Synopsis, catalogue, and bibliography of North American Thysanoptera, with description of new species

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Title:
Synopsis, catalogue, and bibliography of North American Thysanoptera, with description of new species
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English
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Moulton, Dudley
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Govt. Print. Off. ( Washington, D.C )
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TECHNICAL SERIES No. 21.
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU O F ENOMOIOG-Y.
L. 0. HOWARD, Entomologist and Chief of Bureau.




SYNOPSIS, CATALOGUE, AND

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA,

WITH DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW SPECIES.



LIBRARY

a
DUDLEY MOULTON,
Deputy State Commissioner of Horticulture for Calfformia.




ISSUED JUNE 13, 1911.


WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.
1911.



























BUREA U OF ENTOMOLOGY.


L, 0. HOWARD, Entomologist and Chief of Bureau.
C. L. iMARLATT, Entomologist and Acting Chief in Absence of Chief.
R. S. CLIFTON, Executive Assistant.
W. F. TASTET, Chief Clerk.
F. H. CHITTENDEN, in charge of truck crop and stored product insect investigations.
A. D. HOPKINS, in charge of forest'insect investigations.
W. D. HUNTER, in charge of southern field crop insect investigations.
F. M. WEBSTER, in charge of cereal and forage insect investigations.
A. L. QUAINTANCE, in charge of deciduous fruit insect investigations.
E. F. PHILLIPS, in charge of bee culture.
D. M. ROGERS, in charge of preventing spread of inoths, field work.
ROLLA P. CURRIE, in charge of editorial work.
MABEL COLCORD, librarian.
2















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY,
Washington, D. C., December 13, 1910.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith the manuscript of a
bulletin to be entitled "Synopsis, Catalogue, and Bibliography of
North American Thysanoptera, with Descriptions of New Species."
During the past few years the order Thysanoptera in America has
been the subject of increased study by entomologists, not only on
account of the extreme interest attaching to the insects themselves,
but also by reason of the considerable importance which several of
the species have attained as pests of horticultural and other crops.
Mr. Moulton, while in the employ of this bureau, was a part of the
time engaged in a study of two very destructive species in California,
namely, the pear thrips (Euthrips pyri Daniel) and the orange thrips
(Euthrips citri Moulton), and the present paper is an outgrowth of
data and specimens collected during his investigation of these insects
for the bureau.
An up-to-date synopsis and catalogue of the Thysanoptera is
greatly to be desired and will be of much use to students of this order.
I would therefore recommend the publication of this paper as Tech-
nical Series No. 21 of the Bureau of Entomology.
Respectfully,
L. 0. HOWARD,
Chief of Bureau.
Hon. JAMES WILSON,
Secretary of Agriculture.

































CONTENTS.

Page.
Introduction ............................................................... 9
Classification of North American Thysanoptera .............................. 10
Key to the suborders and families ..................................... 10
Key to the genera ..................................................... 11
Key to the species ..................................................... 13
Catalogue of North American Thysanoptera .................................. 21
Descriptions of new genera and new species .................................. 34
Bibliography of recent publications .......................................... 44
Index ..................................................................... 47
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ILLUSTRATIONS.


PLATE I. Fig. 1.-Erythrothrips arizonx: Head and thorax of female, dorsal
view .................................................
Fig. 2.-Erythrothrips arizona: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal
view .................................................
.Fig. 3.-Erythrothrips arizonx: Tip of abdomen of male, dorsal view.
Fig. 4.-Erythrothrips arizonx: Right fore wing ....................
Fig. 5.-Erythrothrips arizona: Maxillary palpus .................
Fig. 6.-Erythrothrips arizonax: Left antenna ......................
Fig. 7.-Erythrothrips arizona: Larva .............................
II. Fig. 8.-Orothrips kelloggii: Right antenna ......................
Fig. 9.-Orothrips kelloggii yosemitii: Right antenna ..............
Fig. Or-Thrips magnus: Head and prothorax of female ..........
Fig. 1.- Thrips magnus: Right fore wing .........................
Fig. 12.-Euthrips citri: Head and prothorax of female ..............
Fig. 13.-Euthrips citri: Tip of abdomen of female ..................
Fig. 14.-Euthrips citri: Right antenna of female ..................
Fig. 15.-Euthrips citri: Right fore wing ........................
III. Fig. 16.-Echinothrips mexicanus: Head and thorax of female, dorsal
view ................................................
Fig. 17.-Echinothrips mexicanus: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal
view. ........................................
Fig. 18.-Echinothrips mexicanus: Right fore wing of female ........
Fig. 19.-Echinothrips mexicanus: Right antenna ...................
Fig. 20.-Euthrips albus: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal view.
Fig. 21.-Euthrips albus: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view ....
Fig. 22.-Euthrips albus: Right fore wing .........................
IV. Fig. 23.-Euthrips parvus: Head and thorax of female, dorsal view..
Fig. 24.-Euthrips parvus: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view..
Fig. 25.-Euthrips parvus: Right fore wing of female ................
Fig. 26.-Euthrips helianthi: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal
view ..................................................
Fig. 27.-Euthrips helianthi: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view.
Fig. 28.-Euthrips helianthi: Right antenna of female ...............
Fig. 29.-Euthrips helianthi: Right fore wing .......................
Fig. 30.-Euthrips albus: Right antenna of female ..................
V. Fig. 31.-Anaphothrips ze.T: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal
view ..................................................
Fig. 32.-Anaphothrips zem: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view.
Fig. 33.-Anaphothrips zex?: Right fore wing .......................
Fig. 34.-Anaphothrips zeT: Right antenna of female ...............
Fig. 35.-Anaphothrips tricolor: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal
view ..................................................
7


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NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


PLATE V. Fig. 36.-Anaphothrfps tricolor: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal
view ................................................
Fig. 37.-A naphothrips tricolor: Right fore wing of female..........
Fig. 38.-Anaphothrips tricolor: Right antenna of female ............
VI. Fig. 39.- Tricothrips tuber: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal
view .................................................
Fig. 40.-Trichothrips ruber: Tip of abdomen, dorsal view .........
Fig. 41.- Tric otrips ruber: Right antenna of female ..........
Fig. 42.-Cephalothrips errans: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal
view .................................................
Fig. 43.-Cephalothrips errands: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal
view ..................................................
Fig. 44.-Cephalothrips errans: Right antenna of female ...........
Fig. 45.-Cryptothrips californicus: Head and prothorax of female,
dorsal view ..........................................
Fig. 46.-Cryptothrips californicus: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal
view .................................................


Page.

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SYNOPSIS, CATALOGUE, AND BIBLIOGRAPHY OF NORTH
AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA, WITH DESCRIPTION OF
NEW SPECIES.

INTRODUCTION.
The many recent publications on American thrips, and especially
the descriptions of new species with their added notes, have con-
stantly impressed the writer with the need of a catalogue of these
already known species, with references to their habitat and food plants
and to notes on their life history. The writer is also impressed with
the need, for future workers, of. a uniform method in describing new
species.
Several English and European entomologists have published
extensively on European thrips, but it is only within the last decade
that American writers have given more than passing notice to these
insects. Several species of injurious thrips, in both the East and
West, have been carefully studied, and these economic problems, it
seems, have been largely the incentive for the other, the systematic
work. The grass thrips (Anaphothrips striatus Osborn), the straw-
berry thrips (Euthrips tritici Fitch), the onion thrips (Thrips tabaci
Lindeman), the tobacco thrips (Euthrips fuscus Hinds), the green-
house thrips (Heliothrips hmorrhoidalis Bouch ), the bean thrips
(Heliothrips fasciatus Pergande), the orange thrips (Euthrips cit i
M.oulton), and lastly the pear thrips (Euthrips pyri Daniel) are all
examples of what serious pests this group includes. Already many
agents of the Bureau of Entomology of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture and various State and county workers have spent
much time and money in learning the habits of these several inju-
rious forms. California, unfortunately, harbors all of the above-
mentioned species except, so far as we know, the tobacco thrips.
Messrs. Hood, Shull, Franklin, and D. L. Crawford have published
extensively on these insects since the monograph by Dr. W. E. Hinds
appeared. The writer also knows of others who are collecting thrips
and preparing manuscript on description of new species. It seems
opportune, therefore, for the sake of future workers, that a uniform
method of describing species be adopted. The writer, therefore,
9







NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


includes an outline,' which has been found most satisfactory in his
own work.
Thrips are such minute insects that it is necessary for accurate
study that they be mounted on slides. The w-riter has been able to
get the best results by treating them in the following way: The thrips
should be collected and killed by dropping them directly into 75 or 80
per cent alcohol; they should be dehydrated by passing them succes-
sively through 90 per cent, 95 per cent, and absolute alcohol, and then
cleared in xylol or cedar oil, and mounted in balsam. One specimen
only should be placed under a cover glass; but by using small
cover glasses, two can be placed side by side on a single slide. Glycerin
jelly mounts are not to be desired.
The present paper includes 118 species of known American thrips,
which are variously divided among 40 genera. Descriptions of 2
genera, 10 species, and 1 variety are herewith presented. The
bibliography includes only references to recent publications.

CLASSIFICATION OF NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
KEY TO THE SUBORDERS AND FAMILIES.
I. SUBORDER TEREBRANTIA.
Female with a sawlike ovipositor. Terminal abdominal segment of female conical
and of male broadly rounded. Wings usually present; fore pair strongest,
with more or less well-developed veins; membrane of wings with micro-
scopic hairs.
a. Antenna with nine segments. Fore wings broad and rounded and with promi-
nent ring veins and cross veins. Ovipositor upcurved.
(A.) Family EOLOTHIPIDX.
a'. Antennae with seven, eight, nine, or ten segments. Wings present or want-
ing; when present usually narrow and pointed at tips. Ovipositor down-
curved ........................................ (B.) Family TimPIDm.

I ORDER FOLLOWED IN DESCRIBING TIIYSANOPTERA.
Na me.
Measurement.: ]lead length, width; prothorax length, width; mesothorax width; abdomen width;
length of tube in the Phleothripidav; total body length; antenua, length of segments in microns, total
length. Note any variations.
General color, N ith variations.
head: Comparative size, shape (frons, cheeks), markings, spines.
Eyes: Size, shape, position on head, color; shape and size of facets; presence or absence of pilosity.
Oelli: Present or wanting, size, position, color.
Mouth-cnc,: Comparative size, shape; maxillary palpus, shape, segments; labial palpus, shape, seg-
men ts.
A ntnfle : Number of segments, total length compared with head, color, markings including spines,sense
Cones and areas.
Prothora: General shape, size, angles, number and position of spines, color.
Mrfjothorax: Sh ape, comlparative size, color.
Mfeatolirax or ptrthlorar: Ditto.
Legs: Shape, markings of claws or spines, color.
win~s: Fore wings, size, shape, veins, spines or hairs, fringe, color; hind wings, ditto.
A bdomtn: Shape, markings, spines: shape of tube in PhleothriIida'.
Nuw mher of speiicis from which described.
IHabitat.
Food plants.
Noths: including time of year when alults a:r taken.
)i-sriptlons of males should follow the same outline as for females.
Nots on larval stages.


10







KEY TO THE GENERA.


II. SUBORDER TUBULIFERA.
Female without sawlike ovipositor. Terminal abdominal segment tubular in both
sexes. Wings usually present; fore pair only with a rudimentary median
longitudinal vein; membrane of wings without microscopic lairs. Ailtena
with eight segments, or sometimes only seven.
(C.) Family PIILCOETHoRIPIDE.

KEY TO THE GENERA.
A. Family EOLOTHRIPID2E.
1. All segments of antenna freely movable and diminishing in size gradually toward
the tip.
a. Maxillary palpi with seven or eight segments; wings with bands.
b. Wings with dark cross-bands; maxillary palpi with seven segments.
(1) Orothrips MIoulton.
b. Wings with dark longitudinal bands along posterior margin; maxilliary palpi
with eight segments ........... (2) Erythrothrips new genus.
a'. Maxillary palpi three-segmented, labial palpi two-segmented; wings without
dark cross-bands ................. (3) Ankothrips Crawford.
2. Last four segments of antennae closely united and together shorter or a little longer
than the fifth; maxillary palpi three-segmented, labial palpi
four-segmented .................. (4) Eolothrips Haliday.

B. Family THRIPIDhE.
1. Antennae with seven segments.
a. Body with deeply reticulated structure; wings broad, reticulated, and without
front fringe --------------------- (5) Parthenothrips Uzel.
a,. Body without reticulated structure; wings pointed, front fringe present.
b. Maxillary palpus with two segments ---------------- (6) Baliothrips IHaliday.
bV. Maxillary palpus clearly with three segments ---------- (7) Thrips Linnaeus.
2. Antenne with eight segments (with six segments in Aptinothrips rufus var. con-
natticornis).
a. Body with reticulated structure, wings present.
b. Last segment of antenna long and slender and very much longer than segment 7.
c. style longer than segment 6; prothorax much shorter than head; spines on
veins pointed ...................... (8) Heliothrips Haliday.
c'. style shorter than segment 6; prothorax about as long as head; spines on
wings long, strong, and with dilated tips.
(9) Echinothrips new genus.
b'. Last segment of antenna not noticeably long and slender and only a little
longer than segment 7; style shorter than segment 6.
(10) Dictothrips Uzel.
a'. Body without reticulated structure (except in Sericothrips reticulatus).
b. Abdomen having a silky luster (when living or in dried condition), because
of covering of extremely small hairs.
(11) Sericothrips Haliday.
b. Abdomen without small hairs giving it a silky luster.
c. Last two antennal segments longer than the sixth .... (12) Raphidothrips Uzel.
c'. Last two antennal segments shorter than the sixth.
d. Terminal segment of abdomen with a pair of extremely stout, short spines
near the tip above ................ (13) Limothrips Haliday.
d'. Terminal abdominal segments without stout spines.






12


NORTH AM.IERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


e. Antennae with second segment drawn out into an acnte process on outer
angle; fore femora usually broad and with small tooth at
end on outside ................... (14) Chirothrips Haliday.
e'. Antennae with second segment normally symmetrical- fore femora
smaller and without tooth.
f. Ocelli and wings wanting; hairs upon the end of the abdomen short
and as a rule very weak ........ (15) Aptinotkrips Haliday.
f'. Ocelli and wings present; hairs upon the end of the abdomen moder-
ately long and proportionately stout.
g. With a long spine at the middle of each side of prothorax; spines on
body and wings very strong ......... (16) Scolothrips Hinds.
gr'. Without a spine at the middle of each side of prothorax.
h. Ovipostor long and extending considerably beyond tip of abdo-
men ............................... (17) Scirtothrips Shull.
Y. Ovipostor not unusually long and not extending beyond tip of
abdomen .................. (18) Euthrips Targioni-Tozzetti.
3. Antennae with apparently nine segments.
a. Head only slightly wider than long; wings not regularly set with spines; spines
weak and not conspicuous ....... (19) Anaphothrips Uzel.
a-'. Head fully one and one-half times as wide as long; wings set regularly with
spines ........................... (20) Pseudothrips Hinds.
4. Antennm with clearly nine segments, sometimes apparently ten.
(21) Heterothrips Hood.
C. Family PHL(OTHRIPIDJE.

1. Head about as long as wide and either shorter or only a little longer than the pro-
thorax.
a. Antennae with seven segments.
b. Antennae one and one-half times as long as head; head rounded in front and
about as wide as long; basal segments of antenna? subap_
proximate .......................... (22) Allothrips Hood.
V/. Antenna two and one-half times as long as head; head rectangular; basal
segments of antennae widely separated and placed on the
prominent anterior angles of the head.
(23) Rhaptothrips Crawford.
a'. Antennae with eight segments and one and one-half to twice as long as head.
b. Width of abdomen of females not nearly equal to one-half its length; wings
constricted in the middle.
c. Mouth-cone not longer than its breadth at base; labrum narrowed toward
the tip but not sharply pointed; fore femora but slightly
thickened; fore femora of males without large curved tooth
on inner side ....................... (24) Anthothrips Uzel.
c'. Mouth-cone reaching nearly to bind edge of prosternum; labrum blunt; fore
femora of females thickened, of males greatly enlarged and
with a large curved tooth on inner side.
(25) Aleurodothrips Franklin.
b. Width of abdomen of females equal to about one-half its length.
c. Head narrowed in front ............................ (26) Eurythrips Hinds.
7'. Head not narrowed in front.
d. Third antennal segment very short and narrow.....(27) Lissothrips Hood.
d'. Third antennal segment normal.
e. Segment 8 of antenna shorter than segment 7 .... (28) Tricothrips Uzel.
e'. Segment 8 of antenna very slender and noticeably longer than segment 7.
(29) Plctothrips hood.







KEY TO THE SPECIES.


13


2. Head considerably longer than wide and longer than the prothorax.
a. Head less than twice as long as wide.
b. Fore femora each with a tooth on the inner side near the end.
(30 Acanthothrip8 Uzel.
b'. Fore femora unarmed.
c. Wings wanting or reduced to pads (or very short and weak if fully developed).
d. Mouth-cone shorter than its width at base, labrum not narrowed in the
middle and with a blunt tip ....... (31) Cephalothrips Uzel.
d'. Mouth-cone as long as its width at base, labrum sharply pointed.
e. Cheeks with spine-bearing warts .............. (32) Malacothrips Hinds.
e. Cheeks without spine-bearing warts ................ (33) Neothrips Hood.
c'. Wings fully developed.
d. Wings constricted in the middle.
e. Mouth-cone broadly rounded at the end; wings only slightly narrowed
in the middle ...................... (34) Cryptothrips Uzel.
e'. Mouth-cone constricted at the end; wings considerably narrowed in
the middle and having somewhat the shape of a sole.
f. Head nearly twice as long as wide; mouth-cone reaching nearly across
prosternum ........................ (35) Leptothrips Hood
f'. Head only a little longer than broad; mouth-cone reaching only to
middle of prosternum ................ (36) Zygothrips Uzel.
d'. Wings of equal width throughout.
e. Cheeks with a few very small warts, each of which bears a small spine.
(37) Phlaothrips Haliday.
el. Cheeks without such warts ........................ (38) Liothrips Uzel.
a. Head more than twice as long as wide; individuals very large.
b. Antennae one and one-sixth to one and one-half times as long as head; fore
tarsi of females unarmed, of males each armed with a tooth;
without prominent spines along fore margin of prothorax.
(39) Idolothrips Haliday.
/. Antennae twice as long as head; color brown to dark brown; fore tarsi not
armed; four prominent spines along fore margin of protho-
rax, two of which stand on the outer angles.
(40) Megalothrips Heeger.
KEY TO THE SPECIES.

(1) Genus OROTHRIPS Moulton.

1. Segment 2 of antenna quite uniform brown; segment 3 not constricted in the middle;
sense areas on segments 3 and 4 elongate.
(1) Orothrips kelloggii Moulton.
2. Segment 2 of antenna brown at base, yellow at tip; segment 3 constricted in the
middle; sense areas on segments 3 and 4 ovoid.
(2) Orothrips kelloggii yosemitii, new variety.

(4) Genus EOLOTHRIPS Haliday.
1. Fore wings with dark cross-bands.
a. White band around abdominal segments 1 and 2; last four segments of antenna
much longer than fifth.
b. Segments 2 and 3 of abdomen white; wings with cross-veins.
(5) Xolothrips bicolor Hinds.
V. Segments 1, 2, and posterior half of 3 white; wings without cross-veins.
(6) Eolothrips vespiformis Crawford.






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NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


a. Without white band around first two abdominal segments; last four segments of
ant ennoe approximately as long as the fifth alone.
(7) AZolothripsfasciatus Linnaus.
2. Each fore wing with dark longitudinal band along posterior margin.
a. With veins in anterior wings normal as in most species of this genus.
(8) X3olothrips icuwanaii Moulton.
a'. Without veins in anterior wings .............. (9) Eolothrips Longiceps Crawford.

(7) Genus THnus Linnaeus.
1. Head considerably wider than long.
a. Body color dark brown, thorax and other parts orange-tinted, inner crescents
bordering ocelli orange-red; individuals large, about 1.25 mm. in
length.
b. Wings light brown, with lighter colored area near base.
(12) Thrips madronii Moulton.
V/. Wings uniform dark brown to brown ........ (13) Thrips magnus, new species.
a'. Body color light yellow to light brown or brown; inner crescents bordering ocelli
light brown; body length about 1 mm.
b. Ocelli subapproximate; posterior longitudinal vein of fore wing with about
fourteen to seventeen regularly placed spines.
(14) Thrips tabaci Lindeman.
b'. Ocelli widely separated, anterior one on frons and directed forward; posterior
longitudinal vein bearing about seven spines.
(15) Thr ps abdominalis Crawford.
2. IIead about as long as wide.
a. Color uniform light lemon-yellow ................ (16) Thrips brernnerii Moulton.
a'. Color of head brown, of thorax reddish orange-brown, of abdomen pale yellow to
gray-brown .....................(17) Thrips perpkxus Beach.

(8) Genus HELIOTHRIPs Haliday.
1. All tibite yellow.
a. Antenna nearly three times as long as head; wings shaded brown, with two more
or less distinct whitish cross-bands and whitish at tip.
(18) Heliothripsfemoralis Reuter.
a'. An tenne about twice as long as head; wings almost white, shaded light brown
along veins ................. (19) Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis Bouch6.
2. Mi(ldle and hind tibie brown.
a. A ntennm two and one-half times as long as head, segments 3 and 4 modioliform,
maxillary palpi three-segmented... (20) Illiothripsfasciatus Pergande.
a'. A ntene twice as long as head, segments 3 and 4 fusiform; maxillary palpi two-
segimented ...................... (21) Heliothripsfasciapennis Hinds.

(11) Genus SEWICOTITRIPS Haliday.
I. WNimng fully d(evclo)ed or rudimentary.
aI. Wings fully developed.
b. Fore wings dusky or gray-brown and more or less distinctly marked with whitish
cross-bands; general color yellowish to dusky gray.
(24) Sericothrips variabilis Beach.
b. Fore wings black, with two broad white cross-bands, and white at tip; general
color blackish ..................... (25) Scricothrips pulchllus Hood.
a'. Wings reduced or fully developed; body dark brown to nearly black, except seg-
ments 41, 5, and 6 of abdomen, which are almost white.
(26) Scricothrips cingulatas I1inds.







KEY TO THE SPECIES.


15


2. Wings wanting.
a. Body very dark brown, nearly black; pterthorax yellow to yellow-brown; legs
brown ........................... (27) Sericothrips apteris Daniel.
a'. Body uniform brown; surface of body strongly reticulated; legs yellow.
(28) Sericothrips reticulatus Moulton.
a". Body and legs uniform brown; four stout spines on dorsal side of segment 9.
(29) Sericothrips stanfordii Moulton.

(14) Genus CHIROTHRIPS Haliday.

1. With two moderately long spines at each hind angle of prothorax; two longitudinal
veins in each fore wing; fore wings gray-brown.
(31) Chirothrips manicatus Haliday.
2. With one moderately long spine at each hind angle of prothorax; one median longi-
tudinal vein in each fore wing, five spines on apical part of wing
where second vein should be ..... (33) Chirothrips mexicanus Crawford.
3. Without spines at hind angle of prothorax.
a. Abdomen light yellow ........................... (34) Chirothrips obesus Hinds.
a'. Abdomen light brown .......................... (35) Chirothrips crassus Hinds.

(18) Genus EUTHRIPS Targioni-Tozzetti.

1. Without prominent spines on fore angles of prothorax, longitudinal veins not regu-
larly set with spines.
a. Head noticeably wider than long; general color white to light yellow or orange.
b. Last two segments of antenna rather long and slender, and together about two-
thirds as long as segment 6; wings shaded brown, with transparent
whitish areas near base and at tip; ring vein and longitudinal veins
not conspicuous ................... (39) Euthrips orchidii Moulton.
b'. Last two segments of antenna not noticeably elongate and slender and together
about one-half as long as segment 6.
c. Ring vein and at least a part of fore vein conspicuous; color of body orange-
yellow.
d. Wings shaded brown; fore part of longitudinal vein alone conspicuous.
(40) Euthrips parvus, new species.
d'. Wings not shaded brown; both longitudinal veins present, with three or
four scattered spines on each, one of which stands.at the abrupt ending
of each vein ............................ (41) Euthrips citri Moulton.
c'. Ring vein and longitudinal veins not conspicuous; group of six spines on basal
part of wing where anterior vein should be and nine on outer half
where posterior vein should be; color of body and wings clear white,
outer half of antennae dark brown... (42) Euthrips albus, new species.
a'. Head about as long as wide; general color brown, thorax sometimes orange-
brown.
b. Basal segment of antennae concolorous with head and with segment 2; wings
brown, with an irregular, somewhat triangular transparent area
near base; two long prominent spines between posterior ocelli;
without prominent spines along posterior margin of prothorax; legs
brown, concolorous with body, except tarsi, which are lighter.
(43) Euthrips pyri Daniel.
b. Basal segment of antennae lighter colored than head and segment 2; wings
uniform light brownish-gray, without whitish area near base.
(44) Euthrips ehrhornii Moult on.
2. With spines on fore angle of prothorax; longitudinal veins set regularly with
spines.






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


a. Fore tibive armed at end with tooth. Females dark brown; wings brown, with
whitened area near base; antennae concolorous with head, except
segment 3, which is light yellow.
(45) Euthrips ulicis californicus Moulton.
a,'. Fore tibi not armed with tooth.
b. Postocular spines wanting; row of spines along anterior margin of prothorax
either wanting or at least not conspicuous, except often the third
from the outer margin.
c. Antennae uniformly brown to dark brown, concolorous with body; wings
light brown, veins prominent; spines brown, twenty-three on fore
vein, sixteen on hind vein, short and comparatively stout; white
longitudinal area near base of wing. -(46) EuLhrips nminutus Moulton.
c'. Antenna with segment 3 yellowish, 4 and 5 light gray-brown, yellowish at
base; wings gray-brown, veins not prominent, spines on wings nor-
mally long and stout, fourteen on fore vein, ten on hind vein.
(Wings may be reduced to pads) ........ (47) Euthripsfuscus Hinds.
'. Postocular spines, conspicuous.
c. General color uniformly brown to dark brown, no shading of orange; antennae
with segments 3, 4, and 5 light brown to yellow and shaded.
d. Uniformly dark brown; fore wings shaded dark brown, with a large
whitened area extending across wing near base; spines on wings all
dark brown ...................... (48) Eutkrips insularis Franklin.
d'. Color yellowish brown; fore wings uniformly shaded with gray.
(49) Euthrips nerrosus Uzel.
e'. General color whitish to yellow or yellowish to brown, no shading or orange.
d. Second segment of antennae with a double spine-bearing tubercle; vertex
of head depressed; anterior ocellus directed forward.
e. Color uniformly yellow; surface of body without reticulation.
(50) Euthrips cephalics Crawford.
e,'. Color uniformly brown; surface of body reticulated.
(51) Euthrips cephalicus reticulatus Crawford.
d'. Second segment of antennae without double spine-bearing tubercle; ver-
tex of head not depressed; anterior ocellus directed upward;
color yellowish, shaded with dusky brown.
(52) Euthrips helianthi new species.
c". General color light yellow to yellowish brown; thorax or other parts
decidedly tinted with orange.
d. Head pale lemon-yellow to light yellowish brown; thorax orange-yellow;
abdomen brownish yellow to brown; segment 1 of antenna whitish
to light brown; segment 2 dark brown.
(53) Euthrips occidentalis Pergande.
d-'. General color brownish yellow, not uniform; thorax orange-yellow; seg-
ment 1 of antenna pale yellow, 2 light brown, base sometimes yel-
lowish ................................ (54) Euthrips Iritici Fitch.
d. General color brown to dark brown: thorax orange-brown.
(55) Ethrips tritici californicus, new variety.

(19) Genus A,APIIOT1RIPS Uzel.
1. Without spines on posterior angles of prothorax; cheeks straight; surface of abdo-
men not faintly cross-striated; crescents of ocelli bright orange-
yellow ......................... (56) Akaphothrips striatus Osborn.
2. With one stout spine on posterior angle of prothorax; cheeks arched; surface of
abdomen distinctly cross-striated; crescents of ocelli light brown.


16







KEY TO THE SPECIES.


17


a. Head about as long as wide; wings shaded gray-brown; segments 5, 6, 7, and 8
of abdomen without comblike arrangement of spines along posterior
margin; color uniformly yellow to gray-brown.
(57) Anaphothrips hesperus new species.
a. Head noticeably wider than long; wings transparent; segments 5, 6, 7, and 8
of abdomen with conspicuous comblike arrangement of spines; color
of head and prothorax yellowish or orange-yellow, abdomen brown.
(58) Anaphothrips tricolor new species.

(21) Genus HETEROTHRIPS Hood.
1. Prothorax twice as long as head; antennae with apparently nine segments.
a. Antennae without circles of distal sensoria on segment 4; segment 3 light yellow,
palest at base; segment 4 brownish, palest toward base; articulation
of segments brown, not clear. Wings brown, paler at base. Ante-
rior femora shading to yellow at apex, fore tibiae yellow, shaded with
brown laterally; tarsi yellow ......... (60) Bteterothrips salicis Shull.
a'. Antennae without distal circles on segment 4; segments 1 and 2 slightly lighter
than body, shaded laterally with black; segment 3 light yellow,
with a narrow subbasal white band; distal one-third clouded with
brown; segments 4 to 9 uniform light blackish-brown except band
of sensoria on segment 4. Wings blackish brown, with a broad white
band near base. Legs concolorous with body, except tarsi and distal
part of fore tibiae, which are yellow.
(61) Heterothrips arisTmrx Hood.
2. Prothorax less than twice as long as head; antenna with apparently 10 segments;
circles of sense areas on segments 4 and 5 (corresponding to seg-
ments 3 and 4 of other species of Heterothrips); segments 3 and 4
(corresponding to segment 3 of other species) light yellow; all others
dark brown. Wings light brown, basal one-sixth clear.
(62) Heterothrips decacornis Crawford.
(24) Genus ANTHOTHRIPS Uzel.

1. Postocular spines wanting; antennae almost uniformly brown, except segment 3
and base of 4, which are light brown .... (65) Anthothrips niger Osborn.
2. Postocular spines well developed.
a. Segments 3 and 6 of antennae, eyes, fore tibiae, all tarsi, and other lighter parts of
body shaded with orange-yellow... (66) Anthothrips verbasci Osborn.
a-'. Intermediate segments of antennae and other light parts of body light brown.
(67) Anthothrips variabilis Crawford.
(26) Genus EURYTHRiPS Hinds.

1. Width of abdomen about one and two-thirds times that of prothorax; antennae
twice as long as head.......... (69) Eurythrips ampliventralis Hinds.
2. Width of abdomen about one and one-fourth times that of prothorax; antennae
two and one-half times as long as head. (70) Eurythrips osborni Hinds.
(28) Genus TRICHOTHRIPS Uzel.
1. Prominent spines on body with blunt or dilated tips; most forms very dark brown
or nearly black (except T. angusticeps), usually with short wings
(except T. longitubus).
a. Each fore tarsus armed with a tooth; antennae about one and two-thirds times
as long as head; total body length about 14 to 1.7 mm.
719240-11-2







18


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


b. Postocular spines very short and not conspicuous.
c. Color brown, with conspicuous red pigment blotches; mouth cone pointed
and reaching beyond posterior margin of prosternum; segments
1 and 2 of antennae brown, unicolorous with body.
(72) Trichothr ps dens Moulton.
b'. Postocular spines prominent.
c. Postocular spines acute; color of body black; mouth cone blunt, short,
reaching but slightly past middle of prosternum; segments 1 and 2
of antennae black, segment 2 shading to lighter.
(73) Trichothrips brericurals Shull.
c'. Postocular spines prominent and nobbed at ends.
d. Color of body brownish yellow, shaded with brownish black, with maroon-
colored hypodermal pigmentation; mouth cone considerably sur-
passing base of prosternum: segments 1 and 2 of antennae paler
than body color .................. (74) Trichothrips angusticeps Hood.
d'. Color of body brown to deep brown, with maroon-colored pigmentation;
mouth cone not surpassing base of prosternum; segments 1 and 2
unicolorous with body .......... (75) Trichothrips ruber new species.
a. Fore tarsi not armed; body length about 1.8 mm.; antennae about twice as long
as head.
b. Wings fully developed; tibiT, tarsi, and intermediate segments of antennae
bright lemon-yellow; prothorax two-thirds as long as head; tube
fully as long as head ............ (76) Trichothrips longitubus Hood.
b. Wings short; antennal segments 1 to 3 yellowish-brown, segments 4 to 8
black; prothorax about as long as head; tube slightly shorter than
head ................................. (77) Trichothrips buifrg Hood.
2. Prominent spines on body acute; most forms yellow-brown (except T. ilex which
may be almost black); antennae about twice as long as head; all
rather large individuals, about 1.7 mm. or more in length, and with
wings usually fully developed (except T. smithii, which is without
wings and very small, about 1 mm. in length).
a. Individuals small and without ocelli or wings.... (78) Trichothrips srithi Hood.
a'. Individuals large; wings usually fully developed (they may be rudimentary
in T. americanus.)
b. Each fore tarsus armed with a small tooth.
c. Small stout spines on head borne upon small warts; tube fully as long as head.
(79) Trichothrips beachi Binds.
c'. Spines on head not borne on small warts; tube shorter than head.
d. Antennae one and three-fourths times as long as head; tube two-thirds as
long as head; total length about 2 mm.; fore tarsus with a short,
stout tooth; wings clear white, except a slightly clouded band at
one-third the wing's length ........ (80) Trichothrips amnbitus Hinds.
d'. Antennae twice as long as head; tube three-fourths as long as head; total
body length about 1.7 mm.; fore tarsi with a very small tooth;
wings clear white ............ (81) Tri~cothripsfemioralis Moulton.
d". Antennr slightly more than twice as long as head; tube slightly shorter
than head; total body length about 1.7 mam.; fore tarsi with a small
acute tooth; wings light gray-brown, spotted with darker.
(82) Tr;icholhrips amnricius Hood.
bV. All tarsi armed each with a small tooth.
c. Color very dark brown, almost black; all tarsi, tips of fore tibix, and seg-
ment, 3 and 4 of antennae shading to yellow; sides of head slightly
arched ............................. (83) Trichothnrips ilex Moulton.







KEY TO THE SPECIES.


19


c'. General color similar to that of T. ilex; all tarsi gray-brown to brown; anten-
nae brown, with base of segment 3 yellow.
(84) Trichothrips ilex dumosa Moulton.
c". Color brown to light brown; tarsi light brown; antennae concolorous with
body, except segment 2 and base and top of 3, which are yellowish;
sides of head nearly parallel..... (85) Trichothrips tridentatus Shull.

(30) Genus ACANTHOTHRIPS Uzel.
1. Postocular spines wanting; back of head with spine-bearing tubercles; antennae
hardly twice as long as head; body without latero-dorsal white
stripes.
a. General color yellowish brown; antennae, legs, and segments 8 and 9 of abdo-
men banded with nearly transparent or yellowish white; tube bear-
ing a circlet of eight very long hairs.
(87) Acanthothrips magnafernoralis Hinds.
a'. General color dark brown, without white bands and without long hairs at end
of tube.
b. A distinct white fleck, by reflected light, on dorsal anterior corners of all
abdominal segments except the two basal and the two apical.
(88) Acanthothrips nodicornis Reuter.
b. Without whitish markings ............... (89) Acanthothrips doanei Moulton.
2. Postocular spines long and pointed; back of head without spine-bearing tuber-
cles; antenna about one and one-fourth times as long as head; body
with latero-dorsal white stripes extending from posterior margin of
eyes to base of eighth abdominal segment.
(90) Acanthothrips albivittatus Hood.

(31) Genus CEPHALOTHRiIPS Uzel.
1. General color yellowish brown; antennae yellow, shaded with brown; all femora
and middle and hind tibiae brown; all tarsi and fore tibie (except
at base outside) pale yellow; body length 1.48 mm. (1.40 mm. to
1.56 mm.) ......................... (91) Cephalothrips yuccx Hinds.
2. General color dark brown; antennae dark brown, except segment 3, which is yel-
lowish brown at tip; all femora and bases of all tibiae brown; tips
of all tibiae and all tarsi yellow; body length 1.16 mm. (1.86 mm. in
winged forms when bodies are distended).
(92) Cephalothrips errans new species.

(34) Genus CRYPTOTHRIPS Uzel.
1. Color brown to blackish brown, with conspicuous purplish pigmentation; seg-
ments 1 and 2 of antennae concolorous with head, 3 and base of 4
yellow, others shading to brown toward tip; postocular spines not
long and prominent ........... (93) Cryptothrips calbjornicus Daniel.
2. Color uniformly coal-black, except tarsi, which are blackish brown.
a. Antennae uniformly black; body length about 2.22 mm.; two pairs of promi-
nent postocular spines .......... (96) Cryptothrips carbonarius Hood.
a'. General color of antennae black, segment 2 paler at apex, segment 3 with two
transverse brownish-yellow bands, one at base and the other in the
middle; body length about 2.7 mm.; without prominent postocular
spines.................... (97) Cryptothrips rectangularis Hood.






20


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


(37) PHLOTHRiPS Haliday.
1. Postocular spines long and conspicuous.
a. General color dark brown, with tibiae and tarsi bright yellow; cheeks nearly
straight; antennae one and three-fourths times as long a head.
(100) Phloeotlhrips uzeli Hinds.
a. General color yellowish brown, with considerable irregular red hypodermal
pigmentation; legs grayish brown; cheeks slightly arched; antennae
twice as long as head........... (101) Phlatothrips pergandei Hinds.
a". General color brown; fore tibiae and all tarsi light browir; cheeks strongly
arched; antennae one and one-half times as long as head.
(102) Phkeothrips raptor Crawford.
2. Postocular spines wanting; general color dark mahogany brown, with many smaller
white pigment markings along head, thorax, and abdomen, and on
legs ............................ (103) Phloeothrips maculatus Hood.
(38) Genus LIOTHRIPS Uzel.
1. Head about one and three-tenths or less times as long as wide.
a. Fore wings brownish at extreme base; head about one and fifteen one-hundredths
times as long as wide; marginal abdominal bristles yellowish; tube
eight-tenths as long as head ........... (104) Liothrips ocellatus Hood.
a'. Fore wings nearly black in basal half; head about one and three-tenths times
as long as wide; marginal abdominal spines nearly black; tube
six-tenths as long as head ........ (105) Liothrips umbripennis Hood.
a"t. Fore wings brownish in basal half.
(106) Liothrips umbripennis mexicanus Crawford.
2. Head about one and five-tenths times as long as wide.
a. Antennae lemon-yellow; spines on prothorax large and prominent; mid laterals
present, fully as long as anterior marginals; tube two-thirds as long
as head ........................... (107) Liothrips citricornis Hood.
a'. Antennal segments 1 and 2 concolorous with head; spines on prothorax not
prominent; mid laterals wanting.
b. Antennae with segments 1 and 2 almost black, 3 light yellow to light brown,
others brown; tube one-half as long as head.
c. Head converging anteriorly ........... (108) Liothripsfascicudatus Crawford.
c'. Head distinctly converging posteriorly.
(109) Liothrips fasciculata stenoceps Crawford.
b. AntennT one and two-thirds times as long as head; segments 1 and 2 dark
brown, concolorous with body, others yellow.
(110) Lithrlps bakeri Crawford.
b". Antenne one and one-fourth times as long as head; segment 1 and base of
2 concolorous with body, apical half of 2 and of 5 and 6 to 8 light
brown; 3, 4, and basal half of 5 yellow; tube one-half as long as
head .......................... (111) Liotirips mwcone1li Crawford.
(39) Genus IDOLOTHrIps Haliday.
1. Wings wanting or reduced to pads; all tibie and tarsi bright yellow; tibie often
clouded with brown at base ......... (112) Idolotripsflavipes Hood.
2. Wings fully developed but short.
a. Average length 5.28 mm.; color deep black; entire body surface, including
feiora and tibia, finely reticulated; tarsi yellow.
(113) Idolothrips angusticeps Crawford.
a'. Average length about 4 mm.; color coal-black, without marking; tarsi dark
brown........................ (114) Idolothrips coniferaruin Perade.







CATALOGUE.


a",. Average length about 3.3 mm.; color black, antennal segments 3 to 5 yellow
at bases; tarsi blackish brown ........ (115) Idolothrips armatu Hood.
3. Wings large, powerful, brown at base; median vein brown, prominent, and extend-
ing to middle of wing; fore wings double fringed behind for about
40 hairs ....................... (116) Idolothrips tuberculatus Hood.

(40) Genus MEGALOTHRIPS Heeger.

1. Color dark brown, with orange or red pigment; all tibice and tarsi shaded with
yellowish; bases of antennal segments 3-6 lemon-yellow.
(117) Megalothrips hesperus Moulton.
2. Color nearly uniformly black, excepting tarsi, which are blackish brown.
(118) Megalothrips spinosus Hood.

CATALOGUE OF NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.

1. Genus OROTHRIPS Moulton, 1907.
(1) Orothrips kelloggii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept.
Agr., p. 45, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Santa Cruz Mountains, central California.
Taken in blossoms of manzanita (Manzanita manzanita) and madrofia
(Arbutus menziesii) in March and April.
(2) Orothrips kelloggii yosemitii new variety. (For description see p. 34.)
Habitat: Yosemite Valley, Cal.
Taken in blossoms of wild lilac (Ceanothus sp.?) at an altitude of 6,000
feet, in June and July.

2. Genus ERYTHROTHRIPS new genus.
(Described on page 34.)
(3) Erythrothrips arizons new species. (For description see p. 35.)
Habitat: Phoenix, Ariz.; Oroville, Cal.
Taken in orange and olive blossoms in Arizona, by Mr. J. Eliot Coit,
and on Rhamnus purshiana at Oroville, Cal., by Mr. B. B. Whitney.

3. Genus ANKOTHRIPS Crawford.
(4) Ankothrips robustus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4, p.
100, figs., 1909.
Habitat: Claremont and Los Gatos, Cal.
Taken on California laurel (Umbellularia californica) and California lilac
(Ceanothus sp.?) at an altitude of 5,000 feet.

4. Genus MOLOTHRIPS Haliday.
(5) AEolothrips bicolor Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.
26, p. 130, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: Brunella vulgaris, Panicum sanguinale, bindweed, and various
grasses in mowings.
(6) Molothrips vespiformis Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4,
p. 109, figs., 1909.
Habitat: Managua, Nicaragua.
Food plant not known.


21






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


(7) Nolothrips fasciatus Linnaeus, 1758. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N.
Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 127, figs., 1902.
Habitat: England; Vienna, Austria; Finland; Germany. In the United
States-Connecticut; Massachusetts; New York; Indiana; Iowa; Michigan;
New Mexico; San Jose and Chico, Cal.; Corvallis, Oreg.
Food plants: As listed by Hinds-alfalfa, buckwheat, celery, clover,
CompositT, oats, onion, tansy, wheat, various grasses and weeds. In Cali-
fornia in blossoms of California buckeye (,Esculus californica) and monkey
flower (Dplacus glut inosus), and on sugar beet foliage. In Oregon on Chrysan-
themu in leucanthemum, specimens collected by J. C. Bridwell. Taken in
California from April to July.
(8) 2Eolothrips kuwanaii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept.
Agr., p. 47, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Santa Cruz Mountains, California.
Food plants: California lilac (Ceanothus thyrsiflorus), elderberry (SamIbucus
glauca), chamisal (Adenostoma fasciculatum), purple lupine (Lupinus sp.?),
April to July.
NOTE.-Specimens of olothrips kuwanaji collected from the blossoms of
C&anothus thyrsiflorus, at La Honda, Cal., have a variation in the shape of
the dark longitudinal band on the wing. This band is widened at its anterior
end and often extends across the entire wing. Segment 3 of the antenna is
also often brown instead of lemon-yellow, shading to light brown at the tip.
Eolothrips 7.uwanaii, variety robustus Moulton (Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur.
Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr., p. 48) is withdrawn and included in the species.
(9) 2Eolothrips longiceps Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4,
p. 101, figs., 1909.
Habitat: Claremont, Cal.
Food plant: Artemisia.
NOTE.-JDescribed from one male.

5. Genus PARTHENOTHRIPS Uzel.
(10) Parthenoth-rips draccen~e Heeger, 1854. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 176, figs., 1902.
I1abitat: Vienna; Finland; St. Petersburg; Germany; Bohemia. United
States-Washington, D. C.; Amherst, Mass.; San Francisco and Sacramento,
Cal.
Food plants: After Hinds-Draca naw, Ficus elustica, Kentia belmoreana. In
California on Aralia (?) and sago palm (Cycas revoluta).

6. Genus BALIOTERIPS Halday.
(11) Baliothrips basalis Shull, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 224, figs., May, 1909.
Iabitat: Huron County, Mich.
On leaves of millet grass (M iliumn efusum) in August.

7. Genus THRIPS Linnaus.
(121 Thrips madronii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 57, 1igs., 1907.
habitat: California; Oregon.
Food plants: California lilac (Ceanothus thyrslorus), mountain laurel
(Umbellilaria cal fornict), Solanum umbelliferum, Arbutus nenziesii, western
azalea (Ihododcndron orcidellale), lemon blossom; taken from April to July.


22






CATALOGUE. 23

(13) Thrips magnus new species. (For description see p. 36, Pl. II, figs. 10, 11.)
Habitat: Visalia, Cal.
On monkey-flower (Mimulus sp.?). Specimens collected by Mr. P. R.
Jones.
(14) Th.ips tabaci Lindeman, 1888. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer.,
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 179, figs., 1902. (The onion thrips.)
Habitat: After Hinds-Russia; England; Italy; Bohemia; Heligoland;
Bermuda. In United States, generally distributed from Maine to California.
Food plants: Almost all wild and cultivated flowers, grasses, fruit blos-
soms, and truck crops.
(15) Thrips abdominalis Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
page 157, March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Taken in various Composite, Solanum, Daucus sp.?, and others.
(16) Thrips bremn.erii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 59, figs., 1907.
Habitat: San Jose, Cal.
From inside of ripe figs, July.
(17) Thrips perplexus Beach, 1895. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer.,
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 184, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Ames, Iowa; Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: After Hinds-Cyperus sp.?, corn, various grasses.

8. Genus HELIOTHRIPS Haliday.
(18) Heliothrips femoralis Reuter, 1891. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N.
Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 172, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Helsingfors, Finland. United States-District of Columbia;
Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: As listed by Hinds-Amarillis sp., Aralia, Arum, Cestrum
nocturnum, Chrysanthemum, Crinum, cucumber, Dracxna sp., Eucharis
grandiflora, Ficus elastica, F. grandiflora, Gardenia, Gossypium, Hydrangea,
Mina lobata, moonflower, Pandanus, Phoenix, Richardia wthiopica, tomato,
Vitis.
(19) Heliothrips hemorrhoidalis Bouch6, 1833. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 168, figs., 1902. Ref.: Russell,
Bul. 64, Pt. VI, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.; Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 33,
p. 719, 1908. (The greenhouse thrips.)
Habitat: England; Germany; Vienna; Finland. United States-District
of Columbia; Iowa; Massachusetts; Michigan; California. Mexico; St.
Vincent and Barbados Islands; Hongkong, China.
Food plants: Aspidium, azaleas, croton, dahlias, ,ferns, liliaceous plants,
Pellea hastata, phlox, pinks, verbenas, vines, laurestinas.
NOTE.-This insect is usually a hothouse pest, but lives out of doors on
such plants as laurestinas and azaleas in the milder California climate.
Mr. Franklin records it from the Barbados and St. Vincent Islands, in the
West Indies group, where it feeds on cacao, kola, and date palms; and numer-
ous shipments of mangoes from Mazatlan, Mexico, which arrive in the port
of San Francisco, indicate that this insect is a serious pest on these fruits.
(20) Heliothrips fasciatus Pergande, 1895. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 174, 1902.
Caliothrips woodworthi, Ent. News, vol. 15, p. 297, November, 1904.
Habitat: Widespread throughout California.






24


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


Food plants: Oranges, wild vetch, burr clover; foliage of beets, radishes,
pea vines, and lettuce; pear blossoms and foliage.
NoTE.-This insect is a serious pest on oranges, alfalfa, pear trees, and
various garden crops.
(21) Heliothrips fasciapennis Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, 15. 171, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: Grasses.

9. Genus ECHINOTHRIPS new genus.
(Described on page 37.)
(22) Echinotli-ips mexicanus new species. (For description see p. 37.)
Habitat: Acapulco, Mexico.
Specimens taken from a small potted plant on shipboard in San Fran-
cisco, Cal.
10. Genus DICTOTERIPS Uzel.

(23) Dictothrips reticulatus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
p. 155, figs., 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
"Taken on blossoms of native acacia-like tree" (Crawford).

11. Genus SERICOTHRIPS Haliday, 1836.

(24) Sericothrips variabiis Beach, 1895. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 143, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Iowa; Massachusetts; Yosemite Valley and San Jose, Cal.
Food plants: Cucumber, grass, smartweed; in blossoms of buckthorn and
mountain lilac (Ceanothus sp.?) in Yosemite Valley in California at an altitude
of 5,000 ft. The California specimens should probably rank as a distinct
new variety of this species.
(25) Sericothrips pulchellus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 363, 1908.
Habitat: Muncie, Ill.
Food plants: Hop-tree (Ptelea trifoliata).
NOTE.-Mr. Hood notes that "this species is very close to Sericothrips
variabilis Beach, but the coloration is distinctive. In living specimens
examined under a hand lens, the head and prothorax are velvety black and
without luster, due no doubt to the microscopic reticulation."
(26) Sericothrips cingulatus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 141, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.; Nebraska City, Nebr.
Food plants: Various grs;es. The writer has collected specimens of this
insect from grass at Nebraska City, Nebr., which have fully developed wings.
These are broader and clear white in the basal fourth and slender and uniform
gray-brown in the outer three-fourths.
(27) Sericothrips apteris Daniel, Ent. News, vol. 15, p. 295, November, 1904.
Redescribed by Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 49, 1907.
IHabitat: Counties about San Francisco Bay, California.
Food plants: Various grasses and weeds.
Now.-Many specimens of this thrips collected recently indicate a close
relationship to S. stanfordii Moulton. Some specimens are almost uniformly
brown.







CATALOGUE.


25


(28) Sericothrips rebiculatus Moulton, Tech. Scr. 12, Ft. 111, Bur. Ent., U. S.
Dept. Agr., p. 50, figs., 1907.
HTabitat: Santa Clara Valley, Cal.
Food plant: Grass and weeds.
(29) Sericothrips stanfordii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S.
Dept. Agr., p. 51, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Stanford University, California.
Food plants: Grasses and various weeds.

12. Genus RAPHIDOTHRIPS Uzel.

(30) Raphidothrips fuscipennis Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mu.,
vol. 26. p. 159, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Massachusetts.
Food plants: Grasses.

13. Genus LIMOTHRIPS Haliday.
(31) Limothrips cerealium Haliday, 1852, Redescribed by ITnds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 139, figs., 1902. (Limothrips
avenue Hinds.)
Habitat: England; Germany. United States-Pennsylvania; Massachusetts.
Food plants: Oats, Festuca pratensis.

14. Genus CHIROTHRIPS Haliday.

(32) Chirothrips manicatus Haliday, 1836. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 134, figs., 1902.
Habitat: England; Germany; Finland; Russia; Bohemia. United States-
Manchester, Iowa; Amherst, Mass.; Nebraska City, Nebr.; Corvallis, Oreg.
Food plants: Flowers of various grasses and cereals, clover, wild carrots.
(33) Chirothrips mexicanus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1. no. 4,
p. 114, figs., 1909.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Food plants: Tobacco flowers (Nicotiana tabacun).
(34) Chirothrips obesus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.
26, p. 137, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: Festuca ovina, Poa pratensis.
(35) Chirotlrips crassus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.. vol.
26, p. 136, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: "Old witch grass," Panicum capillare.

15. Genus APTINOTHRIPS Haliday.

(36) Aptinothrips rufus Gmelin, 1788, and variety connatticornis Uzel, 1895. Rede-
scribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 166,
figs., 1902.
Habitat: England; Russia; Sweden; Bohemia; Germany; Heligoland;
Finland. United States-Amherst, Mass.; Nebraska City, Nebr.; San Jose
and Oakland, Cal.
Food plants: Various grasses and in turf.






26


NORTH AMERICA]N THYSANOPTERA.


16. Genus SCOLOTHRIPS Hinds.
(37) Scolothrips sexmaculatus Pergande. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 157, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Missouri; Ames, Iowa; Lincoln, Nebr.; Baraboo, Wis.; Honolulu,
Oahu, Hawaiian Islands.
Taken on beans, blackberry, elm, and hop (Beach).
NOTE.-" Found on many plants infested with red spiders, on which it has
repeatedly been observed to feed" (Pergande). "Feeding on mites in fold
of cottonwood leaf" (Bruner). Specimens of thrips sent by Mr. David
Fullaway from the Hawaiian Islands are larger and darker in color than as
given in Hinds's description and all of the dark spots on the wings are enlarged
to bands.
17. Genus SCIRTOTHRIPS Shull.
(38) Scirtothrips ruthveni Shull, Ent. News., vol. 20, p. 222, figs., May, 1909.
Habitat: Huron County, Mich.
Food plants: Terminal clusters of dogwood (Cornus stolonifera).

18. Genus EUTHRIPS Targioni-Tozzetti.
(39) Euthrips orchidii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
figs., 1907.
Habitat: Fruitvale, Alameda County, Cal.; Brussels, Belgium (Bagnall).
Taken in flowers of orchids in greenhouse in California and on Chamxdorea
fragrant, Ficaria, and palms in Belgium, by Mr. Bagnall.
(40) Euthrips parvus new species. (For description see p. 38, P1. IV, figs. 23-25.)
Habitat: San Francisco, Cal.
Food plants: Various hothouse plants.
(41) Euthrips citri Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. VII, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
ills., 1909. (The orange thrips.)
Habitat: Orange districts on eastern foothills of San Joaquin Valley,
southern California; Phoenix, Ariz.
Taken from citrus trees and thistle (?) in San Joaquin district; from
orange in southern California; from nightshade (by Mr. P. R. Jones) in
Phoenix, Ariz.
NOT.-This is a very destructive pest in some of the orange districts of
California, the injury being done in the retarding and deforming of the new
growth of foliage and in the marking (scabbing) of the oranges.
(42) Euthrips albus new species. (For description see p. 39, P1. III, figs. 20-22.)
Habitat: Red Bluff, Cal.
Taken on peach-tree foliage.
(43) Eutlrips pyii Daiiel, Ent. News, vol. 15, p. 294, November, 1904. Redescribed
by Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr., p. 53, figs.,
1907; Iuill. 68, Pt. 1, Bur. Eut., U. S. Dept. Agr., figs., ills., 1907; Bul. 80,
Pt. IV, Bur. Ent., U. S. 1)ept. Agr., figs., ills., 1909. (The pear thrips.)
Ihabittt: ('ounties around San Francisco Bay, central California, north to
Sacraiiiento, south to 1ollister; Berkhamusted, llertford County, England.
Food points: Deciduous fruits, including almond, apple, apricot, cherry,
fig, grape, peach, pear, plum, prune, English walnut. Blossoms of wild plum
in England.
(44) Eutbxips ehrhornii Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept.
Agr., ). 51, figs., 1907.
Habitat: San Jose and Saratoga, Cal.
Taken on grass and on foliage of prune trees.







CATALOGUE.


27


(45) Euthrips ulicis californicus Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. fIl, Bur. Ent., U. S.
Dept. Agr., p. 55, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Wrights Station, Santa Cruz Mountains, Cal.
Taken from wild vetch sweepings.
(46) Euthrips minutus Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 56, figs., 1907; Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4, figs., 1909.
.Euthrips minutus setosus Crawford.
Habitat: Santa Clara Valley, Yosemite Valley (altitude 5,000 ft.), Suisun,
Newcastle, Loomis, Lindsay, East Highlands, La Honda, Cal.
Food plants: Prune and cherry foliage, pear and cherry blossoms, grass,
yarrow, chamisal, buttercups, sunflowers.
NoTE.-This insect is also found to be usually much larger than in the
original description. A new typical specimen has: Head, length 0.105 mn.,
width 0.135 mm.; prothorax, length 0.12 mm., width 0.18 mm.; mesothorax,
width 0.240 mm.; abdomen, width 0.270 mm., and total body length 1.30 mm.
Antennse: 1, 15,u; 2, 33k; 3, 37/t; 4, 39,u; 5, 36p ; 6, 45,a; 7, 9p; 8, 151,;
total 0.23 mm.
The back of the head is cross-striate, the ocelli have orange-brown cres-
cents, and the fore and middle tibite are light brown. The costa has
twenty-six to twenty-eight spines, the fore vein twenty to twenty-one
spines, and the hind vein fifteen to sixteen spines.
(47) Euthrips fuscus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26,
p. 154, figs., 1902. Euthrips nicotianx Hinds, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash., vol. 18,
p. 197, 1905; Cir. 68, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr., figs., 1906; Bul. 65, Bur.
Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr., figs., ills., 1907. (The tobacco thrips.)
Habitat: Massachusetts; Florida; Georgia; Texas.
Food plants: Grass (?), tobacco.
(48) Eutbrips insularis Franklin, Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 33, p. 715, figs., 1908.
Euthrips insulaiis reticulata Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1,
no. 4, p. 116, 1909.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico; Barbadoes and West Indies Islands.
Food plants: Lupinus, Convolvulus, Composite, Rhamnus in Mexico at an
elevation of from 1,000 to 2,500 ft.; black willow, legumes, yams, beans, roses,
grass, potato, papaw, pepper, tobacco, white wood, woolly pyrol, Convolvulus,
ground nut, arrowroot, flamboyant in the Barbados and West Indies Islands.
(49) Euthrips nervosus Uzel, 1895. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer.,
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 155, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Bohemia; Ames, Iowa; Amherst, Mass.
Taken on corn, various grasses, and spring flowers.
(50) Euthrips cephalicus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1, p. 153,
March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Food plants: "Several composite, a small native acacia-like tree, a Solanum,
and several other plants (Crawford).
(51) Euthrips cephalicus reticulatus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2,
no. 1, p. 155, March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Taken on certain RGsaceai and Labiatoo.
(52) Euthrips helianthi new species. (For description see p. 40, P1. IV, figs. 26-29.)
Habitat: Visalia, Cal.
Taken in wild sunflower blossoms.
(53) Euthrips occidentalis Pergande, 1895. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 152, 1902.
Habitat: California.
Food plants: Blossoms and foliage of numerous trees and -weeds.






28


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


(54) Euthrips tritici Fitch, 1855. (For description, life-history notes, and references,
see Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 149, 1902.)
Habitat: Generally distributed throughout the United States.
Taken in flowers of almost all wild and cultivated plants.
NoTE.-This is undoubtedly the commonest and the most widely dis-
tributed of all American species of thrips. The variation within the species
will probably lead some later writer to divide the group into several distinct
varieties. The insect varies from very light colored, almost white individuals
(which for the most part are collected in white or light colored flowers) to very
dark brown, and from individuals with no shading of orange to those colored
to a deep red-orange. The writer is here erecting one new variety, to include
the very dark brown specimens in this group. These can not possibly be
included within the species as Mr. Hinds's description now stands. The
variety is called Euthrips tritici californicus.
(55) Euthrips tritici californicus new variety.
Habitat: California, Oregon, and Washington.
Taken in company with Euthrips tritici, in the blossoms of almost all wild
and cultivated plants. The variety is distinguished from the species by the
following characters: General color uniformly dark brown, thorax orange-
brown; segment 1 of antenna brown, unicolorous with head, segment 2 uni-
formly darker brown.

19. Genus ANAPHOTHRIPS Uzel.
(56) Anaphothrips striatus Osborn, 1883. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 160, figs., 1902. Ref.: Ent. News,
vol. 20, p. 224, May, 1909 (males found).
Habitat: Illinois; Iowa; Maine; Massachusetts.; New York; Ohio; Ontario;
Nebraska; California.
Food plants: Poa pratensis, Phleum pratense, and other grasses; in Cali-
fornia on leaves and ears of corn, and on alfalfa.
(57) Anaphothrips zew new species. (For description see p. 41, P1. IV, figs. 31-34.)
Habitat: Visalia, San Jose, and Red Bluff, Cal.
Taken on leaves and ears of corn, on grasses, and on foliage of orange.
(58) Anaphothrips tricolor new species. (For description see p. 41.)
Habitat: Tulare County, Cal.
Taken on goldenrod and on orange nursery stock by Mr. P. R. Jones.

20. Genus PSEUDOTHRIPS Hinds.
(59) Pseudothrips inequalis Beach, 1896. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys.
N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 146, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Ames, Iowa.
Food plant: Aster.

21. Genus HETEROTHRIPS Hood.
(60) Heterothrips salicis Shull, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 220, figs., May, 1909.
Habitat: IIuron County, Mich.
Taken on the outside of catkins of a willow (Salixfluviatilis).
(61.) Heterotbrips arisma Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. list., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 362, August, 1900.
Habitat: Urbana, Il.
Taken in flowers of jack-in-the-pulpit (ArisCMna triphyllum).






CATALOGUE.


29


(62) Heterothrips decacornis Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4,
p. 110, 1909.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Taken on a low native tree with small yellow flowers, common in the bar-
rancas near Guadalajara; also on a shrub belonging to the family Malpig-
hiacese.
22. Genus ALLOTHRIPS Hood, 1908.
(63) Allothrips megacephalus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 372, figs. 1908. Ref.: Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 228, May, 1909 (males found).
Habitat: Urbana and Springfield, Ill.
Taken from under bark of various trees in winter.

23. Genus RHAPTOTHRIPS Crawford.
(64) Rhaptothrips peculiaris Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4,
p. 116, figs., 1909.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Food plant: "A certain spiny solanaceous plant" (Crawford).

24. Genus ANTHOTHRIPS Uzel.
(65) Anthothrips niger Osborn. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer.,
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 188, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Iowa; Michigan; Massachusetts; Oregon; California.
Food plants: Achillea millefoliun, oxeye daisy, red and white clover,
various grasses.
(66) Anthothrips verbasci Osborn. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer.,
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 189, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Ames, Iowa; Amherst, Masb.
Food plant: Mullein.
(67) Anthothrips variabilis Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
p. 166, fig., March, 1910.
Habitat: Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba; Managua, Nicaragua; Guadalajara,
Mexico.
Food plants: "Celosa, Dodder and native creeping vine" (Crawford).

25. Genus ALEURODOTHRIPS Franklin.
(68) Aleurodothrips fasciapennis Franklin (described as Cryptothripsfasciapennis),
Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol. 33, p. 727, figs., 1908; as Aleurodothrips fascia-
pennis in Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 228, figs., May, 1909.
Habitat: Newstead, St. Peters, Barbados Islands; Florida.
Taken on flower of La France rose and commonly in Florida feeding on the
eggs, larve, and pupme of the citrus white fly (Aleyrodes citi R. & H.).

26. Genus EURYTHRIPS Hinds, 1902.

(69) Eurythrips ampliventralis Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat.
Mus., vol. 26, p. 202, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Masd.
"Taken in turf in fall" (Hinds).
(70) Eurythrips osborni Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.
26, p. 203, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plants: Grasses.






30


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


27. Genus LISSOTERIPS Hood, 1908.

(71) Lissothrips muscorum Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2
p. 265, 1908.
Habitat: Illinois.
Taken in moss.

28. Genus TRICHOT rIPS Uzel, 1895.
(72) Trichothrips dens Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 60, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Santa Clara Valley, Cal.
Taken on apricot foliage.
(73) Trichothrips brevicuralis Shull, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 227, figs., May, 1909.
Habitat: Huron County, Mich.
Taken among leaves of pine-cone gall on willow (Salix fluviatilis).
(74) Trichothrips angusticeps Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 367, figs., 1908.
Habitat: St. Joseph and Urbana, Ill.
Taken under bark of rotten stumps.
(75) Trichothrips ruber new species. (For description see p. 42.)
Habitat: San Jose, Cal.
Taken in azalea blossom.
(76) Trichothrips longitubus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 368, 1908.
Habitat: Carbondale, Ill.
Taken in sweepings.
(77) Trichothrips buiffi Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2, p. 369,
figs., 1908.
Habitat: Decatur, Homer, and Urbana, Ill.
Taken under bark of soft-maple trees.
(78) Trichothrips smithi Hood, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 29, figs., January, 1909,
Habitat: Boskydell, Ill.
Taken on hard maple (Acer saceharum).
(79) Trichothrips beachi Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.
26, p. 192, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Taken under quince bark.
(80) Trichothrips ambitus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 191, figs., 1902.
IIHabiat: Amherst, Mass.
Food plaid: Grass.
(81) Trichothrips femoralis Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept.
Agr., p. 61, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Newca4tle, Cal.
Food plant: Wild mullein.
(82) Trichothrips americanus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 366, fis., 1908.
Ifabita: ('arbondale, Homer, and Urbana, Ill.
Taken under bark on rotten stumps.
(83) Trichothrips ilex Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
1). 62, figs., 1907.
Ihibitat: (oa.st region of California.
Food plant: Christmas berry (Jlctcrolcs arbutiolia).







CATALOGUE.


31


(84) Trichotbrips ilex dumosa Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S.
Dept. Agr., p. 63, 1907.
Habitat: Saratoga, Cal.
Taken on scrub oak (Quercus damosa).
(85) Trichothrips tridentatus Shull, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 226, figs., May, 1909.
Iabitat: Huron County, Mich.
Taken under the scales of the bark of white oak (Qwercus alba).

29. Genus PLECTOTHRIPS Hood, 1908.
(86) Plectothrips antennatus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2
p. 370, 1908.
habitat: Urbana, Ill.
Taken on a window of a woodshed, in June.

30. Genus ACANTHOTHRIPS Uzel, 1895.

(87) Acanthothrips magnafemoralis Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S.
Nat. Mus., vol. 26, p. 199, figs., 1902. Ref.: Psyche, vol. 10, p. 221, October-
December, 1903.
Habitat: Miami, Fla.; Amherst, Mass.
Food plant: Under loose bark on a sycamore tree.
(88) Acanthothrips nodicornis Reuter, Uzel's Monograph, p. 260, figs., 1895.
Ref.: Psyche, vol. 10, p. 222, October-December, 1903.
Habitat: Germany; Finland; Bohemia; Amherst, Mass.
Taken under the bark of a sycamore tree in Massachusetts.
(89) Acanthothrips doanei Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept.
Agr., p. 64, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Alum Rock Canyon, San Jose, Cal.
Food plant: Grass.
(90) Acanthothrips albivittatus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art.
2, p. 374, 1908.
Habitat- Bloomington, Ill.
Taken on the trunk of a Carolina poplar.

31. Genus CEPHALOTHRIPS Uzel, 1895.

(91) Cephalothrips yuccse Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 194, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.; Washington, D. C.
Food plants: Yucca filamentosa, goldenrod.
(92) Cephalothrips errans new species. (For description see p. 43, Pl. VI, figs.
42-44.)
Habitat: San Jose, Cal.
Food plants: Wild mustard, apricot, and pine foliage. Taken during June
and July.

32. Genus MALACOTHRIPS Hinds, 1902.
(93) Malacothrips zonatus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 200, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Taken in turf.







32


NORTHI AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


33. Genus NEOTHRIPS Hood, 1908.
(94) Neothrips corticis Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2, p. 372,
figs., 1908.
Habitat: Urbana and Hillery, Ill.
Taken under bark in winter.

34. Genus CRYPTOTHRIPS' Uzel, 1895.
(95) Cryptothrips californicus Daniel, Ent. News, vol. 15, p. 293, November, 1904.
Redescribed by Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S. Dept. Agr.,
p. 66, figs., 1907.
Habitat: California, Oregon, and Washington.
Often taken under the old shells of the brown apricot scale (Lecanium corni
Bouch6 (armeniacum Craw)) and black scale (Saissetia olexe Bern.).
Taken on foliage of peach, French prune, and Bartlett pear, also on leaves
of chamisal (Adenostoma fasciculatum) and tanbark oak (Quercus densifora)
and other plants.
(96) Cryptothrips carbonarius Hood, Bul Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 376, figs., 1908.
Habitat: Pulaski, Ill.
Taken in sweepings from grass and weeds.
(97) Cryptothrips rectangularis Hood, Can. Ent., vol. 40, no. 9, p. 307, figs., 1908.
Habitat: Urbana, Ill., and Harrisburg, Pa.
Taken under dead bark in peach tree in Illinois and "In burrow of lepi-
dopterous or coleopterous larva in dead willow stem."

35. Genus LEPTOTHRIPS Hood, 1909.

(98) Leptothrips asperus Hinds, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 249, June, 1909.
Cryptothrips asperus Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 205, figs., 1902.
Phyllothrips asperus Hood, Can. Ent., vol. 40, no. 9, p. 305, 1908.
Habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Taken on grape.

36. Genus ZYGOTHRIPS Uzel, 1895.
(99) Zygothrips longiceps Hood, Bul. 11. State Lab. Nat. list., vol. 8, art. 2,
p. 364, figs., 1908.
Habit at: Carbondale, Ill.
Taken in a gall on Solidago.

37. Genus PHL(BOTHRIPS Haliday, 1836.
(100) Phlceothrips uzeli Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus., vol.
26, p. 196, figs., 1902.
habitat: Amherst, Mass.
Taken ou various grasses and clover and on Ulmis onwtaia var. pendulu.
(101) Phlceothrips pergandei Hinds, Mon. Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus.,
vol. 26, p. 197, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Amherst Mas
Taken ori grass.

For Cryptothrips asperun Hinds, see Leptothrips asperus, No. 98.







CATALOGUE.


(102) Phiceothrips raptor Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
p. 159, March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mex.
Taken in sweeping shrubbery.
(103) Phlceothrips maculatus Hood, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 250, figs., June, 1909.
Habitat: Baldwin, Mich.
Taken under rotting poplar bark.

38. Genus LIOTHRIPS Uzel, 1895.
(104) Liothrips ocellatus Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2, p. 375,
1908. Ref.: Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 249, June, 1909.
Habitat: Hillery, Ill.
Taken in moss.
(105) Liothrips umbripennis Hood, Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 30, figs., January, 1909.
(Described as Plhyllothrips umbripennis.)
Habitat: Illinois and Michigan.
Taken on various species of oak.
(106) Liot~hips umbripennis mexicanus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent.,
vol. 2, no. 1, p. 161, March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mex.
Taken in oak galls, at an elevation of 10,000 feet.
(107) Liothrips citricornis Hood, Can. Ent., vol. 40, no. 9, p. 305, fig., 1908.
(Described as Phyllothrips citricornis.)
Habitat: Dubois, Duquoin, Odin, and Pulaski, Ill.; Harrisburg and Rock-
ville, Pa.
Food plants: "On hickory leaves," in Illinois and "on wild grape" in
Pennsylvania, April 28 to July 16.
(108) Liothrips fasciculatus Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4,
p. 105, figs., 1909. (Described as Phyllothripsfasciculata.)
Habitat: Claremont and Suisun, Cal.
Food plant: Wild buckwheat (Eriogonurn fasciculatum).
(109) Liothrips fasciculatus stenoceps Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent.,
vol. 1, no. 4, p. 108, 1909.
Habitat: Claremont, Cal.
Specimens taken with Liothripsfasciculatus on wild buckwheat.
(110) Liothrips bakeri Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1, p. 161,
March, 1910.
Habitat: Havana, Cuba.
Taken on "galls on leaves of Ficus nitida and flowers of Ficus religiosa"
(Crawford).
(111) Liothrips mcconnelli Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
p. 163, March, 1910.
Habitat: Guadalajara, Mex.; Chico and Suisun, Cal.
Taken from "stems and leaves of a certain bignoniaceous shrub, and also
from sweepings on other shrubs" (Crawford); prune foliage and apple blos-
soms in California.

39. Genus IDOLOTHRIPS Haliday, 1852.
(112) Idolothrips flavipes Hood, Bul. Ill. State Lab. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2, p. 377,
fig., 1908.
Habitat: Illinois.
Specimens taken among fallen oak leaves.
719240-11- 3


33






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


(113) Idolothrips angusticeps Crawford, Pomona College, Journ. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1,
p. 168, figs., March, 1910.
Habitat: "Belize; Havana, Cuba; San Marcos and Chivandega, Nicaragua;
Guadalajara, Mex." (Crawford).
(114) Idolothrips coniferarum Pergande, 1896. Redescribed by Hinds, Mon.
Thys. N. Amer., Proc. U. S. Nat. Tus., vol. 26, p. 206, figs., 1902.
Habitat: Washington, D. C.; Amherst, Mass.
Taken on Pin us imops, Juniperus virgin iana, and .A bies sp.
(115) Idolotlirips armatus Hood, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., vol. 1, no. 4, p. 285, figs.,
December, 1908.
Habitat: Carbondale, Havana, Pulaski, and Urbana, Ili.
Taken in galls of Gnorimoschemia gallsolidaginis on Solidago canadensis in
miscellaneous and woodland sweepings; on Plantago rugclii.
(116) Idolothrips tuberculatus Hood, Ann. Ent. Soc. Amer., vol. 1, no. 4, p. 287,
figs., December, 1908.
Habitat: White Heath and Boskydell, Ill.
Taken on white oak.
40. Genus MEGALOTHRIPS Heeger.
(117) Megalothrips hesperus Moulton, Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, Bur. Ent., U. S.
Dept. Agr., p. 65, figs., 1907.
Habitat: Stanford University, California.
Foodplant: Not known.
(118) Megaloth-ips (?) spinosus Hood, Can. Ent., vol. 40, p. 306, figs., 1908. Ref.:
Ent. News, vol. 20, p. 231, May, 1909.
Habitat: Harrisburg, Pa.; St. Anthony Park and St. Paul, Minn.
Taken "in burrows of lepidopterous or coleopterous larvae in dead willow
stem," and "under the bark of dead limb of white birch."

DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND NEW SPECIES.
[The numbers correspond to the list numbers in the catalogue.]
(2) Orothrips kelloggii yosemitii new variety. (P1. II, fig. 9.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.16 mm., width 0.20 mm.; prothorax,
length 0.16 mm., width 0.25 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.35 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.45 mm.; total body, length 1.75 mm. Antenna:
1,30/; 2,54 p; 3,99/p; 4,96/L; 5,63 p; 6,48/i; 7, 45 p; 8,33 p; 9,33I;
total, 0.50 mm.
Ooior (lark brown to blackish-brown; cheeks not strongly arched.
Segment 2 of antenna yellow, dark brown at base; segment 3 yellow,
but dark brown in outer half; segment 3 noticeably constricted in
the middle; sense areas on segments 3 and 4 ovoid (in 0. klefloggii
elongate). Spines on hind margin of prothorax short but quite
stout; those on mesonotum likewise small. Trochanters not notice-
ably yellow. Darkened bands in center and at tip of wings smaller
and lighter colored and more irregular than in Oroth7ips kelloggii.
2. Genus ERYTHROTHRIPS new genus.
Head almost one-third longer than wide. Ocelli present in both
sexes. Antennw nine-segmented, the last two segments closely
joined and together somewhat shorter than segment 7. Maxillary


34






DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND SPECIES.


palpi geniculated and with eight segments. Labial palpi with three
segments. Prothorax about as long as head and only a little wider,
without large bristles. Legs long and slender; fore femora somewhat
thickened in both sexes. Wings present in both sexes; fore wings
very slightly narrowed before the middle; fore part of ring vein and
fore longitudinal vein furnished with a few sparse, inconspicuous
hairs; fore wings white, with dark-brown longitudinal band along
posterior margin.
(3) Erythrothrips arizonse new species. (P1. I, figs. 1-7.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.24 mm., width 0.19 mm.; protho-
rax, length 0.24 mm., width 0.23 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.38 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.49 mm.; total body, length 2.66 mm. Antennae:
1, 451u; 2, 63 u; 3, 126.;4, 111 ; 5, 6, 72p; 7, 69 t; 8, 30#; 9, 18,;
total length, 0.64 mm.
Color dark brown, with red pigmentation; connecting tissue of
abdominal segments light brown to brown.
Head about one-fourth longer than wide, rounded in front and
elevated only a little between basal segments of antenna; cheeks
slightly arched, converging but very slightly posteriorly; back of
head cross-striated; without prominent spines. Eyes prominent, not
protruding, black; eyes with large facets, pilose. Ocelli present.
Mouth-cone short, pointed; maxillary palpi geniculate, eight-seg-
mented; labial palpi four-segmented; basal segment small. Antenna
nine-segmented, two and one-half times as long as head; brown, uni-
colorous with body except basal part of segment 3, which is light
brown. All segments thickly clothed with short spines. A long
slender sense area on each of segments 3 and 4.
Prothorax about as wide as long and only a little larger than the
head; with several inconspicuous spines; all angles broadly rounded.
Legs uniformly dark brown in females, but fore tibiae and tarsi
shading to light brown in males. Fore femora slightly enlarged;
tibiae each with a stout spine at tip; all legs thickly set with short,
dark spines. Fore wings of about even width for entire length, very
slightly narrowed before the middle, broadly rounded at tip; with
ring vein and two longitudinal veins that unite with ring vein near
tip; with five cross veins; fore part of ring vein and fore longitudinal
vein with small, white, inconspicuous spines; second longitudinal vein
with about twenty-seven dark spines. Posterior margin of wing only
with fringe. Wings clear white, with dark-brown longitudinal band
extending from base, including scale, to tip, this band broadest at
middle of wing and somewhat narrowed before the middle. Hind
wings clear white, margined with fringe only along posterior side.
Abdomen large, fourth and fifth segments widest and from them
tapering gradually to the bluntly pointed tenth segment. Without


35






6 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTEIRA.


long spines except on last three segments. Eighth abdominal seg-
ment of males covered with many long hair.
Described from four females and ten males.
Habitat: Phoenix, Ariz., type specimens collected and forwarded
by Mr. J. Eliot Coit; California, specimens collected by Mr. B. B.
Whitney at Oroville.
Food plants: Orange and olive blossoms in Arizona; Rhamnus
purstiana in California.
The larva of this species is uniformly light brownish-yellow and
has conspicuous red pigment bands across the dorsal plates of meso-
thoracic and metathoracic segments and all segments of abdomen.
(13) Thrips magnus new species. (P1. II, figs. 10, 11.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.13 mm., width 0.18 mm.; protho-
ra-, length 0.16 mm., width 0.23 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.35 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.40 mm.; total body, length 1.70 mm. Antennm:
11 24 I; 2, 36 ji; 3, 56 Iu; 4, 51/t; 5, 42 It; 6, 54 p; 7, 24 y; total length
0.30 mm.
General color very dark brown, head blackish brown.
Head considerably wider than long, broadest near back; cheeks
very slightly arched, roughened; front of head broadly rounded; back
of head transversely striate. A small spine on front of each posterior
ocellus and a row of several smaller spines back of each eye. Eyes
large, occupying about two-thirds the width of the head, not unusually
protruding, pilose. Ocelli subapproximate, with dark-brown cres-
cents. Mouth-cone short, reaching hardly past middle of prothorax,
pointed; maxillary palpi three-segmented; labial palpi two-seg-
mented. Antenna seven-segmented, slightly more than twice as long
as head, uniform dark brown, with segments 1 and 2 often blackish-
brown; forked sense cones on dorsal side of segment 3 and ventral
side of segment 4.
Prothorax somewhat larger than head, all angles rounded; two long
prominent spines on each posterior angle, several smaller ones along
posterior margin, the inner one being the longest; other spines present
but not conspicuous. Mesothorax largest, sides of pterthorax broadly
and evenly rounded. Legs dark brown, tips of tibif and tarsi shad-
ing to lighter or yellowish brown; hind tibiw alone armed with
spines. WTings present; fore wing large, uniform brown, with spines
arranged as follows: Costa, thirty-one; fore longitudinal vein with
eight at base and three scattered on outer half; hind vein with
tiirteen.
Abdomen subovate, third and fourth segments largest; longest
spineis on last two segments.
Describcdfrom numerous females. Males much larger.
Habitat: Visalia, Coyote, and San Francisco, Cal.
Food plant: M1imulus sp.


36






DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND SPECIES.


9. Genus ECHINOTHRIPS new genus.
Head and thorax with a deeply reticulated structure (sides of abdo-
men may also be reticulated). Head about as long as wide and not
longer than the prothorax. Eyes large, oval, prominent. Ocelli
present. Antenna with eight segments, long, slender, last four seg-
ments united evenly and diminishing in size gradually. Prothorax
angular at sides. Legs slender, unarmed. Wings present, strong,
broadest at base and tapering gradually to a pointed tip, without
prominent veins except fore part of ring vein. Spines on fore margin
and where fore longitudinal vein should be, long, strong, and with
blunt tips.
This genus has many of the characters of both Ilelioth rips and Dic-
tothrips. It is readily determined from the former by the shape of
the antenna, inasmuch as the segments are all rather slender and quite
evenly united; segment 6 is longest; the style not longer than, seg-
ment 6. It is readily separated from Dictoth rips by the character of
the wings, which have two rows of long, strong, blunt spines along the
anterior margin.
(22) Echinothrips mexicanus new species. (P1. III, iigs. 16-19.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.10 mm., width 0.15 mm.; protho-
rax, length 0.10 mm., width 0.18 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.23 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.23 mm.; total body, length 0.92 mm. Antennae:
1) 9 p; 2, 30 p; 3, 45 p; 4, 39 u; 5, 45 It; 6, 60 u ; 7, 15 p ; 8, 27 p;
total, 0.27 mm.
General color uniform dark brown, with red pigmentation. Bases
of femora, tips of tibio, all tarsi, outer half of segments 3 and 4, and
base of segment 5 of antennme yellow.
Head noticeably wider than long, retracted into the prothorax,
angular in front, with basal joints of antenna subapproximate; ver-
tex depressed and bearing the anterior ocellus on its anterior surface;
strongly reticulate; cheeks roughened and with spines. Eyes large,
oval, prominent, slightly protruding, reddish black with yellowish
inner and outer margins; facets large, protruding, strongly pilose.
Ocelli present, subapproximate, placed near center of head, anterior
ocellus directed forward, posterior ones distinctly separated from
inner margins of eyes; yellow-orange, with deep orange-red crescents.
Mouth-cone pointed, reaching past base of prosternum. AntennX
with eight segments, two and one-half times as long as head, slender;
segment 6 longest; segments 1 and 2 deep brown, unicolorous with
head, terminal segments brown, intermediate segments yellow.
(Segments 5 to 8 united evenly, antenna tapering gradually from
base of segment 6 to tip.)
Prothorax about as long as head, widest at middle; sides angular,
roughened and with curved spines; strongly reticulate. Mesothorax


37






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


largest, with notch on either side near posterior margin, uniting
evenly with metathorax. Legs slender, with numerous hairs but
without claws. Fore wings strong, broadest at base, tapering grad-
ually from base to point at tip; anterior part of ring-vein prominent,
posterior part and other longitudinal veins wanting. With a row of
thirteen long, brown, blunt spines along anterior margin, and ten other
similar spines close to anterior margin where fore longitudinal vein
should be; fore fringe long and wavy, especially on outer half of
wing; posterior fringe also well developed. Wings uniform dark
brown, with elongate whitened area near base. Posterior pair of
wings each with single, median, dark brown, longitudinal vein extend-
ing from base to near tip; wing membrane brown, fringe well devel-
oped.
Abdomen widest across third and fourth segments and from them
tapering gradually to a blunt tip; with numerous spines along sides
and on dorsum; a single pair near anterior margin on each segment
most conspicuous.
Described from a single female.
Habitat: Acapulco, Mexico.
Specimens taken from a small potted plant on shipboard in San
Francisco from Acapulco, Mexico. One adult with numerous larvw
and pupal.
(40) Euthrips parvus new species. (Pl. IV, figs. 23-25.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.09 mm., width 0.126 mm.; pro-
thorax, length 0.096 mm., width 0.144 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.16
mm.; abdomen, width 0.21 mm.; total body, length 0.95 mm.
Antenne: 1, 15 p; 2, 30 t; 3, 45/q; 4, 39 p; 5, 36p ; 6, 45 p;7,9 p;
8, 12 y; total length 0.225 mm.
General color orange-yellow; forewings, as also segments 3 to 8 of
antenna, light brown.
Head angular in front, with depression to receive basal segments
of antennav; frons depressed, broadest across eyes; sides of head
constrictedl posteriorly, not retracted into prothorax; back of head
faintly cross-striated; two small spines in front of anterior ocellus
and one in front of each posterior ocellus; a pair bordering the
posterior inner side of each eye. Eyes large, ovoid, prominent and
protruding; facets large, pilose. Ocelli located in central part of
head, closely placed but not contiguous, yellow, with orange-red
crescents; anterior ocellus in depression on fore part of head and
directed forward. Mouth-cone short, blunt, tipped with black;
naiaillary palpi with three segments, labial palpi with two. Antenna
with eight segments, two and one-half times as long as head; seg-
ment 1 pale yellow, 2 orange-brown, others uniformly brown;
spies and senIso cones present but not conspicuous.


38






DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND SPECIES. 39


Prothorax only a little wider than head, sides arched, all angles
rounded; with scattering spines, three on either side along posterior
margin, brown and conspicuous, the central one of each group largest;
sides of prothorax constricted in middle. Legs, especially posterior
pair, rather long and slender, covered with numerous hairs, unicolor-
ous with body. Fore wings broadest in basal one-third, pointed at
ends; ring vein prominent, fore longitudinal vein conspicuous only
at base; with about twenty spines along anterior margin; five or six
spines on basal part of fore longitudinal vein, the outer two separated
from the others; three spines on outer half of wing where fore vein
should be and three spines near posterior margin where posterior lon-
gitudinal vein should be. Fringe on wing on both anterior and
posterior margins long only on outer half of wing. Wings brown, with
inconspicuous, light, longitudinal area extending from base to tip.
Abdomen rather long and slender, spines conspicuous only on last
two segments; a comblike structure on posterior margin of segment 8.
Described from numerous specimens.
Habitat: San Francisco, Cal.
Food plants: Taken on various hothouse plants, especially on
Cathartica sp ?
Adults and larvea collected during June and July.
(42) Euthrips albus new species. (P1. III, figs. 20-22; P1. IV, fig. 30.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.12 mm., width 0.12 mm.; pro-
thorax, length 0.12 mm., width 0.16 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.23
mm.; abdomen, width 0.25 mm.; total body, length 1 mm.
Antenn: 1, 15 u; 2, 30 a; 3, 48p; 4, 45j1; 5, 33 p; 6, 54/j;
7, 9 p; 8, 12 It; total length 0.25 mm.
Color translucent whitish, segments 4 to 8 of antenna brown.
Head about as wide as long, noticeably square, cheeks straight and
very slightly arched; front angular; spines, except a pair between
eyes, weak. Eyes prominent, black, with light outer borders,
coarsely faceted. Ocelli wanting. Mouth-cone long, pointed, tipped
with black; maxillary palpi three segmented. Antennx eight-seg-
mented, about twice as long as head, segments 1 to 3 inclusive
whitish, 4 brown, whitish at base, others brown. Forked sense cone
on dorsal side of segment 3, and a similar one on ventral side of
segment 4.
Prothorax somewhat wider than long. A very weak spine at each
anterior angle. A pair of prominent ones on each posterior angle.
Mesothorax largest; front angles rounded. Legs unicolorous with
body. Spines prominent only on hind tibive, each tarsus with a black
spot at end. Wings present, rather broad, and tapering gradually
from base to distal end; not sharply pointed at tip; costa of fore
wings set rather sparsely with about twenty spines; fore vein with
six spines near base of wing and two near tip. Hind vein with nine


39






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


regularly placed spines, these beginning immediately below where
the group of six spines on fore vein ends. Spines brown.
Abdomen elongate-ovate, tapering rather gradually from third
segment to near tip; with prominent spines on outer posterior angles
of all abdominal segments except first.
Describedfrom one female taken on peach foliage, Red Bluff, Cal.
(52) Euthrips helianthi new species. (P1. IVy, figs. 26-29.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.135 mm., width 0.16 mm.; pro-
thorax, length 0.150 mm., width 0.20 mm.; mesothorax, width
0.28 mm.; abdomen, width 0.28 mm.; total body, length 1.25 mm.
A-ntenne: 1, 21 q; 2, 39 p; 3, 60a; 4, 51 p; 5, 42 p; 6, 54 p; 7, 9 p;
8, 15 11; total length 0.300 mm.
General color transparent yellowish-gray, shaded with brown.
Head only a little wider than long, cheeks straight and parallel;
anterior margin only slightly elevated and rounded in front, back of
head very faintly cross-striated. Head retracted into prothorax.
Large, brown, conspicuous spines in front of posterior ocelli and back
of eyes; other smaller spines present, also dark brown and conspicu-
ous. Eyes rather small, occupying about one-half the width of the
head, not prominent, with purple-black pigment, pilose. Ocelli
present, translucent whitish, separated, and posterior ones not
contiguous to eyes, with light orange-yellow pigment blotches which
are only irregularly crescent-shaped. Mouth-cone pointed, dark
brown, nearly black at tip. Maxillary palpi three-segmented, labial
palpi two-segmented, basal segment very short. Antenna eight-
segmented, only slightly more than twice as long as head, segment
1 light yellowish gray, unicolorous with head; 2 dark brown; 3, 4,
and 5 brown, yellowish at base; 3 also sometimes yellowish at tip;
6 and style uniform dark brown. A forked sense cone on dorsal side
of segment 3 near tip, and a similar one near tip on ventral side of
segment 4. All spines dark brown and conspicuous.
Prothorax about one-fourth wider than long, with a long, conspicu-
ous, dark-brown spine at each anterior angle, two at each posterior
angle, one on either side of anterior margin about halfway between
center and side, a medium-sized dark spine on posterior margin on
either side near center, and many other smaller spines, also brown
and conspicuous. Mesothorax with angles broadly rounded in front,
uniting almost evenly with metathorax, the sides of which con-
verge posteriorly. Legs with fore femora somewhat thickened, light
brownish gray; all tibiw. armed; all tarsi with a dark-brown spot
near tip. Wings uniform translucent whitish. Veins set regularly
with spines; costa with about twenty-seven, fore vein with twenty-
one, hind vein with fifteen, scale with six, inner side of scale with one;
all spines brown. Microscopic hairs transparent; costal fringe short;
posterior fringe long and wavy.


#' 4 0









Tech. Series 2 1, Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture.


5


Fig L-rtrtrp ar --we: Hedadtoa ffmldraiw i.2-rlh
,_, / .' /


2 '- ,










NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 1.-Erythrothrips arizonx: Head and thorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 2.-Erythro-
thrips arizoaw: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. 3.-Erythrothrips arizoux:
Tip of abdomen of male, dorsal view. Fig. 4.-Erythrothrips arizonx: Right fore wing.
Fig. 5.-Er',throthrips arizonax: Maxillary palpus. Fig. i.-Erythrothrips arizona': Left
antenna. Fig. 7.-Ejythtrothrips arizumt: Larva. (Original.)


PLATE I








Tech. Series 21, Bureau of Entomology, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture


PLATE II.


_ 1/


~ ~__


~." N'~
N N
N


I,



/
1








0


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 8.-Orothrips kellogii: Right antenna. Fig. 9.-Orothrips kclogiy!/oscmitii: Right antenna.
Fig. 1.-Thrips magats: Head and prothorax of female. Fig. 11.-Thrips wavquuls: Right
fore wing. Fig. 12.-Euthrips citri: Head and prothorax of female. Fig. 13.-Euthrips citri:
Tip of abdomen of female. Fig. 14.-Euthrips citri: Right antenna of female. Fig. 15.-
Euthrips citri: Right fore wing. (Original.)


N
N
N







Tech. Series 21, Bureau of Entomolopy U. F pt (J Af-ricullurp


PLtTE Ill.


22


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 16.-Elchinothrip)s mcxicanus: Head and thorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 17.-Echino-
thrips mcxicawtus: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. I8.-L,'chinothrips iHxicitU :
Right fore wing of female. Fig. 19.-Echinothrips ,u.rcileants: Right antenmi. Fig. 20.-
Eathrips albas: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal view Fig. 21.-Ettthrips al!,t,': Tip of
abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. 22.-Eathrips (llbms: Right fore wing. (O)riginal.)








Tech. Series 2 1, Bureau of Entomolovy) U S Dept of Agriculture


PLATE IV.


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 23.-Euthrips parvus: Head and thorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 24.-Euthrips par.us:
Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. 25.-Euthrips parvus: Right fore wing of
female. Fig. 26.-Euthrips hli(nithi: Head and prothorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 27.-
Eithrips hclianthi: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. 28.-Euthrips hWlianthi:
Right antenna of female. Fig. 29.-Euthrips helianthi: Right fore wing. Fig. 30.-Euthrips
albus: Right antenna of female. (Original.)







Tech. Series 21, Bureau of Entomology U. S, Dept, of Agriculture


PLATE V.


'\XS
\,'\ \\, \





337








[32\


!





, "<~- x-~-- 7'
D T36_7
















338

33











NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 31.-Anaphothrips zea: Head and prothorax ()f female, dorsal view. Fig. 32.-A apho-
thrips zcx: Tip of abdomen of female, dursal view. Fig. 33.-Aumphuth rips Z a': Right fore
wing. Fig. 34.-Aualhthri.Psze~e: Rightantenna of female. Fig. 35.-A v iphothrijps tricolor:
Head and prothorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 36.-Awyuphothrips tricolor: Tip of abdomen
of female, dorsal view. Fig. :37.-Auophothripslrwlor: Rtight fore wing of female. Fig. 38.-
Anaphothrips tricolor: Right antenna of female. Fig. 39.-Trichothrips rubcr: Head and
prothorax of female, dorsal view. (Original.)










Tech. Series 21, Buret, of Entomoogy, U $ I pt f Ao'r ure.


PLATE Vl.


NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.
Fig. 40.- Trichothrip rtibcr: Tipuf abdomen. dorsal view. Fig. 41.-Trichothrits rub .: Right
antenna of female. Fig. 42.-(Cfhalthrips erun-s: Head and prothorax of female. dorsal
view. Fig. 4.-C( 'hlothrips crran,: Tip of abdomen of female, dorsal view. Fig. 44.-
('cph(dothrips (rrais: Right antenna of female. Fig. 45.-Crtptothrips ctiJfornictdu: I ead
and prothorax of female, dorsal view. Fig. 46i.-rftoth riprS calnicus: Tip of abdomen
of female, dorsal view. (Original.)






DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND SPECIES.


Abdomen cylindrical ovate, with cons)iious |)rown spines on outer
margin of each segment, six along the posterior ventral niargin of
each ventral plate, and longer, stronger ones at tip on segments 9
and 10.
Habitat: Visalia, Tulare County, Cal.
Food plant: Wild sunflower.
(57) Anaphothrips zere new species. (Pl. V, figs. 31-34.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.12 mm., width 0.13 mm.; protho-
rax, length 0.12 mm., width 0.16 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.23 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.26 mm.; total length 1.10 mm.
Antennae: 1, 18,u; 2, 30 p; 3, 42 p; 4, 39pa; 5, 33 p; 6, 30/p; 7, 8,
9, 33 p; total length 0.225 mm.
Color yellow to grayish brown, wings gray.
Head about as long as wide, broadly rounded in front, cheeks
arched. Eyes prominent, slightly protruding, with coarse facets.
Ocelli present, widely separated, with light-brown crescents. Head
with prominent spines. Mouth-cone broad at base, pointed at tip.
Maxillary palpi large, three-segmented, labial palpi very small, with
two segments, mouth-cone dark brown at tip. Antennx about as
long as head, segment 1 yellowish gray, segment 2 light brown,
segment 3 light brown, transparent yellowish at basal half, segment
4 and others light brown, shading to darker toward the tip, without
conspicuous spines or sense cones. Antennm sometimes almost uni-
formly light brown, with segment 2 darker.
Prothorax about as long as head and only slightly wider, with one
transparent but rather prominent spine on each posterior angle.-
Mesothorax largest, sides rounded; metathorax with sides almost
parallel but constricted abruptly at the posterior margin. Pter-
thorax somewhat darker than rest of body. Legs uniformly grayish
brown, only hind tibia armed. Wings uniformly brownish gray,
with small, semitransparent, elongate area near base with veins and
spines prominent, although all veins are transparent. Costa with
twenty-seven spines, fore vein with nine regularly placed spines near
base and other scattered spines along outer part. Hind vein arising
from fore vein at about one-fourth the wing's length from the base
and ending abruptly near tip of wing with ten more or less regu-
larly placed spines. Fringe on fore vein weak.
Abdomen cylindrical ovate, uniformly brownish gray, without
prominent spines except on terminal segments; all spines
transparent.
Habitat: San Jose, Fresno, Lindsay, Tulare County, Cal. Taken on
grasses, leaves, and ears of corn.
(58) Anaphothrips tricolor new species. (Pl. V, figs. 35-38.)
Measurements: Head, length 0.10 mm., width 0.15 mm.; prothorax,
length 0.13 mm., width 0.18 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.23 mm.;


41





NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


abdomen, width 0.25 mm.; total length 1.16 mm. Antenn,%: 1, 12pr;
2, 30 p; 3, 39/I; 4, 30/t; 5, 30/I; 6, 30 /a: 7, 8, 9, 33 p; total length
0.21 mm.
Color: Head and prothorax grayish yellow; pterthorax orange;
abdomen brown, shading to darker toward tip.
Head considerably wider than long, cheeks almost straight and
diverging behind. Front of head broadly rounded; back of head
very faintly cross-striated, without prominent spines. Eyes promi-
nent, black, occupying almost two-thirds of width of head. Ocelli
present, with light-brown inner crescents. Mouth-cone long and
slender, reaching almost to posterior margin of prothorax, tipped
with black. Maxillary palpi three-segmented, labial palpi two-
segmented, basal segment very short, second segment very long.
Antenna3 apparently with nine segments, only slightly more than
twice as long as head, segments 1, 2, 3, and base of 4 unicolorous with
head, segment 2 shaded with brown, tip of 4 and others shading quite
uniformly to dark brown, all spines transparent.
Prothorax with angles broadly rounded, unicolorous with head, with
one prominent spine on each posterior angle; other smaller spines are
present but all are transparent. Mesothorax and metathorax united
evenly at sides and conspicuously orange-colored. Legs slender,
grayish yellow, unicolorous with head, all tibiw armed. Wings, includ-
ing veins and spines, transparent. Veins prominent. Costa with
twenty-five regularly placed spines, fore vein with a group of about
eight spines on basal half and two or three scattered spines near tip.
Posterior longitudinal veins arising from fore veins at about one-
third the wing's length from the base and ending abruptly near
tip of wing with about ten regularly placed spines; fringe on anterior
pair of wings slight.
Abdomen with segments 2 to 6, inclusive, almost equal and with sides
parallel. Segments 8, 9, and 10 with sides abruptly converging to
meet the smaller pointed tenth segment. Surface of abdomen cross-
striated. Posterior margins of dorsal plates of segments 5 to 8,
inclusive, with arrangement of short, sharp spines; these are most
conspicuous on segments 7 and 8. Abdomen dark brown, shading
to darker toward tip, all spines of abdomen dark brown.
110tWit: Tiilare County, Cal. Taken on goldenrod and orange
foliage. Specimens collected by Mr. P. R. Jones.
(75) Trichothrips ruber new species. (Pl. V, fig. 39; P1. VI, fig. 40.)
h1asUr1cints: Ilead, length 0.18 nm., width 0.19 mm.; prothorax,
length 0.14 ra1., width 0.28 nun.; mesothorax, width 0.33 mm.;
abdomen, width 0.33 mm.; tube length 0.12 ram.; total body, length
1.42 mm. Antenmu: 1, 18 L; 2,42 p; 3,36 p; 4, 48 p; 5, 42pu; 6, 39 p;
7, 33 I; 8, 21 It; total 0.28 mm.


42






DESCRIPTIONS OF NEW GENERA AND SPECIES.


43


General color uniform dark brownish-red. Antennma dark brown,
legs brown, tips of fore tibiw and fore tarsi yellow.
Head about as long as wide, broadly rounded iii front, checks slightly
arched, back of head cross-striated; postocular spines long and with
blunt tips. lyes large, semitriangular in shape, slightly protruing,
black, with bright-yellow outer borders, pilose. Ocelli present, sit-
uated far forward, anterior one on vertex; posterior ocelli contiguoUs
with inner anterior margins of eyes, red, with reddish-black crescents.
Mouth-cone short, pointed, not reaching across prosternum, maxillary
palpus with two segments. Antenna with eight segments, one and
five-tenths times as long as head, dark brown, except segment 3, which
is lighter; segments increasing in size gradually until the fourth,
which is largest, and then gradually diminishing toward the tip; all
spines and sense cones transparent, three sense cones on segment 4,
two smaller ones on segment 5.
Prothorax with sides diverging posteriorly, widest near the back.
The fore coxm are broadly rounded and prominent and form what
appear to be the posterior angles of the prothorax; long blunt spines
on anterior and posterior angles, on sides and on prominent coxve;
other spines not conspicuous. Pterthorax largest. Legs rather slender,
without conspicuous spines or markings; only a very small claw on
each fore tarsus. Wings long, slender, transparent except where
light brown at extreme base above.
Abdomen'with segments 2 to 6, inclusive, about equal, after which
they decrease gradually until the tube. Segments 2 to 8 each with
two long, blunt hairs on posterior angles. Segments 2 to 7 each with.
a pair of strong, brown, inwardly curved spines on either side half
way from center to margin; other spines smaller and not conspicuous.
Hairs on terminal segments long and slender.
Described from a single female.
Habitat: San Jose, Cal.
Taken in blossoms of azalea, in May.
(92) Cephalothrips errans new species. (P1. VI, figs. 42-44.)
Measurements of two wingless females: Head, length 0.18 mm., width
0.13 mm.; prothorax, length 0.12 m., width (including prominent
fore coxa) 0.22 mm.; mesothorax, width 0.20 mm.; abdomen, width
0.28 mm.; tube length 0.10 mm.; total body, length 1.16 mm.
Antennm: 1, 18 p; 2, 39t; 3, 39 p; 4, 45 y; 5, 45q; 6, 39 u; 7, 39It;
8, 24 4a; total length 0.28 mm.
Three specimens of the winged male of this species show the follow-
ing variations: Prothorax, length 0.14 mm., width 0.26 mm.; meso-
thorax, width 0.25 mm.; total length 1.86 mm. when the body is dis-
tended. Antenna,: 1, 21p; 2, 45 p; 3, 45/I; 4,48pa; 5, 42,u; 6, 39pa;
7, 45 tt; 8, 30 It.





NORTH AMERICAN T]HYSANOPTERA.


General color uniform dark brown except tips of all tibive and all
tarsi, which are yellowish. Wings (in the forms which have wings)
transparent.
Head about four-tenths longer than wide, broadly rounded in front
except at vertex, which projects forward between basal segments of
antennae; cheeks almost straight, without markings and without
spines other than the long, transparent, blunt, postocular ones. Eyes
somewhat triangular in shape, prominent but not protruding, black,
with lemon-yellow outer margins, not pilose. Ocelli present, situated
far forward on head, each posterior one contiguous with inner
anterior margin of eye, slightly reddish-brown, with darker crescents;
anterior ocellus smaller and with pigment, elongate and not crescent
shaped. Mouth-cone a little shorter than its width at base; maxillary
palpus two-segmented, basal segment very small, second segment
long; labium broadly rounded. Antenn with eight segments, one
and one-half times as long as head, uniform dark brown except
segment 3, which is light brown and somewhat yellowish at base;
spines and sense cones present but not conspicuous; segments 7 and
8 closely joined.
Prothorax about seven-tenths as long as head; sides (including
prominent coxa) diverging rapidly from the anterior margin to about
three-fourths the length and then abruptly constricted, the outer
angles thus formed broadly rounded. With three pairs of long, blunt
spines on fore and hind angles and one midway along sides; also
similar spine on each prominent fore coxa. Pterthorax with sides
almost even and parallel, a little narrower than prothorax but much
wider than head; almost as wide as prothorax in winged forms.
Legs short, stout, each fore tibia with a small tooth. WinPgs (in
winged forms) very weak, hardly attaining half the length of the
abdomen, transparent, and hardly to be seen except for very light
brownish area at extreme base.
Spines on sides of abdomen long and transparent, those on tip of tube
brown.
Described from two wingless and three winged females.
Habitat: San Jose, Cal.
iood plants: Wild mustard, apricot, and prune foliage.
Adults taken from April to July.


44






45


BIBLIOGRAPHY OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS.

CARY, LEWIS I.
1902. The grass thrips (Anaphothrips striata Osborn). Bul. 83, June.
CRAWFORD, D. L.
1909. Some new Thysanoptera from southern California. Some Thysanoptera of
Mexico and the South. Notes on California Thysanoptera. College, Journ. Ent., vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 100-121, figs., December.
1910. Thysanoptera of Mexico and the South, 11. Ent., vol. 2, no. 1, p. 153, March.
DANIEL, S. M.
1904. New California Thysanoptera. November.
FERNALD, H. T., and HINDS, W. E.
1900. The grass thrips. FOSTER, S. W., and JONES, P. R.
1911. How to control the pear thrips. pp. ii+24, figs. 15, January 9.
FRANKLIN, H. J.
1903. Notes on Acanthothrips.

HIN



Ho











Ho


ber, 1903.
1908. On a collection of thysanopterous insects from Barbados and St. Vincent
Islands. March.
1909. On Thysanoptera. DS, WARREN ELMER.
1902. Contribution to a monograph of the insects of the Order Thysanoptera
inhabiting North America. pls. 1-11.
)D, J. DOUGLAS.
1908. New genera and species of Illinois Thysanoptera. Nat. Hist., vol. 8, art. 2, pp. 361-378, figs., August.
1908. Two new species of Idolothrips. figs., December.
1908. Three new North American Phleothripidae. p. 305, figs.
1909. Two new North American Phlceothripidoe. 28-32, figs., January.
1909. A new genus and a new species of North American Phlceothripidve. News, vol. 20, pp. 249-252, figs., June.


O


)KER, W. A.
1906. The tobacco thrips and remedies to prevent "white veins" in wrapper
tobacco. 1907. The tobacco thrips, a new and destructive enemy of shade-grown tobacco.
ES, P. R., and HORTON, 3. R.
1911. The orange thrips: A report of progress for the years 1909 and 1910. Dept. Agr., Bur. Ent., Bul. 99, Pt. I, pp. i-iv+1-16, pls. 1-3, figs. 1-2,
March 6.


JON






NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.


MOULTON, DUDLEY.
1907. The pear thrips. figs. 1-8, pls. 1, 2, June 10.
1907. A contribution to our knowledge of the Thysanoptera of California. Dept. Agr., Bur. Ent., Tech. Ser. 12, Pt. III, pp. 39-68, pls. 1-6, April 5.
1909. The orange thrips. pp. 119-122, pl. 8, February 11.
1909. The pear thrips and its control. Pt. VI, pp. 51-66, figs. 13-17, pls. 4-6, September 1.
1909. The pear thrips. pp. 1-16, figs. 1-8, pls. 1-2, September 20.
QUAINTANCE, A. L.
1898. The strawberry thrips and the onion thrips. Bul. 46, July.
RUSSELL, H. M.
1909. The greenhouse thrips. pp. 43-60, figs. 15-17, August 4.
SHULL, A. FRANKLIN.
1909. Some apparently new Thysanoptera from Michigan. 20, pp. 220-228, figs., May.


46













INDEX.


[New genera and species and pages on which they are described are given In black-faced type]
I age.
Abies sp., Idolothrips coniferarum taken thereon ..............................
Acanthothrips .......................................................... 13, 19, 31
albivittatus ................................................... 19, 31
doanei ........................................................ 19,31
magnafemoralis .............................................. 19, 31
nodicornis ................................................... 19, 31
Acer (see also Maple).
Acer saccharum, food plant of Trichothrips smithi ............................ 30
Achillea millefolium, food plant of Anthothrips niger .......................... 29
Adenostoma fasciculatum (see also Chamisal).
food plant of Eolothrips kuwanaii .................. 22
Cryptothrips califorrdcus ................ 32
E OLOTHRIPID ........................................................... 10, 11
Xolothrips ........................................................ 11, 13-14, 21-22
bicolor .......................................................... 13, 21
fasciatus ....................................................... 14,22
kuwanaii ..................................................... 14, 22
var. robustus, withdrawn ................................ 22
longiceps ........................................................ 14,22
vespiformis ..................................................... 13, 21
Xsculus californica, food plant of Zolothripsfasciatus ....................... 22
Aleurodothrips ..-- ------------------------------------------------- 12, 29
fasciapennis, enemy of Aleyrodes citri ......................... 29
Aleyrodes citri, preyed upon by Aleurodothrips fasciapennis -------------------29
Alfalfa, food plant of olothripsfasciatus ................................... 22
Anaphothrips striatus --------------------------------- 28
Heliothrips fasciatus ................................... 24
A llothrips ................................................................. 12,29
megacephalus .................................................... 29
Almond, food plant of Euthrips pyri ---------------------------------------- 26
Amarillis sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis .............................. 23
Anaphothrips ------------------------------------------------------ 12, 16-17, 28
hesperus ----------------------------------------------------- 17
striatus ..................................................... 9,16,28
tricolor .............................................. 17, 28, 41-42
zes ------------------------------------------------------- 28,41
Anlcothrips -------------------------------------------------------------- 11,21
robustus ------------------------------------------------------- 21
Anthothrips ----------------------------------------------------------- 12, 17, 29
niger ---------------------------------------------------------- 17,29
variabilis ------------------------------------------------------ 17,29
verbasci ------------------------------------------------------- 17,29
Apple, food plant of Euthrips pyri ----------------------------------------- 26
Liothrips mcconnelli ------------------------------------ 33
47






48 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTEBA.

Page.
Apricot, food plant of Cephalothrips errans .................................. 31,44
Euthrips pyri ...-................................... 26
Trichothrips dens-...................................30
Aptinothrips .............................................................. 12,25
rufus ........................................................ 25
var. connatticornis .......................................... 11
Aralia sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis.............................. 23
Parthenothrips dracxnx .............................. 22
Arbutus renziesii, food plant of Orothrips kelloggii ........................... 21
Thrips madron i ............................. 22
Arisxna triphyllum, food plant of Heterothrips arisxme ........................ 28
Arrowroot, food plant of Euthrips insularis ................................... 27
Artemisia sp., food plant of Eolothrips longiceps .............................. 22
Arum sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ................................. 23
Aspidium sp., food plant of Heliothrips huemorrhoidalis....................... 23
Aster, food plant of Pseudothrips inequalis .................................... 28
Azalea, food plant of Heliothrips hxnwrrhoidalis ............................. 23
Trichothrips ruber ...................................... 30
western. (See Rhododendron occidentale.)
Baliothrips ................................................................. 11, 22
basalis .......................................................... 22
Beans, food plant of Euthrips insularis ...................................... 27
Scolothrips sexmaculatus ............................... 26
Beet, food plant of Heliothripsfasciatus ...................................... 24
sugar, food plant of Eolothripsfasciatus ............................... 22
Bibliography of recent publications on North American Thysanoptera ........ 44-46
Bindweed, food plant of Eolothrips bicolor ................................... 21
Birch limb, dead, Megalothrips (f) spinosus taken under bark ............... 34
Blackberry, food plant of Scolothrips sexmaculatus ............................ 26
Brunella vulgaris, food plant of olothrips bicolor ............................. 21
Buckeye, California. (See ,scuelus californica.)
Buckthorn, food plant of Sericotirips variabilis ............................... 24
Buckwheat, food plant of olothripsfasciatus ................................ 22
wild (see also Erigonumfasciculatum).
food plant of Liothripsfasciculatus stenoceps ................. 33
Buttercups, food plant of Euthrips minutus .................................. 27
Cacao, food plant of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis ............................... 23
Carrots, wild, food plant of Chirothrips manicatus ............................. 25
Cathartica sp., food plant of Euthrips parvus ................................. 39
Catalogue of N(rt h American Thysanoptera ................................ 21-34
Ceanothus sp., food plant of Anleothrips robustus ............................. 21
Orothrips kelloggii yosemitii ...................... 21
Sericothrips variabilis ............................. 24
thyrsiflorus food plant of L.olothrips kuwanaii ...................... 22
Thrips madronii ........................... 22
Celery, food plant of olothripsfasciatus ..................................... 22
(elosa, food plant of Anthothrips variabil ................................... 29
Cephalothrips .......................................................... 13, 19, 31
errans ............................................... 19, 31,43-44
yuct .......................................................... 19,31
Cereals, food plants of (hirothrips manicatus .................................. 25
C(serum nocturnumn, food plant of li othjps feitoralis ......................... 23
(vIhanldoreafragranws, food plant of Euthrips orchidii ............................. 28







INDEX.


49


Chamisal (see also Adenostorafasciculatum).
food plant of Euthrips minutus ..........................
Cherry, food plant of Euthrips minutus .............................
pyri .......... :. .....................
Chirothrips ........................................................
crassus .................................................
m anicatus ...............................................
m exicanus ..............................................
obesus ..................................................
Christmas berry. (See Heteromeles arbutifolia.)
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, food plant of oothrips fasciIt s ......
sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ..............
Citrus sp., food plant of Euthrips citri ..............................
Classification of North American Thysanoptera .....................
Clover, burr, food plant of Heliothripsfasciatus ......................
food plant of Eolothripsfasciatus ...........................
Chirothrips manicatus .........................
Phlceothrips uzeli ............ .................
red, food plant of Anthothrips niger .......................
white, food plant of Anthothrips niger .......................
Compositve, food plants of Lolothrips fasciatus .......................
Euthrips cephalicus ......................
insularis ........................


Thrips abdominalis ..................
Convolvulus sp., food plant of Euthrips insularis .................
Corn, food plant of Anaphothrips striatus .........................
zex ............................
Euthrips nervosus ...........................
Thrips perplexus ............................
Cornus stolonifera, food plant of Scirtothrips ruthveni .............
Crinum sp., food plant of Heliothrips femoralis ..................
Croton spp., food plants of Heliothrips hemorrhoidalis ............
Cryptothrips ..................................................
asperus=Leptothrips asperus californicus ..............


Page.


...... 12,


......... 22
......... 23
......... 26
......... 10-21
......... 24
......... 22
......... 25
......... 32
......... 29
......... 29
......... 22
......... 27
......... 27


...... ....
........o..
.......o...
.....o....
..........
.....o..o..
........13,


taken under old shells of
Lecanium corni .........
taken under old shells of
Saissetia olex ...........
carbonarius ....................................................
fasciapennis- A leurodothrips fasciapennis rectangularis .............
Cucumber, food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ...............................
Sericothrips variabilis ..............................
Cycas revoluta, food plant of Parthenothrips dracxnx ......................
Cyperus sp.? food plant of Thrips perplexus .................................
Dahlia spp., food plants of Heliothrips hxemorrhoidalis .........................
Daisy, oxeye, food plant of Anthothrips niger ................................
Daucus sp.? food plant of Thrips abdominalis ................................
Descriptions of new genera and new species of Thysanoptera..............
Dictothrips ................................................................
reticulatus .......................................................
Dtplacus glutinosus, food plant of Eolothripsfasciatus ........................
Dodder, food plant of Anthothrips variabilis .................................
71924-11---


27
28
28,47
27
23
26
23
23
19, 32
19, 32

32

32
19, 32
19, 32
23
24
22
23
23
29
23
34
11,24
24
22
29






50 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.

Page.
Dogwood. (See Comus stolonifera.)
Dracxna sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ............................ 23
Parthenothrips dracxn ............................ 22
Echinothrips........................................... 11,24, 37
mexicanus ............................................ 24,37-38
Elderberry. (See Sambucus glauca.)
Elm, food plant of Scolothrips sexmaculatus .................................. 26
Erigonumfasciculatum, food plant of Liothripsfasciculatus ................... 33
Erythrothlips... ....... ..........11,21, 34-35
arizon ..................................... 21,35-36
Euc'aris grandiflora, food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ..................... 23
Eurythrips ............................................................. 12, 17,29
ampliventralis ................................................... 17,29
osborni .......................................................... 17,29
Euthrips ......................................................... 12, 15-16,26-28
albus ..................................................... 15,26,39-40
cephalicus ........................................................ 16,27
reticulatus ............................................... 16, 27
citri ............................................................ 9,15,26
ehrhorni .......................................................... 15, 26
fuscus ........................................................... 9, 6,27
helianthi ................................................. 16, 27, 40-41
insularis .......................................................... 16, 27
reticulatus=Euthrips insularis ............................. 27
minutus ........................................................... 16,27
setosus=Euthrips minutus ................................... 27'
nervous s .......................................................... 16,27
nicotianx=Euthripsfuscus ......................................... 27
occidentalis ........................................................ 16,27
orchidii ...................... .................................... 15, 26
parvus............................................. 15, 26, 38-39
pyri ................................ ........................9, 15, 26
tritici ..........................................................9, 16, 28
californicus ................................................. 16,28
taken with Euthrips tritici on flowers ................ 28
ulicis californicus ................................................. 16, 27
Ferns, food plants of Heliothrips hmmorrhoidalis ............................. 23
Festuca ovina, food plant of Chirothrips obesus ................................ 25
pratensis, food plant of Limothrips cerealium ........................ 25
Ficaria sp., food plant of Euthrips orchidii ................................... 26
Ficus elastica, food plant of Heliothrips femoralis ............................. 23
Parthenothrips dracmx .......................... 22
grandiflora, food plant of 1eliothripsfemoralis ......................... 23
nitida, Liothrips bakeri taken in galls on leaves ........................ 33
religiosa, Liothrips bakeri taken in galls on flowers ..................... 33
Fig, food plant of Euthrips pyri ............................................. 26
Thrips bremn rii .......................................... 23
Flowers, food plants of Thrips tabac ....................................... 23
spring, food plants of Euihrips ervo5us ............................. 27
wild, food plants of Euithrips triti ................................. 28
Fruit blossoms, food of Thrips tabaci ....................................... 23
Galls, on icus nitida leaves, Liothrips bakeri taken thereon-.................. 33
reliiosa flowers, Liothrips bakeri taken therein .........-..... 33
oak, Liothrips uimbripcnnis mexicanus taken thereon ................. 33







INDEX. 51
Pago.
Gall, on Solidago, Idolothrips armatus taken therein ......................... 34
Zygothrips 1on giceps taken therein ........................ 32
pine-cone, on willow, Trichothrips brcvicuralis therein .................. 30
Gardenia sp., food plant of Ileliothrips fimoralis .............................. 23
Gnorimoschema gallxsolidaginis, on Solidago carzadnsis, Idolothrips (iri(ahius
taken in galls ........................................................... 34
Goldenrod (see also Solidago).
food plant of Anaphothrips tricolor ............................... 28
Cephalothrips yuccx ................................ 31
Gossypium sp., food plant of Heliothrips femoralis ........................... 23
Grape (see also Vitis). I
food plant of Euthrips pyri ......................................... 26
Leptothrips asperus taken thereon .................................... 32
wild, food plant of Liothrips citricornis ............................... 33
Grass, millet. (See Milium effusum.)
"old witch," food plant of Chirothrips crassus .......................... 25
Groundnut, food plant of Euthrips insularis .................................. 27
Heliothrips .......................................................... 11, 14, 23-24
fasciapennis .................................................... 14, 24
fasciatus .....................................................9, 14, 23
femoralis ....................................................... 14,23
hxmorrhoidalis .................................................9, 14, 23
Heteromeles arbutifolia, food plant of Trichothrips ilex ......................... 30
Heterothrips ......................................................... 12, 17, 28-29
arisxm ...................................................... 17, 28
decacornis ...................................................... 17, 29
salicis ......................................................... 17,28
Hickory, food plant of Liothrips citricornis ................................... 33
Hop, food plant of Scolothrips sexmaculatus .................................. 26
Hop-tree. (See Ptelea trifoliata.)
Hydrangea sp., food plant of Heliothrips femoralis .......... ................... 23
Idolothrips ...................................................... 13, 20-21, 33-34
angusticeps ...................................................... 20, 34
armatus ......................................................... 21, 34
coniferarum ...................................................... 20, 34
flavipes ........................................................ 20, 33
tuberculatus ..................................................... 21,34
lack-in-the-pulpit. (See Arisxma triphyllum.)
Juniperus virginiana, Idolothrips coniferarum taken thereon .................. 34
Kentia belmoreana, food plant of Parthenothrips dracxnx ...................... 22
Key to genera ............................................................ 11-13
species ............................................................ 13-21
suborders and families ............................................. 10-11
Labiatw, food plant of Euthrips cephalicus reticulatus ........................ 27
Laurel, California. (See Umbellularia californica.)
mountain. (See Umbellularia californica.)
Laurestinas, food plants of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis ....................... 23
Lecanium corni (armeniacum), Cryptothrips californicus taken from under old
shells ................................................................32
Legumes, food plants of Euthrips insularis .................................. 27
Lemon, food plant of Thrips madronii ...................................... 22
Leptothrips .............................................................. 13,32
asperus .....................................................32
Lettuce, food plant of Heliothripsfasciatus .................................. 24






52 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTEI

Lilac, California. (See Ceanothus thyrsiforus.)
mountain. (See Ceanothus sp.)
wild. (See Ceanothus sp.?)
Liliaceve, food plants of Heliothrips hemorrhoidalis ...........
Limw thrips ................................................
avenx-=Limothrips cerealium ....................
cerealium .......................................
Liothrips .................................................
bakeri ............................................
citricornis ........................................
fasciculatus .......................................
stenoceps .............................
taken with Liothrips fasciculat
wheat .................
m cconnelli ........................................
ocellatus .........................................
umbripennis ......................................


LA.

Page.


..... ..... .... 23
... .w. . .11,25
.............2 5
... ... .... ... 25
........13,20,33
... . . .20,33
.-- - - -20,33
... . . .20)33
...2... . 0133
u~s on wild b uck-
..... ..... .... 33
... . . .20,33
... . . .20,33
... . . .20,33


mexicanus ............................................
Lissothrips ............................... ...............................
m uscorum .......................................................
Lupine, purple. (See Lupinus sp.?)
Lupinus, food plant of Euthrips insularis ..................................
sp.?, food plant of Eolothrips kuwanaii ............................
Madrofia. (See Arbutus menziesii.)
M alacothrips ...............................................................
zonatus .......................................................
Malpighicea-, food plants of Heterothrips decacornis ............................
Mango, food plant of Heliothrips hxrnorrhoidalis .............................
Manzanita. (See Manzanita manzanita.)
Manzanita manzanita, food plant of Orothrips kelloggii ........................
Maple, hard. (See Acer saccharum.)
soft, food plant of Trichothrips buffx .................................
M egalothrips ............................................................ 13
hesperus .......................................................
spinosus ......................................................
Milium effusum, food plant of Baliothrips basalis .............................
Mimulus sp., food plant of Thrips magnus ...................................
Mina lobata, food plant of Heliothripsferoralis ...............................
Monkey flower. (See Diplacus glutinosus and Mimulus sp.)
Moonflower, food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ..............................
Moss, food plant of Lissothrips muscorum ....................................
Liothrips ocellatus taken thereon ......................................
Mullein, food plant of Anthothrips verbasc ...................................
wild, food plant of Trichothrips femoralis ...........................
Mustard, wild, food plant of (ephalothrips errans ............................
N eoth ips .................................................................
cortic s .........................................................
Nirotiana tubacun (see also Tobacco).
food plant of Clhirothrips mexicanus ........................
Nightshade, food plant of Euthrips citri .....................................
Oak leaves, fallen, Idolothripsflavipes take therein ..........................
Liotlhrips umbripennis mexicanus taken in galls .........................
taken on various species ..........................
scrub. (See Quercus dumosa.)
tainbark. (See Quercus densrflora.)


20,33
12,30
30

27
22

13,31
31
29
23


21

30
21, 34
21,34
21,34
22
23,36
23

23
30
33
29
30
31, 44
13,32
32

25
26
33
33
33










Oats, food plant of iEolothrips
Limothrips
Odve, food plant of Erythrothr
Onion, food plant of Xolothrip
Orange, food plant of Anaphot

Erythrot
Euthrips
Ieliothri
Orchids, food plants of Euthri
Orothrips .....................
kelloggii ............
yosemitii.


fi sciutus .....................................
cerealium .....................................
ips arizonw ...................................
is fasciatus ....................................
hrips tricolor .................................
zeal..................................
hrips arizonx ..................................
citri .........................................
psfasciatus ....................................
s orchidii .....................................

..... .... .......o..o.........................3
.......................................... 13,


25
21, 3(i

28
28
21, 35
26
21
26
11,21
13, 21
21,34


Palm, date, food plant of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis ......................... 23
kola, food plant of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis .......................... 23
sago. (See Cycas revoluta.)
Palms, food plants of Euthrips orchidii ....................................... 26
Pandanus sp., food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis ............................ 23
Panicum capillare, food plant of Chirothrips crassus ........................... 25
sanguinale, food plant of zEolothrips bicolor ......................... 21
Papaw, food plant of Euthrips insularis ...................................... 27
Parthenothrips ............................................................. 11, 22
dracTnx .................................................... 22
Pea, food plant of Heliothrips fasciatus ..................................... 24
Peach, food plant of Cryptothrips californicus ................................. 32
Euthrips albus ......................................... 26
pyri ......................................... 26
tree, dead, Cryptothrips rectangularis taken under bark ................. 32
Pear, Bartlett, food plant of Cryptothrips californicus ........................ 32
food plant of Euthrips minutus ....................................... 27
pyri .......................................... 26
Heliothrips fasciatus ..................................... 24
Pellea hastata, food plant of BHeliothrips hxmorrhoidalis ....................... 23
Pepper, food plant of Euthrips insularis .................................... 27
Phleum pratense, food plant of Anaphothrips striatus ......................... 28
PHL(EOTHRIPIDE ................................................. ...... I 12, 13
Phl othrips ......................................................... 13, 20, 32-33
mam latus ...................................................... 20, 33
pergandei ..................................................... 20, 32
raptor ........................................................ 20, 33
uzeli .......................................................... 20,32
Phlox, food plant of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis ............................... 23
Phyllothrips asperus=Leptothrips asperus .................................... 32
citricornis=Liothrips citricornis ................................ 33
fasciculata =Liothrips fasciculatus .............................. 33
umbripennis=Liothrips umbripennis ........................... 33
Pine (see also Pinus).
food plant of Cephalothrips errans ..................................... 31
Pinks, food plant of Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis .............................. 23
Pinus (see also Pine).
inops, Idolothrips coniferarurn taken thereon ........................... 34
Plantago rugelii, Idolothrips armatus taken thereon ............................ 34


Oak, white.


INDEX.


(See also Quercus alba.)
Idolothrips tuberculatus taken thereon ......


53






54 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.

Page.
Plectothrips .............................................................. 12, 31
antennatus .................................................... 31
Plum, food plant of Euthrips pyri ........................................... 26
wild, in England, food plant of Euthrips pyri ................. ........ 26
Poa pratensis, food plant of Anaphothrips striatus........................... 28
Chirothrips obesus................................ 25
Poplar, Carolina, Acanthothrips albivittatus taken thereon ..................... 31
Phleothrips maculatus taken under rotting bark ..................... 33
Potato, food plant of Euthrips insularis ...................................... 27
Prune, food plant of Cephalothrips errans ................................... 44
Euthrips ehrhorni ...................................... 26
minutes ...................................... 27
pyri .......................................... 26
Liothrips mcconnelli .................... & .............. 33
French, food plant of Cryptothrips californicus ....................... 32
Pseudothrips .............................................................. 12,28
inequalis ...................................................... 28
Ptelea trifoliata, food plant of Sericothrips pulchellus ......................... 24
Pyrol, woolly, food plant of Euthrips insularis ............................... 27
Quercus (see also Oak).
alba, food plant of Trichothrips tridentatus ............................ 31
densiflora, food plant of Cryptothrips californicus ..................... 32
dumosa, food plant of Trichothrips ilex dumosa ........................ 31
Quince, food plant of Trichothrips beachi .................................... 30
Radish, food plant of Heliothripsfasciatus .................................. 24
Raphidothrips ............................................................ 11, 25
fuscipennis .................................................. 25
Rhamnus purshiana, food plant of Erythrothrips arizonx ....................... 21, 36
sp., food plant of Euthrips insularis ................................ 27
Rhaptothrips ............................................................. 12, 29
peculiaris .................................................... 29
Rhododendron occidentale, food plant of Thrips madronii ...................... 22
Riclwrdia wthiopica, food plant of Ileliothripsfemoralis ........................ 23
Rosaeceu, food plants of Euthrips cephalicus reticulatus ....................... 27
Rose, "La France," food plant of Aleurodothrips fasciapennis ................ 29
Roses, food plants of Euthrips insularis ...................................... 27
Salix (see also Willow).
fluviatilis, food plant of Ileterothrips salicis ............................ 28
Trichothrips brevicuralis ......................... 30
Sambucus glauca, food plant of XEolothrips kuwanail ......................... 22
Saissctia olex, Cryptothrips californicus taken from under old shells ........... 32
Scale, black. (See Saissetia olex.)
brown apricot. (See Lecanim corni [armeniacumn].)
Scirto thrps ................................................................ 12, 26
ruthveni ........................................................ 26
Scolothri)s ................................................................ 12,26
sexiaculatus ......................................................... 26
r hrips...................................................... 11, 14-15, 24-25
ap ris........................................................ 15, 24
n tus...................................................... 14, 24
pl cc ilts ...................................................... 14, 24
ret ul tu .................................................. 11, 15, 25
st ordii ..................................................... 15, 25
a(r .b.ilt .............................................. 14, 24






INDEX.


55


Smartweed, food plant of Sericothpris variabilis ........................
Solanum sp., food plant of Euthrips rephalics ...............................


24
27


Thrilps abdominalis .............................. 23
umbelliferum, food plant of Thrips nadronii ........................ 22
Solidago (see also Goldenrod).
canadensis, Idolothrips armatus taken in galls ........................
Zygothrips longiceps taken in gall ................................... 32
Sunflower, food plant of Euthrips minutes .................................. 27
wild, food plant of Euthrips helianthi ............................. 27, 40
Sycamore, Acanthothrips nodicornis taken thereon ............................ 31
food plant of Acanthothrips magnafemoralis ....................... 31
Tansy, food plant of Eolothripsfasciatus .................................... 22
TEREBRANTIA .................................. ......................... 10
Thistle, food plant of Euthrips citri ........................................ 26
THRIEPIDX ...................................................... ....... 10,11-12
Thrips ............................................................. 11, 14, 22-23
abdominalis ........................................................ 14,23
bean. (See Ieliothripsfasciatus.)
bremnerii. .................................................. 14, 23
grass. (See Anaphothrips striatus.)
greenhouse. (See Heliothrips hxmorrhoidalis.)
madronii .......................................................... 14, 22
m agnus ...................................................... 14,23,36
onion. (See Thrips tabaci.)
orange. (See Euthrips citri.)
pear. (See Euthrips pyri.)
perplexus ......................................................... 14,23
strawberry. (See Euthrips tritici.)
tabaci.. .................................................9, 14, 23
tobacco. (See Euthripsfuscus.)
THYSANOPTERA, North American, bibliography of recent papers ............. 44-46
catalogue ............... .................. 21-34
classification ............................. 10-21
key to genera ............................ 11-13
species ............................ 13-21
suborders and families ............. 10-11
Tobacco (see also Nicotiana tabacum).
food plant of Euthripsfuscus ....................................... 27
insularis ..................................... 27
Tomato, food plant of Heliothripsfemoralis .................................. 23


Trichothrips ............................................


12, 17-19, 30-31


ambitus ........................
americanus .......................
angusticeps .......................
beachi ..........................
brevicuralis ......................
buffx ...........................
dens .............................
femoralis .......................
ilex .............................
dumosa .....................


longitubus ..........................
ruber ..............................
smithi ..............................
tridentatus .........................


18,30
18,30
18, 30
18, 30
18,30
18,30
18, 30
18,30
18, 30
19, 31


......................... 18,30
.................. 18,30, 42-43
......................... 18,30
......................... 19,31


........l Ill.l.............

.... .... ...................
........ ..... ........... ..
.............................
.............................






56 NORTH AMERICAN THYSANOPTERA.

Page.
TUBULUFERA 11
Ulmus montana var. perdula, food plant of Phkeothrips uzi ..................
Umbellular a californica, food plant of Ankothrips robustus .................... 21
Thrips madronii ....................... 22
Verbenas, food plants of Heliothrips hmorrhoidal ......................... 23
Vetch, wild, food plant of Heliothrips hmorrhoidalis ........................ 24
Vines, pea, food plant of Heliothripsfasciatus .............................. 24
food plants of Heliothrips hmemorrhoidalis ............................. 23
Vitis (see also Grape).
spp., food plants of Heliothripsfemoralis ............................... 23
Walnut, English, food plant of Euthrips pyri ................................ 26
Weeds, food plants of ,olothripsfasciatus .................................. 22
Sericothrips apternis .................................. 24
reticulatus ................................. 25
stanfordii ...............................25
Wheat, food plant of Z.olothripsfasciatus ................................... 22
White fly, citrus. (See Aleyrodes citri.)
wood, food plant of Euthrips insularis... ............................. 27
Willow (see also Salixfluviatilis).
black, food plant of Euthrips insularis ............................... 27
stem, dead, Cryptothrips rectangularis taken in lepidopterous or coleop-
terous larval burrows ................................. 32
Megalothrips (?) spinosus taken in lepidopterous or coleop-
terous larval burrows ................................. 34
Yams, food plant of Euthrips insularis ....................................... 27
Yarrow, food plant of Euthrips minutus .................................... 27
Yucca filamentosa, food plant of Cephalothrips yuccx ......................... 31
Zygothrips ............................................................... 13,32
longiceps ........................................................ 32

0 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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