Service and regulatory announcements

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Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory annoucements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Physical Description:
8 v. : 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 112 (July/Sept. 1932)-S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 119 (Apr./June 1934).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030288972
oclc - 12903553
lccn - sn 86033972
System ID:
AA00023075:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    No. 114 (January-March 1933)
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
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        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    No. 115 (April-June 1933)
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
    No. 116 (July-September 1933)
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
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        Page 232
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        Page 234
        Page 235
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        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
    No. 117 (October-December 1933)
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
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        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
    Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine
        Page 299
        Page 300
    Index to service and regulatory announcements, 1933
        Index 1
        Index 2
        Index 3
        Index 4
    Cumulative index to service and regulatory announcements, Nos. 1 to 117, inclusive (1914-33), Bureau of Plant Quarantine
        Cumulative index i
        Cumulative index ii
        Cumulative index 1
        Cumulative index 2
        Cumulative index 3
        Cumulative index 4
        Cumulative index 5
        Cumulative index 6
        Cumulative index 7
        Cumulative index 8
        Cumulative index 9
        Cumulative index 10
        Cumulative index 11
        Cumulative index 12
        Cumulative index 13
        Cumulative index 14
        Cumulative index 15
        Cumulative index 16
        Cumulative index 17
        Cumulative index 18
        Cumulative index 19
        Cumulative index 20
        Cumulative index 21
        Cumulative index 22
        Cumulative index 23
        Cumulative index 24
        Cumulative index 25
        Cumulative index 26
        Cumulative index 27
        Cumulative index 28
        Cumulative index 29
        Cumulative index 30
        Cumulative index 31
        Cumulative index 32
        Cumulative index 33
        Cumulative index 34
        Cumulative index 35
        Cumulative index 36
        Cumulative index 37
        Cumulative index 38
        Cumulative index 39
        Cumulative index 40
        Cumulative index 41
        Cumulative index 42
        Cumulative index 43
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        Cumulative index 45
        Cumulative index 46
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        Cumulative index 48
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text











LAK
STATE P1 State of Florida Department of Agriculture


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY







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Digitized by the Internet Archive
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S.R.A.* B.P.Q. Issued June 1934

United States Department of Agriculture Bureau of Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1933





These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a permanent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations






WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS










vNRT








77












UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1934


















F LA. ID EPT, AM.
DIV. OF PLA"~
INDUSTRY%
UBRARI


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE
A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief.
B. CONNOR, Business Manager.
R. C. ALTHOUSB, Information Officer.


E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and European
Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
II












TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 114 (JANUARY-MARCH 1933)
Page
Quarantine and other offi cial announcements -.. ... ... .. ... ..... ...... .. ... ..... ... ... .. 137
Announcements relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ---------------- 137
Quarantine on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and plant
diseases with revised regulations --. ..-------.------------------------------------------ 137
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------- 141
Instructions to postmasters ....------------------------------------------------------- 141
Modification of Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ----------------112
Instructions to general )ublic through newspapers ------------------------------------ 142
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) -------------------------------- 143
Narcissus inspection records for 1932 --------------------.------------------------------- 14:3
Announcements relating to packing materials quarant ine (no. 69) ----------------------------- 144
Packing materials quarantine no. 69 with regulations -- ---------------------------------- 144
Instructions to collectors of custorns (T. ). 46267) ------------.----------------------- 147
Announcements relating to )hony-p each disease quarantine (no. 67) ---------------.---------- 147
Phony-peach disease quarantine revoked ----------------------------------------- 117
Notice of lifting of quarant ine no. I67--ph ony-peach disease quarant ine.-.............. 14,
Instructions to postimasters-removal of quarantine on account of phony-peach disease- 14s
Announcements relating to pink-bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -----------------------I------- 149
Modification of pink-bollworm qluarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ----------------- 149
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------- 149
Instructions to postmasters ----------------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to plant safeguard regulations --------------------------------------- 150
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.I). 46211) ------------------------------------------ 150
Announcement relating to seed or paddy rice quarantine (no. 55) ---------- ------------------ 150
Revision of quarantine and regulations ---------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to white pine blister-rust quarantine (no. 63) ------------------------- 152
Instructions to posrmasters --------------------------------------------------------------- 152
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 153
Idaho discontinues terminal inspection ---------------------------------------------------- 153
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.}.A.-294, supI)lement no. 1) ------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P.Q.-347)------------------------- 154
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.--4s) ---------------------------- 158
Plant quarantine restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299 revised, supplement no. 1) --------------.-------------------------------------------------------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, (}uateinala P. Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 2) --------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Sweden (P.Q.C.A.-321, supplement no. 1) ----------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.--350) ------------------------- 164
European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised Mar. 16, 1933) --------------- 167
Permits potato imports from Spain ------------------------------------------------------- 173
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -------------------------------173
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 175

CONTENTS OF NO. 115 (APRIL-JUNE 1933)

Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------------------------- 177
Barberries and mahonias classified under black stem rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.320, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ------------------ 178
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46335) ------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------- 178
Administrative instruct ions-comulercially packed apples under the Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations (B.P.Q.-352) ----------------------------------------------------------- 178
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) --------------------------------- 178
Supplementary administrative instructions-narcissus treatment and pest suppression
(B.P.Q.-353) -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 178
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 181
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46431) -------------------------------------181
Announcement relating to packing-materials quarantine (no. 69) ------------------------- ---- 182
Amendment no. I to notice of quarantine -------------------------------------------182
Announcement relating to seed- or l addy-rice quarantine (no. 55)---------------------------182
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46373) ------------------------------------- 182
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 183
Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 183
Georgia discontinues terminal inspection -------------------------------------------------- 183
Puerto Rico inaugurates terminal inspection ----------------------------------------------- 183
Miscellaneous itetns ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products through the mails
(B. P.Q.-351) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products into Italy (P.Q.C.A.289, supplement no. 1) -------------------------.-------------------------------------- 185
Summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany (B.P.Q.-302)
(revised) ----------------------.------------------------------------------------------- 185
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Union of South Africa (P.Q.C.A.-297, Supplement no. 3) -. 193
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------- 193
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 195
682:30-34 1






2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

CONTENTS OF NO. 116 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1933)
Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease -------------------.---------------------197
Secretary Wallace calls hearing Se 15 on Dutch elm disease --------------------197
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of
elm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe ------------ 198
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)_ ..................
Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine -------------------- 198
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46591) ------------------------------------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48) -----------------------------200
Japanese-beetle conference in Washington Octot er 24 ------------------------------------20
Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on and
after September 15 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 2
Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits
and vegetables ....------------------------------------------------------------------ 201
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ------------------------------- 201
Department authorizes lengthening of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Rio
Grande Valley --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 201
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ---------------202
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46590) ---------------------------------------202
Conditions governing the entry and treatment of narcissus-bulb importations (B.P.Q.-354).- 202 Strong calls conference on important plant quarantine -----------------------------------203
Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administration
of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37 -------------------------------204
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------------------------204
Revision of re ulations -----------------------------------------------------204
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------ 211
Campaign against pink bollworm started in cotton fields of South ------------------------- 212
Announcements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61) ---------------------------- 212
Revision of regulations --------------------------------------------------------------------- 212
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------- 218
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 1) ----------- 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica, B.W.I. (B.P.Q.-355) ----------------------------- 219
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1) --------- 221
Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302. revised, supplement no. 1) ----------223
Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.--314, supplement no. 3) -------- 224
Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,
revised) ------------------------.--------------------------------------------------------- 225
Lee A. Strong named Chief of Bureau of Entomology ------------------------------ 227
Fruit-!y survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru -------------------- 227
Statement of Federal plant quarantines --------------------------------------------------- 241
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---------------------------------- 242
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine .------------------------------------------------244

CONTENTS OF NO. 117 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1933)
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------------------------245
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70) ---------------------------- 245
Notice of quarantine no. 70, with regulations ---------------------------------------------- 245
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46721) -------------------------------------- 248
Information for importers of elm burl logs under the Dutch elm disease quarantine no. 70
(B.P.Q.-356) ------------------------------------------------------------------------248
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)----------------------------- 250
May extend beetle quarantine to Maine and West Virginia -----------------------------25
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on account
of the Japanese beetle to the States of Maine and West Virginia ------------------------- 250
Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------ 251
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------- 260
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -------------------------------- 261
Amendment to pink bollworm quarantine regulations ------------------------------------- 261
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------------------------262
Reviion of pink bollworm quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------ 263
Notice to general public through newspapers ----------------------------------------- 27
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------271
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ------------------------------------------ 271
Revision of quarantine and regulations ----------------------------------------------------271
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46809) ------------------------------------- 274
Announcements relating to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61) ------------------------------ 275
Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------------------------- 275
Miscellaneous items ....... ...............----------------------------------------------------- 275
Dutch elm disease conference October 26 ----------------------------------------- 275
Notice of conference to discuss Dutch elm disease situation in the United States- -------- 276 Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (P.Q.C.A.-289, supplement no. 2) -------- 276
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A.-315, supplement no. 1)-----276
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-294, supplement no. 2) -------277
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B.P.Q.-357) ------------------------ 277
Plant-(uarintine restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 7)-------288
Plant-quarantine restrictions, England and Wales (P.Q.C.A.-327, supplement no. 1) ------288
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A -315, supplement no. 2)----- 289
Official plant inspection service instituted in Hungary --------------------------------290
Penalties imposed for violations of the Piant Quarantine Act ---------- z ------------ ---------- 290
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations---------- 292 Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------------------299
List of intercepted plant pests.
Index.

0





S.R.A.--B.P.Q. No. 114 IS1sn1~ 19;









United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH. 1933


CONTENTS Pg

Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------------- 137
Announcements relating to European corn-borer quarant ine (foreign) (no. 41)------------------ 137
Quarantine on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and plant
diseases with revised regulations ---------------------------------------------------- 137
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------ 14t
Instructions to postmasters----------------------------------------------------------- 141
Modification of Japanese-heetle quarantine regulate ions (amendment no. 1)----------------- 142
Instructions to general public through newspapers- --------------------------------- 142
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulh quarantine (no. 62)---------------------------------143
Narcissus inspection records for 1932--------------------------------------------------- 143
Announcements relating to packing materials quarantine (no, 69)---------------------------- 144
Packing materials quarantine no. 69 with regulations------------------------------------ 144
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46267)------------------------------------ 147
Announcements relating to phony-peach disease quarantine (no. 67)-------------------------- 147
Phony-peach disease quarantine revoked----------------------------------------------- 147
Notice of lifting of quarantine no. 67--phony-peach disease quarantine--------------------- 148
Instructions to Ipostmiasters-remnoval of quarantine on account of phony-peach disease- 148
Announcements relating to 1ink-bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------------------------ 149)
Modification of pink-bollwormi quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)------------------ 149
Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------------- ------------- 149
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to plant safeguard regulations -------------------------------------- 150
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46211) --------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to seed or padIdy rice quarantine (no. 5,5) ---------------------------- 150
Revision of quarantine an(1 regulations ------------------------------------------------ 150
Announcement relating to white pine blister-rust quarantine (no. 63)------------------------- 152
Instructions to postmasters----------------------------------------------------------- 152
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ------------------------------------------ 153
Idaho discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 153
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------- ------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-294, supplement no. 1) ---------15:3
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347)-------------------------154
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.-348)--------------------------- 15,S
Plant quarantine restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299 revised, supplement no. 1)------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Guatemala (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 2)--------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Sweden (P.Q.C .A.--321, supplement no. 1)------------------ 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.-350)------------------------ 164
European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised MLar. 16, 1933)---------------- 167
Permits potato imports from Spain---------------------------------------------------- 173
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -------------------------------- 173
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------------------- 173



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORER QUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)

QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE EUROPEAN CORN BORER AND OTHER DANGEROUS INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES WITH REVISED REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In the 5 years which have elapsed since tile last revision of these regulations sufficient changes have taken place in tile general situation to justify a considerable modification of the restrictions so as to liberalize materially the conditions governing the entry into the United States of corn and the allied plants concerned.
174391-33-1 317





138 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE ~January-March,

Experience having demonstrated that articles made from cobs or other parts of the corn plant by methods involving any considerable degree of process or manufacture are unlikely to carry the European corn borer or other injurious pests, such articles are relieved of all restriction except that of being still subject to inspection. Under the new regulations the same status is accorded to corn silk, imported in considerable amounts for the manufacture of medicinal preparations.
In making provision for the entry of green corn on the cob in small lots for local use only, from adjacent areas of Canada, cognizance has been taken of the fact that the infested regions of both countries are practically coincident, and that Canada maintains a quarantine to prevent the spread of the European corn borer to the Provinces west of Ontario. It Is therefore considered that the few shipments concerned involve no appreciable risk.
Under the revised regulations commercial shipments of corn on the cob, green or mature, from the borer-free western Provinces of Canada, and shelled corn and seeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine from any part of Canada, are permitted entry under proper safeguards, which include permit, entry inspection, and a certificate of freedom from corn borer issued by the Canadian authorities. This certificate and entry inspection may be waived at the discretion of the department for shipments originating in borer-free areas.
According to the most recent information available to the department the European corn borer appears to be absent from the countries of the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, and South America, and importation is now permitted from these areas of corn on the cob, green or mature; in addition the presence of bits of cob or other fragments of the corn plant in Importations of shelled corn will be disregarded. Permit and other requirements of the regulations are still continued, however, as a protection against other pests.
The revised regulations now provide for mail importations of corn and the seeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine. Inasmuch as these are enterable in commercial quantity by freight or express, it would appear that under the safeguards provided entry by mail can justly be authorized in order to facilitate the import of the small quantities often needed for seed purposes.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 41, WITH REGULATIONS (SECOND REVISION)
(Effective June 1, 1926)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is hereby given, that dangerous plant pests, including the so-called European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.) and also other dangerous insects, as well as plant diseases not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist, as to one or more of such pests, in Europe, Asia, Africa, Dominion of Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, and other foreign countries and localities, and may be introduced into this country through importations of the stalks or other parts of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, and related plants.
Now, therefore, I, W. M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, under the authority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further introduction of the dangerous-plant pests mentioned above, to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto, the importation into the United States from all foreign countries 'and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize (Zea mwys L.), broomcorn, (Andropogon 8orghum var. technietss), sweet sorghums (Andropogon sorghum), grain sorghums (And ropogon s0rghumn), Sudan grass (Andropogon 8orghumt sudanensis), Johnson grass (Andr pogon halepensis), sugarcane (Sacharum offiinarum), including Japanese varieties, pearl millet (Pen nisetum glaucumb), napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), teosinte (Euchlaena tuxurians), and jobs-tears (Coix lachrv/7aJobi).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 139

Hereafter, and until further notice, by virtue of said act of Congress approved August 20, 1912, the importation into the United States of the stalk and all other parts of the plants enumerated above from all foreign countries and localities except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto, is prohibited.
Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of April, 1926.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORN
OR MAIZE, BROOMCORN, AND SEEDS OF RELATED PLANTS
(Difective on and after March 1, 1933)
REGULATION 1. PLANT PRODUCTS PERMITTED ENTRY'
Except as restricted from certain countries and localities by special quarantines and other orders now in force,2 and by such as may hereaf ter be prom~ulgated, the following articles may be imported:
A. Subject only to the requirements of the first three paragraphs of regulation 5:
(1) Green corn on the cob, in small lots for local use only, from adjacent areas of Canada.
(2) Articles made of the stalks,. leaves, or cobs of corn, when prepared, manufactured, or processed in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no pest risk is involved in their entry.
(3) Corn silk.
B. Upon compliance with these regulations:
(1) Broomcorn- for manufacturing purposes, brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn, clean shelled corn, and clean seed of the other plants covered by this quarantine.
(2) Corn on the cob, green or mature, from the provinces of Canada West of and including Manitoba,' and from Mexico, Central America, South America, the West Indies, the Bahamas, and Bermuda.
REGULATION 2. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS
Persons contemplating the importation of any of the articles specified in regulation 1, B, Shall first make application to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for a permit, stating in the application the name and address of the exporter, the country and locality where grown*, the port of arrival, and the name and address of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent. Unless otherwise stated in the permit, all permits will be valid from date Of Issuance until revoked.
, Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed shipments'; but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before a permit is received, the importation will be held in customs custody at the 'risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days pending the receipt of the -permit.
Applications may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required above must be given.
I Exeept as provided In regulation 6, these regulations do not authorize importations through the mails.
IThe entry of the following plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted b specific quarantines and other restrictive orders now In force. b
(a) Living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, from all foreign countries. (Quarantine no. 15.)
(b) Seed and all other portions In the raw or unmanufactured state of Indian corn or maize (Zea mays L.), and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte (Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionulehne, and Selerachne, from south eastern ~Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and Chfina),, Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, -Oceania, Philippine Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands. (Quarantine no. 24.)
$A quarantine is. maintained, by Canada to prevent spread of the European corn borer Irom the infested eastern areas to -the till uninfested Provinces west of Ontario.





140 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE LJanuary-March,

REGULATIO-N 3. ISSUAN CE OF PERMITS
On approval by the Secretary of Agriculture of such application a permit will be issued in quadruplicate.'
For broomicorn and brooms or similar articles made of broomeorn, permits will be issued for the ports of Boston and New York and such other ports as may from time to time be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
For shelled corn and for seeds of the other plants listed in this quarantine permits will be is sued for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine mainrains ain inspection service, and for such other ports as may be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
For corn on the cob. green or mature, covered by regulation 1, B (2), permits will be issued for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine maintains an inspection service and for such other ports as may be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

REGULATION 4. No i'Ic oir AR~ivAL. By PE~mirrEE
Immediately upon arrival of the importation at the port of arrival the permittee shall submit in duplicate notice to the Secretary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, date of entry, name of ship or vessel, railroad, or other carrier, the country and locality where grown, name of the foreign shipper, quantity or number of bales or other containers, and marks and
-numbers on containers, the port of arrival, and the name of the importer or broker at the port of arrival.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
The entry of the articles covered by regulation 1 is conditioned on their freedom from the European corn borer and other injurious insects and plant diseases, and upon their freedom from contamination with plant materials prohibited entry under other quarantines." All shipments of these articles shall be subject to inspection at the port of arrival by an inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, in order to determine their freedom from such insects and diseases and from contaminating materials, and to such sterilization, grinding, or other necessary treatment as the inspector may prescribe. Should an importation be found on inspection to be so infested or infected or contaminated that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be made safe by sterilization or other treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
When entry under sterilization or other treatment is permitted, the import tation will be released to the permittee, upon the filing with the collector of customs of a bond in the amount of $5,000 or in an amount equal to the invoice value, if such value be less than $5,000, with approved sureties, the conditions of which shall be that the importation shall be sterilized or otherwise treated under the supervision of the inspector; that no bale or container thereof shall be broken, opened, or removed from the port of arrival unless and until a written notice is given to the collector by the inspector that the importation has been properly sterilized or treated; and that the importation shall be redelivered to the collector of customs within 30 days after its arrival.
Should af shipment requiring sterilization or other treatment under the provisions of this regulation arrive at a port where facilities for such sterilization or other treatment are not maintained, such shipment shall either be promptly shipped under safeguards and by routing prescribed by the inspector to an approved port where facilities for sterilization or other treatment are
available, or it shall be refused entry.
Other conditions of entry as applying to the certain classes of articles
enumerated in regulation 1 are given in the following paragraphs:
Broomecwn.-All importations of broomcorn shall be so baled as to prevent
breakage and scattering in connection with the necessary handling and sterilization; ,If in the judgment of the inspector they are not so baled, entry may

4 One copy of the permit will be furnished to the applicant, one copy will be mailed to
the collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine at
the port of first arrival, and the fourth will be filed with the application.
5 Of particular interest is, the presence of cottonseed in shelled corn and the attendant
risk of such seed carrying the pink bollworm of Cotton.






19831 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 141

be refused. All importations of broomcorn shall be subject to such sterilization or other treatment as the inspector may require. Articles made of broomcorn.-Brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn shall be subject to sterilization unless their manufacture involves the substantial elimination of stems or such treatment of the included stems as in the judgment of the inspector shall preclude such articles from being the means of carriage of the European corn borer and of other injurious insects and plant diseases.
Shclled corn ant other s:ecds.-If shipments of shelled corn and seeds of the other plants from countries other than those named in regulation 1, B (2), are found upon inspection at the port of arrival to be appreciably fouled with cobs or other portions of the plants the inspector may require sterilization or other treatment or may refuse entry.
Corn from Canada. Shipments of corn from Canada shall be accompanied by an original certificate issued by a duly authorized official of the Canadian Department of Agriculture stating that the material in question covered by the certificate was thoroughly inspected by him or under his direction at the time of shipment and was found, or is believed to be, free from infestation with the European corn borer and other insect pests and plant diseases and free from admixtures of cobs or other portions of the plant: Provided, That such certification may be waived as to Provinces or districts on the presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such Provinces or districts have not been reached by the corn borer, such waiver to become effective at any authorized entry port (see regulation 3) upon the receipt of notification of such waiver from the Department of Agriculture by the customs collector of that port.

REGULATION 6. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL

In addition to entries by freight or express provided for in the preceding regulation, importations are permitted by mail of (1) mature corn on the cob from the countries specified in item 2, paragraph B, of regulation 1, and (2), clean shelled corn and clean seed of the other plants covered by this quarantine: Provided, That a permit has been issued for the importation: Provided further. That each shipment is accompanied from the foreign mailing point by a special mailing tag, which will direct the package to a Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection station for inspection in accordance with regulation 5 before release to the mails for delivery to the importer. These special mailing tags will be furnished on request to the importer for transmission to his foreign shipper.
The above rules and regulations are hereby adopted and shall be effective on and after February 20, 1933, and shall supersede on and after said date the rules and regulations issued February 10, 1927, under Notice of Quarantine No. 41 (second revision), as amended July 5, 1927. Done at the city of Washington this 10th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POST\IAsTEIR GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 30, 1933.
POSTMASTER:
My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of a revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (quarantine order no. 48, United States Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, P. L. and R.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.






142 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

MODIFICATION OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following amendment to the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations modifies the boundaries of the regulated area by removing therefrom certain territory in northwestern Pennsylvania and by adding an election district inallv-ertently omitted in Wicomico County, Md. The Pennsylvania territory removed is not infested so far as known and the action is taken at the request of the authorities of the State in order to provide a greater protective zone for the fruit-gro-wing district near the regulated area.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (ELEVENTH. REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
(Approved Jan. 13, 1933; effective Jan. 23, 1933)

Under authority conferred b'y the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (3T Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that those paragraphs of regulation 3 which relate to the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania in the rules and regulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated on December 22, 1932, be and the same are hereby amended to read as follows:
Alaryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland and election districts nos. 4, 5, 6, 14, 22, and 23, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election district no. 5, in Anne Arundiel County; election districts nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, in Baltimore County; election districts of Henderson (no. 1), Greensboro (no. 2), Denton (no. 3), and Ridgely (no. 7), in Caroline County; the city of Westminster, in Carroll County; election district of Cambridge (no. 7), in Dorches~ter County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and Brunswick (no. 25). in Frederick County; County of Har ford, except election district of Marshall (no. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), and Ellicott City (no. 2), in Howard County; election district and town of Laurel (no. 10), in Prince Georges County; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot Cou~nty; election districts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2), Hagerstown (nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook (no. 11), and Halfway (no. 26), in Washington County; election districts of Pittsburg (no. 4), Parsons (no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters (no. 8), Salisbury (no. 9), Delmar (no. 11), Camden (no. 13), Willards (no. 14), and Fruitland (no. 16), In Wicomico County.
Pennsylvania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Venango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, and Ashland, Beaver, Elk, Richland (including boroughs of Foxburg. and St. Petersburg), Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.
This amendment shall be effective on and after January 23, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of January 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHtJE M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of foregoing amendment sent to all common carriers doing business In or through the quarantined area.]

INSTRUCTIONS To GENERAL PUBLio THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUAW'LNTINE,
Washington, D.C., January 13, 1938.
N-otice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on himu by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and re -gulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN-OUNCEMLNTS 143


of the Japanese beetle, effective on and ,fter January 28, 1,93. Vhe amendment excludes from the regulated area as designated in the said revision
several counties and parts of counties in northwestern Pennsylvania, and adds to said regulated area one election district in eastern AIyIli id. (Copies of
the amendment may be obtained front the Bureau of Plant Qlltralitiille, Washington, D.C.
Ait'rji;I M\I. lywc,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published In the following newspapers" The Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 21, 1933; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., Jan. 23, 1933.]


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE (NO. 62)
B.P.Q.-349. FEBRUARY 17, 1938.

NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORD FOR 1932

Tablt 1 livess a record of the narcissus plantings inspected during the calendar year 1932 under the Federal quarantine fr Ihe prevention of spread of bulb pests. The figures given are summarized front the reports sent to this Bureau by the nursery inspectors of the various States who act as FederA collaborators in making such inspections.

TABLE 1.-Inspection of narcissus and number of bulbs certified and treated,
1932 crop


Plantings Bulbs certified as Bulbs treated and
inspected Bulbs inspected uninfested certified
State
Poly- Daf- Polyan- Polyan- Polyanall- fo- ths Daffodils ths Daffodils ths Daffodils
thus dils

Alabam a ------------- 7 7 81,215 65, 824 70, 015 20, 131 .....................
Arkansas ------------- 2 4 42,000 57, 900 42,000 57,900 ----------............
California ----------- 181 143 15,045,951 8, 243, 860 5, 685, 148 1,530, 555 1,264, 750 1,037, 515
Connecticut ---------- ------ ------------ 25,000 ------------ 25,000 .....................
District of Columbia-. 1 9 24 65,840 ------------ 67 24 65,773
Florida ------------- 189 8 103,993,420 546,000 93,589,820 541,000 .....................
Georgia -------------- 17 24 722,650 1,772, 300 722, 650 1,,767, 800 ----------- 4,500
Illinois --------------- 1 5 100, 000 322, 000 100, 000 267, 300 ------ 48, 200
Indiana ------------------- 13 ------------ 204,000 ------------ 2,000 ----------- I
Kansas ------------------- 2-.------------ 42,100 ------------ 42, 10 ....................
Kentucky ------------------ ------------- 2,400 ------------- 2, 4001
L o u i s i a n a - - - - - - 9 5 7 9 5 8 6 3 1 2 1 8 0 2 0 9 4 7 6 1 6 2 7 5 9 7 5 - - - - - - - -
Maryland ------------ 1 2 26, 000 2, 310, 958 26, 000 2, 260, 9S8 ---------- 50,000
Michigan ------------ 1 33 25,000 4,845, 528 ------------2,700,528 ---------- 1,101,500
Minnesota ----------- ------1 ----------- 56,500 ------------ 56, 500
Mississippi-----------11 4 467,075 28,000 467,075 2S,000------------------Missouri -------------1 8 600 136,850 600 93,100 ----------- 33,000
New Jersey ---------------8------------ 1,379,950 ------------ 714,650 ----------- 665,300
New York .......... 13 97,200 8, 714, 020 ------------132,500 40,400 7,442,397
North Carolina ------- 14 35 623, 600 4,183, 200 363,600 2, 670, 700 1*3, 600 112, 800
Ohio ----------------- ----- ------------ 168,350 -------------74,650
Oregon --------------67 316 548, 290 22,915,21S 33,926 1,324, f; 40S,404 19, 116, 2,7
Pennsylvania -------- ------ 3------------ 6S0,400 -------------35, 00 -.. 645, 00
South Carolina ...... 39,907, 845 ------------ 39,907,S15
Tennessee ------------ 3 9 ,600 925,513 5,600 313,513 ---------- ---------Texas ---------------- 3 7,235, 275 3,620, 595 7, 235, 275 3,607,095 ------------ 13,500
Utah ---------------------- I ------------- 2,000 ------------- 2,000
Virginia --------------2 21 29, 565 13, 150, 435 10, 865 1,265, 550 1S, 750 455 995
Washington ----------30 166 277, 55, 315, 22 ............. 272, 11 51,28,416
Wisconsin ------------ ------ 1----------- 2,517,500 ------------ 17,500 -----------2,S5,000
Total ----------637 927 169, 815, 503 132, 507, 762 148, 736, 51 19,629, 551 2, liS, 109


Similar tables htve )een issued in previous years. that for 1931 being given on pages 14 and 1.5 of no. 110 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
The number of narcissus bulbs of all types reported as inspected in 19 2
totals 302,323,265. This is a reduction of over 70.000,000 1() hut from the






144 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-Marc,

previous year, the reduction extending to both the polyanthus and daffodil types of bulbs and to nearly all the leading bulb-growing States. The reduction in the number of polyanthus bulbs reported is, however, much greater than the number of daffodils. About 50 percent of the bulbs reported for 1932 are Paper Whites and other polyanthus varieties commonly grown in the South and about 44 percent are of the daffodil type produced in the Northern States. In this series of tables the only varieties.considered as of the polyanthus type are Paper White, Soliel d'Or, Chinese Sacred Lily, Grand Monarque, Aspasia, Elvira,. and a few unconmmnon varieties grown in small numbers. The figur es therefore differ to some extent from the census totals, since the Census Bureau accepted the reporting growers' division into "narcissus (polyanthus) and narcissus (all other) ", and many growers customarily include within the polyanthus group numerous important hardy poetaz varieties, such as Laurens. Koster.
The figures given in the table showing "bulbs certified ", whether on the basis of freedom from infestation, or on account of treatment, indicate supplies available for shipment so far as adequate inspection and freedom from pests are concerned. The greater proportion of such bulbs are, however, replanted by the growers on their own premises for the purpose of securing increase in future years. Growers estimate that only from 20 to 30 percent of the total number of bulbs inspected is available for interstate movement during any 1 year.
Infestations with eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci) were reported in 1932 as to one or more plantings in each of the following States: California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. In addition to the records for the year 1932, this species had previously been reported on properties in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin. Some of these properties have not since been reported as inspected, and infestation may possibly still be persisting in them. Under administrative instructions issued on July 7. 1932, the standard hot-water treatment procedure is definitely prescribed only as to Tylechus infestations, while the finding of other parasitic forms of eelworms, without Tylencwhus, is referred to this Bureau for special consideration in each case.
Greater bulb flies were reported in California, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington. They have also been found in previous years in Illinois, Ohio, and Utah.
Lesser bulb flies (Eumerus spp.) were removed from consideration under the Federal narcissus bulb quarantine in an amendment which became effective on May 20, 1932. Accordingly, most of the State inspectors did not report as to the presence or absence of these 1sser flies in 1932.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PACKING MATERIALS
QUARANTINE (NO. 69)
PACKING MATERIALS QUARANTINE NO. 69 WITH REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Various plant products used as packing material in connection with ordinary commercial shipments from abroad are known to constitute a distinct danger to the agricultural interests of this country on account of the insects and plant diseases which they may carry with them. For some years the packing materials used in connection with imports of nursery stock have been restricted because of this danger, and for like reason fruit and vegetable imports are required to be free from leaves and other plant parts.
The pest risk which may be involved in packing materials is well exemplified by rice straw. Rice-straw packing originating in the Orient has been found at a large number of ports of entry on over 100 occasions to be infested, sometimes heavily, with living stages of the Asiatic rice borer (Chilo simple), an insect recognized to be damaging in the regions where it occurs. In ddi tion to this and several other insects from which we are as yet fortunately free, 80 or 90 diseases are known to occur on rice abroad, none of which have





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 145

yet reached our rice areas. It is well recognized that straw and hulls provide a dangerous channel of introduction for these rice pests.
Without disturbing the restrictions already in'existence under other quarantines, this quarantine aims to secure additional protection against foreign pests by prohibiting or restricting the use of certain packing materials considered on good grounds to involve danger of pest introduction when these materials are us6d as packing in connection with ordinary commercial shipments.
In addition to the rice straw and rice hulls mentioned, leaves of plants forest litter, and soil containing vegetable matter are potentially such dangerous carriers of plant pests that their use for -packing purposes is likewise prohibited. These materials, however, are so rarely used as packing, and safe substitutes are so universally available, that their exclusion is of entirely ne-jigible importance from the commercial standpoint.
The remaining items in the prohibited list (sugarcane, corn and related plants, cotton, and bamboo) are already covered by specifle quarantines and are included here merely that all packing materials may be dealt with together.
Concerning the restricted list it will be noted that the materials here included are required to be free from plant pests, and are made subject to inspection, the inspector being authorized to prescribe such treatment or disposition as may be necessary in the interests of safety.
A considerable number of widely used packing materials, such as excelsior, paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials, which, because of their nature or process of manufacture are unlikely to transport plant parasites, are not covered by this quarantine.
It is believed that under this quarantine the necessary protection has been provided with the least possible restraint or interference with commercial practices.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69
(Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

1, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, in accordance with the requirements of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), have determined (1) that it is necessary to forbid the importation into the United States of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from the countries named when used as packing materials for other commodities, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of plant diseases and injurious insects not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and (2) that the unrestricted importation of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from the countries named when used as packing materials may result in the entry into the United States of injurious plant diseases and insect pests.
Now, therefore, by virtue of the said act of August 20, 1912, the public hearing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given as follows:
1. On and after July 1, 1933, the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, are prohibited entry into the United States from the countries and localities named:
(a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomcorn, Sudan grass, napier grass, jobs-tears, teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) ; all parts, from all countries except Mexico, and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South America.
(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint, waste, seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.
(d) Su(nireane; all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all countries.
(e) Bamboo; leaves and small shoots, from all countries.
(f) Leaves of plants; from all countries.
(g) Forest litter; from all countries.
174391-33-2






146 BUREAU OF PLANT-' QUARANTINE [January-March,

(70 Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, except such types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe for packing- by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
2. Onl and after July 1, 1933, the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, will be permitted entry into the United States from the countries and localities named only in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
(a) Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls, other than rice (such as emmer, spelt, oats, barley, and rye) ; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomicorn, Sudan grass, napier grass, jobs-tears, teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) ; all parts, from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South America.
(c) Willow twigs; from Europe.
(d) Grasses and hay and similar indefinite dried or cured masses of grasses, weeds, and herbaceous plants; from all countries.
(e) Soil containing an, appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, which is authorized as safe for packing by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
This quarantine shall leave in full force and effect all other quarantines and orders.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agric'ulture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69
(Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS
(a) Packing materiali.-The expression packing material ", as used in this quarantine includes any of the plants or plant products enumerated, when these are associated with or accompany any commodity or shipment to serve for filling, wrapping, ties, lining, mats, moisture retention, protection, or for any other purpose; and the word packing ", as used in the expression packing materials shall include the presence of such materials within, in contact with, or accompanying such commodity or shipment.'
(b) Soil con tainting an appreciable admix~ture of vegetable matter, here brought under quarantine only because its content of decaying vegetation or plant remains carries a definite pest risk, is to be distinguished from soil of purely mineral or earthy composition, which is not covered by this quarantine.
(c) Ins pector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. FREEDOM FROM PESTS
All packing materials allowed entry under restriction shall be free from injurious insects and plant diseases.
REGULATION 3. ENTRY INSPEcTON
All packing materials shall be subject to inspection at time of entry.

RE-GULATION 4. DISPOSITION OF MATERIALS FOUND IN VIOLATION'
If the ispector shall find packing materials associated with or accompanying any commodity or shipment being imported, or to have been imported, in violation of this quarantine or of these regulations or shall, find them infested or infected with injurious insects or plant diseases, he may refuse entry to the shipment, or hie may seize and destroy or otherwise dispose of such packing material, or he may require it to be replaced, or sterilized,, or Otherwise treated.
6 Since it is the packing materials themselves which constitute the danger and not the manner of use, it is intended that the definition shall include their presence within or accompanying a shipment regardless of their function or relation to a shipment or the character of the shipment.





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 147

REGULATION 5. TYPES OF SOIL AuTiaomzED FOP. PACKING
The following types of soil or earth are authorized as safe for packing:
(1) Peat, (2) Peat moss, and (3) Osmunda fiber.
The above rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
QUARANTINE wiTu REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION INTO THE
UNITED STATES OF INSECTS AND DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH PACKING MATERIALS OF PLANT NATURE (T. D. 46267)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., March 11, 1933.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 69 with regulations (packing materials quarantine), Issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to become effective July 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner 'of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the quarantine.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PHONY PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE (NO. 67)
FEBRUARY 6, 1933.
PHONY PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE REVOKED
(Press release)
Federal plant quarantine no. 67, issued in 1929 to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease, has been revoked, effective March 1, according to an announcement by the Secretary of Agriculture today. In the opinion of the Department, the further spread of this disease can be controlled more satisfactorily by improved and modified nursery-inspection methods in the various States than by the enforcement of the type of Federal quarantine regulations now in effect. The Department plans to cooperate with the State nursery inspectors in developing adequate inspection methods. Officials expect that the States will prepare this month to make the required inspections.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, says that when the quarantine was placed by the Department it was believed, as a result of surveys made in 1926, 1927, and 1928, that the disease was confined to the States of Georgia and Alabama, although it was known to have been present in Georgia for some 50 years. Surveys in 1929 and 1930 disclosed infections in Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Surveys in 1931 revealed infections in Florida and Illinois. In all of these States, except Mississippi, Louisiana, and South Carolina, the infections were discovered only in limited areas and the quarantine was extended on November 30, 1931, to the entire States of Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, and to parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, as well as to those parts of Alabama and Georgia which were not already under quarantine. Surveys in 1932 revealed a few infected trees in southern Oklahoma and in southeast Misssouri. Scattered infections were also discovered in 1932 in new localities in Arkansas, Illinois, and Texas.
The smallness of the area in which the disease was known to occur when the quarantine was first issued, together with the inauguration of an intensive eradication campaign by the Department in cooperation with the States, just!fled the original placing of the quarantine, in the opinion of Department






148 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jau

officials. Since that time, however, the disease has been found through extensive areas, says Mr. Strong, although there are no outside of Georgia and Alabama where infection has been present a length of time to cause serious loss in commercial orchards. The fun available to the Department for quarantine activities have not been increa and funds for eradication activities have been reduced. The widely separated infections in some of the States concerned have made the enforcement of intrastate-quarantine regulations by these States impracticable, thereby complica the problem of maintaining Federal control of interstate shipments.
As its research work has developed, the Bureau of Plant Industry has bn increasingly impressed with the importance and potential seriousness of the phony-peach disease to the peach industry, and to the limit of its ability will endeavor to encourage prompt eradication activities wherever infec trees are found. For the immediate future, however, eradication must depend largely on the cooperative activities of the States.
Apparently the disease is transmitted from one tree to another only through the roots. Investigation by the Bureau of Plant Industry points so strongly to the iwach-root borer as the carrier of the disease that it seems reasonable to believe that it will be possible to reduce the danger of spreading the disease by preventing the movement of borer-infested trees from nurseries in ar infested by the each borer.
State inspection officials should undertake the critical inspection of nursery stock budded on peach, nectarine, apricot, or almond stock, either at digging time or at any other times that will insure that no borer-infested stock leave the nursery. This should give more effective protection than would be possible by continuation and extension of the present type of Federal quarantine. Moreover, the Federal quarantine is considered less essential to the present retarded program of phony-peach eradication that it was to the original plan of intensive and rapid eradication.
The revocation of the quarantine does not mean the abandonment of interest in this disease, says Mr. Strong. The Bureau of Plant Quarantine will plan to cooperate, insofar as funds and facilities permit, in the establishment and execution of uniform and efficient methods of inspection and certification of nursery stock as to freedom from borer injury.

NOTICE OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINE NO. 67-PHONY-PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE
(Effective on and after Mar. 1, 1933)
I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act, approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), do hereby remove and revoke the quarantine placed by Notice of Quarantine No. upon the entire States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, and parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North C Tennessee, and Texas, and do also hereby revoke the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, such removal and revocation to take effect on March 1, 1933.
Done in the District of Columbia, this 3d day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of above notice were sent to all common carriers doing business in or tbrough the quarantined area.I

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS-REMOVAL OF QUARANTINE ON" ACUNT OF T PHONY PEACH DISEASE
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 16, 1933.
Quarantine Order No. 67 on account of the phony-peach disease, quaran the States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina, Tenne and Texas, has been revoked.






SKAIZVICE ,\Nl) NEGUL.VI'ONY ANNOUNCENIENTS 149

Consequently, postimistors ill Ille 'Ire'l (111"I raill i Iled shmild Ill) II)II-er ('111'(wc(l tile regulations pl.()nllll ",l1vd lender 111,11 0rder. 0t, cmir"c' Hic requirellwilt.,."
of pant.-raph 2, sectimi -167, L Iws 111d Rc-1l1,11iow;. the
'ICCept'llice I'm in'lilill", of plailt 111,1teri'll fipr pr(q),11".111(lil, 11111'st he chs( l d.
( '. I E I I, 1, N [,,I,: I.(; v It,
Third Assi.,4(int Pwdiimstcr (Iciwiwl.


ANNOUNCEMENT'S RELATING To PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (N 0. 5 2)
MODIFICATION' OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INIFIVOI)IJITMIX), X(Y1,11"

The followiii,,,rttiti( it(iiii(,itt modifie" till, Irc,!', re"111,11ed 1111der pillk-b(d1worill quanaiitine 1)y rch,,ishi- 1*1-mll re-41-icliml.1 p.111 ill
maillely, Lovill"', Winkler. AmIrews, Ecim-, 0-,mc, mid Uptim Cmuities entire, nild ill (0,the I'(willel-h- rcu'uLited p(irlioii ()I* Alidhmd ('minty. N4l piuk-lmllw(will hevil I'milill ill taily p"Irt: of' such rclej -cd tlvo slice 01'1 cr()p seasoll (_4 19131. Lvv A.
Cllicf Burc(Ill of 111(lilt Q11(trall tinc.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL 110 NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
.\J)prm'ed Fch. -7, effec-live F01). 28, 19:)3)
Under '1111 hority cwl1*cvr('d by the jdkllll (111,11%ildhif, 1cl td' Aug'usl 21) 11)12
(:)7 Sttt-. :'15) t-, mwnded hy Hie tci ()f Cwi-r(- s :ippr()ved A.janii 4, 1()17
(39 Stot. 1-1:'4. it is m-dercd 1h,11 rc-, lll,1tiwl :.)) ()t, the revkol 1-111es.
re "111"Iti(Ills slipplellw ilt:11 to lm t-ice of (pitll.,111tille il'). .521, w l "Ic-c(m ilt oll, the Ili 11 1 boilworiii, which wcre prml)(111"(1ted (m 000bor 99, he '111d the i",
llerelly callicilded to rezld

IZEG( NATION RECREATED

"Ictm-0,111(v with the pr()vi-,1)s fi) imlice W' no. -52 (ivvi sed), 11w
Secret-ary (if A -11 ('111111 re de'4"wtte ; ( -, iv-ul'ited zliv,1 4, 1'(w 111c jjurpw (, W* 1114-c r( ... ufiltioll". t1w fidhowill- cmlllti(-- and pw-i (It' c(millic", ill Ariz,111,1, 1"holli'l,
Mexico). illd Tex.1-'. illcIti(lill-," all]
p(ditic,11 slihdivisiom, withill t1li-ir lilllit- :
11, i (" j I (I (I rc (1. 1' 11 e (.1) 11111 ics 01, 0 )cili" ( ree 1! 1 ce. Alaricop.l.
Ftol-W(f (fr(w.-The cmillties ()]* M,14-1111,1, Bflker. 1')rl(11,(w(!, ( 'Allinjoi;l, and Union.
Xcir '11c.rim (low.-The ()f ('11,1ves, Edd.v, ()Wr(), 1)()11,1 lm,
Grold, :tIld llidni-().
Tcxo- (Irca.-The (d, Terrell, Pn-idio,
Ward, 011hw.:, Iln, lllldspcdl ljld EA] Pasio.
Thi-, 'llnelldilwilt- '-dwil h" effective ml 111(1 'lller Fchr!] lr.v
Dt lw it the city (d' W:ishill-tou, thi,, 271h (hy (d' Fehrutry. l!)*):,.
W itllc,'. s iliv 11,111d 'tild Ill(, "e ll (d, the t'llited "."I'lics 1)( p lrtllw jlt id, A _,riA L.
,1 ccl.ct(ovf of
[Cw oics (4 '11)(OvA, .11ilendmont wcl*l, doill hilsilles., ill (w
1111-ou-11 the (111:1r,1111illcd nlv l.j

.Noncj,_ ro C'i%-,xj--Atu Vi-mw Tiin()v(;ij

()v
BVIIE.W OF PLANT ()['A1.ANT1:\J:.
1V(1x1linyto;?. 10%, Ycbriml. 11 2t.
Notice is hereby giveii t1i'll Ille 'Secret'll'y (fl' A-ricult ure. under nut 1writy cmiferred on him by the plant quormitine zi(I (4 Aii-iist 20, 1IN2 (:-,7 Sktl. 345),
-is amended, has pi-miltil-ated '111 '1111endillent, tf, the rules 111(1 re-111(ttiolls sup-






150 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

plemnental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm, effective February 28, 1933. This amendment modifies the areas regulated under the pink-bollworm quarantine by releasing from restriction a part of the regulated area in Texas, namely, the entire countries of Loving, Winkler, Andrewvs, Ector, Crane, and Upton, and all of the formerly regulated portion of Midland County. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. C. IF. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of AgriculZture.
liiuhuislied in the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Mar. 6, 1933.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 29, 1988.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: An amendment to the pink bollworm quarantine regulations has been announced by the United States Department of Agriculture, effective February 28, 1933. Under this amendment the areas regulated under the quarantine are modified by releasing from restriction the counties of Loving, Winkler, Andrews, Ector, Crane, Upton, and Midland in the State of Texas. A copy of the quarantine is enclosed and you will please be governed in accordance therewith.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EiL1NBEa~m,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PLANT SAFEGUARD REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING (1) ENTRY FOR IMMEDIATE EXPORT, (2)
ENTRY FOR IMMEDIATE TRANSPORTATION AND EXPORTATION IN BOND, AND (3) SAFEGUARDING THE ARRIVAL AT A PORT WHERE ENTRY oR. LANDING IS NOT INTENDED OF PROHIBITED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS, REVISED (T.D. 46211)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., February 24, 1983. To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended plant-safeguard regulations, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective December 1, 1932, superseding all previous editions thereof, are published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned. FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the regulations.)


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEED OR PADDY RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following revision of the seed or paddy rice quarantine and regulations
-adds rice straw and rice hulls to the articles prohibited entry, amplifies the definition of seed or paddy rice, and makes provision for the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico by mail. LEA TOG


Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.





1933] SERVICE AND RIIGULATO11Y ANNOUNCEIMENTS 131

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55 (REVISED) (Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 193:)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, a:id notice is hereby given, (1) that injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sc/croq)ora ii(tcrocarp) leaf smutl (EuIlylouia oryzuc), blight (ospora orijztorum), and glume blotch (Mcluitomma gluniarum), as well as dangerous inspect pests, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist, as to one or more of such diseases and pests, in Europe, Asio, Africa, centrall America, Soutlh America, and other foreign countries and localities, and may be introduced into this country through importations of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls, and (2) that the unrestricted importation of seed or paddy rice from the Republic of Mexico may result in the entry into the United States of the injurious plant diseases heretofore enumerated, as well as insect pests.
Now, therefore, I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of the insect pests and plant diseases referred to, to forbid the importation into the United States of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls from the foreign countries and localities named, and from any other foreign country or locality: Provided, That seed or paddy rice may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the provisions outlined in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
On and after July 1, 1933, and until further notice, by virtue of the said act of Congress, approved August 20, 1912, the importation of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls into the United States from any foreign country or locality is prohibited, with the exception that the importation of seed or pladdy rice into the United States from the Republic of Mexico may be permitted upon compliance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHIUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 55, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION INTO THE UNITED STATES OF SEED
OR PADDY RICE FROM MEXICO
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS
(a) Seed or paddy rice.-Unhusked rice in the form commonly used for seed purposes; these regulations do not apply to husked or polished rice imported for food purposes.
(b) Port of first arrival.-The first port within the United States where the shipment is (1) offered for consumption entry or (2) offered for entry for immediate transportation in bond.
(c) Inspector.-An inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture.

A. IMPORTATIONS OTHERWISE THAN BY MAIL
REGULATION 2. APPLICATIONS FOR PEMI'IS FOR IMPORTATION OF SEED Olt PADDY RICE
Persons contemplating the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall first make application to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for a permit, stating in the application the locality where grown, the port of first arrival, and the name and address of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent.
Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed shipments; but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before a permit is received, the importation will be held in customs custody at the port of first arrival at the risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days, pending the receipt of the permit.
Application may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required above must be given.
A separate permit must be secured for each shipment.






152 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

REGULATION 3. ISSUANCE OF PERMITS
On approval by the Secretary of Agriculture of an application for the importation of seed or paddy rice. a permit will be issued in quadruplicate; one copy will be furnished to the applicant, one copy will be mailed to the collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine at the port of first arrival, and the fourth will be filed with the application.

REGULATION 4. NOTICE OF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEE
Immediately upon the arrival of seed or paddy rice from Mexico, at the port of first arrival, the permittee or his agent shall submit a notice in duplicate to the Secretary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, the quantity of seed or paddy rice included in the shipment, the locality where grown, the date of arrival, and if by rail, the name of the railroad company, the car numbers, and the terminal where the seed or paddy rice is to be unloaded, or if by boat, the name of the ship or vessel and the designation of the dock where the shipment is to be landed.

REGUiATION 5. INSPECTION AND DISINFECTION AT PORT OF FIRST ARRIVAL
All importations of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such inspection or disinfection, or both, at the port of first arrival, as shall be required by the inspector, and to the delivery to the collector of customs by the inspector of a written notice that the seed or paddy rice has been inspected and found to be apparently free from plant diseases and insect pests.
Should any shipment of such seed or paddy rice be found to be so infested with insect pests or infected with plant diseases that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be cleaned by disinfection or treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection and disinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the importer.

B. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
REGULATION 6. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
Regulations 2 to 5 provide for importations otherwise than through the mails. Importations of seed or paddy rice may also be made from Mexico by mail, provided (1) that a permit lhas been issued for the importation in accordance with regulations 2 and 3, and (2) that each shipment is accompanied from the Mexican mailing point by a special mailing tag directing the package to a Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection station for inspection and, if necessary, for treatment, before being released to the mails for delivery to the importer, unless entry is refused in accordance with the provisions of regulation 5. The special mailing tags will be furnished on request to the importer for transmission to his foreign shipper.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933, and shall on that date supersede the rules ond regulations promulgated July 17, 1923.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 63)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
REVISION OF WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
The regulations of Quarantine O)rder No. 63 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the white-pine blister rust governing the shipment of 5-leafed pines, currant, and gooseberry plants, appearing on pages 16 to 19, inclusive, of the August 1930, Supplement to the Postal Guide, have been





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 153

amended. The list of States designated as infected witi white-p)ine blister rust has been extended to include Iowa, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia.
The embargo which Irohibite(d tihe shimlent of s1uch pines froum infected to noninfected States is removed, and the (Federal pine-shil)ping iiermits which heretofore authorized shilments only between infected States may no)w be used for shipments to noninfected States also.
At the same time the interstate movenmient itot( other infeled States of 5leafed pines grown in the lightly infected Stales is somewhat more restricted than heretofore, experience indicating that such p1ines should he raised in a Ribes-free environment in order to be considered safe from blister rust.
The embargo which has hitherto prohibited the movement of 5-leafed pines from points east of the Missouri Valley to the Western Stales is removed.
The interstate shipment of currant and gooseberry pda its is also simplified by the elimination of the provision that such plants if transported from the infected States were required to be both dormant and dipped in lime-sullphur solution. Hereafter such plants will not be required to be disinfected in lime-sulphur unless shipped with leaves or act ive buds.

SUMMARY
The infected States and District are designated( as (Coninecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Miines(ota, Montana, New Hampshire New Jersey, New York. Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washingtin, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and tihe District of Columbia.
The careful attention of postmasters is invited to the following revise(l regulations of Quarantine Order No. 63 on account of the white-pine blister rust, effective January 1. 1933:
(Then follow in full text regulations 2, 3, and 7 and the appendix.)


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
IDAHO DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD) ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL.
Washington. March 14, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
MY DEAR SIR: The director of the bureau of plant industry, Delpartment of Agriculture of Idaho, has advised that as the recent Legislature of Idaho made no appropriation for nursery-stock inspection, parcels of plants or plant products upon arrival at the post office of address may be delivered to the addressees without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B1. EILENBERGEIR.
Third Asisttant Postmister Gc nral.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

P.Q.C.A.-294. Supplement No. 1. JA.NUARY 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL
MEASURES REGULATING TIHE IMPORTATION OF SELECTED SEED POTATOES
Decree No. 21734 of August 16, 1932, prescribes that:
ARTICLE 1. The importation of selected see(d-potato tubers, with exemption from customs imposts (in the terms of Art. 3, no. XIII-3, of Law No. 1616 of Dec. 30. 1906), is subject to previous authorizationii by the Ministry of Agriculture.
(a) This authorization will be granted only to growers or syndicates and agricultural cooperatives registered in the Service of Inspection and Agricul174391-33-3






154 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

tural protection (Servigo de Inspecao e Fowento Agricolas) and to commeil firms regularly established and registered in Brazil for seed business.
(b) Importation shall be made only through ports or localities where there is a representative of the Biological Institute of Agricultural Protection (Instituto Biologico de Defesa Agricola) authorized to carry out phytosanitary inspection.
(c) The Ministry of Agriculture will publish the names of the authored ports or localities through which importation will be permitted.
ART. 2. Seed potatoes may be imported into Brazil only from countries where technical experimental establishments specializing in the culture of this plant exist, according to the criterion of the Servigo de Inspecao e Fomento Agricolas, in order to prevent the importation of inadequate varieties into regions for which the tubers are intended, and to prevent the introduction of injurious or exotic diseases, and the importation will be subject to all the provisions and instructions concerning phytosanitary protection, applying to the case the judgment of the superior counsel of agricultural protection instituted by article 90 of the regulations approved by Decree No. 15189 of December 21, 1921.
(a) The certificates of origin referred to in article 2 of the resolution of May 26, 1928, shall affirm that the tubers are from regions free from the parasites Ch rysophlyctis endobiotica, Spongospora subterranea, and Phthorimaea operculetla, and that the imported tubers are free from those and other parasites.
(b) In addition to this certificate, each shipment must be accompanied by a statement of the Minister of Agriculture of the producing country affirming that selected seed potatoes are concerned.
(c) If, upon inspection on arrival, the tubers indicate need of disinfection by immersion in insecticidal and fungicidal solutions, this precaution will be required at the expense of the importer.
ART. 3. Tubers which may be deemed by the Servigo de Inspecao e Fomento Agricolas unfit for planting may be used for consumption, provided that the competent sanitary authorities are not opposed, and that the importer pay the imposts required by law.
ART. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities unfit for planting or for food shall be destroyed under the supervision of the same at the expense of the importer.
ART. 5. Concerns the storage of imported seed potatoes.
ART. 6. Concerns the requirements to be met by the importer in applying for a permit to import seed potatoes.
Articles 7, 8, and 9 concern importers of seed potatoes.
LEm A. STRONG,
Chief of Bu.rea.

B.P.Q.-347. JANUARY 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE

This summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Greece has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the French texts of some of the Greek decrees, and from translations made by Paul Vogenitz, translator, Post Office Department, from the Greek texts of other decrees and laws. It was then reviewed by the chief, section of phytopathology, DirectionGeneral of Agriculture, Athens, Greece.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts and decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees and laws themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEm A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.
BAsIo LAWS
Law No. 214 of April 9-22, 1914, protective measures against phylloxera.
Law No. 217 of April 9-22, 1914, concerning the combat against plant diseases and the organization of the phytopathological service.





19331 SERVICE AND I 10'1 AT'H:Y N1"'INCEMENTS 155

IMPORTATION PROIITED

Grapevines or paris thereof ; phylloxera in any stage of developiieiil ; materials which have been used along grapoevinIes; auninial or plan11 r1fus: hunius and soils; any green plaiit or par8t It(reof. ilcllding -arden voeantibles ; madder and licorice; frot mny foreign counilt ry or from a1y ph.\ lloxeinnld region of Greece into nonphylloxerated or slispected regions of Greem to prl'veIlt he introduction of phylloxera. (Decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see 1. 155.)
Citrus fruits, jilo :Inly portion of G C cece except tie (nepartnte a Thrae and Macedonia, to prevelt t lie int rodul ia(in of lhe cale iinsect Ch ry.miu pliu (Decree of Feb. 27, 1931, see 1. 157.)
Cottonseed, into tle dejin tients of Tr ra ce aiud macedonia; unginned cotton into any part of Greece, to I)revenit the introdlictioln of 1he pink bollivorm of cotton (PcCtioph0ora( yoy.'fp&launders). (1)ecrce of Feb. 20, 191. see p 157.)
IIPORTATION RESTHICIlED
Cuttilgs awl uprooted scionS (except of thie -rapeVille exceptioiially iay be imported froilli forei.gIl CoUlliVies into 01lplylloxerated ( sUspected regiolis of Greece uiiler special order of the Ministry of Azri culture and subject to disinfection. (Art. 4. decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see p. 15(.)
Grlpev ines and pa rts thereof, etc.. fron any foreign country or region of Greece through I the port of Piraeus for speian! scientific institutions of Greece, when accompanied by a certificate of ori-in anid under a special order of the Ministry of Agriculture. (Art. 5, decree of Apr. 14, 1927. Cottoinseed may be uimported into Greece (except into the departments of Thrace and Macedonia) subject to disinfection and certification to I hat effect by competent authority of the country of origin. (Art. 1, degree of Feb. 20, 1931, see p. 157.)
Fresh vegetables. including potatoes. also 1hun!bs and unr oted cutt-inigs, except grapevine cuttings. from Egypt, Cyprus, England, Irelaind. Denimiark. Swedon, Norway, Belgium, Netherlaids. or Luxembourg, only when aec-ompanied by a certificate of origin issued by competent authority of the country of origin, and authenticated by the Greek consular official. (Art. H. decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see p. 156.)
Plant materials prohibited by article 1 of the decree of April 14, 1927, may be imported from any foreign country through the port of Piraeus for the special scientific institutions of Greece when accompanied by a certificate of origin, under a special order of the Ministry of Agriculture, subject to disinfection or other necessary measures. (Art. 5, decree of Apr. 14. 1927, see p. 156.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Article 2 of the decree of April 14, 1927, lists the products that. may be imported into any region of Greece from aliy foreign country without restriction (see p. 156.)
PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONs
[Decrue of Apr. 14, 1927]
ARTICLE 1. Prohibits the introduction into nonphylloxerated regions of Greece (regions free from phylloxera or suspected regions) from any foreign country (whether phylloxerated or not), as well as from phylloxerated regions of Greece, of any of the plants or plant products mentioned in article 1 of Law No. 214, namely:
(1) All varieties of grapevines, parts thereof, living or dead, including roots, stocks, cuttings, stumps. bark, leaves, grapes, lees. and in general. any fragment or refuse of grapevines, except dried grapes and grape seeds. Grape mare and wine must are not included in these provisions.
(2) Phylloxera pronymphs, nymphs, and eggs.
(3) Stakes. props. sheaves, and baskets which ha ve been used among grapevines.
(4) Animal or plant refuse or mixtures thereof.
(5) Humus and agricultural soils and any ballast composed of soil, as well as gravel and sand containing soil.
(6) Any green plant, as well as green cuttings. grafts. roots. rhiizomues, twigs, tubers, bulbs, branches, bark, rind, peelings, leaves, flowers, and fruits of garden vegetables (tomatoes, melons, cucumbers, etc.), as well as grapes.
(7) Madder and licorice (with the exceptions provid(ed for by Arts. 3 to 5).






156 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

ART. 2. Provides for the importation into any region of Greece (whether phylloxerated or not), from any foreign country, of:
(a) Raisins, grape juice, musts, and wines.
(b) Any dry seeds (grains), such as wheat and other cereals, as well as legmininous and other similar seeds.
(c) Fresh fruit, such as apples, pears, oranges, lemons, bananas, etc., without twigs or leaves. These fruits do not include grapes. the importation of wldch is prohibited into nonphylloxerated or suspected regions if they are from foreign countries, or from phylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece. (For citrus fruits see decree of Feb. 27, 1931.)
(d) Dried fruits, such as walnuts, Indian walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, chestnuts, figs, prunes, dates, pistachios, pine cones, beans, etc., if free from earth; also dried truffles, mushrooms, and peanuts, likewise free from earth.
(e) Dried medicinal plants.
(f) Dried plants, whether powdered or not, for tanning, such as pine, Oak, and acacia.
(g) Dried gallnuts in general, acorns and dried leaves for tanning, from sumac, rushes, etc.
(h) Dried straw and hay as stock feed, dried industrial grasses in general, whether manufactured or not, such as straw, rushes, esparto grass, broomcorn, and other similar materials, as well as dried leaves and flowers.
(i) Lumber in general, and dried woods, with or without bark.
(j) Agricultural and industrial products and by-products, such as preserved fruits, pressed oil-bearing seeds, olive pits, and the like, with the exception of pressed grape hulls.
(k) Dried and green sea plants, not mixed with earth or other plants; clean sand for any purpose, porcelain earth, soap earth, or any earth for industrial or metallurgical purposes.
ART. 3. Provides for the introduction of garden vegetables, bulbs, potatoes, cuttings without roots (except grapevine cuttings) from Egypt, Cyprus, England, Ireland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Netherlands, or the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, when accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by competent authority of the country of origin, the certificate to be authenticated by the Greek consular official at the place of purchase or at the port of embarkation. The certificate shall enumerate the kinds of products included in the shipment, their weight, their origin (country), and the fact that they are not from greenhouses or farms where grapevines have been cultivated. Cuttings must be packed without soil. Certificates from foreign countries must be prepared in French or be officially translated into French or Greek.
ART. 4. Provides, exceptionally, for the importation from foreign countries into nonphylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece, of cuttings and unrooted grafts free from soil, after request by the importer to the Ministry ef Agriculture, under the following conditions:
(a) By special order from the Ministry of Agriculture, in each case, to the domestic customs and postal authorities.
(b) Subject to previous disinfection at any of the customs or post offices authorized in article 7, in the manner prescribed in article 6, at the expense of the importer.
ART. 5. Provides for the importation from any foreign country or from any region of Greece (whether phylloxerated or not) of any of the articles mentioned in article 1 through the port of Pirseus, for the special scientific institutions of the States, subject to the following conditions:
(a) When accompanied by the certificate of origin prescribed by article 3 in the case of shipments from foreign countries, or by the certificate prescribed in article 8 if of domestic origin. Certificates from foreign countries must be prepared in French, or be officially translated into French or Greek.
(b) By special order of the Ministry of Agriculture (subject to the favorable opinion of the phytopathological board) to the domestic customs and health officials, requiring disinfection or other measures deemed necessary.
APT. 6. The disinfection of the materials mentioned in article 4 shall be effected, after separating the materials from their packing, by immersing them in water at a temperature of 530 C. for 5 minutes, and afterwards for a few seconds in a I percent solution of copper sulphate, then rinsing them in clean water and setting them in a shady place to dry. The packing material will be destroyed by burning or be thrown into the sea.





19:13 SERVICES AND) H111G ULATOR ANNMlNCy1l :~~ 157

ART. 7. The it1ithorized1 custom 01115 p1(lost oficos for Iho oe enrY a in dishlfec"tion or H ie a ri idIes, julentioned in article 4 are: T11e eistouizs o1114 evs al Pi raeus oil(d Patros. ilnd thle post offices at Pir'aeus, Athenls, aIl 1111 at rs, ill a'11,ordlliie Nwith the provisions of" 1hat article.
Awi'. S. 1)oiiiest ic restrid ionis.

REG ION S FREt,'E FROM 1P1IlY LA)OXElR A8

1 All ancient (1'reece, except (a1) the l1ovifl(ces of 1llaissal, Tyriiavw L a('id( Agyj.N~a in the Nome of Larissa ; ( b) thle I 518fld of AInolgos.
2. The island of (Crete.
3. Epirus, except the 1l:Iarcliy of Konltza.

REGIONS S LISPECTEl) OF P11 YLIA )XERA

1. The former coirmunes of G onna anid Olympus ill the l)fw)inlce of Tyrnavos.
2. The former (oniiiiiiijles of Nesson aiid Antiibelakia inl thle piwovi1nce of La,, r is sa.
3. Thle foriiiet comniiiiies of* Eury'Viiili o11( 1\85t h~liaiia ill thle l)OI1Cof A gyl a.
4. The regions of t ie( comninniji ics of Aiiiorgos. A l('mi,81( Ka iipta oil the island of Xniorg(1os, is Nvell as the follovilig- nei-ghborig islands:Ku fonlesia, I)0n01151, Schii 10115, 1 erakia, Mleriiaes. a imdKn s
5. The island of Lenmios.
). The part of Macedonia comprised between the boundaries of Epirus aind the Nomies of Trikka hi aind Larissa andl a line beginin-g from the southern part of Lake Kastoria, following the course of River Aliakom-ton as falr aIs the Convenit of St. Nikantor ( Zanipourdas) passig through the villages of La,-zacrades, Gl~ykovon, the in of Hadjig-ogos, then through the villages of Liii-iades, Selos. Skamnia, Karya,-, S8kotin)a, and finishing at the seacoa1st at Skai $ k otin als.
PH YLLOXERATEI) REGIONS

1. The whole of Thrace.
2. The whole of Macedonia, except the region indica-ted under G i-egiofls suspected of Phylloxera.
13 The province of KIt inAirs
4. The Noiies of Sanmos, ('hlios, Lesbos (except the isla iid ol ,enimios, Nvli; It has been lroclaillle suspected of phylloxera).
5. The former commune of Ai1gyialia on the island of Arnorgos.
6The former commune of Travos ill the p)rovincee of Tyriia.vos.
7. In the p~rovinlce of Larissa. the former communes of Larissa. Arienioi, Kronnou, Otichiston, Sykourion, afid Fakion. that is, the whole of the p~rovince, except the former conimunies of lNesson and knibhikia, wvhichi have been proclaimed suspected of phylloxera.
8. The former commune of 1)otion in the province of Agyia,1 (Decree, of Aug,1. 22, 1929.)

IM-PORTATION OF ('ITRus, FRUITS PROHIBITED EXCEPTr I To T HRACE ANI) MACEDONIA
The importation into Greece is prohibited ( except into the dleparM-flents of Macedonia anid TraceY) of hemns, oranges, amid ot-hiei citirus fruiits in order to prevent the introduction of the coccid Chrysomphalus. (Decree of Feb. 27, 1931.)

11ESTRICTiO-Ns oN TIllE IMPORtTATION OF COTTONN AN) C o1'TONSEED

ARTICLE 1. The importation of cottonseed into Greece is not, p~ermitted1 111 fss the seed has been (July disinfected. Tfhe (lisinlectioli imi1st be cel fied lby competent authorities of the country of origini. The cerificote in ust b~e visaied by the Greek cons5ul. ln the absence of such a certificate cot toiiseedl may not b)-cleared through the customs.
The imp)ortation of' ingrinied cottonl inlto GIreece is lbslhit ely prohlibitedl.
In order to hirevelit the iioduct iou of the p111k bollwormi of cotton (Pectinoph ora qo,' sypic11a Saunmders ) ito Trocl.;(e aind Ahicedloiiia the iniportation is prohibited into those Departments of cottonseed and unginned cotton,






158 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,'

not only from foreign countries, but also from any other Department of Greece, Exceptionally, the importation of cottonseed is permitted by scientific establishments for scientific purposes and after being subjected to proper disinfection. (Decree of Feb. 20, 1931.)
Within the term "duly disinfected" in article 1 may be included vacuum disinfection with carbon disulphide or hydrocyanic acid gas, provided that the disinfection is effected in accordance with the rules of the exporting country and is deemed efficacious. (Letter from the chief, section of phytopatholoy, Ministry of Agriculture of Greece to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Apr. 14, 1932.)
B.P.Q.-348. JANUARY 12, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
This summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Chile has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the original text of Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924, on the application of provisions concerning the phytosanitary police (Decreto-ley sobre aplicaci6n de las disposiciones relativas a la Policia Sanitaria Vegetal); section 1 of Decree No. 105, of February 11, 1925, regulating Decree-Law No. 177 on phytosanitary police (Reglamento del decreto-ley sobre Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) ; and subsequent decrees promulgated by the Ministry of Agriculture and Industry of Chile (Ministerio de Agricultura e Industria), and reviewed by the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal of that Ministry.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consulted for the exact text.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.
BAsIc LAw
The law of phytosanitary police, Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924, effective February 1, 1925, declares (art. 1) that weeds, injurious animals, and in general, diseases of cryptogamic or animal origin will be deemed plant pests and will be the objects of sanitary measures. Article 2 provides for the introduction of plants, cuttings, seeds, fruits, or any other plant product only, through authorized ports. Article 3 provides that such plants and plant products offered for importation shall be inspected in the customs by the phytosanitary service (Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal), and in case they are infected or are suspected of being infected any of the following measures may be ordered: Disinfection, quarantine, return to point of departure, confiscation, or destruction.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Seeds, plants, or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insects
named in Decree No. 105, article 5, a and b. (See p. 160.)
Rooted grapevines from any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, d, and Decree
No. 2921, May 27, 1929. See p. 160.)
Peach trees from the United States. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, e.) Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, f. See p. 160.) Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5, g. See p. 160.)
Fresh plant products capable of introducing fruit flies. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5, h, and Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930. See p. 160.)
Fruits infested with Aspidiotus perniciosus or Diaspis pentagona. (Decree
No. 105, art. 5, i. See p. 160.)
Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928. See p. 161.) Potatoes. (Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931. See p. 163.)





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 159

IMPORTATION RIESTIRICTED
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRE)
Seeds if not infested by any of the insects 1 nmed(l ill 'rli-le 5 (a1) 4 I)ecree
No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 1%0.)
Plants or parts thereof if noti, in e'st(ed by anIy of tihe insects i1n aed(l in article
5 (b) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p1. 160.)
Bulbs, tubers, or roots free from parasites (heenied injurious. (Art. 5 (g)
of Decree No. 105, Feb. 11, 1925. See p. 160.)
Fresh fruits from the United States if free fromin the scale inseoits A.spidiotus
pernicioNus anl Diaspis p (ntagona, a( i iccoinmpanied by i certific te attesting origin in a district free froni Mediterranean fruit fly :and vis;aed by Chilean consul. (Decrees No. 105, art 5 (i), Feb. 11, 1925, and No 12,
Sept. 4, 1930. See pp. 160, 161, and following.)
Alfalfa, clover, and other forage seeds containing less than 200 seeds of
Cuscuta per kilogram. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (j), Feb. 11, 1925. See p. 160.) Straw packing to be sterilize(d and certifie(l accordingly. ( Decree No. 2526,
Aug. 28, 1928. See p. 161.)
Oranges and Inangoes from IBralzil. (Decre No. 1971. July 12, 1928.
See p. 161.)
IMPORTATION UITNRESTRICTED OF REGULATED
Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cilinnaminon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, a n(l pimento: No inspoction0 certificate require(l. If importe(l in tin ctns may enter any port without inspection. If found infested with pests, subject to the general regulations of Decree No. 105.
(Decree No. 450. Aug. 6, 1926. See p. 161.)
Bananas, plantains, pineapples, dates, avocados, and Pa:nma ,'oconuts without
inspection through certain ports, but subject to inspection at other ports.
(Decree No. 560, Sept. 21, 1926. See p. 161.)

SITMMARY OF THE GENERAL l:RTULA'TIONS
(Decree No. 105, sec. 1, Feb. 11, 1925)
DECLARATION OF PLANT PESTS
ARTICLE 1. Plant diseases of cryptogaminic or aniiiial origin, as wvll as injurious animals and weeds, which can be regarded as plant pests, will be so declared by decree. The office of plihytopathological inspection service will indicate the procedure to be followed in each case.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
ART. 2. Plants, including seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, anld other plant products capable of introducing any agricultural pest into Chile may be imported only through the ports of Valp:a raiso, Talcahuano, and Los Andes; if imported by mail they may enter through the post oflices at those ports and at Santiago.
DECLARATION AND CERTIFICATE RbEQUIREI)
ART. 3. The importer in Chile shall furnish to tihe customs a written decla mation indicating:
(a) Name and address of importer:
(b) Purpose for which the material is intended;
(c) Country of origin;:
(4) Locality where the material will be planted or sown.
The declaration shall be accompanied(l by a health certificate issued( by the competent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective consul of Chile.

CONFISCATION OF PASSENGERS' UNLAWFUL BAGGAGE
ART. 4. Passengers who carry in their lggage any plants, see(lds, fruits, or other product subject to inspection shall declare them to the captain of the vessel. Customs inspectors shall confiscate all plant products whose clandestine imnportation is attempted.






160 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

4 ?IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
ART. 5. The importation is prohibited of:
(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested by any of the following-named insects: Sitotroga cerealella, Bruchus obtectus, B. quadrimaculatus, B. rufimnanus, B. ohinensis, B. signaticornis, B. lentis, and 8permophagus pectoralis.
(b) Plants or parts thereof upon which the following-named insects are shown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pentagon, Euproctis o1hrysorrhoea, Porthetria dispar.
(c) Potatoes (Solanum tuberoswumn). (See Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931.)
(d) Rooted grapevines, whatever their origin may be.
NoTrE.-Decree No. 2921, May 27, 1929, prohibits the importation of vine stocks from any country, but permission may be obtained, if conditions to be later established by the services of viticulture and oenology and of plant sanitary police (policia sanitaria vegetal) are observed, for the importation of vine stocks resistant to phylloxera. The customs will exercise special supervision to prevent the importation of plants from countries infested with phylloxera and will extend such supervision to the whole cargo (Diario Oficial, Santiago de Chile, June 11, 1929, from abstract in International Bulletin, Plant Protection III: Sept. 9, 1929, p. 135).
(e) Peach trees from the United States of America, since it is impossible to demonstrate (or establish) the existence of the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little peach.
(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. To permit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all their soil for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.
(g) Bulbs, tubers, or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shown to exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.
(h) Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonly known as "fruit flies ": Rhagoletis pomonella, R. cingulata, C(ontarinia pyrivora, Epochra canadensis. Ortalis (Tephritis) cerasi, Geratitis capitata, Dacas oleae, Trypeta ludens, T. acidusa, Tephritis tryoni, and others. A decree shall determine the cases and the classes of fruits deemed to be comprehended in the prohibitions referred to in this section. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930.)
(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus pernicious and Diaspis pentagon. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930.)
(j) Alfalfa, clover, or other seeds which contain more than 200 seeds of Cuscuta per kilogram. In cases where more than the greatest permitted percentage is found the importer must elect relading the seed upon the vessel or have it cleaned in an establishment equipped with adequate machinery. In the latter case the seed will be subject to the supervision of the phytopathological inspection service, and cannot be withdrawn, in whole or in part, without the written authority of the same service, provided that the percentage of Cuscuta, after the seed has been cleaned, is less than 200 seeds per kilogram. The residuum shall be destroyed by fire.
The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is not limited, and consequently others may be listed in subsequent orders.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED MATERIAL
ART. 6. If the phytopathological inspection service discovers any of the conditions set forth in article 5, making it necessary to prohibit importation, the chief of that service is authorized to order the return to the point of departure or the destruction of the plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits which it is attempted to import.
ART. 7. Not applicable.

TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMED NECESSARY
ART. 8. Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the importation of which is not prohibited by article 5. may be subjected to the following procedures:
(a) Quarantine of suspected or infected consignments pending final decision.
(bi) Disinfection in the manner prescribed by the phytopathological inspection service.
All expenses thus incurred will be borne by the interested persons.





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 161

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
COFFEE, TEA, YERBA MATE, RICE, CHICORY, SAFFRON, MUSHROOMS, CINNAMON,
CLOVES, CUMIN, PEANUTS, CACAO, AND PIMIENTO-INSPECTION CERTIFICATE NOT
REQUIRED
Since these products are exclusively for food purposes no inspection certificate is required.
They may be imported in tin cans through any port of Chile without inspection.
Rice, cumin, peanuts, and cacao may be imported without restriction through the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, and Taltal, but shipment thence to southern ports is prohibited.
These products may be imported thiroughi the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and Corral, subject to inspection.
If any of these products are found to be infested with pests, whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general provisions of the respective law and regulations. (Decree No. 450, Aug. 6, 1926.)
Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to inspection. (Decree No. 143, Mlar. 16, 1927.)
The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestricted entry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, etc., is the Department of Chanaral and the unrestricted reshipment of these products is permitted between the sports included in this zone. (Decree No. 1080, Apr. 25, 1928.)

BANANAS, PLANTAINS, PINEAPPLES, DATES, AVOCADOS, AND PANA-MA, COCONUTS1IPORTATION REGULATED
Free importation of those products is permitted through the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, Taltal, and Chianaral, and subject to, inspection through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and C'orral. (Decree No. 560, Sept. 21, 1926.)

ORANGES3 AND MANGOES FROM BRAZIL-ENTRY AUTHORIZED THROUGH PORTS OF THE CENTRAL ZONE
Shipments of these fruit's must b~e accompanied by certificates issued by the official plant quarantine service of Brazil, visaed by the Chilean consul, and subject to inspection on arrival. (Decree No. 1971, July 12, 1928.)

CORN IN THE EAR AND B3ROOMCOR N-IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
The importation is prohibited of corn in the ear, or parts thereof, and of broomcorn or sorgo intended for the manufacture of brooms, but shelled corn an~d sorgo seed, if thoroughly clean andl free from fragments of cobs and stalks, may be imported. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928.)

STRAW PACKING TO BE STERILIZED
No goods of whatever origin may be imported if packed in straw, grasses, or stems of any class of plants: Pro rhtcd, That wines or liquids in bottles with straw casings, may be imported if accompanied by official certificates. issued by competent officials of the country of origin, attesting that the straw casings have been sterilize(] with steam for at least 15 minutes at 1150 C., or disinfected ini a closed chamber from which the gas cannot escape, at a temperature of not less than 200, with a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall contain at least 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde at the rate of 500 cc per 20 m3' of space.
Goods arriving without the above-mentioned certificate of disinfection shall be disinfected as prescribed, and all expenses incurred shall be charged against the person directly concerned. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928.)

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING FRUIT FLIES
The regulations promulgated by Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930, follow:
ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant products, whatever their origins, which are capable of carrying -fruit flies. Especially






162 BURE-kU ()F PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

included In this prohibition are all kinds of fresh fruits, and the vegetables: Tomatoes, eggplants, squash, green. peas, and peppers.

ENTRY PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING A DISTRICT FREE FROM
FRUIT FIJES
ART. 2. The following products are excepted from the above prohibition:
(a) Fresh fruits froin the State of California'; (b) bananas (including plantains), pineapples, coconuts, dates, avocados, watermelons, and cucumbers from Ecuador; (c) fruits indicated under (b) and vegetables from Peru and Brazil, on condition that they originate in a zone declared free from fruit fly by the plant quarantine authorities of the said countries; (d) fruits from Argentina, except the orange, on condition that they, likewise, proceed from a zone declared free from fruit fly by the plant quarantine authorities of that country.
ART. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zone free from fruit fly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine authorities of the country of origin, which certificate shall accompany the shipping papers or bill of lading, and which will indicate in each case the kind, quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree. This certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chilean consul in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shall accompany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruit while it remains on board.
ART. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, indicated in (a), (b), (c), and (d) of article 2, are subject to the following conditions:
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaral entry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitary certificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also stated that the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by competent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respective Chilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3, and it will also be required that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the plant quarantine service of Arica, after inspection made on board by that official.

AUTHOWZED PORTS OF ENTRY
The insp ctlon made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports where there are no inspectors of the 'Plant quarantine service; but in port's where there are officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection has been made at the place where the products were unladen.
(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decree may be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intended exclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region included between Pueblo Hundido, and the northern boundary.
(c) The products named in article 2, with the exception of avocados, watermelons, and cucumbers, may be entered south of Chanaral only through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso,, Los Andes, San Antonio, Talcahuano, and Valdivia, after the inspection established by the law of the plant quarantine service and upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.
ART. 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables of whatever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirement than the certificate prescribed by article 3, provided that those products are Intended for consumption in the Departments of 'Magellanes, Niatales, and Tierra del Fuego, their relading being definitely prohibited for the north of these departments.
ORANGES FROM ECUADOR,
ART. 6. The importation is permitted of oranges from Ecuador into the zone included between Arica and Taltal, provided that their origin from a fruitfly-free zone is attested by a certificate from the plant quarantine authority of the country of origin, in accordance with the provisions of article 3.
7 See caption Fresh Fruits from the United States, p. 163.





1933 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 163

OLIVES IN BRINE NOT RESTRICTED
ART. 7. Olives preserved in brine, from the Department of Arica, may be exported or reshil)ped without any restriction.

TRANSPORTATION WITHIN THiE EPUIUBLIG
ART. S. The following products of the Department of Arica: Fresh l ves, oranges, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, squash. watermeloii.s, melons, peas, chick peas and vegetables in general, mnay depart from the port of Arica, after inspection made in that port by olicials o(l the plant quiarantine service. and provided that they are not found to be infested witli the fruit 11iy.v, a"ld that they are intended solely for the zo(ne included between Arica a(tii Taltal, inclusive.
ART. 9. The products named in the preceding article, which are from Peru or Bolivia, and which have the right to depart from the port of Arica in virtue of effective treaties, shall comply with the requiremIents prescribed for Chilean products for the purpose of their exportation to the zone included between Arica and Taltal.
ART. 10. The products mentioned inll articles S 'nIld 9 shall be transported in motor launches engaged exclusively in service between Arica and Taltal; but this transportation may also be effected onil the regular steamship lines on condition that they unlade the entire products at Taltal, their reshipment by rail being prohibited to ports or localities situated south of Taltal.
ART. 11. Steamship companies are prohibited from transporting to any port of the country fresh fruits and the other products nmied in article 1 of the present decree, and the crew and passengers shall not be allowed to have or to embark those products; but the transportation of the products excepted from the prohibition in article 2 may be effected.
ART. 12. The railroad Longitudinal Norte shall observe the provisions of the preceding article for the transportation of fruit in trains.
ART. 13. Steamship companies, railroads, especially the lines entering the country, transportation companies, trucks, automobiles, etc., are obliged to make known to the passengers the provisions of the present decree and to require the declarations established in article 4 of the general regulations of the plant quarantine service. Infractions of this provision will be sanctioned in accordance with the provisions of article 12 of the said law.
ART. 14. Vessels that embark fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products whose importation is prohibited by article 1 shall not keepl) these products on board if they have to land at any port south of Taltal; but if those products should be intended exclusively ais food for their passengers and crews they may be retained on board, provided that they be kept in locked enclosures while the vessels remain in port. In no case may tomatoes, mangoes. cherimoyas. guavas, or other tropical fruits be kept on board. unless expressly excepted from the prohibition to enter, as ordered in the present decree.
An inspector of the plant quarantine service will confirm compliance with this provision and the vessel shall not be received if this requirement is not complied with.
ART. 15. Maritime and land transportation companies. merchants and private persons who contravene the provisions of the present decree will incur the sanctions established in article 12 of the law of the plant quarantine service.
ART. 16. Provisions dictated prior to this d(late, contrary to the present decree, are revoked.

FRESH FRUITS FROM THE UNITED STATES
Fresh fruits may be imported into Chile from any State of the United States, provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the competent American authorities, affirming that the fruit originated in a district free from the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata ). the certificate to be visaed by a Chilean consul. (Minister of Agriculture of Chile through the American consul, Santiago, Chile, Oct. 28, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROIIIBITED
From the date of this decree the importation is prohibited of potatoes from foreign sources, to prevent the introduction of the wart diseasee (Chrysophlyctis endobiotica). (Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931.)






164 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

P.Q.C.A.-299, Revised, Supplement No. 1. FEBRUARY 17, 19.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
HOPS PROHIBITED FROM COUNTRIES IN WHICH DOWNY MILDEW OR MOSAIC OOCUR
According to an abstract published in the International Bulletin of Plant Protection, VI: 12, December 1932, p. 206, the proclamation of March 27, 1930, (see P.Q.C.A.-299, revised, p. 4, caption Importation of Hops Prohibited) has been amended by proclamation No. 215. of May 5, 1932, to read as follows:
It is forbidden to import into Australia plants of the genus Hunmuls coming from any country whatever. Importation is authorized, however, of the flower parts known commercially as hops, provided that they come from a country where the downy mildew, P&eudoperonospora humuli, or the mosaic, are not known to occur." LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 2. FEBRUARY 17, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GUATEMALA
FLOWER AND VEGETABLE SEEDS SHIPPED BY MAIL-CERTIFICATION NOT REQUIRED
According to an abstract published in the International Bulletin of Plant Protection, VI: 12. December 1932, page 206, the decree of June 4, 1932, prescribes that the phytosanitary certificate established by the decree of August 29. 1919 (see p. 3. P.Q.C.A.-314, Guatemala). will no longer be required in the case of flower and vegetable seeds sent in small quantities by mail.
For every other consignment, including potatoes for food or seed, the consuls of Guatemala will require the presentation of phytosanitary certificates before the customary permit can be issued. LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-321, Supplement No. 1. FBRUARY 17, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, SWEDEN
EXEMPTIONS TO IMPORT POTATOES FROM THE UNITED STATES MAY BE GLkNTED
According to a notice published in Commerce Reports. January 14, 1933, page 28,. the State Plant Protection Institute has been authorized, under a Swedish Royal letter of November 18, 1932, to grant exemptions from the import prohibition on potatoes from America, as well as from the certification requirements applying to all imports of potatoes, and those affecting imports of certain living plants and parts of plants.
Such exemptions are only to be granted after test in each individual case, and under such conditions as the Institute nmay find necessary to impose.
Thlie above modities the decree of January 11, 1927 (see P.Q.C.A.-321, pp. 4 and 5). LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quardntine.


B.P.Q.-350. MARCH 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAY

The following sumnary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Kingdom of Norway has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and' others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to that country.
This summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. from translations made by Paul Vogenitz, Post Office Department, and Mr. Shaw. of the texts of Royal Resolutions promulgated under the law of July 21. 1916, to combat insect pests and plant diseases (Lov av 21 juli 1916 om bekjaempelse av skadeinsekter og
plantesygdomne), and reviewed by the Norwegian Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway).





19,3:3] SERVICE AND 111'4GULATORY 165

The inforinatiou contiiiied ill t1jis circular is believed to be coi'iect, and complete 111) to lbe tilile of pi-epal.'Itioll, but, it is llot ilitelldcd to be us'ed independently oI', 11or as a Sllb stlitllto for, t1w orig-imil, lexts (A' t1w (1miraiiiiiie resolutions', '111d it-, is not to be ilitelpl-eted '1'; v '1111 bol-iill ive. 1,110 resolutiolis t1leinselves sliould be cowulted for t1w ox.t( I text.
Lj :j," A.
("Iticl, (Al* RIII-c(lit.
BASIC PLANT QUARANTINE LAW

Under the law oI' July 21, 1910, the Kiiil,- oI' _Nor\vtY is julboi1zo, d to I)i-()illulgate regulatiolls 0) c4)1llb'1t insect pests '111d I)I'llit disease.-4. wilen

1-MPORTATION 014' PLANTS, BuLBS, AND SFEDS NOT RESTRICTED
Except as indicated below, tliere ii-e uO plint (Iiiii-,mline restrictions ulwil, tll(, im portation ilito Nonva ot, 11111'sei' stock ot'llel. Id"llits, bull)", '111d Seeds grown ill aild expol-ted fl-oill tjl(' 1"llited states.

I-MPORTAT'10N PIMIJIBITI-1) OF G00SEBERRY I)LANTS AND GO08FIlEERIES

Goosehcri-y bwslie -4 ind fi.c.,41 Imly ll()t )w fillported 171-oill oll '
foreign couiiti'y inl4j t1w Deptitincio 14' :111d Fjonl'llw (w intf) Hie d'paj-tIlielits, fill-Ifier ]lot-tll. (RoY'11 decice o I ept. 'S" 11916.)

POTATOES NOT, ADMITT.i) Coll-NTMES IN WHIC11 I'0TAT0 NN'Awr EXISTS
Potatoes may be inipoi-ted into -NorwaA, oiilN* fI ],onl cf)TI1111-io" furnish satisfactoi-v evidence that potato Nvart, Chr!/. opltlycti.s cadobiotica (Syacltytriunt. ciWobioticimi), does not exist there aiid lias not existed tliere during the past 6 yezi rs. (Shice there are small local 8i-e,is inf(, cte(l with potato wart disease ill sevoi-t-d '8mtes of the United States tll(' impoi-lotion into Not-way of potatoes grown ill United 'States is pl-ollibited. Decisil)ll of t1le Norwegian Department of Agi'icullure per flie Royal Norwejail Le-ation, lettet- of F(J). 18, 1931.)
Each sihipineW of pofiitoes must be accolliptallied by 111 illspectioll cortiflo-.8tel attested by a Noi-wedaii (-onsul. affirining that tlie potatoes, are f ree f roin pot,,1to wart, the potato tuber moth, and the sugmr beet noniatode. Ea(1-b shipment is Subject to illspeetioll "it the customs port of clearance ill 'Noi-way. (Royal re..;oliitioii of Fob. 1* 1 925, as aniemled by fliose of Mar. 20, 1925. Jail. 13 in(] Oct. 5. 1928.)

SEFDS 0F PICKA AN-D PINUS TO BE 'STAINED
Seed of all Species of Ilico(i and Pinu. froiu forei-ii countHes except tliose of Pinus conibra. and 1'. -Obirim,. "11,111 be treated by the custoills Nvith a, stlillinlg solution before, release for impoi-ttitioll.
The Seeds must be packed ill sacks steiieile(l in i ed Vt(-ii1aiid,',k Fro (foreil ll seeds) oil eacli side of the Sacks, parallel to flie in letters-, 2 inelies
high, "lild the 11-hole inscription sluill he at least 20 iiielies Imig.
Oil small sicks the inscription inay fwciip tNvo lines or be iwido ill sm,111or letters ill olle lille. In Sucli n (.,Is(,, the ill'Irk lilies[ oc("Ilpy It le'I'st tilree fourths of t1w length of t1w sack. Sacks not pr()pevIy marked oil .Il'rivil will be so marked- by the eust-onis.
Before reletl se by Ole cil"toills, the seod.,; slizill be cobwed ill ill(' f(Illm-dill." ni.aiiner : At different ploce,; oil the. sn(,-k -,mail (pimitilies of :i s(ilutioil of eosill (S pgrai'll" eo sijl dissolved ill 1 lifer of 11collol) ,411.111 be illjooed witli ,I syrin-e: 150 ce ()I' solution must lq used foi- (,,wli 10 k (-)I' seed. Mtoyal decreo of -Mar. 13, 1914. )

CO-NDITION-8, GOVEICNING Till,- 1NIP01tTATION OF CLOVER AND ri\ioTuY SEED
In Coll liec t- i on Nvilli Ilw RoN-21 r(-,olution of Mit-cb -1. 1927. concornim, the provisions of t1w Law ot' June 27, 1924. Ole importation is prohibited of Seeds of red clover, w1iiie clovoi% alike. and tiiiiotli '. uidess i poi-init pre s(,,ribing the eoudition's of elit-l-v luis first beell oblaille(t fi-oill tll(, -Norwe-i"Ill Department of Agriculture O:.4o. Niwwn -) pi-escribing, Ole
conditions of entry.






166 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [iJanuary-March,

Until further notice these conditions are as follows:
Import permits will be issued only for red clover, alsike clover, and timothy seed grown in northern or central Sweden or Finland. If a sufficient quantity of these seeds cannot be obtained from these countries the question of admitting such seeds from other countries will be considered.
White-clover seed grown in northern or central Europe will be admitted.
Applications for import permits shall indicate the germinability and weed content of the seeds offered for entry.
To obtain such permits the seeds must meet the following requirements (table 2):

TAutx 2.-Germinability required aiid weed seed content allowed in imported clover and timotzy seed

Minimum Maximum
Kind of seed germina- weed conbility tent

Percent Percenst
Red clover ------------------------------------------------------------------ 90 0.50
Alsike----------------------------------------------------------------------- 90 .75
White clover -------------------------------------------------------- 90 -----Timothy ------------------------------------------------------------ 95 .75


The control station concerned will be advised by the department concerning the import permit and the reported percentages.
Samples will be taken by the customs service in accordance with the law of June 27, 1924.
The seeds will not be released until their origin has been established. (Proclamation of Dec. 16, 1930.)

SAMPLING OF SEEDS
The following regulations have been promulgated by the Norwegian Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway) under the law of June 27, 1924, for the sampling of seeds:
SEcTON 1. In view of section 4 of the above-mentioned law, samples shall be taken by an official of the customs service or of the control station, or by another public sampler.
SEC. 2. Samples taken from imports of merchandise shall, if not taken by a public sampler, be drawn in the presence of two witnesses, who must declare that the samples were drawn in conformity with the provisions of sections
3 to 8.
SEC. 3. Samples are to be taken as soon as possible, and at the latest within 8 days of the receipt of the merchandise. In case of rain, care must be taken that no moisture reaches the samples. No samples are to be drawn from sacks which have become wet or damaged. Such sacks shall be set aside from the remainder of the lot, for eventual separate sampling.
SEC. 4. A sample shall, as far as possible, represent an average sample of the lot involved. One average sample may not, however, represent a lot of more than 10,000 kg of seed corn or other large grain for sowing, or 5,000 kg of seed of small grain. For larger shipments an average sample shall be taken for every 10,000 kg of large grains or 5,000 kg of seeds.
Smc. 5. Concerns the sampling of stock tonics and artificial fertilizers.

SEC. G; (1) SHIPME-NTS OF SEEDS IN SACKS
In shipments up to 10 sacks, small samples are drawn from top, middle, and bottom of each sack with the hands or a suitable instrument. In larger shipments, small samples are drawn in the same manner from every fifth sack, but from at least 10 sacks.
The small samples must be thoroughly mixed together on a dry, clean floor or in a suitable container.
Out of the average sample so obtained, two or more samples of the aforementioned size are to be taken for analysis. Any finer or thinner parts present easily fall to the bottom. That this shall occur also in the samples for analysis





S LRI'i AN KGVk~h:YAN.N0T7'NCF1 M EMS$ (

in the same proportion ( as it happens in the original alv(rae s iple must receive accurate attention.
The size of the sample for analysis should 1e: Speeies of russ. beets, carrots, at least 100(r: clover, turnips., kuhilrnbi, awl the like, at loust 15in; corn, peas, and other large seeds, at leat4 -500-.
The samples are placed in linen habas or strong double paper ha -s and are then sealed ind iiarked to show:
(a) The designation of the meorchan dise;
(b) The seller's unme (or, in (ase the sample is taken by the eustonis Qervire, the importer's nane) ;
(c) The size of the shipment and any special marks or numbers
(d) Place and dlate of saiplin;
(e) Name of simpler.
One sample is sent to the computeilt district contldo station : the other is retained or sent to the seller or importer, as the case may be.

(2) 'UNPACKED SHIPMENTS OF SEED
From different places and deptis in the shipment of seed at least 10 siall samples are drawn; these are blended and handled as inflicted in paragraph
(1).
If the seed is particularly damp and it is of importance to get a dependable record of the water content of the merchandise, a special (extra) sample must be sent in to determine the water content. This sample must he packed in a light container (glass, tin hox). Such a saiple is not suitable for determining the germinability, as this may have been inpaire(l en route.

IMPORTATION OF ELMS PROHIBITED

Until further notice 4raphium almi Schwarz will be regarded as a fungus which is dangerous to plants, shrubs, or trees.
The importation of plants of any species of the genus Ulmus is prohibited. (Royal resolution of Mar. 21, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF FLOwER BULBS PROHIBITED
Until further notice, the importation of flower bulbs from foreign countries is prohibited unless permission is granted by the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway). (Royal resolution of Apr. .9, 1032)

IMPORTATION OF IloP PlANTS oR CUTTINaiS PROHIBITED
AiRTICLE 1. Until further notice, the fungus Pscudopcronospor h Un di shall be deemed dangerous to plants, shrubs, or trees.
ART. 2. The importation of living plants or cuttings of hops Hunt alus lupulus) shall be prohibited.
ART. 3. This resolution becomes effective immediately.
Exceptions may be granted by the Department of Agriculture under eonditions prescribed by that Depart ment. (Royal resolution of Feb. 3, 1933.4

MARCII 10. 1983.
B.P.Q.-346 (Revised Mar. 10, 1931; superseding I.P.Q.-346 issued Dec. 10,
1932. an1 supplemet no. 1).
EUROPEAN CORN BORER
STATE REGULATIONS
The rec-ulations outlined below are those issued by various States subsequent to the revocation of the Federal quarantine on account of tle European corn borer. The compilation is prepared in response to requests for such inforniation but is not intended to be used independently of or as a substitute for the quarantines and is not to be interpreted as leally authoritative. The quarantines themselves should be consulted for the exact wording of legal orders. It should be understood that the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of tho United States Department of Agriculture is not iii a p(sit in to LriVe explanatory information concerning State quarantines. Inlquiries as lo the interpretation of such restrictions, or requests for the full text of order> should be addressed






168 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

to the appropriate official of the State concerned. (See list of State officials on page 170.) It is also possible that quarantine orders or revisions have been issued which have not reached the Department.

INFESTED STATES
All the States which have enacted quarantines place the regulations on the entry of the restricted articles from any part of the following States: Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia.
The Oklahoma quarantine includes Wisconsin among the States from which shipments of such articles are restricted.
The Tennessee quarantine includes Kentucky, Virginia, and Wisconsin, among the States from which shipments of such articles are restricted, and the California quarantine includes Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and Wisconsin.
The quarantines of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas apply to the 13 above-listed States, and also to any other States in which the corn borer may be found.

STATES WHICH HAVE ENACTED QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

SUMMARY OF QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
The orders in the following summary are divided ipto three groups, as the various States have issued different types of quarantine regulations.

GROUP 1. EMBARGO -NO CERTIFICATE
The State of Wyoming prohibits entirely the entry of the following articles from the infested States.
Restricted articles.-Cornstalks, corn on the cob, cobs or any other debris of corn, broomcorn, all sorghums and Sudan grass (except the clean shelled seeds of these plants), celery, beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat or rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, cosmos, zinnias, hollyhocks, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladioli and dahlias except the bulbs or corms "which are free from other plant growth whether grown or stored in the infested district."

GROUP 2. STATES ACCEPTING ONLY FEDERAL CERTIFICATES
Quarantines largely uniform have been issued by the following States which require Federal certificates for entry of the restricted articles: Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Neveda,8 Oregon," and Utah.
Restriction.s.-Cornstalks, ears, cobs, or other parts or debris of corn and broomcorn plants, or sorghums and Sudan grass (except clean, shelled corn, broomcorn seed, sorghum seed, and Sudan-grass seed) are not certified by Federal inspectors for movement from the infested States. The Colorado quarantine provides, however, that they may enter that State without certification, when manufactured or processed in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of carrying the borer.
Lima beans in the pod, green-shell beans in the pod (of the variety known as Cranberry or Horticultural), beets with tops, rhubarb,9 cut flowers, or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, gladioli, and dahlias, except the bulbs or corms without stems, are accepted by States in group 2 when certified by a duly authorized Federal inspector to be free from the borer, and are contained in a car, box, or other container to which is attached a copy of said certificate. Articles named in this paragraph may be admitted into Colorado, however, either when so certified or when manufactured or processed.

8 Embargoes formerly placed by Arizona, California, Colorado.' Georgia, Louisiana, South Dakota, and Utah have been modified (see groups 2 and 3) and a similar modification ~is pending with respect to the Nevada regulations; in the case of Oregon arrangements have been made administratively to accept certification.
9The Louisiana quarantine does not include rhubarb.






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN OUN CEMENTS 169

GROUP 3. STATE CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED ON CERTAIN PRODUCfS
Regulative quarantines, largely uniform, have been issued by the following States: Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South I akota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.
Restrictions.-Except as provi(led under subsections (1)-(3) below, the following articles are not admitted to the States in group 3 unless they have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of carrying the European corn borer:
Class (a).-Cornstalks, ears, cobs. or other parts or debris of corn or bro'incorn plants, sorghums, and Sudan grass (except clean, shelled corn," broomcorn seed, sorghum seed, and Sudan-grass seed), which have originated in the infested States.
- Except as provided under subsections (8)-(7) below, the following articles are not admitted to the States in group 3 unless they have been manufactured or processed as provided above, or unless they have been inspected by a duly authorized State or Federal inspector and certified to be free from the European corn borer, and are (ontained in a car, box, or other container to which is attached a copy of said certificate.
Class (b).-Celery, beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat or rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, cosmos, zinnias, hollyhocks, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladioli and dahlias except the roots, bulbs, or corms thereof without stems, which have been grown or stored in the infested States. The South Dakota quarantine also places these requirements on spinach.
Exceptions.-(1) The South Dakota quarantine applies to "all parts of the plant" in the case of corn and broomcorn and makes no reference to the exemption of shelled corn or seeds.
(2) The States of Florida, Mississippi, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Texas accept articles of class (a) when certified as provided above or when manufactured or processed.
(3) The Illinois and Virginia quarantines place oat and rye straw in class
(a) instead of class (b). They also provide for the admittance of seed corn on the cob in small quantities for exhibition purposes under certificate, in the case of Illinois, that it has been subjected to a temperature of 150' F. for not less than 3 hours; and in the case of Virginia, that it has been processed in such a manner as to eliminate risk of carrying the European corn borer.
(4) Celery is omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Kentucky, and Texas.
(5) Cosmos, zinnia, and hollyhock are omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Mississippi, and Texas.
(6) Oat and rye straw is omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Mississippi, and Texas.
(7) The South Carolina quarantine does not provide for the acceptance of articles of class (b) when manufactured or processed. They must be certified.

REGULATIONS VITH RESPECT TO CANADA
Shipments to Canada.-Shipments of cleaned shelled corn, either for seed or feed, and cleaned seed of broomcorn may enter Canada, if accompanied by a certificate of inspection, signed by an authorized Federal or State official, to the effect that the shipment in question is free from infestation with the European corn borer.
Shipments from Can ada.-Federal Quarantine No. 41 (revised) prohibits the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, and certain other articles, except that permits may be issued by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for the importation of broomcornn for manufacturing brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn, clean shelled corn, and clean seed of the other plants covered."
10 Not exempt under the South Dakota quarantine. See subsection (1).






170 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-Marchl,

A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined, but reference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictions on foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional.
For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, apply to Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.
For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau~ of Plant Quarantine.
Refrren-ces-The State orders of the various groups have the following titles, and information concerning the orders may be secured from the officers named:
Arizona-State entomolog-ist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12
and Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.
Arkansas-State plant board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 and'
rule 64, effective January 16, 1933.
California-Chief quarantine officer, Sacramento, Calif., Quarantine Order
No. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.
Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No.
4 (second series) as amended, effective February 17, 1933.
Florida-State plant board of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., rule 32, effective
August 16, 1932.
Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., regulation 36 (revised), effe-ctive January 12, 1933.
Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., a proclamation
by the governor, effective July 27, 1932.
Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3,
effective July 25, 1932.
Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5,
effective August 5, 1932.
Kentucky-State entomologist, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1, effective
October 10, 1932.
Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European corn borer
quarantine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.
Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., rule 49 (amended),
effective September 13, 1932.
Missouri-Plant commissioner, Jefferson City, Mo., Quarantine No. 3,
effective July 20, 1932.
Nebraska-State department of agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr., Quarantine
No. 2, effective July 29, 1932.
Nevada-State quarantine officer, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by the
governor, effective September 1, 1932. Modification proposed.
New Mexico-Head of biology, College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts,
State College, N.Mex., Quarantine No. 9, effective September 22, 1932.
Oklahoma-State plant board, Oklahoma City, Okla., plant board Quarantine No. 9 (amended), effective September 14, 1932.
Oregon-Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., Quarantine Order No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932.
South Carolina-State crop pest commission, Clemson College, S.C., Quarantine regulation on account of the European corn borer, effective October 1, 1932.
South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2
(revised), effective March 7, 1933.
Tennessee-Commissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenn., Notice of Quarantine No. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.
Texas-Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency Quarantine
Proclamation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.
Utah-Commissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No.
11 (amended), effective February 9, 1933.
Virginia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va.,
Quarantine No. 2, effective January 26, 1933.
Wash ing,,,ton-Director of ag-ricultulre, Olympia, Wash., Quarantine No. 18
(njewsris) effective January 24. 193-3.
Wiscons;in-Statfe enttomiolog-ist, Madison. Wis., Quarantine No. 4 (fourth
revision), effective Aug.-ust 19, 1932.
Wyoming-Commissioner of agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine Order
No. 5, effective November 1. 1932.









19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 171






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19331 SERVICE .\Nl) l1FGrI'I_\T()I'Y _\NN0l*N(*FMI NTS

PER'INTITS POTATO ENIPORTS FIMM SPAIN Wress lll)tiei l
2(o. 10:1".
Spaiii, iiicludiii,- Ilie v lla.,4 h(wil I() thw list ()I' colllltrie.-4
froul NvIlicIl 11my 1w sllippcd 14) 111( I-11iled Skiles. III(' 1-11iled St"It(I"s
Department. t)f A i gHcultur( 11,1s 1 "11 n.'I 11 ()f I Qual"tiltille
finds that Spaiji Im s mct :111 1 lie c(mditioii:-; (it' reu*ula I ion 2 1 if I 11( I"I I iolls Goverilill'-, tilc Impo-tatioll (11, 1,()IIIqws illt() t1w l*IliI(,(I 'Stotos. 'Spaill 11,1s 'llso) presented evidcm-c 111,11 'Splill 11)(1 IIIe ('allary ls](111(1 s (In, free fl'()Ili 1)(0,10) w ('111 111(1 w iler h1jurim is Il()t(II() dis( ,ise, '111d ius(wl pe.st NvIlicIl 11'(- to III(, ,u ates or ll()l %videly pve\-II(,1l1 ill t1lis ('1011111W -(Ill, 11ited St, Ill ( se(Ilw li( I Ile
bureau will issue. at*Wr Fohruary 1. perillits I'm. t1w (-Ill ry ()f p)tatocs gr()Nvll
iii Spain or in the (aimry I.slmids.


PENALTIES EMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

\cem-dillr to relmrt.,-4 re(-(Iived 1) v Ille bure'lli durill- tile period jailuary -1 to
3) pellaltic'.; 11:1N
Alireh ")I. (, heell illilwse(l bY tile pr()per Federal
authorities for viol'Itiolls of Ilic phmt quarantim, act, a,- f4)1Io\vs:

JAPAN ESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case (if the Uiiitcd St(itc- v. the Mercliam's (twof ]Ihici-- Trwtsport(iti(m Co.. ill tile filtel-4,1te trailspmtatioll of 3 lots of 'Ippic" fl.()Ill p)illts ill the re"11lated area to lmhits imtAde t1wreld" withmit ij) spcctioll '110 certificatioll. tile defendmit pleadefl. guilty aml Nvzt thwd 25 (,)n eacli ()f :1, (,( mits, aii(l
In the ca, (, (if the 1,111tcd st(ltcs v. Robcrt .1. (libbmis, M(milt 11(ffly. __N.J.. doitll- busilless Is "I'lle No,-;t, Pellil-lertmi. -N.J., ill t1le 111terst'.1tc, s'llipillellt
of 11111-sery stock from a lmillt in the rel,_,-ulate(l arei to I Imitit outsi(le tliere(d. withmit inspectioll "11)(1 certificatimi. the (lefemlaw plca(hd guiltY aii(l Nvzis placed oil prokitimi fm- 6 niontlis.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the ease of the United States versus the persolls listed 1)elovv, for attemptin- to smuggle W contrabaii(l. plaW material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United Stite,; customs officials Zzlt the foll()Nving ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Mr. Longmire ---------------- 1 Brownville, Tex -------------- 30 avocados with seed ------- $1)
Evaristo Yanez --------------- El Paso, Tex ---------- 4 gmavas ----------------------M rs. R. D. M artinez --------- Laredo, Tex ------------------------ 3 plants -----------------------




























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

LE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau. A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHoUs, Informational Officer.


E. R. SASSc ER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHL=, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Eastern Section, South Norwalk, Conn.; Western Section, Springfield, Ohio). L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headquarters, South Norwalk, Conn.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bolliworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Teo.). B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).I
P. A. HOIALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Warm Quarantine (Headquarters Harlingen, Teo.).
175




















U. S, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1933








S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 115 Issued Septener l!J3.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
APRIL-JUNE 1933



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------------------------- 177
Barberries and mahonias classified under black stem rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.320, revised, supplement no. 1) -...... .. ....---------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ---------------179
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46335) ------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48) -------------------------------- 178
Administrative instructions--commercially packed apples under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations (B.P.Q.-352) ------------------------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) ----------------------------------- 178
Supplementary administrative instructions-narcissus treatment and pest suppression
(B.P.Q.-353) ----------------------------------------------------------178
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 181
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46431) ------------------------------------------ 18t
Announcement relating to packing materials quarantine (no. 69) ------------------------------ 182
Amendment no. ito notice of quarantine --------------------------------------- 182
Announcement relating to seed- or paddy-rice quarantine (no. 55) ----------------------------- 182'
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46373) ----------------------------------------- 182'
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 183'
Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 183
Georgia discontinues terminal inspection --------------------------------------------------18 3
Puerto Rico inaugurates terminal inspection ----------------------------------------------- 183
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------- 18
Regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products through the mails
(B.P.Q.-351) ---------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products into It~ily (P.Q.C.A.289, supplement no. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------- 18&
Summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany (B.P.Q.-302)
(revised) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 185
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Union of South Africa (P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3) 193
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------------------------- 193
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 195QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUST
QUARANTINE (NO. 38)

P.Q.C.A.-320 (revised), supplement no. 1. JUNE 1, 1933.

BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACK STEM RUST
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

P.Q.C.A.-320, as revised August 15, 1932, is hereby modified by transferring Berberis gilgiana and B. san guina from group D to group B. The effect of
this change is td authorize permittees under this quarantine to produce and ship interstate these two additional species of Berberis to the 13 protected! States under their Federal permits.
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
5516 3 1177





178 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN
QUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OF QuA
41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORN
BROOMcORN, AND SES OF Ri~rfriT PLANTS (T. D. 46335)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CUSTO 7ashington, D.C., Apri
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 41, with revised regu on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and diseases, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, which became effective Ma 1, 1933, and supersedes all previous decisions [editions] and amendments of quarantine, is published for the information and guidance of custo ofi and others concerned.
Act. ig Corntssioner of Custom
[Then follows the full text of the quarantine and revised regular

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARA

(NO. 48)

B.P.Q.--352 Ju 2
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-COMMERCIALLY PACKED APPLES E T
JAPANESE-BEETLE-QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
Under regulation 5 of the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations, cially packed shipments of apples in any quantity" are exempt from the cation requirements applying to other lots of apples of over 15 pounds to the shipment transported from the regulated areas to outside points.
In interpretiig this provision the term "commercially packed" will icld "(a) All apples in closed barrels, boxes, or baskets, of sizes and types arily used in the apple trade;
"(b) Apples in open packages when such apples have been graded n ac ance with the official standards for apples promulgated by the United Sta Department of Agriculture or in accordance with any official grades auth i by the State in which the apples were grown and when the containers marked with such grade. The so-called 'unclassified' grade is not, h v considered a grade within the meaning of this definition, and apples i pn packages so marked are not considered commercially packed."

Chief, Bureau of Plant Qua t


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUA
(NO. 62)

B.P.Q.-353 JuNF, 26,193
SUPPLEMENTARY ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-NARCISSUS T AND PEST SUPPRESSION

The following instructions are issued to supplement circulars B.P.Q. B.P.Q.-338, and to interpret certain points on which question has arisen.
GENERAL STATEMENT
In general, the provisions of circular B.P.Q.-337 are mandatory throw In certain sections, however, such terms as "should" were used wherth recommendations were primarily for the protection of the grower-su i





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 179

vice concerning care in the use of cyanide, and p)reve ntiilig injury to the bulbs by treating at the proper time of year. In cases where the administrative instructions use the term should inspectors are justified in making exceptions where such exceptions seem necessary and where the grower lhas a full realization of the dangers or disadvantages involved.

IN SPECTIONS

The authority of iispl)ectors to refuse to make eel\vorin insp)ecti(ons in w I(,dy fields relates to instances where the fields are so fille(l with weeds aini grass as to prevent the inspector from finding eelwormi infestations sat isfacto rily.
In cases where the grower or his employees are roguing the field or sorting out culls in dormant bulbs, in advance of the inspector, the rogues and culls are to be held for the inspector's examination if hlie desires. Such rogues and culls should be destroyed as promptly as possible after exanination. One method of accomplishing such destruction is burying the bulbs deeply and covering them with quicklime and then with soil.
Dormant inspection for eelworm is especially important wvlere certain stocks are under suspicion, but where the inspector has failed to lind eelworm infestation in tie field. Some of these conditions are:
(1) Where the lot of bulbs concerned was given hot-water treatment the previous year;
(2) Where the bulbs were produced by a grower whose premises have been known to be infested in previous years;
(3) Where the bulbs were produced in the vicinity of another variety in which infestation was discovered; or
(4) Where through purchase or otherwise the complete previous history of the stock concerned is unknown.
If the number of inspectors in a State or district is not Lirge enough to enable them to examine carefully 10 percent of every lot of dormant bulbs within the State or district, such dormant inIspection may be limited to bulbs of the four special classes named above.
Dormant inspection is not required where infestation has already been found in the same lot in the field, as such hulbs must be treated in any event.
The Bureau has been asked whether there are not some conditions under which the inspector is justified in dividing unusually large blocks of a single variety, requiring treatment of an infested portion, and, in the absence of visible eelworm infestation, certifying the remainder as free from infestation without treatment. Such division is justified only when there is definite evidence that the eelworm infestation (diiscovered in the infested portion of the block is both (a) extremely scarce. and (b) definitely of the current seasoil's origin. A current season infestation in one end of a block may result from the flow of irrigation water from an infested variety past the ends of the rows of a previously uninfested variety. Where such infestation is very slight, where the location is one on which bulbs had not previously been grown, and where reasonable care has been used to avoid carrying infestation during cultivation and at other times on tools and the clothing of laborers, the inspector is authorized to make provision for the d(ligging, separate handling, and treatment of the infested portion of the field. If no eehvworm is found onil dormant inspection in the apparently uninfested sections, permits may then be issued for the latter without requiring treatment.
In no case in which either the bull)s or the premises have been infested before---whether the bulbs were treated or nt--could such a division of a block he authorized. Experience has shown that in such cs:es the lid(linig of infestation is ordinarily due to a carry-over from 1)previ(us years, and the inspector, if finding one or more infested bulbs in the b(ck, is omIpel led to assume that such carry-over has taken plic(0 in a larger number ()f narcissus than actually show spikkels.

TREATMENTS FOR BULB FLIES

The construction details given for fumigation chambers are mandatory exceIpt that several different types of construction are indlicated and the growers may choose between them.
In addition to the warnings outlined in circular B.P.Q.-337. care must also be taken to avoid explosion. Such explosion has occurred where an electric






180 BUIREAUT OF PLANT QUARANTINE twl4

heater with open wiring was employed to bring up the tempeaur of1h fumigation chamber during treatment and where a relatively high concentrations of cyanide gas being generated from sulphuric acid and sodium cyndecm into direct contact with such wiring.
The commercial calcium cyanide prescribed in circular 337, in additon td, being of the "slow-evolving type ", has a content of 40 to 50) percent of pure calcium cyanide, and is of the so-called granular type."

VAPOR-HFMAT TEATMENIT FOR BULB ILUS

It has been demonstrated by the Bureau of Entomology of this Department that the vapor-heat treatment properly applied will destroy all immature stages of the greater bulb fly, Merodon equestris. Based upon data furnise by that Bureau, the following method of treatment is authorized if desired in lieu of the hot-water treatment or fumigation for this bulb fly:
Heating the bulbs contained in the tray in a chamber of approved design~ by means of conditioned air to a temperature of 110' F. at the approximate center of the bulb and holding them at that temperature for a period of 2 hours. The temperature to be determined by distance thermometers of an approved design in six or more locations in the treating chamber.
The treating apparatus must be so constructed that the temperature of the bulbs is raised evenly to 1100 F. with a variation of not more than 2' i the temperature in the air in different parts of the room at any time aftet it has been in operation 30 minutes. It must be equipped to maintain the temperature automatically after it reaches 1100, with a variation of not more than 1" from 110' in the load throughout the treating period of 2 hours. Tile equipment must have sufficient capacity to heat a full load of bulbs from 60* to 110* i 6 hours, and must be provided with facilities for maintaining the air circulated through the room saturated with water vapor without the presence of free, water in the air. A heater, so that warm. dry air can be circulated through the load after the sterilization Is completed, should be installed i the air, conditioner.
While the performance of equipment for applying this process and the distance thermometers for determining the temperature will be carefully checked, and the equipment approved only after it is shown that it will apply the treatment properly, the shippers will not be limited to any particular~ type.
The general requirements for furnishing the proper conditions for this treatment are a source of steam at approximately 15 pounds pressure, an airconditioner, consisting of a blower of sufficient, capacity, a conditioning chamber in which air, water, and steam can be mixed together to bring the air at the proper temperature to saturation,. together with an automatic control for maintaining constant temperature. The blower must be of sufficient capacity to force conditioned air at a temperature of 110' F. through the bulbs in large volume. At least four changes of'air per minute through the treating-~ chamber are necessary to provide the proper conditions for the treatment.
The distance thermometers must be accurate to within one half degree Fahrenheit and of the type that will make possible reading the temperature of the bulbs in any part of the treating chamber within one half degree Fahrenheit without opening the chamber. The bulbs of these thermometers must be of such design that they may be inserted into the narcissus bulbs and so, thait the temperature at the approximate center of the bulb can be obtained.. Distance thermometers calibrated for direct reading,- of the temperature in, degrees Fahrenheit may be found easier to use than other types. Temperature readings should be made ait 15-minute intervals and an accurate record of the temperatures maintained.
Specifications for equipment which has successfully met these requirement,and information as to where the parts may be secured, will be furnished to State inspectors on request, and interested growers or dealers may secure. such information through them. Possible disappointment or loss through the purchase of equipment which might later prove ineffective may thus be. avoided.
TREATMENTS FOR EELWORMS

Hot-water treatment is to be supervised by the inspector. In case of insufficient inspection personnel, an inspector may authorize the owner of the bulbs to proceed with treatment for limited periods in the inspector's absence, mak-





19331 SERVW(' AND BEGULATOItY A-N-NOU-NCEM ICN'1 S 181

ing the grower himself or one of his colnpetelit eip oyees responsible. Records are to be kept of the telilpera-tr ofi Othle NvatIer iti 15.-i iiiim DIeito1 rva Is duiringl( the entire peIriod of treatiiit, and when thle i iisj w( 1 I is 0)1 eijt stii record14 s are to be kept by the gfrowver or eIiloyee iii (I iar 1gv. I-';X(Q1 Nvhi .Fe a grower has been definitely atil Ir)iz&'( b y anl iii spcctoWI or proc( w I. tre fl e! it c' Ir i oe II out in the ilispect or' abs5enc(e is otA cohisHlred aIs fl Itilli iig Ihle i*4 (qui reijilts for the issuance of Federal p~ermHits.
In tbat pargr (hof I lie discuIssioni of bot-wa Ier I rmil iiielit, elil it led "Process in circ(ular 11.1.Q.-88i, it is stated Owht ho)t vat ci' Ireal mciii is required either if elworni infestation has, bken fol'nJd or if tbe iiispeetnrl hazs heeii una1,ble to determine to hisi full sUL islaictioii that the iaricssiis are free froni ecd1 worm1s.'' This hitter clause refers to (Uca5e.- NNllere the iisj wct or is an1t horized inl the instructions to assume infestation, a in the cas~e o)f weed(I fields, o)r istances where the grower or hiis employees are thleiniselves ri i~Zi ug the field,, for eelworni infestations in awlvance of the ispector, and other similarly authorized cases.

CHIANGE IN PRE5o.\i{ ING hiEQUIREMENT

InI the ca ise of bulbs NNhich have dried for m ore t han 3 weeks, circular 1.P.Q.-337 stated that 4'thiey should be soik1ed I'm i' 12 hoiirs in cold water before beinir treated." Tli.' advisory\ expression should w;Lsi used in plac e of making this a spvcilic requirement, as experiiiiental tests; of the effec:-t of suich presoaking on many varieties had not been completed. Presoakingl- for a 2-hour period has been used commercially, however, for several years in certain seetions. The former reconlmienidation is now miodified to4 providIe that such presoAing for 2 hours is a definite requirement in the case of bulbs which are to be treated after having dried for more than approximately 8 weeks.

FIELD SANITATION

In addition to the reconnlneni(lations of eicibir B.P.Q.-337, it is advantageous to dig all the healthy varieties antd blocks, first, anol to store them in a separate section of the shed. This a ids in pre'venting the spread of eeiwormis on tools and container,-. Trays of infested varieties should never be placed on the same rack above unlinfested lot--).
Except as modified or interpreted in this circular. the provisions of circulars B.P.Q.-337 and B.P.Q.-338 aire considered as bindig- (on inspectors as condition- (of certification for the iiterstate miovemient of narcissus bulbs3 under Federal plant quarantine no. 62.
LEEu A. STRONG,
Chief. flu; cal of Pluant Qiz ie


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

T.D. 4,3980, PUBIASIIING A LIST OF -NAv-MES OF RF:PRn.ICxNTTIVIF, OF TiHE CANAD)IAN
I.)FPARTM\E-NT oF AGRICU'lT-UIE QCIALIFIEI) TO INSPECT AN!) CLIY PLANXTS
A'MENDED (T.D. 46431)1
iE.Asunty DE,-PAITMENT,
OFFrcF: OF THlE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.
11'(l. hifl!Itoii. D.C., Mai, 29, 1933.
To CollcctorN of Citstwii mid. Othcrs Cone' riwl:
The published list of )ticial represent t ivo.s of the Canadian Departmnent of Agriculture who are qualified and atitorized to inspect a~nd certify nursery stock, plants. tand sees for shipment from Canaida to tile I United States in accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental to quaria ntine no. 37 (U.S. Department of Agriculture), is amended by removing the name of C. S. Thompson and substituting the ime of AV. It. Lapp, wvho has, been designated as district inspector at the port of Windsor, Ontario.
FRANK Dow,
A uti ('orni; Nxiower of ('u.stoais.
1For complete list see S.R.A.-P.Q.C.A. No. 10)3, April-Juim 1930, p. 74.






182 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PACKING-MA
QUARANTINE (NO. 69)
AMENDMENT NO. I TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This amendment, which is made concurrent with the date on quarantine first becomes effective, has relation only to the list of materials, permitting exceptions to be made therefrom in the case of packing materials in which it is judged that the pest risk has been r eliminated by the method of preparation, process, or manufacture.
Av-ry S. oT
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Qua


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 6
[Approved June 28, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that section 1 -of of Quarantine No. 69, approved February 20, 1933, effective July 1, 193b and the same is hereby amended to read:
1. On and after July 1, 1933. the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, are prohibited entry into the United States fro the countries and localities named:
(a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomeorn, Sudan grass, pier grass, jobs-tears, teointe, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachue); al parts, from all countries except Mexico, and the countries of Central West Indies, and South America.
(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint, waste, seed cotton, cott cottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.
(d) Sugarcane: all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all
(e) Bamboo; leaves and small shoots, from all countries.
(f) Leaves of plants; from all countries.
(g) Forest litter; from all countries.
(h) Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, except such types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe for packing by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
Exceptions to the above prohibitions may be authorized in the case of materials which have been so prepared, manufactured, or processed that in judgment of the inspector no pest risk is involved in their entry.
This amendment shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of June 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] R. G. TuGWLL,
Acting Secretary of Agri future.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEED- OR PADDY-RICE
QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
REVISION OF QUAR-ANTINE AND REGULATIONS COVUUNG IMPORTATION OFSM l
PADDY RICEm (T.D. 46373)
TRF-ASURY DEPARTMENT,
OMcE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF G Washingt on, D.C., May 2,1
To Collectors of Custons and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 55, revised (seed- or rice quarantine), with revised regulations, adding rice straw and rice hs





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 183

the articles prohibited entry, amplifying the definition of seed or paddy rice, and making provision for the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico by mail, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to become effective July 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officials and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioncr of Customs.
[Then follows the full text of the revised quarantine and regulations.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
WYOMING DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERA-L, Washington, April 10, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: The State entomologist of Wyoming has advised that as the recent Legislature of Wyoming made no provision for nursery-stock inspection, parcels of plants and plant products upon arriving at the post office of address may be delivered to the addressee without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILYNBERGER,
Third Assistant Postumrtter General.


GEORGIA DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, June 15, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: The State entomologist of Georgia has requested that parcels of plants or plant products addressed for delivery in the State of Georgia be not sent for terminal inspection in future. Therefore, parcels of plants and plant products arriving at the office of address may be delivered to the addressee without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 59K, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER.
Third Assistant Postmaster Gencral.


PUERTO RICO INAUGURATES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, May 16, 1933.
The island of Puerto Rico has established a place for terminal inspection under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:
All florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit
pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products in the raw or unmanufactured state including
field, vegetable, and flower seeds; also cotton lint.





184 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTIlNE [AprU-JIump

All postmasters are, therefore, informed that packages containing an plant or plant products addressed to places in the island of Puerto Rico may be accepted for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.
Postmasters within the island of Puerto Rico shall be governed strictly by the provisions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, in the treatment of all packages addressed for delivery at their offices containing any of the plants or plant products above described as subject to terminal inspection.
Inspection service is maintained at San Juan only.
Owing to the perishable character of plants and plant products, the packages containing such matter must be given prompt attention.
Any failure of compliance with the foregoing' instructions or with the provisions of section 596, Postal Laws and Rtegulations, coming to the attention of any postmaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General, Division of Classification.
C. B. EILENBERGE R,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B.P.Q.--351 (superseding H.B.-212) APRIL 12, 1933.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS THROUGH THE MAILS
The following regulations have been established by the Post Office Department, in conference with the Department of Agriculture, to govern the movement through the mails of the plant material named (Postal Guide 1932, pp. 17-19).
Plants and plant products, including all field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products for propagation, except field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding- plants, and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, may be admitted to the mails only when accompanied with a certificate from a State or Government inspector to the effect that the nursery or premises from which such stock is shipped has been inspected within a year and found free from injurious insects and plant diseases, and the parcel containing such stock is plainly marked to show the nature of the contents and the name and address of the sender (sec. L595 (2) 1, Postal Laws and Regulations).
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products addressed to Arizona, Arkansas, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, [Louisiana], M'Nississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, Oreg-on, Utah, and Washington is required. (See see. [596] Postal Laws and Regulations, and instructions in the supplements to Postal Guide.) All parcels addressed to the States named must be plainly marked on the outside to show the exact nature of their contents.
"4Plant qtiarantines.-When the United States Department of Agriculture, under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act, quarantines any State or area on account of a plant disease or insect infestation, the mailing of plants or plant products from such State or area is subject to the restrictions imposed by such order."
Full information regarding any or all plant quarantines may be secured by addressing the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Washington, D.C. The correspondent should state the nature of the material which it is expected to move, aud the points from and to which it is to be sent.
LEE A. STRONG,
C,ef, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.




1933] SEI~VI('CE ANI) 1:EGULATOY ANNO()NCIEMENTS s 185

M1.NY 15. 1933.
P.Q.C.A.-289, supl)Iement no. 1
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS INTO ITALY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED) OF PLANTS AND FRUITS OF CACTI AND O)F PLANTS. AND PARTS THEREOF, OF CERTAIN (CONIERS

The Italian ministerial order of December 2(0, 1932. effectlive MA lrli 1. 19)3. prohibits lthe importation into, andI transit thr ilgLh. Italy, o)f It e following :
(a) Plants and fruits ofI cacti from any country whatever, on count of() tlhe danger of introducing insects, fungi, or bacteria injurious to prickly pear (Opuntia fieus indices .
(b) Plants and parts of plants of conifers of the genera Abies, Picca, Pinu. Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga.
The importation of plants and parts of plants belonging to other gene ra of conifers is permitted if the shipment is accompanied by a certifi,'ate issues hy the plant protection service of the country of origin in the Italian or French language, affirming that the said plants and parts thereof, and the locality in which they were grown, are free from injurious diseases and pests, and (especially from Rh abdoclin e pscudotsugae. The same certifi-ate must also indicate the origin of the goods and the names of the species included in 1lhe shipment, and all necessary data for identifying the slipmenlt.
LEE A. STRO.G,
Chief. Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-302, revised.
SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

A revision of circular P.Q.C.A.-302 bau become necessary because: the original San Jose scale decrees of the German Republic have been super(eded by the decree of November 3, 1931. and its regulatory order of November 26. 1931, restricting or l)rohibiting the importation of l)lants from the United States, among other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. and providing for the entry of fresh fruits from the United! States if fund free from San Jose scale (A.'pidiotu. p)erniciosis) and from the apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoleti. pomoieilla).
This revised summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the German Republic has been prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, Bureau of Plant Quarantine. from his translations of the oriinal texts, and reviewed by the German Ministry of Nourishment and Agriculture. fir the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United Stat(es to Germany.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation. but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for. T he original texts: and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The German texts should be consulted.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief. Bureau of Plant Quaran li n .


SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

OBJECTS OF GERMAN PLANT-QUARANTINE DECREES

The plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany are designed to prevent the introduction into and distribution in Germany of phylloxera (Phylloxcera vastatrix), San Jose scale (A.spidiotus perniciosus), apple maggot
5516-33- 2






186 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAtANTINE [April-June

or fruit fly (Rhagoletis poniwnella), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotra dcemlineata), potato wart (Chrysophlyctis endobiotica), the cherry y (agoletis cerasi), the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana), injurious diseases and pests of flower bulbs and tubers, of conifers and seeds of conifers, of plants and parts of plants of the genus LCn us, of the southern cottonwood (Populus [cainadensis] deltoides), and of Indian azaleas (Azalea indica).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine from any country, to prevent the introduction of phylloxera. (Decree of October 31, 1879, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. p. 303, etc.) (See p. 187.)
Living dicotyledonous plants or parts thereof from the United States and certain other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. (Decree of November 3, 1931, and circular of November 26, 1931; Reichsgesetzbl. 1: 74, 1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des RM.f.E.u.L. an Liinderregierungen vom 26 November 1931, II: 41, p. 258. Decree of July 8, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. 1: 45, 1932, p. 331.) (See p. 188.)
Potatoes from the United States, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle. (Decree of February 26, 1875, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. 135, etc.) (See pp. 191 and 192.)
Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants: peelings, and refuse of such products; and sacks, and other materials which have been used for packing or preserving such products. Importation and transit prohibited from France. (Decree of February 23, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.) (See p. 191.)
Seeds of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea crcelsa) from any country, to prevent the introduction of diseases of those trees. (Decree of February 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 11, 1929, p. 76.) (See p. 189.)
Plants of the following genera from any country, to prevent the introduction of pests of those plants: Fir (AbieR). spruce (Picea), pine (Pinus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), hemlock (Tsuga). (Decree of June 3, 1930; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 20, 1930, p. 188.) (See p. 190.)
Rooted carnations, cuttings, and cut flowers from any country, to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana). (Decree of March 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzbl. 1929, 1: 15, p. 83.) Entry of carnation cut flowers prohibited from March 15 to November 30. of each year. (Decree of September 30, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 68. 1932, p. 492.) (See pp. 189 and 190.)
Rooted plants of the genus Ulnmus and the southern cottonwood (Populus [canadensis] deltoides), and parts thereof from any country, to prevent the introduction of pests and diseases of those plants. (Decree of February 2, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.) (See p. 191.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Living plants and parts thereof, the importation of which is not prohibited by special decrees, as indicated above. Shipments of restricted plants and parts thereof are to be accompanied by phylloxera certificates and by certificates attesting the noninclusion of dicotyledonous plants (except cacti), of Ulmes spp., and of Populus [canadcasis] deltoides. Certificates must be prepared in the German language and in that of the country of origin. Every shipment will be subject to inspection for San Jose scale. (Decree of July 4, 1883, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. 153, etc. Decree of November 3, 1931; Reiclsgesetzbl. I: 74, 1931. p. 670. Circular of November 26, 1931. Decree of February 2, 1932: lteichsgesetzbl. 1: 10, 1932, p. 63. Decree of July 8, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 45, 1932, p. 351.) (See pp 187, 188, and 191.)
Flowers, bulbs, corms, and tubers must be accompanied by a certificate attesting freedom from certain pests and diseases, and by the certificates prescribed for living plants and parts thereof. (Decree of July 7, 1930; Reichsgesetzhl. 1: 24, 1930, p. 204.) (See p. 190.)
Indian azaleas must be accompanied by a certificate attesting freedom from certain pests and diseases, and by the certificates prescribed for living plants and parts thereof. (Decree of November 9, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.) (See p. 190.)
Fresh fruits may be imported in the original pack only and are subject to inspection for San Jose scale and the apple maggot or fruit fly on arrival at





193:11 SERVICE NN1) RkEGULATORY I'S 7

the port of entry. (De(-iee of November 3. 1: 74. 1(5111). 670. Circular Of Noveitilier 26, 1931. De(.-i-ee of JuI%- Rei('Ils-esetzbl.
1:45, 1032, 1). :151.) (See 1). IS S.)
Fresh cherries.-To prevent the iiitroductioit Of the chorr v truil fly (Rba w) Ictis ccra.0). Eoch shipineiA imist be, aco:,-onlpollied hY i ()f f
from that pest. il)ocreo Of Alwil 27, 192): 1. 192. 1). !)2 )
(IS of 1). 1 (4). 1)
Potato" Ir(-)Ill ()tlloi- thall tile 1-11ite'l slot(' 14) jwevl jll l1w illln'duction (it, the dise;lse. E(4-11 -:11ij)IIII'lit, Iw h %- ;:
certifi( ate of freedoin froiii poloto Nv;ti't. tft' Mii'ch T. R,-ich---esetzhl. I:(-;. 19:'0, p. :))4. 'See p. 192.
Fresh vegetabl('.- of :111 kiiAs' lei.iot parls (d p1,11ITS (*Xc(")j
Franc.e, whOse QlItl*y alld trall 4it are llot lwollihitvd hy ill-lick. I ()f tlli"- (bwl-( t (see list under llllpol'tati( ll Pridtibited) may be inilwrted friin March -I-) T Noveniber 14 of each year uii(.Ier certifie;ite of origin in iioiiiiifesteil Ltiit. (Dooreetif FebruavN-2:1, 1!1:')2. Roich ;tzesetzhl. 1:13. 1932, 1). 91.) (See 1).

I-MPORTATIO-N U-NRI-:STIU('TED

N'ubterrinean parts of pl,,ws, all kiiid. : of seeds, tropic;il fruits. cerc t! 4, 'liA ve-etables for food aiid other purpose' : dril"S '11A jiwI4 rizds for
-ind medicinal purposes from tho Vidtod except as prtiIiihited by otiIto
r(,-,, i i la t i o i is. Cii'cul;tr of Noveillh( 1- 26. 19:))L Runilsehreiheii RM.
11.1'. :Ill die H -41 11 : 412--)S. S e c 1). PPlIYI.I.OXERA Rl'-STRICTIO-NINTP0R'lATI()N PROHIBITED OF GRAPEVINES I3UT NOT OF GRAPES

In accordaiwe Nvith the of the Interii.--iti0iial Phylloxera Colivelltion of Berne, -Noveniber 3, 1\-Sl- '. the iinportati0ii hitti Goriii tiiy i pnihil)ite(l of gr,,tl)evine stocks awl all parts of the -,rapevlne. especially Of br"ill(Iles witli foliage.
Table grapes may be imported when packed, without (,'rapevine leave- ill boxes, cases, baskets, or well-headed barrels, easy to hispect.
Wiiie --rapes (ind grape inarc iiiay be inipol-te(l on]v w1wil 1)'wketl ill tightly closed barrels. (Decree of Oct. 31. 1879; Reiclis--esetzbl., 1). 303, n'id decree of July 4, 18SI), and subsequent orders : Reich s -esetzlh 1., 1). 153, etc.)

SITIPPER S DECLA.TZATIO-N A--ND PHYLLOXEIIA (-J-R-I-IYI('ATI: REQUIRED

SShipments of live plants and parts thereof. Other than -rapes, the enti, Of which is not prohibited by the San Jose scale an(I other sl-)(,ci;tl quarawbies. must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and by a phylloxera certiticat issued by a coiopetent authority of the country of ori-in, as follows:
hipper's declarationn sh, 11
(1) Affiriii that the entire cont iits Of tile sllilll(,iit aiv t*rf)lll lli- e'tablishitiem.
(2) Iii(licate t1w re(-eiving p(-Ant iill the a(Nros 4 oI' the cow-1,-mee.
(3) Affirni that iio (,-rapevine,, are im-luded in the "llipillent.
(4) State -,N-liether t1w ,hiplilent collwills plalits with eartli oil tl-"
root.s.
(:-),) Lear tile "i"'fliature of the shippel..
The phylloxera cortificale shall affirm:
(1) That the points, are from -roulld "-('parart d froll) )IIN- -rapovill"
s bN at least 20 iiieters. or hy soijw ol)stacle o t, (I t'
stoel Y t tfi '-Z 01110(l Silfficient by couipetent autliority.
(2) That the -romid itself contaiiis no
(3 ) That the place has, not 1)( elj UsCId W;' a dopot t (w that plalit.
(4) That if stocks, iiife: ted witli phylloxera have beeii thero.
their radical extirpation lias been offeeted by rope"Ited toxic applic"'Itioll'-Z and by investi-ations for a period of 3 years. thus ijisurin- the coiiiplete
destruction Of tile insects aii(I root ..

(Decree Of July 4. ISS3. aiid subs(,quoia Orders. Reichsgosetzbl. 1). 153, eto.i





188 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Juue

RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE ]INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE MAGGOT

The original San Jose scale decree of February 5, 1898, prohibited the importation into Germany of all living plants or parts thereof from the United States, but the edi.rt of May 8, 1907, now superseded by the decree of November 3, 1931, and the circular of November 26, 1931, (Reiclisgesetzbl. 1: 74, 1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des RM.f.E.u.L. an die Liinderre-ierungen vom 26 November, 1931, 11: 41, p. 258), group plants into classes A, entry absolutely prohibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestricted; and they prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when found free from S an Jose scale and apple maggot.

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS ON PLANT IMPORTATION

To prevent the introduction of San Jose scale into the German Republic, article I of the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended by the order of July 8, 1932. prohibits the importation of living plants and.. fresh parts thereof from North America, Austria, Hungary, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Hawaii, Japan, China, British India, Mesopotamia, and the Union of South Africa, except as provided in the circular of November 26, 1931.
This prohibition applies also to materials and containers which have been used for packing and storing such plants or parts of plants.
The regulations supplemental to the decree of November 3, 1931, as promulgated in the circular of November 26, 1931, group plants as follows:
(a) Importation absolutely prohibited -Living dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of all species (except cacti), also seedlings, as well as portions of plants, such as cuttings, scions, layers, etc. In this group are included all fruit trees and shrubs, as well as timber and ornamental trees and shrubs of every species. t
(b) Importation conditional.--Cacti, trees, shrubs, plants, and parts thereof, not included among the dicotyledons (except when prohibited by other regulations; for example, the importation of certain conifers, and of rooted carnations, carnation cuttings, and carnation cut flowers is prohibited), on condition that they be not packed with plants of group A and that a thorough inspection falls to establish infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
(c) Importation unrestricted.-Until further notice, all subterranean parts of plants, all kinds of seeds, tropical fruits, cereals, and vegetables for food and other purposes, drugs and raw materials for technical manufacturing purposes (except as prohibited by other regulations; for example, importation is prohibited of potatoes, diseased flower bulbs, and tubers).
Plants and parts of living plants, even in a withered state, are to be regarded as fresh, and are to be treated as living plants.
Shipments which include plants of different groups are placed in their entirety in the most restricted group.
With respect to plants falling within group A, the right is reserved, in single
and under special conditions, to except them from the prohibition of ,ntry when guaranty is furnished against the introduction of San Jose scale.
Living plants or parts thereof brought in by passengers as baggage or by hand are subject to the provisions of this decree.
Insofar as their entry is allowed, living plants and fresh parts thereof may be imported only through the customs ports of entry authorized for fruits.
Direct transit under customs supervision is permitted of living plants and fresh parts thereof, as well as of fresh fruits.
The fees for inspection are those established for root crops, namely, 0.01 relchsmark for each kilogram of net weight, with a minimum of I RM for any shipment.

FRESH FRUITS MUST BE FREE FR03L SAN JOSE SCALE AND THE APPLE MAGGOT

Article 2 of the decree of November 3, 1931, prescribes that, until further notice. fresh fruits and refuse of fresh fruits, originating in the countries mentioned, may be imported only through authorized customs ports, in the original pack, and on condition that an inspection at the port of arrival at the expense of the importer, shows them to be free from San Jose scale, and that consignments from the United States of America and from Canada are not





-19331 SERVICE AND PEGITLATORY -NNN0UNCF',MFNTS

,found to be, or suspected of being, athicked by f1w olq)le io.it1got, (it" frliit fly (Rhagoletis pomo)iella).
The Imperial Minister of Nourishiiient and Agriculture (,all lwrmit exceptiolls to the provisions of tile precediiig, p.tragraplis at)(I prescribe 11w iiovessiry safeguards.
Soutlwrn fruits, such is batima's, Aelliolls, Illatid'Irills, pilloapples,
and raisins are itot to be 1-c.I'll-de(I -,ls fruits for lbe I)IIrpost"s I)i* ill(' dcclw of November 3. 1931.
Dried fruits of ny kiiid, mid reflise of dried frilit, willwilt re-ard to Illo degree of drying, do not 17.111 Nvitbill the scope of fliese rel-,111,14ioll".
These provisions do not apply to frilit carried by P,) ,sf'llgors 'j-, Im-gn-o or by halld.
AUTHORIM) PORTS OF ENTRY

On the basis of ,irt,icle 2 of the order for proventill g- tho ilitrodtict-ioll of 8"11) Jose scale and the 670), it is hereby ordered:
ARTICLE 1. Frost fruit, :md fresli refuse of fruit froiii Noi-th Amorica, Au.stralia Austria, Tasiiiaiiii, New Zo -iland, Ilawaii, llumgory, f.waii, ('10na, Nle -()potanii'a, and ille 11"llion or Soutli Africa utitil fill-t1wr iiotico ond iw-ofar as their eiitrv is i:ot prohibited may be ilill)orted olil", t1w foilowilig
ports:
Prussia: Chief office-Stettiii (foreig.ii t ollinwnl,). Custom-,
offices-Aaclien M111111of Wevi- Ili-entlwinl, JWrheil, OV-, Cr,111cliblir-, Ellinierich Bahnhof, Groi-lau Balmhof, Stettin Freibezirk, Stnieleii, Lieban Bahnhof, Oderberg Balinhof, Mittelwalde Bilhijhof. Braiteli cusloins fllcf- Kaldeiikirchen Bahnhof. Steaiiiship laiidiiig-Eniniericli I aii(I If, Airl)orl-Borlin, Tempelhofer Feld.
Baden: Kehl.
Bayern: Chief custonis office-Lindau, c)ffices-Passau
Bahnhof, Kufstein, Tdihicheii Grossmarkth ,i Ile, SalzbllrMecklenburg- Sell werin : (!ustonis office-Warneiiiiiii6o.
Lubeck: Chief custoins office-Mbeck.
Bremen: Chief customs offlee-Bremerhaveii. Clusfoms otfices-Babilliof, Zollausschluss 1, and Zollaussehluss II in Bremeii, Zollausscliltiss in I'WemerMaven. Airport-Breineri.
Hamburg: All customs offices in Hambtirg and th-i, of Cuxhaven.
Sachsen: Customs offices-11ad Schandau for ship -oiiimerce, I >odeiibach, lReitzenhain, Tetschen, Warnsdorf, Weipert.
ART. 2. The provision,,, of irtiole I apply also to flie 4,1111, )f -i la it y I N I 1) 1 -s
and fresh parts thereof froin the comit-ries iiient-ioned, iw, of-ir is ilwir eiltry is exceptionally permitted. (Decree of Noveinber 7, 1931 ; Reiclisministerialbl. 50, 1931, 1). 80. Decree of 'May 14, Reicbsiiiinisteriall)]. 22, 19:12, 1). 256.
Decree of July 9. 19.32; Reicbsinh)'sterialb]. 31, 19-32, p. 44:3. Decree of October
2.9, 1932; Iteielismittisterialbl. 47, 1,932, p. (375.)

PMPORTATION OF, PINE AND 811"RUCE SEEDS PROMMTF, [)

The importation into Germany of pitie and sprtice seeds and of pille and spruce cones containing seeds (tariff no. 95) is prohibited zis of March 15, 1929. (Decree of February 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzblatt 1: 11, 1929 ', 1). 76.)
Amended by the decree of September 13, 1 )29 (Relchsgesetzbl. 1: 35, 1929, p. 147), to prohibit the importation into Geritiany of seeds, 1nid of colles containing r-eeds of the Scotch pine (Phols L.), mid of the Norway
spruce (Picea cxcclsa, Link) only: I roridcd That these seods may be imported into Gierinany in exceptional cases if the importer has obtained an import permit from the Germ(mi 'Miiiister of A.-riculture. filitil, fill-tiler notice, no permit is required to import the see(.1s of ()tiler species of pine or spruce (Pimis or Picea).
IMPORTATION OF CAIINATIONS PROHIBITED

To prevent the Introduction of the carn.-ition leaf roller, 7ortrix promil)"ua, the entry of rooted carnatioiis and earnatioii CllttiD-S is prohibited Ulltil further notice. The entry of cut flowers of earivitiom..; eltso is lm)llibite(l from March 15 to November 30 of each year.






190 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Jun

The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit excep tons to this prohibition.
The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named plants under customs supervision is permitted. (Order of March 28. 1929; ReichsgesetbL I:15. 1929. p. 83. Decree of September 30, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. 1:68, 1932, p. 492.)
IMPORTATION OF FREsu CHERRIES RESTRICTED
The importation of fresh cherries attacked or suspected of being attacked by the maggot of the cherry fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.) is prohibited until further notice. Shipments of this fruit must be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by the communal authorities of the place of origin and by a sanitary certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, vouching for the freedom of the fruit from the maggot of the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will b2 inspected at the port of entry. Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of April 27, 1929, Reichsgesetzbl. I, 1929, p. 92.)
Importation must be made through authorized ports. (Decree of April 27, 1929; Deutscher Reichsanzeiger and Preussischer Staatsanzeiger. No. 104, May 6, 1929, and later orders.) *

IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROUS PLANTS RESTRICTED

The entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is prohibited until further notice: Abies (fir), Picea (spruce), Pinus (pine). .Pseudotuga, and Tsuga, or parts thereof.
The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are packed separately or mixed with each other, and unless the invoice is accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that the shipment covered by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to this prohibition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of June 3, 1930, Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 20, 1930, p. 188.)
(The phrase "The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are packed separately or mixed with each other" is understood: to mean that coniferous plants, other than those named above, will not be permitted entry unless those of a single genus are packed by themselves, or unless those of several genera, other than those named above, are packed together. In other words, coniferous plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferous plants, may not be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered for importation under the provisions of this decree.)

IMPORTATION oF FLowER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTED

The entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from the following plant diseases or insect pests: Yellow disease (Pseudomonas hyacinthN), Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum), black rot of bulbs (Sclerotium tuliparum), fire disease (Botrytis [parasitical tulipac), Penicillium rot (Penicillium sp.), eelworm disease of bulbs (Tylenchus [hyaoih.thi] dipsaci), greater and lesser narcissus flies (Merodon spp. and Eurnerus spp.), bulb mite (RhiZoglyphus echinopus).
Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of July 7, 1930; Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 24, 1930, p. 204.)

IMPORTATION OF AZALEA INDICA RESTRICTED

The entry of azaleas (Azalea indica) is not allowed, unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate in the German language and in that of the country of origin, issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, attesting that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by





193] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 191

him and found free from the following plant diseases or insect pests: Leaf scorch of azalea (Septoria azaleae), azalea gall (Exobasidium azaleae), azalea leaf miner (Gracilaria azaleella), azalea tortricid (Acalla schallerana).
Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of November 9, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.)
IMPORTATION OF ELM AND SOUTHERN COTTONWOOD PROHIBITED

The importation of rooted plants of the genus Ulmus and of the southern cottonwood (Populus [can adensis] doltoides), as well as of cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants, is prohibited until further notice.
The importation of other deciduous plants than those named in article 1, or cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof, is permitted only when the consignment is accompanied by a certificate, in the German language and that of the country of origin, attesting that the shipment was inspected by him and that it does not contain plants or parts thereof above mentioned.
The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can grant exceptions to these provisions.
The direct transit of the above-mentioned plants and their parts is permitted under customs supervision. (Decree of February 2, 1932, Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.)

IMPORTATION FROM FRANCE PROHIBITED-POTATOES, TOMATOES, EGGPLANTS, STRAWBERRIES, ROOTED PLANTS OR VEGETABLES, TUrBERs, BULBS, RHIZOMES, AND OTHER
STrERRANEAN PARTS, OF PLANTS

ARTICLE 1. The importation and transit are prohibted from France of potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted plants or vegetables (with or without soil), bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants, and of peelings and other refuse of such products, as well as of sacks and other materials which have been used for packing or preserving those products.
ART. 2. The importation and transit from France of fresh vegetables, and other fresh plants for cooking, of all kinds, of fresh aerial parts of plants except fruits, whose importation and transit are not prohibited by article 1, are permitted from March 15 to November 14 of each year under the following conditions:
(a) If the products were grown at a distance of not less than 200 km from the limits of the territory infested by the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlinata) ;
(b) If each shipment is accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in the form prescribed issued by an expert of the plant protection service of the country of origin in German and in the language of that country. The certificate must affirm that the products comprising the shipment have been inspected by him and found free from the potato beetle, and that within a radius of 200 km from the locality in France in which they were grown the potato beetle has not hitherto been determined.
ART. 3. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can make exceptions from the provisions of articles 1 and 2. (Decree of February 23, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.)

COLORADO POTATO-BEETLE QUARANTINE-IMPORTATION OF POTATOES FROM THE UNITED STATES PROHIBITEDImportation from the United States into Germany is prohibited of potatoes, potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of sacks and other containers which have been used for packing potatoes. This prohibition does not apply to potatoes carried on vessels as ships' stores. (Decree of February 26, 1875, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.)
The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited. (Order of March 8, 1900.)
The importation of sweetpotatoes is not restricted. (Order of August 9, 1906.)
The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles, at any stage of their life history, are prohibited. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions from this prohibition. (Decree of October 7, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 69, 1932, p. 496.)






192 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-4uw

POTATO-WART RESTRItONS

The entry of potatoes infected with. or suspected of being infected with the potato-wart disease (Synchytium endobiotiuum) across the customs frontiers of the German Republic is prohibited until further notice.
Until further notice, potatoes may be imported only through authorized cutoms districts of the German Republic and only under the following conditions:
(1) That the potatoes be forwarded in unused containers, or in bulk in cars, and that each container or car be sealed with a leaden seal of the official plant protection service of the country of origin.
(2) That each potato shipment be accompanied by a certificate in the German language and in that of the country of origin, issued by an expert of the official plant protection service of that country. Such certificate shall be valid fo only 20 days from the date of issuance and shall contain the statements: (a) That the shipment was examined by an expert of the official plant protection service and was found free from wart; (b) that the shipment originated in a farm not infected with the disease, and that within a radius of 2 kilometers from the field in which the potatoes were grown no such disease has been found; (c) in the case of packages, that the packing material has not been used before; (d) that the official seal has been attached to each package or car. and a statement of the inscription of the seal; and (e) a description of the shipment, indicating the kind of potatoes comprising the shipment, the locality in which the potatoes were harvested, the weight of the shipment. kind of packing, number of containers, distinguishing marks of packages if any, or the car number, name and address of consignee and of sender.
(3) That the said examination at the customs, at the expense of the interested person, reveals the fact that there is no ground for suspicion.
Certain exemptions from the provisions under paragraph 2 are granted for imports of potatoes, especially seed potatoes, from neighboring countries within limited distances from the German frontiers.
Direct transit shipments of potatoes under customs supervision are permitted. (Decree of March 7, 1930; Deutsch. Reichsanzeiger 57, March 8, 1930, p. 1.)

MODEL CERTIFICATE

The undersigned expert of the plant protection service hereby certifies:
(1) That the potatoes contained in the shipment described below have this day been examined and found free from potato wart (Synchytrium endobioti cur).
(2) That the potatoes originated in a farm uninfected with potato wart, and that potato wart has not been determined within a radius of 2 kilometers from the field in which they were grown.
(3) That the containers had not previously been used.
(4) That every package (every car) had been sealed by him with a lead seal furnished with the following description of the shipment:
Variety of potato
Locality where harvested
Weight. of shipment
Kind of packing
Number of packages
Distinguishing marks of packages
Car numbers
Name and address of consignee
Name and address of shipper

(Place and date)

[SEAL] Name and title of ofcial.

URSPRUNGS- UND GESL-NDHEITSZEUGNIS FUR KARTOFFELN

Der unterzeichnete Sachverstitndige des amtlichen Pflanzenschutzdienste bescheinigt hermit:
(1) Dass die in der unten beschriebenen Sendung enthaltenen Kartoffeln vom lhm am heutigen Tage untersucht und frei von Kartoffelkrebs (Synchytrium endobioticum) befunden worden sind;





19331] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 193

(2) Dass die Kartoffeln aus einem nicht mit Kartoffelkrebs verseuchten landwirtschaftlichen Betrieb stammen und dass innerhalb eines Umkreises von zwei Kilometern von dem Felde, auf dem die Kartoffeln gewachsen s nd, Kartoffelkrebs nicht festgestellt worden ist;
(3) Dass die fiir die Sendung verwendeten Umschliessungen unbenutzt sind; (4) Dass jedes Packstiick-jeder Wagen-von ihm mit einer Plombe mit folgender Aufschrift versehen worden ist;
Kartoffelsorte
Gemeinde, in der die Kartoffein geerntet worden sind
Gewicht der Sendung
Art der Verpackung Zahl der Packstiicke
Bezeichnung der Packstiicke
Nummer des Wagons
Name und Anschrift des Empfiingers
Name und Anschrift des Absenders

(Ort und Datum)
[Dienstsiegel]
Name des amtlichen Sachverstl.ndigen

Dienststellung des Sachverstilndigen


P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3 JUNE 15, 1933.
PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
The Governor General of the Union of South Africa, under date of December 2, 1932, in the terms of section 28 (b) of the agricultural pests act, 1911, as amended by the agricultural pests act further amendment act, 1924, made the following regulation no. 1576:
(1) All unmanufactured leaf tobacco introduced into the Union of South Africa must, unless specially exempted, be accompanied by a certificate issued by the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin, stating that after examination and to the best knowledge of the examining officer, the tobacco in question is free from infestation with Ephestia elutella.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June 30, 1933, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. W. E. Jones & Co., Inc., Baltimore, Ud., in the interstate shipment of 355 baskets of apples from a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $20. (Plant quarantine case no. 474.)






194 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [ArlJn 93

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND) CANADIAN POUT

In the case of the United States v. the persons listed below, for atmtn to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated wer moe
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Ieat

Pedro Ramirez--------------- Brownsville, Te--- 2 mangoes --------------------- $
J. Martinez----------------- ----- do -------------- 6 avocados with seed ---------- 5
Guadalupe Hernandez ------- ----- do ------------- ----- do ---------------------------5
W. Molina ----------------- ----- do -------------- 3 mangoes--------------------------- 5
Amparo Materrey----------- ----- do -------------- 4 mangoes------------------------. 5
Fausto Gutierrez------------ ----- do--------------- 3 avocados with seed---------------5
F. .Lake----------------- ----- do -------------- Inmango----------------------------- 5
F. L.Britton --------------- ----- do -------------- 2mangoes--------------------------- 5
Eva Ortiz------------------ ----- do -------------- 3 xnangoes ---------------------------- 5
H. P. Eaton ----------------- Hidalgo, Tex --------- 4 avocados --------------------------- 1
F. Cardenas ----------------- Laredo, Tex ---------- 12 mangoes and 3 avocados------------- 5
Leon Salinas---------------- ----- do -------------- 36 avocados -------------------------- 5
Mrs. T. M'%cCusker----------- Blaine, Wash--------- Daisy and Scotchbroom roots ----H. Johnson----------------- ----- do -------------- 50rock plants------------------------- 5
Mrs. P. S. Dashnow--------- ----- do -------------- Iplant---------------------------2
Mtrs. R. V. Harris----------- ----- do -------------- 12 lily-of-the-valley roots--------------- 5






















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau. A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information Oflicer.


E. R. SAS8CER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRAcxKERa, in Charge Dowmestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and European
Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollwormn and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters, Harlingen, Tex.) .
195
























U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1933









S...BPQ. No. 116 Issued December 1933.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARA~NINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1933



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements------------------------------------------------ 197
-Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease-------------------------------------------- 197
Secretary Wallace calls hearing September 15 on Dutch elm disease --------------------- 197
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of
elm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe ------------- 198
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------------------------- 198
Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine---.----------------- 198
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46591) ---------------------------------- 200
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48)----------------------------- 200
Japanese-beetle conference in Washington October 24 ---------------------------------- 200
Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on and
after September 1 -------------------------------------------------------------- 200
Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits
and vegetables..------------------ ------------- 201
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) --------------------------- 201
Department authorizes leng-thening of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Rio
Grande Valley------------------------------------------------------------------ 201
Announcements: relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)---------------- 202
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 4659C)-------------------------------------- 202
Conditions governing- the entry and treatment of narcissus-bulb importations (B .P. Q.-354) -202 Strong calls conference on important plant quarantine-------------------------------- 203
Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administration
of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37 ---------------------------------- 204
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ----------------------------- 204
Revision of regulations ------------------------------------------------------------ 204
Notice to general public through newspapers-------------------------------------- 211
Campaign against pink bollworm started mn cotton fields of South----------------------- 212
Aninouncements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61) --------------------------- 212
Revision of regulations----------------------------212
Notice to general public through newspapers-------------------------------------- 218
Miscellaneous itemis--------------------------------218
Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A .-306, supplement no. 1)------------ 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica, B.W.I. (PQ-3)------------219
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1) --------- 221
Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------- 223
Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 3) -------- 224
Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the -United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,
revied)-----------------------------------------------225
Lee A. Strong named Chi.ef of Bureau of Entomology --------------------------------- 227
Fruit-fly survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru.-------------------- 227
Statement of Federal plant quarantines. ------------------------------------- 241
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine-------------------------------------------- 244




QUJARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE

SCEARY WALLACE CALLS HEARING SEPTEMBER 14 ON DUTCH ELM DISEASE

(Press notice)
AUGUST 30, 1933.
Secetryof Agriculture Wallace has announced that notice has been issued for a hearing, to be held in Washington, D.C., September 15, to consider whether
sesshould be taken to prevent further establishment of the Dutch elm diseas inthis country by placing under quarantine host materials likely to carry
this dies rmErope.
2344--33197






198 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Although the source of the recent outbreak of this disease in the environs of New York is still unknown, officials say the Department of Agriculture cannot dlisregard the possibility that the elm-disease fungus may have been brought into that area in imported parts of diseased elm trees. Within recent weeks a few shipments of elm logs from Europe have arrived at Atlantic ports, and though for each of these lots safeguards have been provided, it is believed that the whole problem demands immediate attention. In view of the prompt efforts being taken to eradlicate the disease, the necessity for protecting the country against further introduction from abroad is regarded as important.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITING
OR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY OF ELM AND RELATED SPECIES OF TREES A.NP
PARTS AND PRODUCTS THEREOF FROM EUROPE

AUGUST 29, 1933.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exists on the continent of Europe an injurious disease, known as the Dutch elm disease, due to the fungus Graphiboa lmhi Schwarz, and that this disease, not now widely prevalent within or throughout the United States, may be introduced into this country with importations, of plants, cuttings, seeds, logs, timber, lumber, or other wood products of all species of the family Ljlmaceae, among which elms (Ulmus gpp.) and zelkova or keyaki (Zelkova spp.) are known to be hosts of this fungus.
It appears necessary, therefore,, to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of any or all parts or products of plants belonging to species of the family Ulmaceae from the continent of Europe.
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture, in room 42-43 of the U~tifled 14tates National Museumn, Tenth Street and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., September 15, 1933, in order that any person interested in the establishment of such prohibition or restriction may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.
H. A. WALLACE
Secretaryi of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
AMENDMENT NO. S OF REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 56

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 of the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, which became effective November 1, 1923, as amended October 23, 1923, January 18, 1924, January 10, 1925, February 6, 1925, and July 15, 1932, be, and the game is hereby, further amended to read as follows:

REGuLATIOx 2. REsT~ic~rioNs o~v ExTmY OF FRUITS AND) VEGETABLES

All importations of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or portions of plants, as defined in regulation 1 (b).
Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables, including dried products, cured figs, dates, and raisins, etc., nuts and dry beans, peas, etc., may be inported without permit or other compliance with these regulations: Pro vid1ed, That any such articles may be made subject to entry only under permit and on compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein when it shall be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the condition of drying, curing, or processing to which they have been subjected may not entirely eliminate risk. Such determination with respect to any such articles shall1 become effective after due notice.
Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts' by special quarantines and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as may

1See List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 199

hereafter be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from all countries under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas, pineapples, lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera type and any vegetable, except as restricted by special quarantine as indicated above, may be imported from any country under permit and on compliance with these regulations, at such ports as shall be authorized in the permits, on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Trypetidae), or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.
The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries concerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph: Provided, That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits may be conditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruit flies and melon flies; or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk:
Commonwealth of Australia-States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania.-Upon compliance with these regulations and under such additional conditions and safeguards as may be prescribed in the permits, all fruits from
-the States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania may be permitted entry at Seattle, Wash., and Portland, Oreg., and at such other, ports as may be specified in the permits.
New Zealand.-Upon compliance with these regulations fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from New Zealand under such conditions and through such ports as may be designated in the permits.
J"an.-Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28, oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine varieties, may be imported from Japan through the port of Seattle and such other northern ports as may be specified in the permits.
Mexico.-Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the regulations issued under the order of December 22., 1913.
Argentina.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Argentina under such conditions and through such northern ports as may be designated in the permits.
Chile.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Chile under such conditions and through such northern ports as may be designated in the permits. Melons from Chile may be admitted at any port.
West Indiesa--Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits from the West Indies may be permitted entry at New York and at such other ports as may be designated in the permits.
Jamaica.-Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port of New York or such other northern ports as may be specified in the permits.
Canada.-Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada may be imported into the United States from Canada free from any restrictions whatsoever tinder these regulations.
General.-In 'addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothousegrown fruits or other special fruits, which can be accepted by the United States Department of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects, including fruit flies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions and through such ports as shall be designated in the permits.
This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of July 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] R. G. TUGW=,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.






200 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE t[Tuly-Sept.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

T.D. 39792, PUBLISHING TRE NOrICE OF QUARANTINE; No. 56, OF TE UNrr
STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WITH REGULATIONS RELA.T[NG TO FRUIT
AND VEGETABLES, A-MENDED (T.D. 46591)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE Co-M MIS SIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., Au~gust 14, 1933.
To Collectors of Cust oms and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable quarantine) issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective August 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK DOW,
Acting Commissioner of C~ustoms.
(Then follows the full text of the amendment.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE-BEETLE CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 24
(Press notice)
SEPTEEMBERL 12, 1933.
A conference to discuss this season's developments in the Japanese-beetle situation has been announced by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture. It will meet in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building, Eighteenth and F Streets NW., Washington, D.C., on October 24, at 10 a.m. This is one of a series of annual conferences and anl interested in the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations or in1 possible changes in such regulations are invited to attend and to join in the discussion. SThis annual Japanese-beetle conference will be held on the day before a discussion scheduled recently by the Bureau to consider modifications in the plant importation regulations issued under Federal Quarantine No. 37. The consecutive dates were arranged for the convenience of nurserymen and others who are interested in both subjects.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MAY BE -SHIPPED THIS FALL WITHOUT JAPANESEBEETLE CERTIFICATES ON AND AFTER SEPTEMBER 15
(Press notice)
SEPTEMB3ER 13, 1933.
The Secretary of Agriculture announced today (Sept. 13) that restrictions
on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations will be removed for the season on and after Friday, September 15. The restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until October 15. Under the quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required on shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15. The effect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that requirement a month earlier than is provided in the regulations themselves.
The inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Due to the prevailing cool evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.





193] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 201

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation) are in force throughout t1he year and are not affected by this announcement.
REMOVAL OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THE
INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Since it has been deternkined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the f ruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 f rom, the regulated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 15, 1933. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 15, 1933, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 13th day of September 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
bSecretary .of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
DEPARTMENT AUTHORIZES LENGTHENING OF NEXT SHIPPING SEASON FOR
CITRUS FRUIT OF LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
(Press notice)

The season for shipping citrus -fruit under the Mexican fruit-fly quarantine regulations from the Texas counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo, has been extended to include April 30, 1934, according to an announcement today by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department o~f Agriculture, following a conference in Harlingen, Tex., with J. M. Del Curto, State entomologist, Texas State Department of Agriculture. Extension of the shipping season makes the grove clean-up requirements by the end of the season even more imperative, and quarantine officials anticipate the same cooperation heretofore extended in this work by growers of the lower Rio Grande Valley.
INessrs. Strong and Del Curto point out that both the Federal Department and the State Department of Agriculture desire to assist in every possible manner in the movement of the Texas citrus crop. At the same time there must be full appreciation of the responsibility to prevent the building up of infestation and spread of fruit fly, and it is hoped and believed that the growers will at all times realize the importance of full compliance with the clean-up regulations. Discovery of any infestation of the Mexican fruit fly will necessarily require immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures in any area which may be involved, they point out.
As to the beginning of the shipping season this fall, there was an effective clean-up at the close of last shipping season; two applications, of spray have been made; the season seems somewhat advanced; and, therefore, to give the fulest possible marketing advantages and relying on the;, continued cooi)-ration of the growers in clean-up and other precautionary measures, so far as the fruit-fly regulations are concerned, fruit may be certified on and after September 1, 1933.
[Above press notice was released at Ha rlingen, Tex., July 31, 1933.]






202 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
T.D. 43980, As AMNE.NDED BY T.D. 46431, PUBLISHING A LISTr Oi NAMES OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE C-'ANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE QUALIFIED TO
1iNSPECT AND CERTIIFY P'LANTIS, FURTHER AmENDED (T.D. 46590)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CO-MMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., August 14, 1983.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The published list of official representatives of the Canadian Department of Agriculture, who are qualified and authorized to inspect and certify plants, nursery stock, and seeds for shipment from Canada to the United States in accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental to Quarantine No. 37 (U.S. Department of Agriculture), is amended by removing the name of W. H. Lyne and substituting the name of H. F. Olds, who has been designated as inspector in charge at Vancouver, B.C.

FRANK Dow, Acting Commissioner of Customs.

B.P.Q.-354. AUGUST 15, 1933.
CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY AND TREATMENT OF NARCISSUS-BULB IMPORTATIONS
Importations of narcissus bulbs are governed by the provisions of regulation 14 of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine. Each shipment of such bulbs must meet the conditions of entry as set forth in Quarantine No. 37 and in the special permit authorizing the shipment with respect to certification, marking, freedom from sand, soil, or earth, packing materials, inspection and disinfection, if necessary, for injurious insect pests and plant diseases, notice of arrival, etc. All such bulbs imported for propagation must be graded as to type and size before shipment from abroad, and the grades and the exact quantity of each indicated by varieties for each container on the true copy of the invoice required with each shipment~ Run-of-thefield or ungraded bulbs will be refused entry.
Heretofore, in addition to the general conditions of entry, a prescribed hotwater treatment has been given all imported narcissus bulbs as an additional condition of entry; hereafter such bulbs will be inspected at the port designated in the permit (provided that mail importations of narcissus bulbs will be inspected at Washington, D.C., only) and, if found to be apparently free from injurious plant pests, will be released for forwarding to the importer without treatment.
If infested with the greater bulb fly, Mero don equestris, the bulbs shall be treated in accordance with the requirements prevailing for the interstate movement of bulbs so infested. Such bulbs may be (1) fumigated by exposure to calcium cyanide (slow evolving type containing 40 to 50 percent of pure calcium cyanide) at the rate of 16 ounces per 100 cubic feet of space for 4 hours at a temperature of 600 F. or more in an air-tight chamber of approved construction; (2) as an alternative, exposed to hydrocyanic acid gas produced by the use of 7 ounces of sodium cyanide (50 percent cyanogen), 10:V: ounces of sulphuric acid (660 B.), and 14 ounces of water for 100 cubic feet of space under temperature and equipment conditions set forth above for the calcium cyanide fumigation; (3) ,they may also be treated by submersion in hot water held at a temperature of 1100 to 111.50 for the entire period of 1 hour in an approved tank; or (4) by heating the bulbs to a temperature of 11-0* by means of moist conditioned air and holding that temperature for 2 hours, using apparatus approved for this treatment.
If infested with the bulb eelworm, Tylenchus dipsaci, the bulbs shall be treated at a plant approved for use during the current season, under the supervision of a representative of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, by submersion for 3 hours in water held at a temperature of 1100 F., or higher, the approved maximum being 111.50. In the case of bulbs over 2 inches in diameter the treating period will be extended to 4 hours. In view of the fact





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 203

that the effectiveness of this treatment is greatly increased if bulbs which have been dried for more than 3 weeks are presoaked in cold water for 2 hours, the use of this desirable modification of the treatment is recommended. The use of a disinfectant to check subsequent infections of diseases such as basal rot is optional with the permitted. The disinfectant may be used either In the hot water or as an after-dip.
Further information regarding the treatments will be furnished upon request.
Shipments requiring treatment shall be held intact at the place of treatment until the Bureau's representative arrives. In the event infestation is not general but occurs in only one or more clearly distinguishable units, only those infested units shall be required to be treated. All bulbs of the same variety from one shipper to the same addressee will be considered as belonging to the same unit unless evidence is presented to show that certain cases of the lot came from a separate, source in the country of origin and unless such cases are marked to indicate that fact. When 2 or more varieties are included in the same case, the entire case will be considered as I unit unless these varieties are completely separated from each other in tight containers which would prevent an intermingling of dirt and debris.
To prevent any unnecessary delay should treatment be required, the permittees should arrange in advance for facilities for giving any necessary treatments. Small lots of bulbs may be treated at the Inspection House of this Department in Washington, D.C.
A permitted may elect to refuse a shipment if found infested, in place of providing for the required treatment. If any permitted intends to follow that plan, he should notify this Bureau in advance of the arrival of the bulbs, stating whether such infested shipment is to be removed from the country at his expense or is to be abandoned for destruction.
LEE A. STRGNG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
NoT,.-Other publications having to do with this general subject are:
Quarantine No. 37. Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.
Circular B.P.Q.-340. Explanation of Provisions for Entry of Plants under Qu,,jrantine 37.
Circular P.Q.C.A.-324. Use of Disinfectants in Hot-Water Treatment of Narcissus Bulbs.
Circular B.P.Q.-337. Treatment and Pest Suppression Measures in Narcissus Plantings.
Circular B.P.Q.-341. Segregation, Labeling, and Utilization Requirements of Plants Imported under Special Permit for Propagation.
Circular B.P.Q.-353. Supplementary Administrative Instructions. Narcissus Treatment and Pest Suppression.


STRONG CALLS CONFERENCE ON IMPORTANT PLANT QUARANTINE
(Press notice)
AUGUST 22, 1933.
Called to reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforcement of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37, a public conference will be held at 10 a.m. October 25 by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture. In announcing the conference, Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau, referred to his statement issued July 20 in which he reviewed the legislative and administrative history of this quarantine, and indicated that the Department now is ready to give serious consideration to modification and liberalization of this regulation. The conference will meet in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building in Washington.
In his statement a month ago Mr. Strong said: "After a careful and extended study of this whole problem, I find myself seriously questioning the need for, and the justice of, the procedure we are following. Inspection methods ha-ve been greatly improved and our scientific knowledge of foreign pests and diseases hai4 increased. I feel that greater confidence can be placed in the efficacy of inspection of plant material at the time of arrival." In the formal announcement of the conference Mr. Strong threw open the door for discussion of all questions pertaining to this quarantine and mentioned specific subjects for consideration.






204 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC CONFERENCE TO CONSIDER CERTAIN CHANGES WITH RESPECT
TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE
NO. 37
AUGUST 21, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that a public conference will be held by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building, Eig-hteenth anid F Streets, NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., October 25, 1933, at which consideration will be given to the advisability of modifying certain features with respect to the enforcement of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37.
As indicated in a statement issued July 20, 1933 it now seems advisable to reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforcement of the quarantine in question. At this conference it is specifically proposed to give consideration to the following subjects in reference to the importation of plants under permit: The elimination of consideration of the availability of plants in this country; limitation to be placed on the number of plants which may be imported by reason of facilities for adequate inspection; value of considering horticultural qualifications of the applicants in the issuance of permits; desirability of continuing to hold certain plants for 2 or more years before release; the advisability of providing for the inspection of imported plants at New York and certain other ports of entry rather than shipping them to Washington as at present; and such other pertinent items as may be brought up.
Any person interested in the changes under consideration may appear at this public conference and be heard either in person or by attorney.
L= A. STRONG, GCeJ of Busreau~.



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRoDucToity NoTE

The following revision of the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations makes no, addition to the areas formerly under regulation. The regulated areas are, however, now divided into heavily infested areas and lightly infested areas. The heavily infested areas consist of the counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, Terrell, and a portion of Hudspeth in the State of Texas. The remaining counties in Texas, as well as those under regulation in Arizona, Florida, and New Mexico, are designated as lightly infested areas. The measures of control and prevention of spread of the pink bollworm remain substantially unchanged.
SUMMARY

The regulated areas under this revision include 5 counties of southern Arizona, 6 counties of north-central Florida, 7 counties of southern New Mexico, and 10 counties of western Texas. Of this area, 5 counties and part of an additional county of Texas are designated as heavily infested and the other areas as lightly infested. (See regulation 3.)
-No stalks, bolls, or other parts of either cultivated or wild cotton plants and no gin waste are allowed to be transported interstate from any regulated area and no permits, will be issued for such movement, except that the local transportation of gin waste between regulated areas is authorized after freezing weather starts. (See regulation 5.)
Seed cotton must not be transported interstate from any regulated area, except between contiguous regulated areas for ginning. (See regulation 6.)
Cottoniseed, cotton lint, cottonseed hulls, cake,. and meal, and bagging, wrappers, and containers which have been used for cotton products must not be transpIorted interstate from any regulated area except under permit. Cottonseed produced in the heavily infested area must not be moved interstate therefrom






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 205

.and no permits will be issued for such movement. (For the conditions governing the issuance of permits, see regulations 7 to 12, and 15.)
Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equipinent, and other articles, must not be moved interstate from regulated areas unless free from contamination with cotton and cotton products. (See regulation 13.)
Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments of re.stricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles, they must accompany the vehicle. (See regulation 15.)
To secure permits, address the local inspector or the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)
(Approved Oct. 26, 1932 ; effective* Oct. 29, 1932)

1, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm (Pect inophora go8sypielia Saunders), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or ,distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),,as amended by the act of 'Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given
-the public hearing as required thereby, I (10 quarantine the said States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas, effective on and after October 29, 1932. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and
-cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, or 'Te-xas into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, o6r which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as reg-ulated areas when,' in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the .eniforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm: Provided further, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon .the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, ini the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm therefrom to other parts of the State.
Donle at the city of Washington this 26th day of October 1932.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of, Agriculture.
[SEAL] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
23445-33-2






206 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [uly-Sept

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
(Approved Sept. 19, 1933; effective Sept. 19, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIoNS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Pink bollworr.-The insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (Peotinophora gossypiella Saunders), in any stage of development.
(b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossypiwn and Tlurberia); seed cotton; cotton lint and linters, including all forms of unmanufactured cotton lint and linters; gin waste; cottonseed; cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal.
(c) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.
(d) Liinters.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.
(e) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of the continuous process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145' F. in an approved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and in such manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
(f) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(g) Moved or allowed to be noved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fom one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAs

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the restrictions provided for in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such articles moving from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That restricted articles may be moved interstate without permit from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFEsTED AREAs

REGUTATED AREAS
In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of these regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Arizona area.-The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, and Pinal.
Florida area.-The counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, and Union.
New Mcxiro area.-The counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero.
Texas area.-The counties of Brewster, Culberson, El Paso, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, and Ward.

Heavily Infested Areas
Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations: The counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth iCounty in the same State except that part of the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65 .






19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 207

Lightly Infested Areas

The following areas are designated as lightly Infested: The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, and Pinal, in Arizona2 ; the counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, and Union, in Florida; the counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero, In New Mexico; the entire counties of El Paso, Pecos, Reeves, and Ward, in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65/2.

REouL.ArIoN 4.' EXTENSION OR REDUcTIoN oF REw1JLxr1D AImAs

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in which such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. STALKS, BOLLS, GIN WASTE, ETC.

Stalks, bolls, and other parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossypiumr or Thurberia), and gin waste shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, except that gin waste may be moved interstate without permit from a gin in a lightly infested area ato farms in another regulated area within the contiguous ginning territory thereof, on condition that in the judgment of the inspector such movement would not, owing to the arrival of f reeling weather, increase the risk of spread of the pink bollworm.

REGULATION 6. SEED COTTON

seed cotton (including grabbots) shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas to nonregulated territory, but, for the purpose of ginning, seed cotton may be moved8a interstate without permit from a lightly infested area to a contiguous regulated area.

REGULATION 7. COTTON SEED

HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS

Cottonseed produced within a heavily infested area shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from that area, and no permit will be issued for such movement.
IGHTLY INFESTED AREAS

Cottonseed produced in a lightly infested area shall not be moved or allowed Io be moved interstate therefrom unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seed produced in a lightly infested area on condition that it either is to be moved to another regulated area without passing through any territory not regulated under this quarantine or, under the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; or is a sample to be moved to an approved laboratory in nonregulated territory for analysis; or is a sample to be moved for some other approved purpose.
2 Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the requirements of that quarantine.
3 Except from the area In Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil (Quarantine No. 61).






208 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterile seed produced in a lightly infested area to an authorized oil mill in nonregulated territory for crushing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oil mills in nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such safeguards against the spread of infestation, and to comply with such restrictions on the subsequenit movement of the linters and other products manufactured from the seed concerned as majy he required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed from lightly infested areas to any destination on condition that it has been given a special heat treatment at 1450 F. maintained under approved conditions for a period of at least 1 hour and subsequently has been protected from contamination, or has been given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed from lightly infested areais on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

OOTTONSEED PRODUCED OUTSIDE THE REGULATED APEAS

Cottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area may be moved interstate from such area under permit on condition that while in the area the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
RE GULATioN 8. LINT AND SAMPLES

Lint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall. have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint or samples thereof, produced in a regulated area, on condition that the said lint was produced in a gin operated, as to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination, to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled lint produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination) must be given both vacuum fumigation and either compression or roller treatment. unless and until the said Bureau shall approve some other treatment or treatments for the purpose; baled lint produced in a lightly infested area to be moved to nonregulated territory must be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled lint and samples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be moved interstate under permit to another regulated area without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the material will not pass through any cotton-growing territory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; samples (except when moved as above from a lightly infested area to another regulated area), whether produced in a lightly infested or heavily infested area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise trea ted as, may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled lint or samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom, on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the said materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permiits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint from the regulated area--s on such conditions as may he prescribed by that Bureau.
4 Exempt from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevl (Quarantine No. 61).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 209

REGULATION 9. LINTERS AND SAMPLES
Linters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters or sainpleg thereof, produced in a regulated area on condition that said linters were produced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled linters produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination) must be either fumigated under vacuum, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled linters produced in a lightly infested area to be shipped to nonregulated territory must be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given. such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled winters and samples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be shipped interstate under permit to another regulated area without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the material will not pass through any cottongrowing territory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia, weevil; samples (except when moved as above from a lightly infestedtarea to another regulated area), whether produced in a lightly infested or heavily infested area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters or samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that such materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the Carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters from the regulated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 10. MILL. WASTE, UNBALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER FoRu'ms OF UNMANULFAOTJRED LINT AND LINTERS

No form of cotton lint or linters shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United -States Department of Agriculture, except that no permit is required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been woven or spun from cotton lint or linters and are uncontaminated with other cotton or cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows, cushions, or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compliance with the pink-bollworm regulations of the State concerned and in which any unwoven lint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finished product. / Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regulated area of mill waste and of all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint or winters for which permits are required under these regulations and which are not specifically covered in regulations 8 and 9, on condition that the material h~as been fumigated and compressed or roller treated,'or has been given such other treatment or handling as will, in the judgment of the Bureau, eliminate risk of spread of the pink bollworm.

REGULATION 11. COTTON SEED H~ULLS. CAKE, AND MEAL

No cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a heavily infested area to any destination of cottonseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed

11 Except from the area In Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil (Quarantine No. 61).






210 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector on condition that they are given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector. Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a lightly infested area" of cottonseed hulls produced from sterilized cottonseed and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector on condition that they are either to be moved to another regulated area without passing through any territory not regulated under this quarantine or under the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia, weevil, or are to be moved to nonregulated territory and have been given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any destination of cottonseed cake a-nd meal produced either f rom sterilized cottonseed or from cottonseed obtained from iionregulated territory, on condition that the cake and meal have been protected against subsequent contamination with cottonseed to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGULATION 12. BAGGING AND OTHER WRAPPERS AND Co.-NTAINERs

Bagging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in connection with or which are contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGVLATiON 13. CARS, BOATS, VEHICLES, HOUSEHOLD GOODS, AND EQUIPMENT

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products, and farm household goods, farm equipment, and other articles, if contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movements allowed under this regulation.

REGULATION 14. HAY AND OTHER FARM PRODUCTS; COTTONSED OIL

Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, and cottonseed oil, may be moved interstate without permit or other restriction until further notice.

REGULAIION 15. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING; STRAGE, CARTAGE, AND LABOR COSTS

To obtain permits under these regulations, application should be made either to the nearest local inspector, or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area for the shipment, and, in that event, the material concerned shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations other than those specified in such permit.
Copies of the permits required Under these regulations shall be attached to the articles or to the wvaybills or other shipping papers which accompany the shipment. lit the case of movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permit shall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bear such marking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of the inspector, to identify the material.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor, incident to inspection, other than the services of inspectors, shall be paid by the shipper.
6Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil (Quarantine No. 61).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 211

REGULATION 16. SHIPMENTS BY TILE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT oi' AGRICULTURE
Products and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Depairtmenit of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on sucli conditions~ and under such safeguards as may be prescribed b~y the Burieau of Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attaced to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall. be effective on and after September 10f, 1933, and shall supersede on that (late the rules and regullations iSSUed under Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on October 20, 1932, as amended to date.
Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1933. Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture. C. F. MARVIN,
[SEFAL] Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing revision sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated area.]I



N. M4 ECX.
IL






PINKA BGLOR URANTINE
EFFECTIVE DON SETEBR 9V 13
L-1ni FONAYOVRGLTE0RA



AEASL RESLTED ANDEA




FIGURlE I


NOTICE To GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D.C., Scptemtber 19, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on- him by the plant quarantine act of Augufst 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),I as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, effective September 19, 1933. Under this revision the regulated areas include 5 counties of southern Arizona, 6 counties of north-central Florida, 7 counties of southern New Mexico, and 10 counties of western Texas. Various changes with regard to the handling and issuance of permits, of interest to growers and shippers of cotton and cotton products, have been made in the revision. Copies of said revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published In the following newspapers: The Republican Phoenix, Ariz., Sept. 26, 1933; the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Sept. 26, 19A3; the New Mexico State Tribune, Albuquerque, N.Mex., Sept. 26, 1933; the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Sept. 25, 1933.]






212 BUREAU OF PLANET QUARANTINE (July-Sept,.

CAMPAIGN AGAINST PINK BOLLWORM STARTED IN COTTON FIELDS OF SOUTH
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER, 25, 1933.
The Unitedl States Department of Agriculture today concentrated its facilities for inspecting cottonl-gin trash in the area around Enigmia, Ga., where plant quarantine inspectors last week found pink bollwormns during a routine inspection of gin trash. An intensive inspection of adjacent fields is also under way. Prompt extermination measures will be taken against any additional infestation discovered.
This is the first time in 12 years that the pink bollwornm has appeared in the main Cotton Belt of the United States, says Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Clean cultivation of the fields and sterilization of the seed are among the control measures advocated by the Department. Af ter the cotton is picked every bit of cotton plant and debris in an infested field must be pulled but, raked up, and-burned. The seeds, in which the bollworm. passes part of its life cycle, must be sterilized. In this way infestations have been stamped out over thousands of square miles in several cotton-growing States.
Annual inspections of gin trash disclose any incipient infestation of pink bollworms, Mr. Strong says, and make it possible to take proper control measuires before the insect can build up a large population. A light infestation wa~s discovered by such an examination last year in Florida, lie adds, and, as a result of the control measures immediately taken, no infestation has been found there this year.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO THURBERIA-WEEVIL QUARANTINE (NO. 61)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODucToRY NOTE

The following revision of the Thurberia-weevil-quarantine regulations is issued to authorize the use of various improved treatments and other safeguards that have been developed by the Department in recent years. The changes in every case provide for the issuance of permits for interstate shipments on conditions with which it will be simpler andI less expensive to comply than'those, previously required, or under which a wider market for cotton products is authorized.
Changes include provisions under which cottonseed given a special heat treatment of 1450 F. for 1 hour is authorized shipment under permit to any destination; baled cotton lint may be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, instead of having to be both compressed and fumigated 'as heretofore; and cottonseed hulls may be shipped to nonreglulated territory on the application of such special treatment as may be required by the inspector.

SUMMARY

The regulated areas under this quarantine include Cochise and Santa Cruz Counties, and parts of Graham, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona. (See reg-ulation 3.)
No Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for such movement. (See regulation 5.)
No seed cotton, stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant; or gin waste, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, and no permit will be issued for such movement. (Regulation 5.)
Cotton lint, linters, cottonseed, cottonseed hiulls, cake, and meal, and bagging, wrappers aind containers which have been used for cotton products must not be transported interstate from the regulated area except under permit. (For conditions governing the issuance of permits see regulations 6 to 11 and 14.)
Railwvay cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equipmient, and other articles must not be moved interstate from a regulated area





1931 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 213

unless free from contamination with cotton and cotton products. (See regulation 12.)
Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments of restricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles they must accompany the vehicle.
To secure permits apply to the nearest local inspector or address the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 61 (REVISED)
(Effective on and after Aug. 1, 1927)

I, Renick V. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Ag:i culture, have determinedly that it is necessary to quarantine the State of Arizona to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil (Anthonom us grandis thurberi(rc Pierce), a dangerous insect not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said State of Arizona, effective on and after August 1, 1927. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912. amended as aforesaid (1) Thurberia, including all parts of the plant; (2) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, winters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottouseed cake and meal; (3) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (4) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products: (5) hay and other farm products; and (6) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a conmmnon carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the State of Arizona into or, through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner .or.method or under conditions -other than those prescribed i'n the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in the State of Ar'zona now, or which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent thq spread of the Thurberia weevil: Provided further. That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil therefrom to other l)parts of the State. ,
Done at the city of WIVashington this 9th day of July 1927.
Witness my land and the seal of the United States Departmient of Agriculture.
[SEAL] RENICK W. DUNLAP,
Acting ecretary of Agi-'icult '.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 61
S(Approved Sept. 30, 1933; effective Oct. 2, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFiNITIONS
For' the piuriose 6f these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respecti ely, to mean:
23445-33--3






214 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(a) Tliurbcria weecil.-The insect known as the Thurberia weevil (Antlioonlus yrandis thurberiae Pieice), in any stage of development.
i b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossyphim and Tlburbcria) ; seed cotton; cotton lint and linters, including all forms of unmanufactured cotton lint and linters; gin waste; cottonseed; cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal.
(c) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.
(d) Lint crs. .All forms of unmnanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.
(C) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of the continues process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145' F. in an approved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and in such manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
([) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(g) Mored or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LImITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State of Arizona with the provisos in Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised), the restrictions provided for in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), will be limited to such articles when moving from the areas in the State of Arizona now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), the atricles enumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AEA

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised) the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties, or portions thereof, of Graham, Cochise, Santa Cruz, Pima, and Pinal, of the State of Arizona, embraced within the following-described boundary line, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Beginning at the most southeasterly corner of Greenlee County; thence westerly along the most southerly line of said county to the most southwesterly corner of said county; thence northwesterly along the county line of Greenlee and Graham Counties to the point where the township line between township 10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, intersects, or would intersect, the county line between Graham and Greenlee Counties; thence west along the said township line between township 10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the line between the townships in range 23 east and range 24 east; thence north along the township line between the townships in range 23 east and range 24 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect. the township line between township 6 south and township 7 south; thence west along the said township line between township 6 south and township 7 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the line between the townships in range 8 east and range 9 east; thence south along the township line between the townships in range 8 east and range 9 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the township line between township 8 south and township 9 south; thence west along the township line between township 8 south and township 9 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects,. or would intersTect, the line between the townships in range 5 east and range 6 east; thence south along the township line between the townships in range 5 east and range 6 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the boundary line between Pima County and the Republic of Mexico; thence southeasterly and easterly





19331 SERVICE AND REGUL.&TORY ANKOUNCBMBNTS 215

along the boundary line between the State of Arizona a nd the Republic of Mexico to the point where the said boundary line interwts the boundary line between the States of New Mexico and Arizona; thence northerly along the boundary line between the States of New Mexico and Arizona to the point of beginning. .
All townships, township lines, and ranges referred to in the above-described area are of the Gila and Salt River base and meridian.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reducidon and Lhe areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in, or through the State of Arizona and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the said State.
REGULATION 5. PROHIBITED MOVEMENT

No Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for such movement.
No seed cotton, grabbots, or stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant, or gin waste shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, and no permit will be issued for such movement.

REGULATION 6. COTTONSEED

Cottonseed shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for such movement of samples of sterilized seed to an approved laboratory in nonregulated territory for analysis, or of samples to be moved for some other approved purpose.
Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seed to an authorized oil mill in nonregulated territory for crushing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oil mills in such nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such safeguards against the spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions on the subsequent movement of the linters and other product manufactured from the seed concerned as may be required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed to any destination on condition that the seed has been given a special heat treatment at 145' F. maintained under approved condition's for a period of 1 hour and subsequently has been protected from contamination, or has been given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed from a regulated area on such conditions as may be prescribed by thdt Bureau.
Cottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area -may be moved interstate from such area under permit on c6nditionthat while in the area the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
REGULATION 7. LINT AND SAMPLES

Lint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit has been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such movement of lint or samples thereof produced in a regulated area on condition that the lint was produced in a gin operated as to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and upon compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:






216 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Spt..

Baled lint must be either vacuum fumigated, or compressed, or roller tratd or given such other treatment or treatments as may later be approved by the said Bureau; samples must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for thie interstate movement of baled lint and samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area -and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the siaid materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judg-ment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, pernits may be issued for the interstate, movement Of lint from a regulated area on Such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 8. L'iNTZRS AND SAMPLE

Linters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters and samples thereof produced in a regulated area on condition that they were produced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the Supervision of an, inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled linters must be either vacuum fumigated, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; samples must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters and samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that such materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters from the regulated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 9. MILLWAST19, U:\BALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER, FORMS OF UNMANUF-ACTURED LINT AND Li-NTERS

No form of cotton lint or winters shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no permit 1.- required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been woven or spun from cotton lint or linters and are uncontaminated with other cotton or cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows, cushions, or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compliance with the Thurberia, weevil regulations of the State concerned and in which any unwoven lint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finished product.
Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regulated area of inillwaste and of all other forms of unmianufactured cotton lint or linters for which permits are required under these regulations ;1nd which are not specificallyI covered in regulations 7 andI 8. on condition that the material has been fumigated and compressed or roller treated, or has been given such other treatment or handling(' ;i-s will, in thie judgmnent of the Bureau, eliminate risk of spread of the Thurheria weevil.

REGULATION 10. CyrirON~SEE HULLS, CAKE, ANDI) MEAL

No cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any deCstinitionl Of cottonseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed on





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 217

condition that they have been protected from subsequent contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector and have been given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any destination of cotton seed cake and meal produced either from sterilized cottonseed or from cottonseed obtained from nonregulated territory, on condition that the cake and meal have been protected against subsequent contamination with cottonseed to the satisfaction of the Inspector.
REGULATION 11.,BAGGING, WRAPPERS, AND CONTAINERS

Bagging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in connection with or which are cont aminated with cotton or 'cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved'interstate from the regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States, Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGuLATiioN 12. CARS, BOATS, VEjHIcLES, HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND EQUIPMENT

Railway cars, boats, and other v ehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with, such products, and farm household goods, farm equipment, and other a 'rticles, if contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowved to be moved interstate from the regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movements allowed under this regulation.

REGULATION 13. HAY AND OTHER FARMI PRODUCTS; AND COTTONSEED OIL

Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, and cottonseed oil, may be 'moved interstate without permit or other restriction until further notice.

REGULATION 14. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING; COSTS OF, TREATMENTS, -ETC.

To obtain permits under these regulations application should be made to the nearest local inspector or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area for the shipment and, -in that event, the material concerned shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations other than those specified in such permit.
In case Thurberia-weevil infestation within any part of the regulated area becomes so general or so heavy in the future that, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine the safeguards or treatments prescribed herein are insufficient to prevent the spread of the weevil therefrom, permits for the interstate movement of restricted articles produced or stored in such generally or heavily infested part of the area may either be refused or may be withheld until such additional treatments or safeguards have been applied as may be necessary, in the judgment of the Bureau, to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil.
Copies of the permits required under these regulations shall be attached to the articles or to the waybills or other shipping papers which accompany the shipment. In the case of movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permit shall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bear such marking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of the inspector, to identify the material.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor, incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.






218 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATION 15. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL

Products and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for expertmental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2, 1933, and shall supersede on that date the rules and regulations issued under Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised), on July 9, 1927, as amended to date.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of September 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing revised regulations sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated area.]


NoTIcE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
Wakisngton, D.C., September 30, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 61, on account of the Thurberia weevil, effective October 2, 1933. Under the revision the regulated areas include Cochise and Santa Cruz Counties, and parts of Grahaml, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona. The revision authorizes the use of various improved treatments and other safeguards that have been developed by the department in recent years, and makes various other changes with regard to treatment and transportation, of interest to growers and shippers of cotton and cotton products. Copies of said revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
I. A. WALLAoE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 10, 1933.]


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

P.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 1. AUGUST 25, 1933.

PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand Gazette No. 50, July 13, 1933, publishes Notice No. Ag. 3131, amending regulations under the Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1928, in regard to the importation of fruits or plants into New Zealand.
This notice amends regulation 6 and the inspector's certificate of the sixth schedule, and reads as follows:
REGULATIONS

1. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the principal regulations insofar as they relate to the admission of fruit, the introduction into New Zealand of any fruit from any country in which Mediterranean or, West Austtalian fruit fly (Hatterophora capitata, described also as Ceratitis capit t), is known to exist, is absolutely prohibited.
2. Every shipment of fruit which by the principal regulations and these regulations may be introduced into New Zealand shall, in addition to the






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 219

certificates required by the principal regulations to accompany such fruit to New Zealand, be accompanied by a certificate signed by an officer of the Department of Agriculture or other department performing the functions or duties relating to horticulture in the country where such fruit was grown, certifying that Mediterranean or West Australian fruit fly (1111t croph ora capitate, described also as Ceratitis capitata), does not exist in the country where such fruit was grown: Providcd, Thlat the aforesaid certificate may be combined with the appropriate certificate required by the principal regulations to accompany fruit the introduction of which is permitted under the principal regulations -and these regulations, and if so combined may be in or t o the effect of the form set out in the schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

The Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1928 (New Zealand)

Inspector's additional certificate to accompany fruit to New Zealand

I hereby certify that Mediterranean or West Australian fruit fly (Halterophora c'apitata, described also as Ceratiti capitata), does not exist in the country where the above-mentioned fruit was grown,

Dated at ,this day of -, 193Signature -- - - - - -

Official designation--------Address-- - - - - -

AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.

B.P.Q.-355.
SEPTE-MBER 7, 1933.

PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

The following summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of Jamaica, British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the acting director of agriculture of that Colony and is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States.
The information contained in this circular is offered as being correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to b)e usedl independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and proclamations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The orders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE. A. STRONGG,
Chief of Bureau.







220 BUYRAU OF PLANT~ QUARANTINE uyrsA

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTITIOS OF J A
WEST INDIES


Proclamations, orders, etc., in~ force Feb., 1932I
Aricle I f :9
Instrument DaePoiin.


Citrus:
Fruits--............... Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924.., Prohibied rs.
law 23 of 1916.
Plants, buds, and grafts- Order under law 10 of June 18, 1925- -t-.
1925.
Cotton, including any part ----do ---------- ------ ;.-do ---------P Prohibited from all countries
of any plant of any species (except Turks and Caicos
or variety y of Gossypium. Islands) except under special
license from Diector of Agri culture.
Coconuts in the husk ------Proclamation under May 15, 1923 ----Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916. ,'d
Banana plants or parts do-------------Apr. 3, 1917 Do.
thereof or articles used as
packing or covering for.
Tools or implements usually -----do---- h------------ Prohibitdr Oe or
employed ini the cultiva South Ani~d rTifi'
tion of bananas.
Earth or soil -------------------.do --------------------- do ---------- Prohibited from allcountries
Fruits and vegetables (ex- -----.do ------------ (1) July 9, 1929__ Prohibited from all countries
cept dried or processed, (2) May 27, 1930. except United' States- of
grains, seeds, potatoes, America, Canada, United
onions, or any species of Kingdom, and Ireland. A
Allium). certificate that the products
are home grown is requiem from the named countries.
Order under law 10of June 4, 1929 ----- (1) From the United King1925. dom may be imported without permit. Entry permitted into port of Kingston only. On arrival must be fumigated with hydrocyani acid gas.
(2) From any country other than the United Kingdom permitted only if and when a written permit has been granted by the Dire Agriculture previous
Plants or parts thereof, in- portation.
eluding any soil, articles, Admission allowed into port o
coverings, or packages i Kings o G must
which they may be en- be.c...ig.. .to teeCDirecdot
closed or packed. of Agriculture and on arrival
will e betd osc dis. : binfecto orfuiaon s

maybe considee deesa
d o ----------- Apr. 26,1930-----The permit willtaketht.
of a, laibel which mutbefr




)permit ttahedm are be destroyed forthiwit yips

Agricultural tools or imple- A permit as in (2) aove is
mnents of labor: fOrder under law 10 of June 4, 1929-----i necessary before ue ol
(a) New and unused - 1925. J and implements can b m
(b) Used ---------------- ported from any country, inLeluding United K





19331]. SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 221

B.P.Q.-347, Supplement No. 1.
SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE

RESICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF POTATOES
(Decree of Mar. 29, 1933)

ARTICLE 1

(1) The importation into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes and parts thereof, as well as of sacks and other containers, which may have served for their transportation and storage, from countries infested by the coleopteron, Dorypora decemlineata, or the fungus, Jynchytrium endobioticum, are prohibited.
(2) The importation into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes from countries other than those which are affected by the prohibition of the preceding paragraph, are authorized under the following conditions:
(a) When potatoes are offered for entry in containers, the containers (sacks, baskets, cases, etc.) must be new and never have served for the transportation of potatoes, and must be sealed by the plant protection service of the country of origin.
If the potatoes are transported by rail, the cars must be c!osed and sealed as above.
(b) Each shipment of potatoes must be accompanied by two copies of certificates of health and origin prepared according to the model under article 5, in the language of the country of origin and in French, or officially translated into Greek. One copy will remain in the customhouse at which consumption or in transit entry is made, and the other will accompany the shipment.
The late of the certificates shall net precede the (late of shipment by more than 20 days.
The foreign authority issuing the certificate must at once mail the original to the phytopathologicaj section, Ministry of Agriculture, Athens, Greece.
For importations of potatoes by rail the two copies of the certificate of health and origin must be attached to the waybill.
If a shipment includes several cars, each car must be accompanied by two copies of a crtificate issued for each car separately.
(3) The importation of potatoes from countries that are free from Doryphora and Sync'ytrium, but which have traversed countries in which that insect and that fungus exist, is authorized on condition that the potatoes are well packed and are sealed by th6 official service of plant, protection of the country of origin.
If the potatoes are transported by rail, the formalities required by the preceding paragraph are to be applied.
(4) The frontier customs offices, in the case of transportation by rail, or the ports, in the case of ocean transportation, will prohibit the entry and transit of potatoes, parts thereof, their containers, etc., if the shipments do not absolutely comply with the conditions provided by the present decree.
(5) The entry into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes, must be effected only through the customhouse of Eidomeni, and through the ports of Piraeus, Saloniki, and Patras.
(6) For the present, the countries considered as attacked by Doryphora are France (except its colonies and Corsica), the United States, and Canada.
(7) The following countries are attacked by Synchytrium: Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Sw4eden, and Swi.tzerland.

ARTICLE 2

The entry of living plants, and living parts thereof, bulbs, rhizomes, tubers (other than potatoes), insofar as they do not fall under the prohibitions prescribed by measures in force against Phylloxera, is authorized only when each shipment of the said products is accompanied by an official certificate of the country of origin, affirming that the products shipped are free from Doryphora and that that insect does not exist where the products were grown, nor within a distance of 100 kilometers therefrom.






222 BUREAU OF PLA-NT QUARANTINE [July-sept

ARTICLE 3

The importation of potatoes intended for planting is permitted, whatever their origin, under the following conditions:
(1) A permit must have been obtained in advance from the Ministry of Agriculture.
(2) The potatoes shall be in containers.
(3) The containers shall be absolutely new.
(4) Each container shall be sealed by the official plant protection service of the country of origin.
(5) Each shipment shall be accompanied by a certificate of health and origin in conformity with the conditions set forth in article 1 of this decree, and also a declaration of the firm whence the seed potatoes came, affirming in addition to the identifying marks of the shipment, the variety of potatoes. and a statement that they are suitable for planting.
ARTICLE 4

The Minister of Agriculture reserves the right to have the potatoes and the products mentioned in article 2 inspected when offered for entry, by officials designated for that purpose, even in cases where all the provisions of this decree have been complied with.
If that inspection shows the potatoes to be carriers of Doryphora decemlineata, or Phthorinaea operculella or of Synchytrium eutobiotim.m, those products will be reexported within 15 days at the expense of the importer, or subjected to disinfection, likewise at the expense of the importer, to the extent that such a measure is deemed sufficient, and that means for disinfecting are available at the port of entry; or, finally, they will be destroyed, still at the cost of the importer, without right of indemnity.
The destruction shall take place immediately, if the detention of the potatoes is deemed dangerous or after a perior of 15 days. For destruction, the formalities of article 2 of law No. 217 are to be followed.
ARTICLE 5

The model of the certificate of health and origin mentioned in this decree will be the following (see model appended).
The present decree becomes effective one month after date of publication in the Official Journal (No. 81 of Mar. 29, 1933).

MODEL OF CERTIFICATE OF HEALTH AND ORIGIN MODT LE DU CERTIFICAT SANITAIRE I DORIGINE

Indication of Country
Indication du pays

Official Plant Protection Service
Service Officiel de Protection des Vdgftaux

Order No .......
No. d'ordre---I, the undersigned (full name, address, and official title of agent authorized to issue the certificate) certify, in conformity with the results of the supervision of the cultures of origin and inspection of the products in the shipment. that the plants or parts of plants contained in the shipment described below are judged free from injurious diseases and insect pests, and especially from those hereafter named:
Le soussign6 (nom, prlnom. et quality officielle et adresse de l'agent autoris6 A la d~livrance des certificats) certifie, conforniment aux r~sultats de la surveillance des cultures dorigine, et de l'inspection des produits c6ntenus dans l'exp6dition, que les v6getaux ou parties des v~g6taux contenus dans l'envoi dtcrit ci-dessous sont jug, s indemnes de maladies et ennemies dangereux, et notamment de ceux fnum6r~s ci-apr~s:





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 223

Doryphora decenlineata, Phthorinaea operculella, and Syichytrium enuobioticu m

Description of Shipment
Description de l'envoi

Number, weight, and kind of container.
Nombre, poids, et nature des colis.

Marks of containers.
Marque des colis.

Description of plants and indication of place where growl.
Description des v'gstaux et indication du lieu de culture.

Name in fall and address of shipper.
Nom, pr6nom et adresse de r'exp6diteur.

Place and date of issuance of certificate.
Lieu et date de d6livrance du certificat.

[SEAL] [SCEAU] Signature:
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.


B.P.Q.-302, Revised, Supplement No. 1. SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

The decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and the apple fruit fly, was amplified by that of April 20, 1933, by adding a new paragraph to article 1. Therefore the following paragraph should be inserted between the second and third paragraphs under the caption San Jose Scale Restrictions on Plant Importation on page 5 of Circular B.P.Q-302, revised:
"The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement with the Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of living plants, and fresh parts thereof, from countries other than those named in paragraph 1, in connection with which the occurrence of San Jose scale is suspected, shall be restricted to certain customs ports of entry and be subject to the condition that, as a result of the required inspection of the shipment at the port of entry, no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established; he can also extend the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 to other countries in which the presence of San Jose scale has been established."
Furthermore, the following paragraph should be inserted between paragraphs I and 2 under the caption "Fresh Fruits must be Free from San Jose Scale and the Apple Maggot" on page 7 of the same circular:
"The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement with the Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from countries other than those named in paragraph 1, in connection with which San Jose scale is suspected, shall be restricted to certain ports of entry, and be subject to the condition that, as a result of the required inspection of the shipment at the port of entry, no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established; he can also extend the provisions of paragraph 1 to other countries in which the presence of San Jose scale has been established."
The decree of November 1931, has also been supplemented by that of June 11, 1933 (Reichsgeset l. 1: 79, July 14, 1933, p. 468), to restrict the importation into Germany of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania, Bulgaria, Greece, Poland, and Yugoslavia. The text of that decree follows:
ARiicLE 1. (a) The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania across the frontiers of the German Republic is prohibited until






224 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

further notice. The same applies to wraps and articles of any kind that have been used for packing or storing such plants or plant parts.
(b) Fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from Rumania, until further notice, may be imported only through the customs ports named in article 3, only in the original packages, and only under the condition that an inspection, made at the port of entry at the cost of the interested person, reveals no infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
ART. 2. Living plants and fresh parts thereof, as well as fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from Bulgaria. Greece, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Czechoslovakia may be imported only through the customs ports named in article 3, and only on condition that an inspection, made at the port of entry at the cost of the interested person, reveals no infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
ART. 3. The products named in articles 1 and 2, insofar as their importation is not prohibited, until further notice, may be imported only through the following customs ports of entry:
Prussia:
Chief customs office: Stettin Auslandsverkehr.
Customs offices: Beuthen Q. S. Bahnhof, Deutsch-Eylau Bahnhof,
Fraustadt Bahnhof, Kreuz Bahnhof, Libau Bahnhof, Mittelwalde Bahnhof, Neu-Bentschen, Oderberg Bahnhof, Seidenberg Bahnhof, Stettin Freibezirk, Tilsit Bahnhof, Tilsit Memelbriicke, Trachenberg
Bahnhof, Ziegenhals Bahnhof.
Branch customs offices: Berlin-Tempelhof airport, Breslau Grossmarkthalle, and Eydtkuhnen Land.
Bavaria:
Chief customs offices: Lindau and Simbach.
Customs offices: Asch Bahnhof, Eger Bahnhof, Kufstein, Miinchen
Grossmarkthalle, Passau Bahnhof, and Salzburg. Saxony:
Customs offices: Bad Schandau for steamship traffic, Bodenbach, Reitzenhain, Tetschen, Boitersreuth, Warnsdorf, and Weipert. Hamburg:
Combined customs offices in Hamburg, and the customs office of Curhaven.
ART. 4. The provisions of article 3 apply also to the importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania when importation is exceptionally permitted.
ART. 5. The provisions of section 2 of article 2, sections 3 and 4 of the decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and the apple fruit fly are applicable.
LEE A. STRONG, Chief Of Bureau.


P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 3. SEPTmmBEB 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
The text of Proclamation No. 21, of August 1, 1933, prohibiting the importation of tobacco seeds into British Honduras, is as follows:
"Whereas it is expedient for the protection of the tobacco industry to prohibit the iniportation into this colony of tobacco seeds:
"I, Henry Guy Pilling, officer administering the Government, in exercise of the powers vested in me by the Plant Protection Ordinance-Chapter 71 of the Consolidated Laws, 1924-as amended by the Plant Protection !(Amendment) Ordinance, 1928 (No. 21 of 1928), and otherwise, and with the advice of the Executive Council, do hereby order and proclaim that from the fifth day of August 1933, all importations of tobacco seeds are prohibited except under license issued by the Agricultural Officer and which shall prescribe such treatment of the seeds by the Department of Agriculture as the Agricultural Officer may deem necessary."
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 225

P.Q.C.A.-305, Revised. SEPTEMBE 11, 1933.
SHIPMENT OF MEXICAN CITRUS FRUITS IN BOND THROUGH THE UNITED STATES

The importation for consumption purposes of citrus fruits (exclusive of lemons and sour limes) and certain other fruits from Mexico, is prohibited by Notice of Quarantine No. 5, and Amendment No. 1 thereto, issued under the authority of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, to prevent the entry into the United States of an injurious insect known as the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens) .'
With respect to articles prohibited entry in this and other similar quarantines promulgated for the purpose of excluding plant pests, provision has been made for the entry, under permit, either for immediate exportation or for immediate transportation and exportation in bond, of such articles, when uch action can be taken without risk to the fruit or other cultures of the United States. Thee provisions are embodied in the revision of plant safeguard regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture October 4, 1932, and effective December 1, 1932.
CONDITIONS GoEv.NING RAIL SHIPMENT IN BOND OF CITRUS FRUIT PRODUCED IN THE STATE OF SONORA, MExICO
(1) Permits will be issued to authorize the entry for immediate transportation and exportation in bond of Mexican citrus fruit produced in the State of Sonora alone, under conditions which will be incorporated in the permits.
(2) The exporter of citrus fruit or his forwarding agent in the United States must first procure from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine a permit to authorize the routing of the shipment via a certain port of the United States. A separate permit will be required for each port of entry and country of destination, but each permit will be an open permit continuing until revoked and valid over all the designated routes.
(3) Such movement will be limited to entry through the ports of Nogales and Naco, Ariz., and movement through the United States by designated routes to Canada, or back into Mexico at ports not farther east than El Paso.
(4) As a condition of such movement the fruit must be shipped in bond under United States customs seal in refrigerator cars, and may not be transhipped en route.
(5) Prior to entry the permittee or his forwarding agent must submit to the collector 6f customs at the port of entry a notice, in duplicate, on forms provided for the purpose, indicating the initials and number of the railroad car, the particular authorized route over which it is proposed that the car shall move, and the port of exit on the Canadian or Mexican border through which the car ANill pass out of the United States.
(6) Before entry each car must be disinfected in such manner as shall be required by the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
(7) After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged either in Canada or Mexico. the car conveying it, as a condition of return to the United States, must be carefully swept and freed from all boxes, fruit, or other rubbish by the railroad company involved.
Failure to comply with any of the above requirements may cause the cancelation of the permit.
RAILROAD ROUTES AUT HGRIZED FOR THE MOVEMENT OF SONORAN CITRUS FRUIT
DIRECTLY FROM MEXICO TO CANADA OR BACK INTO MEXICO

From Sonora, Mexico, to Canada in Bond Through the United States
Direct routing is authorized of citrus fruits from the State of Sonora, Mexico, through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., eastward to El Paso, Tex., thence to Canada via any routing which does not pass west of the direct rail routes through Salt Lake City, Utah, and Portland, Oreg., or southeast of the direct rail routes through San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo. (See map.)

I The Federal Plant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20, 1912, as amended, provides either for regulation or prohibition of the entry of plants and plant products when such action shall be necessary to prevent the introduction into the United States of injurious insects and plant diseases. Under this authority citrus fruit from Mexico, including oranges. grapefruit, and sweet limes, and also mangoes, sapodillas (Achras sapota), peaches. guavas, and plums are prohibited entry into the United States on account of the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens).






226 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [JuySpt

Fromt Sonora, MIexico, i bond through tihe United States back into Mexico

Poto Inr Port of exit
iotof eUntryVi from Port of reentry into
itatedi United Mexico
StatesStates

Nogales, Ariz-- Southern Pacific & _Nacozari R.R-------------DPouglas.... Agua Prieta, Sonora.
Do --------Southern Pacific & Mexico Northwestern R.R__ El Paso_. Ciudad Juarez, Cihuahua.
Naco, Ariz------ Southern Pacific & Nacozari R.R------------- Douglas_. Agua Prieta, Sonora.
Do --------Southern Pacific, Mexico Northwestern, or E] Paso---.. Ciudad Juarez, ChiNational R.R. of Mexico, hauhua.
Douglas, Ariz------- do --------------------------------------do--- do_ Do.

CONDITIONS GOVERNING MOVEMENT IN BOND TO CANADA OF MEXICAN CITRUS FRUIT THROUGH NORTH ATLANTIC PORTS
In addition to the rail movement from the Mexican border ports of citrus fruit produced in the State of Sonora, Mexico, under the conditions set forth above, citrus fruit from any part of Mexico coming to the port of New York or other approved northern Atlantic ports by ocean transit during the period October 15 to March 15, if apparently free from infestation, as determined by inspection at the approved port of entry, may be permitted entry at such Ports for immediate transportation and exportation in bond to Canada in accordance with the Revised Plant Safeguard Regulations, promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture October 4, 1932, and effective December 1, 1932. (See par. 2 of this circular.)
A separate permit is required for each shipment of this character and application should be made in advance: Provided, That a continuing permit, valid until revoked, maay be issued upon application when it is shown that shipments will be made throughout each season. If all required information is not available in advance of the arrival of any shipment for which a separate permit is required, the forwarding agent at New York may file an application at the New York office of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, room 844, Federal Building, Christopher Street, New York, on the arrival of such a consignment at that port.
After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged in Canada, the car conveying it, as a condition of return to the United States, must be carefully swept and freed from all boxes, fruit, or other rubbish by the railroad company involved.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Busreau.


-
I ,---r





Se1r~=,ON~

FIUE2-irc otn from Sooa 'Seicoi to Caad byayriradwtih
unhae area





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 227

LEE A. STRONG NAMED CHIEF OF BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
(Press notie)

SEPTEMBERt 29, 1933.
Lee A. Strong, who for the past 4 years has been chief of the Bureau of
Plant Quarantine, wvill become chief of the Bureau of Entomology on October 1, Secretary Wallace announced today.
The work of these twvo bureaus is closely related. The Bureau of Entomology
is a research institution, charged with investigations and demonstrations for the promotion of economic entomology ; it seeks the best means of destroying injurious insects and the development of beneficial ones. The Bureau of Plant Quarantine is responsible for the enforcement of quarantines promulgated to prevent the entry or dissemination of dangerous p~lanlt pests new to or not widely distributed within the United States; it is also responsible for carrying onl, in cooperation with the States, necessary work to prevent the spread or to eradicate pests that may have gained local foothold. Mr. Strong's transfer to the position of Chief of Entomology will reestablish a close working arrangement between the two bureaus that previously existed until the control and research work were definitely separated on July 1, 1928. Even after that, the Chief of Entomology continued also as chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration until Mr. Strong came to the Department on December 1, 1929.
Mr. Strong succeeds C. L. Marlatt, who is retiring after nearly 45 years oif service with the Federal Government. Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chief, will become Acting Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. However, Mr. Strong will complete several important projects he has started in the quarantine work after his transfer takes place; he will, for example, conduct the hearing which has been called for October 25 to consider a possible revision of Quarantine 37.
Mr. Strong's legal residence is in California where he served as assistant director of agriculture just before coming to the United States Department of Agriculture. He was formerly connected with the Federal Department as a specialist in plant-quarantine work.


FRUIT-FLY SURVEY IN THE WEST INDIES, BRAZIL, URUGUAY, CHILE, AND PERU
/ SEPTEmBERm 30, 1933.
This field survey, which was made with the consent and cooperation of the officials of the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru, had for its purpose two objectives: (1) To determine whether, in the administration of the fruit and vegetable quarantine (Quarantine No. 56), fruits and vegetables produced in those countries which did not represent pest risk were being denied entry into the United States; and (2) to determine whether fruits and vegetables
-which were being admitted into the United States from the countries named were subject to attack by fruit flies or other injurious insects. Arrangements for this survey were made through the State Department, whose relwesentatives in the countries concerned assisted materially in perfecting plans for the investigation. The success attained was in no small measure due to the helpful cooperation rendered by the government officials of the countries visited.
Because of their fruit-fly experience, Max Kisliuk,' Jr., and C. E. Cooley, plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, were selected to make this survey. Much valuable information was secured, not only with respect to fruit flies but other pests which attack fruits and vegetables in the countries concerned. A total of 2,171 collections were made. Of this number 2.,.153 represented insects and 18 plant diseases. The insect and plant-disease id(ent ifications included in this summary were made by the specialists of the Bureaus of Entomology and Plant Industry. The following summary of the results secured has been prepared by Messrs. Kisliuk and Cooley.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plantt Quaranti.






228 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-ept

BRITISH BAHAMA ISLANDS

The survey of this group, May 28-30, 1931, was for various reasons limited to the section immediately surrounding the city of Nassau and the Blue Hill region, both on the island of New Providence. Due to previous hurricanes and other agricu tural difficulties, there was but little of fruit and vegetables to be seen. scarcel.v more than 100 fruits of the mango being encountered durin the entire time spent on this island. Most of the fruits consumed were grown on the neighboring islands and in certain of the West Indies, viz, Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, etc.
The only trypetid found on the island of New Providence as result of thi survey was the papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst. Fifty percent of the ppayas examined were found to be infested with the larvae of this fruit fly, and several adults were taken.
Among economic insects other than fruit fly observed on the island, the most injurious were the citrus black fly, Aleurocanthus oglumi Ashby, and the curculionid, Pachnaeus (?) psittacus Olivier, on nearly all citrus plants. The scale insects, Coccus hesperidum L. and C. viridis Green, were also quite d(lestructive to citrus foliage. The latter insect was also found to be damaging about 12 percent of the leaves of guava. Okra was attacked by Nezara ridla L. Cornstalks and ears of corn were riddled with borings by Heliothis obsolete Fab. and Laphygma sp., and the leaves of corn were being fed upon by the Mollusca. Capolis varians, and the Coreidae, Phthia picta Drury, Pigeopea pods were heavily infested with H. obsoleta, as well as a species of Fundea, and 10 percent of the sapodilas from the neighboring island of Eleuthera had scales of Aspidiotus lataniae Sign. Squash was being bored into by a species of Diaphania, while cabbage was fed upon by Plutella maculipenis Curt and M1urgantia kistrionica Hahn, etc.

JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

Heavy rains during the period of the survey of Jamaica, June 2-20, 1931, made it difficult to reach many districts, but the following places were visited: King ston and its immediate vicinity, Hope Gardens, Spanish Town, Papine, Constance Springs. Cinchona Gardens, Pleasant Hill, Temple Hall, Castleton, Linstead, Moneague. St. Anns Bay, Dry Harbour, Falmouth, Montego Bay, Phoenix, Caladupa, Ginger Hill, Lacovia, Santa Cruz, Mandeville, Williamsield, Perus, May Pen. Hartlands, Chapelton, Williamsfred, and Manchester Pastures.
Examinations were made of all fruits and vegetables found to be in a susceptible stage of maturity in the field and in the various public markets visited. The following fruits were encountered: Bananas, plantains, papayas, mangoes, soursops, tangerines, limes, guavas, oranges, grapefruit, rose apples, sour oranges, pineapples, breadfruit, star-apples, purple hog plums, immature avocados, cashew fruits, and akee (Blighia sapida). Vegetables seen were cucumbers, tomatoes, chayotes, okra. peppers, eggplants, beets, turnips, sweetpotatoes, yams. green peas, string beans, pumpkins, onions, scallops, carrots, potatoes, cabbages, and lima beans.
The following fruit-fly infestations were found: 226 larvae of Anastrepha sp. in mangoes, purple hog plums, guavas, rose apples, and sapodillas, and 38 adults of Anastrephla sp. were successfully reared from larvae taken in mangoes and( purple hog plums. Four adults of Anastrepha sp. were collected on the leaves of cooa and mango at Hope Gardens, and 70 adults of A natrepha acidu.a Walk., on the leaves of bitter almond, akee. cocoa, mango, and purple hog plums were also taken at that place. At Cinchona. 3 adults and 2 puparia of an apparently unusual trypetid were taken on the leaves and buds of a sweetpotato vinie. Ipomoea jnamaiceniis.
Among the more noteworthy injurious insects other than fruit fly taken in Jamaia were the following: The citrus black fly, Aleurocanthus lmi on citrus foliage and on tmhat of surinam-cherry, the latter also being found attacked by a species of Pmeudoparlatoria. Prepod4es vittatus L. and Padtnaeu citri Mrshl. were also found to be especially injurious to citrus plants. Bephrata cubensis Ashm. was found in seeds of custard-apples. Larvae of a species of Olethreutidae were found in guavas, and toiba swartzii Thunb. was devouring the leaves and stems of the sweetpotato. Lachnopus aurifer White was taken on the foliage of mango. Crotalaria. and many other plants. The pink ollworm. Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., was found in cotton bols, and