361 60,867Total............... 81, 946 129,618 379,360 227,324 227,684 1,452,831 2,498,763
Willacy:
(ra efruit. ------------15,751 16,947 47,659 16, 200 13,016 37,431 147, 004
range------------..... 7,105 6,747 16,235 4,369 3,764 18,419 56,639.
Other citrus............ ------------1,417 1,438 3,120 433 742 2, 195 9,345
Tota................ 24, 273 25, 132 67,014 21, 002 17,522 58,045 212, 988
Total, all counties:
(rapefru----------. 276,402 401,893 949,427 733,546 692, 295 3, 127, 242 6,180,805
Orange--------------............. 89,909 110.388 164, 160 107, 495 166, 328 1, 211, 676 1, 849,956
Other citrus..------------.......... 10,579 8,991 10,282 4,715 12, 697 123, 186 170,450
rand total ..-------....... 376,890 521, 272 1,123,869 845, 756 871,320 4,462, 104 8,201, 211


TABLE 2.- itrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 1934, by districts


Number of growing citrus trees of age-District and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Mission:
rapefruit....---------- 41,375 40,058 155,352 153,046 150,271 564,758 1,104,860
range----------------- 8,312 9,627 44,551 31,431 41,309 205, 641 340,871
Other citrus------------ 2,299 1,181 1,975 844 2,017 22,613 30,929
Total.....-------....---------.......... 51,986 50,866 201,878 185,321 193, 597 793, 012 1,476,660
McAllen:
Graefruit-------------.......... 22,466 15,813 68,562 59,583 95,497 214,934 476,855
Orage...----..------------ 8, 285 5,248 11, 597 7,499 21,368 83,485 137,482
Other citrus ....------------ 1,418 245 792 452 2, 197 8, 275 13,379
Total..-------------- 32, 169 21,306 80,951 67,534 119,062 306, 694 627,716
Edinburg:
rapefruit......-------------....... 58,027 82, 193 189,549 177,661 111,683 474,734 1,093,847
COrange.-.------- ---. 28,905 13,769 16,625 7,309 21,460 138, 510 226,578
Other citrus------------ 1,457 150 529 340 186 4,363 7,025
Total.............----------------. 88,389 96, 112 206,703 185,310 133,329 617,607 1,327,450
harr-San Juan-Alamo:
Grapefrit.............. --------------18,910 62,992 45,494 37,832 46,985 285,309 497,522
Orange---.....-----....--------- 4,591 25,620 16,979 6,565 12,698 102,913 169,366
Other citrus....------------........ 179 825 1,077 410 818 10,274 13, 583
Total----------------................. 23,680 89,437 63,550 44,807 60,501 398,496 680,471
Donna:
Grapefruit...---..--....... 27,488 23,458 27,745 18,438 34, 670 178,400 310,199
Orange....--....------------ 4, 377 4,728 6,323 9, 163 10,842 113,362 148,795
Other citrus----------- 749 589 95 138 106 7,858 9,535
Total...-------------............ 32, 614 28,775 34, 163 27, 739 45, 618 299, 620 468,529






38 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

TABLE 2.-Citrus cea*u.s of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 193-, by districts-Continued


Number of growing citrus trees of ageDistrict and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Weslaco:
Grapefruit....-- ....------------ 16,012 28,302 44,314 42,443 44,062 243, 883 419, 016
Orange -----------------............ 5,171 8,512 4,312 3, 545 6,338 76,184 10 062
Other citrus. ------------ 2,385 2,882 481 514 377 7,009 13,648
Total----------------......... 23,568 39, 696 49, 107 46,502 50, 777 327,076 536,726
Mercedes:
Grapefruit ----------- 14, 327 33,855 36,041 32,985 18,366 142,577 278,151
Orange----------------- 3,808 6,294 4,978 6,940 3,690 55,908 81,618
Other citrus ------------ 130 181 124 292 1, 174 10,238 12,139
Total----------------................. 18, 265 40,330 41, 143 40,217 23,230 208,723 371,908
La Feria:
Grapefruit --------------28,571 33,473 99,846 24,973 27,859 287,704 502,426
Orange----------------.... 6,233 6,727 10,047 4,987 5,843 132,428 166,25
Other citrus............ ------------ 184 119 435 184 943 9,024 10 889
T otal...............----------------.. 34,988 40,319 110, 328 30,144 34,645 429,156 679, 58)
Raymondville:
Grapefruit --------------15,751 16,947 47,659 16,200 13,016 37,431 147,004
Orange -----------------7, 105 6,747 16,235 4, 369 3,764 18,419 5 ,639M
Other citrus. ------------ 1,417 1,438 3,120 433 742 2,195 9,345
Total ..............---------------- 24,273 25, 132 67,014 21,002 17,522 58,045 212,9 088
Harlingen:
Grapefruit.. --------------8,252 38,437 82,025 50,029 35,044 256,076 469,863
Orange -----------------2,501 10,773 10,277 9,228 11,456 117,519 161,754
Other citrus ------------ 137 1,157 918 410 995 10,836 14,453
Total ---------------- 10,890 50,367 93,220 59,667 47,495 384,431 646,070
San Benito:
Grapefruit........... --------------21,788 19, 998 134,327 96,925 88,702 289,892 651,632
Orange -----------------7,058 8,211 17,402 13,585 19,445 111,630 177,331
Other citrus ------------ 158 176 697 651 1,673 12,365 15,720
Total ---------------- 29,004 28,385 152,426 111,161 109,820 413,887 844,683
Brownsville:
Grapefruit. 3, 435 6,367 18,513 23,431 26, 140 151,544 229,430 Orange ----------------............ 3,563 4,132 4, 834 2,874 8,115 55,677 79,195
Other citrus.. ------------ 66 48 39 47 1,469 18,136 19,805
Total-----------------................. 7,064 10,547 23,386 26,352 35,724 225,357 328,430
Total, all districts:
Grapefruit ------------- 276,402 401,893 949,427 733, 546 692,295 3, 127,242 6,180,805
Orange----------------................. 89, 909 110,388 164, 160 107,495 166,328 1,211,676 1,849,956
Other citrus............ ------------10, 579 8,991 10, 282 4, 715 12,697 123,186 170,450
Grand total.......... ----------376,890 521,272 1, 123,869 845,756 871,320 4,462,104 8,201, 211


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

JUNE 26, 1934.

PLANT PEST AND QUARANTINE WORK IN AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MERGED

(Press notice)

Two major units of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Bureau of Entomology and the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, have been merged into one, to be known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace announced today. The new organization takes over from the Bureau of Plant Industry the activities on the control and eradication of five important plant diseases.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

This consolidation, which goes into effect July 1, SecretaTry Wallace points out, will permit greater economy of administration in the Department's search for better methods of insect control and in the regulatory work necessary to prevent the spread of plant pests and diseases. It also insures better coordination and more effective direction of the various parallel lines of research and control activities.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine from December 1, 1929, to October 1, 1933, and since then Chief of the Bureau of Entomology, has been appointed Chief of the new bureau. S. A. Rohwer, now assistant chief of the Bureau of Entomology, and Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, will be assistant chiefs of the new bureau. F. H. Spencer will be business manager. Karl F. Kellerman, formerly associate chief of the Bureau of Plant Industry, will have charge of the division devoted to the eradication and control of citrus canker, phony peach disease, Dutch elm disease, white pine blister rust, and the stem rust of grains.
Research in the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine will cover studies on the life history and habits of beneficial as well as injurious insects, with a view to developing practical methods for destroying injurious insects and promoting the increase and spread of those found beneficial.
The regulatory work, under the authority of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, will include the enforcement of quarantines and restrictive measures to prevent the entry into, or the spread within, the United States of dangerous plant diseases and insect pests.
Under the new arrangement the different lines of work on related subjects, whether regulatory or research, are brought together in a single unit. The work of collection, introduction, and clearing through quarantine of foreign parasites for the control of injurious insect pests established in the United States has been placed in a single division under the direction of C. P. Clausen. The fundamental investigations to develop control methods by the use of insecticides, attractants, and repellents have been brought together in the Division of Control Investigations, under Lon A. Hawkins. The Division of Household and Stored Product Insects, in the Bureau of Entomology, as such, has been discontinued, and the work assigned to other divisions. Studies on insects attacking stored products have been transferred to the divisions concerned with the insects that infest the same crops in the field. For example, investigations on dried fruit insects will be conducted by the Division of Fruit Insects. As the insects found in stored products are often hangovers from field infestations, such an arrangement is designed to further simplify and expedite the new Bureau's work. The investigations on household insects formerly assigned to this division have been transferred to the Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals, under the direction of F. C. Bishopp, who has long been in charge of that division. All informational work has been brought together with the Insect Pest Survey and placed in the Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information, under the leadership of J. A. Hyslop.
The other research divisions of the Bureau of Entomology, the regulatory divisions of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and the field stations of both bureaus will remain about as they were.


B.P.Q.-357, Supplement No. 1 APRIL 25, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA
The decree of February 20, 1934, revokes that of May 11, 1927, which prohibited the importation of corn (Zea mays) and broomcorn (Andropogon sorghum var. technicus) into that country. The text, in translation, follows:
ARTICLE 1. The decree of May 11, 1927 (see par. 1, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357), whereby the importation of corn and broomcorn was prohibited, is hereby revoked, and the portion (par. 2, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357) relating to the disinfection which was required for other seeds mentioned in that decree, becomes ineffective.
ART. 2. The importation is authorized of corn and sorghum only (Johnson grass, Andropogon halepensis, being excluded), if clean and free from any plant refuse, it being necessary when that condition is not fulfilled to disinfect the shipment with hydrocyanic acid gas, carbon disulphide, or other similar prod-





40 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

ucts applied in vacuo for the period and with the dosage established in this connection by the Health Office of Plant and Seed Importation and Exportation (Oficina Sanitaria de Importaci6n y Exportaci6n de Plantas y Semillas).
ART. 3. The importation is prohibited of plants, or parts of plants, of corn, especially the ear, tassel, stalk, green husk, etc., as well as of broomcorn straw intended for manufacturing purposes, or as raw material for packing agricultural implements and various other articles. The introduction is likewise prohibited of feed from plants belonging to other species of Andropogon, Saccharum, Pennisetum, and Coix, as well as fresh vegetables and flower stems of gladioli and dahlias from countries in which Pyrausta nubilalis exists and whose products may serve as vehicles for the distribution of the corn borer.
ART. 4. The introduction is permitted of shipments of the seeds referred to in article 1 of this decree through ports authorized for that purpose, but if those ports do not satisfy the provisions of the last part of article 2 entry is tems porarily restricted to the port of Buenos Aires, the authorization finally being extended to the ports of La Plata, Bahia Blanca, Rosario, Santa Fe, and the customs at Mendoza, as soon as equipments for vacuum disinfection are installed in those ports.
E. R. SASSCER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

B.P.Q.-363 MAY 1, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
The following summary of the plant-quarantine-import restrictions of the Philippine Islands has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to those islands.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from the texts of the following administrative orders of the Philippine Bureau of Plant Industry: No. 10, approved April 25, 1932; no. 11, approved July 14, 1932, and no. 12, approved June 14, 1933, as well as administrative orders no. 56, approved August 21, 1928, and no. 57, approved October 10, 1928, of the old Bureau of Agriculture, and reviewed by the Director of Plant Industry, Manila, P.I.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of those administrative orders, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The orders themselves should be consulted for the exadt texts.
E. R. SAsscEE,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
BASIC LAW
Act No. 3027 of March 8, 1922, entitled: An Act to protect the agricultural industries of the Philippine Islands from injurious plant pests and diseases existing in foreign countries and further to regulate the domestic movement of plant materials in order to minimize the injury from pests and diseases already introduced.
CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED BY SPECIAL QUARANTINES
Plant materials of all plants of the genera and species: Agave castula, maguey; Musa spp., banana family; Agave sisalana, sisal; Nicotiana tabacum, tobacco; Ananas (comosUs) sativus, pineapple; Saccharum officinarum, sugarcane; Cocos nucifera, coconut; Oryza sativa, rice; Bambusa sp., bamboo; Citrus varieties, known commercially as the Chinese yellow and red kids; except under permit, in limited quantity, for experimental purposes in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10 of March 19, 1932. (Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932.)
Fresh fruits from countries infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), namely: Algeria, Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil,






1984] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMiENTS 41

British East Africa, Canary Islands, Cape Colony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo, Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar, Madeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, New South Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria, Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily, Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis, Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and Western Australia, may be imported only in limited quantities for experimental purposes and under special permit. (Administrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933.)
Fresh fruits from Texas, U.S.A., and from Mexico: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Mexican fruit fly or Morelos orange worm, Anastrepha ludens. Provision is made, however, for the importation of small quantities of those fruits to procure better varieties and new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes in accordance with article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10, through the Bureau of Plant Industry, Manila. (Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928&.)
Mimosa invisa: Importation prohibited of plants in the natural state capable of propagation, except to procure new propagating stock for experimental purposes under the provisions of section 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 of March 19, 1932. (Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928.)
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED-IMPORT PERMIT AND INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended for food purposes, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, may be imported under the provisions of articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 of Administrative Order No. 10. (See art 14 of that order.)
Plant materials for propagation not governed by special quarantines are admitted after inspection upon arrival if found free from injurious insects and plant diseases, under the general provisions of article 9 of Administrative Order No. 10.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIALS INTO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
(Administrative Order No. 10, approved Apr. 25, 1932)
Deftnitions
ARTICLE 1. (a) "Person" is construed as singular or plural and applies to and includes corporations, societies, associations, firms, companies, and other legal entitles.
(b) "Plant materials" includes living plants, rhizomes, fruits, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, and corms, grafts, leaves, roots, scions, and fruit pits, and such other parts of plants as are capable of propagation or of harboring plant pests and diseases.
(c) "Country" shall refer to and include independent political units or sovereign nations, territories, colonies, and political or territorial subdivisions.

Plant materials for which a permit is required
ART. 2. Plant material governed by special quarantine orders may be imported from countries which maintain inspection in limited quantity under permit from the Director of Agriculture for the purpose, of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock, and from countries which do not maintain inspection in limited quantities for experimental purposes only, subject to such conditions as the Director of Plant Industry may impose, in compliance also with the particular administrative orders governing them respectively and with these regulations. Manila is the authorized port of entry for such importations.
Application for import permit
ART. 3. All persons who intend to import plant materials must apply to the Director of the Bureau of Plant Industry in advance of the shipment.
ART. 4. On approval by the Director of Plant Industry of an application to import plant materials under quarantine, a permit shall be issued, but before issuing a permit the Director may require the importer to file a bond in twice the invoice cost of the plants imported.
80185-34- 2






42 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Notices of arrival and shipment required
ARTS. 5 and 6. Require the permittee to furnish in duplicate a notice of arrival and a notice of shipment on the prescribed forms.
Permits may be revoked for violations
ART. 7. Permits may be revoked and further permits may be refused for the importation of the products of any grower or exporter of any foreign country who has violated Act No. 3027, or any rules or rgeulations promulgated thereunder; or for the importation of the products of any country where inspection is considered by the Bureau of Plant Industry, as a result of its examinations of importations therefrom, to have been merely perfunctory, or because of the failure of the permittee to comply with the regulations, or if, in the judgment of the Director, the interests of the public and the service so require.

Conditions of entry
Foreign certificate of inspection required
ART. 8. Importations of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and other plant materials from foreign countries must be accompanied by certificates of inspection issued by the proper government authority of the country of origin, stating that the materials are free from injurious insects and plant diseases. Where the government maintains a plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certiflcates of inspection required by this order shall be certificates of inspection of plant materials issued by the chief or director of the plant-quarantine or plantinspection service of the country or place of origin or his duly authorized representatives. In countries or places the governments of which do not maintain plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certificates of inspection must have been accomplished by the exporter or shipper concerned, duly subscribed and sworn to by him before a person legally authorized to administer oaths in the country of origin; in this case the certificate must include a statement to the effect that the plant materials did not originate in a place where injurious insects or plant diseases were prevalent; that they have not been kept or stored in places infested by injurious insects or infected by plant diseases; and that whatever treatment is required by the Director of Plant Industry prior to shipment has been effected. The presentation of such certificates shall not preclude inspection on arrival if an inspection is deemed necessary.

Inspection upon arrival
AnT. 9. All persons who intend to import plant materials must submit to the Bureau of Plant Industry an application for inspection of incoming plants on or before the arrival of such shipment. All such plant materials shall be inspected upon arrival for injurious insects and plant diseases. All plants which are found to be free from injurious insects and plant diseases shall be certified and tagged or stamped. Such plants after having been so tagged or stamped shall then be allowed to enter. Plant materials which are found to be infested by injurious insects or infected with diseases shall be returned to the point of origin or destroyed, at the option of the importer and at his expense.
NOTE.-Plant materials not governed by special quarantine orders and which are imported for propagation purposes are allowed entry into the Philippines after the proper inspection and certification has been made by the plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Industry and they have been found free from any injurious insects and plant diseases, provided such plants or plant materials are not weeds or are not likely to become weeds. Such plant materials come under the general provisions of article 9 of this order. (Letter of the Director of Plant Industry of May 2, 1933.)
Disinfection or fumigation
ART. 10. Plant materials imported under article 2 shall, at the expense and responsibility of the importer, be subject, as a condition of entry, to such disinfection or fumigation as may be required, and may be quarantined in places designated by the Director of Plant Industry until evidence is available that no injurious insects or plant diseases are present on such plants.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

Plant materials must be free from sand, soil, or earth

ART. 11. All plant materials offered for entry must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and all plant roots, rhizomes, tubers, etc., must be washed to thoroughly free them from such sand, soil, or earth and must be so certified by the duly authorized inspector of the country of origin or by the shipper or exporter, as prescribed by article 8: Provided, That sand, soil, or earth may be employed for the packing of bulbs and corms when such material has been sterilized or otherwise safeguarded by methods prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Industry and so certified by the authorized inspector of the country of origin or by the exporter or shipper, in accordance with article 8. The use of such sand, soil, or earth for packing materials other than bulbs and corms is not authorized.

Approved packing materials

ART. 12. All packing materials used with importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds shall be subject to approval by the Bureau of Plant Industry and must not previously have been used as packing or otherwise in connection with living plants, and, except for bulbs and corms, must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and must be certified as meeting these conditions by the authorized inspector or by the exporter or shipper, in accordance with article 8.
ART. 13. Any container of plant materials held for inspection, etc., shall have attached to it a quarantine sign.

Plant materials for which a permit is not required

ART. 14. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended for food purposes, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, when free from sand, soil, or earth, and when not governed by special quarantine orders, may be imported, but subject to the conditions prescribed by articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 of this order.

Authorized ports of entry

ART. 15. The inspection of incoming plant material shall be made at the ports of Manila, Cebu, Iloilo, Zamboanga, Legaspi, Davao, and Jolo. Plant materials shall not be admitted at any other port.

Importation by mail

ART. 16. Plant materials entering by mail shall be inspected by the plant quarantine officials upon notification of the presence of such materials at the post office. Such materials shall be subject to the same inspection as materials entering through the customhouse.
ART. 17. Deals with fees for fumigation or disinfection.

Certification for export

ART. 18. Application should be made to the Director of Plant Industry for the inspection of plant materials for export. ART. 19. Provides for the issuance of inspection certificates for plant materials intended for exportation.
ARTS. 20, 21, and 22. Penalties, repealing provision and effective date (May 1, 1932).
PROHIBITED PLANT MATERIALS
(Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932)
ARTICLE 1. The importation is strictly prohibited of plant materials of all plants of the genus Musa; coconut, Cocos nucifera; sugarcane, Saccharum offiinarum; rice, Oryza sativa; pineapple, Ananas comosus; bamboo, Bambusa spp.; tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum; Citrus varieties commercially known as the Chinese yellow and red kids; maguey, Agave cantula; and sisal, Agave sisalana: Provided, That a limited quantity of plant materials of such plants may be imported, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10, upon proper application to the Director of Plant Industry and under permit






44 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Jne

from the said official, through the port of Manila. They shall also be subject to such other conditions, requirement, or treatment as the Director of Plant Industry may prescribe.
ART. 2. Definition of "plant materials" (see definitions).
ARTS. 3 and 4. Treatment of contraband, and penalties.
ART. 5. Revocations and effective date (Aug. 1, 1932).
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM OUNTI8 INFSSTED WITH MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY
(Administrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933)
ARTICLE 1. The importation, bringing, or introduction of fruits and vegetables of the species listed hereunder from countries and places known to be actually infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, namely, Algeria, Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil, British East Africa, Canary Islands, Cape Colony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo, Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar, Madeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, New South Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria, Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily, Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis, Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and Western Australia, is strictly prohibited: Provided, That a limited quantity of such fruits and vegetables may, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10, upon proper application made to the Director of Plant Industry, be imported through the port of Manila from countries or places herein enumerated which maintain plant-quarantine and inspection service, for the purpose of obtaining seeds or planting materials to ,keep the Philippine Islands supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock.
The same fruits and vegetables may also be imported in limited quantities under quarantine, from countries or places herein enumerated not maintaining plant-quarantine and inspection service, provided they are to be used for experimental purposes only, subject to such conditions as the Director may impose. The fruits and vegetables, or the seeds or planting materials obtained from them, imported for the purposes mentioned in this article, shall be held or planted, as the case may be, under quarantine in an isolation station by the Director for close observation and shall be released only when evidence is available showing that no injurious insects and plant diseases are present on, in, or amongst such fruits and vegetables, or seeds, seedlings, or plant materials derived therefrom. They shall also be subject to such other conditions, requirement, or treatment as the Director may prescribe.

PROHIBITED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Achras sapota, sapodilla.
Amygdalus (Prunus) persica, peach.
Amygdalus (Prunus) p ersica nectarina, nectarine.
Annona muricata, soursop.
Arenga saccharifera, sugar palm.
Artocarpus incisa, breadfruit.
Averrhoa carambola, carambola.
Calophyllum inophyllum, ball kamani.
Capsicum spp., peppers.
Carica papaya, papaya.
Carica quercifolia, dwarf papaya.
Carissa (arduina) bispinosa, carissa.
Casimiroa edulis, white sapote.
Cestrum sp., Chinese inkberry.
Chrysophyllum cainito, star-apple.
Chrysophyllum oliviforme, satin-leaf chrysophyllum.
Citrus japonica, Japanese orange.
(Citrus) Fortunella japonca, kumquat.
Citrus nobilis, var. deliciosa, tangerine and mandarin.
Citrus limonia, lemon.
Citrus (decumana) grandis, grapefruit, pomelo, shaddock.
Clausena wampi, wampi.
Coffea spp., coffee.
Cydonia oblonga, quince.
Diospyros (decondra) ebeiwm, persimmon.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Eriobotrya japonica, loquat. Eugenia brasiliensiss) domnbeyi, Brazilian plum or Spanish cherry. Eugenia jambos, rose apple. Eugenia (micheli) uniflora, Surinam-cherry, French cherry. Ficus carioa, fig.
Garcinia mangostana., mangosteen. Garcinia xanthochymus, mangosteen. Gossypium spp., cultivated cotton. Jambosa malaccensis, mountain apple. Latania loddigesi, palm. Litchi chinensis, lychee or lichee nut. Lycopsersium esculentunm, tomato. Ma.lus spp., apple.
Mangifera. indica, mango. Mim usops elengi, elengi tree or Spanish cherry. Murraea or Murraya exotica, mockorange or orange-jasmine. Musa sp., banana.
Noronhia emarginata, noronhia. Ochrosia elliptica., ochrosia. Opuntia vrulgars, pricklypear. Passiflora caerulea, passion vine. Persea (gratissina) americana, avocado. Phoenix dactylifera, date palm. Prunus armeniaca, apricot. Prunus spp., plums.
Psidium cattleianum, strawberry guava. Psid4um guajava, sweet, red, and white lemon guavas. Psidiurn gitajava pomiferum, common guava. Psidium guajava pyriferum, waiawi. Punica granatunm, pomegranate. Pyrus communis, pear. SFantalum freycinetianum, sandalwood. Solanum melongena, eggplant.
Spondias (dulcis) cytherea.
Terminalia chebula, Natal plum.
Terminlia catappa, tropical almond or winged kamani.
Thevetia nereifolia, bestill, yellow oleander.
Vitis labrusca, fox grape.

Contraband plant products will be seized

Am. 2. All or any fruits and vegetables of the species listed herein imported from the countries and places named in article 1, in contravention of the provisions of this order, shall be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Industry and shall be immediately returned to the country or place of origin or completely destroyed according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry, at the expense of the importer.
ART. 3. Penalties.
ART. 4. Revokes orders, rules, and regulations which are inconsistent with the present order.
ART. 5. The effective date of this order is July 1, 1933.

FRESH FRUITS FROM TEXAS, U.S.A., AND MEXICO, IMPORTATION PROHIBITED TO
PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF ANASTREPHA LUDENS
(Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928)

An insect pest known as the Morelos orange worm or Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, is known to exist in the State of Texas, U.S.A., and in Mexico, where it attacks fruits, especially oranges, limes, mangoes, peaches, guavas, chicos, and plums; this pest does not exist in the Philippine Islands;: consequently:
ARTICLE 1. The importation of fruits from the State of- Texas, U.S.A., and Mexico is hereby prohibited: Provided, That the importation through the port of Manila of small quantities of such fruits may be permitted in order toprocure better varieties, new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes, in accordance with section 2 of Administrative Order No. 29 (now






46 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.June

article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10). Such importation must be made through the Director of Agriculture (now Director of Plant Industry), subject to the provisions of Administrative Order No. 29 (now no. 10), and to the condition that the imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolation station until it is evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are present on such plant materials.
ART. 2. Any importation of fruits from these places made in contravention of the provisions of this order will be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors duly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will be either immediately returned to the country or place of origin or completely destroyed, according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly authorized agents. The cost of the returA or destruction of said plant materials shall be borne by the importer.
ART. 3. Penalties.
ART. 4. Effective date of this order, August 21, 1928.

IMPORTATION OF MIMOSA INVISA PROHIBITED
(Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928)

Under certain conditions Mimosa invisa Mart. is a noxious and very harmful weed to agriculture. Consequently:
ARTIcut 1. The importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or of any part of the said plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation is strictly prohibited: Provided, That the importation through the port of Manila of the seed or parts of the said plant may be permitted in order to procure new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes, in accordance with article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 of this Bureau. Such importation must be made through the Director of Plant Industry, subject to the provisions of the said Administrative Order No. 10, and to the conditions that the imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolation station until it is evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are present on such plant materials, and that the propagation of said imported stock must be made under such directions as may be prescribed by the Director.
ART. 2. Any importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or any part of the said plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation, made in contravention of the provisions of this order, will be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors duly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will be either immediately returned to the country of origin or completely destroyed, according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly authorized agents. The cost of the return or destruction of the said plant materials shall be borne by the importer.
ARTS. 3 and 4. Pertain to domestic restrictions. ART. 5. Prescribes penalties.


B.P.Q.-364 MAY 5, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH MANDATE OF SYRIA

This summary of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the French mandate of Syria has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the French text of the order of the French High Commission of Syria, No. 248, of April 19, 1934.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the order, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The order should be consulted for the exact text.
Av=icT S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Pltant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, cut flowers, leaves, fruits, vegetables, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and seeds. Each shipment offered for entry must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued in the country of origin.
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Plants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food and for industrial :and medicinal purposes, but when their use is in doubt they shall be deemed restricted products.

ORDER OF THE FRENCH HIGH COMMISSION, No. 248, OF APRIL 19, 1926

GENERAL REGULATIONS

Movements of plant material restricted

ARTICLE 1. Subject to the provisions of the present order are:
(a) Importation into the States under French mandate;
(b) Commerce between these same States;
(o) Exportation from these States;
(d) Transit through the territories under French mandate.

Restricted plant material

(1) Plants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, seeds, cut flowers, leaves, fruits, and vegetables;
(2) Material of any kind used for the packing and transport of the products mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

Unrestricted plant material

ART. 2. Plants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food, manufacturing, and medicinal purposes are not subject to the present regulations.
However, in case of doubt as to the real purpose of the plants and parts of plants, or if, although intended for food, or for manufacturing or medicinal purposes, their introduction into or distribution through the country constitutes a danger to agriculture, the present regulations will be applied to them by decision of the High Commissioner upon the request of the heads of the States concerned and upon the advice of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
ART. 3. The High Commissioner may prohibit the importation and transit of these products by special orders issued upon the proposal of the Secretary General of the High Commissariat on the advice of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
ART. 4. Commerce in the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 shall be the object of provisions made by each State.

Customs ports of entry

ART. 5. Subject to the provisions mentioned in the following article, the right to import into the territories under mandate the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 is limited to customs offices on maritime and land frontiers which will provide the technical personnel and material necessary to insure the control of importation and, when required, the disinfection of the imported products.
An agreement between the inspection-general of customs of Syria and Lebanon and the State concerned will regulate the conditions under which the products to be disinfected will be transported from the point of importation to the State disinfecting station and their delivery to the importers after disinfection.
ART. 6. Requests for the opening of customs offices for the entry of the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 shall be addressed by the heads





48 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Juneof the States concerned to the High Commissioner, who will promulgate a decree on the proposal of the Secretary-General of the High Commissariat upon the advice of the inspector-general of customs of Syria and Lebanon and of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
According to the technical means and materials that the localities in which the customs offices whose opening for importation is requested will provide, import authorizations may be extended to all the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1, or be limited to certain of those products and to certain botanical species.
ART. 7. In each State, in order to facilitate for the agricultural service the control of the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1, the customs service shall notify the former service without delay of the address of the depository of the import declarations pertaining to those products.
Inspection certificate required

ART. 8. Products offered for importation must be accompanied by a phytopathological inspection certificate adopted in the country of origin affirming that the products are free from any parasite known to be injurious to crops.
This certificate, after being visaed by the customs service and registered by the director of agriculture of the State in which the port of entry is located, will accompany the imported products to their final destination.
Disposal of noncertified products

ART. 9. Products unaccompanied by a phytopathological inspection certificate will be inspected by the local Direction of Agriculture on their arrival at the port of entry.
They may be admitted if found free from parasites; disinfected if necessary; shipped to a port having facilities for disinfecting if the port of entry does not furnish those facilities; or returned to the country of origin or destroyed, at the choice of the importer, if disinfection cannot be carried out.
Destruction will be effected by the customs service within 6 days from the date the importer was notified by the customs service, if he had not made his decision known.
Packing

ART. 10. Imported products must be so packed as to facilitate inspection and disinfection.
Each package shall be provided with a tag attached conspicuously indicating: Full name and address of the exporter; locality of origin of the products; character, variety, and quantity of the products contained in the package; and name and address of the importer.
The opening of the packages, and disinfection, reshipment, or destruction of the products will be made at the expense and risk of the importer.
ART. 11. The examination of products imported without certificate will involve a report, in duplicate, which will be prepared by the agent charged with the inspection.
This report, which will contain the information necessary for the identification of the products examined, will state the outcome of the examination and the resultant operations.
ART. 12. If the entry of the inspected products is permitted, the duplicate of the report will accompany the products to their final destination.
No one may transport in territory under French mandate imported plants or parts of plants which are not accompanied by a phytopathological certificate or by the inspection report mentioned in the preceding article.
The Consultative Epiphyte Commission may satisfy itself, upon the arrival of the imported products at destination, that they are free from parasites.
ARTS. 13 to 19. Interstate traffic.

Transit

ART. 20. The transit of the plants and parts of plants mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 through the territory of States under French mandate is subject to the regulations concerning the importation of those plants and parts thereof.






,,1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

ARTS. 21 to 23. Penalties.
ART. 24. The Secretary-General of the High Commissariat, the president of ,the State of Syria, the governors of the States of Great Lebanon and of Alaouites are charged each in that which concerns him, with the execution of the ,present decree.


-P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 5 MAY 7, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS

Proclamation No. 6, of February 13, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 1, of February 5, 1929, and supersedes it. Proclamation No. 6 prescribes:
An absolute prohibition of importation into the Colony, directly or indirectly,
-of citrus plants, including plants of grapefruit, orange, lemon, lime, and tangerine trees, save and except under the following conditions:
"(a) All orders shall be placed through the Department of Agriculture .and the selection of the nursery from which any plants are obtained shall
-be made by and be in the discretion of the agricultural officer.
"(b) Trees shall be fumigated on arrival if considered necessary by the
-agricultural officer.
"(c) Trees in each consignment shall be planted out in one block and shall be open to inspection at any time by officers of the Department of Agriculture.
"(d) Within 3 years after planting any tree as aforesaid, if in the opinion of the agricultural officer it is necessary to destroy any tree or to spray the same in any particular manner due to the presence of harmful disease believed to have been introduced on such tree, the owner thereof shall, on ;being required to do so in writing by the agricultural officer, carry out at his own expense any such instructions as aforesaid. The owner shall be
-precluded from claiming any damage or compensation arising through any destruction or treatment of any plant as aforesaid.
"(e) All materials used in the packing of any trees, as well as any container in which the same may have been conveyed, shall be destroyed by fire after the plants have been received on the farm on which they are to be set out."
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



B.P.Q.-314, Supplement No. 6 MAY 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS

IMPORTATION OF COCONUT PALMS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 25, August 14, 1933, effective August 19, 1933, prohibits all importations into the Colony, directly or indirectly, of any part or portion ,of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), including plants, leaves, leaflets, and unhusked fruits (but not including the husked nut of commerce), except by the Department of Agriculture for the purpose of experimental work undertaken by that Department.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 7 JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
Proclamation No. 18, of May 4, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 5 of Novemlber 27, 1920 (see P.Q.C.A.-314, p. 1), and supersedes it.
Proclamation No. 18 prohibits absolutely the importation into the Colony of British Honduras, directly or indirectly, of the plant known as the banana plant and any other spies of the genus Musa from the West Indian Islands, Republics of Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the Con-






50 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Jne

tinent of South America, Canary Islands, and West Africa, together with any articles or soil packed therewith, or any package, covering, or thing in which it may be packed, unless it is imported by the Department of Agriculture for experimental purposes, or under a license issued by the agricultural officer.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.--347, Supplement No. 2 MAY 7, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE
PHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECE
(Decree of Jan. 10, 1934)
ONLY ARTICLE

I. The following regions are declared phylloxerated:
(1) The communes of Amorgos, Arkessini, and Katapola of the island of Amorgos, with the islets of Kato Koufonissia, Schinousa, and Irakleia, which are part of the commune of Katapola. The islets around the island of Amorgos: Denoussa, Kavos, Nikouria, Petalidi, Gravoussa, Dryma, Antikaros, Gougari, Fidoussa, Agrilos, Glaros, Prassoura, and Amorgopoula.
(2) The Province of Kalambaka of the Department of Trikkala.
(3) All the Province of Grevena.
(4) All the Province of Castoria.
(5) All the Province of Elasson.
II. The Provinces of Trikkala and Karditsa of the Department of Trikkala.
III. The place called Valta" of the village of Palama of the Province of Carditsa is declared infested with phylloxera.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



B.P.Q.-355, Revised JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

The following summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Jamaica, British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the Director of Agriculture of that Colony, revised by him May 9, 1934, and is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to Jamaica.
The information contained in this circular is offered as being correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and proclamations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative.. The orders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact text.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.







1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES


Proclamations, orders, etc., in force
Article
Instrument Date Provisions

Citrus:
Fruits.........---------------- Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916.
Plants, buds, and grafts.. Order under law 10 June 18, 1925 Prohibited from all countries, but of 1925. Dec. 5, 1933 may be imported by Director of Agriculture at any time from any country.
Cotton, including any part of .....-do-----------............... June 18, 1925 Prohibited from all countries (exany plant of any species or cept Turks and Caicos Islands) variety of Goas#pium. except under special license from Director of Agriculture. Coconuts in the husk--------......... Proclamation under May 15, 1923 Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916.
Banana plants or parts thereof .....do---.............-------.. Apr. 3, 1917 Do.
or articles used as packing or covering for.
Tools or implements usually .....do----......-----.........----.....do........ Prohibited from Central America,
employed in the cultivation South America, and Trinidad. of bananas.
Earth or soil---- ----------- do-------------...... ..... do........ Prohibited from all countries.
Fruits and vegetables (except .....-do-...........-----....------.... Jan. 13, 1934 Prohibted except from countries
dried or processed) grains, specified in schedule (United seeds, potatoes, onion, or any Kingdom and Ireland, Canada, species of Allium. Bahamas, United States of America).
Permitted importations to be certified by a competent authority of the government of the country of origin as home grown, free from disease, and from a country where Mediterranean fruit fly does not exist.
Importer to give 7 days notice of arrival. On arrival subject to inspection, treatment, or destruction by officer authorized by the Director of Agriculture. Copra--------..............-------------.....do------------ Sept. 2,1933 Prohibited from all countries.
Plants or parts thereof, includ- Order under law 10 June 4, 1929 (1) From the United Kingdom may ing any soil, articles, cover- of 1925. be imported without permit. wings, or packages in which Entry permitted into port of they may be enclosed or Kingston only. On arrival must packed. be fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas.
(2) From any country other than the United Kingdom permitted only if and when a written permit has been granted by the Director of Agriculture previous to importation.
Admission allowed into port of Kingston only. Goods must be consigned to the Director of Agriculture and on arrival will be subjected to such disinfection or fumigation as may be considered necessary.
-....---do.....------------ Apr. 26, 1930 The permit will take the form of a
label which must be forwarded by the importer to the supplier, who must attach it to the package containing the plants. Packages arriving without a permit attached are to be destroyed forthwith by post office or cus toms.
Agricultural tools or imple- -.....do-----------........ June 4,1929
ments of labor.
(a) New and unused ------ ---- ---------------------- Same as (1) and (2) above.
(b) Used-----...................................-------------------------------------... A permit as in (2) above is necessary before used tools and implements can be imported from any countty, including United Kingdom.






52 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

B.P.Q.-350, Supplement No. 1 JUNE 15, 1994.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAY

IMPORT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOES

In view of the fact that the Royal Resolution of December 15, 1933, further amended that of February 13, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-350, p. 1), to take cognizance of the Colorado potato beetle, it was deemed desirable to furnish a more nearly complete text of the amended resolution.

RESOLUTION OF FEBRUARY 13, 1925, AS AMENDED

ARTICtm 1. Potatoes may be imported into Norway only on condition (a) That by a thorough and comprehensive field inspection, which the Department of Agriculture has found adequate, it was determined that neither wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum) nor the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) occurs in the country in question, and that these parasites have not occurred there during the past 6 years ;1
(b) That the country of export concerned permits the importation of potatoes only from countries in which likewise it has been satisfactorily determined, as indicated in paragraph 1 (a), that neither potato wart nor Colorado beetle exists ;
(c) That each shipment is made directly from the country of export to the place of import and is accompanied by a certificate issued by an official phytopathological service of the exporting country, in accordance with article 9 of these regulations;
(d) That the potatoes are packed in sacks or boxes not previously used and that each sack or box is sealed with the seal of the phytopathological service concerned;
(e) That on arrival in Norway the potatoes are inspected by a Government inspector, who will certify to the customs that he has inspected them and found them to be free (if such be the case) from potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), the potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), and that the potatoes also fulfill the requirements of the regulations for the importation of potatoes. The potatoes shall not be delivered by the customs until this certificate is submitted.
ARTS. 2 and 3. Concerning the employment of inspectors.
ART. 4. Anyone who intends to import potatoes must first obtain a permit from the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet), Oslo, and must subsequently report each shipment to that Department; such a report must reach the Department at least 3 days before inspection is to be made.
ART. 5. Inspection is to be made at the place of customs clearance. Importers shall transport the potatoes to and from the place of inspection and provide the necessary labor during inspection.
ART. 6. At least 5 percent of the boxes or sacks shall be inspected.
ARTS. 7 and 8. Instructions to inspectors and fees for inspection.
ART. 9. The certificate of the foreign phytopathological service must be issued within 14 days of shipment. It must indicate the locality where the potatoes were grown and the names and addresses of shipper and consignee. It shall certify:
(a) That the potatoes were grown in the exporting country concerned and that the said country is free from wart disease and Colorado potato beetle;
(b) That the potatoes were grown in ground free from root nematodes (Reterodera rostochiensis var. solani) ;
(c) That shipment is made in new containers and that each sack or box bears the seal of the respective phytopathological service. The certificate shall be signed and bear the official title of the authorized official of that service and be visaed by a Norwegian consul.
A copy of the certificate shall at once be transmitted to the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet), Oslo, Norway.

1 Since there are small localized areas infected with wart disease in several States In the United States, the importation into Norway of potatoes grown in this country Is prohibited (decision of the Norwegian Department of Agriculture per the Royal Norwegian Legation, letter of Feb. 18, 1931).

~iQ~~ li~IB





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

ART. 10 Concerning small shipments from Sweden.
ART. 11. The Department may make exceptions in special cases. ART. 12. Penalties.
ART. 13. Effective immediately, until further notice; revokes the regulations of August 9, 1921.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-310, Supplement No. 1 JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU

PORTS OF ENTRY

According to the decree of August 12, 1931, the entry may be allowed, in particular cases, of living plants through other ports of the Republic than those previously authorized. For this purpose, the chief of the Service of Phytosanitary Seed and Plant Inspection and technical officials of agricultural stations and boards may attest the corresponding inspection.
Interested persons must apply in advance for the permit and pay the cost of the said inspection.
NoTE.-The above supplements the information under the caption PORTS OF ENTRY ", p. 3 of P.Q.C.A.-310.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 25, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND
TERRITORY OF WESTERN SAMOA

The secretary of the administration of western Samoa, in a communication dated April 11, 1934, to the American consul general, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia,' stated that in the matter of plant quarantines western Samoa is guided by the New Zealand customs acts and regulations, but certain local special regulations also apply to the entry of plants, etc., into that territory. These are the Board of Health Regulations No. 7, effective October 10, 1924, and the proclamation of September 9, 1933.

BOARD OF HEALTH REGULATIONS NO. 7 OF WESTERN SAMOA 2
(Effective Oct. 10, 1934)
HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, HUSKS USED AS PACKING TO BE BURNED ON ARRIVAL

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Board of Health Regulations No. 7.
ART. 2. In every case where goods of any kind are imported into Western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, from Great Britain, Ireland, or any part of the Continent of Europe, or from the States of Queensland or Western Australia, or from the United States of America, accompanied by hay, straw, chaff, or husks as packing or otherwise, the importer shall burn those materials with as little delay as possible, and in any case within 3 days of the commencement of unpacking of the goods.

2 Since these regulations apply to import restrictions and prohibitions of plant materials, including fresh fruits and vegetables, they are included as a matter of information, although they are precautionary measures against the introduction of foot-and-mouth disease into western Samoa. The certificates concerned must be issued by the Bureau of Animal Industry.





54 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-une

ART. 3. In no case shall any importer use or suffer to be used any such hay, straw, chaff, or husks for repacking the same goods or for packing any other goods.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF OATS, BARLEY, MAIZE, HAY, STRAW, OHAFF, PLANTS
OR PORTIONS OF PLANTS, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGIJABL, AND ALL GRAIN AND
FARM PRODUCE FROM CALIFORNIA, OREGON, AND WASHINGTON
ART. 4. The importation from the United States of America into western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, of the following goods is absolutely prohibited: Oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, chaff, plants or portions of plants, all fresh fruits and vegetables, and all grain and farm produce: Provided, That in the case of all goods the importation of which is prohibited under this article, and not grown in any of the States of California, Oregon, and Washington, or directly handled or exposed within any of those States, otherwise than is necessary for through transportation to western Samoa, importation shall be permitted if the goods are accompanied by a certificate signed by a person appointed in that behalf by the government of the State concerned and countersigned by a responsible officer of the Federal Department of Agriculture certifying:
(a) The name of the State in which grown;
(b) That such State is, and has been for not less than 12 months, free from foot-and-mouth disease; and
(c) That the goods under certificate have not been directly handled or exposed within any of the States of California, Oregon, and Washington otherwise than is necessary for through transportation into western Samoa.

-CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED WITH HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, OR HUSKS IMPORTED
FROM THE UNITED STATES AS PACKING MATERIAL

ArT. 5. The importation from the United States is also prohibited of all hay, straw, chaff, or husks used as packing material for goods of any kind unless accompanied by a certificate signed and countersigned as specified in .article 4, certifying such material to be the produce of a State other than the States of California, Oregon, and Washington, and that it has not been directly handled or exposed within any of these States otherwise than is necessary for through transportation to western Samoa.
ART. 6. The importation into western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, is prohibited of all oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, and chaff from Queensland and Western Australia; and, save with the prior consent of the Director of Agriculture, of all the aforesaid articles from any other State in the Commonwealth of Australia, other thaA Queensland and Western Australia.

PROCLAMATION OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, SEPTEMBER 9, 1933

CERTIFICATION OR FUMIGATION OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any soil, plant matter, fruit, bags, native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the produce of the soil which is not accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent authority of the place of export affirming that it is free from pest or disease or that it has been fumigated immediately prior to export unless such article or thing shall first be fumigated at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.
ART. 2. Likewise prohibited is the importation of any soil, plant matter, fruit, bags, native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the produce of the soil, whether accompanied by a certificate as aforesaid or not, which has passed in transit through any place where in the opinion of the administrator it may be subject to infection by pest or disease, unless it shall first be fumigated at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.
ART. 3. Describes the building in Apia appointed as a fumigation station for the purposes of this proclamation.
ART. 4. Fixes the charges for fumigation.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

P.Q.C.A.-299, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 28, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
Proclamation No. 227 of April 18, 1934, amends that of June 5, 1924 (see P.Q.C.A.-299, p. 2), to read as follows:
The importation into Australia is prohibited of deciduous fruit trees or parts thereof (including the fruit and seeds), plants and parts of plants of the family Rosaceae (including the fruit and seeds), which were grown in any country in which pear blight or fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus) exists: Provided, That apples grown in New Zealand in districts in which fire blight does not exist, may be imported subject to the conditions prescribed in the regulations: Provided further, That the minister for health may permit the importation of ornamental plants or of new or special varieties of deciduous fruit trees or their fruit or seeds subject to any conditions which he may think fit to impose."
Under the same date the following regulations were promulgated concerning the certification of apples imported into the Commonwealth from New Zealand:
"REGuLATION 1. Any person desirous of landing apples imported from New Zealand shall, at the time of giving notice, also furnish with each consignment a certificate signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of New Zealand, identifying the fruit, stating the quantity and the district in which the apples were grown, and certifying:
"(a) That the disease known as fire blight' (Bacillus amylovorus) does not exist in the said district, and
(b) That the apples were grown and packed in the said district for shipment from the port stated in the certificate.
REGULATION 2. Each case of the consignment shall be labeled or branded with the letters and figures under which the name of the grower and the district of production are registered with the Department of Agriculture of New Zealand, in addition to any other marks which may serve to identify the consignment."
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting ChMief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to .July 1, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

B. C. Ball.................. Brownsville, Tex------....... 8 oranges.............................. $5
Victoria S. Varela----------................do-........---..........------ 5 plants---------------------------- 5
Maria M. de Perez--------.........---.....do.....-------------- 4 mangoes--------------------------............................. 5
Elenterio Rodriguez --------........--.....do-....-------------- I avocado seed and 1 orange----------........... 5
Leonora Guerra .... ....----------------- do ----------------- 13 plants_..--------------------------- 5
Mariano Moreno------...........-----..do---------------................... 4 mangoes -------------------------- 5
Francisca Garza------------.................do--------------- 1 avocado with seed..........------------------ 5
M. L. Barnes....-------------................ do--------------................... 4 mangoes__.-------------------------- 5
Lupe Baker...-------------........--..... do--.....------------ 3 mangoes...................------.....------------------- 5
J. M. Fonseca--------------...............do---.........------------ 1 avocado seed...........-------------------........-- 5
fMrs. D. C. Hogan ....---------- do ..--------------............... 1 mango--------------------------- 5
Refugio Hernandez---------.........-do-------------- 3 mangoes and 1 avocado with seed.... 5
Otto Markworth..----------... --do-...----..-------- 8 mangoes ......---------........---....------------......... 5
0. R. Hupp---------- ............---- do.......-------------............ 31 avocados with seed.---------------- 5
Maria T. Ugelda.......---------.... Calexico, Calif.......... 6 mangoes------.....................----- .......--------------- 2
Adolph Castro-..---------.......... Eagle Pass, Tex......... 2 avocados with seed----------.................-------- 1
'.Guada e Duran------- ----do.....------------- 1 mamey -------------------------- 1




4


56 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Eugenio Reyes Arriola ...... Eagle Pass, Tex-------......... 1 avocado............................. $1
Dallas F. Whaley ---------..........--.....do... .........---..-----------...... 24 avocados with seed-....----------------............. 1.2
Josefa Garza---------------..... ---do---------------................... 2 plants------------------------------i 1
Lorenzo Arlenz ------------..................do---------------................... 6 avocados with seed..------------------................ 1
I. Z. Lozano.....................-----------do................... 4 mangoes....--------------------------........................ 1
Rodrigo Perez ......------------........-.....do--------...................9 avocado seed- ...................... 1
Anastacio Garci............-----------do----......-----------............. 3 avocados and 1 mango............... 1
Santiago F. Rodriguez -----...... El Paso, Tex1............ I orange and 4 sweet limes---......----....
Rosa Reza de Hernandez ---...---.....do---.....--------.....-- 4 plants..........................2
C. R. Howard-------------...................do---------------................... 3 avocados with seed-----------------............... 1
Juana Perez---------------.....................do-....--------------3 fig plants----------.............------........-------- 1
Manuel Mena ------------------ do-------------- .....I avocado...............----------------...---- -- 1
Manuel V. Rodriguez........---------...do---------------................... 5 mangoes, 6 avocados, 1 sapote, 1 1
grapefruit, and 2 sweet limes.
Don Diaz -........-----........-----------do--------------- 256 apricots .........--------.........----------------. 1
Eugenio Quintia .....------.... Hidalgo, Tex .--------- 5 mangoes............ ....--------------------- 1
Felix Medina ...........-----------...----do.....-------------- 11 mangoes...--.................--------------- 5
Rafael Aranda-........--------.......----.... do---................------------... 5 avocados -.........-----------------------................. 5
Paul Califa........--------------..--...do--....---............... 2 avocados ...---..........------------..---------- 5.
Ignacio Ceja-------------................ Laredo, Tex ----------............ 2 mangoes-------.................---------.....----------... 1
Jose Garza ------------.................. ---- do----------------.......... --do.............................----------------------------E. Resendez ----------------do................... 10 oranges and 7 mangoes-------... --.......-- 1
R. D. Peck----------..........---------do..--...-------------.............. 7 mangoes and 7 avocados -----...-----........
P. Caussauli ............-------------- do---------------................... 36 avocados -------.............---------------........ 1
A. R. Marlanada---..........---------do................... 3 avocados and 3 mangoes ....-----------....... 1
J. G. Guajardo...--------------do....---------............. 2 avocados ..........--------......-----....---- I
D. Zapata----------------- do----................-------------.. 9 avocados .............--....---------------------.........
L. Walker-----------------.......................do---------------..................7 avocados ...................-------------------------- 1I
J. W. Davis ...----------- -----do--------------- 6 avocados...........................-------------------------- 1
Fred Mendez---------------do.................. 9 avocados-.........---....-----------.......-----.......... 1
Nicalosa Ramirez ....------------..do ---------------................. 2 plants-........-------....-----...------------- 1
Mrs. H. Hernandez--------........--.....do.................. 3 mangoes-------------------------- 1
Victor Sielski--------------do ----------------..................--.....do ----------------------...........................------- 1
P. Guerra ...-----------------do.................. ---------------9 mangoes and 2 mameys .-_ --------Taneisea R. de la Garza ----....---.....---do .................--------------- 1 mango ..-------------- ---------1
S. E. Garcia---------------.....................do ------------------......................do .....----------------------------Abraham Garcia------........---...--.....do................---------------.. 6 avocados ...--................--------------......
James Webb ......---------- -----do ........----------------.....do.......................------------------------.....---L
Genovena Parraldo----------do -------------...............-- 1 mango ......................---------------------Ricardo Lianas ------------..................do---------------.................. 3 mangoes .---------------...----------Glen White--....--------- ---do.................. 2 plants ..-- ..----------- ---------------... ....
R. Garcia Gomez----------..........--.....do.................. 3 avocados and 1 mango .-------------- 1
M. M. Garcia ------.................-- -----do....--------------- 2 mangoes --........------------------------1
Emma Vela---------------..................do---------------.................. 3 mangoes -------------------------Maria Valdez .....-------------- do.................. 2 mangoes --------------------------. 1
Augustine Pena.... ..... ----------- do.................. 4 avocados .......--...1---------------- ----Adolph Trego-------------...................do ..................------------------ .....do .....-----------....---------------- 1
Valente Velasquez do--------------- ................. 2 avocados -------------------------- 1
Jacobs Villarreal -----------.... do ..---------------.............. 10 mangoes ----------------------.. 1
J. Gonzalez ...............--------- -----do--------------- 2 avocados ------ -------------------- 1
Mrs. Otil Barrera----------..........--..do---------------.................. 2 mangoes_-------------------------- 1
Luis S. Martinez ----------- --- do---------------.................. 6 avocados --............-----.....--------------....1
Edward Clayborne--------...... --do ---------------8 avocados ....................--------------------------.1
0. E. Garza ....----------------do.................. 11 avocados and 1 sweet lime ........1---------P. Solis ......--------------... -----do ---------------.................. 7 avocados ..........-------...........------------------. 1
Miss A. Martinez ----------..........--...do ---------------.................. 2 avocados --------.............-----------.... 1
G. Sanchez ----------------......................do---------------.................. 5 avocados and 4 mangoes -------------1
Mateo Luna------------................ ----- do---------------..................5 avocados .....-----------------------.1
C. Trevino----------------....... ..... do ---------------1 mango ------------------------- 1
R. Caballero -------------... ..... --do --------------- 8 avocados -------------------------- 1
M. M. Trevino ...............------------do ----........-----------.......... 5 avocados ...----------- -----------S. P. Gonzalez ------------..............--..... do--.........-----------........ 13 avocados--..----------------------- 1
Arturo Guterrez...------------ do ---------------4 avocados---......---...-------------------W. M. Rodgers -----------............ --.....do_ -- ------------ 29 plants ...-----.... ----------------Mrs. Leo Zander --------- New Orleans, La........ ------12 orchid plants ..........----------------... 22.
Armando Villareal--------......... Rio Grande City, Tex 30 pounds broomcorn --------------........3.60
Roberta Garza_----------- Roma, Tex. ----------- 1 potted rose bush -----.........---------.. 5

T1 hese plants came from Brazil.


























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief. B. CoNNoR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information officer.


E. R. SASSCER, iZ Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Diuision. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(Headquarters, Greevfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and
Brown-Tail Moth Quarantines and European Corn Borer Certification (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.). B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters, Harlingen, Tex.).
57






















U. 5, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1934


















































































I,





:S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 120 Issued January 1935.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1934


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements...................----------..............----------------....................---------------- 59
Announcements relating to citrus canker quarantine (no. 19) ----------------------------- 59
Revision of quarantine__---- -------------------------------------------------- 59
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47254) ------------------------------------- 60
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) --------------------------- 61
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362, supplements nos. 1
and 2)............................ ----------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45) -------------- 61
Revision of regulations -------- ---------------------------------------------- 61
Notice to general public through newspapers_ ----------------------------------- 69
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) --------------------------------- 69
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments_ ----------------- 69
Removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables ...-----....-------------.. ................................................... 70
Instructions to postmasters_. ---__ --------------------------------------- 70
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 64)- ------_---------------------- 71
Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to begin September 26
(B. E. P. Q.-367) ------------------------- ---------------------------------------- 71
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)-.---------------- 71
Notice to permittees and others interested-willow withes as plant ties prohibited on plants
for entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.-365) ------------------------------------- 71
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ..--------------------------- 72
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ---------------- 72
Notice to general public through newspapers----------------------------------- 74
Instructions to postmasters..........------------------------------------------------............................................... 74
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ----.------------------------------ 74
Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1) ------------------------------------------- 74
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47229).---. ------------------------------- 76
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 15) -------------------------------- 76
Sugarcane quarantine revised. .---- ---------------------------- ------------------ 76
Revision of quarantine -------------------------------- ---------------------- 76
Miscellaneous items ............---------...... -------------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions,,Republic of Greece (B. P. Q-347, supplement no. 3) 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.-355, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------------78
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants (P. Q. C.
A.-310, supplement no. 2) ------------ .--------- ----------------------------- 78
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283, revised, supplement no. 3) --------- ------------- ------------------------------------79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284, supplement no. 9) 79.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 2) 80 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366)-------- 80
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------------------------- 89
-Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ---------------------------- 92



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO CITRUS CANKER QUARANTINE (NO. 19)

REVISION OF NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 ON ACCOUNT OF CITRUS CANKER AND OTHER CITRUS DISEASES

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Quarantine No. 19, on account of citrus canker and other citrus diseases, originally prohibited the importation of citrus nursery stock, including buds, scions, and seeds, from all foreign countries and localities, and this prohibition applied to all citrus plants and their relatives contained in the subfamily Citratae of the family Rutaceae. Information accumulated since this quarantine was first issued indicates that both citrus canker and the other important
99783-34-1 59





60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Septcitrus diseases concerned are not likely to occur on any host outside of onetribe in this subfamily, viz., the tribe Citrinae. Establishment of an effectiveseed treatment has already led to a modification of this quarantine, effective July 1, 1932, whereby the prohibition against the importation of citrus seeds was removed, and the present revision now proposes to effect further modification by releasing also from prohibited status all species of the subfamily Citratae except those comprised in the one tribe, Citrinae. The genera thus released are : Atalantia, Aegle, Aeglopsis, Balsamocitrus, Chaetospermumn (Swinglca), Chalcas, Claucena (Clausena), Clausena, Echinocitrus, Feronia, Ferionella, Glycosmis, Hesperethusa, Lavanga, Limonia (Feronia), Luvnga (Lavanga), Merope, Merrilia, Micromelu, Murraya (Chalcas), Oxanthera, Pam burus, Paramignaya, Pleiospermium, Severinia, Swinglea, Triphasia, andWenzelia.
Both the citrus seeds and the various plant species thus removed from Quarantine No. 19 may hereafter be imported under the provisions of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 (REVISED) (Approved Aug. 17, 1934; effective Sept. 1, 1934)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that a dangerous disease of citrus plants, known as the citrus canker, and also other citrus diseases, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, North America outside of the United States, and foreign oceanic countries and islands, and are coming to the United States with imported citrus nursery stock.
Now, therefore, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved AuguSt 20, 1912, as amended, do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further introduction into the United States of citrus canker and other citrus diseases, to forbid the importation into the United States of all citrus nursery stock, including buds and scions, from the foreign countries and localities named.
On and after September 1, 1934, and until further notice, by virtue of said act of August 20, 1912, the importation from all foreign localities and countries of citrus nursery stock, including buds and .scions, except for experimental or scientific purposes by the Department of Agriculture, is prohibited.
The term "citrus as used herein shall be understood to include only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the family Rutaceae, which tribe comprises the following genera: Citropsis, Citrus, Eremocitrus, .Fortunella, Microcitrus, Monanthocitrus, Pleurocitrus, and Poncirus.
This notice of quarantine revises and supersedes Notice of Quarantine No. 19, approved December 10, 1914, effective January 1, 1915, and a modification thereof approved June 22, 1932, effective July 1, 1932, and shall become effective on and after September 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of August 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

INsTRUaTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
T. D. 34993, PUBLISHING NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19, PROIIIBITING THE IMPORTATION OF CITRUS NURSERY STOCK, AS MODIFIED BY T. D. 45795, REVISE (T. D.
47254)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C., September 13, 1934.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 19, on account of the citrus canker and other citrus diseases, issued by the Secretary of






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

Agriculture, effective September 1, 1934, is published for the information and guidance of collectors of customs and others concerned.
ELI FRANK, Jr.,
Acting Commissioner of Customs,
(Then follows the full text of the revised, quarantine.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)

B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 1. JuLY 26, 1934.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION

It now appears that occasional shipments of grapes may be offered for entry under the provision of B. P. Q.-362 during the late summer months. In view of this situation, as an added safeguard the entry, subject to sterilization of grapes from regions where the Mediterranean fruit fly is known to occur, will be limited to the period October 15 to March 15.
In this connection it should be emphasized that the only type of container which has been approved for the shipment of grapes originating in countries where the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs is a tight barrel or keg. To avoid any delay or rejection of fruit arriving in containers which have not been approved, all in interest should submit in advance of the shipping season, samples of the container to be used.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 2. AUGUST 2, 1934.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION

The purpose of the additional safeguards contained in Supplement No. 1 to B. P. Q.-362 was to limit the entry of grapes to the cooler months on the theory that there might be sufficient breakage of containers during the period when susceptible fruits would be available for oviposition by fruit flies should any escape during weather suitable for the development of the fly.
For the present shipping season grapes will be permitted entry from October 1 to April 15, a period when availability of susceptible fruits and temperature conditions are such as not to offer risk in the development of the fly should any escape from broken containers. Meanwhile breakage conditions will be observed and future shipping seasons will be restricted or not according to conditions found to obtain.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations are revised below in order to bring them up to date with respect to changes in the known distribution of these insects since the last revision of the regulations was adopted May 25, 1931. The revision reduces the size of the regulated area in Vermont, and designates as generally infested certain territory of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont which has heretofore been classed as lightly infested. It also modifies the boundaries of the area desig-





62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

nated as brown-tail moth infested in the States of Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, and adds parts of four counties in Vermont.
Additional changes of interest to shippers include the exemption of such woody plants as have been grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and are so labeled; the authorization of the shipment of Christmas trees from the generally infested area when grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the nursery-stock provisions; the adding of empty cable reels to the list of restricted articles; and slight modifications in the procedure for the certification of car-lot shipments.

SUMMARY

The regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
The restricted articles are as follows: (1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, and parts of evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel;
(2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts thereof, excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone or quarry products. (Regulation 1.)
Under these regulations no restricted articles (as defined above) shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested area to the lightly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector. (Regulation 5.)
Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infested area are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of that area, and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement unless such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and are certified under the provisions of regulation 6. (Regulation 5.)
Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed to be moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points without a certificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificate may be substituted for certain classes of movement within the gypsy moth regulated areas. (Regulation 5.)
Plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on condition that each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking requirements and similar details, see regulations 6 to 12, inclusive.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45
(Effective on and after July 1, 1920. Supersedes Notice of Quarantine No. 33, revised)

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is hereby given, that two injurious insects-the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar) and the brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoca)-not heretofore widely distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in parts of the following States, to wit: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Now, therefore, I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 11f65), do hereby quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), known and described as Christmas- trees ", and parts thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly and laurel, known and described as Christmas greens or greenery "; (2) forestplant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties,






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

cordwood, and lumber; (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products, excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products, shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate from any of said States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done in the District of Columbia this 28th day of May 1920.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture. [SEAL] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45
(Approved Sept. 27, 1934; effective Oct. 2, 1934)

REGULATION 1. DEFITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Gypsy motl.--The insect known as the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar).
(b) Brown,-tail m oth.-The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea, formerly referred to as'Euproctis chrysorrhoea).
(c) Quarantined area.-Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or both, exist therein.
(d) Regulated area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, or both. therefrom.
(e) Generally infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as generally infested with the gypsy moth.
(f) Lightly infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as lightly infested with the gypsy moth.
(g) BrOwn-tail moth infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infested with the brown-tail moth.
(h) Restricted articles.-(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, and parts of evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts thereof, excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone or quarry products.
(i) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the State concerned providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to the regulated areas as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth to other parts of the State, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.






64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; GENERAL AND LIGHTLY INFESTED An ; BROWN-TAIL MOTH INFESTED AREA

(1) REGULATED AREAS

The Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and other political subdivisions listed below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits.
Co n ect icut.-Coun ties of Hartford, Middlesex, New London, Tolland, and Windham; towns of Barkhamstead, Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County.
Maine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Industry, Jay, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and Townships D and E, in Franklin County; all of Hancock County except Plantations 3, 4, 35, and 41; all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including Magalloway Plantation and Richardsontown; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie, and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations, town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield, Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Milbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations 18 and 24, in Washington County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester; all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.
Newo Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos County lying south of and including the towns of Columbia, Errol, Ervings Location, and Millsfield.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Caledonia, Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns of Brunswick, Concord, East Haven, Ferdinand, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County: towns of Elmore and Wolcott, in Lamoille County: towns of Chittenden, Clarendon, Ira, Mendon, Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Proctor, Rutland, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, Tinmouth, Wallingford, West Rutland, and the city of Rutland, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.

(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREA

For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territory designated above is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the generally infested" and lightly infested" areas respectively, and part of such regulated area is also designated as "brown-tail moth infested."

(3) Lightly infested area

The following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightly infested area:






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 60

CominctiCut.-County of Middlesex; towns of Avon, Berlin, tBristol, liurli igton, Farmnigton, MA1lrlboro, New I riIkin, Newvingion, P'lainville', Rocky Hill, Southingtlon, and West I arilford, in II' rit od (C'llty; towels of ('olel)rook, Harwinton, New Harlford, Plymouth, Ths()t)I oil, Torrington, mid Wichester, in Litchfiel (County; towns of Ih'al(ford, C(uilford, Ma dison, MIeriden, No)rth B'anford, North II aven, Waterbury, and( W (ott, in New IIav\'en countyy; towns of East Lyme, Lyme, and Old Lynme, in New lodon n (Coii y.
Mainec.-Townis of Avon. Ii rlin, C(arilge, (lChesterville,. (rok:ertown, D)allas Planta tion, Fai rmiigtlonl, Freenmal, Industry, .Jay, Jerusalem, Kin-field, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Shron, New Vineya1rd, Perkins, P'hillipls. ItIneley Plantation, Redlington, Salem, Sandy River Phlantation, Stroin Tqemple, Washinigtoi), Weld, and \Vilton, :111(1 TowIIshipls D an(1 E, in Franklin (Comluty; owns of Amherst, Aurora, BufckSl)orI, I)(hlli n, Eastlhrook, Frankllin, Gouldshor, lancock, Laminiie, Mari vile, (rlald, Oso)(rn Pla) tait ion, Otis, P) obscot, Sorrento, Sullivan, Trel ton, Verona, Waltham, city of Ellsworih, lnd Itownships or I)plantations numbered 7, 8, 9, 10, 1ti, 22, 28, :2, 3, 34, :19, ad(1 4(0, in Hancock County: towns of ienton, ('linton, in(me, Unity I'latation, and Vienna, in Kennelec County : towns of Andover, B:atchelders Grant, Bethl)(1, Byron, C., ('. surplus, Dixfield, Fryeburg Acadeiy Grant, Gilead, Grafton, Hanover, Magalloway Plantation, Mexico, Milton Plantation, Newry, North Andover surplus, I'eru, Richlardsomitown, Riley Grant, Roxhury, Runf(rird, and TUpton, in ()xford ( 'ounty; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bra(ley, Carimel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls IPlantation, (ireei)ush, Greentfield, Hampden, HIermon. HIolden, Hudson, Kenduskealg, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Siulinmit, ahnd Veazie, and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in PIelnobscot County; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations, town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Brooks, Burldlam, Frankfort, Freedom, Jackson, Knox, Monroe, Montville, Morrill, Prospect, Searsmoi t, Searsport, Stockt on Springs, Swanville, Thorndike, Troy, Unity, Waldo, Winterport, and the city of BIelfast, in Waldo County; towns of Bedington, Cherrylield, Columhia, Deb lois, Harrington, Milbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations IS and 24, in Washington County.
Mussachuselts.-Towns of Charlemont, HaIwley, Heath, and Rowe, in Franklin County; towns of Chester and Tolland, in Hampden County; towns of Cumnington, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, and Worthington, in Hanipshire County.
Nerr Hafmpshirc.-Town of Hart Location, in Carroll County: all that part of (Coos County lying south of and including the towels of Columbia, Errol, Ervings Location, and Millsield ; towns of Bathi, Bethlehem, Franconia, Lan(latff, Lislhon, Littleton, Lyman, and Monroe, in (Grafton County.
Rhode I.la nd.-Town of New Shorelhamn (I lock Island) in Newport County.
Vclr on t.--(ounties of Caledonia and Orange ; towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winlhll, in Ie('1ington (Comity: towns of IBrunswick, Concord, East Haven, Ferdiiianl, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex county y ; towns of Elmnore and Wolcott, in Lamoille County ; towns of Chittenden, ('larendon ,endon, Mount Iolly Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Proctor. Rutlaind, Slherb)urne. Shrewsbury, Tinniouthi, Wallinglfor(, West Ruland, and the city of Rutland, in Hutl::id (Couunty towns of Barre, lierlin, Cabot, C'alais, East 'Montlelier, IIarslhfield, Middllesex, Mo(intpelier, Moretown, Noirlthtlel(l, PIlainiel(l, IRoxbuiy, Wait stield, \Wooh(u1llar-y, and Worcester, in Washin'gitoni (C'()outy; towns (of Athens, ILrookline, I )over. ('rafton, IHalifax, Jamaic:. ,Londonderry, Mlarlhorn, New fam Somier.,set, Stratton, Townsliend, Waordshoro, Whit inj Wilm, ington, and Windhlain, il Win(illiamn (ounlty: all (f Windsor (County except the towns of Springlield, Weathersfiel(d, and Wi)nds()1r.

(I) Gencrutll!y infcstcd area

All Iparts of the regulated( area not designated as lightly infested in section
(3) hereof, shall comprise the generally infested area.






66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept..

(5) Brown-tail moth infested area

The following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated as the brown-tail moth infested area:
Ma ine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry, Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County; towns of Bar Harbor, Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hancock County, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county; towns of Albany, Bethel, Brownfield, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark, Dixfield, Fryeburg, Greenwood, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, Mason, Milton Plantation, Norway, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Rumford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner, Sweden, Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; cities of Bangor and Brewer, and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Hermon, Newburgh,. Orrington, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County; and towns of Canaan, Fairfield, Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittsfield, Skowhegan, Smithfield. and Starks, in Somerset County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,. Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin, Blackstone, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenberg, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royalston,. Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city of Worcester, in Worcester County.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County, except the town of Jackson; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.
Vermont.-Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns of Bradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County; towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and Westminster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Springfield, Weathersfield, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing tothe transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRIcTED ARTICLES

(1) Certification required.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof, no restricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested to the lightly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.
(2) Christmas trees a'nd evergreen boughs.--Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees", and parts thereof over 1 foot in length, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 6 hereof), shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of such area and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement. Such articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be shipped interstate from the generally infested area under the inspection and certification prescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.
(3) Shiprnents from brown-tail moth infested area.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof, no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or other parts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the area designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point outI...





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

side thereof unless and until a certifica te or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector, except that as to such movement wholly within the generally infested gypsy moth area or wholly within the lightly infested gypsy moth area, or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy moth area, a valid State nursery-inspection certificate of the State from which the shipment is made may be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.
(4) Shipments within regulated areas unrestricted.-Other than as prescribed in paragraph (3) hereof, and in regulation 9, no restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of restricted articles wholly within the generally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area or from the lightly infested area to the generally infested area.
(5) Cut flowers and greenhouse-grown plants.-In the case of woody plants which are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselves and the cut flowers thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection or certification under these regulations on condition that each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
(6) Herbaceous plants unrestricted.-No restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of strawberry plants, or of other herbaceous annual or perennial plants or parts thereof.

REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES
(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.-Persons intending to move or allow to be moved restricted articles interstate shall make application therefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products or stone or quarry products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location, and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped so that they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspection will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and in condition to make inspection easily practicable,
(b) Nursery-grown stock.-With respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a valid State certificate stating that the nursery in question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and certifying that it is apparently free from infestation with gypsy and brown-tail moths. Such State certification shall be renewed each year, shall be based on an inspection made as promptly as practicable after the egg-laying' period of the gypsy moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certification, until the following egg-hatching period, except that, pending reinspection, shipments may be inspected and certified for interstate movement on the basis of the State certification of the preceding year. Whenever any nursery or independent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipment therefrom, is reported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is determined by a Federal inspector on his examination of material offered for shipment, further certification for interstate movement from such nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has been freed from infestation and has been again inspected and certified by the State to be apparently clean. During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by him as free from any infestation, either by egg masses or wind-blown larvae, it may then be lined up and thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in manner and method satisfactory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been thus inspected and treated.
(c) Native trees and shrubs.-With respect to living trees and plants not grown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant indicating the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement, if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation with either the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification will be refused as to the intended shipment and as to other similar shipments of trees or plants originating on the same property or in the same locality.
99783-34- 2





68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(d) Forest products and stone and quarry products.-Certificates of inspection authorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone and quarry products may be issued under either of the following conditions: (1) When the articles to be shipped have actually been inspected and found free from infestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of infestation. With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or other places where forest products are assembled for shipment, as a condition of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such places shall be cleaned up and kept free from gypsy moth infestation.
(e) Charges for storage, etc.-All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection or disinfection other than the services of the inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.
(f) Use of certificeates.-Certificates of inspection will be issued only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are free from Infestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so determined by an inspector. The use of such certificates in connection with plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are not in compliance with these regulations is unlawful.

REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS WITHOUT INSPECTION
Permits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may be issued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed, and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of the infested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and safeguarded in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are not infested with the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth.

REGULATION 8. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION
(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed for which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany the vehicle.
(4) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the shipment.

REGULATION 9. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE
Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting restricted articles within the regulated areas shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate until the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regulated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such restricted articles shall be moved or allowed to move interstate.

REGULATION 10. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT
Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 11, CANCELLATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS
Certificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2, 1934, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 25, 1931.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
iForegoing revised regulations sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

Nonce TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washington, D. C., September 27, 1934.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 45, on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, effective October 2, 1934. The revision releases part of Vermont from the regulated area, modifies the boundaries of the areas designated as lightly infested, generally infested, and brown-tail moth infested in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont, adds empty cable reels to the list of restricted articles, exempts from restriction such woody plants as have been grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, and makes other changes in the regulations. Copies of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE.
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., Oct. 4, 1934; the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, Oct. 5, 1934; the Post, Boston, Mass., Oct. 5. 1934; the Union, Manchester, N. H., Oct. 5, 1934; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., Oct. 4, 1934; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Oct. 11, 1934.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.
The Secretary of Agriculture announced today that restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations





70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

will be removed for the season on and after Sunday, September 16. The restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until October 15. Under the quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required on shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15. The effect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that requirement a month earlier than is provided in the regulations themselves.
The inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in cut flowers. In cool fall evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this amendment.



REMOVAL OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THE
INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Since it has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (twelfth revision) supplemental Ito Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the regulated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 16, 1934. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 16, 1934, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 15th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLAGE.
Secretary of Agriculture.



INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, September 18, 1934.
POSTMASTER :
MY DEAR SIR: The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5, rules and regulations (12th revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, from the regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.
Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may, therefore, accept until June 15, 1935, fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vegetables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of inspection prescribed by that quarantine.
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
B. E. P. Q.-367 SEPTEMBER 21, 1934.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT TO BEGIN SEPTEMBER 26
(Issued under regulation 7, section A, Federal Quarantine No. 64, as revised effective Sept. 1, 1932)
(Approved Sept. 21, 1934; effective Sept. 26, 1934)

The issuance of permits for the shipment of citrus fruit of the 1934 crop under the Federal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo, in Texas, is hereby authorized to begin on September 26, 1934, so far as that quarantine is concerned. The host-free period required by the Department of Agriculture to be enforced by the State of Texas under regulation 7 will for the year 1934 close on September 25.
The Department of Agriculture has evidence that such modification is desirable from the standpoint of Mexican fruit worm control and does not involve increase of risk of propagating that insect. All clean-up and other requirements concerning the production and distribution of Texas citrus fruit remain unchanged.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B. E. P. Q.-365
NOTICE TO PERMITTEES AND OTHERS INTERESTED
WILLOW WITHES AS PLANT TIES PROHIBITED ON PLANTS FOR ENTRY FROM EUROPE AND CANADA

(Approved Aug. 14, 1934; effective Oct. 1, 1934)

Willow withes taken from plants infected with the destructive watermark disease may readily disseminate that malady, since the bacterial organism concerned (Bacterium salicis Day and Pseudomonas saliciperda Lindeijer) may be carried within the tissues. The watermark disease thus far has been reported only from England and the Netherlands and, insofar as this Bureau has been able to ascertain, there are no restrictions in Europe on the movement of such infected material from the two countries concerned. It is obvious, therefore, that, on account of uncertainty as to the distribution of this disease and freedom of movement of the host material, the entry of willow withes from Europe may readily bring the watermark disease to this country. As a precaution against the introduction of this disease, Salix propagating stock from Europe has been restricted for some time to horticultural necessities; permittees and others in interest are now notified that as a further precaution willow withes used as ties or otherwise in connection with shipments of plant materials for propagation, from Europe, including the British Isles and Ireland, will not be admitted into the United States on and after October 1, 1934. Since European nursery stock is frequently reshipped here from the Dominion of Canada and since Canada imposes no restrictions against the entry of willow withes from Europe, shipments of plants from Canada, after October 1, 1934, must also be free from willow withes.
Accordingly, attention is directed to regulation 7 of Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37 which requires that "All packing materials employed in connection with importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds are subject to approval as to such use." The use of willow withes in any manner as packing material for such plant material is disapproved. On and after October 1, 1934, all plant material for propagation from Europe and Canada






72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept,

must he free from willow withes or it will be refused entry until such withes are removed. Shipments with such material present may be held in customs custody for a period not exceeding 40 days, during which period the permittee or his a gent, after making satisfactory arrangements, may remove and dispose of the witches under the supervision of, and in a manner satisfactory to, an inspector of the Department of Agriculture, after which the shipment may be handled in the usual way.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
MODIFICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following amendment modifies the area regulated under the pink boilworm quarantine regulations in Florida by bringing under restriction the counties of Jackson and Suwannee in that State. This change is due to the finding of a light but scattered infestation in those counties during the past few weeks. No other change is made in the regulated areas at this time.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
(Approved Sept. 14, 1934; effective Sept. 19, 1934)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm of cotton, which were promulgated on December 11, 1933, be and the same is hereby amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS

REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of these regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Mexico, and Texas, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Arizona area.-Counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee.
Florida area.-Counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Jackson, Madison, Suwannee, and Union.
Georgia area.--All of Berrien County except (a) the portion located northeast of the Alapaha River, and (b) the portion located south of a line drawn across the county just south of the railway station of Allenville along the south side of lots 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, and 332 of the tenth land district; that part of Cook County located north of a line starting on Little River at the bridge marked Kinard Bridge on the soil survey map of said county issued by the .Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, series 1928, no. 11; thence following the old Ty Ty-Nashville road southeast past Spring Hill Church through the village of Laconte; thence in an easterly direction along the road to Nashville past Grovania School to McDermott Bridge over the New River; all that part of Tift County located east of Little River.
New Mexico area.--Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero. and Roosevelt.
Texas area.-Counties of Brewster, Cochran, Culberson, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Terry, Ward,






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

and Yoakum; that part of Bailey Copnty lying south of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of league 207; thence west following the northern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, 188, 175, and 171 to the northwest corner of league 171; thence south on the western line of league 171 to the northeast corner of the W. H. L. survey; thence west along the northern boundary of the W. H. L. survey and the northern boundary of sections 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of block A of the M. B. & B. survey to the western boundary of said county; that part of Dawson County lying north and west of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the western boundary line of said county at the northwest corner of section 113 of block M; thence in a northeasterly direction on the northern boundary line of sections 113, 90, 83, 72, 65, 54, 47, and 36 of block 1M to the northeast corner of section 36; thence in a northwesterly direction along the western boundary line of section 21 to the northwest corner of section 21; thence northeasterly along the northern boundary line of section 21 to the northeast corner of section 21; thence northwesterly along the western boundary lines of sections 27 and 30 in said block M to the northwest corner of section 30; thence southwesterly along the northern boundary line of section 29 of block M to the southwest corner of section 17, block C-41; thence north along the western boundary line of sections 17 and 16 of block C-41 to the Dawson County line; that part of Lamb County lying south of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of section 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west following the northern boundary line of sections 9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson survey and the northern boundary line of sections 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A. Thompson survey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 635 to the southeast corner of league 239; thence north on the eastern boundary line of league 239 to the northeast corner of said league; thence west on the northern boundary line of leagues 239, 238, 233, 222, 218, and 207 to the western boundary line of said county.
HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS
Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations: Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that part of the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 651/,.

LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS
The following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee in Arizona; 1 the counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Jackson, Madison, Suwannee, and Union in Florida; the regulated parts of Berrien, Cook, and Tift Counties in Georgia; the counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt in New Mexico; the entire counties of Cochran, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Pecos, Reeves, Terry, Ward, and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey, Dawson, and Lamb Counties in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 651,2.
This amendment shall be effective on and after September 19, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand anid the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of above amendment sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated areas.]

1Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the requirements of that quarantine.






74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washington, D. C., September 14, 1934.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm, effective on and after September 19, 1934. The amendment modifies the area regulated under those regulations by bringing under restriction the counties of Jackson and Suwannee in the State of Florida. Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Oct. 4, 1934.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, September 26, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of Quarantine Order No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the pink bollworm, together with a copy of amendment no. 1 to revised rules and regulations thereunder, adding Jackson and Suwannee Counties in the State of Florida to the area quarantined in that State.
As your post office is within one of the above-mentioned counties, you are requested to be governed in accordance with the quarantine order and amendment thereto. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
RICE QUARANTINE AMENDED
(Press notice)
JULY 30, 1934.
An amendment of the Rice Quarantine, No. 55, issued today and effective August 1, requires that foreign rice straw imported into this country must not be- compressed in the bales to a density of more than 30 pounds per cubic foot, the Secretary of Agriculture has announced. Rice straw, used in broom making, must be sterilized at the time of entry by a steam process. In highly compressed bales the heat penetrates the interior of the mass so slowly that the bale cannot be effectively sterilized in a reasonable time. Recent tests by the Division of Control Investigations of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine indicate that in bales of a density of less than 30 pounds, penetration of heat takes place rapidly enough to put effective treatment on a practical basis.

RICE QUARANTINE NO. 55
REVISION OF REGULATION 6
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Owing to difficulties encountered in obtaining heat penetration within a reasonable time in highly compressed bales of imported rice straw, it has been





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

found necessary to restrict entry of this material to bales, of such density as will permit practical and effective treatment. The present revision of regulation 6 is intended to incorporate this restriction, and to provide more definitely for routing shipments arriving at ports where no treating facilities are available to approved ports where such treatment can be given.
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureatu of E tomology and Plant Quarantine.



AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55
(Approved July 27, 1934; effective Aug. 1, 1934)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 6, of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 55, on account of injurious insects and diseases of rice, as revised effective November 23, 1933, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 0. INSPEiCTION AND, DISINFECTION AT PORT OF ARRIVAL

Paddy rice.-All importations of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such inspection or disinfection, or both, at the port of arrival, as shall be required by the inspector, and to the delivery to the collector of customs by the inspector of a written notice that the seed or paddy rice has been inspected and found to be apparently free from plant diseases and insect pests or that the required treatment has been given. Should any shipment of such seed or paddy rice be found to be so infested with insect pests or infected with plant diseases that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be cleaned by disinfection or other treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
Rice straw and rice hulls.-As a condition of entry, rice straw and rice hulls shall be subject to inspection and to treatment at the port of arrival, under the supervision of the inspector, by methods and at plants approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, and, as a further condition of entry, in order to permit effective treatment, the contents of packages or bales shall not be compressed to a density of more than 30 pounds per cubic foot. Rice straw and rice hulls will be admitted only at ports where adequate facilities are available for such treatment. The required treatment must be given within 20 days after arrival, but if any shipment of rice straw or rice hulls shall be found upon arrival to be dangerously infested or infected the inspector may direct immediate treatment under adequate safeguards; and, if the treatment and safeguards are not put into effect as directed, the shipment shall be removed from the country immediately or destroyed.
Unless, within 20 days after the date of arrival of a shipment at the port at which the formal entry was filed, the importation has received the required treatment, due notice of which shall be given to the collector of customs by the inspector, demand will be made by the collector for redelivery of the shipment into customs custody under the terms of the entry bond, and, if such redelivery is Dot made, the shipment shall be removed from the country or destroyed.
General.-All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection
-nd disinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the I mporter.
All shipments shall be so baled, bagged, or iWrapped as to prevent scattering or wastage. If, in the judgment of the inspector, a shipment is not so bagged, baled, or wrapped, it shall be reconditioned at the expense of the permittee or entry may be refused.
This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of July 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
99783-34--3





76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REVISED REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO RICE QUARANTINE No. 55, REVISED,
GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED AND PADDY RICE, PUBLISHED IN T. D.
46809, AMENDED (T. D. 47229)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C., August 21, 1934.
ITo Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of amendment no. 1 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 55 (rice quarantine) issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective August 1, 1934, permitting the importation of rice straw and rice hulls, with treatment as a condition of entry, at approved ports, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the amendment.)



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SUGARCANE QUARANTINE (NO. 15)

SUGARCANE QUARANTINE REVISED
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 24, 1934.
A revision of Quarantine 15, which will regulate importation of bagasse, the fibrous refuse from sugarcane mills, was announced today by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace. The revision, which becomes effective October 1, provides for the inrportation of specific lots of bagasse under conditions judged by the Department to be safe.
The original measure, put into effect June 6, 1914, shut out all living canes of sugarcane or cuttings thereof from all foreign countries, except such as were imported by the Department itself for use in its cane-improvement program. Such iinportations have been made with unusual care to avoid the introduction of numerous foreign insects and diseases, and a special quarantine greenhouse at the Arlington Farm is devoted entirely to making foreign cane varieties safe to distribute to our cane areas.
A recent increase in inquiries regarding the introduction of foreign bagasse has convinced the Department that the danger of pest introduction in this material, especially if distributed into cane-growing areas, is important enough to justify bringing lyagasse as well as other cane parts under control.



REVISION OF SUGARCANE QUARANTINE NO. 15 (FOREIGN)

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The principal aim in this revision is to bring under the quarantine bagasse
-and other parts of the sugarcane plant in addition to living canes, for the reason that such materials are regarded as effective carriers of cane diseases, and the importation of foreign bagasse and other plant parts of sugarcane, especially into our cane-growing areas, would subject our cane cultures to a definite and unnecessary risk. The former exemption of Hawaii and Puerto Rico is not continued because it seems desirable to provide Federal authority .for control over foreign importations into these Territories.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 15 (REVISED)
(Approved Sept. 20, 1934; effective Oct. 1, 1934)

I, W. R. Gregg, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, new to and not heretofore prevalent and widely distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in certain foreign countries, and that it is necessary, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of these insects and diseases, to forbid the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane, or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse.
On and after October 1, 1934, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, the importation into the United States of canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, from all foreign countries and localities, is prohibited: Provided, That this prohibition shall not, apply to importations by the United States Department of Agriculture for scientific or experimental purposes, nor to importations of specific materials which the Department may authorize under permit on condition that they have been or are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department, their entry will involve no pest risk.
This revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 15 shall be effective on and after October 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] W. R. GREGG, Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. P. Q.-347, Supplement No. 3 AUGusT 1, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE
PHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECE
Supplement No. 2, of May 7, 1934, furnished a list of additional regions of the Republic of Greece which were declared phylloxerated by the decree of January 10, 1934. The chief of the section of phytopathology of the Greek Department of Agriculture has revised the list included in B. P. Q.-347 to include the list above referred to; therefore the following list supersedes both that of p. P. Q.-347 and its Supplement No. 2:

1. REGIONS FREE FROM PHYLLOXERA
(a) All ancient Greece, except the Provinces of Larissa, Tyrnavos, and Agyia in the Department of Larissa, the Department of Trikkala, and the island of Amorgos and all the small islands around it.
(b) The island of Crete.
(c) Epirus, except the Province of Konitza.

2. REGIONS SUSPECTED OF PHYLLOXERA
(a) The former communes (demes) of Gonnoi and Olympus in the Province of Tyrnavos.
(b) The former communes (demes) of Nesson and Ampelakia in the Province of Larissa.
(c) The former communes (demes) Eurymenai and Kasthenaia in the Province of Agyia.
(d) The Provinces of Karditsa and Trikkala in the Department of Trikkala (except the place called Valta in the village of Palama of the Province of Karditsa, which is declared infested with phylloxera).
(e) The island of Lemnos.





78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

3. PHYLLOXERATED REGIONS
(a) The whole of Thrace.
(b) The whole of Macedonia, including the Provinces of Grevena, Kastoria, and Elasson, which up to the present have been regarded as suspected of phylloxera.
(c) The Province of Konitsa in Epirus.
( d) The Departments of Samos, Chios, Lesbos (except the island of Lemnos).
(e) The entire island of Amorgos, with the small islands Ano Koufonissia, Kato Koufonissia, Schinoussa, and Heraklia. The sma ll islands around the island of Amorgos: Denoussa Karos, Nikouria, Petalidi, Gravoussa, Dryma, Antikaros, Gougari, Fidoussa, Agrilos, Glaros, Prassoura, and Amorgopoula.
(f) The former commune (demne) of Tyrnavos in the Province of Tyrnavos.
(g) The entire Province of Larissa (except the former communes (demes) of Nesson and Ampelakia, which have been declared suspected of phylloxera).
(h) The former commune demee) of Dotiou in the Province of Agyia.
(i) The place called "Valta" in the village of Palama in the Province of Karditsa.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q.-355, Revised, Supplement No. 1 AUGUST 1, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

Jamaican proclamation of February 13, 1924, has been amended by that of June 19, 1934, as a result of which the first item of the summary should read as follows:

Proclamations, orders, etc., in force
Article
Instrument Date Provisions

Citrus fruits or any parts thereof, fresh or Proclamation under law Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from all dried, but not including candied fruit or 23 of 1916. June 19, 1934 countries. preparations in form of jam or marmalade.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


P. Q. C. A.-310, Supplement No. 2 SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.

PERU PROHIBITS THE EXPORTATION OF PROPAGATING MATERIAL OF ROTENONEPRODUCING PLANTS

To prevent the exploitation and exhaustion of rotenone-producing plants in Peru, the decree of April 14, 1933, prohibits the exportation from that country of cuttings, slips, seeds, or fresh roots of plants of the genera Apurimanta, Cracca, Jacquinia, Lonchocarpus, Serjania, and Tephrosia.
Exportation is permitted only of roots of those plants which contain a maximum of 10 percent of moisture; and that only until the Government of Peru shall have erected mills for the extraction of rotenone.
Persons who desire to export such dried roots must apply to the Direcci6n de Agricultura y Ganaderifa of the Ministerio de Fomento for a permit and certificate of chemical analysis.
The resolution of May 23, 1933, prescribes that dealers who export such roots shall send an average sample of 500 grams from each shipment to the technical section of the Direcci6n de Agricultura y Ganaderia for analysis, at the same time depositing a fee for the analysis.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

P. Q. C. A.-283, Revised, Supplement No. 3 SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

DISINFECTION REQUIRED OF TOMATO AND PEPPER SEEDS

To prevent the introduction into Cuba of the bacterial spot or canker, Bacterium vesicatorium Doidge, the resolution of August 6, 1934, published August 15, 1934, in the Official Gazette, prescribes the disinfection of all seeds of tomato, Lycopersicum esculentum, and peppers, Capsicum spp., as a condition of entry. The text (in translation) of the resolution follows:
ARTICLE 1. The seeds of tomatoes and peppers, imported from any source, must be accompanied by a certificate from the country of origin, issued by official phytopathological authority, declaring that such seeds have been disinfected by immersion in a solution (aqueous) of bichloride of mercury, 1 to 3.000, for at least 5 minutes.
ART. 2. Tomato and pepper seeds not supported by such certification shall be subjected upon arrival to the said process of disinfection.
ART. 3. This quarantine provision shall become effective 30 days after publication in the Official Gazette.
LE, A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



P. Q. C. A.-284, Supplement No. 9
SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 12-ALFALFA
(July 2, 1934; effective Aug. 18, 1934)

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with article 43 of the regulations of agricultural sanitary police (Policia Sanitaria Agricola) an absolute quarantine is established against plants of alfalfa, Medioago sativa, and their various parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) in the fresh condition or as hay, which proceed from the following States of the American Union: Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, and a partial quarantine for the counties of California infested by the alfalfa weevil ((Phytonomus) Hypera postica Gyll.).
ART. 2. The fohowing conditions are established for the importation into Mexico of the articles mentioned from the State of California, U. S. A.:
(a) Importers must apply for and obtain, before shipment, a special
permit from the Direcci6n de Fomento Agricola.
-(b) Application for permit may be made by telegraph and shall indicate
the name and address of the exporter; locality where the alfalfa was grown; port of shipment and port of entry into Mexican territory; destination and name of importer; quantity of the product; date of application
and signature of applicant.
(c) Each permit issued will be numbered and the period of its validity
wil! be indicated therein.
(d) The product shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate,
duly legalized, issued by the respective authorities of the State of California, U. S. A., and visaed by one of our consuls with jurisdiction in the place of origin of the product, declaring that the pest in question does not
exist there.
(e) Unloading or introduction will be permitted only at the following
frontier ports or customs offices:
On the northern frontier.-Mexicali and Tijuana, Baja California;
Nogales, Sonora; Ciudad Jaurez. Chihuahua;- Piedras Negras, Coahuila; Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, Tamaulipas.
On the Pacific coast.-Santa Rosalia, Ensenada, and La Paz, Baja
California; Guaymas and Yvaros, Sonora; Topolobampo and Mazatlan, Sinaloa; Manzanillo, Colima; Acapulco, Guerrero; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca.






80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

ART. 3. Contravention of the provisions of the present quarantine will be deemed illegal transit, in accordance with article 74 of the regulations of Policia Savitaria Agricola already cited, and in accordance with article 75 of the same regulations the illegal transit will be punished by a fine of $10 to $1,000 both with respect to the consignee and the carrier of the merchandise, and by proceeding with the destruction of the latter without right of indemnity.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. P. Q.-302, Revised, Supplement No. 2 SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS

CITRUS FRUITS AND NUTS TO BE INSPECTED FOR SAN JOSE SCALE

The order of the German Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture of March 27, 1934 (R. F. M., Mar. 27, 1934-Z 1101-246 II), as modified by those of April 9 (R. F. M., Apr. 9, 1934-Z 1101--275 II), and May 15, 1934 (R. F. M., May 15, 1934-Z 1101-364 II), prescribes that henceforth oranges, mandarins (tangerines), and lemons may be imported only on condition that an inspection of the shipment at the port of entry at the expense of the interested person does not determine infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
The above applies only to the products of those countries from which the importation of deciduous fruits is specially restricted to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. Consequently the inspection of these citrus fruits from Italy and Spain is not necessary.
Importation of these fruits is permitted only through customs offices authorized for the entry of deciduous fruits.
The order of March 15, 1934 (R. F. M., Mar. 15, 1934-Z 1101-216 II), prescribes that walnuts and other nuts (hazel, Brazil, etc.), which, without green husks, are imported as commercial, dried merchandise, are not subject to inspection for San Jose scale, even when the separated remains of the outer husk still adhere to the nuts. On the other hand, occasional shipments of unripe and of mature nuts imported with husks still green must be inspected.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q.-366
SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Czechoslovakia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the German text of Governmental decree no. 168, December 13, 1927, of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, on the administration of the tariff law, and reviewed by the Ministry of Agriculture of that Republic.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the decree, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decree itself should be consulted for the exact text.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA
AUTHORIZING LAW

Law of July 2, 1924, concerning the protection of plant production.

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Clover: Refuse, chaff, etc., of all species.
Potatoes: Parts and refuse thereof, if infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease; also potatoes originating in countries contaminated by wart disease.
Grapevines and parts thereof, compost, used props and supports, live phylloxera and eggs, merchandise packed or enclosed in grape leaves or which contains parts of grapevines, as a precaution against the introduction of phylloxera.
Living plants, living parts, and fresh refuse thereof, and containers thereof from America, Africa, Australia, Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, and New Zealand as a precaution against the introduction of San Jose scale.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Red clover and alfalfa seed: Importation and exportation subject to control by the seed control station, including the withdrawal and testing of samples.
Potatoes may be imported from countries where potato wart does not occur if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in prescribed form in the official language of Czechoslovakia and in the language of the exporting country, and subject to inspection on arrival.
Living plants (except grapevines) and parts thereof must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and by a phylloxera certificate by competent authority if from a country where phylloxera is known to exist.
Fresh fruits: Importation from countries infested with San Jose scale permitted on condition that inspection on arrival does not reveal San Jose scale on the fruit or the containers.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cut flowers, seeds, bulbs, and tubers free from soil, grape seeds, and vegetables.

REGULATIONS UNDER DECREE NO. 168, OF DECEMBER 13, 1927

The plant quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Czechoslovakia are assembled in part 2, section 4, governmental decree no. 168 of December 13, 1927, on the administration of the tariff law.
The regulations apply to all methods of forwarding plants, not only by public transportation organizations (mail, railroad, ship, airplane, etc.) and by road by means of vehicles, but also to that affected by persons crossing the customs frontier, and are grouped as follows:
A. Seeds.
B. Potatoes.
C. Other plants, their fruits and parts.
1. Precautionns against phylloxera.
2. Precautions against San Jose scale.

A. SEEDS

Exported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed subject to control

ARTICLE 1. Exported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed is subject to control by the seed control station of the land cultivation council of Bohemia, Prag; the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institute, Briinn; and the Government Agricultural Institute, Bratislava and Kolice. The exported seed must be sealed or marked.






82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-ept.

ART. 2. The importation of refuse, chaff, etc., of all species of clover seed is prohibited. The exportation of this refuse is subject to control by the institutes named in article 1.
ART. 3. The entry and exit customs offices, respectively, are required to take an average sample from every imported and exported shipment of red clover and alfalfa seed and of refuse, chaff, etc., and to send it, according to the location of the customs office, to the proper seed-control station.

B. POTATOES

Importation prohibited of potatoes infected with wart disease

ARTICLE 1. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease, and the entry of parts and refuse of such potatoes, as well as of sacks, baskets, cases, and other containers, or of articles which have come in direct contact with infected or suspected ground or potatoes, is prohibited.

Importation prohibited of potatoes from wart-infected countries

ART. 2. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes from countries in which potato wart has been determined also is prohibited.
The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Trade, is authorized to make exceptions to this prohibition in special cases.
ART. 3. Foreign potatoes which are transported in containers (not in bulk) may be imported only in new, unused containers.
ART. 4. The list of countries from which potatoes may be imported will be published annually in January and the offices will be informed.

Ports of entry for potatoes

ART. 5. The following frontier customs offices have been designated for the importation of potatoes: Bfieclav, Schattau, Cesk4 Velenice, Oberhaid, Eisenstein Markt, Furth i. W., Eger, Reitzenhain, Bodenbach, Tetschen, GeorgswaldeEbersbach, Zittau, Seidenberg, Halbstadt, Ziegenhals, Jiigerndorf, Troppau, Oderberg, Petrovice in Schlesien, Skaliti, Such&, Hora, Orlov, Medzilaborce, Uok, Jasina, Valea Visaului, Campolung la Tisa, Kiralyh.za, cop, Slovensk, Nov4 Msto, HidAsnemeti, Turna n. Bodvou, Tornala, Rimavska, Se, Filakovo, Sahy, ParkAn, KomArno, Bratislava-Petrzalka, and Marchegg.
Inspection certificate in prescribed form required

ART. 6. Shipments of foreign potatoes offered for importation must be accompanied by a phytopathological certificate printed in the language of the exporting country and in the official language of Czechoslovakia. These certificates must correspond to the prescribed model and must include:
(a) The official title of the phytopathological institute at the head of the certificate and the serial number.
(b) A declaration of the potato grower confirmed by the local authority as to the place where the potatoes were grown.
(c) The declaration of the official phytopathological station that the place where the potatoes were grown is not in a locality infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease, and that no wart has been determined within a radius of 15 km therefrom and that there is no suspicion of such infection.
(d) A declaration of the officials of the phytopathological station which:
(1) Insofar as potatoes intended for consumption, or for an industrial
process in the Republic of Czechoslovakia are concerned, includes a statement that they were inspected at the loading station and no infection or suspicion of wart was found and that these potatoes were either laden in his presence into a covered car which he provided with the seal of his institute, or were delivered for transportation by rail or mail as packages in new containers which he provided with the seal of his institute; furthermore, that he personally entered in the certificate the car number and the number of the seal or of the bill of lading, or of the postal declaration, and of the seals of the separate containers, respectively.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

(2) Insofar as potatoes intended for planting in the Republic of
Czechoslovakia are concerned, includes a statement that he inspected them in the field where grown before they were placed in containers, and that neither in the exported seed potatoes, nor in the remainder of the crop of that establishment did he find any infection or suspicion of infection of wart, and that new containers were used for the said I>tatoes, which containers he closed and provided with the seal of his institute; and that furthermore he personally entered in the certificate the number of the bill of lading or postal declaration and of the seal of the separate
containers.
(e) A clear impression of the date and locality stamp of the shipping station in the respective heading, which must correspond with that in the bill of lading.
ART. 7. The shipper must indicate on the bill of lading or upon the postal declaration form :
(a) The number of the phytopathological certificate and the title of the phytopathological station that issued the certificate.
(b) The fact that the certificate or declaration is enclosed.

Prescribed Potato Certificate

(Title and location of the official phytopathological station)

Phytopathological Certificate on Potato Wart (Synchytrium endobioticum)

1. Potato grower's declaration.
I declare that the potatoes intended for exportation to the Republic of Czechoslovakia were grown in--------------__ ,----------- in the district
(place of origin)
of ----------------------------- in_(country ,of origin)
Date ----------------(Signature of the potato grower, and stamp if possible.) (Stamp and signature of the local authority.)
2. Declaration of Official Phytopathological Station.
In the name of the above-mentioned phytopathological station I declare that the said district does not lie within a locality infected, or suspected of being infected, with potato wart, and that in the land register of this district no potato wait has hitherto been recorded within a radius of 15 km and that there was no suspicion of its occurrence.
Date
(Stamp of the station and signature of the director.)
3. Declaration of the inspector from the official phytopathological station on the inspection of the potatoes.
In the name of the (official title and location of the phytopathological station whose representative inspected the potatoes), I declare:

POTATOES FOR CONSUMPTION OR MANUFACTURING PURPOSES
That, on behalf of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, I inspected the potatoes intended for consumption (or for manufacturing purposes) in the loading station and have found no potato wart or suspicion thereof;

POTATOES IN BULK 2

That in my presence the potatoes were loaded into covered (or closed) car no. which I provided with seal no. of my station and that I personally entered the car number and the seal number in the certificate;

POTATOES IN CONTAINERS 2

That the potatoes were delivered in my presence to the railroad station or postal service in new containers,
2 Strike out (or omit) the part not concerned.





84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

That I closed the containers and provided them with seals of my station, and that I personally entered in this certificate the car number, the seal number of each container, as well as the number of the bill of lading or the postal declaration ;
WITH SEED POTATOES

That, on behalf of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, I have inspected these potatoes in the district of (locality where grown) and have not found potato wart or suspicion thereof in the potatoes intended for exportation or in the potato crop on the same land;
That new containers were used, which I closed and sealed with the seal of my station;
That I personally entered the following numbers of the seal of the separate containers in the certificate.
(Stamp or seal of the station and signature of the official who made the inspection.) Distinct official date stamp of the shipping station; this must agree with the date stamp on the bill of lading.
(Stamp.)
Vzor.
(Nizev a misto oficielniho fytopathologickdho dstavu [stanice] jako zAhlavf.)
Cislo jednaci: _FYTOPATHOLOGICKE OSVEDENf o rakovin6 brambord (Synchytrium endobioticum).
(I. ProhldSeni pistitele bramborfi).
Prohlahuji, ie brambory urden6 pro vyvoz do republiky Ceskoslovensk6 byly vyp6stoviny v obci ----------- okrese ------------, ve stt ----------V -----------------dne
Razitko mistniho difadu a podpis: Podpis pistitele bramborfi,
pfipadn6 tMz' razitko:
(II. Prohltienf oficielniho fytopathologick6ho istavu [stanice]).
Za shora uvedenr fytopathologick:y 6stav (stanici) prohlahuji, Ae v:ye uvedeng obec neni v dzemi rakovinou zamoen6m, ani z rakoviny podezel6m a Ae v katastru tito obce a v obvodu 15 km nebyla dosud zjiftena rakovina bramborfi a ie neni t~i podezleni, ze by se rakovina brambori vyskytovala.
V -------------------- dne
Razftko (istavu (stanice) a podpis plednosty:
(III. Prohlaseni diiednika oficielniho fytopathologick6ho dstavu [stanice] o vykonand prohlidce bramborfi).
Za --------------------(uved' fiocielni nizev a sidlo fytopathologick6ho
dstavu [stanice], jehol org&n prohlidku bramborfi provddi) ------------------prohlasuji:
U BRAMBORfj KONSUMNiCH A PROMYSLOV'CH
Ze jsem konsumni 3 -, prfimyslov 3 brambory ureen6 do republiky Ceskoslovensk6 v naklidaci stanici ------------(uved' nizev nakladaci stanice) prohl6dl
a nezjistil rakoviny bramborfi, ani podezieni z t6to choroby,

BRAMBORY SYPANg 3
Ze brambory byly v md pfitomnosti nalofeny do kryt6ho vozu dislo ----kter' jsem opatfil uzaviraci plombou 6islo ------sv6ho dstavu (stanice), a .e jsem vlastnoru'n6 zapsal do tohoto osv6deenfi islo vozu a 6islo plomby vozu,

NAKLADOVA KUSY 3
Ze brambory byly v m6 pffitomnosti pod(ny k pfeprav6 ielezninf nebo poitovni jako nSkladov6 kusy v novfch obalech, ie jsem obaly uzavfel a opatfil
SNehodicif se budii krtnuto.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

uzavfracfmi plombami sv6ho dstavu (stanice) a ie jsem vlastnoru6n' zapsal do tohoto osv~de'enf Cislo vozu a Efsla uzavfracfch plomb jednotlivich obalii, a to a Cisla ndkladnfch listed nebo
pogtovnfch prfivodek, a to -----------------------------------------U BRAMBOR SADBOVfCH
2e jsem brambory urden6 jako sadbu do republiky (Ceskoslovensk6 prohl6dl v obci------------ (uved' nIzev obce uvedenyr ad I.) a nezjistil rakoviny bramborf
nebo podezieni z rakoviny ani na sadbi urden6 k vyvozu, ani na ostatni sklizni brambori t6hol hospodistvi,
2e bylo poulito novy'ch obali', kter6 jsem uzavel a opatfil plombami sv6ho dstavu (stanice),
Ze jsem vlastnoruin6 zapsal do tohoto osveddeni n sledujici isla plomb jednotlivfch obalfi--------------------------------------------------------Razitko istavu (stanice) a podpis diednika, kter' prohlidku provedl:

(IV. Zieteln6 diednf datumov6 razftko odesilaci stanice, kter6 music souhlasiti s datumovfm razitkem v ndkladnim list&): RAZfTKO.
Through international bill of lading required

ART. 8. Potatoes imported into the Republic of Czechoslovakia by rail must be accompanied by a through international bill of lading from the station at the place of origin to the intended station in Czechoslovakia. The importation of potatoes by sea or by watercourse will be permitted in particular cases by the Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce, and Trade under special conditions.

Inspection of imported potatoes required on arrival

ART. 9. Imported foreign potatoes must be subjected to a phytopathological inspection. The following institutions are charged with that work:
(a) Bohemia: The phytopathological institute of the Government Research Institution for Plant Production, Prag.
(b) Moravia: The phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institution, Briinn.
(c) Silesia: The phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institution, Briinn, through the intermediation of the Government Research Station, Troppau.
(d) Slovakia, except the Province of K6sice: The phytopathological institute of the Government Research Institution, Bratislava.
(e) The Province of K6sice and Podkarpatska Rus: The phytopathological institute of the Government Institution, K6sice.
ART. 10. As a rule inspection is to be effected at the entry station (art. 5); shipments up to 50 kg in weight may be entered and inspected at any customs office at the seat of the research institute.

Entry refused in absence of certificates
ART. 11. The customs office will reject shipments of foreign potatoes not provided with phytopathological certificates; furthermore, those which are excluded in accordance with article 1 and, insofar as the importation of potatoes was not expressly permitted, also those from the countries mentioned in article 2, and also, on the basis of recorded opinions of officials of the research institute, shipments which do not comply with the regulations. The rejection is to be noted on the bill of lading.

Restricted frontier traffic permitted without certificate

ART. 12. In frontier traffic persons having permanent residence in the Czechoslovak Republic may import from the countries referred to in article 4 the potato crop from their own (or rented) land, and persons whose permanent address is in a foreign country may import potatoes for planting in their own (or rented) ground in Czechoslovakia during the period established in the communities in question by the separate customs offices, without phytopathological certificate or inspection. However, interested Czechoslovakians





86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

must present information to the customs offices concerning the area in which potatoes are grown, and interested foreigners concerning the area intended for planting.

Transit permitted under through international bill of lading

ART. 13. The transit of foreign potatoes is permitted under the condition that the transportation of the shipment be effected under a through international bill of lading from the foreign shipping station to the designated station in the foreign country in a sealed, well-closed, and undamaged car, or in sealed and undamaged containers.
ART. 14. The exportation of potatoes from a closed district to a foreign country is not permitted.

O. OTHER PLANTS, THEIR FRUITS AND PARTS

1. Precautions against phylloxera

Importation and transit prohibited

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with the International Phylloxera Convention, the following regulations are applicable to the forwarding of articles through which phylloxera may be introduced:
The importation or transit is prohibited of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with or without roots) ; grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or fragments), and grapevine leaves; compost (plant refuse for manure) ; used props and supports; live phylloxera and eggs thereof; shipments of merchandise packed or enclosed in grapevine leaves or which contain parts of grapevines.
Exceptions.-The importation of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with or without roots), grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or fragments), and grapevine leaves is excepted from the prohibition when they are packed in cases the covers of which are secured with screws, or are in entire carloads, under permit from the Ministry of Agriculture, under the conditions indicated in the permit, and when imported through the designated authorized customs offices.
Importation restricted

ART. 2. Shipper's declaration and phylloxera certificate required.-The importation or transit of plants, shrubs, trees, seedlings, cuttings, etc., from nurseries, gardens, and greenhouses (coldframes, orangeries, etc.), except grapevines, is permitted only through designated authorized customs offices and under the following conditions:
(a) The goods must be carefully packed, but in such a manner that they can be inspected.
(b) The shipment must be accompanied by the shipper's declaration which indicates:
1. That the contents of the shipment were grown in his establishment; 2. The place for which the shipment is intended and the name and
address of the consignee;
3. That the shipment contains no grapevines;
4. Whether the shipment contains plants with or without balls of earth.
(c) Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate from the authority of the country of origin affirming:
1. That the plants are from ground separated from any grapevine stocks
by at least 20 m or by some obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient by
competent authority;
2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines;
3. That no grapevines have been stored there;
4. That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their
radical extirpation has been effected by repeated toxic applications and investigations for a period of 3 years, thus insuring complete destruction
of insects and roots.
ART. 3. It is not required that shipments from countries that subscribe to the convention be accompanied by a certificate if they originate in establishments






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

of which it has been published that they are under continuous official supervision and meet the requirements of the convention. The shipper's declaration and the official certificate may be printed on the back of the bill of lading.
ART. 4. On making entry of the shipment, the customs office will attach the shipper's declaration and the official certificate to the customs documents; however, if these are printed on the bill of lading the fact is to be noted in the customs report that they were presented and were observed on the bill of lading of the customs entry and were furnished with an imprint of the date stamp of the place. If the shipment is in transit, the customs office will leave the shipper's declaration and the official certificate with the transportation papers.
ART. 5. Mail shipments.-In traffic with phylloxera-infested countries the sender of mail shipments of plants may enclose a duplicate of the declaration and certificate in the shipment, whereby it may be cleared through the customs without delay in case the certificate may be lost in forwarding. The fact that the duplicate of the certificate is to be found in the shipment is to be noted on the postal declaration and on the wrapper.
ART. 6. Doubtful shipments.-In the case of well-founded doubts as to the cleanliness of the shipment, or if the customs officials have received special instructions concerning merchandise from a particular source, or for a prescribed period, the customs office will, in either case, allow the shipment to be inspected by an expert customs official or by an official specialist; if such a person is not available, the customs office will at once inform the Ministry of Agriculture (by telegraph if necessary) whereby it may issue instructions for precautionary measures. If the shipment is found in proper condition it will be dealt with officially by the customs office, otherwise the entire package will be burned and a report thereon will be made to the Ministry of Agriculture.
ART. 7. Transit shipments in bond.-Products of the soil whose transit is permitted only conditionally under the foregoing regulations, without reference to their origin, are allowed to proceed in transit if they are forwarded in bond.
ART. 8. The importation and transit of table grapes, wine grapes, and grape skins is permitted, through any customs port of entry authorized to admit them, under the following conditions:
(a) Table grapes must be packed in well-secured boxes, eases, baskets, or barrels, but in such a manner as to be easy to inspect; the shipment may not contain grape leaves or vines.
(b) Vinifera grapes (intended for wine making) may be entered only when crushed and packed in casks with a capacity of at least 5 hl; the casks must be so cleaned as to carry no particles of soil or grapevine. Vinifera grapes packed otherwise may not be imported.
(c) Wine-grape skins may be entered only in tightly closed cases or casks.
ART. 9. The importation or transit of cut flowers, seeds (including bulbs and rooted tubers, free from soil), grape seeds, vegetables, and fruits (deciduous), except grapes, is permitted through customs ports of entry authorized to admit them.
ART. 10. Hand baggage, conditions of entry.-Insofar as grapes or the products mentioned in article 9, potted flowers, or other plants (except the grapevine stocks, wood, and leaves the entry of which is not permitted by the provisions of article 1 (a)) are imported or carried' in transit as hand baggage, they may enter any customs port of entry. However, if doubt exists as to the cleanliness of such plants, they are to be handled as prescribed in article 2.
ART. 11. The importation of products mentioned in article 1, and products infested with phylloxera, as hand baggage (art. 10) is to be effected by the political authorities (Government police) without prejudice to the penalties, in accordance with the appropriate penalty provisions.
ART. 12. Uncertified shipments.-Shipments of the plants referred to in article 2 are to be cleared at customs ports of entry and mail shipments at authorized ports of entry. Foreign plant shipments which lack the prescribed certificates of origin are to be returned through the customs port of entry to the foreign frontier offices and mail shipments to the post office for export.
ART. 13. In all cases of the return by the customs office of a shipment suspected of phylloxera infestation, a report on the condition of the articles and on the reason for their return is to be made in the presence of the interested person or of his representative.





88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

2. Precautions against San Jose scale

Living plants and parts thereof and their containers--Importation prohibited
from countries infested with San Jose scale

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of living plants, seedlings, cuttings, scions, and other separated parts of plants, as well as of fresh refuse of plants and articles which arrive in direct contact with the above-mentioned goods, also barrels, cases, sacks, and other containers of such merchandise, from Africa, America, Australia, Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, and New Zealand, because those countries are infested with San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus). The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Trade and the Ministry of Finance, can extend this prohibition to the importation of the said products from other countries in which San Jose scale may appear. (As extended by the notice of Feb. 1, 1932.)
ART. 2. Exceptions from the prohibition of article 1 may be allowed in individual cases under special conditions imposed by the above-mentioned ministries.

Importation of fresh fruit permitted if free from San Jose scale

ART. 3. The importation of fresh fruit (deciduous) from countries, infested with San Jose scale is permitted on condition that San Jose scale is not found either on the fruit or in the containers comprising the shipment.

Inspection at frontier customs offices

ART. 4. The phytopathological inspection of shipments exceeding 20 kg gross weight must be effected exclusively at frontier customs offices expressly authorized for the entry of such shipments. Shipments not exceeding 20 kg in weight may also be entered at inland customs offices established at the seat of the research institutes. The cost of this inspection is to be borne by the importer.
ART. 5. Phytopathological inspection is to be effected at the following research institutes :
The phytopathological section of the Government Institute on Plant Production, Prag; the phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institute, Briinn; the phytopathological section of the Government Agricultural Research Institute, Bratislava; and the Government Agricultural Research Institute, Troppau.
ART. 6. The station or post office will immediately notify the competent research institute and the consignee at his expense by telegraph of the arrival of shipments of fruit.
ART. 7. The research institute will send out at once, or at the latest within 24 hours after receipt of the notice, its inspector to the customs office in order that the phytopathological inspection may be carried out in the presence of a customs official and a railroad or postal official, and also in every case, the consignee. According to the needs of the case, the inspector will withdraw 10 percent of the contents of the shipment at the expense of the interested person and will make a thorough inspection to determine whether or not the fruit or packing is infested with San Jose scale. The inspector is also authorized to withdraw a suitable quantity of fruit for further examination in the laboratory. After examination the fruit will be replaced in the shipment.

Rejection of shipments infested with San Jose scale

ART. 8. If it be determined by the inspection that the fruit is infested with San Jose scale, the customs office will refuse entry of the shipment on the basis of his written statement and will note the fact in the bill of lading or the postal declaration, as the case may be.
ART. 9. If the inspector has a reasonable suspicion that the shipment is infested with San Jose scale and must undertake a laboratory examination of a portion of the shipment, the customs office will refuse entry until the inspector has advised the said customs office that, as a result of the examina-






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

tion, the shipment has been found unobjectionable by the research institute, which assents to the entry, the withdrawn sample being returned, and until the importer shows that he has paid the expenses and fees pertaining to the phytopathological examination.
ART. 10. The official of the research institute will make a written report of the results of the inspection, which will be completed by the customs official and in all cases by the consignee.
ART. 11. The official of the research institute will note on the customs documents and on the waybill the result of the inspection: No objection is made to customs entry or Entry may not be made, because ", adducing the reasons and affixing his signature and the stamp (seal) of the institute.
ART. 12. The customs office will immediately transmit the report to the Ministry of Agriculture; the inspector will present a carbon copy of the report to the research institute.

Transit of fruit permitted without inspection

ART. 13. The transit of fruit is permitted without phytopathological inspection on condition that the shipment is transported in an undamaged and wellclosed car or in uninjured and tight containers.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to September 30, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal .authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

JAPANESE BEETLE

In the case of the United States v. John H. Gibbas, Shadyside, Ohio, in the interstate transportation of approximately 7 bushels of peaches from a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $5. (Plant quarantine case no. 482.)

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States v. the persons listed below, for attempting to :smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Weldon J. Bailey--------- Brownsville, Tex .... 4 mangoes................................------------------------------ $5
Pedro Murillo --------------do....------------ 1 mango..................................-------------------------------- 5
Mrs. I. E. Rodriquez ------.......--....do -------------........ --do ................................---------------------------------- 5
Matilde Jimenez---------............ do ------------ 3 mangoes--------------------------------- 5
Viola Duval ..----------------do..... ------------ 1 mango ---------------------------- ----- 5
J. A. Castillo---------------do....------------..........---... do ...............................---------------------------------- 5
Antonia de la Cruz.....---------... do .....--------- 2 mangoes ------------------------------ 5
Raul Cavazos--------------................. do .......------------ 3 mangoes ----------------------------- 5
Francis Hernandez --------............ do ------------ 3 mangoes and 2 pomegranates------------............. 5
Anita Champion----------...........--. do.....------------ 2 mangoes .--.......................------------------------------- 5
Antonia Rodriquez---------............ do ..............------------1 avocado with seed------------------------ 5
Louis Montes--.......-----------..... do ..............------------ 14 mangoes-..----------------------------- 5
Bonifacio Rodriquez -------........ --.....do------------............... 6 avocados with seed----------------------- 5
Candalario Samarripa ------.......... do------------............... 2 mangoes......------------------------------- 5
Ramona Morales ...-----------..do-----------.............. 3 plants --------------------------------- 5
A. C. Rodgers .....--------- -----do------------............. 3 oranges ............................-------------------------------- 5
Esteban Vasquez ---------...........--....-- do.....------------ 1 avocado with seed and 1 pomegranate...... 5
Carmen Salinas--.........-----....----.. do-.....-----------2 apples------------------------------------ 5
Antonio Alonso-----------.............--....do------------ 3 mangoes and 3 tuna fruits..... -------------- 5
Inez Lopez ..-----------------do------------............... 1 avocado seed................---------------------------- 5
Jose Nayola. ------------- Eagle Pass, Tex-..... 1 avocado and 3 avocado seeds......-------------- 1
Consuelo Flores ...------------..do------------.......... 5 plants.......--------------------------------- 1
Herlinda Calderon....... ----... do ------------ 4 avocados with seed and 3 pears ..----------- 1






90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.


Name Port Contraband Penalty


Grabiel Soliz....------------ Eagle Pass, Tex..... 3 avocado seed and 2 plants and 1 avocado I
with seed.
Gaudelupe Sanchez......---------....do............... 3 avocados with seed----------------------....................... 1
Juana Ramirez .-----------.. ..... --do....... ------------ 1 mango--.....------------------------------- 1
Clemencia Arreyola--............---......-----do-----------.......... 1 potato---------------------------------.. 1
Mrs. Epifanio S. de Mota --.. ---.....do -------------- 8 plants -----------------------------------. 1
Jose A. Campos............ -El Paso, Tex-------........ 3 mangoes-------------------------------................... 1
J. M. Barnes---------------do------------............... 6 avocados....----------------------------......... 1
Saturino Saldana ..............------------do.....------------6 sapotes and 1 avocado_ -------------------- 1
Jose Rubio... .........--------------...---do------------ 29 plums------------ --------------------........... 1
Casimiro Molina.---------l Hidalgo, Tex-------........ 3 mangoes, 2 quinces, and 4 pomegranates..- 5
Marcelo Gonzalez ----------. -- do ------------ 10 avocados, 2 mangoes, and 1 pear ......... 5
Eudelio Flores ...------------..........--.....do------------ 3 apples. 7 pears, and 1 quince--------------.............. 5
Vicente Rocha...------------..........--.....do ..............------------ 2 avocado seeds---------------------............................ 2
Lenora Valdez ....----------- Laredo, Tex-------......... 4 avocados. ------------------------------- 1
John Williams .----------.........---.....do---------------.......... do ----------------------------------...................................... 1
Marie Hernandez ...----------- do......------------ 2 mangoes-------------------------------.................................. 1
Mrs. Leya Fernina--------...... ---do.....------------ 1 avocado--.....------------------------------........................... 1
Mrs. Z. Perez--------------....................do------------............... 4 avocados................................. 1
Maria Estrada ....-------------..............do ------------ 4 mangoes-------------------------------.................................. 1
Maria Bustas----------.........----.....do------------............... 1 plant ---------------------------------- 1
Mrs. A. Hernandez------.............---do------------............... 6 avocados_ -------------------------------1
Mrs. Lenera Perez ........-----------do ----------- 1 mango......---------------------------------.............................. 1
Juan Perez..----------------- do---....---------5 avocados-----..........-------......-------------------................. 1
Mrs. E. Castillo----------......--do......------------ 1 mango ...................................--------------------------------- 1
Miss G. Freed --------- do------------............... 2 mangoes_. ------------------------------- 1
Miss Anora Borrera--------........--.....do.............------------ 1 mango......---------------------------------1
Delores Martinez -----------do--.....----------3 avocados..-------------------------------.............................. 1
Mrs. M. E. Ramerez ..-----.....--.... ----do...-----..-------.. 1 mango.........--.......----------....--------------------............... 1
Mrs. C. Ojdade..-------------.... do-----.......---------- do...... 1---------------------------------Mrs. Olivia Garcia -----------do ......-- --------- 6 figs and 1 avocado seed. -------------- -1
Marcelino Martin.---------- do.... --- --------8 avocados__ ------------------------------Mrs. Sussie Pulido...........----------do....------------.......... 5 pomegranates---------------------------............................. 1
Jesus Jasoa .... -----------------do--.....---------- 2 mangoes.---- ----------------------- 1
Mrs. E. Ramos-----.......--------.......do.....------------ 1 mango...---....------------------------------1
Randall Nye...---- --------- do......------------ 8 avocados--__ ----------------------------Miss P. Mato .------------- do--....---------- 2 oranges................................... 1
Geronino Santos.. ----------.... do.....------------ 15 figs -----------------------------------Carlota Martin ......--------.. ---.......do------------ 1 mango..... 1--------------------------------Rosilin Martinez..---------- --...do.------------ 7 plants ------------------------------- 1
Miss J. Ramirez...-----------..............do.....------------ 3 pomegranates ................-------------------------- 1
Miss H. Juneza----------- ...... --do------------............... 2mangoes.......... ------------------------------B. Hernandez-----------...... ---do------------............... 5 avocados.....------------------...........................------------- 1
Miss H. Santos........------------do------------............... 10 plants--------------------------------................................... 1
Alejo Flores....------------..........---.....do............... 4 avocados---........--....-------------------------..................... 1
Louis Martinez..------... -----do------------ avocados ......------------..................-------....------...... 1
Pablo Torrez_..-------_--- ...--do--.....---------- 9 avocados ----------............--......-----------------........... 1
Mrs. W. W. Winslow....-------..--.....do.....------------ 1 mango _--------------------------------- 1
M. G. Hernandez......---------- ....do....------------ 3 plants ........--..........---------...............---------------------- 1
P. A. Villreal..... ---------------do------------3 avocados_.. -----------------------------Mrs. Juan Cuellar -----------..............do...----..------.. 2 avocados. -------------------------------1
Mrs. Felipe Garcia--------.........---..... do.....------------1 mango and 2 avocados ---------------- 1
Mrs. Evangeline Flores........-------do.....------------ 2 peaches...........................-------------------------------- 1
Maria Garcia--...-------- -----do---.....-------- 4 avocados --.......---.......----------.......-------......... 1
Mrs. M. Pacheco ----------- -do....------------ 2 avocados ...------....-----......-----.....-------..... 1
Eliso Chapa ..----------- -----do----......-------6 avocados -----------.................----------------.. 1
Gauro de Hayas ------------..... -do------------............... 25 figs, 17 peaches, 5 quinces, and 5 pomegranates. 1
Mrs. Isidora Sanches------.......---.....do ------------2 avocados --....-------......--------------------........ 1
Mrs. Isabel Maro----------...........--...do------------............... 2 peaches .................-------------------------------- 1
Blas C. Garza ----------.........---.....do------------............... 4 avocados........................ ------------------------------1
Miss Victorio Ramero--.........------do..........-----------..... 3 avocados...................... -----------------------------1
J. Gonzalez ...........---------------do.......------------ 2 apples and 1 pomegranate ....------------- 1
Miss E. Lopez------------.............. --.....do------------............... 2 pomegranates ---............------------------------ 1
Julio Durati ..............------------....----...do--.............---------- 1 pear and 1 apple ...................... -------------------------1
Ignacio Garcia-----...----... -----do------------.............. 1 mango ---------------------........................--------------... 1
Maria Barredo...... ----------do.........----------....-- 14 avocados........ ---.......-----......------------------........ 1
Paula Enrique ................--------------do------------............... 1 quince..........----..............-----------------------------............ 1
R. Teuoria .....------------.......--.. ---.....do.....------------ 9 avocados .....-------...............--------. ----------------. 1
Miss T. Villareal---------..........--.....do------------............... 2 quinces and 1 avocado ...---..---------------.. 1
Mrs. P. Gonzalez ...............-----------do.............------------2 pomegranates and 1 peach....----------------- 1
Mrs. M. Quesala.. ------------do-----..........-----.. 2 mangoes and 2 avocados------...........------....... 1
Juana Josso --...........--------------.....do---------.............. 2 avocados ----..............---....--.......------------------ 1
K. H. Walker-------------...................do.............------------2 mangoes-.........--------...---------------------E. Didier -----------------........................do------------5 avocados -------.......................----......----------------... 1
J. Villerreal .....-----------..... ----do.............. 3 avocados, 1 mango, 5 pomegranates, and 1
5 sweet limes.
Miss J. Urguisa -----------............--.....do.............. ------------12 avocados---.......................--..----....-------------..--------...
Mrs. A. Arzogarita--------.........---.....do------------.............. 2 mangoes----------..............................---------.... 1-----------Pascula Gonzalez ...............-----------do.............. 3 avocado seeds ---------.......................------------..... 1
Mrs. G. Resendez ------............--...--do------------1 mango and 5 avocados------..................-------.. 1
'Miss A. G. Vela-----------............--.....do------------.............. 2 avocados--------.........................-----------------........ 1
Miss A. Torres------------.............--.....do---............---------.. 2 plants-----------...................................---------------.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91


Name Port Contraband Penalty


Francisco Pena_. ---------- Laredo, Tex-------....... 8 pomegranates, 8 quinces, and 4 pears..... 1
Raul Ibarra-------------................--.....do------------............. 1 quince............................--------------------------------- 1
Maria Ramos .....----------............do -----------.............. 4 avocados.............------------------------------- 1
Jesus Rodriquez -...----...............do------------.............. 1 mango---------------------------------.................................... 1
Alfred Seqobia-------------..do...------------.......... 11 avocados and 1 mango------------------................... 1
Delores Mejia------------...... --do. ------------ 4 avocados_------------------------------- 1
Mrs. A. Sauvignet---------- do..-------------............--..... do---------------------------------- 1
M. A. Morales ----------.............--- ....do------------2 apples and 3 quinces..........---------------------- 1
Miss I. Benavides ..... -.-.do ------------ 4 guavas.....-------------------------------- 1
Jess Hill --......... ..... .do ------------7 avocados-....------------------------------ 1
Juana Perez --------------.................... do------------ 5 mangoes..............----.......-------------------------- 1
Andrew Vasquez ..-----------... do ------------ 2 quinces-------------.............------------------- 1
D. Benavides------------............... .. do------------2 avocados...------------------------------- 1
M. G. Garcia---------------................... do ------------............5 avocados------------------------------- 1
Henry Cardenas-----------... ..... do ----------- 3 mangoes, 11 avocados, and 8 guavas...... 1
E. H. Krebs---------------.....................do------------ 2 mangoes------------------------------ 1
Solda Pelagn --------------....................do__------------ 3 pomegranates --------------------------- 1
Ines Iscoboda .................---------------do -.........--------..... 1 mango and 6 avocados--------------------.................... 1
Ciraco Linarez ............. .... do ------------ 7 guavas, 4 figs, and 5 avocados------------- 1
Juarez V. Rivera. i ....-.- do-__-----------__ 4 mangoes....................------------------------------- 1
Mrs. Antonio Serana -----.......--.... --do ---------- 1 mango..................................---------------------------------.. 1
Eloise Rodriquez -------------..... do --------. 3 mangoes----------.--------------------- 1
Mrs. Costelo Jimenez.....------.... do------------ 1 mango---------------------------------.................................... 1
Carlos Kerchmer ----------...........--.....do---.....---------......... 7 pomegranates and 1 avocado.......-------------- 1
Pedro Mendez-------------..............-.....do------------ 1 mango....-------------------------------- 1
Candelano Reyna ---------..........--.....do.............. ----------2 mangoes------------------------------- 1
Angla Morales--------------................... do-- --------- 8 quinces.....-------------------------------- 1
J. J. Howel...----------------do------------.............. 5 avocados --........................-----------------------------......... 1
Juanita Flores ..................--------------do------------.............. 2 avocados...------------------------------- 1
Maria Villreal ..--------- -----do------------ 4 peaches and 1 quince--------------------..................... 1
Lorenza Ramirez ...-----------..do ------------............. 1 plant.---------------------------------- 1
Miss N. M. de Ramirez----....---.....--do -------------..............--..... do---------------------------------- 1
Arturo Rodriquez.......... .....-----------do ----------- 8 avocados -------------------------------................................. 1
Juana Villarreal --------...........----. .....do------------ 16 quinces and 12 guavas------------------- 1
Jesus A. Esparza---------........... San Ysidro, Calif... 8 mangoes .------------------------------- 5
F. H. Barger.. ------------ Blaine, Wash------....... 6 rooted grape plants, 2 grafted apple stocks, 5
and 1 pine seedling.


















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. R. P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. A. YSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. C. H. HADLEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. HAROLD IIORRISON, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth ControF
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bolliworm. and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
92














U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1935