The Seminole

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Title:
The Seminole
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Serial
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University of Florida
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Senior Class of the University of Florida ( Gainesville, Fla )
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Dedication
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Board of Control and State Board of Education
        Page 8
    In memoriam
        Page 8a
        Page 8b
    Foreword
        Page 9
    Brief historical sketch
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Faculty
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Senior
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Junior
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Sophomore
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Freshman
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Sub-fresh
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    The Florida Alligator
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Let's trade!
        Page 92
    Clubs and organizations
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Literary societies
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Musical organizations
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Fraternities
        Page 131
        Page 131a
        Page 132
        Page 132a
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 135a
        Page 136
        Page 136a
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 139a
        Page 140
        Page 140a
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 143a
        Page 144
        Page 144a
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
    Athletics
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Back Matter
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Advertising
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 204a
    Back Cover
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page
Full Text

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-oil i ___ IN


The Seminole

1914




VOLUME V




PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY

The Senior Class

OF THE

University of Florida


191/4
Pepper Publishing and Printing Company
Gaincsville, Florida


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__. __ i ___ -- -__-_ _____ t______, _._ ______ ___ ___
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5Ui Dedication
Dr. Murphree is first of all the friend of the
University student-and for this phase of his ver-
," i satile character he is most admired by the student
'' body, who are unanimous in his praise-both for
': ~what he has done for the State University and for ..
the very man himself. His untiring efforts and
devotion to the cause of education have brought
Florida to the front rank as a recognized Univer-
sity of standing and merit. To him is principally
due the credit for the tremendously rapid growth
and development that has been accomplished
within the few years of his administration; and to


PRESIDENT A. A. MURPHREE
OUR FRIEND
A CHRISTIAN GENTLEMAN
AN UNSELFISH WORKER FOR THE UNIVERSITY
We, the Combined Senior Classes of 1914, respect-
fully dedicate this, the Fifth Volume of the
SEMINOLE








































R. A. HENDERSON, JR.
Editor-in-Chief



WORTHINGTON BLACKMAN
Business Manager



ALBION W. KNIGHT
Literary Editor


JOHN B. SUTTON
Athletic Editor









































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T. B. BIRD
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I. G. CI..\YT,)N
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i I Board of C

1t P. K. YONGE, Chairman------------..
T.B. KING..........-- ..-- .................
E. L. WARTMAN -----------------------
,, W.D. FINLAYSON ----------......................----------
,, F.. E.JENNINGS .........................
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board.


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.--..---------. Pensacola, Fla.
---......----. Arcadia, Fla.
. ...-.. .... -Citra, Fla.
-.......-.- ----Old Town, Fla.
-... .-.... Jacksonville, Fla.
---------- Tallahassee, Fla.


State Board of Education

PARK TRAMMEL, President- ---..--..----- Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD --------------------- Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING ....----...----.----------. State Treasurer
THOS. W. WEST ..--------.----------- -Attorney-General
W. N. SHEATS ----------.----- --State Supt. of Public Instruction
















IN MEMORIAL





Mrs. Thomas W. Hughes


WIFE OF

Dean Thos. W. Hughes


of the College of Law


Requisate in Pace















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A Campus Drive












Foreword
THE Class of 1914 desires to present to all
FLORIDA men "THE SEMINOLE". In this
publication we have endeavored to portray our
college life at "The Baby University of the South",
in the hope that it will mirror the activities of the
institution from the inside. We trust that to the
Alumni it will serve to recall their own college
experiences, and that it will ever be a source of
pleasure to the present student and to the graduat-
ing class of the University.






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Brief Historical Sketch .QQ


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The necessity for brevity in this article forbids any extended historical sketch of tilhe
University. Only the most salient points arc, therefore, included in the following account.
The University of Florida was created by an Act of the Legislature in 1905. This Act
provided for the abolishment of all the State Institutions then existing and merging the same
in the present State University and the Florida State College for Women.
In the fall of 1905 the University opened its doors at the old Agricultural College plant
at Lake City, with twenty-four instructors and other officials and an enrollment of 136 stu-
d(ents. That year the general work of the institution was divided into the Academic depart-
ment embracing literary and scientific courses, engineering and agriculture; the Normal de-
partmient; and the Agricultural Experiment Station. The following year the University opened
its session in the two uncompleted dormitories on its new campus at Gainesville. In these
buildings, and one or two small auxiliary buildings, all the activities of the institution were
conducted until the fall of 1910), when the laboratories were moved into the new Science Hall
and the Experiment Station into its own new building. Both of these buildings were com-
pleted that year. The enrollment of students since the University opened at Gainesville is as
follows: 102 in '06-'07, 11)3 in '07-'08, 103 in '08-'09, 186 in '09-'10. The matriculation for each
succeeding year after that is as follows: 241, 302, 321, while this year the total enrollment,
April 1st, is 354. Counting the enrollment of the University summer school, matriculations this
summer have reached the net total of 483. The entire force of instructors and other officials
has increased from 24 in 1905 to 61 for the current year.
Other buildings have been provided for by the Legislature since 1909 and there now
stand about the campus ten attractive brick buildings, well adapted to their various uses.
The University domain has been increased until it now embraces over 600 acres; and the
drives and walks and other improvements have greatly increased the beauty and attractiveness
of the 90-acre plot set aside for buildings, drill grounds, athletic field and the like.
The University has followed the tendency towards the English idea of a University;
namely, an institution which consists of a number of associated colleges or schools. In 1910
the State University was reorganized and at present it carries on its activities under the follow-
ing divisions: 1. The College of Arts and Sciences; 2. The College of Agriculture; 3. The
College of Engineering; 4. The College of Law; 5. The Teachers' College; 6. The Agricul-
tural Experiment Station; 7. The Graduate School; 8. The Extension Division.
The first exists for the training of men in those studies which lead not to a particular
calling, but to a general view of the world and of their duty to it. The second
exists to give a modicum of culture training, and emphasizes the various branches appertain-
ing to scientific farming, horticulture, animal husbandry and the like. The College of Engi-
neering offers advantages to prospective mechanical, electrical and civil engineers. This
course has a faculty and equipment, as is the case in all other colleges, equal to the very best
in the South. The College of Law prepares men for the highest service for the bench and
bar of Florida. The Teachers' College occupies its own building, as do the other colleges.
This building is the gift from the Peabody Board of Trust of New York, and cost $40,000.00.
Here men are trained for teachers and principals, and for superintendents of schools of the
commonwealth. The Experiment Station is strictly a research department, maintained for the
promotion of the agricultural and horticultural interests of the State. The Graduate School,
when fully developed and equipped, is designed to train men for scholarly research, by men
who are expert investigators and leaders in their profession. The Extension Division at pres-
ent, is conducting activities along four different lines, namely: (a) Farmers' Institutes; (b)
Co-operative Farm Demonstration Work; (c) Correspondence Study; (d) Literary and Lecture
Bureau. In this division of its work, as well as in the endeavors of all thie colleges, the
watchword of the University is, "Scholarship and Service".
Perhaps enough has been said to indicate the progress of the State University during
the eight years of its life. Its rapid development is probably without a parallel in the history
of education. It has already become the pride of the State and is attracting the attention of
the leading educators of the country. And yet it is just now entering upon a field of useful-
ness and service to the young men who come within its walls, and to the State, which the
University has not been able hitherto to render. At the present rate of growth Florida may
soon boast of the leading University of the entire South.
(10)


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College of Law

NDERSTAND that the University of Flor-
-. I ^ida is going to have THE law school of
Sf the South, and one of the recognized best
":' in' the country. Our Dean is an enthusiast
S ., and his assistants on the Law faculty are
Smen whose ability and whose application
to the interests of the individual student
Sand to the future of the College of Law be-
Sspeak nothing short of remarkable suc-
cess. This department of the University
has had a remarkable growth. The first
year of the Law College was '09, and un-
. .. .der the guidance of A. J. Farrah, who was
its first Dean, it became immediately an
:j.' important department of the University.
' *" !Since 1912, under the able direction of Dean
'.'-,':"" .. , Hughes, great progress has been made,
",, '! and the enrollment for 1914 reached seven-
*'. *. ty-seven (77).
The College of Law building is the latest addition to the campus, and
will be ready for occupancy at the opening of school for '14-'15.


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Agricultural Hall

N EVER has agriculture occupied such a
prominent place in the science of the
world as it does today. The University of
g.^Florida boasts of her College of Agricul-
ture, the home of which is shown in the
'above building. Students from every part
of the United States come to Florida in or-
der to take advantage of the excellent
courses offered, and this department of the
University attracts more out-of-the-state
students than does any other department.
wdThe University Chapel is located in this

here for the morning's worship.
The Dean of the College of Agricul-
ture has his office here. The extension
work of this department thru its corre-
fi~~ ~~ BH^~ffi|^above building adaiyteStudents bromdvey partes









spondence courses is doing much for the
good of the farmer who finds it impossible
to take a resident course. Already the practical good of the Agricultural
course has been demonstrated and a majority of the out-of-the-state stu-
dents remain to till Florida's fertile soil.


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Engineering Hall
N PLANNING for Florida's young man-
hood and their education, the present day
demand for specialists in every line of
work, was not overlooked, and the College
: -'e, 0;. .. "of Engineering was given an important
'. t K place in their plans. The BEST instructors
-i 1 E were employed and courses were offered
in ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL and CIVIL
,* 1, engineering. This department is annually
Si- increasing in size and importance and its
""41 already splendid equipment is constantly
being added to. Dean Benton of the Col-
lege of Engineering is a recognized author-
ity in the realm of engineering, and has
done especial work for the government in
this line. The instructors employed in
this department are men possessing prac-
tical experience as well as a theoretical
knowledge and its aim is to furnish such
training as will be useful to its graduates in the profession of engineering.
Engineering Hall is a three-story brick building, 122 feet by 73 feet, with a
one-story wing for boilers and steam engine laboratory. Besides the build-
ing shown above, well equipped shops have been built and the University
is gaining a reputation for its technical department.





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Experiment Station

_L N ERILY the Government Experiment Sta-
[,*^ 'tion located at the University of Florida is
I one of the most important of its kind in
-- the United States. Its director, P. H. Rolfs,
is recognized as one of the ablest men em-
played in this line of work and his reputa-
j tion as an expert is nation wide. Under
Mhis direction a corps of assistants labor for
the betterment of the animal and \ .u.tabl,
S\ life of Florida; all able men and specialists
-__ l .J 1 in their particular fields. Already their
S~j efforts have resulted in the saving of mil-
4, .lions of dollars to the cattle, citrus and
,~~ other industries of Florida. The agricul-
turists of the state are being organized for
the purpose of studying and for co-opera-
tion in the using of improved methods in
,, f farming. Farmers' Institutes bring di-
rectly to the workers of the soil the discov-
eries of the Agricultural Experiment Station and the teachings of the Col-
lege of Agriculture and present them so that they can be understood. This
experiment station is one of especial note for the progress made and for its
already shown benefit to the needy State of Florida.





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Language Hall

E NGLISH and Dr. Farr; Modern Languages
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S-_and Dr. Crow; Latin, Greek, and Dr. An-
derson, and the foregoing will give one an
idea as to what to expect upon entering
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Language Hall. Yet the history andsocial
E NGLISH and Dr. Farr; Modern Languages
and Dr. Crow; Latin, Greek, and Dr. An-
derson, and the foregoing will give one an
f* '" idea as to what to expect upon entering
.^fg Language Hall. Yet the history and social
science and the mathematics classes are
"i"f ~ heard in this building. The president and
." the auditor's offices are located here and
.l will be until the prospective administration
...S *building shall have been built. Besides these
i ue offices the remainder of the first floor is
given over to the College of Law and the
lLaw Library and to the office of the Dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences.
.... -,Rooms are also provided for the use of the
'." a Literary Societies and the Young Men's
Christian Association. Language Hall
was completed in 1913 and is one of the
two newest buildings on the University
campus. It is one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-five feet
wide.



























Science Hall


"4.. OENTGEN Rays and Physics, Biology,
4 Chemistry and the other Sciences are
S' taught in this building, which is one of the
, best equipped on the University campus.
,, This building is almost entirely given over
'. to laboratories, with very few lecture
i rooms. The armory for the military phase
of the University is also located here, as
well as the book and student supply room.
Science Hall is one of the most conspic-
uously located buildings on the campus,
and the subjects taught within its walls are
of great importance. It is a brick and con-
crete building of two stories and a finished
basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet
long and sixty-six feet wide. One of the
things that the University student will re-
Smember Science Hall for longest, is the
Fact that Dr. Flint always gave his "calo-
mel" prescriptions from his office located here.








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Peabody Hall
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Apar&,^ 'OMETIME in the future the teacher will
,pJ,7^-'B -receive his just (pecuniary) reward, for his
"" A " -h.' .' ', profession is a noble one and Society is
Awakening to the fact that he should be
..;. ~ duly recompensed for his high service. At
.. ^athe same time a higher and more complete
education is being required and the Teach-
ers' College is striving to take care of this
Li.. '*"- latter demand, which must indirectly in-
fluence the former one and that for the
teacher's benefit. The Psychology Labora-
tory, located in this building, is a very fine-
one, and the man at the head of this branch
of education is a master in this subject.
Peabody Hall is the home of the Teach-
ers' College and Normal School, of Pea-
body Club, and of the Model High School.
It also contains the University Library and
Reading rooms. This building was com-,
pleted in 1913 and occupied this year for the first time.








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Thomas Hall

lB N the beginning this building was used for
Sandy and all purposes. Thomas Hall is at
present our largest dormitory. It is built
-fon the unit system plan and contains six
sections of twelve suites of two rooms each.
It is located farthest west of all the Uni-
1versity buildings and overlooks the tennis
courts and athletic field. This was the
-' 'second building of the University to be
built and was named in honor of one of
Gainesville's most progressive citizens,
Major W. R. Thomas. This building is
well equipped with baths, flowing hot and
cold water, and is steam heated. There is
to be found a shower bath, lavatories and
toilet on each floor of each section. This
4is the largest building on the campus, be-
i ing three hundred and fifteen feet long
and sixty feet wide.



























Buckman Hall


jHERE is no building on the University
campus that might be called old, but BUCK-
MAN HALL was the first structure to be
erected by the State under the direction of
s the Buckman Bill, which created a Univer-
Ssity and provided for the combining of the
then several state schools into two schools,
one for women, and one for men. This
hall was named in honor of the author of
the bill. The unit system plan prevails
here and this dormitory is divided into sec-
tions, five in number, and each containing
2 ~twelve suites of two rooms each. Like the
other buildings on the campus, it is well
equipped with modern conveniences and is
arranged so that its occupants may use one
of their rooms for ai study, and the other
S* for a bed room. This building is fireproof
and is two hundred and forty feet long by sixty feet in width.































University Commons


ONDER in the future each student of the
University will remember that during his
college life three meals a day were among
the most important of his scheduled
hours. The liquid-like tune of "Soupy!
Soupy! Soupy! Not a Single Bean-&c.,"
always brought about anticipation keen for
emptiness. Meals were always served on
time, provided "Rat" Grace finished in
time to sound the bugle for the next meal,
or Curtis Crom had devoured all in sight.
The Mess Hall is large, accommodating
over 350; the meals are prepared in up-to-
date steam cookers, and our matron, Mrs.
Swanson, is never happier than when
looking after each student's wants.
This building is a brick structure of
one story and a basement, one hundred
and fourteen feet long and forty-two feet wide, with a wing forty-nine feet
long and twenty-seven feet wide.


























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JAS N.ADRO, ,. hD., Professor of
Latin and Greek, Dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
M.A., University of Virginia, 1887; Morgan Fel-
low, Harvard University, 1887-88; Student, Universi-
ties of Berlin, Heidelberg and Paris, 1889-90, 1896;
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1894; Professor of
(Greek, Florida State College, 1903-05; present posi-
tion, 1905-.








THOS. W. HUGHES, LL.B., LL.M., Professor of
Law, Dean of the College of Law.
LL.B., LL.M., University of Michigan; Professor
of Law, University of Michigan, 1892-98; Professor of
La~w, University -of Illinois, 1898-1910; Professor of
Law,, Louisiana State University, 1910-12; Phi Delta
Phi; T heta Kappa Nu; Phi Kappa Phi; Author of
boolik on Evidence, Commercial Law, Criminal
P~lhading and Procedure, etc.; now completing a 500-
page ,ta ,1. on Criminal Law; present position, 1912-.





P. HI. ROLES, M.S., Director of Agricultural Experiment
Station and Director Division of University Extension.
B.S., Iowa Agricultural College, 1889; Post Grad-
uate and M.S., 1891; Entomologist and Botanist to Flor-
ida Experiment Station, beginning with December 1,
1891, and continuing with the Florida Agricultural Col-
lege until August, 1899; Botanist and Bacteriologist to
Clemson Agricultural College and Experiment Station
(South Carolina Agricultural College), to August, 1901;
Plant Pathologist in charge of the Subtropical Labora-
tory for the U. S. Department of Agriculture at Miami,
Fla., from 1901 to February 1, 1906; President Florida
State Horticultural Society 1908, 1909, Chairman Execu-
tive Committee continuously since; Member of the Bo-
tanical Society of America; Fellow, American Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Science; Member of the
Missouri Botanical Society; Member, American Pomo-
logical Society; Member, American Association Econo-
mic Entomologists; Present position, 1901-.




















J. R. BENTON, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physics
and Electrical Engineering, Dean of the College
of Engineering.
A.B., Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., 1897;
Ph.D., Goettingen, 1900; Instructor in Mathemat-
ics, Princeton University, 1900-01; Instructor in
Physics, Cornell University, 1901-02; Special In-
vestigation Work in Physics, Carnegie Institution,
Washington, D. C., 1904 05; Present position,
1905-.


J. J. VERNON, M.S. in Agri., Professor of Ag ron-
omy, Dean of the College of Agriculture.
B.Agr., Iowa Agricultural College, 1897; Fel-
low in Agriculture, 1898- 1900; Professor of Agri-
culture and Station Agriculturist, Agricultural Col-
lege of New Mexico, 1900-08; present position,
1908-.











JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph.D., Head of Departmnent of Education, Professor of Secondary Ed-
ucation and Inspector of High Schools.
A.B., Furman University, 1899; Principal Public Schools, Nanning, S. C., 1899-1901; Pro-
fessor of Latin and Greek, Edgefield College, S. C., 1901-03; Superintendent City Schools,
McCall, S. C., 1903-06; Graduate Student in Summer School University of Virginia and Uni-
versity of Chicago, 1903-06; Fellow in New York University, 1906-08; Pd.M. New York Uni-
versity, 1907; Ph.D. New York University, 1908; Professor of Mathematics, State Normal
School, Winona, Minn.; Professor of Philosophy and Education, University of Florida, 1909-
11; present position, 1912-.








.. -... . ---=
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I
IJI A*_


C. L. WILLOUGHBY, B. Agr., Professor of Animal H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Mtliheniatics
lHulsbndry and Dairying. and Astrononmy.
B. Agfr., University of Missouri, 1901; Student in A.B., Hope College, 1899; Graduate Student Clark
Academic Dept., Univ. of Mo., 1894-96; Sec. Mo. AgI. University, 1892-95; Mathematical Fellow, Clark Uni-
Cul-i..',-. ,Jd Expt. Station, 1896-1900; Graduate Stu- versily, 1893-95; Instructor in Mathematics, North-
<,i. V'. .ni, r Dairy School, Univ. of Wis., 1900-01; In- western University, 1896-1900; Mathematical Fellow,
structor in Dairying, Mo. Agrl. College, 1901; Dairy- Clark University, 1900-01; Ph.D., 1901; Instructor in
man and Animal Husbandman, Ga. Experiment Sta- Mathematics, Northwestern University, 1901-08: pres-
lion, 1902-10; Lecturer, Farmers' Institute Staff of Ga., ent position, 1908-.
1903-07; Graduate Student, Cornell Univ., second se-
mester, 1908; Secretary and Treasurer Ga. Dairy and
Live Stock Association, 1905-11; President of same,
1912; Editorial Contributor Southern Ruralist, 1905-
12; Supt. Fern Crest Dairy, Sandersville, Ga., 1910-11,
Manager of Creameries, Columbus and Eatonton,
(;a., 1912; present position, 1912-.


W. S. PERRY, A.B., Instructor in Physics and Elec-
trical Engineering.
A.B., Southern University; Teaching Fellow in
Physics, Tulane University, 1908-1910; present posi-
tion, 1910-.


W. L. FLOYD, M.S., Professor of Biology.
B.S., South Carolina Military Academy, 1886; Prin-
cipal Clio School, 1888-89; Principal Cypress High
School, 1889-92; Instructor in English, East Florida
Seminary, 1892-96; Graduate Student, Harvard Univer-
sity, Summer School, 1903; Professor of Natural
Science, East Florida Seminary, 1896-1905; Professor
of English and Science, Normal Department, Univer-
sity of the State of Florida, 1905-06; Graduate Student
University of the State of Florida, 1905-06; M.S., Uni-
versity of the State of Florida, 1906; present position,
1906-.







', < ../-

-.^^ ==-~"- I ,-- -,--- -- / / ,





i C -A'-- ......






























C. L. CROW, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Modern Lan-
giatges, Secretary of the General Faculty.
M.A., Washington and Lee University, 1888;
Ph.D., University of G ., ,1it .- j ', 1892; Vice-Principal,
Norfolk High School, I 1i ', F professor of l.a tin and
Modern Languages, Wealherford Ct*l,.'- lI ii-f -
Adjunct Professor of Modern Languag, . I.' ,,
and Lee University, 1899-1905; present .1.. a.n, I'ln


A. JULIUS WEICHARDT, M.E., M.M.E., Professor
of Mechanical Eniieerimin!.
Shop Experience, 1880-83; M.E. Lehigh Univer-
sity 1887; Foreman and Instructor in the shops of Iowa
Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1888-91;M.M.LE.,
Cornell University, 1891; Professor of Mechanical En-
gineering, New Mexico College of Agriculture and
Mechanic Arts, 1894-97; Professor of Mechanic Arts,
Mississippi State A. & M. College, 1898-1901; Professor
of Mechanic Arts and Electricity, same institution, 1902;
consulting engineering office, practice chiefly in
electric railway work, 1903-10; present position, 1910-.


EDWARD R. FLINT, 1.S., Pli.)., M.)., Resident
Phiysician aind Professor of Chei'nistry.
B.S., MassachusetI. I.., Ih,, .1 College, 1887:
Ph.D., U'.i:,. i .:i, of (.., ,.... I-s'. Assistant Pro-
fessor of I. 'o., i. 1 .... hli. 11. \L cultural Col-
lege, 1893-99; 'l. -.hi. i..l. I r.-I University,
1899-03; M.D. Harvard, 1903; Professor of Chemistry,
University of Florida, 1904-05; present position, 1905-.


LUTHER LEE BIERNARD, B.S., A.B., P'h.D., Pro-
fessor of History andi Economics.
Educated at Pierce City Baptist College, Univer-
sity of Missouri and University of Chicago. Teaching
positions: Pierce City Baptist College. 1901-03; Lamar
College, 1903-05; Western Reserve University, 1910-11;
University of Missouri, summers of 1913-14; University
of Florida, 1911-. Member Phi Beta K(ia ., Mi-., i
Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi, University of 1 tI.r,, i (_,r
responding member Instilute de '4- ,.;,' In ,stilute
Solvay, Brussels; President of I 1,r.dl i oi, Child
Labor Committee; Executive Committeeman for
Florida of Southern Sociological Congress.















































HAlRY R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B., 'Professor of
Laiv.
Arizona Normal School, 1898-1902; Principal of
Schools, Dragoon, Arizona, 1902-03; 1LL.B., University
of Michigan, 1906; A.M., Oscsl',oii Cnllece 1'll; As-
sociate Editor M i, i;i, 1, .\\ I i, I '.;,1. i. prac-
ticed lawv, Eini t I, i. i1 n. 1, ,. I ..t, ..,11 f Law,
Jiohn B. Stetson University, 1908-09; present position,
1909-.


H. S. DAVIS, Ph.D., Professor of Zooloiyv and Geology.
Ph.D., Wesleyan, 1899; Graduate Student, Weslev-
an University, 1899-1900; University Scholar, Harvard,
1900-01; Instructor in Zoology, Washington State Col-
lege, 1901-04; Assistant Professor of Zoology, Wash-
ington State College, 1904-06; Assistant Zoologist,
Washington State Experiment Station, 1901-06; Thay-
er Scholar, Harvard University, 1906-07; Ph.D., Har-
vard, 1907; present position, 1907-.


CLIFFORD W. CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B., instructor
in College of Lm,.
B.S. Adrian College, 1896; LL.B., University of
Michigan, 1899; Practiced Law in Port Huron, Michi-
gan, 1899-1913; Present position 1913-.


W. S. CAWTHON, A.B., Assistant Professor Muthie-
inatics and Science.
Instructor Mathematics Florida State Normal
School 1900-05; A.B. University of Chicago, 1906; In-
structor Mathematics Normal Department, University
of Florida, 1905-06; Librarian and Graduate Student,
University of Florida, 1906-07; Principal Gainesville
Graded and High School, 1907-08; Principal Pensacola
High School 1908-13; Graduate Student University of
Chicago, Summer Quarter 1908, and University of
Wisconsin, Summer Sessions, 1909-10-12; Certificate in
Advanced Course for Training of Teachers, same
Institution, 1912; Present position, 1913-.











































JOHN FREDERIC DUGGAR, JR., B.S.,
Instructor in Soils and Fertilizers.
Bachelor of Science, Auburn, 1912; As-
sistant in Agriculture, Auburn, 1912-1913;
present position 1913-.


W. BYRON HATHAWAY, A.B., B.D., In-
structor in Languages, 1'eacliers' College.
Student Rollins College 1898-1901; Prin-
cipal of Schools, Department of Education,
Philippine Islands, 1901-1903; student in Uni-
versity of California and Pacific Theologi-
cal Seminary 1903-1906; Principal of High
Schools in Florida 1906-1913; degree of A.B.
from Rollins College, and B.D. from Pacific
TheologicalSeminary; present position 1913-.


IRA D. ODLE, B.S., Assistant Professor of
Botany and Bacteriology.
B.S. Purdue University 1910; Professor
of Science Milwaukee University 1911-12;
Present position 1913-.


1. NV. BUCHHOLZ, A.M., Professor of l.h,'mentary
Educitiion.
Graduate Teachers' Seminar at Pr. Friedland,
(Germany, 1875; Principal l'airochiiai School ((;ermany)
1876-1880; teacher in Pul)lic Schools of I'lorida 1884-
1887; C .'. '\ .u, r 1,i . i i'Public Instruction, Hills-
boro C_ *,unis, ll.,rii I. I "1, organizedand taught
first county teachers' summer training school 1887,
continued the same until 1901; Vice-P'resident Nation-
al Educational Association 1898-1900; President Flor-
ida Educational Association 1900; Professor of Phil-
osophy and Educ ,.i i-ii-li %i tie College, Talla-
i ,.. Il"ill 1908; I',, 1 1 ,I I ,jinlln, I l -
D)eLand, Gainesv'll. Tlli ,., I1, I'd'is "uj-, rn
tendent Public lor..r ii. HIll.ihr,. County and
Principal of Couni ''rin. I r ni School 1909-
1913; present position 1913-.








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-'I6-


















W. A. EDWARDS, Arcldtect State Board K. fl1 (RAI-IAM, Auditor (IaKn t'ti-cbiisiiin
of Conlrol Xdit.























E. S. WALKER, MAJOR U.S.A., Retired, ROBERT ROWE SELLERS, Sc C. E.,
Coninand(iiit(u; Professor of Miliitary Instructor in C'ivil Engtineering Depart-
Corn ,uiiuh.-,



























Scienct'e; Assista tif Civil -_i_. I.. '. inAei_ -_t.
Sc.B.C.E. Buckiiell University 1911;
Draftsman for Emmitsburg Generator Co.;
Assistant in Mechanical Drawing- at Buck-
nell '11-12; C.E. on Maintenance of Way
work for Baltimore and Ohio R. R. '12-13;
Engineer of Tests of M. of W. work for
B. and 0. R.R R. '13; present position,
1913-.


T --'





.,: 41Ti'
-.. _... __- -, _.-.-_,


- .:... ___ __-=-- ^ _-_
17; AI.BERT A. MURPHREE, A M, I L.D., President of the University.
I\ JAS. M. FARR, A.M., Ph.D., Vice-President of the University and Professor of Enilislih.
| HARVEY WV. COX, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy.
,% f R. W. THOROUGHGOOD, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering.
',., J. MADISON CHAPMAN, D.O., Instructor in Oratory.
I M. B. HADLEY, A.B., Librarian and Instructor in Mathematics.
A. J. STRONG, M.E., Assistant in Mechanical -,iwcri,, and Assistant in Mechanical Arts.
JOHN M. SCOTT, B.S., Animal Industrialist.
C. K. McQUARRIE, Professor of Agricultural Extension.
J. OSCAR MILLER, Musical Director.
G. E. PYLE, Physical Culture and Athletics.


MISS MCROBBIE, Resident Nurse.


MRS. SWANSON, Matroi.


w uj W














ROBERT SALTER BLANTON
Master of Arts in Education
Plant City, Fla.
L.I. from University of Florida, '06; A.B. in Ed-
ucation, University of Florida, 1913; Varsity Football
Team, '05-06; Member of Farr Literary Society, 1911-
12-13; Member of Peabody Literary Society, '11-12-
13-14; Chairman of Program Committee, Peabody
Literary Society, '11-12; Vice-President of Peabody
Literary Society, '12-13; Critic Peabody Literary So-
ciety, '14.


POST


GRADS


ARTHUR C. MASON
Master of Science
Saline, Mich.
B.S. Michigan Agricultural College, 1913; Post
Grad University of Florida; Laboratory Assistant in
Entomology at the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station.














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C

L


C


L


A


S


S


S

S


L. E. TENNEY
President Combined Senior Classes
H. A. THALIMER
President Senior Academic Classes


J. B. SUTTON
Vice-President Combined Senior Classes
R. A. HENDERSON, JR.
President Senior Law Class






























THOMAS BUCKINGHAM BIRD
Bachelor of Science
Monticello, Fla.
-Buck"
Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Presi-
dent Farr Literary Society 1913-14;
Student Organization Editor of
Seminole '14; Vice-President Farr
Literary Society 1913; Charter
Member Farr Literary Society;
Corporal Company A 1909-10;
Sergeant Major 1910-11; First Lieu-
tenant and Adjutant 1911-12; Ath-
letic Association.
"Be still, my heart-
He comes."


HARRY S. KLINGLER
Bachelor:of Arts
Butlei:r, Pa. '
"Harry"
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity;
Farr Literary Society.
"Who mixed reason with pleas-
ure, and wisdom with mirth."


ip^^B 7
SM" z


OW ;-*


Arts and Sciences


jj- '. -'.-1"1.-
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-Ism-















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IT


.......


THOMAS JOSEPH SWANSON
Bachelor of Arts
Gainesville, Fla.
"Jo"
Vice-President Farr Literary So-
ciety; Football Team 1910-11, 1911-
12, 1913-14; Baseball Team 1910-
11, 1911-12; Basketball Team 1911-
12, 1912-13, 1913-14; Gymnasium
Team 1910-11, '11-12, '12-13,'13-14;
Assistant Literary Editor of The
Pennant 1911-12; President Fresh-
man Class 1910-11; President Soph-
omore Class 1911-12.
"Six feet two, and there's damn
few that's half so limber."


LEON WILLIAM TRAXLER
Bachelor of Arts
Alachua, Fla.
"'rax"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; President Farr Literary So-
ciety 1914; Gobblers; Tennis Club;
Athletic Association; Young Men's
Christian Association.
"For a mustache he prayed and
prayed-
And then it came-but oh, how
frayed!"


NJ


Arts and Sciences















W ,-J "." ..






Baheo of^ ^ ....... Hakl,: Fi.-^





i'in
OWEN EDGAR WVILIIAMS JOSEPH EMORY WILLIAMS
SBachelor of Science Bachelor of Science
'Haskell, Fla. Haskell, Fla.
"Okie" "Jew"
Farr Literary Society 1912-13-14; Farr Literary Society 1912-13-14;
Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. First Sergeant Company C 1913;
"Wisdom lies not in mighty Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association;
words, but in great thoughts." Stockton Club; Prohibition Club;
r Member Farr Literary Debating
Team 1914.
_"He got his start saving car fare."






NO




1^


Arts and Sciences












, I .s-s. -'

J^ .


A. C. ARNOLD
Bachelor of Laws
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Daddy"
John Marshall Debating Society;
Member of the "Daddy" Club,
and President thereof.
"Congeniality is the purchase
price of friendship."


LEON WV. ALEXANDER
Bachelor of Laws
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Alex" ,
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; John Marshall Debating So-
ciety; Y. M. C. A.; Secretary and
Treasurer Senior Law Class.
"He is as silent as a sphinx, yet as
wise as an owl."


"4.-


Law
































WORTHINGTON BLACKMAN
Bachelor of Laws
Winter Park, Fla.
"Padereu'ski"
A.B. Rollins College 1910; Phi
Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity;
John Marshall Debating Society
1912-14; President Senate, John
Marshall 1913-14; Athletic Editor
The Alligator 1913-14; Vice-Presi-
dent Tennis Club 1913-14; Busi-
ness Manager The Seminole 1913-
14; Historian Senior Law Class
1913-14; Stockton Club; Prohibi-
tion Club; Manager Glee Club
(resigned) 1913-14; President Cos-
mopolitan Club 1914; Senior Orator
1914; Treasurer Senior Prom 1914.
"Job had some troubles-but not
The Seminole.' '


ARCHIE P. BUIE
Bachelor of Laws
Gainesville, Fla.
"Sam"
Two years at Davidson College;
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity; I.
T. K.; Serpents; Glee Club 1913-
14; Dramatic Club 1910-11-12; '"F"
Club 1910-14; Secretary and Treas-
urer "F" Club 1912-13; President
"F" Club 1913-14; Varsity Foot-
ball Team 1910-11-12-13; Captain
Football Team 1912-13; "All Flor-
ida Football Team" 1910-11-12-13;
Captain All Florida Team 1912;
Varsity Baseball Team 1910-11-12-
13; All Florida Baseball Team
1911-12-13.
"To love is to be all made of
sighs and tears."


Ii


I


Law














-". PI-1 .-,, I.N -


MAXWEII, BAXTER
Bachelor of Laws
Gainesville, Fla.
"Bax"
LL. B. Cumberland University;
John Marshall Debating Society.
"Appropriate silence presents an
unknown quantity."


LEON N. LISCHKOFF
Bachelor of Lau's
Pensacola, Fla.
"Lisch"
Entered from Tulane. Zeta Beta
Tau Fraternity; Serpents; John
Marshall Debating Society.
"The most patient man in loss,
The coldest that ever turned up
anll ace."


rq


Law





























HERBERT BARNEY CARTER
Bachelor of Laws
St. Augustine, Fla.
"Rusty"
Stetson University; Alpha Tan
Omega Fraternity; Serpents Rib-
bon Society; German Club; Dra-
matic Club; John Marshall Debat-
ing Society.
"A camel can go eight days
without a drink, but who wants to
be a camel?"


ALBION WV. KNIGHT
Bachielor of Laws
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Skeeter"
B.A. University of the South
1912; Kappa Alpha Fraternity;
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Serpents, Ribbon Society;
John Marshall Debating Society;
Intersociety Debater 1913; Vice-
President Law Class 1913; German
Club 1912-14; President German
Club 1913; Dramatic Club 1912-14;
Tennis Club 1914; Assistant Coach
2nd Football Team 1913; Literary
Editor The Seminole 1914; Vice-
President John Marshall '13.
"And I will roar you as gently
as any suckling dove."


iimi~


Law


luk

































ROBT. A. HENDERSON (2ND)
Bachelor of Laws
Ft. Myers, Fla.
"Lord"
Emory College; Alpha Tau
Omega Fraternity; Theta Ribbon
Society; Follies Dramatic Qlub;
Vice-President Follies Dramatic
Club 1913; Editor-in-Chief The
Seminole 1914; President Senior
Law Class 1914; Class Historian
1913; President John Marshall De-
bating Society 1913; Intersociety
Debater 1913; Scrub Football 1912;
Glee Club 1912-14; University Or-
chestra 1912-14; University Band
1914; Toastmaster Senior Law Ban-
quet '14.
"The Bull, the Bull, my Diplo-
ma for the Bull."


WILLIAM L. HILL
Bachelor of Laws
Gainesville, Fla.
"W. L."
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; John Marshall Debating So-
ciety; Masonic Club; Member of
the Daddys Club.
"He is a salesman, but carries
not a sample case."


r.. ~ 0-.
's'-,.


Law






























PAUL D. MOBLEY
Bachelor of Laws
Punta Gorda, Fla.
"Grouch"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fra-
ternity; John Marshall Debating
Society; "Sons of Rest Club".
"For too much rest itself be-
comes a pain."


THOMAS W. MOORE
Bachelor of Laws
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Hep"
Masonic Club 1913-14; John
Marshall Debating Society 1913-14;
Y. M. C. A. 1913-14.
"Constant attention wears the ac-
tive mind,
And leaves a blank behind."


Ltaw


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_______rW1fl1C11.~4.I...'IIflf-r



rn


PAUL D. McGARRY
Bachelor of Laws
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Rosie"
University of Virginia 1911-13;
Delta Chi Fraternity; Serpents
Ribbon Society; John Marshall
Debating Society; German 'Club
1913-14; Dramatic Club 1914.
"I love to mope, and mock the
mellow moon."


FRANK E. OWVENS
Bachelor of Laws
Eustis, Fla.
"F. E."
John Marshall Debating Society
1912-14.
"Nothing so becomes a man
As modesty, stillness and humil-
ity."


Law


I i "


































JOSEPH CLAYTON POPPEL.L
Bachelor of Laws
Stairke, Fla.
"Pop"
John Marshall Debating Society;
formerly Superintendent Public In-
struction Bradford County 1908-12.
"Slow, persistent and persever-
ing, he mounts the Alps of Knowl-
edge by freely using the midnight
oil."


THOMAS P. PRUITT
Bachelor of Laws
Tallahassee, Fla.
"F' 'lossie''
Wake Forest College 1909-10,
1912-13; Alpha Tau Omega Fra-
ternity; John Marshall Debating
Society; Intersociety Debater 1914.
"Every man is my master in that
I learn of him."


Law


Si
















.,r -r i '*'_ m*, ,-


""" "O,".
4. .


k


JAMES HARDIN PETERSON
Bachelor of Laws
Lakeland, Fla.
"Pete"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fra-
ternity; John Marshall Debating
Society; Ag. Club; Y. M. C. A.;
Athletic Association; Secretary
and Treasurer John Marshall 1913-
14; Speaker Junior-Senior Oratori-
cal Contest 1913.
"And his big manly voice turn-
ing again toward childish treble."


P. R. PERRY
Bachelor of Laws
St. Augustine, Fla.
"Pete"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Athletic Association 1912-14;
Executive Committee Athletic As-
sociation 1913-14; John Marshall
Debating Society; Vice-President
John Marshall 1st semester 1913-
14; Masonic Club 1913-14; Scrub
Football 1912-13.
"Forensic ability leadeth a man
to politics."


Law
































THOMAS C. RAY
Bachelor of Laws
Marianna, Fla.
"Tominmie"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; John Marshall Debating So-
ciety; Masonic Club 1912-14; Vice-
President Masonic Club 1912-13;
Secretary Masonic Club 1913-14;
Anglers Club; "B. S. C." Club.
"A battle scarred veteran."


RICHARD P. ROBBINS
Bachelor of Laws
Titusville, Fla.
"Dick"
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Ser-
pents Ribbon Society; John Mar-
shall Debating Society.
"I love the birds and chickens,
but this is The Life!"


L aw


I














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< ~ ,; a


ROBERT W. SHACKIEFORD
Bachelor of Laws
Tampa, Fla.
"Shack"
A.B. University of Florida, 1912.
Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Phi Kap-
pa Phi Honorary Fraternity; Ser-
pents Ribbon Society; German
Club; Vice-President 1913; Presi-
dent 1914; University Dramatic
Club 1910-13; President 1912-13;
Scrub Football Team 1910-11; Var-
sity Football Team 1911-12, 1912-
13; All-Florida Quarter 1911-12;
Coach Second Team 1913-14; "F"
Club, Tennis Club, Secretary-
Treasurer Junior Law Class, Vice-
President Senior Law Class, John
Marshall Debating Society; WVin-
ner Senior Oratorical Medal 1912;
Athletic Editor Alligator 1912-13;
Vice-President Athletic Associa-
tion 1912-13, I. Tappa Kegs 1910-
11-12.
"If music be the food of love,
play me a rag."


THADDEUS HENTZ SMITH
Bachelor of Laws
Marianna, Fla.
"Heinie"
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity;
John Marshall Debating Society;
Cheer Leader 1913-14. Night Owl
Club.
"A world of fun and the life of
his fellows."


Law





























JOHN B. SUTTON
Bachelor of Laiws
Lakeland, Fla.
"Sut"
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity;
Theta Ribbon Society; Assistant
Business Manager Follies Dramatic
Club '13; Business Manager '14;
Manager Junior Prom '13; Presi-
dent Agricultural Club '11; Secre-
tary-Treasurer John Marshall De-
bating Society '12; Vice-Presi-
dent '13; President '14; Interso-
ciety Debater '14; Vice-President
Combined Senior Classes '14;
Athletic Editor "The Seminole"
'14; Assistant Manager Univer-
sity Minstrel '14; President Ath-
letic Association '14; Chairman
Executive Committee '14; Execu-
tive Committee '13; Varsity Foot-
ball 1911-12-13; "F" Club; Cap-
tain Elect Football 1914.
"Let him bear the palm, who
deserves it."


ROBT. R. TAYLOR, JR.
Bachelor of Laiws
Miami, Fla.
"C-Bob"
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity;
Varsity Baseball Team 1911-12-13;
Major of the Battalion 1912; Cap-
tain 2nd Football Team 1912; Win-
ner Board of Control Medal for
Declamation 1911; Winner Board
of Control Medal for Oratory, Jun-
ior Class, 1912; John Marshall De-
bating Society; Farr Literary So-
ciety; "F" Club; Stockton Club.
"-- and we'll whisper sweet
little nothings over cold bottles
and hot birds."


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EARLE E. WIGGINS CHESTER M. WIGGINS
Bachelor of Laws Bachelor of Laws


Hawthorne, Fla.
"E. E."
John Marshall Debating Society;
Masonic Club; W. 0. W.; Y. M.
C. A.
"If looking wise were wisdom,
Then thou wert wise indeed."


Bartow, Fla.
'"'Slim''
Washington and Lee University
1912-13; Phi Kappa Sigma Fra-
ternity; Phi Kappa Delta Frater-
nity; Theta Ribbon Society; Pres-
ident Follies Dramatic Club; Glee
Club; John Marshall Debating So-
ciety.
"There is no pleasure like the
pain of being loved, and loving."


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C. LEHMAN WELCH
Bachelor of Loiws
Tampa, Fla.
"C. L."
John Marshall Debating Society;
B. S. Club; J. &W. Pressing Club;
Athletic Association; R o o t e r s
Club; Assistant Manager The Sem-
inole 1913-14.
"Happiness consists not in
friends, but in their cigarettes."


ALONZO DEWITTE WILDER
Bachelor of Laws
Orange, Fla.
"Dad"
John Marshall Debating Society;
Stockton Club; Masonic Club; Odd
Fellows.
"Just a wee cot, the crickets chirr,
Love and the smiling face of her."


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HAROLD G. CONANT
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Minneapolis, Minn.
"Connie"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Sergeant Major 1912-13; Glee
Club 1911-12; Mandolin Club 1911-
12; Agricultural Club 1912-13; Ten-
nis Club 1912-13; Athletic Asso-
ciation.
"'Tis impious in a good man to
be sad."


JOSHUA FENLEY GIST
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Mclntosh, Fla.
"Josh"
Agricultural Club; Tennis Club;
Vice-President Agricultural Club
'13; Anglers Club.
"Let him who would be ac-
counted wise-be silent."


Agriculture




























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J. THADDEUS GRACE HAROL]
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Bachelor
Graceville, Fla.
"Thud"
Y. M. C. A. 1910-14; Agricul- Delta F
tural Club 1911-14; Captain Scrub nity; Cosr
Baseball 1910, 1912; Scrub Base- tural Club
ball 1910-13; Varsity Baseball Team '13; Scrul
1911, 1914; Track Team 1910; Sec- "Take
retary-Treasurer Tennis Club 1913- way.
14; Tennis Team 1913; Assistant
Librarian 1910-13.
"Grace and philosophy go a long
way in helping a man."


D C. HOUGHTALING
of Science in Agriculture
New York City
"Doc"
'i Lambda Local Frater-
nopolitan Club; Agricul-
; Manager Football Team
Football Team '12-13.
me back to old Broad-


Agriculture















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CHAS. A. MARTINI
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Van Wert, Ohio
"Mart"
Plii Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Glee Club '11-14; Secretary
Glee Club '12-13; Y. M. C. A.;
Secretary Agricultural Club '13;
President Agricultural Club '13;
2nd Lieutenant Company A '12-13;
Cosmopolitan Club; Student As-
sistant Correspondence Course in
Agriculture.
"Composed, optimistic and
hopeful."


ROBERT J. MCPHERSON
Bachelor of Science in Agriculturc
Juniper, Fla.
"Mac"
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Stockto:
Club; Socialist Club; Vice-Presi
dent W. 0. IV.; Agricultural Dra
matic Club; Inter-Society Debate
Vice-President Agricultural Clu
'13; President Agricultural Clu]
'14.
"Back to nature and eat Egg-O
See."


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JAMES A. MILLER
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Independence, Mo.
"Jeff"
Agricultural Club; "F" Club;
Tennis Club; B. S. Club; Rooters
Club; Cosmopolitan Club; Mess-
Hall Club; J. & W. Pressing Club;
Waiting Staff; Athletic Associa-
tion; Y. M. C. A.; Manager Bas-
ketball Team 1913-14; Captain
Gym Team 1912-13; Varsity Foot-
ball Squad 1911-12-13; Sergeant
Company A 1912-13.
"I am little, but oh my!"


ALEXANDER G. SHAW
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Tampa, Fla.
"Alex"
Secretary-Treasurer Academic
Senior Class 1914; Chairman In-
vitation Committee, Combined
Senior Class 1914; Varsity Foot-
ball Team 1913; Varsity Baseball
Team 1912-13-14; Manager Base-
ball Team 1914; "F" Club; Agri-
cultural Club; Tennis Club: Ath
letic Association; Y. M. C .\.
"Cheer up, the worst iN %.i to
come."


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JOHN R. SPRINGER
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Pitman, N. J.
"Spring"
Delta Pi Lambda Local Frater-
nity; Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fra-
ternity; Agricultural Club; Presi-
dent Agricultural Club 1913;
Chemistry Assistant 1913-14; Cos-
mopolitan Club; Tennis Club.
"The vaulted ceiling shook with
dread,
Elastic from his airy tread."


WM. HENRY SCHULZ
Bachelor of Science in Agricul ture
Eau Claire, Wis.
"Winkle"
Delta Pi Lambda Local Frater-
nity; Phi Kappa Phi Honorary
Fraternity; Agricultural Club;
Seminole Student Photographer;
Cosmopolitan Club.
"'Tis not my fault that I was
born beautiful."


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DONALD M. BADGER
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Minneapolis, Minn.
"Miss"
Delta Pi Lambda Local Frater-
nity; Business Manager Glee Club
1913-14; President Mandolin Club
1911; Agricultural Club; Cosmo-
politan Club; 2nd Lieutenant "C"
Company 1912-13.
"Soprano, basso, and even contra-
alto,
Wished him five fathoms under
the Rialto."


HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Tampa, Fla.
"Crane"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Tennis Club; Agricultural
Club; 1st Lieutenant Quartermaster
1912-13; President Agricultural
Club 1912; Field Marshal 1913-
14; Executive Committee Ath-
letic Association; Local Editor
The Seminole; Anglers Club.
"He was a child of Nimrod al-
ways."


Agriculture


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GUY WILSON
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Gainesville, Fla.
"Guy"
Emory College '09-10; Scrub
Baseball Team 1910-11; Track
Team 1910; Gymnasium Team
1911-12-13-14; Manager Gym Team
1913; Captain Gym Team 1914;
"F" Club 1913-14; Secretary and
Treasurer "F" Club '14; Tennis
Club 1911-12-13-14; Tennis Team
1913-14; President Tennis Club
1914; Agricultural Club; President
Agricultural Club 1914.
"He was wont to do Gym stunts
and drive Ford cars.


19W


NEILS R. ALWYN-BECKER
B.S. in Electrical Engineering
Jacksonville, Fla.
"Neils"
Delta Pi Lambda; President Y.
M. C. A. '13-14; WVinner Junior
Oratorical Medal 1913; Secretary-
Treasurer Kelvin Engineering So-
ciety '11-12; Business Manager Y.
M. C. A. Hand Book '12-13; 1st
Lieutenant Company A '12-13;
Corporal Company B; Sophomore
Football '11; Junior Football '12;
University Orchestra '10-11-12;
University Band '13-14; Junior En-
gineer '12-13.
"Long have the learned sought
without success,
To find out what you alone pos-
sess."


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AUGUST DEWINKLER
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Miami, Fla.
"DeWink"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Vice-President Transit Club
'13-14; University Orchestra '12-13-
14; Tennis Club; Y. M. C. A.;
Stockton Club; Junior Engineer
'12-13.
"He has more good nature in his
little finger than you have in your
whole body."


FREDERICK W. LANDIS HILL
B.S. in Electrical Engineering
Narcoossee, Fla.
"Freddie"
Pi Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa
Phi Honorary Fraternity; Assistant
Editor-in-Chief Seminole; Captain
Sophomore Football '11; Captain
Scrub Football '12; Captain Com-
pany C; Treasurer Sophomore
Class '12; Vice-President Junior
Class '13; Glee Club '11-12-13.
Secretary-Treasurer German Club
'13-14; Chairman Junior Prom '13:
Kelvin Engineering Society; Sen.
ior Class Editor Engineering Col
lege; Hobo Association 1913; Jun
ior Engineer '12-13; Serpents.
"Bashfulness is an ornament to
youth."


Engineering



























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CHAS. CLEMENT LAROCHE
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
Cocoa, Fla.
". CC."
Junior Engineer '12-13; Lieuten-
ant Company C '12-13; Corporal
Company A '11-12; Scrub Baseball
'13; Vice-President Kelvin Engi-
neering Society; Hobo Associa-
tion.
"He longed to be a hero, and
dreamed of the Philippines."


MALCOM COLLINS McNEILL
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Tallahassee, Fla.
"Chicken"
Alpha Tau Omega; Serpent Rib-
bon Society; Scrub Football '11-
12-13; Captain Scrub Football '11-
12; Lieutenant Company B '12-13;
Transit Club; Junior Engineer '12-
13; Son of Rest; Hobo Associa-
tion '12-13.
"Happy am I; from cares I'm free!
Why aren't they all contented
like me?"


Engineering


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WALLACE CECIL PARHAMI
B.S. in Electrical Engineering
Gainesville, Fla.
"Rat"
Sergeant Company A '10-11; Jun-
ior Engineer '12-13; Kelvin Engi-
neering Society.
"His cogitative faculties im-
mersed in cogiliundity of cogita-
tion."


JOHN CARY PRICE
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Warrenton, N. C.
"Bump"
Pi Kappa Alpha; Transit Club;
Junior Engineer '12-13; Junior
Prom Committee '12-13.
"His life is gentle; and the ele-
ments are so mixed in him, that
Nature may stand up and say to all
the world, 'This is a man'."


Engineering













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FRANK MARION SWANSON
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Gainesville, Fla.
"F. M."
President Engineering College
'13-14; Vice-President Athletic As-
sociation 1913-14; Captain Com-
pany B '12-13; Varsity Basketball
'12-13-14; Varsity Gym Team '11-
12-13-14; Transit Club; F Club;
Junior Engineer '12-13.
"He that is merry of heart hath
a continual feast."


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DAVID L. WHITE
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Citra, Fla.
"Little David"
Junior Engineer '12-13; Transit
Club; Lieutenant Company C '12-
13; Hobo Association '12-13; Sec-
retary-Treasurer Engineering Col-
lege '13-14.
"Meet him, and I'm sure he will
please;
Look closely, and you will find
an ace up his sleeve."


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LOUIS EARLE TENNY
B.S. in Civil Engineering
Federal Point, Fla.
"Louie"
Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta Ribbon
Society; German Club; Transit
Club; President Junior Class '11-
12; President Transit Club '12-13;
President Combined Senior Class
'13-14; Treasurer Engineering Col-
lege '12-13; Treasurer Junior Prom
'11-12; Leader Junior Prom '12-13;
Sergeant Company A '10-11; Lieu-
tenant Company A '11-12; Chair-
man Athletic Executive Commit-
tee '11-12; Captain Varsity Base-
ball '11-12; Captain Varsity Foot-
ball '13-14; Varsity Football'09-10-
11-12-13; Varsity Baseball '10-11-
12-13; F Club.
"A lion among ladies is a most
drendlful thing."


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B.S. in Civil Engineering i; '.

DeFuniak Springs, Fla. : i ." I
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"Pete" i? -.
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater- i" i
nity; President Senior Academic .
Class; Secretary-Treasurer Tran- _--' -
sit Club; 1st Lieutenant Company --" -
C '12-13; 1st Sergeant Company C.
"Still and quiet, but deeper than .- -"
you think." ( .-
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WILLIAM HAMPTON CROM
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and
Electrical Engineering
Ocala, Fla.
"Bill"
Delta Pi Lambda Local Frater-
nity; Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fra-
ternity; President Kelvin Engineer-
ing Society '11-12; Major Battalion
'12-13; Captain Junior Football'12-
13; Sergeant Company B '11-12;
Editorial Staff Alligator '-13-14;
Varsity Football Squad '12-13;
Sophomore Football '10-11; Wood-
row WVilson Club '12; Junior Engi-
neer '12-13; Hobo Association '12-
13; Secretary-Treasurer Freshman
Class '09-10.
"Persist, persevere, and you will
find most things attainable that are
possible."


GEORGE CURTIS CROM, JR.
B.S. in Electrical Engineering
Ocala, Fla.
"Curt"
Delta Pi Lambda Local Frater-
nity; Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fra-
ternity; Assistant Mechanical Draw-
ing '12-13; President Combined
Junior Class'12-13; Captain Com-
pany A '12-13; Vice-President Kel-
vin Engineering Society '12; Mana-
ger Scrub Football '11-12; Sergeant
Company A '12; Sophomore Foot-
ball '11; Junior Football '12;
Woodrow Wilson Club; Junior
Engineering '12-13; Hobo Associa-
tion '12-13.
"And still they gazed, and still the
wonder grew,
That one small head could carry
all he (thought he) knew."


Engineering












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LEONARD WALLACE RIGGINS
B.S. in leclianical Engineering
Lakeland, Fla.
"Rig'"
Pi Kappa Alpha; Athletic Execu-
tive Committee '12-13; 1st Ser-
geant '12-13; Kelvin Engineering
Society; Varsity Baseball '1213-
14; '"F" Club; Junior Prom Com-
mittee '12-13.
"Of honest worth, truly a man
on whom we can safely depend."


R. LEE GOULDING
Bachlielor of Arts in Education
Pensacola, Fla.
"Jew"
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Frater-
nity; Yocum Literary Society '10;
Teachers' Club and Peabody Club
'10-11-12-13-14; President Peabody
Club '11-13; Critic '13-14; Farr
Literary Society '12-13; Y. M. C.
A. Cabinet '11-12-13-14; Assistant
Editor Alligator '13-14; Secretary-
Treasurer Combined Senior Classes
'14; Peabody Debating Team '14;
U. D. C. Medal '12; State Division
Children of the Confederacy
Scholarship '10 and '14.
"He scans great projects with his
eagle eye,
And hopes to span them by and
by."


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j History of the Senior Academic Class
|l As we pen this short history of the immortal class of 1914, we feel a L)
-, touch of sadness; for to many of our classmates we are, perhaps, saying
goodbye forever. Even as we write, several members of the class are mak-
ing their way across the pathless ocean to the distant Philippines, others
are preparing to leave for the far north, while a few are journeying to the '
4 sunny isles of Cuba and Jamaica.
0 Yes, there comes a touch of sadness at the thought of leaving. For four
long years we have toiled together in the class rooms, we have listened to
Dr. Crow's "line", and even in our agony we have forced an unwilling
smile to our wearied lips; together we have witnessed Dean Benton in ac-
tion, and from his nimble fingers we have imbibed a knowledge of the
power of the elements, and we have applauded to the echo Dean Vernon's
harrowing tales of his experiences in far distant Mexico.
We have formed friendships which will last forever; we have learned
to respect our many professors and to appreciate the noble work they have
done for us; and we have learned to love our "Alma Mater" with a love "as
deep as first love", and with a love which will linger thru the coming
years.
We arrived at the University of Florida in 1910, and as all freshmen do,
we easily "fell" for the "rusty" jokes, which have been "pulled off" on the
unsuspecting and innocent freshmen since Moses received his college edu-
cation in the land of Egypt. Of "bathroom tickets", and "radiator keys",
we bought our share, and to this day we wonder how we lived thru such
exciting experiences. There were at that time two buildings on the Uni-
versity campus, but today we leave behind us ten of the most beautiful and
well equipped buildings for education in the entire Southland.
The Senior Class is proud of its record. Proud of its record as a whole
class and proud of the records of its individual members. On the athletic
field we have been supreme. Our Combined Senior Class has furnished
the University with such renowned athletes as Tenny, Riggins, Shaw,
Sutton, Buie, Grace, Bullock, Miller, Swanson Bros., Taylor, and many
others too numerous to mention. "Coach" Flaherty was so well pleased
with our athletic powers, that he captured Tenny, and took him to Massa-
chusetts, there to develop him into another "Chief" Myers.
"Peace hath its victories no less than war", and our work in the class
room and on the debating floor has been as meritorious as the battles on
the athletic field. Time after time our members have borne away the lau-
rel wreaths in the declamation contests, and only a few months ago twen-
ty of our number were, for excellent scholarship, taken into the ranks of
the Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Fraternity.
But after all is said and done our record here must be judged by this
criterion, have we been broadened by college life? Can we look at both
sides of a question? And can we see the good in all our fellow men? An-
swering these questions in the affirmative, our college life shall not have
been in vain, and the labors and hardships of our four years' stay here shall
never be regretted.
The men of the class of 1914 will enter the various avenues of life, and
they go to demonstrate to the world the practical value of a college educa-
tion. May they ever conquer the forces of darkness and despair, bearing
on their shoulders the invincible "armor of righteousness", and may they
remember always that "Eternity is here and Time is over yonder".
A. G. S., '14.















.1'


History of the Senior Law Class
It is with a feeling of mingled gladness and regret that the historian
commences the last history of the class of '14 Law. While we are without
a doubt, glad to make our get-away from this great city of Gainesville, still
there must be mingled with that gladness a feeling of sadness at the thought
of leaving, forever, our beloved Alma Mater. Here, in our well-remem-
bered class rooms, we have learned to know Dean's fingers by heart; here
we have learned the fine distinctions and discrimination of Trusler, and
delved with "Dicky" and Crandall into the mysteries of the Common Law.
Here we have formed those life-long, enduring friendships and that love for
the old University that will be a common bond between us throughout life.
The Senior Law Class has, I believe, a right to be proud of its rec-
ord for the past two years. On the athletic field, we have claimed some of
the foremost upholders of the University's honor. During our junior year
we gave two out of three men to the champion debating team of the Uni-
versity. To THE SEMINOLE we gave five out of eight members of the staff,
while our representative is also found on the staff of The Alligator. Our
class took the lead in the fight to maintain the traditions of Commence-
ment Week, and in starting the tradition of a Senior Class Day, in which
the Senior Orator is also a member of the Senior Laws. Throughout the
year, our class has always been found at the front in any good cause, where-
in the welfare of our University has been in question. And we feel that,
from our class, there will be found in the future, many men whose lives
will be an honor to their Alma Mater and an inspiration to future students.
In the line of scholarship, we have set a pace that the best will have a
hard time to live up to. Nine men, our full quota, were found eligible for
Phi Kappa Phi, with two more who had the requisite grades, but could not
get in for lack of room. Hardly a man of the class has failed to maintain
the standard of the class, and it is fully expected that every man will grad-
uate, which is a record of which we may well be proud.
It would be useless to attempt to individualize this history. Each and
every man has had his part in the work of the class, in maintaining its high
standards, and to attempt to enumerate those worthy of mention would
compel me to give a full list of the class, which is impossible. Suffice it to
say that, for scholarship, for hard, earnest work for our University's credit,
for prominence in the social life of the University, our class is, we believe,
the champion class of the University, both now and of the past.
WORTHINGTON BLACKMAN, Historian.









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Li .Junior Class Officers

!1 WILLIAM E. EMBRY .... President, Combined Classes
,-"'} C. A. ROBERTSON ...------- Vice-President, Combined Classes (
:. ii J. H. SCHUMAN-----.--- Secretary-Treasurer, Combined Classes
."-)H. S. SAWYER -------. President, Junior Law Class "'r
d iPOST HALLOWES -------President, Junior Academic Class


H. L. CAPPLEMAN J. P. HALLOWVES GEO. D. HAMILTON
Engineering Engineering Engineering
Ocala, Fla. Green Cove Springs, Fla. Bartow, Fain.


R. P. TERRY
Arts and Sciences
Lakeland, Fla.


URIEL F. BLOUNT

Lakeland, Fla.


U. C. BAILEY
Engineierin.
Gainesville, Fla.





























R. L; JOYNER S. R. WVARD SAM P. HARN
Engineering Engineering Agriculture
Roberts, Ga. Brooksville, Fla. Mooresville, Ala.























N. E. HAINLIN T. U. JACKSON C. D. McDOWALL
Agriculture Agriculture \i ii :iIllii
Goulds, Fla. Lakeland, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.


4 '~





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H. L. DEWVOLF W. E. EMBRY G. B. KNOWLES
Teachdiers Teachers Teachers
Crescent City, Fla. Dade City, Fla. Greenwood, Fla.








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F. R. MASON
Teachers
Macclenny, Fla.


E. B. HELM
Arts aInd Sciences
Miami, Fla.


M. I. GLEICIHMAN
Agricultire
Largo, Fla.





































JAY L. HEARING HARRY W. PEEPLES C.A. ROBERTSON
Arts anl Sciences Arts and Sciences Arts and Sciences
Quincy, Fla. Valdosta, Ga. Tallahassee, Fla.






























T. XW. BRYANT C. A. BOYER FRANK B. CARTER, JR.
Law Lait Law
Lakeland, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. Pensacola, Fla.





































R. A. GOLDBERG J. MORGAN GROOVER PATRICK HOUSTON
Law Law Law
Madison, Fla. Lakeland, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.


HUGH HALE E. MARKLEY JOHNS
Law Law
Brooksville, Fla. Starke, Fla.


R. LEE JARRELL, A.B.
Law
Kissimmee, Fla.









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R. G. KEY A. A. LOTSPIECH
Law Law
St. Petersburg, Fla. Weaverville, N. C.


SUMTER LEITNER, A.B.
Law
Kissimmee, Fla.


VICTOR MOFFATT
Law
Miami, Fla.


B. F. MEREDITH
Lair
Ft. Myers, Fla.


R. F. MAGUIRE
Law
Ocoee, Fla.





































L. B. NEWMAN T. EARL PRICE G. E. PYLE
Law Law Law
Jacksonville, Fla. Marianna, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.






























IHI. L. RUSH B. L. SOLOMON A. B. STEVENS
Law Law Law
Gainesville, Fla. Marianna, Fla. Los Angeles, Cal.




































H. S. SAWYER, A.B. J. E. SHOEMAKER J. B. STEWART
Law Law Law
Merritt, N. C. Gainesville, Fla. Hilliard, Fla.































CLYDE G. TRAMMEL FRANK D. UPCHURCH B. C. WILSON
Law Laiw Lauw
Lakeland, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. Bartow, Fla.




























Arts and Sciences
Chipley, Fla.


T. J. POPPELL
Teachers
New River, Fla.


BASCOM BARBER R. R. WHITE, A.B.
Teachers Law
Tallahassee, Fla. Starke, Fla.


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Sophomore Class


B. K. PANCOAST, Pitman, N. J .....- President
H. N. LORD, Ft. Pierce, Fla.------- Vice-President
G. E. NELSON, Dunedin, Fla.. --- --- Secretary and Treasurer
L. L. BLACKBURN, Gainesville, Fla. Reporter
T. E. MCCALL, Jasper, Fla..-------- Sergeant-at-Arms


K


B. D. Adams, Gainesville, Fla.
B. 0. Bishop, Gainesville, Fla.
J. M. Coarsey, Tampa, Fla.
R. A. Dukes, Worthington, Fla.
M. I. Gleichman, Largo, Fla.
C. B. Grace, Evinston, Fla.
C. D. Gunn, Marianna, Fla.
J. H. Glidewell, Tampa, Fla.
F. E. Davies, St. Augustine, Fla.
H.A. Hall, Green Cove Springs,Fla.
C. I. Hollingsworth, Lakelapd, Fla.
F. L. Holland, Orlando, Fla.
J. P. Little, Gainesville, Fla.
G. R. Moseley, Gainesville, Fla.
F. E. Nolan, Lal


L. W. Metcalf, West Palm Beach, Fla.
W. McElya, Gasparilla, Fla.
A. C. Jackson, Micanopy, Fla.
A. J. Peacock, Bronson, Fla.
F. L. Prescott, Starke, Fla.
J. F. Sikes, Punta Gorda, Fla.
L. P. Spencer, Palm Beach, Fla.
I. M. Stephens, Charlotte Harbor, Fla.
P. C. Taylor, Miami, Fla.
R. K. Van Camp, Punta Gorda, Fla.
P. W. Wood, Tampa, Fla.
F. R. Weeden, Tampa, Fla.
W. D. Wilson, Westville, Fla.
W. A. Whitmire, Milton, Fla.
ke Elmo, Minnesota


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Campus Scene showing Experiment Station and University Commons


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Freshman Class


J. M. TILLMAN, Bartow, Fla....
F. L. HOLLAND, Bartow, Fla. -
D. E. WEST, Monticello, Fla.
C. M. MANN, Fernandina, Fla....
W. E. STREET, Denver, Colorado


L. R. Bracken, Lakeland, Fla.
G. W. Brown, Lawtey, Fla.
W. R. Briggs, Zephyrhills, Fla.
D. Beeler, Rock Hill, S. C.
C. J. Braymer, Bradentown, Fla.
J. Browning, Francis, Fla.
P. B. Armstrong, Terra Ceia, Fla.
C. C. Caswell, St. Petersburg, Fla.
C. E. Chillingworth,
West Palm Beach, Fla.
A. J. Cone, Gainesville, Fla.
L. Clarke, East Palatka, Fla.
R. M. Coile, Bowling Green, Fla.
L. Y. Dyrenforth, Anona, Fla.
J. R. Farrior, Chipley, Fla.
R. A. Green, New River, Fla.
G. Hart, Lakeland, Fla.
W. B. Henderson, Tampa, Fla.
W. M. Hodgson, Tampa, Fla.
A. K. Hutchinson, Palatka, Fla.
I. H. Hilton, Melrose, Fla.


- President 'I
Vice-President /
*Secretary
-. Treasurer
.. Reporter


B. T. Himes, West Palm Beach, Fla.
R. I. Jackson, Lakeland, Fla.
J. A. Johnson, St. Petersburg, Fla.
A. L. Martsolf, New Brighton, Penn.
R. G. Merrick, Baltimore, Md.
W. A. McRae Jr., Baldwin, Fla.
F. G. Meffert, Ocala, Fla.
R. G. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
E. M. Oglesby, Bartow, Fla.
E. L. Padgett, Jacksonville, Fla.
S. D. Padgett, Lake Butler, Fla.
J. B. Patterson, Chaires, Fla.
C. H. Rosenbush,
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
J. Rosenthal, Tampa, Fla.
A. W. Ramsdale, Tampa, Fla.
C. W. Sweet, Leesburg, Fla.
V. H. Salvail, Helena, Montana.
F. L. Thompson, Pensacola, Fla.
E. F. Wilson, New Smyrna, Fla.
E. M. Yon, Blountstown, Fla.


W W W








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..... _-.__ ,... ....


Studio of J. Oscar Miller


Glee Club on the Road


(86) ..




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' -=- -- -


Twelfth Grade


J. R. HILL, Coleman, Fla.
P. R. MCMULLEN, Largo,
I. MCALPIN, Mayo, Fla..
F. S. Battle, Jr., Sorrento, Fla.
C. S. Brannon, Ocoee, Fla.
E. W. Freeman, Starke, Fla.
G. M. Glazier, Oneco, Fla.
J. R. Hill, Coleman, Fla.
C. L. Johnson, Coleman, Fla.
R. E. Lee, Gainesville, Fla.
N. K. Levis, St. Petersburg, Fla.
C. C. Liddon, Marianna, Fla.
I. L. Register,


------ President
Fla. Vice-President
.-... Secretary- Treasurer
C. W. Long, Mayo, Fla.
P. R. Lowe, Anona, Fla.
F. B. Marshburn, Bronson, Fla.
I. McAlpin, Mayo, Fla.
G. A. Stillson, St. Petersburg, Fla.
E. M. Willis, Williston, Fla.
H. E. Wood, Evinston, Fla.
J. S. Wyckoff, Jr., Citra, Fla.
H. F. Zetrouer, Rochelle, Fla.
Plant City, Fla.


W W W































Eleventh Grade
ROLL
L. R. FRISBEE, Middleburg, Fla...... ... President
R. D. GRAHAM, Piedmont, W. Va......... -----Vice-President
W. H. JORDAN, Jacksonville, Fla .....-... Secretary-Treasurer
A. M. HODGSON, Eau Gallie, Fla..-- ..Reporter
L. A. GRAY, Hinson, Fla..--------...--.. Critic
C. S. Bean, Bronson, Fla. V. E. Lowe, Anona, Fla.
W. J. Carlton, Kings Ferry, Fla. W. H. Lynch, Gainesville, Fla.
G. C. Clyatt, Micanopy, Fla. H. G. Means, Fort White, Fla.
W. S. Duncan, Tavares, Fla. F. G. Merrin, Plant City, Fla.
E. C. Futch, Dade City, Fla. W. McElya, Gainesville, Fla.
G. R. Graham, Fort White, Fla. A. P. McIntosh, Brooksville, Fla.
S. H. Dicran, Gainesville, Fla. D. Pedrick, Gainesville, Fla.
B. B. Johnson, Cocoa, Fla. H. G. Redstone, Eau Gallie, Fla.
K. K. Knight, Dupont, Fla. R. Stountamire, Tallahassee, Fla.
B. E. Lee, St. Augustine, Fla. J. K. Surrency, Bowling Green, Fla.
A. H. Lockey, Esto, Fla. W. H. Toomer, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
G. F. Turner, Gaiter, Fla.











,-The Florida Alligator \



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LORIDA',' ,"'
1 The loria Ali'at rlll


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The Florida Alligator
STAFF
SUMTER LEITNER ..- ----------. Managing Editor
R. LEE GOULDING -------------- -Assistant Editor
WORTHINGTON BLACKMAN ------- -Athletic Editor
W. H. CROM ------------------Society Editor
G. B. KNOWLES .------..-----------. Local Editor
U. BLOUNT- ..-----.....----.--------.--Business Ahiilg1v'r
H. L. DEWOLF -------------- ---Circulation Manager

THE closing sentence in The Alligator write-up for THE SEMINOLE for
1913 was: "May The Alligator be ever typical of old Florida". In this,
the second year of its existence, the wish expressed therein has been
granted.
Progressiveness is typical of Florida, both the State and the Univer-
sity. Likewise progressiveness is typical of The Alligator. It has been
made larger than The Alligator of the first year, its circulation has been
increased, and it has already become one of the recognized best college
weeklies published by so limited a student body.
It has taken a decided stand for clean athletics, and for an uplift of stu-
dent morals. Has it succeeded? That must be left to the judgment of the
many readers of The Alligator over the state at large.
Its aim has been to present to the world the condition of affairs on the
campus and thus to leave a history of the daily growth of the University in
this year of unequaled prosperity and development along every line in the
University of Florida.
The editors reiterate the statement of their predecessors, "NiMay The
Alligator be ever typical of old Florida", and add to this, their hope, that
Florida will ever be that which stands for the highest intellectually,
morally and physically. May she assume her proper place in the activities
of the state and prove a source of never ending benefit, enlightenment and
advancement, to all the citizens of this beautiful Land of Flowers and to
our entire Southland.
May The Alligator, as her spokesman, give out to the world the high
ideals and exalted aims of this hardy Baby University of the United States.














.4, -L, He comes to h
wr ___ <_
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oHe answer

'^y He licks and f,
j And to str
The neighbors
And they
And when I'm
They miss h


yet's Trade!
I.
reel right friendly.
rs to his name.
awns his master,
angers he's the same.
Essay they love him,
feed him scraps and such.
Gone in summer,
im just as much.


If anybody wants to buy a dog,
I ask you, come to me.
For any dog that is everybody's dog
Is not the dog for me.
II.
She's always doing favors,
She's never cross, nor shirks.
She's always sweet and sinless,
And her smile-it always works.
The neighbors say they love her,
And they come to borrow aid,
And she waits on them unceasing-
She's as generous as they're made.
If anybody wants to swap a girl,
I ask you, come to me.
For any girl that is everybody's girl,
Is not the girl for me.
-G. P. G., '13.