The Seminole

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Material Information

Title:
The Seminole
Physical Description:
63 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida
Publisher:
Senior Class of the University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College yearbooks   ( lcsh )
College yearbooks   ( fast )
Students   ( fast )
Genre:
Yearbooks   ( fast )
Yearbooks.   ( fast )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. no.1 (1910) - v. 63 (1973).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01389460
lccn - sc 84005031
ocm01389460
System ID:
AA00022765:00012

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tower (Gainesville, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Foreword
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
    Views
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The university
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Classes
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
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        Page 60
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        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Student association
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
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        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Athletics
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
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        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Military
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
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        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Fraternities
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
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        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Organizations
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
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        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
    Comic
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
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        Page 257
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        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
    Advertisements
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
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        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
    Back Cover
        Page 319
        Page 320
    Spine
        Page 321
Full Text

























E/ NOLE


PUBLISHED ANNUALLY
ay
THE JUNIOR CLA55

























We babe enbeaboreb to incorporate luitbin tbio limit= eb !gpace gucb aaociationq ao Will keep altbe forever, in pour memory, the bappy bap!g pou babe Opent at the Ent= beroitp of _Iloriba.



















Mebtratton
To (Our latber!g, tubo bp their untiring efforts, babe mabe it pozoible for u!9 to attenb the Mniber0itp of
_Itoriba, tbis booh i!9 re= !5pectfullp bebicateb.


















CONTENTS

Views The University Classes Student Association Athletics Military Fraternities Organizations Comic

































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PAGE 24








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J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D. WILMON NEWELL, M.S., D.SC.

ADMINISTRATION COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D., WILMON NEWELL, M.S., D.Sc.,
President Director of Experiment Station and Dean
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D., of the College of Agriculture
Vice-President W. L. FLOYD, B.S., M.S.,
K. H. GRAHAM, Assistant Dean and Professor of Botany
Auditor and Horticulture
Miss R. T. MCQUARRIE, C. H. WILLOUGHBY, B.AGR.,
Assistant Auditor Professor of Animal Husbandry and
Miss W. B. ELLIS, Horticulture
Registrar J. E. TURLINGTON, B.AGR., M.S., PH.D.,
E. M. KNIGHT, Professor of Agronomy
Bookkeeper and Cashier A. L. SHEALY, D.V.S., B.S.A.,
MISS MARY E. PARROT, Professor of Veterinary Science
Secretary to President M. D. CODY, A.B., M.A.,
MRS. S. J. SWANSON, Assistant Professor of Botany and
Matron Bacteriology
MRS. RUTH PEELER, FRAZIER ROGERS, B.S.A.,
Housekeeper Professor of Soils and Fertilizers
MISS RUBY NEWHALL, ......... ... .. .
Secretary to Experiment Station R. DEWITT BROWN,
Miss RUTH DREHER, Director of Cadet Band and Orchestra
Graduate Nurse, Charge of Infirmary MISS CORA MILTIMORE,
G. E. WHITE, MISS PRISCILLA M. KENNEDY,
Y. M. C. A. Secretary Librarians






PAGE 25






































J. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND COLLEGE OF LAW
SCIENCES H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.,
J. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D., Dean of Law College and Professor of Law
Dean R. S. COCKRELL, M.A., B.L.,
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D., Professor of Law
Professor of English Language and C. W. CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B.,
Literature Professor of Law
H. S. DAVIS, PH.D., J. H. MOORE, A.B., J.D.,
Professor of Biology and Psychology Professor of Law
C. L. CROW, M.A., PH.D., W. G. KLINE, A.B., LL.B.,
Professor of Modern Languages and Secre- Professor of Law and Director of
tary of the General Faculty Major Sports
T. R. LEIGH, PH.D.,
Professor of Chemistry
J. M. LEAKE, A.B., PH.D.,
Professor of History and Political Science Professor of Sociology and Economics
T. M. SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D.,A.WSETMAPD,
ProfeSIPSONo MAhemats Director of Department of Hygiene
Professor of Mathematics
R. G. MANCHESTER, A.B., D.O.,
E. C. BECK, A.B., M.A.,
Associate Professor of English Professor of Physical Education
MAJOR BLOXHAM WARD, U.S.A.,
A P B LACK A .B ., C m a d n f C d t
Assistant Professor of Chemical Commandant of Cadets
Engineering CAPT. FRANK E. CULIN, U.S.A.,
T. H. LUCAS, A.B., Professor of Military Science
Acting Assistant of Mathematics and CAPTAIN JOHN H. ATKINSON, U.S.A.,
Physics Professor of Military Science






PAGE 26






































J. R. BENTON, B.A. PH.D
J. W. NORMAN, A.M., PH.D.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING TAHR OLG N
J. R. BENTON, B.A. PH.D. NORMAL SCHOOL
Dean of College of Engineering and Professor of Physics and Electrical J. W. NORMAN, A.M., PH.D.,
Engineering Acting Dean and Professor of Philosophy
COM U. T. HOLMES, U.S.N. (Rtd.) and Education
Professor of Mechanical Engineeing L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.,
P. L. REED, C.E. M.S. Professor of Education and School
Professor of Civil Engineering Management
W. S. PERRY, A.B. M.S. W. B. HATHAWAY, A.B., B.D., M.A.,
Assistant Professor of Physics and Instructor in English, Latin and Spanish
Electrical Engineering JOSEPH ROEMER, A.M., PH.D.,
COL. E. S. WALKER, U.S.A. (Rtd.),PoesrfScndyEuatn Professor of Mechanical DrawingPrfsoofecnrjEdatn
A. J. STRONG,
Instructor of Mechanical Drawing
ALEXANDER BRESTH, B.S.
Assistant Prof essor of Civil Engineering
B. F. GAINES, B.S.
Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering













PAG9~2











HISTORY, ORGANIZATION AND FUTURE
Perhaps the most important factor in the growth and reputation of a
University is its history. The history of this institution, while it should be uppermost in our minds and well known to every one of us, is probably the
least-thought-of essential in connection with the University of Florida.
From the history of this institution we may learn to appreciate what
we really have at our disposal today; how far we have progressed, and through what strife and conflict we have worked our way to the present
high standard.
The State of Florida has always been interested in education, in higher
education particularly, and with this in mind has formulated many plans and many valued institutions. Little do we realize that as far back as 1824 the Legislative Council discussed plans for the foundation of a University. From "Memoirs of Florida" we may learn that in the year 1836 trustees for a proposed University were appointed, but apparently nothing
was accomplished at that time.
Upon the admission of Florida to the Union in 1845, the State was
granted nearly a hundred thousand acres of land by the General Government, the proceeds from which were to be used to establish two Seminaries, one east and one west of the Suwannee River. The effect of this was the foundation of the East Florida Seminary at Ocala in 1852, and of the West Florida Seminary at Tallahassee in 1856. The East Florida
Seminary was removed to Gainesville in 1866.
The State Constitution of 1868 contained provisions for establishing
and maintaining a University, pursuant to which the Legislature passed the next year "An Act to establish a uniform system of common schools and a University." Other attempts to establish a university were made in 1883 by the State Board of Education, and in 1885 by the Legislature.
Furthermore, the State Constitution of 1885 expressly permitted special
legislation with regard to a university.
Meanwhile, in the year 1870, the Legislature had passed "An Act to
establish the Florida Agricultural College." This not fully meeting the terms of the "Land Grant College" Act of Congress in 1862, the Legislature passed, in 1872, a supplementary act and the State received, in consequence thereof, ninety thousand acres of land from the General Government in support of the proposed college. In 1873 a site for this was selected and in 1875 another selection was made. Finally, in 1883, Lake City was chosen, and upon completion of the college, instruction was begun in the fall of 1884. In 1886 an attempt was made to have the name of this institution changed to "University of Florida," and this title was finally secured by a legislative act of 1903. Before this, in 1884, the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station had been established as one of its departments in accordance with the terms of the Hatch Act.
During these years, in addition to the three mentioned, there had come
into existence three other State institutions of higher education: the Normal School at DeFuniak Springs, the South Florida College at Bartow, and the Agricultural Institute in Osceola County. In 1905, however, inasmuch as these six institutions had failed to make satisfactory differentiation among themselves and to separate their work sufficiently from that







PAGE 28







XY-- X


of the high schools of the State, and inasmuch as the cost of maintaining all seemed disproportionate to the results obtained, the Legislature passed the "Buckman Act," the effect of which was to merge the six into the Florida Yemale College" and the "University of the State of Florida." 1n 1903 and 1909 the names were changed by legislative acts to "Florida State College for Women" and "University of Florida."
During the first session of the University, a distinct normal school, which included two years of sub-freshman grades, was maintained. In addition to this, instruction was given in Agriculture and in Engineering, as well as usual collegiate branches. Candidates for admission to the Freshman class must have finished the eleventh grade of a high school. The Agricultural Experiment Station was a separate division, although members of its staff gave instruction to the students, and the President of the University acted as its Director. The next year the staff of the Experiment Station was required to devote its time exclusively to station activities, and a special director was elected. The normal school was abolished and instruction in Pedagogy was transferred to the University proper. Two years of sub-freshman work were, however, still offered.
Upon the election in 1909 of Dr. A. A. Murphree to the presidency, steps were taken to re-organize the University. The present organization dates from 1910. The College of Law was added in 1909, and the departments offering instruction mainly to normal students were organized into a college in 1912. In 1913 the present entrance requirements went into effect. The same year a Summer School was established by an Act of Legislature, and the Farmers' Institute work of the University and the co-operative demonstration work of Florida and of the United States Department of Agriculture were combined on July the first, 1915, and all the agricultural activities of the University were placed under the direction of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.
Immediately after the United States entered the world war the equipment of the Lniversity was placed at the disposal of the Government. During the summer of 1918 the College of Engineering was operated as the "University of Florida Army School" for the vocational training of soldiers. At the opening of the session of 1918-1919 all regular activities of the University were subordinated to the task of training men for the armed forces of the United States. On December fourteen, 1918, upon the mustering out of the Students' Army Training Corps, the University again took up its regular work, although it made liberal allowances in credits to students for the interruption of their studies caused by military service.
During the summer of 1919 the General Extension Division was established at the University. The school also entered into a contract with the United States Government to assist in the work of rehabilitating men disabled while in the armed forces of the country.
Thus, from the earliest period to the present time we have gradually progressed and have reached a very high degree of success.
Next we must consider the organization of this institution. There are now seven complete departments carrying on all forms of higher education, in comparison with only a few selected subjects a few years ago.







PAGE 29












I. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.
II. THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES:
a. A curriculum leading to the B. A. degree.
b. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree.
c. A Pre-Medical Course.
III. THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE:
a. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Agriculture.
b. A curriculum leading to the title of Graduate in Farming.
c. A two-year course.
d. A one-year course.
e. A four-months course.
Experiment Station Division. Extension Division.
IV. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
a. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Civil Engineering.
b. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Electrical Engineering.
c. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Mechanical Engineering.
d. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Chemical Engineering.
V. THE COLLEGE OF LAW:
A curriculum leading to the degrees of LL. B. and J. D.
VI. THE TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL:
a. A curriculum leading to the A. B. degree in Education.
b. A curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Education.
c. A Normal Course leading to a Diploma.
d. Correspondence School.
e. The University Summer School.
General (connected with at least four colleges).
Division of Military Instruction. Division of Rehabilitation. VII. EXTENSION SERVICE.
In addition to the history and organization of our University, we must
include, as one of the most important, if not the highest essential, of our college organization, the Faculty, without which we could not exist. And furthermore, to keep up this existence as a recognized university among the large schools of the United States, the faculty must be of the highest degree of efficiency and of the very best possible qualifications. As a whole, they must be a proficient body of men, capable of handling and understanding students in every way; able to mix with them in athletics and society. They must each, separately and individually, be endowed with a spirit of love and loyalty for Florida, and should mingle with the scholars and discuss with them all phases of life as man to man, as well as verse the younger generation in the divers branches of higher learning.
In analyzing the faculty of this institution, we find all these characteristics, and we are indeed proud of that noble group of men who are dedicating their lives to the worthy cause of guiding the f footsteps of the f utu re






PAGE30











citizens in their seeking of the proper knowledge which is so essential to their success in all walks of life.
Guided by a master hand, and aided by worthy lieutenants, the deans of each college, with all professors working hand in hand with them, the University of Florida needs no better helmsmen to lead it on to the highest pinnacle of greatness in the world of Universities, than this present faculty, who have so ably opened our eyes to the opportunities abounding on every hand.
The General Faculty includes all persons, except laboratory and undergraduate assistants, engaged in the work of instruction in the University. Under the leadership of the President, it forms the governing body in all general matters of instruction and discipline. The Faculty of a College consists of those members of the General Faculty who give instruction in it. Under the leadership of its Dean, it forms the governing body of each separate College. In this General Faculty there are eleven who have attained the degree of Ph. D., and this is more than double the number on the combined faculties of all the colleges in the State. Florida also has many celebrated authorities in many branches of education, and many who are well known from the columns of "Who's Who in America." The University of Florida has much to boast in its Faculty and in the achievements which they have accomplished.
What may the University of Florida expect in the future? What have we to look forward to? Already since the re-organization in 1910 we have risen step by step to our present standard. From as far back as 1834 there has been a continued struggle to create and maintain a University in this State. Finally it was obtained and by degrees it reached what was thought a state of perfection. But in 1909 new life was put into the progress, and since that time there has been a steady growth. No longer is the University a "baby university." It is fast becoming a University of the larger class in the United States, and it must and will eventually be recognized as such. But why wait until eventually? With its ample grounds and buildings, its equipment and location, and its faculty of unsurpassed efficiency, it can be recognized speedily. How can this be done? Only by the whole-hearted, zealous work of every Florida student, graduate, and supporter. The growth of this University has come to that point where it will either continue or will cease progress and perhaps decline.
Henceforth, our University is what we ourselves make it. By our own high degree of work and scholastic standard we may accomplish untold results. By supporting the right officers for our State positions and helping place the proper men in our Legislature, we are assisting our college, putting championship athletic teams into the field, heaping fame upon the University, and making its name widely renowned.
Have we sufficient income? Perhaps not, but by work along the proper lines, the graduation of those men who see this need, eventually appropriations will be made which, in addition to the present income, will properly maintain one of the finest and largest institutions of higher learning in the United States.
Therefore, in living our lives, let us strive always in scholastic work, athletics, fraternities, societies and all intercollegiate activities, and in our capacity as citizens of Florida, and of the United States, to work for the greatest and the best of all Universities: the University of Florida.






PAGV 31












































































PAGE32

























THE PRESIDENTS OF THE CLASSES


SENIOR HERBERT G. FORD Tampa


JUNIOR ARTHUR N. SOLLEE Jacksonville


SOPHOMORE
JAMES A. WINFIELD O'Brien


FRESHMAN KERNEL HUGHES Haines City



















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SENIOR SPONSORS MISS ROSALIA GONZALEZ MISS CORA BEGGS Tampa MISS MILDRED HALL
Madison MISS ELIZABETH CONRADI Jacksonville
Tallahassee









PAGE 36



































CURTIS CARLISLE CoxE CLIFTON DREW JOHNSON
Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Arts
Macon, Ga. Clearwater, Fla.
St. Augustine High School Clearwater High School
Age 22Emory College Age 22Age 21
Theta Chi; Flint Chemical Soci'/ ety; Varsity Basketball Captain ThtCi;FrLteaySd
(3) ; Varsity Baseball (4) ; A. & S. et;UirsyBad
Basketball Team (4); "F" Club. An ambitious young man, he is
S Curtis is a fine example of the doing graduate work already; in'i brilliant athlete and the unusual dependent, he is depending on his i
part ~ ~ ~ ~ w inrveysrachofatleic
student. He has always taken onrsucsto educate himself.
with marked success but has never 'I allowed his participation to interfere with his studies.



























PAGE 37


































MARION BROOKS MATLACK BERTEL RAA
Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Arts
Sorrento, Fla. Tallahassee, Fla.
Florida Military Academy and Age 21
Rollins College Cosmopolitan Club; PhilharAge 23monic Society.
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater- "Miss Raa" is not only a perfect
nity; E. K. Chemical Society; Flint lady, but is one of the most accomChemical Society; Winner of Wil- plished musicians in the Univerloughby Scholarship; American st ehpst eavrus
Assoiaton fr Avancmen of and* if virtue will help in the acScience.complishment of this ambition, his
If love of one's calling will serve virtuosity will be unexcelled.
J~to advance one, then without doubt
Matlack will be a leader in the field of chemistry, for his home address is the Chemistry Laboratory, University of Florida.

























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THOMAS 0. OTTO HARRY M. MERCHANT
Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science
Key West, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.
Age 24 Gainesville High School
Age 22
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Serpent
Ribbon Society; Pan-Hellenic Sigma Nu; Theta Ribbon SociCouncil; "F" Club; Flint Chemical ety; Gainesville Club. Society; Varsity Football (1, 4).
Harry combines the qualities of "Conch," the holder of the Uni- industry and social leadership since versity record and the embossed he is not only a good student but,
leather medal awarded to the most being a citizen of Gainesville, has prolific distributor of b- perhaps the advantage of the rest of us in we might say conversation. An en- that he is a "brother" to all of the tertaining talker who is at his best ladies. if you let him tell you what he knows about medicine, surgery and aviation.





















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MAURICE STEIN FREDERICK R. WEEDON
Batchelor of Arts Bachelor of Science
Tampa, Fla. Tampa, Fla.
Age 21 Age 26
Zeta Beta Tau, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Alpha; Pres. Serpent RibAlpha Phi Epsilon; Cosmopolitan bon Society; Acacia Club; Flint
Club; Tampa Club; Secretary of Chemical Society; Tampa Club;
Debating Council; Inter-Society De- Class President (1); Amer. Chem
bater; Intercollegiate Debating Soc.; E. K. Chemical Society.

Fred, the philosopher and poet,
"Mawruss," the Trotzky of the whose mind in search of pabulum,
7~campus, is of the "intelligentzia." plumbs the depths of Tartarus or
Ready to inform anybody on any scales the heights of Olympus, and
subject, he will hook his nose under like a plant with mighty tendrils,
the other fellow's and proceed to stretches out and draws into it inform him, yea, even if it be an what it wishes. Hie is a disciple of angel from heaven, he would tell Schopenhauer, the gloomy one, but
him how to burnish his wings, or may he yet adopt a more pleasant /[
tune his harp, or escort tired souls master.
over the dark abyss.















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'PAGE 40


































PAUL O'BRIEN BAKER CHARLES PARKE ANDERSON
Bachelor of Science in Agricultitre Graduate in Farming
Gainesville, Fla. Ben Avon, Pa.
Southern College Allegheny Preparatory School
Age 26 Age 21
Pi Kappa Alpha; Captain Foot- Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Theta )d,
ball Team (4), Varsity Football Ribbon Society; Masqueraders;
(1, 2, 3, 4) ; Track Team (1) ; Class Agricultural Club; Alligator Staff President (2) ; President Athletic (2). Association (4), "F" Club; Agricultural Club. Parke has grown a fierce mustachio for the purpose of preventWe all hope that "Bake" never ing persons from confusing him
graduates, for the old place will with "Crip" of the same surname.
never be the same after he leaves. They were so much alike, so handHe started in the dim past but the some, so strong, and yet so gentle. war came along and he was lost to Now they can tell by the tickle.
us for two years. The best tackle that ever graced our gridiron.






















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ALBERT KENT BISHOP Roy LUDFOED DRIGGERS
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Eustis, Fla. Education
Eustis High School Fort Green, Fla.
Age 22 Wauchula High School
It Agricultural Club; Flint Chem- Age 21
ical Society; Athletic Association. Delta Rho, Phi Alpha Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Phi Epsiit This is the great unknown, the Ion; Agricultural Club; Student
mystery man, the sphinx of the Ag. Assistant in Animal Husbandry College. He prides himself that he (4) ; Executive Board, Student
Ar~ knows fewer students than any Body; Senior Member, M i n o r
r / man who ever attended the Uni- Sports Committee (4) ; Y. M.C. A.
versity and that no one, absolutely Cabinet (3); 1st Lieut. R. 0. T. C.
no one, knows him. It is great to (4) ; Inter-Society Debater; Midbe distinguished in at least one dieweight Wrestling Champion (2);
thing."F" Club; Varsity Football (4).



























PAGE 42


































HOMER E. BRATLEY JUNE RAWLs GUNN
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural fa eorfScneinAiulr,
Eductionand Bachelor of Science in
Miam i, Fla. Education
Miami High School Gainesville, Fla.
Age 25 Marianna High School

Agricultural Club; Member Flor- Ae2
ida Ambulance Unit. Sigma Nu, Phi Alpha Kappa;
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (1, 2, 3,4) ; If "'Omer smote 'is bloomin' Agricultural Club; Sergeant, R. 0.
lyre" he could tell many a roman- T. C. (3); Student Assistant in
tic tale of the ancient cities of old Animal Husbandry (3), in PhysiEurope, for he is a much-travelled cal Education (4); Manager of man. Since he is to be a teacher Football Team (4).
it is hardly fair to tell of his many adventures in arms and in love, for June is one of our oldtimers who
he is yet unmarried and he must left to answer the call to arms and
needs be reputed as a quiet and was thus thrown behind. A loss
unadventurous scholar, in time but not in the esteem in
which he has always been held. He is one of the most modest, unassuming, energetic of men.























PAGE 4

































DEFOREST LEWIS CHRISTIANCE WILLIAM HENRY MAHONEY
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Cocoanut Grove, Fla. Leesburg, Fla.
Miami High School Age 21
Age 21
President of the Senior Class of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa the College of Agriculture; First
Phi, Phi Alpha Kappa; Scabbard Lieutenant in R. 0. T. C. (4); Agand Blade; Serpent Ribbon Soci- ricultural Club.
ety; Masqueraders; Mandolin 6!
ii Club; Flint Chemical Society; Ag- "Ma Honey" is an agricultural
ricultural Club; Captain R. 0. T. journalist. He is a star at writC. (4).ing up farm dope. A nice fellow who should turn his talents toward We'll stack up this he-vamp of selling real estate or something
ours against the claimants for sim- more genteel than tilling the soil.
ilar honors in any other university But then, there's no need to worry, or college in the country. He's best for if he farms he'll be one of the
at that, but is also a star theatri- few who do after an ag. course.
cal performer in either male or female characters and equally good in the role of a "hard-boiled" officer.
























pAdt- 4i


































JACK KAUFMAN GOLDSBY LEN Bo TAN
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Ft. Myers, Fla. Canton, China
Gwynne Institute Oakland Technical High School
Age 26 University of California
Alpha Tau Omega; Theta Rib- Age 24
bon City; "F" Club; 1st Lieut. R. Cosmopolitan Club; Tennis Club;
0. T. C. (2); Athletic Council (4); Agricultural Club; Junior OratoriAgricultural Club; Varsity Foot- cal Contestor.
ball (1, 2, 3, 4).
Jack, the good-natured, was for Our little Oriental has endeared
four years the pride of our foot- himself to all with whom he has ball team, one of the mainstays of come in contact for he has all of the line, and an extraordinary the qualities that go to make a player. He was one of the first to friend. We expect to hear of him light, being one of the first to vol- as a professor in one of the colunteer for the army in which he leges of his native land in a short
spent more than two years. time for that is his ambition.



























PAGE 45







IWW Ift
























CARL PETER HEUCK HENRY GLENN HAMILTON
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in AgricWtural Davenport, Iowa Education
Davenport High School Humboldt, Tenn.
Iowa State College Humboldt High School
Age 23 Age 25
Phi Gamma Delta; Theta Rib- Agricultural Club; Ag. College
on ociety; Acacia Club; Basket- Football and Basketball Teams
ball (3) -Treasurer of the
; Agricultural Club. (4) ; Secretary
Agricultural Club (3).
Heuck is not a "square-head"
notwithstanding his name which "Hill Billy" came from the wilds
(for the benefit of the uninformed) of the moonshiners' hills of old
il is pronounced as one would cough, Tennessee. After a long process
with the vowel sound of "oil." Dur- he has become fully civilized and ing the time since he migrated a lowlander can associate with him
from Iowa he has made many without fear of any sort. Old
friends who hope the "orange or- "Billy" may not always be right chard" will be a success. but if he goes wrong it will be a
mistake of the head and not of the heart.






V














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ALTO L. ADAMS JOSEPH STANTON CLARK
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Charleston, W. Va.
Walton High School Augusta Military Academy and
Age 22 St. Edwards College
Ohio State University and West Alpha Phi Epsilon; Secretary- Virginia University
Treasurer John Marshall Debating Age 24
Society; President John Marshall Society (3); Winner Declamation Theta Chi; Newman Club; John
Contest for Trustee Medal (1) Marshall Debating Society.
Alto Soprano is the most serious Joe is a natural leader and had
man now gracing our campus. if he been with us longer his talents
he smiles it is only an accident. would have forced recognition of
He has no time for the petty friv- the fact. Even though he has atolities of life but is a lover of tended here one year only, yet
Blackstone and his disciples. Al- hardly a man but knows him, for
though often sought, he has never Joe is always starting something
cared for the social life of the Uni- that makes a "hit." versity and has deprived of an intimacy with him that would have been profitable all but those who could teach him.









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JOSEPH NIELSEN WATKINS ELMER WESLEY BORING
Bachelor of Science in Civil Bachelor of Laws
Engineering Waldo, Fla.
Key West, Fla. Waldo High School
Monroe County High School Washington and Lee University
Age 22 Age 22
Benton Engineering Society; John Marshall Debating Society;
Franklin Society; American Asso- Acacia Club.
ciation of Engineers.
Elmer is a shrinking violet in Joe Watkins is a "conch" from ordinary contact with his fellow
/; "T
Key West but has been in the students but in capacity for work
United States long enough to be he has the characteristics of a
civilized. A business-like young horse. It will be a pleasure to see
man who has little time for fool- him graduate for he has overcome
ishness and with it all a good fel- the obstacle of ill health and has low to "chum" with. held on by sheer grit and determination when many another would have stopped.









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CHARLES JAY HARDEE MONTROSE EDREHI
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
Gainesville, Fla. Pensacola, Fla.
Madison High School Pensacola High School
University of North Carolina Age 21
Age 22
Zeta Beta Tau; John Marshall Alpha Tau Omega; Serpent Rib- Debating Society.
bon Society; Scabbard and Blade; Captain R. 0. T. C.
(2); John The little man with the big voice,
Marshall Society; Varsity Base- and incidentally, with no mean calball (1) ; Baseball Captain (3). ibre mind. "Monstrous" is full of fun and good nature, in fact you C. J. is first of all a politician, can't make him mad. He will be second a baseball player, and next turned loose on the people as a a student of law, but he does them lawyer. all with unvarying success. If he lets his abilities loose in the direction of politics after graduation, nothing will be out of his reach.
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JOHN WALKER LIDDON SAMUEL WYCHE GETZEN
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
Marianna, Fla. Webster, Fla.
Jackson County High School Age 25
Age 21Alpha Tau Omega; John MarSigma Alpha Epsilon; Serpent shall Society; Serpent Ribbon So4 Ribbon Society; "IF" Club; John ciety; Class Vice-President (4).
Marshall Debating Society; Var- Colonel Getzen slipped one over
sitBaebal 2, ).on the law faculty; he went up to 1A
The brilliant son of an illustri- the Supreme Court, took the exam,
ous father. But, oh, so lazy. Men- and was admitted to the bar. Thus j
tally without a superior but phys- has he overridden all obstacles ically a sluggard, fortunately he when it seemed as if everything
'~has chosen the field of law in was conspiring against him to prewhich to exercise his talents. Just vent him from achieving his life
,,~ o tink e mghtbe wat s ~ ambition, to be able to call himself
t much better, a big league pitcher, a lawyer.
if he only would.


























PAGE 50

































OSCAR HARRIS NORTON FREDERICK HARVEY MELLOR
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
Tampa, Fla. Pensacola, Fla.
Hillsboro High School Santa Rosa High School
Age 22 Age 21
Theta Chi, Phi Delta Phi, Alpha Theta Chi, Phi Delta Phi; PanPhi Epsilon; Varsity Football (2, Hellenic Council; Honor Committee 3) ; "F" Club; Intercollegiate De- (2); John Marshall Debating Sobating Team (1); "Y" Cabinet ciety.
(1) ; Pan-Hellenic Council; Seminole (2); Alligator (2); Phi Kap- For Fred's sake it is to be hoped
pa Phi. that the University does not become co-ed while he is here for "Snowball," politician extraor- the lonesome few that we have had dinary, football player, and excel- have almost wrecked him. How lent student, combines many tal- unfortunate to be so appealing to
ents with great ability. If he fol- the ladies, and with it all, so unlows the law, he will be pre-eminent wittingly charming. in that field; if he enters politics, he will be "boss" of his county.











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--_Amok


PAGE.51


































EDWARD BOTSFORD QUINAN WILLIAM McKEE MADISON
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
Miami, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.
Miami High School Duval High School
Age 20 Age 21
Theta Chi; John Marshall De- Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta
bating Society; 1st Lieut. R. 0. T. Phi, Phi Kappa Phi; Theta Ribbon C. (4). Society; Class President (1);
Class Vice-President (3) ViceEddie is getting an early start President Y. M. C. A.; Vice Presiin the legal profession but he came dent Athletic Association; Debatto the Law College with collegiate ing Council; Pan-Hellenic Council; training and considerable experi- Varsity Baseball (3, 4) ; Varsity ence of a diversified nature. With Basketball (2, 3, 4) ; Manager
1k his bright mind and steady appli- Basketball Team (2, 3, 4).
cation he has a brilliant future. Bill Madison is the best example
of general ability in every field that can be cited among the members of his class. An extraordinary student, a fair athlete, and a general good fellow, liked by all the "Admirable Crichton" of the Class of 1921.


















TH
a,2

PAGE-52



































SIGSB3EE LEE SCRUGGS SAMUEL CLARENCE PEACOCK
Not a candidate for degree. Bachelor of Laws
Aucilla, Fla. Tampa, Fla.
Aucilla High School Mayo High School
Age 23 Age 29
4 Assistant Business Manager Alpha Phi Epsilon Debating
Seminole (3) ; Inter-Society Debat- Fraternity; "Y" Cabinet (3, 4) ; ing Team (1). Class Vice-President (1) ; Intercollegiate Debating Team (3); John Sigsbee has been with us for Marshall Society.
some time, but was one of the unfortunates whose college work was Sam's name is the synonym for
S wrecked by the war. He will grad- work, for he has more irons in the
uate next year with'the degree of fire than any man here in recent
Bachelor of Laws. A wizard, for years. If he were not so busy with
although married, he can attend his various projects Sam could
eollbge. find more time to be the good fellow that he can. It is a matter of/ regret that more cannot be among the ones who are his friends.

























PAGE 53






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e














E. CLYDE VINING CHARLES AUGUSTUS SAVAGE, JR.
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws
Wildwood, Fla. Ocala, Fla.
Leesburg High School Ocala High School
Age 21 Age 22
Alpha Tau Omega; John Mar- John Marshall Debating Society;
shall Debating Society. Law College Football and Baseball
Teams (4) ; 2d Lieut. R. 0. T. C. j If it were a crime to work Clyde (4). 4
would spend the remainder of his
days in durance vile. But if labor Charley the soldier, or Charley
reaps success, he will be more the lawyer, it is difficult to decide
amply rewarded than any of our which is his true love, for he is a
acquaintances. One must love his star in both fields and impartial
chosen work to live with it as it seems to each. Whether he
Clyde does. chooses a military or legal career,
needless to say Charley will seek that "golden mediocrity which merits neither envy nor ridicule."



;ji




















PAGE 54


































GEORGE CREARY HAMILTON SHAFTER WOODFORD CASON
Bachelor of Science in Education Bachelor of Science in Education
Pace, Fla. Otter Creek, Fla.
Santa Rosa County High School P Act e Hih2 cho
Age 22
Delta Rho, Alpha Phi Epsilon;
Theta Chi; Class Secretary- Peabody Literary Society; PeaTreasurer (3) ; Critic Peabody Lit- body Debating Team; Varsity Deerary Society; Sergeant R. 0. T. bating Team (4) ;Inter-Society
C. (3). Debating Council (4) ;Flint Chem" He who teacheth another, ical Society.
teacheth he not himself?" If this The man who will put Otter
'1 maxim is true, Creary will sooner Creek on the map even as one
or later have a corner on knowl- other famous man has distinedge, for he leaves the University guished Gum Center. To reach equipped as a teacher and, at the home Cason goes by rail to Willissame time, one of the best students ton, which is some twenty miles ever to graduate here, with an in- from Gainesville, walks twelve exhaustible fund of information. miles to the big creek which he
must swim, and then his Uncle
meets him with a buggy and drives
thirteen miles to home.























PAGE- 5

































JAMEs ALFRED FRANKLIN HERBERT MILTON FRIEDLANDER
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Science
Jacksonville, Fla. Indian Rocks, Fla.
Age 26 Largo High School
Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Delta Age 20
Phi, Alpha Phi Epsilon; John Mar- Farr Literary Society; Flint
shall Society; "Y" Cabinet (2); Chemical Society; Triangular DeDebating Council; Battalion Adju- bater; Trustee Medal for Oratory
I tant (1); Debating Team (4). (3); Business Manager Alligator
(4).
Jim is one of whom we can say
little. All we can do is look and Friedlander is a live one, active
gasp in awe that one of such com- in everything except the "Maccaparative youth should in the short beans." He is particularly active space of twenty-odd years h.ave in his efforts to down the "hated
become so all-knowing, all-seeing, lawyers" in whatever they try to and all-wise. Great will be his fu- manage, thus showing his patriotture and proud will be he who can ism as well as high order of intelsay that he has known, seen, or ligence. When he grows older and
touched hands with James A. more matured we expect to see
Franklin. Herbert shine as a promoter.




















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PAGE 56

































LESLIE DODD WILLIAMS CECIL H. NICHOLS
Bachelor of Science in Agriculti(re Bachelor of Science in Agricitltural
Evansville, Ind. Education
Evansville High School Pinellas Park, Fla.
Age 20 Largo High School
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Theta Age 21
Ribbon Society; Phi Alpha KappaPhi Kappa Phi; Agricultural Club! "Nick" is one of the serious individuals of the campus. He reAssistant Editor Alligator (3) fuses to be a boy any longer for
Inter-Society Debating Council he has put away childish things
(3). and clings to the things that count.
How one can be so young and A bright student who means to
make good in his future underyet so wise is mysterious. Leslie takings.
4 is one of the best students in his
class, even one of the best in the University. Yet he has time and leisure for any student activity that interests him. It is given to him to be popular and yet to be
intellectual.




4


















PAU 67:






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WILLIAM G. WELLS JOHN DIXIE ALMOND, JR.
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor of Science in Electrical City Point, Fla. Engineering
Cocoa High School Ft. Pierce, Fla.
Age 22 St. Lucie County High School
Delta Rho Phi Alpha Kappa, Age 22
Phi Kappa Piii; Major R. 0. T. C.
Vice-President Benton Engineer(4) ; "Y" Cabinet (3) ; Secretary
"Y" (4); Scabbard and Blade; ing Society; Class Treasurer (4);
Secretary-Treasurer Student Body Swimming Team.
Association; Agricultural Club; Johnny is a fish, not in the orVarsity Baseball Team (4). dinary sense, but in the water. He
is an expert swimmer whose natNo student ever had more un- ural element seems to be water
sought honors thrust upon him
than "Willie Green." Not a poli- rather than land. Likable and ti ian modest but over retiring, he underh in any sense of the word, estimates his ability, which is
is fellow students, recognizing grea
his worth, have seen fit to honor t.
him with the most important of fices in their power to bestow. A living example of the efficacy of
industry and modesty.





















RAM, 58,

































CHARLEs ALFRED PFEIFFER WILLIAM WALTER GUNN
Bachelor of Science in Civil Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering Engineering
Miami, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.
Miami High School Marianna High School
Clemson College Age 24
Age 23 Kappa Alpha; Theta Ribbon SoCadet Captain R. 0. T. C. (4) ciety; Scabbard and Blade; "F"
Seminole Staff (4); Cheer Leader Club; University Minstrels (1);
(4) ; U. F. Quartet (4). Track Team (1) ; Assistant Business Manager Alligator (2); Class Charley, our likable cheer leader, Vice-President (3); Business Manis the personification of "pep," the ager Seminole (3); President Athlivest fellow ever seen. With all letic Association (3) ; Varsity his. interestt in many student ac- Football (3); Treasurer Y. M. C. tivities, he still has time to be a A. (4). good soldier and better than average student. Young and yet full of honors,
Walter leaves the University with the friendship of all with whom he came in contact; a tireless worker who does all things well.


















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PAGE 59






6


























GEORGE WILLIAM HARTMAN DANIEL B. KNIGHT
Bachelor of Science in Civil Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering Engineering
Pensacola, Fla. Bunnell, Fla.
Pensacola High School Lake Butler High School
Age 21 Stetson University
Sigma Nu; Varsity Baseball and Age 22
Manager (2, 3, 4) ; F Club; Stu- Scabbard and Blade; President dent Executive Committee; Vice- of Tennis Club (3, 4) ; Benton EnPresident Athletic Association (4). gineering Society; Captain R. 0.
T. C. (4); designated Honor GradGeorge, the dependable, has been uate to receive regular Army Comfor the past several years our mission.
mainstay in the pitcher's box. So
capable has he been that the man- "Bloxy" is a star in military ciragership of the team has been cles; the mainstay of the military
forced upon him for three years. establishment for he can fill any A
position from that of "buck" number four in the rear rank to Battalion Commander. How one can be such a good soldier and yet so likable is a mystery.



















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McCoy HUBBARD WALLACE ALEXANDER McKEY
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Bachelor of Science in Civil
Engineering Engineering
Terra Ceia, Fla. Plant City, Fla.
Palmetto High School Plant City High School
Age 22 Age 21
Scabbard and Blade; Captain R. Kappa Alpha; Scabbard and
0. T. C. (4); Benton Engineering Blade; Class Vice-President (4) ; I
Society; "Y" Cabinet; Honor Com- Benton Engineering Society; Vicemittee; American Association of President Y. M. C. A.; American
Engineers. Association of Engineers.
Coy is one of the best loved and "Wally" always is one of the
1k most highly respected of the entire leaders in progressive thought and
student body of the University. A is one of the best liked of students.
quiet, industrious, studious chap It can always be said of him that, who does his best in all that he un- whatever he has done, he has done dertakes. his best and has followed the course
that conscience dictates.




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VAN ELLIS HUFF J. ROBERT MOORHEAD, JR.
Bachelor of Science in Civil Bachelor of Science in Civil
Engineering Engineering
Miami, Fla. Ocala, Fla.
Miami High School Age 27
Age 27Member American Association of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kap- Engineers; Benton Engineering/
pa Phi; Serpent Ribbon Society; Society; Transit Club; Marion
Editor-in-Chief Seminole (3) ; County Club. N
Class Secretary (4) ; Benton Engineering Society. "Jarhead" has little time for the
childish things that those of more How can a man be the leader of youthful spirits indulge in. "Strictsociety and yet be classified as a ly business"; that's his motto. How "roughneck" engineer? Van is well he has made it a part of him,
both of them but with only a slight is a matter of common knowledge.
accent on the "roughneck" part Ask the profs.; they know.
and a strong emphasis on the "so/1 ciety leader." Still Van is also one
of the best students in the CollegeI il
of Engineering for it's easy to get in with the Engineers but hard to
get out, that is with a degree.























i'AGt 62



































HERBERT GIDDENs FORD CLARENCE STROUSE THOMAS
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering Engineering
Tampa, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.
Hillsboro High School Gainesville High School
Age 23 Age 21
Alpha Tau Omega; Scabbard and Kappa Alpha; Scabbard and 1 I
Blade; Phi Kappa Phi; Theta Rib- Blade; 1st Lieut. R. 0. T. C. (3) bon Society; E. K. Chemical Soci- "F" Club; Varsity Football (1, 3); ety; "F" Club; President of Stu- Benton Engineering Society. dent Body (4) ; Class President
(4) ; Editor Alligator (4) ; Varsity The laziest man. His only exerFootball (4) ; Benton Engineering cise, except during football season, Society. is breathing. He eats pre-digested
A returned soldier who gave two food only. His aversion to work is physical only, for he is a very years of his college career to the alert student. army and is consequently so much behind his original class. He has been honored in being selected as j
the representative of the state of Florida at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. So generally has he been esteemed that he has reaped the highest honors in college.













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PAGE 63

































Louis JETER TATOM JOSE DE SAMPA10
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Bachelor of Science in Civil
Engineering Engineering
Pensacola, Fla. Sao Paulo, Brazil
Pensacola High School Sao Paulo Normal College
Age 21 University of Illinois
Age 26
Sigma Nu; Captain R. 0. T. C.
(4); Class President (3); Y. M. Delta Rho; Cosmopolitan Club;
C. A. Cabinet; Honor Committee Newman Club; Benton Engineering
(2) ; Benton Engineering Society; Society; Franklin Society.
American Association of Engineers; honor graduate to receive Joe is an example of grit and
regular Army Commission. determination in that he deterin i n e d to come to the United
A self-made man, but oh! how States, acquire an education, and
he loves his maker. There is no fit himself for service to his coundanger of Louis under-rating him- try. He has overcome the great self, but then, he has such great handicap of speaking a foreign
ability that he can hardly mark tongue and now equals the native
himself up too high. A most con- North American student in every
scientious worker who is destined way. And further, Joe is the best
.t.! to accomplish much in his chosen of good fellows and very popular
field. with all, students and ladies.


















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PAGE 64

































NFWELL B. DAvis JOHN DWIGHT McKFy
Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Palatka, Fla. Engineering
Virginia Military Academy Plant City, Fla.
1 appa Alpha; Flint Chemical Age 23
Society; Member University of Plant City Club; Wrestling Club;
Florida Carnival. lst Lieut. R. 0. T. C. (4); Engineer Football Team; University
"Snaky" Davis, the far-famed Minstrels; University Quartet;
snake-charmer, better known as Masqueraders' Club.
"Makaka," was one of the hits of
the Carnival. He eats 'em alive, He came from N. C. A. & M., in
or any other way. But this is not good standing too, but that shouldhis only accomplishment for he is n't be a matter of surprise as to
one of the stars in Dr. Crow's Johnny, the veteran of the MexiFrench classes, being so proficient can border, where he learned the and loving his work so well that he gentle art from the "Meeks." Also has remained an extra year to a long-time member of the A. E.
pursue his studies in Modern Lan- F., where his sweet tenor, wineguages further. soaked, made such a hit with the
"Y" and S. A. lassies.























PAGE 66














SENIOR HISTORY
September, 1917, saw the registration of the Class of
'21. After passing through the trying period of the first
few weeks they organized with success finally. Owing
to the fact that the United States had entered the field
against the Kaiser's forces, this class was unusually
small, numbering only ninety- eight. But in spite of this
handicap at the beginning of its areer, it has shown remarkable work and through the four years of its life at
the University of Florida, many worthy achievements
have been accomplished.
In 1918 it was soon shown that many of the class had
answered the call to arms, but those remaining served
faithfully in the Training Corps, when it was formed, and finally after the period of strife was past, a new strength was added by returning
members, and the class once again began to move to the front.
In all lines of University activity, the Class of '21 took the leading role,
and the record thus established is one of which they may be justly proud.
Especially in athletics has this class stood out pre-eminently. In its
first year, seven men were on the football squad. In the next year three men were on the varsity, and the Junior year found four holding positions.
This present year the Senior Class counted Paul Baker (Captain), Driggers, Norton, Gunn, Otto and Ford on the squad. In basketball Madison, Cox and Heuck represented the Class in fine style. Baseball also seemed a favorite with the Seniors, for the Class of '21 had Hartman (Manager 1918-1919), Hardee (Captain, 1920), Liddon, Cox, and Madison on the
team.
Starting early in the final year, the class elected as its officers, Herbert Ford, President; Wallace A. McKey, Vice-President; Van E.
Huff, Secretary; John D. Almond, Treasurer, and McCoy Hubbard, Honor Representative. With these men leading, real things have been done, and a more notable class has never stepped across the threshold of Florida's University to enter the wide field of life.
For complete preparedness and efficiency this class is noted They have never failed to uphold the class reputation when called upon, and each individual member has faithfully endeavored to gain all possible from the opportunities afforded him; has always stood staunch and true in every crisis; and has proven himself a man, able to face life in all phases; to battle bravely, never giving up, for that which is right and just, and to uphold his high ideals and those of his class.
To the University of Florida-the only Alma Materthis class owes its everlasting debt. In entering upon its new life, and altho the members will be far apart, Florida is not to be forgotten, but will always be cherished in memory as the inspiration for Success.








TH


13AGE 66
















JUNIORS













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JUNIOR SPONSORS

MISS ELSIE TURNBULL Moultrie, Ga. MISS ANTOINETTE MULLIKEN MISS HELEN HEMPHILL HARRIS
Eustis Jacksonville
MISS MARGARET BOYLE Tampa








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JUNIOR CLASS

OFFICERS
ARTHUR N. SOLLEE -------------------------------------------------------------President
JOHN S. SHERMAN----.....----------------------------------------------- Vice-President
GEORGE W. MILAM------------------------------------------ Secretary and Treasurer
ANTHONY REGERO----------------------------------------------- Honor Representative
















PAGE 69

































James Mitchell Alderman William Lansing Gleason Bunyan Pipkin
Robert Drummond Atkisson George Wayne Gray Russell Paul Redmond
Charles Hammond Baker, Jr. John Franklin Hall Anthony Regero
Claude Keigwin Barco Ray Laforest Hamon Lance Clayton Richbourg
Perry Harvey Biddle Leeson Arthur Hogarth Moses Harry Rosenhouse
William James Bivens Hurley Washington Holland Thomas David Sale, Jr.
James Victor Blume Franklin Newman Holley, Jr. Ivan Walter Scott
Eric Russell Boswell Randall Hubert Hu-hes John Scott Sherman
John Ovier Brown John Blake Hurst Andrew Carson Simmons
Sydney Johnson Catts, Jr. William Jeacle Arthur Neyle Sollee
Tullie Hoyt Carlton Holgar Knud Jeremiasson Frank Ovid Spain, Jr.
Albert Reed Caro Henry Cecil Johnson Garland Wesley Spencer
Archer Eugene Carpenter James Velma Keen Lewis Jeter Tatum
John Hardin Carter, Jr. David Willis Keen Royal Perkins Terry
Robert Foster Chatham James Harold Klock William Earl Thompson
Ruby Floyd Cooper Richard Edgar Knight Walter Morris Tillman
Horace Cecil Cooper Daniel Roy Leisher Leonard Todd
Nelson Drennen Cooper Carl Temple Link Horace Lamar Tolbert
Arthur Crago Rudolph Charles Lohmeyer John Pitt Tomlinson
Lemuel Curtiss Crofton Elwood John Maines John Kavenaugh Tredwell
Gilbert Curtis Herbert Stockton Massey Clifford Levi Walker
Anson Borden DeWolf William Harry McBridge, Jr. Judson Buron Walker
Robert Eugene Duckworth Jackson Henson McDonald Kenneth R. Warnock
William John Dyer, Jr. Ian Hart McKillop DeWitt Everett Williams
Kasper Green Duncan Eldridge Franklin McLane John Franklin Williams, Jr.
Lloyd Hayden Ellsworth George Walton Milam Thurston P. Winter
Thomas Sherod Ferguson Edward Welsey Millican, Jr. Milton Leonidas Yeats
Edward Erasmus Fleming Charles Edgar Morgan





























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JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY
Truly this has been a remarkable class. Ever since its entrance in September, 1918, there have been things done by it that stand out prominently in the history of student activities of the last three years. It entered its University career under the S. A. T. C., and lost many of its members when it closed. There was no college atmosphere for this class to breathe. The army had a death grip on "Old Florida" and through its iron-clad regulations smothered the college spirit. However, this did not thwart the class which returned in 1919 filled with the vim of restrained vigor and prepared to work untiringly for the good of "The Orange and Blue."
During its Sophomore year the class saw the need of some regulations on the Freshmen. Securing the support of the Faculty and the upperclassmen, it drew up an excellent code of rules for the Freshmen to follow. This aided greatly in restoring 'Gator spirit to the campus.
Soon after the opening of this scholastic year the class met and reorganized. Arthur Sollee was elected to head the class, assisted by John Sherman as vice-president, George Milam as secretary and treasurer, and Anthony Regero as honor representative.
In the field of athletics this class has never been found wanting. Always has it responded with material when there was any team to try out for. Basketball and baseball found this class working hard to make a better team for a bigger and better Florida. Arthur Sollee, our president, won many laurels at the Southern Track Meet last year. As he is in the best of form, we look for more records from our star this year. Another member of the Junior class who has won great distinction is Lance Richbourg. Two years ago when the Giantsvere training on Fleming Field, they noticed his capabilities and contracted with him. He was released but made such a good showing last year that he is again a member of the Giant aggregation. "Rich" is coaching the Florida nine this year and the team is doing some splendid work under his supervision.
The officers of the numerous organizations on the campus, such as clubs, literary societies and debating societies, are literally infested with members of the Junior class. The officers of the Seminole are drawn from this class and it is their desire to put out a better annual this year.
Looking back, we see the largest part of our college life in the past and it is with deep regret that we will take up the responsibilities of a Senior because of the fact that it will mean that we have only one short year to spend within the pale of our Grand Old University.








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"DAWNPP
A Pessimistic Poem
FREDERICK R. WEEDON, '21

A low dark cloud on the far horizon
Flashes to crimson and blinding white,
The black silhouette of a palm tree rising,
A last lone spirit of vanishing night
Against its glory is etched in darkness
Each feathery frond with its border of flame;
The palm tree whispers, "The Sun is coming,
You sands and ripples, that love his name.

"The breath of his kingship, the Dawn-wind, hurries
The lingering hosts of the mists away,
And I burn for the loss of my gentle mistressThe Night far fled from the shouting Day.
Hers was the love of the stars and the fireflies,
With them she has vanished, his colors appear;
And I call you to rouse from your restless dreaming,
You slaves of the Morning that slumber here.

"Through the long blue night you have lain enchanted,
Her mists were an incense, her shadows a charm,
That held you bound while her fairies wandered,
Lest your glitter and riot should work them harm.
But now they have lifted and gone without me,
I stand here in sorrow, deserted, alone,
The Sun bids me call and I bow to his dawningHis red rim is flaming, the shadows are gone."










r-_1V


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SOPHO-MORES













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IIIIIIlIIllXlI XLIIII1llIIIIIIII 2lIII










































SOPHOMORE SPONSORS MISS NELL CARROLL MISS ANNIE BRUCE Monticello MISS FRANCES KENNEDY
Orlando MISS DOROTHY RUMPH Tampa
Sanford







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T T T-T -XI it







































WL


L I




































PAOE 76





















SOPHOMORE CLASS


OFFICERS


J. A. WINFIELD --------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------ President

TRUMAN GREEN ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Vice-President

W. D. MAHANNAH --------------------------------- ------------- Secretary and Treasurer

JAMES MERRIN -------------------------------------------------------------- Honor Representative



Alvin Austin Ames Patrick Henry Gillen Marmaduke Sewell Pender
Noble Boyd Armstrong Alexander Angus Gillis Ralph Parker Perkins
George Chambliss Battle, Jr. Rodney Herbert Gott James Lewis Pierce
John Jacob Bell Andrew Stephens Graham Sisco Knox Phyfer
Orville Marion Berg Truman Powell Greene Charles James Regero
Edgar S. Blake Errett Fillmore Gunn J. Spenser Roache
David Estion Booth Charles Stuart Hall Wieland Walker Rogers
William Moreau Bostwick John Herndon Hansborough Marcus Ercelle Sanders
Reeves Bowen Pete Harris Ernest Mason Schabinger
Virgin Marlow Bradshaw Charles Roy Hauser G. Ballard Simmons
George Wilmont Brown Maurice Gerald Hauser Richard Menzo Smith
Thomas Richard Brown George Lewis Henderson Harold Campbell Stansfield
William Jennings Bullock Harold Davis Henley George Booth Stanly
Maurice Frank Bunnell Clifford Roswell Hiatt Richardson Lee Stanly
Richard Temple Burr William Holden Hugh Quam Stevens
Robert Perrin Burton Allen Tolar Hollenrake Lloyd Dennison Stewart
George Arthur Calhoun Roy Belknap Hoskins Robert Marcuis Swanson
Robert Arthur Carlton Hugh Reginald Hough Karl William Swartz
Boyd Carleton Donald Hubbard Paul J. Sweeny
Lawrence H. Cobb Frank R. Hunter Jelks Taylor
Willis Judson Cody Thomas Floyd Kennan Will Mason Tiller
Ronald Frank Coe Fred Kilgore Raleigh Tillman
Murray Cohen Walter Russell King Wilson Lorenzo Tooke
Raymond Vorhes Coleman William Porter Ladd, Jr. Irvin Gray Thomas
Charles Edward Cook Paul Earnest Leland Ferdinand Wilson Thomasson
Albert Cecil Cooper Samuel Orlando Lindelie Laudious Laurence Thompson
J. O'Neal Cox Harold Henry Link Barton Eugene Thrasher
Henry Jefferson Davis, Jr. Frances Tillinghask MacKinnon Bennett Dell Traxler
Nicholas Joseph DeMaggio Edward Lee Matthews Ames Burton Weaver
Edgar Earl DeVane Rubin Allen McBrayer Joel Reeves Wells, Jr.
Willie D. Douglas Howard Elton McClain Leonard Allison Wesson
Richard Sanford Dowdell John William Mellor Thomas Franklin West, Jr.
Henry Leitner Edwards James Frank Merrin James Andrew Winfield
Don Gary Ennis Way Douglas Mahannah Irvine Deborry Williams
George Floyd Ferris Clarence William Nelson Johnathon Everett Williams
Paul Gray Franklin John Van Oberholtzer Oliver Joseph Williams
Henry Fuller Horace O'Bryant Edward Bennett Willson
Landon Fuller Emery Sharon Odom Elwood Lambert Wilson
Shelby Gunn Gaskins Francis Webb Parker Horace S. Wilson
Albert James Geiger Frank Crawford Paul Alex White
Thomas Jefferson Geiger Porter Lee Peaden William Laurence Wolfenden
Walter Scott Yates















PAGE 76














SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY
In September, 1919, these men came from far and near to enter a new life. They had their ideas on the new life and of course you could see the green shining forth. Soon, however, they were obliged to alter their ideas and adjust themselves to the ideas of men who had been through the ropes and knew the "higher life" thoroughly. As rats, they adapted themselves in good form and soon were united in one purpose-to make a "Greater Florida."
The true spirit of the class was shown in their turn-out for athletics. The football team was a regular one and composed for a great part of Freshmen. Basketball and baseball also drew their support. The interclass track meet showed them to be a much faster lot than the older men. Then there were those memorable "shirt-tail" parades. Every "rat" turned out at any time of night to celebrate a victory.
At the beginning of the Sophomore year the class reorganized and elected J. A. Winfield as president, Truman Green as vice-president, W. D. Mahannah secretary and treasurer, and James F. Merrin honor representative. As is always the case, there were men who did not return, so the class began its second year with fewer members. However, the pep remained and the class began at once to do things in a monumental way that would tend to increase the prestige of "Old Florida" and serve as an example to the incoming Sophomore Class.
Football again found this class its hearty supporters and basketball flourished through its members. Baseball is as well supported, as the same genuine class spirit, which is indefatigable, exists when laurels are to be garnered for the U. of F.
At the close of the year we look up startled to find half of our scholastic career behind us. True it is a career for a class to be proud of, but ambition places the desire for a better class for a bigger university in the next two years.











PAGE 77














TO THE COALS
RALPH P. PERKINS, '23

0, coals, that you could lend me of your fire, To sound heroic Homer's lyre
To gasp in Sappho's passioned strain,
To Tennyson's melodic majesty aspire.

0, coals, within your heart I see A vision long forbidden me; I see a maiden, on her breast
Her niece's golden duck-curls rest; And in the fire-shine's softest glow
The sweet tears come, and ebb and flow, As through the mist that veils my eyes
In her a vision changes, dies.

All her form unfolds to me
The moody majesty of the sea,
Flecked with froth and roaring spray;
O'er all, the sea gulls, white specks far away.
I see in her the Autumn hills
Where purple vapor from their vales distills,
And the gorgeous gum and lonely pine
In sadly softened landscape swim, divine.
Her sweet inconsequential words to me Ring in my heart like that majestic sea:
Else, like the songs of birds, or like some strain
From many-voiced orchestral choir, or greatest orchestra of all-the rain.

But, coals! What madness holds me now?
Have I forgot my long-kept vow?
I have labored long alone,
Nor love, nor wife, nor children by the fireside known.
Since one maid was forbidden me
'Tis sacrilege that I should ever see
That vision of the long ago.
Her life is all her own, and so should be.

But 0, sometimes this sad heart longs for rest,
A home and hearth by true love blessed,
The form of a girl in the firelight gleam, And the head of a child upon her breast.






i r


PAGE 78








I I y I





























FRESH.M.EN




































PAGE 79





















































FRESHMAN SPONSORS
MISS MARION REED MISS JOSEPHINE WEST Tampa MISS ELLA WILLIAMS
Tallahassee MISS ALMA GIBSON Jacksonville
Tarpon Springs







PAGE 80







































































PAOE 81















FRESHMAN CLASS

OFFICERS

kernel hughs ------------------------------------------------- ----------------- -------------------- President
e. m. bringle ................. ---------------------------- -- ------------- ------------------- Vice-President
h. jones ----------------------- --- --------- ------------------ -------------- ..Secretary and Treasurer
rames r. boyd ---------------------- ------------ -------------- ------------ ...Honor Representative

Charles elliot abbott kenneth b. hait james leroy Padgett
bryan george anderson kenneth kalmar hansen george reed paschal
Claude anderson. robert hamilton harris william mullen pepper, jr.
Cromwell adair anderson william maurice harrison henry Perry, jr.
joseph frank angle william henry harwich, jr. abram Innis pheil
jack Pierce ashore john miller haynes i. w. Philips, jr.
john byron avera oswald lewis helseth wilber crafts Pickett
john c. babson friebole wall hendery robert samuel pierce, jr.
neill hurt bartlett james william. henderson edwin francis Pomeroy, jr.
george james bays. elmer dumont hinckley stewart lines Pomeroy
Clyde ivan bears george randolph hitchcock anderson hooker Potter
Clarence henry beech homer lincoln hobb richard Preece, jr.
john alfred begg Iloyd Calhoun hooks Carlton gibson price
Clarence lee bell william billings horne david alva rambo
Charles dickson berry walter grade howard ainsworth rane
osmund reimert bie henry gwynn howard Innis randall ramsey
robert eades black girdy henry howard leonard maphren reed
julian alfred blake louis joseph hubbard rob roy rhudy
robert mell blake Paul stancy 1. hubbard edgar ray roberts
john milton blount gordon Cushing huie hugh roberts
jack borer james howard huie milton elias robbins
Paul kermotte belles edward griedale hurne winthrop marston robinson
harold archie bowman douglas putledge igou nelson durant rowell
robert mcdonald boulware john leslie jackson john whittier royal
egbert napoleon bowyer reese c. jarnes earneA rutledge
Charles wilson boyd benjamin lott jennings adrian mooresample
james rober boyd ]ester winsor jennings Charles theodore sauls
heyward milhollin braddock Charles ward johnson julian lamar saunders
edwin miller bringle Clifton drew johnson fred wachob sapp
herbert Clifton brown richard green johnson, jr. chaffie audry scarborough
thomas noble brown victor floyd johnson jack lewis schwaen
frank moore bruce mehenry jones walter mitchell schubert
needharn whitfield bryan earl edward jones, orion lawson scofield
john price burdesbaw harry n. s. jones fred frank scott
Calhoun yance burr hewton dorr st. johns rawley wilson scotten
edgar buton busbee john jones george william selby
maurice Campbell werner eugene Jones john h. sharply
wofford martin Campbell isodore leo juster william franklin sheen 01
olin Penn cannon william harrington keen richard harrison sheppard
marshall neatwood earn jack kehoe walter Clark sheppard
leonard Carter harry ewbank king jesse chairman shockney
melville william carruth harold matthew kitchen ear newton short
lewis frank cawthon eury martin knight richard allan sins
austin winnard Chadwick marion barley knight john milton b. simpson
thomas p. chairs lawrence jacob kraus henry richard singletary
edwin aldons Champlin sidney kraus charnelle hodxes summers
staten harder chance david lang robert elmor summit
aby chardkoff homer basil lee francis marion sumner
John Chesnut oscar deen leonard alfred george smith
richard c. chillingworth Clifford joseph ]ester bonnie oathmel smith
howard bacon chitty edward clay lewis william wall smith
raymond harold Clark henry glenn single angelo Pete spoto
thomas lee Clark wilkins linhart Crawford nivan staley
edwin americus Clayton robert gaston little william winston starling
daniel tuttle cloud nelson Charles longer william henry steckert







-T- IT :Lrx IT.



PAGE 82
















carl augutsus clyatt horace eugene loomis james edward still
arthur russell coe ralph theo lyman francis fernando storm, jr.
creshaw caleb collins ojus malphurs judson william strickland
robert trowell collins coey malphurs norton arlington stuart
donald earl conant glenn finley maloy James claggett taylor
charles frank connell fred ferris mansour clement lee theed
James milton connell joseph henson markham paul foster thompson
carr charles colley ralph angelo marsecano robert cochran trimble
horace cecil cooper frederic lawrence marshall dewitt campbell turner
herbert osmond crippen grant arthur martel raymond warren tyler
mitchell jacoby daffin malcolm warren martin earnest pomeroy turner
clyde thompson davies mario ernesto martinez clinton b. van cleef
laurence webber davis frank may massey john howard vandegrift
orville rhodes davis rubin madison mason charles herman von canon, jr.
paul belton divver thomas otis mathis james glasgow wallace
charles lewis dodson kingsley archibald mccallim thomas henry wallis
george franklin duke malcolm stanly mccaskill william gresham ward
charles edwin duncan robert h. mcdavid frank eugene walker
louis eugene dupont harrison hodges mcdonald kenneth r. warnock
bernard king durst raymond elmer mcdonald edwin bruce warren
albert warren dutton david franklin mcdowell olustee kenneth weatherwax
d. culver eberwine chester barto mcmillan daniel booker webb
henry colley edwards joseph wheeler mcvickers lorenzo albert wells
leif torolf ekeland edmund william meisch john wesley whidden
james tyre etheridge james everett melton frank gregory white
walter downing etheridge joe knox merrin joseph senter white
francis webster farnsworth maynard mickler vernon keith white
earl drayton farr william sylvester middleton howard egerton wiig
walter franklin french charles rush miller angus doublas williams
william simms fielding earl malloy miller charles williams, jr.
Jacob wolfe friendman robin glover miller harry grocer williams
lawrence armes garland fred wilman mills james maurice williams
laurence gerow homer virgil milton john 1. williams
harry gordon John milton raburn herbert williams
fred kenneth gore ralph hudson mobley walter samson williams
henry 1. gray, jr. charles ivan monroe burn william wilson
angus woodward graham ellis moore robert merch wilson
otis thatcher green john sherman moore reginald brandon woodward
james houston gribble d. roland moss floyd emil wolfe
edwin alfred griffin willard le baron myres r. ellis young
aubrey cartwright ormsby ray franklin young


SONNET

My Alma Mater, old in my heart, and dear,
Situate 'neath ever-bright Floridian skies,
As deep and pure as some shy maiden's eyes,
Clinging to kind and verdurous earth so near;
O, soul of Florida, that thou couldst hear
The song of one whose proud and humble heart
Sings ever when it ponders what thou art
To all whose fortune 'tis that thou dost rear.

The youths and maids who tread the shifting shade
Cast on thy paths by towering campus pines
Learn from thy heart, and nature's subtle signs,
To keep an unconscious compact they have made, Remembering, reverencing thee where'er they go.
O, ever may thy children love thee so.
-R. P.P.










PAGE 83














FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY

The largest class ever enrolled in the University of Florida is a mild
statement of the size of this class. Numbering over three hundred it almost doubled the class of the preceding year. Men who had been in the army and overseas were returned and in search of higher education. This aided in making this not only a class of large numbers but also one of mature intellect. In previous years the men entering college for the first time were younger, inexperienced boys fresh from the high schools. This class brought a new element into the University: the man with the broad
viewpoint and serious thought.
The big unwieldy body was brought together in the gymnasium early
in the year and organized. They chose for their president Kernel Hughes, Edwin Brengle for vice-president, Robert Jones for secretary and treasurer, and James Boyd for honor representative. With these men in the lead the class at once began to forge ahead. On the football field the "Rat"
was given his chance to make the team and many of the old "F" men were hard pushed to hold their position. Basketball brought the same support and there is great promise as to the baseball prospects. Track will also bring the light-footed "Rats" out to rival the old men. There will be keen rivalry as there is equally good material in all classes this year.
When the Sophomores posted the "Rat" rules this class met and agreed
to do its part in carrying them out. Green caps were donned and the button touched on passing or speaking to an "old man." As a whole there was the best co-operation on the part of this class of any that have entered
Florida.
Taking all in all this class can look back over the year and feel proud
of its achievements. As to their academic work it must be left to the faculty to judge their capability and preparedness for the next year's work. We hope that they may think the best of us all and we resolve
to make ourselves worthy of their revered opinions.
May the "Rats" of next year profit by our mistakes.










PAGE 84











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OFFICERS STUDENT BODY ASSOCIATION

HERBERT G. FORD----------------------------------------------------------- President
JAMES F. MERRIN ------------------------------------------------------- Vice-President
WILLIAM G. WELLS------------------------------------------------------------ Secretary




















PAGE 87








































BUDGET COMMITTEE HERBERT G. FORD, Ex-officio Chairman. Dr. J. M. Leake William J. Bivens

Prof. P. L. Reed Roy L. Driggers

George Hartman















PAGE 88










STUDENT BODY ASSOCIATION
ENT BODY ASSOCIATION
Just before the close of Ze 1919-1920 term the Student Body took a step which is one of the most important ever taken by this University. This was the passing of a budget which puts the activities on such a business-like basis that there is no excuse for failure of any of them. This budget was passed by such a convincing majority, although there were bitter enemies against it, that the Faculty and Board of Control without hesitation accepted it and at the beginning of this year it went into effect.
This budget provided that an entrance fee of twenty dollars be assessed on every man at registration. This fee covers all student activities as follows: Major sports, minor sports, debates and literary societies, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Alligator, Seminole, a Lyceum Course, Gymnasium, and a special fund. The Blue Print at the beginning of this section shows the working of the budget. The adopting of this budget has been a fine thing for the University and may well be copied by other schools. The fact is that many schools have inquired into the nature and working of the budget.
After it had been introduced, a committee, B. E. Bushnell, President of the Student Body, R. P. Terry and J. Velma Keen took it in hand and drew up a proposed constitution. At the same time committees of students well versed in the needs of the different activities were appointed, and they reported the amount which they would need as their share of the Budget. When the amounts were agreed upon and the constitution written it was all brought before the student body for discussion. At the next Friday Chapel it was voted upon, each item separately, by ballot, and every item raised.
The constitution called for the organization of a student body association, which is composed of all who pay the fee required on.entrance. This association has control of all funds. The officers under it are: President, Vice-President, Secretary, and the University Auditor as Treasurer. A committee of two faculty members and three students known as the Budget Committee are elected by the association to supervise the spending of the funds which are turned over by the committee to the officers of the different activities.
The officers and the Budget Committee were elected this year at the first of the term, but after this they will be elected just before school closes for the succeeding year. The committee had no outline of work to follow except that outlined in the blue print above, but at early meetings, by-laws were adopted and it soon started functioning. Records are kept for every cent given out and the different departments are required to return receipted bills to cover the amount given them. In this way there is no chance for fraud, for the books must be kept up to date and are always open for inspection. The Budget Committee meets the last Tuesday of every month.
The fee added to the student's expense at entrance is paid to the University Auditor. Sums may be gotten from him only by having a properly endorsed requisition from the Budget Committee. The total amount paid in is divided to the different organizations as follows.
Major Sports ........... ............ $5.00 per man Literary Societies and
Minor Sports ....... ................ 1.50 per man Debates .............................. $1.00 per man
Lyceum .................................. 1.00 per man Y. M C. A ............................. 2.50 per man
Special Fund ..................... 1.50 per man Gymnasium .......................... 3.00 per man
Alligator .............................. 1.00 per man Seminole ................................ 3.50 per man
This is a time when governments, business organizations and all other wise organizations see the economical value of a budget and are operating under them. It is with us as with all who try it, a great saving. At the small expense to each man the activities have had about $14,000 at their disposal and with wise expenditure this amount has had the value of nearly twice that much. It has saved every man dollars which he cannot realize.
Besides the savings it has created better spirit. The organizations know what they have to work with financially and have been able to do more. There has been none of that disagreeable canvassing for something all the time, which drains the pocket-book and destroys the patience. Every man has gotten far more than he put into it, and most of them realize it. Many of the bitter enemies of the budget before it passed are its staunch supporters now and would not see it done away with.





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ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
PAUL 0. BAKER ..................------ -- -------------------------------------------------------- President
GEORGE HARTMAN ...........................................---- -----------------------Vice-President
JAMES F. MERRIN .........................................................- Sy------------Secreary


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Prof. E. C. Beck William J. Bivens
Coach W. G. Kline George Stanly
Jack Goldsby Lance C. Richbourg
Royal P. Terry










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ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

The Athletic Association of the University is the oldest of the organizations on the campus which includes the entire Student Body. It was organized several years ago and then it was decided that an entrance fee of five dollars would be placed upon all men to cover major sports. This gives every student membership and also entitles him to see free of charge all games and contests under major sports held on Fleming Field or in the gymnasium. The same organization exists today and the fee is included in the budget.
At the organization of the association a constitution was drawn up and adopted. This provides that the officers be a President, Vice-President, Secretary, and the University Auditor as Treasurer. The President after proper notification calls meetings of the association. The constitution also provides that an Athletic Board be elected to carry on certain work for the association. This board consists of a faculty member, the Physical Director or Coach, one alumnus, and four students. The President presides at meetings and the Secretary keeps minutes. The Faculty committee on athletics supervises all the actions of the board.
The Board divides the fund to the major sports, football, basketball, baseball, and track. At one time there was a deficit in the treasury but now the slate is clean and running on what is allowed for it. Track and basketball have been cut down on in the appropriation at times, but not this year. As a result they have taken a long step forward in their accomplishments. The board elects managers for baseball, basketball, and track. It recommends men for election as football manager who have been assistant managers. It awards letters to the participants in the different athletics. It supervises the election of the captains of the teams.
Our school is a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association and is governed by its rules. We were complimented this year by having the yearly convention with us. Representatives from all the colleges and universities in the South were here. Many questions of importance were discussed but there is not space here to enumerate them
The constitution of our association is being re-written and likely there will be many changes'in it. This was made necessary, partly because the S. I. A. A. required more authority in the hands of the faculty and partly because changed conditions warrant it. As soon as the new constitution is written it will be voted upon and very likely will go into effect at the beginning of the 1921-1922 session.









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HONOR COMMITTEE

HERBERT G. FORD, Chairman ---------------------------- President Senior Class
ANTHONY REGERO, Secretary------------------------------....................Junior
M cCC y HYBHUBBA ...D ................................................................ Senior
JAMES F. MERRIN-------------------------------------------..................Sophomore
JAMEs R. BOYD-----------------------------------------------...................Freshman


















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THE HONOR SYSTEM

Approximately six years ago the faculty of the University of Florida gave to the student body the privilege of organizing an honor system. At the same time an Honor Committee was provided for. This committee consists of one member elected from each class with the president of the Senior class as chairman. The representative from the Junior class acts as secretary of the committee.
At the present time there are two major violations of the honor system. The first violation is receiving or giving aid in class work or an examination. The penalty for this offense is expulsion from the student body or the privilege of resigning within forty-eight hours. Failure to resign within the stated time will, of course, result in summary expulsion. The second violation is failure to report cheating when seen. The penalty, more lenient than the breach of honor, is suspension from the student body for any length of time seen fit, or in extreme cases, expulsion.
The modus operandi of the honor system is this: If a member of the student body sees another perpetrating any breach of the honor system, he must call a third student as a witness of the act. The honor committee meets and the two witnesses lay the case before it. If the committee thinks the fact serious enough, the accused is called and the accusation is made known to him. The culprit has the right to plead his own case and to call whatsoever witnesses he desires. If he pleads guilty of the serious offense, he is given forty-eight hours in which to present his formal resignation. Failing in this, he is automatically considered expelled by a special authority delegated to the honor system by the faculty. If the accused pleads guilty to a minor offense or not guilty to a major offense, the committee hears both sides of the case. Their decision is then made known. The verdict of the committee is, however, not final. If the accused so desires, he may carry his appeal to a higher court. He may bring his case before the faculty discipline committee. The faculty discipline committee's verdict is final. So just have been the honor committees and so fair their verdicts that the faculty discipline committee, in the approximate six years of growth of the system, has never failed to agree absolutely with the decision reached by the honor committee.
The honor system as employed in the University of Florida is at present undergoing a revision. A series of unexpected incidents during the year have made it necessary that, while not changed basically, the honor system be extended to cover more territory. Probably the principal revision will be in putting all squads for major sports in the University under the power of the honor system. While there will be other revisions or additions, the above will be the most important.
The honor system is a proven success. Through the past six years it has grown in popularity and usefulness until it has very nearly stamped out cheating, of which all universities have a share. The seriousness with which the student body has accepted the system has had much to do with its success. The Senior class has taken it upon itself to instruct the incoming Freshman in its usage. The system has become an established custom. This fact alone tends to impress its worth on the new student's mind, for a person entering the institution for the first time generally accepts its customs as his own.










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Y. M.C. A. CABINET

GEO. E. WHITE, General Secretary OFFICERS

JAMES F. MERRIN---------------------------------------------------------------- President
WALLACE A. McKEY----------------------------------------------------- Vice-President
WILLIAM G. WELLS---------------------------------------------- ---------- -Secretary
WALTER W. GUNN------------------------------------------------------------- -Treasurer

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES
P. H. BIDDLE, Bible Study J. R. WATKINS, Social
H. C. JOH 'NSON, Mission Study R. P. TERRY, Suggestions
ARTHUR N. SOLLEE, Athletics E. A. CLAYTON, Publicity
LANCE RICHBOURG
J. A. WINFIELD












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THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

The Young Men's Christian Association of the University is composed of all the students who pay their entrance fees. At the head of it is a paid secretary and four elected officers from the Student Body. The officers and secretary form an executive committee which selects committees to help carry on the work of the association. The chairmen of the committees with the elected officers form a cabinet which decides upon and shapes the work. To carry out the work a larger body of men are organized into a Friendship Council.
For a secretary the association, and in fact the University, is fortunate in having Rev. Geo. E. White, a man of exceptional ability, devotion to his work, and untiring energy. He helps plan all work with the cabinet and has a great deal of personal work on his hands. As a member of the self-help committee of the faculty he has given many needy ones work both on the campus and off the campus. He has many personal conferences with men concerning their calling in life and their religious and moral life as well as conferences which are too personal to mention their nature. Through his efforts a large amount of money has been raised from the friends of the association in Gainesville and all over the state. This has aided the work in a way that the budget funds were not able to reach. Among other things a short loan fund has been established, by which boys in immediate financial embarrassment have been assisted.
The Cabinet is composed of a President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Chairmen of the following Committees: Bible Study, Mission Study, Social, Athletic, Room, Publicity, and Suggestions. Meetings are held once a week on Wednesday night. The Friendship Council is composed of enough men to have a man on it for every ten men in the University. The names of ten men are given to each member and he is supposed to make friends with them. In this way the association has touch with every man that is in school.
The Y. M. C. A. has tried to give social advantages to the students. It has tried to co-operate with the Gainesville churches. It has organized Bible Classes and held religious services on Wednesday night. It has secured a large number of scholarships for students. It has tried to make Chapel services interesting and instructive. It has stood for clean athletics and a Greater Florida. It has endeavored to keep alive and increase the religious life of all in school. It has sent a quartet and speakers out to nearby places to hold religious services. It has tried to keep a comfortable room in which men can read, write and have music. We still have in mind the possibilities of a new building and hope to have something definite concerning it in the near future.







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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEBATING COUNCIL

L. C. CROFTON-----------------------------------------------.....................President
L. D. WILLIAMS--------------------------.............----------- -- ----Vice-President
MAURICE STEIN----------------------..........------------------- ------------ Secretary
S. W. CASON----------------------------------------..........................Treasurer
D. L. LEISHER DR. J. M. FARR
















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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEBATING TEAMS


QUESTION: "RESOLVED, THAT THE SMITH-TOWNER BILL SHOULD BE ADOPTED."

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY VS. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA NEGATIVE S. C. Peacock
Maurice Stein

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA VS. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA NEGATIVE S. W. Cason H. M. Friedlander

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA VS. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE AFFIRMATIVE H. C. Johnson Harry Gordon












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ALLIGATOR STAFF
HERBERT FORD ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Editor-in-Chief
TRUMAN GREEN ----------------------------------- ---------------------------------- Managing Editor
HORACE Loomis ------------------------------------------------------ Assistant Managing Editor
H. M. FRIEDLANDER ------------------ ---------------------------------------- Business Manage)M. STEIN -------------------------------------------------------- ....... Assistant Business Manager


REPORTERS
R. B. HOSKINS F. 0. SPAIN, JR.
GLOVER MILLER MURRAY COHEN
HAROLD KLOCK PETE HARRIS

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT B. 0. SMITH A. T. MOORE








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