The Seminole

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Seminole
Physical Description:
63 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida
Publisher:
Senior Class of the University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College yearbooks   ( lcsh )
College yearbooks   ( fast )
Students   ( fast )
Genre:
Yearbooks   ( fast )
Yearbooks.   ( fast )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. no.1 (1910) - v. 63 (1973).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01389460
lccn - sc 84005031
ocm01389460
System ID:
AA00022765:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tower (Gainesville, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Dedication
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Foreword
        Page 6
    The university
        Pages 7-20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Classes
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The Florida Alligator
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Athletics
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Fraternities
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Organizations and societies
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    Clubs
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Advertising
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 204a
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
    Back Cover
        Page 215
        Page 216
    Spine
        Page 217
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Ghe Seminole
1915
1 9 1 5
VO LU ME S I X








Published Annualligj By The Senior Class
of the
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA.





















Medication

To the *tate of -11oriba, in appreciation for the !6plenbib opportunitic.5 !6be bolb!g out to ber gon!5 for a Jbigber Cbucation, b3c, the Combineb *enior Clamgcg; of 1915, re= .qpectfuUp brbicate tbi!9; tf)e .5ixtb volume of lZbe 6eminote.




























4 A. D PR.N T NG CO.
GAINESVILLE. F L A;






















I,, so


























-IF



















N11























Foreword

This is THE SEMINOLE Of 1915. In preparing this volume it has been our constant aim to truly reflect the various activities of our student body. We feel that a College Annual should do more than merely record the events of the school year, but should also mirror the feelings which animate each and every student and the spirit that pervades the entire campus; that it should recall pleasant memories to those who have graduated in the past and to those who will graduate in the future. We have endeavored to impartially represent every College. As to how far we have succeeded in our aims, you, dear readers, are the final judges.




















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ILI









Language Hall
THE expectant eye of the visitor, approaching the University Campus, there first appears a large body of pines and majestic oaks. Upon a nearer approach, through the vistas of the trees, appear, one after the other, the groups of splendid buildings. The first of these, Language Hall, so named from the departments which here have their home, is a magnificent example of the Tudor-Gothic architecture. With its three stories it af fords ample space to the departments of Ancient Languages, Modem Languages, English, History and Social Sciences, as well as commodious offices for the President and other administrative officers. The tall ceilings and fine finish of the interior impress the visitor with the fact that no expense has been spared to make the home of the College of Arts and Sciences as elegant and spacious as needs be. The hard wood floors, beautiful furniture, and superb equipment have a look of solidity and thoroughness. Nearest the College of Arts and Sciences, the central college of the University and the mother of purely cultural learning, is the College of Law.






























College of Law
SHORT walk from Language Hall will bring one to the Law building, the neNvest on the campus, it having been dedicatedat the beginning of the scholastic year. The type of architecture, Tudor-Gothic, which prevails on the campus, has been closely followed in erecting this hall. Near the entrance is the opening leading into the Law library, which contains hundreds of volumes devoted to legal history, decisions, cases, and texts. The book-stacks are of the very latest and most improved types. Comfortable seats, good lights, and large tables are arranged for study. Directly above the library is found the practice court room, the scene of many forensic efforts and fierce contests. Here, for the mind of the law student, questions of great legal import are settled. In elegance and in construction the court room is the equal of any in the State. The arrangement of jury boxes, witness stands and the judge's bench, is that found in the newer court houses of the state. Not only is this room arranged after the most approved fashion, but it is most artistic, and beautiful in finish. The library is flanked on either side by the librarian's office and class rooms, the court room, by retiring rooms for judge and jury, and additional class rooms. The Dean of the Law Department is furnished with a spacious and elegantly furnished office, and each professor has a private office of his own. The seekers after legal lore and learning are, and have just cause to be, truly proud of their new home, the completion of which marked the time when each college should have its individual home. Near the Law Building is the Peabody Hall.







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07












Peabody Hall
HIS is the home of the coming teachers. In the basement we find
the printing office of the college paper, The Florida Alligator, controlled and printed by the students. Above is the general library, which is one of the largest in the state, and certainly contains less dead material than libraries do as a rule. The rest of the first floor is occupied by class rooms and by the great Psychological Laboratory, the only one of its kind in the state. The equipment of the laboratory is all new and improved. The remainder of the building isdevoted to rooms for class instruction, with the exception of the space given to the Peabody Auditorium, where the literary society of the college holds its discussions. This room is tastefully decorated and has its seats amphitheatre. This is the second year of the occupancy of this building presented by and named after George Peabody. The sister college nearest to Peabody Hall is the Engineering College.













23


































Engineering Hall
NGINEERING HALL contains the hydraulics and electrical engineering laboratories, as well as rooms splendidly equipped for mechanical drawing, and for class instruction. A large part of the practical work of the students in this college is done on the campus and in the machine and wood shop, which is a separate building.
For one to appreciate the practical value of the instruction offered in this college it is only necessary to pay a visit to it and observe the earnestness with which the future builders are striving to reach their goal, the combining of correct theory with the best practice.
The tools, instruments and machinery in the laboratories of this college are of the most improved type as sold by the leading manufacturers. Below Engineering Hall we may see the dairy barn of the Agricultural College and Experiment Station. Beyond are grazing grounds for stock and the farm lands.











24
































Agricultural College
HE Agricultural College is situated almost directly in front of the
Engineering Hall. Here is the scene of the labors of nearly a third of the entire student body. The first floor is occupied by a large implement room. Here are all varieties of plows, harrows, rakes, windmills, gas engines, as well as other types of farm machinery. Nearby is the stock judging room. It is so arranged that cattle or horses may be led in, placed on scales and weighed, and judged by the class arranged in the amphitheatre seats.
The first floor also furnishes space for the Dean's office and the immense dairy laboratory. Here every operation incidental to the handling of milk and milk products is practiced.
Above, on the second floor, is found the Soil Physics Laboratories. As the name implies, the physical characteristics are here noted and various types of soil analyzed that the correct fertilizer may be applied. Close bis the Field Crops room, and next, the Chapel where daily exercises are held. On the third floor the members of the live Agricultural Club have fitted up a social room for themselves.
In this hall some of the most important and lasting work is being accomplished.







25


































Science Hall
ORMING a rectangle with Language, Peabody, and Agricultural Halls,
is Science Hall, containing the laboratories of the various natural sciences, chemistry, physics, botany, bacteriology, zoology, and geology. Science Hall is the home of no particular college, but houses many of the research laboratories of the various colleges. The Florida State Museum of Natural History is located on the second floor of this hall. The Museum already has many hundreds of specimens of varied kinds, but the Curator is busied a large part of the time with cataloging new acquisitions. Many beautiful ornithological and zoological, as well as historical exhibits have been placed in display cases where visitors may view and students study them. Many rare varieties, not only of this continent, but of others, may be examined here since this museum is constantly making exchange.with others in distant states and countries.













26
























im -tit M nm _10









Buckman Hall
UCKMAN HALL, named after the author of the famous bill which
abolished the numerous institutions supported by the state and centralized the system of higher education, is by all odds the finest dormitory for men in the state. It is built in fireproof sections, each three stories in height, with a lavatory on every floor, and suites for twenty-four students. Buckman Hall was the second building erected on the campus, and is therefore next to the oldest. Every section has electric lights, baths, steam heat, in fact every comfort of a modern hotel. All the rooms are spacious and to each two students is assigned a suite of two rooms, one for a bed room and the other for a study. That these rooms are comfortable at all times is attested by the fact that all vacancies are promptly filled, no rooms being empty for any length of time.














27


































Thomas Hall
HOMAS HALL, the other dormitory, lying parallel to Buckman, is
almost exactly counterparts by it. Thomas, the oldest building on the campus, is named for one of Gainesville's most prominent citizens, whose influence was a potent factor in bringing the University to Gainesville. At one time this building housed the whole University-laboratories, class rooms, dining hall, chapel, and dormitory. The first students lived, ate, slept, learned, and had their being in this one building. However, now the various departments have each their individual homes and old Thomas is given over entirely to students for a dormitory, except that in the north end there has been established an Infirmary in charge of a trained nurse, whose services it may be said are seldom required except in treating the minor ills of the student body of several hundred. Thomas Hall will always be an object of veneration to the succeeding student bodies as being the most ancient edifice as well as the namesake of a gentleman whose name is inseparably connected with that of the University.











28




































University Commons
PPOSITE the interval between the dormitories is the building,
known to all students and daily visited by them, the University Commons, or Dining Hall. The Dining Hall has connected with it a large kitchen, superintended by an excellent chef with a corps of capable assistants. To feed the army that troops in thrice daily is indeed a task. This difficult matter is handled with extreme capability by the matron, Mrs. Swanson. The dining tables are always attractive, the food appetizing as any could expect. The interior of the ball and the scene at meal time, that of filled tables and white-aproned student-waiters, moving about, is novel and pleasing to the visitor.














29



































Experiment Station
EYOND the Commons is the U. S. Government Experiment Station
and its extensive botanical and horticultural gardens. This immense three-story building is entirely given over to research laboratories and libraries for the study of the problems that effect the farmers and growers of stock and citrus products.
A large force of experts is maintained here by the federal government for this work alone. Many important discoveries effecting the leading crops have been made within its walls by the scientists there employed. Here are the headquarters of the Farmers' Institute bureaus and other extension movements. To this great agent for the betterment of farming, the producers look for aid when difficult problems confront them.














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34









MSENIORS'


FRESHMEN College of Law LAW















SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS






NEWCOMB BARRS, LL.B.
Gainesville, Fla.
"',,k"-" .k,, Nu co,"
U. S. N. A. Preparatory School; Vanderbilt University; S. A. E. Fraternity; Theta Ribbon Society; Manager Dramatic Club JUNIOR 1913-14; Vice-President Junior Law Class; AGRICULTURE
Cooley Club; Barrs and Embry Pressing Club.









~TEACHERS


SENIOR











1915

35










SSENIORS


FRESHMENLA















SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS



RICHARD DALLAS BOWERS, LL.B. FRED J. HAMPTON, LL.B.
Gainesville, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.
"Dick" "Fritz"
A. T. 0. Fraternity; Cooley Club; Presi- A.B. (W. and L. University) 1911; Unident Junior Law Class 1911; President Sen- versity of Georgia 1912-14; S. A. E. Fraterior Law Class 1912; Business Manager Flor- nity; Serpents Ribbon Society; Cooley
ida Pennant 1911-12; Secretary-Treasurer Club; German Club.
Glee Clib 1911; Real Estate Broker 1913-14.
JUNIOR AGRICULTURE














TEACHERS

SENIOR














36










SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW





N.P.










50PHOMIORE
30?HOORE :ENGINEERS





FRANCIS B. CARTER, LL.B.
Pensacola, Fla.
"Pop"'
A. T. 0. Fraternity; Cooley Club; Ser- HUGH HALE, LL.B.
pents Ribbon Society; John Marshall De- Brooksville, Fla.
bating Society; German Club; North End. "
U. of Virginia 1911-12-13; Sigma Nu Fra- ternity; German Club; President 1914-15; JUNIOR Serpents Ribbon Society; President Cooley AGRICULT1E
Club; Society Editor Florida Alligator; John Marshall Debating Society; North End.












TEACHERS

SENIOR










~1915








SENIORS

FRESHMEN LAW





A$





SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS



EVERETT MARKLEY JOHNS, LL.B.
Starke, Fla. CLARENCE A. BOYER, LL.B.
"Speed" Gainesville, Fla.
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi "Cae"
Honorary Fraternity. Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi
Honorary Fraternity; Varsity Baseball Team / 1915; Duval County Club; Member Florida JUNIOR Bar. AGRICULTURE










TEACHERS
SENIOR


-U






19151

38










SENIORS



FRESHMEN LAW

















SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS



SUMTER LEI I'NER, LL.B.
Kissimmee, Fla.


A.B. (U. of F.) 1913; Student Furman University 1910; Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity; Editor-in-Chief Florida Alligator 1913-14; Executive Committee for Athletic
Association 1913-14-15; Cooley Club; John RAYMER F. MAGUIRE, LL.B
Marshall Debating Society; Debating Team Ocoee, Fla.
JUNIOR 1914-15; Critic 1915; Glee Club 1911-12-13; "MA" AGRICULTURE
Business Manager 1912-13. Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Phi Kappa Phi
Honorary Fraternity; Cooley Club; Secretary-Treasurer Junior Law Class; President Stockton Club; Vice-President John Marshall Debating Society 1914; President Com- bined SeniorClasses;President "Mac" Club; L Editor-in-Chief The Seminole: Tom Bird's Boss.







U TEACHERS

SENIOR
















39










SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW
















SOPHOMORE
ENGINEER

BRADLEY C. WILSON, LB.
Bartow, Fla.
THOMAS W. BRYANT, LL.B. "J g'e"--we',, William"
Lakeland, Fla. Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity; Pres"'Dime" ident Senior Law Class; President Polk
B.S. (U. of F.) 1912; Phi Kappa Phi Hon- County Club; John Marshall Debating Soorary Fraternity; Assistant Business Manager ciety: North End; Cooley Club. "
Florida Pennant 1911; Board of Control Or- /
atorical Medal 1912; Assistant Editor Seminole 1912; President Combined Senior
JUNIOR Classes 1912; President John Marshall De- AGRICULRE
bating Society 1914; Debating Team 1914; Polk County Club; Cooley Club; Class
Orator.











......TEACHER S

SENIOR












41915


.40










SENIORS


FRESHMENLA















SOPHOMORE




LEONARD BARTLETT NEWMAN,LL.B.
Jacksonville, Fla.
PHILIP STOCKTON IMAY, LL.B. FtyGt
Jacksonville, Fla. A. T. 0. Fraternity; Theta Ribbon So"Phil"ciety; German Club; John Marshall DebatA.. U.ofF. 91; .Fraternity; ing Society; Duv-al County Club; Senior A
A..o.ofe Fu91; t Ribo Soit;ie Football Champions; Scrub Football Team .
CoednDuCoty Club; ThtGibnScety;aic 1914-15; Associate Business Manager The

JUNIOR Club; Class Historian. Smnl.AGRICULTURE













TEACHERS













1915


41









SENIORS


FRESHMENLAW




I,









SOPHOMORE
4 'ENGINEERS


LEE JOHNSON, LL.B. R. LEE JARR{ELL, LL.B.
Gainesville, Fla. Kissimmee, Fla. 4,
"Let" "1 schy--"Coun try" '1
B.S. (National Greek Academy, Constan- A.B. (U. of F.) 1913; Emory College 1910;
tinople, Turkey) 1908; John Marshall De- Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi
bating Society 1913-14. Honorary Fraternity; Serpents Ribbon Society; John Marshall Debating Society; Ger- man Club; Business Manager Dramatic Club 1911; Member Florida Bar.
JUNIOR AGRICULTU1JE


K






















1915



42









SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW














SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS


JOHN HENRY SHUMAN, LL.B.
Monticello, Fla. JOSEPH EMORY WILLIAMS, LL.B.
"John Henr," Haskell, Fla.
Stanley BusinessCollege; Secretary-Treas- "Jew"
urer John Marshall Debating Society 1914; B.S. (U. of F.) 1914; Farr Literary Society Secretary Junior Classes; Athletic Associa- 1912-13-14; Debating Team 1914; John Marlion; Y. M. C. A.; Scrub Messhall Team. shall Debating Society; Y. M. C. A.; Stockton Club; Polk County Club; Prohibition Club; Historian Senior Law Class; Tom

JUNIOR Bird's Boss. AGRICUL1E








ijZ


SENO TEACHERS
,SENIOR












1915

43









SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW













SOPHOMORE


BENJAMIN LIDDON SOLOMON, LL.B. CIYDE G. TRAMMII, I I.B.
Marianna, Fla. Lakeland, Fla.
"Ikey" "Red"
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Theta Ribbon Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Serpents RibSociety; German Club; Cooley Club. bon Society; German Club; President University Dramatic Club; John Marshall De- bating Society; Polk County Club; Senior tK Football Champions. /

JUNIOR AGRICULTURE





no.
5







TEACHERS
-SENIOR w ONE=








i4



44







\SENIORS






FRESHMEN LAW
















50PHOMORE
ENGINEERS



HUBERT CONNER PETTEWAY, LL.B.
Brooksville, Fla. N,
WALTER RALEIGH PETTEWAY, I.L.B. "Nephew"
Tampa, Fla. A.B. (U. of N. C.); Intercollegiate Debat"Ucle" er for University of North Carolina: ColumA.B. (U. of N. C.); Law School, Colum- bia University Law School 1913-14; Theta
bia University; Captain Columbia Debating Phi Honorary Fraternity; Pi Kappa Alpha
Team 1914; Delta Sigma Rho Honorary Fraternity. i,
Fraternity; Tau Kappa Alpha Honorary
Fraternity; Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity; AGRICULTURE
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity.



,



'Tis odd, of course, to not appear In characteristic pose for show, Yet life is not conventional In all details, we know.

And so, kind reader, we insist On fair deductions, timely made, TEACHERS
SENIOR For we are men just like the rest,
And all our dues are paid.
NV. R. P.











1915

45









_ SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW




J









50FHOMORE
ENGINE iS

H. LYNCH RUSH, LL.B.
Gainesville, Fla.
RALPH EI.RED TALLEY, LL.B. "Tige"
St. Petersburg, Fla. John Marshall Debating Society; Vice"Ra-Rah-' President Senior l.aw Class.
Sigma Chi Fraternity; Vanderbilt University, Commodore Club; Cheer Leader, University of Florida, 1914-15; John Marshall Debating Society; Theta Ribbon Society; Glee Club 1914-15; Minstrel 1914-15; Senior
JUNIOR Football Champions; All Class Football AGRICULTURE
- -n Team 1914-15; Messhall Team.












*mom TEACHERS
SENIOR
%2


K













,46
I1915

inlilN~m46










SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW
















50PHOMORE ENGINEERS


FRANK D. UPCHURCH, LL.B.
Jacksonville, Fla. JAMES B. STEWART, LL.B.

John Marshall Debating Society; Secre- "Jeb"
tary-Treasurer '14; Vice-President '15; As- Graduate Georgia Normal College and
sistant Editor-in-Chief of The Seminole; Business Institute, 1907; John Marshall De-
Executive Committee Athletic Association; baling Society; Sergeant-at-Arms 1914; PresPresident Prohibition Club '14; Prohibition iet 1914 PresOratorical Contest '15; Junior Oratorical ident 1914-15; Sheriff Practice Court; Cooley ,
Contest; Socialist Club '14; Y. M. C. A.; pions; Associate Business Manager The
President Duval County Club; Senior Foot- ein oe ARICULTUoME
JUNIOR ball Champions; Scrub Football Team '14- Seminole.
15; Secretary-Treasurer Senior Law Class;
Cooley Club; Rifle Club.





%






TEACHERS

SENIOR 4







1915







47










SENIORS Il


FRESHMEN LAW















SOPHOMORE ENGINES



LEVERETT EARLE FUTCH, LL.B. RICHARD RAY WHITE, LL.B. St. Petersburg, Fla.
Starke, Fla. "~Sally
A_ "is" S. A. E. Fraternity; Varsity Basketball
A.B. (U. of F.); S. A. E. Fraternity; Char- Team '13;,John MarshallDebating Society;
ter member Farr Literary Society; Delegate Y.M.C.A.; Woodrow Wilson Club.
Southern Students' Conference 1913; VicePresident Y. M. C. A. 1912-13; Tennis Club; .
Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association
JUNIOR (resigned) 1913-14; Inter-Society Debating AGRICULTURE
Council.








SU i




-. s_-_- in TEACHERS
,SENIOR ,













1915

48








SENIORS




FRESHMEN College of Arts and Sciences LAW















50POMORE ENGINEERS






JAY LOVE HEARIN, A.B.
Quincy, Fla.
Jay"
A. T. 0. Fraternity; Theta Ribbon Society; Vice-President Glee Club 1911-12; Asst. Business Manager 1912-13; President 1913-14-15; Business Manager Dramatic Club AGRICULTURE
JUNIOR 1912-13; President 1913-14; German Club;
Secretary-Treasurer Farr Literary Society 1912-13; Cheer Leader 1913-14; U. of F. Band 1913-14-15; University Minstrel 191314-15; Secretary-Treasurer Senior Classes: Manager Scrub Football Team 1914-15.







TEACHERS

SENIOR











1915

49










__ SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW

















SOPHMOREENGINEERS

ALEX. D. CAMPBELL, B.S. MARCUS BROWN, A.B.
Chipley, Fla. Lawvtey, Fla.
"Alex" "Mark"

Flint Chemical Club; Tennis Team; Vice- Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Farr Literary
President Tennis Club 1912-13-14; Secretary Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Club.
1915; Corporal Company A 1912-13; Lieu/ tenant-Adjutant 1913-14; Sons of Rest; Saturday Night Bridge Club. i



JUNIOR AGRICULTURE







S.d






TEACHERS

SENIOR













1915

50








SENIORS





FRESHMEN LAW






N.C


i /






SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS


ROYALL PERKINS TERRY, A.B.
Lakeland, Fla.
C. A. ROBERTSON, A.B.. Cap
Tallahassee, Fla. Football Squad 1912-13-14; Sergeant Corn-
"Chavie"-"Cock Sparrow"' pany B 1912-13; Captain 1913-14; Vice-PresKappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi ident of Stockton Club; Critic Farr Literary
Honorary Fraternity; Corporal Company C Society 1914-15; Y. M. C. A.; Agricultural
1912-13; First Lieutenant Company C (re- Club; Junior Tank Committee; Vice-Presi- K
tired) '13-14; Secretary Farr Literary Society dent Polk County Club; Captain Senior I
1913; Vice-President 1914; President 1915; Football Champions; Athletic Editor FlorDebating Team 1915; Chairman Inter-So- ida Alligator 1914-15; Literary Editor The AGRICUL1UJE
JUNIOR city Debating Council; Vice-President Jun- Seminole.
ior Classes 1913-14; Saturday Night Bridge
-Club; Student Assistant in English.












TEACHERS

SENIOR













71915

51










SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW







1 II.







50PHOMORE ENGINE
ENGNEERS

EMERSON BENNETTE HELM, B.S.
Miami, Fla. FRED HALMA, B.S.
"Dutch" Gainesville, Fla. .
Vice-President Flint Chemical Club; Ten- "Baron"--:ritz"
nis Club; Athletic Association; Art Editor University Chicago Summer Sesion
The Seminole;~- MsgntClbUniversity Chicago Summer Session SThe Seminole; Misogynist Club. 1912-13-14; Agricultural Club; Tennis Club;
Flint Chemical Club; University Orchestra 1911-12; Glee Club 1911-12.


JUNIOR AGRICULTURE


L



SIMI


inininin


TEACHERS
SENIOR













521915
52









SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW
1! p











SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS
THEODORE T. YARBROUGH, B.S.
Miccosukee, Fla.
"Orie'
Georgia Tech. 1909-10-11; Farr Literary
Society; Campus Club; Corporal Co. B
1912-13; First Sergeant Co. B 1913-14; Ath- EARLE SIMEON TRAXLER, A.B.
letic Association. Alachua, Fla.
"*Trax"
Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Ten- / nis Club; Goblers; Farr Literary Society.,

JUNIOR AGRICULTURE











TEACHERS
SENIOR












53








FRSHE S NIORSLA
FRESHMEN College of Agriculture LAW








50PHOMORE
ENGINEERS



BRAINARD B. GRACY, B.S.A.
Smyrna, Tenn. I .
I "B. B."
Vanderbilt University 1910-11; U. of Tenn. 1911-12-13; Wearer of "T."; Agricultural Club; Senior Football Champions. A
JUNIOR AGRICULTURE








TEACHERS
SENIOR






1915

54










SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW
















50PHOMORE
ENGINEERS

NEAL EARNEST HAINLIN, B.S.A. SAM. PEEBLES HARN, B.S.A.

Homestead, Fla. Mooresville, Ala.
"Sam. P."-"Trombonie-"
"Mother'"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity; Y. M. Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kappa Phi
C. A. 1913-14-15; Transit Club; Tennis Honorary Fraternity; Theta Ribbon Society; i,
C aTain Vice-President Agricultural Club 1914; PresiClub; Sergeant Co. C 1912-13; Captain/,'
Clb SeatCo. C 1912-14;-Pre3;dent Agdent 1915; Corporal Co. A 1912-13; 2nd -'p
Co. C 1913-14; President Agricultural Club Lieutenant Co. C (retired) 1913-14; Local 1914; Tre-isurer Inter-Collegiate Prohibi- Editor The Seminole; Inter-Society DebatJUNIOR- tion Association; Flint Chemical Club; AGRICULTURE
JUNIOR Vice-President Senior Academic Class; ing Council; Glee Club 1913, 14; University AIIuLuL
Minstrel 1914-15; Local Editor Florida AlliJunior Tank Committee. gator 1914-15; University Orchestra 191415; Saturday Night Bridge Club; Fruit Tourist.







TEACHERS



,.SENIOR














1915

55









_SENIORS


FRESHMEN LAW





//








SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS

T[IOS. U. JACKSON, B.S.A.
Lakeland, Fla. CHARLES D. McDOWALL, B.S.A.
Bi,~t'l--"Jack" Gainesville, Fla. ",
Agricultural Club; Sergeant Co. B 1913- -c,
14; Flint Chemical Club; Secretary Senior Scrub Football 1911-12-13-14; President =
Academic Class; Junior Tank Committee; Flint Chemical Club; Sergeant Co. B 1913Senior Football Champions. 14; Agricultural Club; Student Assistant in /
Chemistry; Senior Football Champions. / JUNIOR AGRICULTURE












TEACHERS
SENIOR














56










SENIORS



FRESHMEN College of Engineering LAW






Iit









OHOORE ENGINEERS



31.

URIEL BLOUNT, B.S.C.E.
Lakeland, Fla. H. L. CAPPLEMAN, B.S.C.E.
*Sharpie" Ocala, Fla.
Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President 1911-12; Cab- "cat," 4 1
inet Member 1911-14; Class Secretary 1911- Varsity Football Team 1913-14; Scrub
12; Transit Club; Corporal Company A Football 1912-13; Assistant Manager Foot- ,/
1911-12; 1st Lieutenant Company B 1912-13; ball Team 1913; Manager Baseball Team
JUNIOR Delegate to Southern Student Conference 1915; Benton Engineering Society; Presi- AGRICULlJRE
1913; University Orchestra 1911-13; Circula- dent Transit Club; 1st Sergeant Company
tion Manager Florida Alligator 1912-13; Bus- C 1912-13; "F" Club.
iness Manager 1913-14-15; Benton Engineering Society; Secretary-Treasurer 1914; Debating Team 1915; Inter-Society Debating Council 1914-15; Senior Football Chimpions; Fruit Tourist.







TEACHERS

SENIOR










~1915





57













FRESHMEN LAW
















SOPHOMORE

ENGINEERS

JOHN POST HALLOWES, B.S.C.E.
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
HENRY EDWARD FREEMAN, B.S.C.E. "Maior"
Starke, Fla. 'Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity; Ser"Hank" geant Company A 1912-13; Cadet Major
S. A. E. Fraternity; Varsity Football Team 1913-14; Senior Football Champions; Junior
1914; Captain Scrubs 1913-14; Coach Senior Tank Committee; Vice-President Sopho- -(
Football Team; U. of F. Band 1913-14-15; more Class; Transit Club; Benton EngineerSecretary Sophomore Class; Transit Club; ing Society; Secretary-Treasurer Athletic
President Benton Engineering Society; As- Association 1913-14.
JUNIOR sistant Business Manager Florida Alligator AGRICULTURE
~1914-15.













TEACHERS
SENIOR








J,,



19-5

58







SENIORSS
Z




FRESHMEN LAW





1W~~







SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS



RALPH L. JOYNER, B.S.C.E.
Bartow, Fla. SAMUEL R. WARD, B.S.E.E.
"Jiiier" Brooker, Fla.
Transit Club; Sergeant Company B 1912- "Sam"
13; 1st Lieutenant Company B 1913-14; Y. Vice-President Benton Engineering SoM. C. A.; Tennis Club; Senior Football ciety 1915; Sergeant Company B 1912-13; Champions; Vice-President Benton Engi- 1st Lieutenant 1913-14; Gym Team 1911neering Society 1914; President 1915; De- 12-13-14; "F" Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet;
bating Team 1915; Athletic Association; Athletic Association.
JUNIOR President W. 0. W. Club 1913-14-15; Fruit A;RICULTRE
Tourist.





K




TEACHERS

SENIOR









1915


59










SENIORS


FRESHMEN College of Education LAW
















SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS




HERBERT L. DEWOLF, A.B., in Education
Crescent City, Fla.
"'Shewolf"' "
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 1912-13-14; Editor Y. M. C. A. Handbook; Y. M. C. A. Repre- I
sentative Student Conference 1913; Winner /7,
U. D. C. Medal 1914; Vice-President Junior JUNIOR Academic Class; President Senior Academic AGRICULTURE
Class; Circulation Manager Florida Alligator 1913-14; Editor-in-Chief 1914-15; Farr Literary Society; Debating Team 1914-15; President 1914; Critic 1915; Class Prophet; Student Assistant in Psychology; Fruit Tourist.

























1915

60











SENIORS



F19ESHM[1 I LAW





"T













5OPHOOREENGINEERS


GORDON BROWN KNOWLES
A.B. in EducationWLIA ED NEM Y
Greenwood, Fla.WILA ED NEMR
A.B. in Education
"'Gabby" Dade City, Fia.
Secretary Teachers Club 1911; Critic Farr
Literary Society 1913-14; Debating Team
1913-14; John Marshall DeaigScey Varsity Baseball Team 1914-15; Captain
1914-15; Winner U. D. C. Medal 1913; U. 1915; Assistant Manager 1914; Manager Foot- of F. Representative in State Prohibition baallgeam 19141;rsdn Tennis eam 1911; 7'
Contest 1915; Assistant Librarian; Student Mage194PrsdnTnisCu115
JUNIOR Assistant in History, Practice High School; President junior Classes; Vice-President AGRICULTURHE
Local Editor Florida Alligator 1913-14; Sec- Senior Classes; "F" Club; Senior Football retary Y. M. C. A. 1911-12; President 1915. Champions; Athletic Editor The Seminole; Fruit Tourist.

T





%A


5[N)OR



















19615







-S SNIORS'I

FRESHMEN LAW



dli i
Afti






SOPHOMORE
ENGINEERS

FREDERICK RANKIN MASON
TIIOMAS JEFFERSON POPPELL A.B. in Education
A.B. in Education Macclenny, Fla.
New River, Fla. "Father"
Secretary Peabody Club 1911-12; ViceY. M. C. A.; Sergeant Co. A 1912-13; President 1912-13; President 1913-14; Debat- / F.
First Lieutenant and Quartermaster 1913-14; ing Team 1913-14-15; Inter-Society Debating f
Peabody Club; Farr Literary Society; John il Ia Mb13-14; f
Masal ebtngScit; es al rto. Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 1912-13-14; }// Marshall Debating Society; Mess Hall Orator. President 1914-15; Organization Editor The
JUNIOR Seminole; Junior Oratorical Contest 1914. AGRICULTURE

,,





: TEACHERS
SENIOR








62






Page
Missing or
Unavailable






Page
Missing or
Unavailable
























STAFF

























SAM P.


































FREDR. EMERSON B
Art FAt

















65











History of the Senior Law Class
It is with mingled feelings of pride, sorrow and joy, that I present this document that binds us together forever as school-mates at the University of Florida. Pride, because I have the honor conferred upon me to write the document which portrays us as happy college-mates together for the last time; sorrow, because this session will end our school days forever; and joy, because the ending of our school days only marks the beginning of the noble and useful lives which we all hope to live in the future.
The members of the present Senior Law Class have indeed proven themselves to be above the average in morals, character, and ability, and are justly worthy of being called representatives of the great institution from which they are graduating. Many of them have spent several years here at the University, have received their academic training here, have grown up as it were with the school, and have come to be regarded as almost indispensable adjuncts of it. The other members of the class who have been here only two years have also proven themselves to be hard and steadfast workers. Many of them also, are graduates from other institutions of higher learning scattered throughout the Southland, and they have been among the foremost in upholding the standards and ideals of our school and in creating a wholesome and moral school spirit among the student body. Under such circumstances, is it any wonder that we show regret in departing from the dear old institution where we have won so many victories, and suffered (shall I say it) so few defeats?
But as we, the members of the Senior Law Class, leave the dear old University, we realize that our stay here has not been altogether pleasant. We have had many trials, troubles, and temptations, during our sojourn here, but in every case we have tried to do our duty to ourselves, to our fellow-students, and to the school. We have striven for what we believed to be right in every particular. We have tried in every way we could to get the most out of college life, and have formed acquaintances and friendships here which no doubt will prove immortal.
The Senior Law Class takes a pardonable pride in the class as a whole, and in the record it has made. Its members are found in every department of student activity connected with the University, and in every case they stand high. It furnished over twice as many men for the honorary Phi Kappa Phi Fraternity than from all the other colleges combined. It furnished men for the varsity football and baseball teams; many important positions of THE SE MINOLE were filled from its ranks, while others of its members have won lasting fame in oratory and debate.
And now as we are about to say goodbye to the school we wish to express our lasting gratitude and respect to our professors with whom our associations have been so pleasant. To Dr. Murphree, to Dean Hughes, to Professors Crandall and Trusler, with all of whom our acquaintances have been most pleasant, we extend a hearty and lasting farewell. And now we bid adieu to the University of Florida, to the familiar campus scenes, to our professors, and last but not least, to the student body. We have tried very hard to win the good-will and respect of all. We have done our best, we have fought a good fight, and now, we say "Farewell".
J. E. W., Historian.






66















Senior Academic Class History, 1914-115

The year 1911 is an epoch in the history of the University of Florida because of the cl-ass which was born unto her that year. 1911 marked the beginning of the class of '15. That year was no different from any other as far as years are reckoned, but the passing of time is not here considered. The seeds for the deeds done, and the lives lived, by this immortal class of '15, were sown in that year; and what we accomplish, in this world, will be either an honor or a shame to her who has played such an important role in our existence. With this in view ijt is hoped that, when we are tottering with age, our alma mater will look with pride upon the class which she started in the world at that time. On the other hand it is certain that each one of us will ever cherish thoughts of our alma mater and at all times we will be willing and anxious to stand up for the name which is so near and dear to us.
We have labored painstakingly; we have burned the midnight oil, and though we have toiled until the wee sma' hours of the morning, for four long years, it must be acknowledged that we have enjoyed every bit of it, and our Freshman year seems but as yesterday.
In considering our college days, we have been victorious in almost all instances on the athletic field and our senior year was especially success ul in class football. Our academic work, not unlike our athletics, has also been a success at all stages of the game. We have made friends among our instructors, and though they seemed hard at times we know that it was all for our.own good and that the class of '15 owes what it is to the ability and untiring efforts of the faculty.
Yet it is with a feeling of sadness mixed with joy that we write this last history of the mighty class of '15. Sadness because of the friends left behind; sadness because of the separation forever from our alma mater; and sadness because of the flying of time. We are joyful because of the commencement of life in earnest, because of the training with which we are prepared to meet the enemies of success, and because of all that our alma mater means to us.
If in future life we are as successful as we have been in our college work, we may well say, "Classes may come and classes may go, but the class of '15 shall go on forever".
R. L. J.










67



















Id, Op.























19 68










































hl
































69





















E. T. BARCO, A.B.
Law
Manila, P. I.






W. T. BARKER Law
Jacksonville, Fla.





INGRAHAM P. BARLOW Law
Evergreen, Ala.






TOM B. BIRD, B.S.
Vice-President Junior Law Class
Monticello, Fla.





S. A. B. WILKINSON Law
"At Large," U. S. A.






R. E. HAMRICK Law
Aucilla, Fla.

















70





















SPESSARD L. HOLLAND, Ph.B.
President Jinior Law Class Bartow, Fla.





HERBERT LAMSONLbapi
Jacksonville, Fla.






TOM MCGUIRE
Lai'
Chicago, 11.






W. BLOUNT MYERS, A.B.
Law
Tallahassee, Fla.





M. C. SCOFIELD Lan,
Inverness, Fla.





JAS. F. SIKES Law
Punta Gorda, Fla.

















71




















T. J. SWANSON, A.B.
Secretary Jlunior Law Class Gainesville, Fla.





J. W. B. SHAW Law
Tampa, Fla.





H. L. THOMPSON Law
Gainesville, Fla.





HARRY W. THOMPSON Law
Bagdad, Fla.





GEO. WXV. WHITEHURST Law
Wauchula, Fla.





WILBUR W. WHITEHURST Law
Wauchula, Fla.

















72






















0. E. WILLIAMS Law,
Haskell, Fla.






E. E. RIC-I Agriculture
Salisbury, Mass.






L. Y. DYRENFORTH Arts Mid Sciewes
Anona, Fla.





'A. C. JACKSON

Micanopy, Fla.





N. McELYA Arts and .Sciences
Gainesville, Fia.





A. R.HANDCOCK Arts aund .Sciences
Tallahassee, Fla.



















73






















G. W. HARMONY Arts and Sciences
Gainesville, Fla.





ALVA REID Arts and Sciences
Ft. Meade, Fla.





W. H. TURNLEY Arts and Sciences
Ft. Meade, Fla.





P. W. WOOD Arts and Sciences
Tampa, Fla.





B. D. ADAMS Teachers
Gainesville, Fla.




L. L. BLACKBURN Teachers
Bowling Green, Fla.


















74




















R. A. GREEN Teachers
New River, Fla.






C. I. HOLLINGSWORTH Teachers
Ft. Meade, Fla.





T. E. MCCAL: Secretary Academic Class Teachers
Jasper, Fla.




W. D. WILSON Teachers
Westville, Fla.





JACOB HALL Engineering
Green Cove Springs, Fla.





F. LEONARD HOLLAND JR Ensinieerig
Orlando, Fla.

















75




















J. P. LITTLE Engineering
Gainesville, Fla.





GEO. R. MOSELEY Engineering
Gainesville, Fla.






G. E. NELSON President Junior Academic Class Engineering
Dunedin, Fla.





A. F. PEACOCK Engineering
Bronson, Fla.






MOODY STEPHENS Engineering
Punta Gorda, Fla.




R. K. VAN CAMP Engineering
Punta Gorda, Fla.


















76























R. A. DUKES Agriulture
Worthington, Fla.





C. D. GUNN
Vice-Presideis Academic ClIass Agriculture
Marianna, Fla.





C. B. GRACE

Evinston, Fia.




W. H. TAYLOR JR.
Agriculture
Greenwood, Fin.




B. K. PANCOAST Agriculture
V Pitman, N. J.






YICK KUEN WONG Agriuu it,, c
H-ang Saw, Kwong-tong, China



















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Q"s

































A "A










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A
t171 D repair
















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Sophomore Class

OFFICERS
E. M. YON ... ...President
J. REX FARRIOR ........ .... Vice-President
F. L. HOLLAND -----------------------_Secretary and Treasurer
I. M. McALPIN -----------------------Reporter

CLASS ROLL
C. J. Braymer J. A. Johnson
W. R. Briggs A. F. Jones
B. E. Bushnell Norris K. Levis
C. C. Caswell C. W. Long
C. C. Chillingworth C. M. Mann
J. B. Gracey G. D. Maner
G. W. Harmony R. G. Merrin
G. Hart S. D. Padgett
J. F. Hatcher A. W. Ramsdell
M. Heller J. Rosenthal
W. B. Henderson C. W. Stebbins
R. J. Jackson F. L. Thompson
J. M. Tillman



















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Tb.






















































82












FRESH


MEN
















iuF



a.d J




NOWLEDGE






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44

















84


















Freshman Class

A. H. FULLER ------------------------ President
H. F. ZETROUER ---------------------Vice-President
E. W. FREEMAN ---------------------. Secretary and Treasurer

ROLL
Arts and Sciences
G. R. Bailey R. A. Goldberg F. E. Pooser
C. S. Brannon H. C. Gorden J. M. Powell
J. S. Bryan F. M. Grant D. V. Rouse
C. B. Byrd R. P. Green H. A. Wade
E. W. Freeman P. R. McMullen E. M. Willis
G. M. Glazier H. A. Palmer H. F. Zetrouer
W. F. Perry

College of Agriculture
F. R. Edwards Otto Manecke A. J. Sullivan
I. S. Futch R. C. Smally H. R. Tyndale
J. K. Goldsby J. K. Sparkman H. E. Wood
D. A. Storms

Engineering College
L. W. Barlow A. H. Fuller H. L. Padgett
T. J. Barnes Warren Hayford L. B. Pratt
C. U. Bates E. L. Jones F. A. Seymour
T. J. Cowsert R. A. D. McKay D. B. Sweat
F. W. Damon J. R. Moorhead J. S. Wychoff

Teachers' College
F. R. Robinson M. E. Russell 0. C. Sistrunk












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86




















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nor!! 14

















................






































88






















Practice High School

OFFICERS
W.H.JORDAN---...-- ......-- -----------President
H. J. MIXON ......-..- Vice-President
GRADY CLYATT.. ---------------------- Secretary and Treasurer

CLASS ROLL
Twelfth Grade Eleventh Grade
G. B. Clyatt C. E. Burr
W. S. Duncan W. D. Diamon
H. E. Echols G. L. Doss
J. K. Fuller C. E. Duncan
L. A. Gay E. C. Futch
W. H. Jordan G. W. Hinson
K. K. Knight A. M. Hodson
H. H. McCallum A. H. Lockey
William McElya G. F. Miller
H. G. Redstone H. K. Mixon
W. H. Reeves E. S. Odom
Dewey Smith C. U. Smith
Harry Smith II. L. Wilson
Ralph Stoutamire H. C. Youngue
L. G. Thomas J. G. Phillips
R. D. Watts
















89





























T he Florida- Alligator

'AIII FF"Nt 4


Ben Greet Players to The University and













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tI, k-r.,. d;,,rnr 01 t bg,
F. Ir,*,11t 13~I.annn ~n Inln,' iI~d









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tun tnt hii tt t ttu~ i tis t.initi tn ti~ntnt'iini lik, tintitsFi hs c55tiriniin s it .cr woldIn Is ~ut i, ltitli
.. ttt ilut .u nn n .sstt .nin .it lit .it~t .ii ..... tC t i inltpnt wln.











i. t90


















The Florida Alligator

H. L. DEWOLF---------Editor-in-Chief
T. J. SWANSON---------------- -Assistant Editor
R. P. TERRY---------------Athletic Editor
F. L. HAE---------Society Editor
S. P. HARN----------Local Editor
U. BLOUNT----------Business Manager
H. E. FREEMAN--------Assistan t Business Manager IRA MCALPIN ------------------ Foreman Composing Room

This is an age when democratic progressiveism pervades the one-time exclusive university circle, when the aim of an university is to make itself felt as an economic and social force thruout the community of which it is a part. The ideal of the University is also in a small measure the ideal of The Florida Alligator. It is the purpose of this publication to reach out from the University of Florida with an ever-lengthening arm into her supporting medium and in this small way both continually strengthen the hold of the University on the State and make herself a means to an influence ever emanating from the institution.
The conception of The Florida Alligator took place in the spring of 1912 and on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of September of the following fall, the first issue appeared. A modest sheet it was, but under the able leadership of Mr. G. P. Garrett it soon became a live factor in our University life. The next year in the hands of Mr. Sumter Leitner The Alligator attained to its present size and took rank among the best college publications in the entire South.
The year of 1914-15 marks the third year of the paper's existence and her most phenomenal achievement of all, for The Flo-ida Alligator now owns her own press and equipment and has laid the foundation for what will eventually be known as the University of Florida Press. Week by week this lowly sheet emerges from her birthplace in Peabcdy Hall and goes forth in her small way to bear the message of the University of Florida, of her eternally increasing educational progressiveism.











91















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FLORIDA 66;
San""
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92











FOOT BALL






TRACK

UNI

BASE
BALL





93
















Coach McCoy
The University of Florida was very fortunate in getting such an able man as Charles J. McCoy as athletic director for this year. Coach McCov came to us directly from Sewanee Military Academy, where he had two very successful years as football and track coach. Before going to Sewanee to coach* he was in school at Miami University, Ohio, where be was the shining star both of the football tearn and track team, at one time sharing theworld's record for one hundred yards in nine and four-fifths seconds.
Mr. McCoy is a man of sterling qualities. He knows football from schedules to "shirt tail" parades and best of all is a pleasant but at the same time stern disciplinarian. When Coach McCoy says "speed up" every Alligator knows to put on speed. As every one knows, a football coach must have the respect of his players before anything can be accomplished. This Coach McCoy, with his forceful character and imposing personality, acquired the first day he put his foot upon the Florida gridiron. Indeed, it is he whom we should thank for the greater part of Florida's success this past football season, and to him we gladly give the greatest share of praise.
In addition to competency in his line of work, Coach McCoy is a gentleman through and through, exerting always the proper influence over the boys in his charge. We hope that Mr. McCoy may be with us for years to come as our athletic director.












94

































The Varsity
Florida never had a football squad with more real pep, more fighting spirit, and in pig skin vernacular more "guts" than this year's team. They had a real fighting leader in Captain Sutton, but unfortunately, owing to heart trouble, "Big Sut" was compelled to give up the game, his doctors having advised him that he was taking his life in his hands to engage in football. The loss of Captain Suttonwas keenly felt, but "Puss" Hancock, who for four hard years has fought for the orange and blue, was elected to the captaincy in his stead, and a better,, leader was never chosen in the king of college sports. Captain Hancock, not knowing defeat, always had his team right in the hardest of the fight, where he, too, might always be found.
Were one to describe the squad of Gators in one word, he would be compelled to use the word "fighters." Although averaging but slightly over one hundred and sixty pounds, the heaviest and fastest teams in the South did not lessen their courage. Their motto seemed to be "The heavier they are the harder they fall."
In practice they were always fighting just the same as in a regular game. Hard work and willingness on the part of these pigskin warriors made it possible for Coach McCoy to make the machine out of them which he did. Always ready to obey and respect the coach's command, always ready to receive criticism kin7dly and, lastly, always anxious to learn. These are some






95




























4 N







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Upper left, EMBRY, Manager. "Manager Ed" is one of the best managers who ever looked after the wants of a Florida team. He thought the best was none too good for the Alligators, and as far as possible saw that they got it. The slightest wishes of the team were his earliest and latest studies.

Upper center, SUTTON. Age, 23; wei bt, 185; height, 6 ft.; position, tackle. Captain Sutton was forced to quit football on account of his heart at the beginning of the season, only getting to play in one game, that with Auburn, but all who saw "Big Sut" in this game and the others he played in, during his three years at Florida, will remember him as one of the best and most aggressive tackles Florida ever had.

Upper right, HANCOCK. Age, 23; weight, 185; height, 5 ft. 10 in.; position, tackle. "Puss" Hancock, who was elected captain after Captain Sutton was called-from the game, made the Gators a real leader. Captain Hancock is one of the best pigskin warriors of which Florida can boast, and brought his four years of football at Florida t6 a fitting close this year by piloting the best team the University ever turned out.



of the reasons why the squad from the "Baby University" not only received recognition, but merited it, and it is with the tenderest regret that we have to lose several of these boys who have helped so materially in putting Florida on the football map.









96

















































Upper left, CAPPLEMAN. Age, 23; weight, 160; height, 5 ft. 91 in.; position, guard. "Cap" was always right there with the punch and made "Puss" a good running mate in the line. If these two couldn't open up a hole, then there was no hole to be had.

Upper center, FREEMAN. Age, 20; weight, 160; height, 5 ft. It in.; position, end. Henry's football aspirations materialized this season. After several years of hard knocks on the "Scrubs" he "came thru" and made one of the best men in the line-up. H-e was good at forward passes and a hard tackler.

Upper right, SWANSON. Age, 21; weight, 165; height, 6 ft.; back field. Joe is our star end, but owving to the scarcity of material in the back field he was shifted to full. Being an all-round football man this did not affect his playing. He could always be depended on in a pinch, and when it comes to intercepting forward passes, hie is there.




Review of Football Season

Florida's first game was her hardest, when she met Auburn, on October 10, and held the Alabama boys, champions of the South, scoreless for twenty-seven minutes of actual play. Indeed, for the first three quarters the Gators, tho outweighed twenty-five pounds to the man, outplayed the









97


































UL












Upper left, COWSERT. Age, 18; weight, 145; height, 5 ft. 81 in.; end. It is a treat for any football lover to watch "Cow" tackle his man. Yellow is a color left completely out of his make up.

Upper center, RAMSDELL. Age, 20; weight, 148; height, 5 ft, 10 in.; back field. "Rammy", although a little light, is truly a "star." He is fast, nervy, and has loads of fight. He doesn't think lie is in the game unless he receives a punt and runs for a touchdown with it, and this feat is not unusual for him.
Upper right, SPARKMAN. Age, 18; weight, 167; height, 5 ft, 8 in.; back field. That "Jimmie" was mentioned for an "All-Southern Half" is proof enough of his ability. He is fast, hits the line hard and low, and is one of the hardest tacklers we have. "Jimmie" had rather "leave his feet" than not. We are expecting big things of him next year.



Alabamians; but finally were worn down by the superior weight and numbers of their opponents. The final score was 20-0 in Auburn's favor.

One week after the Auburn-Florida game, the Gators took on King's College. By this time our boys were in real form and took this game, 36-0.

The following Saturday the Orange and Blue, rather overconfident,








98















































Upper left, VAN CAMP. Age, 20; weight, 162; height, 5 ft. 101 in.; tackle and back field. "Vanny" proved a very valuable man this season, playing both in the line and ill the back field. He has got the real Gator fight, and that's hard to get by. He should prove a star linesman by next year.

Upper center, FULLER. Age, 19; weight, 158; height, 5 ft. Ill in. Fuller, although on the team for his first year, was one of the coolest and most consistent players we had. Never excited, he could always be called on for a sure gain.

Upper riglit, THOMPSON. Age, 23; weight, 150; height, 5 ft. 71 in.; back field. "Well, I tell you it is just like this." "Harry K" is right there, as he showed before the season was over. He is fast and picks his holes well and is always in the game.



tho expecting a hard game, met the University of the South. Just what happened to our boys on this occasion will never be known, but the Tennessee boys ran with the ball more or less at will and won; the final score being 26-0.

From this time on the Alligators had more or less easy pickings. They defeated Southern 59-0, running back and forth with the ball at will. The








99

































oil

A*










Upper left, GOLDSBY. Age, 19; weight, 185; height, 5 ft. 9 in.; guard. Jack never bad seen a regular football game before coming to Florida, but don't ever think he didn't catch on to that "rough and brutal" game. Before the season was over "Snake" was not only playing a great game, but enjoying and making everyone else enjoy every bit of it.

Upper center, HENDERSON. Age, 19; weight, 155; height, 5 ft. 9 in.; end. "B" is never happier than when the opposing team is trying to "run 'em" around his end. He is a hard and sure tackler and loves to hit 'em. This boy has loads of "pep" and it is a pleasure to play beside one so anxious to work.

Upper right, LOTSPEICH. Age, 23? weight, 165; height, 5 ft. l0J in.; tackle. "Uncle Lot", captain of the Orange and Blue for the coming season, tho calm and very inoffensive, is a lion in a football suit. The bigger they get the better Lot likes them, and he has yet to find the tactile who puts anything over him.



Saturday after the Southern game, in a drizzling rain, Florida met The Citadel and scored a touchdown right on the jump before the ball was wet. After this it was just fighting back and forth in the water four inches deep. Then Florida took on Wofford and it was a shame the way our








100


























X




















Upper left, REID. Age, 19; weight, 167; height, 5 ft. 10i in.; end. Reid is good anywhere in the line, but he stars at end. He takes forward passes well and runs with the ball in good form. We hope we may keep him for his full term with us.

Upper center, YON. Age, 19; weight, 175; height, 6 ft.; guard. "Yonnie" said he was going-to give that old Varsity h-, and lie surely did it. Yon is an earnest, hard worker and is always dependable. judging from the way he handled some of the best in tile South this season, we expect big things of him next year.

Upper right, FARRIOR. Age, 18; -Nveight, 168; height, 5 ft. 9 in.; center. Rex stands out as a "star" of the season. Although opposed by men much larger than lie (luring tile season, not a one "had any edge" on him. Indeed, for the most part, lie handled his man at will. Rex is fast and could be used to advantage in the back field, owing to his peculiar style of running.



fellows did those innocent boys; but to make a long story short, the final score was 66-0 in Florida's favor.

On "turkey day" Florida "topped off" by taking another game from Mercer, 14-0. This was a hard-fought game, but Cochrane couldn't get away for a thing. On the other hand, there was "too much Ramsdell."








101































Senior Football Team





















Scrub Football Team






102











































Scene at Sewanee-Florida Game



The Scrubs

If there is any club organization in Florida which merits the whole-hearted praise of the student body, it is that bunch of loyal men who go out on the gridiron daily and meet the hard knocks of the Varsity. The Scrubs, we must remember, are the men who make the Varsity possible. Although they receive no flattering "write-ups" in the papers, no letters are given to them, not anything except hard, monotonous work, they go out daily and work like Trojans in order that the Varsity may be trained properly. Then let us who know their real worth, who know what an important part they play, and what an essential factor to success they are, when we send up a rousing "Florida yell," send it not alone for the Varsity, but for those men too who make the Varsity possible.


The Senior Team

After the regular football season was over, in order to stimulate more interest in the pigskin game, and develop those men who had not had much chance during the regular season, "Coach" Freeman of the Senior Team inaugurated the movement for class football. Immediately every class busied itself getting out recruits and in a couple of weeks interest and spirit was at its height. Each class was viewing with the other for the championship, it having been passed that the winners were to receive their numerals. By elimination the champion team was found. After three or four of the most hotly contested games, the Seniors came out victorious, having defeated the Sophomores and Juniors, who had already defeated the Freshmen.









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Basketball

W. B. Henderson, Forward, Captain
Jas. Sikes, Guard, Manager T. J. Swanson, Guard
Roy Van Camp, Guard S. L. Holland, Guard
A. V. Ramsdell, Forward Warren Hayford, Center











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105
































Track (Honorary) Thompson, Perry, Wilkinson, Hatcher, J., Koepke, Hatcher, F., Holland,



























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Varsity Baseball

The baseball squad has had rather hard luck this season, especially in regard to losing men. Some were ruled out by the S. 1. A. A. rules, some left school, and a couple of pitchers turned yellow and quit; but notwithstanding this misfortune, under the able guidance of "Coach" P. J. Flaherty the team has made a very creditable showing. A cleaner, nicer set of young athletes never represented the University on any team. With Captain Embry as their leader, they are always in the game, not knowing what defeat is until the last man is struck out.
Two of our best men were called away to Tallahassee, to fill clerkships in the legislature, just when they were playing in their best form-Lotspeich and Yon. "Uncle Lot" paled out a home run with the bases drunk in one of his last games, while Yon batted a little above 800 in the last two games he played in. The loss 91,these two men was keenly felt by the team.
A word should be said of Durrance, our star pitcher, who came to our rescue just when we needed him. This boy can pitch every day when it is necessary. He's got the stuff in him and will make Florida some timber in a year or so. Pooser too wvill be a regular winner by next year. He is young and more or less inexperienced, but pitched some good ball this season.
The greatest praise is due Coach Flaherty for what little success the baseball team has met with. Although facing the most adverse conditions, "Coach" has managed to keep) a pretty good team in shape. H-aving players quit on him doesn't seem to affect him in thle least. He picks up a couple of recruits and makes better players out of them. "Coach" Flaherty is a good, clean, moral man, and is just the man to have in charge of a young bunch of fellows. A man cannot dissipate and play on his team. Hie not only advocates clean living on his team, but enforces it with his players. He has not only made friends with all the ball players, but all who know him admire and respect him; and it is to be hoped that we will have Coach "Pat" with us again next year.







PO




















Reading front left to right. FLAHERTY, Coachi; HANCOCK, Manager; EMBRY, Ceniter Fielder (Captain); DURRANCE, Pitchier.









107