The Seminole

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Title:
The Seminole
Physical Description:
63 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of Florida
Publisher:
Senior Class of the University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
annual
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
College yearbooks   ( lcsh )
College yearbooks   ( fast )
Students   ( fast )
Genre:
Yearbooks   ( fast )
Yearbooks.   ( fast )
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. no.1 (1910) - v. 63 (1973).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01389460
lccn - sc 84005031
ocm01389460
System ID:
AA00022765:00002

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tower (Gainesville, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Foreword
        Page 5
    The Seminole staff
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Dedication
        Page 8
        Page 9
    A vision
        Page 10
    Faculty
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Post grads
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Senior
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Junior
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Sophomore
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Freshman
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Sub-freshman
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Organizations
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    Agricultural experiment station
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Athletics
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Military
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Selected
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Acknowledgement
        Page 185
    Advertising
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Back Matter
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Back Cover
        Page 213
        Page 214
Full Text








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
-- ----------- -




THE SEMINOLE

VOLUME 2
.......... .. ...





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THE YEAR BOOK OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
ISSUED BY THE GRADUATING CLASS, 1911.








4 THE SEMINOLE









FLORIDA


1 long for thee, 0 Florida; Thy sunnyl banks, thy shady leas, Thy plumned, nodding, waving pines, And palms that beckon in the breeze.


I long for thee thru day; and night Brings visions of thy cheerful landAnd suddenly I feel the touch Of thy far reaching, gentle hand.


And only He, who reads the heart, And scans its every tear stained line, Can judge the strength that is required To shun the handclasp that would bind.


But when this dreary exile's o'er I'll turn my soul to thy embrace, And lift my lips up to thy lips, For greetings from thy cheerful face.


Then, On thy Altar, 0 my State!
Will I place all-my life-my best; And when life's services are done, Grant me within thy bosomn rest.
AV. IIL S.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA













FOREWARD

N olden times, at the corning of the white man in search for the Fountain of Youth, the Land of Flowers was inhabited by the Seminole, who in a spirit of friendship came to welcome the stranger to his shores, and to guide him in a new land.
And so dear reader, in order that you may better understand the deep feeling of love and fellowship which has ever animated our college life, and which to us has been a true Fountain of Youth, we, from the odds and ends of the four happiest years of our lives, the memories of which will ever linger and make us better and nobler, send you for a guide the SE~MINOLE.










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fj mo









UNIVERSITY OF FLORI)A 7



THE SEMINOLE STAFF

Ei)ITOR-IN-CHIEF
Benard G. Langston ..... .. ....... Chiplev, Florida

ASSISTANT EI)ITOR-IN-CHIEF
Phil. S. May ....... ............. Quincy, Florida

BUSINESS MANAGER
Robert G. Johnston .... ........... Kissimmee, Florida

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER
Christopher Matheson .... ........ Gainesville, Florida

A RT ED ITO R
Douglas S. Perry. .... ............ Gainesville, Florida

LITERARY EDITORS
R. M. Sealey. ...... ............. live Oak, Florida
H. A. Ferrell ... .... ........... Monticello, Florida
R. B. Huffaker....... ............. Bartow, Florida

ATHLETIC EDITOR
J. P. Hunter ....... ............. Largo, Florida

LOCAL EDITOR
E. E. Macy ...... ............. Eau Gallie, Florida

SENIOR CLASS EI)1TORS
0. W. Drane ...... ............. Lakeland, Florida
W. H. Surrency ." .... .......... Live Oak, Florida
H. A. Ferrell, class poet ... .......... Monticello, Florida

EDITOR R CLASSES
Joseph W. Shands .... ............ Gainesville, Florida

EDITOR STUDEN'r ORGANIZATION
Fred. J. Frei .-. . .. ......... ...Archer, Florida








IHE SEMINOLE


















DEDICATION

S a slight mark of their appreciation of the
courtesy, kindness, and never failing patii ence of Dr. and Mother Farr, the class of
4 1911 respectfully dedicate this volume to
Miss Anita Eugenia Farr, whose little life came into this world at the inception of this volume.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA




















WiLk*AIA












MISS ANrm









10 TH E. SEM I NOLE











A VISION


On an evening late in summer, As I strolled along the strand, Listening to the gentle murmtur Of the waves upon the sand.


Suddenly I saw a vision Conjured up by magic spell; For before me on the shingle Lay a purple tinted shell.


One whose kindred, in the ages That have vanished in the gleam, Wrote their histories on the pages Of Dame Terra's rock bound tome.


As I thumbed the mammoth pages, With my mind's eye, I could see Open there for my inspection Truths of earth and air and sea.
E. IL MACY









UNIVERSITY OF FLORI DA

















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jacvlt













12 TIHE SEMINOLE


































ALBERT A. MLTRPHIREE, A. M.. LL. 1)D.
President of the University.




































JAS. M. FAiRR, A. M., Ph. D. Vice-President of the University, and Professor of English.













UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 13





































JAS. N. ANDERSON, M. A., Ph. D.
Dean of the college of Arts and Sciences, and Professor of
Ancient Languages.




































J. It. IIENTON., NI. A., Phl. 1).
Dean of the college of Engineering, and Professor of
I'hysics and E'lectrical Engineering.













14 T HE SEM INOLE






































IDvai of t I ic colIlege o f A gri ciit iure. and (11'rofessor of A gri c fture.







































A1,131-ItT J. F ARRAH!, A. If.. LL. D. Dean or thc (Ollege of Law, and Professor of Lawv.














UN I ERS'I' it ~yoF F'Lo itI D)A 1





































I IWAI I It. FINT NI I. h
In rfsor off1 ei Is ry







































ENO( I M1iXARVIN BANK. As. l. 1).
professor of II istory and Ituonoin les.














16 THE SEMINOLE



































II. S. LAVIS, Ph. 1). Professor of Zoology and Geology.






































II. G. KIEPPIEL, A. B., Ph. 1).
Professor of Mathematics.














UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 17





































.J01IN A'. I IA( IK-TON, I'l. 1).
Professor of Philosophy and Edoication.








































Professor 01 Mlodern Languages.













18 TIHE SEMI NOLE


































Professor of Methanical Engineering.



































AV. L. FLOIYD, m. S.
Professor of Biology.













UNIVERSITY, OF FLORIDA 19




































(1. 11. LYNCHI, A. B.
P'rofe~ssor of SeUcondary Education.







































Acting Professor orf civil Engineering.













20 THE SEMINOLE



































IARRIY I. TI HISLII, LL. 13.
Professor of Law.




































MAJOR I'. S. WALKIER, U. S. A., Retired. Commandant of Cadets: Professor of Military Science: Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering.














UjNIV ERS IT\ OF FLO II D A 21




































W~.ILLIAM KINMILIA.I, Ph. B.,.I. 1).
Assitant P'rofessor of Law.







































WITI. 1). NmAr~l. It. S.
Professor of \iiual Hlusbandry.














22 'rHE SEMINOLE






































Iiirtriietorof'%I*.Itllelll',Ities-,tiidllistorv: Librarian.







































W. S. PERRY., 13. A.
I instructor in Physics and Electrical F'ngincering.














UNIVERSITY' OF FLOI DA 23
































E. ML. IINCK N ICY, 1B. S.
I nstructor in Agronomy.













































(4. E. P'ILE.
Atblettlc D director.














24 TIH E SEMINOLF







































Auditor and Bookkeeper. AIRS. S. .1. SWANSON.
MIatron.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 25














sw


































- --- -- ----











26 T H E SE I N 0 E




























0. F. 131'L{(ER, A. It., University of Indiana. 110Y ItI I]i,. A. II., Uiiivcrsity oif Florida.













UNIVERSITY OF- F'LORIDA 27




































17. C( LO)FT'IN, 11. S., North C arol ina A. andi M. RI. P. B'RI~X1. A. it. ValparaIs4) Uiversity.










28 THE SEMINOLE







































F. Tr. WI LSUN. It. S., U'niversity' of Florida.









UNIVERSITY OF Fj.oRi DA 29









30 THE SEMINOLE















A BOQUET

Only a purple dahlia, Old and faded, and dry, Bound with a sprig of cedar Whose colors can never die.

She gave it to me in silence, And I little thought she kenned The secret message it bore me In a language never penned.

It said, "I am thine forever" And "I live alone for thee," But soon Oh joy! I found that it Had all been meant for me.
E. K. ACY









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 31


DUGAL M. BuIE, Jonesboro, Florida.
"DOOG"
LL. B. Course; John Marshall Ileb-ating Society; (aptain Second Foot Ball Team ; Coach Varsity Ise Ball 'vni 'I1I ; Wearer of* "'N. C '' Wearer (if'' 1) This introduces to you one l)oog"a typical Tarheel of woolen texture measuring anywhere from a yard to a yard and a half wide. His weakness is Foot Ball andi Base Ball, wherein he displays a deal of strength. From Davidson on down he is hailed as I diamond dancer and a conjurer of the hidebound sphere. Being possessed of a romantic turn of mind and an appetite for watermelons, he migrated Southward not long since, and located at Jonesboro; but not before he had cultivated the very desirable acquaintance Of Madam de .ex, through one years' residence at Chapel Hill. His idle hours are spent in a rehearsal of the assassination of Ceasar. The Personae of this little act are Ceasar'Shipman's Common Law Pleading, "Brutus," and "Doog" with a large butcher knife.



SNYDERI LARKIN CA RTER, Gainesville, Florida.
"JUDGE"
1,I,. B Course ; .Johin marshall Debating Society.
Neither a seeker nor a recipient for office; neither taciturn nor verbose; neither headstrong nor sullen-the "Judge" is just the "Judge," so help him up. He has an I don't care a hang" expression about him which is well adapted to decieve the uninitiated; but the "Judge" is there with all the odds in his favor. His motto is "Stand up for your rights by heck," or words to that effect; and those who sit down on the "Judge's" rights thinking that he is a lily will recoil with surprise and sorrow on discovering that (for the time being) he is a cactus.









32 THE SEMINOLE


WILLIAM E. CHRISTIAN, MacIntosh, Florida.
"LORD"
P. K. A.; 11. S. Course in Chemistry; German Club; Dixie Literary Society; 2d1 Lieut. Co. 13," 1910.
And Lo! after many days and many nights, it came to pass that a young Christian did journey on his ass to the University of Florida, during the third year of the reign of A. Sledd, saying "I have come unto you to taste of the tree of knowledge." A. Sledd answered him saying: "Awake thou
wicked and slouthful Christian, the feast has been ready these many days, partake of the fruits of wisdom." The Christian did eat of the fruit and went his way rejoicing. Christian is a quiet retiring sort of a fellow, but to those who know him, he is
the best kind of a friend, Yea Verily.



A. S. CREWS, Starke, Florida.
"BLACKSTONE"
l,I.. ('ourse ; John Mar.hall Debating Society.
Another donation from Bradford County. Portly, rotund, and truely
Falstaffian, he would have been warmly welcomed by Julius Ceasar; but
notwithstanding the age which he adorns, he is none the less a favorite with his contemporaries. Like others of our number, he once regulated the flow of the Piersian Spring, but tiring of his duties there, he is now here,
slaking his thirst at the fount of Law. Ever,
hear him laugh? My Lord and Ladies, he has a gurgle that takes the boodle. His
chuckle is contagious in its corporeal manifestations. It has a vibratory quality which makes the epidermis loosen up and get
there on both feet. Tradition is to the effect that it was largely through the instrumentality of "Blackstone's" gleesome gobble that the
walls of Jericho were shaken down.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 33


OBIE CROCKER, Lake Butler, Florida.
"OBIE"
LL B. Course; Pres. Senior Law Class '10-'11; John Marshall I Debating Society.
Proud of his native town, Lake Butler, and he avers that it will some clay be proud of him. Who can tell? The clay of miracles
has not yet passed. Obie served in the U. S. army a short time not many years ago, anl while there he learned the mess-call so perfectly that he has never missed a meal since he came to the University. He has few bad habits. He never uses any tobacco of his own. He says that when he begins the practice of law he is afraid that his gentle, unobstrusive, and lamb-like ways and disposition will interfere with his success as a lawyer.










OSSIAN WRIGHT DRANE, Lakeland, Florida.
B. S. Course in E. E.; Elec. and Mech. Eng. Club; Tennis (1111); (hrinan Club ; Captain Co. "A 1909; Eng. Editor Pennant '10-'1; Senior Class Editor Seminole 1911 ; Pres. Senior (lass '11.
That he is our class President shows how much we think of him. He is seldom seen out of his room, and from this you may infer that he "bones" quite a lot. He has a way of keeping his mouth shut which causes others to think him wise. Likes a good joke any time and has a good opinion of us all probably because he does not know us well.









34 THE SEMINOLE


CLARENCE CRAIG EI'IPEIRSON, L. L. D., Williston, Florida.
"EPP."
S. A. E.; II. H. (oure; President of the Junior Law Class '10o; John Maurhall Debating Society 'll ; P'resident Athletic Association '10-'ll ; LL. B. Mercer ( ollge.
Come read me this riddle."' We herewith present you with the only genuine Sphinx in esse-note him carefully, for the like of him will never more be seen. He has the
craft of a Ulysses and the tactics of a Fabius. With an immoble and inscrutable countenance hlie corners the market on motives and keeps you eternally in the dark. Behold him. Do you think that you think what he thinks? Impassive hlie is like the Indian. But all who say, say this: "he is a good fellow, companionable, generous "--the boys like him, trust him, believe in
him, and call him Epp." Nuf Ced."





H. A iw cmi FEiRuiis.t, Apalachicola, Florida.
"ARCH"
I1,,. 1. coursese; Associate Editor Pennant 'I ; John
Marshall 1)ebating Society; Iuterary Elditor Seminole
'11 : Class Poet'11.
An Alabamian by birth-a Floridian by
adoption- a professor by choice-an unreconstructed rebel in particular-and a hotchpotch of tenimperaments in general. Rather an indefinite statement that; but the fact of the business is, that Arch reached here only a short time before hlie left, and consequently to particularize under the circumstances is a little difficult. He is versatile, entertaining, a writer of good prose and equally good verse.
Fiery tempered, perhaps hlie is, but at the same
time open and above board.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 35


FREDERICK J. FREtI, Archer, Florida.
"FRITZ" "HONK" B13. S. Course in ('. E.; Y. 31. C. A. Delegate to Southern Student ('onferene '8O; Vice-President Y. 3M. (C'. A., '0S-'09; Editr Y. 31. C. A. landhook, '10; Editor University calendar 'II; Vice-President Senior (la.s, '10-' 11 ; IPresident lhe. and Mech. ('lub, '11 ; Major Hatallion of ('adets, '10.
Fritz looks after his own affairs and
dosen't say much. Somebody has said that he is the best boy in school, and up to the present time of writing it has been impossible to find evidence to refute the assertion. Nobody was ever known to speak unkindly of Fritz, yet he is one of the best known fellows here.






FLOYD GREEN, New River, Florida,
"GREEN"
LL. B. Course; John Marshall Debating Soeiety.
Green is still green. He is the originator and patentee of the phrase "Now the way it seems to me, professor"-and then the way it seems to him is something wonderful to hear. Doubtless it will never seem to any one else in exactly that way again. Green is a strong believer in ancient maxims, and his favorite one is "Damnium absque injuria" which
when freely translated means, Let him be
eternally damned who gets a recitation out of me." His resources are fertile. Green is a wholesome good fellow, is popular with the Faculty and the students. After graduation he will retire to the sylvan shades of New River where he will tell his clients how it seems to him when it comes to collecting debts.









36 THE SEMINOLE


WALTER B. HILTON, Gainesville, Florida. A. 11. course e in Education; President Y. -I. C A. '09-'10 and '10-11 ; President Press (Club '09-10 ; Treasurer Senior (!asses ; Teachers' Club; 'Maso nic Clul.
WNe are extremely anguished by being unable to print the photograph herewith in
natural colors. Inability to do so accounts for the absence of that roseate hue which would otherwise eminate from the likeness of this our Quaker friend, ex-inhabitant of the City of Brotherly Love. He has tried to deceive us, but from our association with him in the Mess Hall, we well know that his greatest ambition is to be appointed minister plenipotentiary to the Sandwich Islands. Hilton's quiet kindness, his earnestness in Y. M. C. A. work, and his untiring efforts for all the better things in college life has made all of us his friends. Hilton has done his part to "round us out to completeness."










G. LISLuE HowARxD, Madison, Florida.
"BROMOS"
B. S. (Course ; Yt em Literary Soviety; Teachers' Club;
Track Team '09-11; Varsitv Squad '10.
Bromos always looks as if his next act
will be to fall to pieces, hut he has not yet ever been known, however, to seem to be going to pieces in his work; for he is one of the brainest men in our class. Always "shoots" Dr. Keppel with the greatest ease, which is a matter of constant wonder to some of the rest of us.
Rooms with "Big Bake" this year, but we
hope for the best.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 37


ROBERT BASSET HcwFA :R, Bartow, Florida.
'" FAKER"
LL. B. Course; Literary Editor Scmiiole, '11 ; John Marshall Debating Societvy; graudmlte Pe toly (College, '02; Principal Suninierlin Institute, '05-'10; Instructor Sin English a lnd Aigelbra University v of Florida, '10-1 I.
Be not deceived; this is not the dome of the capitol building in a false face. This is only Rubifoam Bruce de-Huffaker, the Tennessean intellectual Conoid. Having oftentimes forced a passage through his native mountains, the Alps of Law are to him but molehills. He Alexanderates their Hindukushity, Hannibalizes their Alpinicity, and otherwise dwindles them down to pigmean proportions. (To get the full measure of the foregoing sentence it should be read backwards.) He is a hard student and has the habit of fondling his cerebrum with studying. On these occasions you may hear him mutter softly unto himself, "Oh brow of brows, by thy cold sweat I am browsing."




JAMEs P. HUNTER, Largo, Florida.
"LONG JIM"
P. K. A.; B11. S. Course in C. E.; Vice-Pres Transit ('Clu), '1 ; Captain Varsity Base-hall team, '07-'08 anid '09-10; Athletic Editor Seminole, 'I I; First Lient. (Omilpany A, '10; Y. 21. C. A.
Yes, looks are deceiving. You would think that "I Long Jim" was the laziest man in the class, but records on the gridiron, on the base ball diamond, and better than all in classroom, show that Hunter is either very lucky or wide awake, perhaps both. Long Jim'" is the easiest, happiest fellow in the class, is ever ready for a rough house, and is an adapt at all forms of the ratting art. If it were not for his longitude, he would be called "Sunny Jim."'










38 THE SEMINOLE



ROBER' G. JOHNSON, Kissimmee, Florida.
"PAT"
LL. B. ('nurse; Manager Vanrity Foot Ball Team '10; Varsity Foot Ball Team '09; John 3Marshall Debating Society; Tennis (lub; Deating Team J. 31. 1). S. '10; Business Manager "Seminole," '11 ; Y. 31. ('. A.
This is Pat. He hails from the land of Kissimmee, where cows graze upon a thousand hills. The quiet, peaceful look you see upon the face of Pat is due to his having imbibed considerable of the serenity and peacefulness of the cows among whom he was reared. Pat's chief purpose in the Law School has been to point out the errors of the famous law writers, many of whom have received the benefit of his kindly and helpful criticism. He has.also performed inestimable services for the Faculty by the correction of immature and unsafe legal principles enunciated by them. To Pat, above all others, is
due the success of the Seminole.








Ruvus LEvi KING, Columbia, Alabama.
"QUEEN"
I. ('mirse in A griculttiture; entered from Alabama IP'ol vytechnic Institute 1910; Agricultural club; Y. 31. (.
A ; South Alhabina Assiiation.
Behold his majesty. Long live the King.
Gaze upon his countenance and view the face that sways empires. This quiet, unassuming fellow in no way looks to be a ruler, yet he is a King, descended from Kings -look at his name. He ruled at Alabama Tech. for a year or so, and then came to the U. of F., where his word is now law. His reign has been quite
peaceful and happy.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 39


BERNARD) GAINER LANGSTON, Chipley, Fla.
BEAUTYT"
A. 1. Cor-e; Athletic Editor Penmnnt," '08-'09' Associate EdIitor Pennant, '09-'10; Editor-in-chief i'ennant '10-'11 ; Winner gold luedal offered by the ('hildh 'l Af ('on ederaeyv, 1909; President Yocmn Iiterarvy smciet v. '10; (Captain ('Co. "B." '10; Vice-pres.ident Athletic Association, 10-' 11 ; Tennis Team ; V rsity siie Ball Team, '07-'08 ; '0s-'09 ; '0) '10 ; Editor-in-chief The Seminole, '11
If you don't believe his pet name was fairly acquired look at his picture again. One of the most popular men in college, and then some. Deserves to be popular for everybody likes him, even the lawyers. He will go out of his way to do you a favor, and in consequence has honors upon him as his record shows. He has a wonderful knack for turning off loads of work without any apparent bother, but he always has time to mix and is a good mixer."



EDwIN Eius MACY, M. D., Eau Gallie, Florida. A. B1. ('Curse in Eiducation ; Graduate Iliahnalmimn lMedical collegee 1885; (;raduate Indilana State Normal 1894 ; President Lhuntington Nrmal School ; 'Te'acher f I'hycolog*y and Philosophy, Jlohnson's Bible College; Brevard High Schol. 1902; Eu Iuli I ligh Sclmol, '06-'07; ('ica High School, '08-'10; Vice-Pres. Yo(nm Liter.ry i oty, 0-'l I Tuachers' ('lu) ; Masonic ('lu); Seminole Staff, 1911.
To know himn is but to love him."
A true loyal student of the old school," who by his quiet unassuming ways has won the hearts of the whole class in the year that he has been with us. I)r. Macy seldom ever
talks, but when he speaks, you hear something worth while. He is endowed with much
good common sense and a huge fund (of humor. When you see his eyes sparkle get ready to laugh. He has been a true friend to all, and his presence with us younger boys has proven a blessing. Dr. Macy has been a tower of strength in helping to make the Seminole what it is.









40 THE SEMINOLE


PHILIP STOCKTON MAY, Quincy, Florida.
"PHIL."
A. T. 0.; A. B. Course; Pennant Staff, '09-'10; winner 1Historical Medal State U. 1). C. 1909; President Yocumn Litrar Sciey '0;President (Comm~encement Ball; President Tennis Club '10-'11; Asst. Editor-in-chief Seminole '11; First Lieut. and Battalion Adjt., '10; German Club; Treasurer Bryan.
This is the young man from the Tobacco county, who by his skill has done so much to make history for the class of '11. May jumped into prominence in 1909 by winning the U. D. C. medal over the other colleges of the state and has remanied there ever since. He is ever ready to enter into an argumenton any subject, at any place, or on any sideand usually comes out ahead" On the whole Phil. is a fine, all around good companion, full of grit and is sure to make good when he goes out in the
world.






CHARLEs HENRY OVERMAN, Pensacola, Florida.
"HECK"
B. S. Course in C. E.; Transit Club; Yocum Literary
No. 54 Society ; Vice-President Press Club, '10; Secretary' and Treasurer Transit Clu) '10-'l ; honorable
mention Buckman Engineering Medal '10.
'This is King Heck from the Deep Water
City, who in his first year made high grades, and in the remaining ones made friends.
Heck" is an easy-go-lucky fellow and never
lets his studies interfere with his college work, yet he continually makes high grades. It is thought that he has his professors fooled. But reports of the envious to the contrary, etc.
In Heck," if you seek, you will find a true
and loyal friend.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 41


DOUGLASS S. PERRY, Gainesville, Florida.
"DOUG"
B. S. Course in C. E.; Athletic A.ss(o.iatioii ; Tennis ('lb; Art Editor Seminole; First Lieut. and Battalion Q. M.; President Trai Clb 1-'I Y. .(.'. A.
This is not he who explored the drear frozen fields, and drove the Great Bear over the ice covered regions, and climbed on the topmost part of the North pole, but our own real, living Perry, who by his skillful drawings, has done so much to make the Seminole what it is. He has put so much life into some of his sketches until they have wept and spoiled the drawings. Perry is a hard conscientious worker and a true friend. He says little but means what he says.





CHARLES 0. RIVERS, B. S., Lake City, Florida.
"CHARLEY"
LL. B. Course; John Marshall l)ebating Society; President Senior Classes, '10-' I i; Debating Team J. M. 1). S., '10; Asst. Chief Clerk House of Representatives State of Florida; President Alumni Association; MAlminic Club.
Charley is the politician of the class. He is suave, polite, agreeable, pleasant, smooth, polished, obliging, careful, genial, even tenpered, kindly, sympathetic, friendly, joyful, lively-and he is heartily for any man or measure, when it is for his interest to support said man or measure. It is thought by some of Charley's classmates that the faculty have graded him more on his kindness and geniality of disposition than upon his knowledge of law. But we do not give this suspicion full credit; for it may be due to the envy of the less successful.









42 THE SEMINOLE





A. M. ROLAND, Morriston, Florida. LL. B. Course John Marshall Debatingr Society.
Has a monopoly on lanwidge." He
is never happy unless he is doing all the talking. He has the perfect art of concealing thought by a flood of words. Roland is a humantalking machine, and like Tennyson's Book, when once started, he runs on forever. Looks like a preacher, talks like a preacher, but does'nt act like one.







RomERO M. SEA LEY, Live Oak, Florida.
ROMEO"
A. T. 0., A. H. (Course in Education; Y. M. (C. A. Cabinet '09-'11; Yocum i Literary Society;
President Agricultural (Club, '0!0-'10; Vice-President Press Club, '0oi-'10; President Teachers' Clubi '0)-'10 and '10 -'11 ; Secretary and Treasurer Tennis ('Club, '10-'i ; Secretary and Treasurer Senior Classes, '10-11; Secretary Senior Class, '10-'l ; Literary Editor P ennant '10-'il ; Literary Editor Seinole, 'll; Winner of the State U. D. (C. Medal, i10 ;Entered
froni the 'University of North Carolina, [1)00.

A quiet unobtrusive chap, who by his
manly bearings, has won more friends than any boy in school. Sealey is a hard, earnest student, who has nearly ruined his college course by studying. Among his many accomplishments he knows how to have a good time, and often does. Romeo jumped into prominence in 1910 by winning the State
U. D. C. Medal, and has stayed there by rooming with Pat. He has proven that environment counts for nothing, since he is the same old Sealey. The University will never turn out a more loyal student and gentlemanly
fellow than Sealey.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 43


JOSEPH W. SHANDS, Gainesville, Florida.
"JOSIE"
K. A.; A. B. Course; Pennant Staff '07-'11 ; L'vut. ('Co. "B" 1910; Vice-pres. Coummencement Ball '10; (hr

Behold the laziest man in the class, the prince of idlers! Josie, in spite of his deep aversion to all kinds of work, has stood high in all his classes, though he spends on them the least possible time. He is one of those unfortunates, who ever look on the bright side of life, and thus loses many good chances of complaining. He believes that you can get more out of college by passing without studying than by working hard. Needless to say, he has given his theory a fair trial. When you want to listen to good stories, look for Josie.









IRA E. SOAR, Dade City, Florida.
"FUNGI"
B. S. ('Course in Agriculture; Press (Club; Agricultural Club ; Yommn Literary' Sohiety ; Y. 3_1. C. A.; Pennant Staff 10-'ll ; Vice-pres. Prohibition Club. Here is the only true living, feeling, kicking, breathing, whooping, howling, hooting, harping, shrieking, wailing, yelling, screaming graphophone on record. When once wound up nothing on earth can stop him. After talking all day, he talks in his sleep. Soar likes to talk better than to eat, and is proficient in both. Never will a more earnest student enter the University, nor one who can speak more words to the square meal.









44 THE SEMINOLE


CYRUs Q. STEWART, A. B., Monroe, N. C. LL. B. Course; John Marshall Dehating Society ; Tennis ('Club; A. B. Trinity College.
"Old Northcalina," what more could one say of any man? "Old Northcalina" is a "Tarheel" whose love for his native heath is like unto that of a fat piglet for fresh buttermilk. This proud descendant of a proud state is noted for his spirit of independence. Shades of King's Mountains! Old Hickory! and Duke's Mixture! has he ever been "ratted?" Well, not to any great extent, that is, not by anyone who has ever lived after the commission of said sacriligious deed to tell the tale.















WINDER H. SURRENcy, Live Oak, Florida.
"WINE"
IL. H. Coi rse; John has ll "1 eatingg Society; Seminole Staff.
In his veins flows the blood of the Auld
Country and of Robert Burns' land, wherefore Wine" is a poet. Much planning of means to extract passes out of the professors has impaired the covering of his roof. But
Kix and Harry" think him a prodigy.
He is timid, shy, modest, and talks only when
absolutely necessary.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIA)A 45




DONALD FRASER THOMAs, Gainesville, Fla.
"MUTT"
B. S. ('one in C. E.; Transit (lub.
Save the pieces, here comes Thormas, the happiest, truest, jolliest fellow in the class. Always ready for a tussle, and never happier than when in one. He has been known to cut classes rather than to stop tussling. "Mutt" is the most scientific cusser in school-not a mean cusser, but an elevating one. Beyond his fun and mischief you will find a true man.









LEONIDAS ELIJAH WADE, Jacksonville, Florida.
"HAPPY"
LL. B. Course ;John Marshall Debating Societ y.
Pause, kind reader, and for a second let your eyes wander upward to the smile that adorns this page. There now, once more; good. This is Happy-but not he of the Sunday Times. This is Wade-but not
within the inscription on Belshazzar's palace hall. No; this is plain Leonidas Happy Wade, or Happy Leonidas Wade, at your service. Here is a man who will go out of his way to do you a kindness. As a law student he makes good, and he has that degree of perseverance that means a making. You
cannot discourage him. His friends agree that Happy, indeed should be, he who is happy.









46 THE SEMINOLE









TO AN ABSENT LOVER

I sit by my window at evening With yearning and love in my heart. ) say! will you come to me darling, And that we shall never more part?


Will you not come to me, sweetheart? Come to me now at my call. My heart is gone out in my pleading; Will you not come at my call?


0! the days are so long, love, without you! The nights all seem starless and drear; And I dream night and day you are coming.
I long to wake with you here.


To feel your arms around my neck twining, Your breath coming warm on my face, With lip pressed to lip, our love sealing, In a fond and loving embrace.


Will you not come to me, sweetheart? Come to me now at my call. My heart is gone out in my pleading. Will you not come at my call?
1;. E. MACY.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORII)A 47


HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1911.

HN the fall of 1907 there assembled at the University of
Florida a group of young men who formed the nucleus of that noble body who will go down to posterity as the class of 1911. These young men, desirous of an education, foreseeing the greatness of the institution, even though it was in its third year of growth, in casting around for a suitable university or college, decided that, considering all things, they desired to attach to their names a degree given by the University of Florida, above all others.
Other brilliant young men seeing the greatness of the institution and more especially attracted by the brilliance and intellect of these young men who first took advantage of these great opportunities, after showing their vorth and eligibility have affiliated with this noble class from time to time. In Nineteen Hundred and Nine the Board of Control taking note of this splendid aggregation, who were then in their junior year, decided that to make the body complete and to add lustre to its fame it was necessary to make such addition to the faculties of the University as to enable other prominent young men of the State who did not desire or were not in need of the branches of instruction then offered, and added to the University a College of Law. Then there were immediately added those to our ranks who rounded us to completeness. Never in the history of the University has there been such a splendid group, glorying in untried manhood, knowing now that with such training it would be impossible not to achieve.
We have labored from Freshmen to Senior or have joined on the way. Many have been our trials, many our troubles, but through all there has been a note of happiness, sometimes subdued but in the main ringing strong and clear. We have striven for what we believe to be the right, conscientiously and long. We have attended to what we regard our duty, not dwarfing our social nature by strict application to study, but in trying to get the most out of college life, both by way of books and class-room instruction, and by studying human nature on the campus, forming associations and friendship which we trust will defy wear for all time. We have









48 THE SEMINOLE


striven to uphold the dignity of our school, throwing no discredit on any of its institutions. We may at times have tried the patience of our teachers, but never maliciously. In all of the mischief of our earlier and even later (lays of college life, nothing has been more in evidence than the spirit of fun. Here, nowv in our senior and last year at college, we look back with a feeling of happiness, that greatest form of happiness in life, the consciousness of having done a good work well. Still a note of sadness also pervades this glow of happiness, in that no\\ is, after a fashion, a parting of the ways, old associations must be broken, 01(1 bonds must be severed. But, looking back over these days, filled for the most part with exquisite happiess, will not our old associates seem the nearer for being co-partners in that time of joy? Surely the fond memory of these scenes cannot but make our lives sweeter and our associations and friendships stronger, holding them as things which resist all ravages of time. Still will. we exist in each other's hearts while the memory of these happy days is yet green. For our professors' guidance and instruction wve have been profoundly grateful. Owing to the smallness of our college the personal element that has entered our college life has been very pleasant. Through them, wve realize we have attained that which wve have. Without their assistance our craft would have swamped, but Nvithi their guiding hand wve have safely reached
our goal. For this wve wish to extend our sincerest gratitude.
We have endeavored by our actions to guide the footsteps of our
followers and deemn them now strong enough to walk without our assistance. And so wve pass out into the wide world Nvith unfaltering steps, with all the confidence of youth, hoping to have left traces of our course through college ineradicable by time, through virtue of our good works. And lastly wve close our college career with all good wishes to our college professors, for the steady growth of our Alma Mater, and lastly for a successful career to the class of 1911 in whatsoever career they, have chosen.
J. W. SHANDS,
Class Historian.









UNIVERSITY OF FLoR113A 49


CLASS OF 1911 SIXTEEN YEARS AFTER GRADUATION
JOHNSTON & MAY,
Attorneys-at-Law,
Butte, Mont.
March 15, 1927.
MR. J. N. LAWTON,
Alumni Editor of "The Seminole,"
Gainesville, Florida.

DEAR SIR: Your letter of January 4th reached mie here four days ago, after having followed me all over the United States and Canada. My business kept me in Alaska for some time past, and mail there wvas delivered infrequently, so that explains wh!y I had not received your valued communication sooner.
Last night wvas the first time since my return to Butte that I have had a chance to give your letter much thought. To conjure up the right line of thought, I pulled out my old black briar pipe, which has beenemy constant companion since my Sophomore year at the University of Florida. I pulled a large Morris chair in front of a cheery oak fire and prepared to take a trip back to Gainesville and separately follow out the life of each one of my classmates to the present day.
It was an ideal night for retrospections, cold and clear out with a high north wind whistling around the corners of the house. InIside, my bachelor's den wxas lighted only by the great crackling logs in the old style fire-place. By the flickering light I could see Over in the corner of the room the faint outlines of an orange and blue pennant which has been with me since my Seni or year. Onl thle table at my side was a stack of SeiInoles,'' the most valued books in my library; around and about mle were letters and newspaper clippings galore, all concerning the University of Florida anl especially the class of 1911.
I had read them all over, and as I lay back in my chair pLfing out great clouds of Prince Albert smoke, I could see again, in thle delicious grey vapor, the faces of my classmates. As each one passed before me with that old familiar expression on Is face, anl ineffably sweet sadness stole over m-e, a longing for the old (lays in Gainesville.









so THE SEMINOLE


But I fear I bore you with the retrospective musings of an old
bachelor. What you want is information as to the whereabouts of the members of my class. And nowx I shall cease intruding on your timne and give you, as far as I amn able, what you desire. I am very glad indeed that I can be of service to you in your work for the annual and trust that all the classes will respond, so that this year's
Seminole "' may contain a complete history of the alumni of the
University of F'loridla.
It is hardly necessary to mention Bernard Langston who has
kept the whole world ringing with laughter at his brilliant witticisms in "' Life.'' Everybody knows what a great improvement hie has
made in that weekly since hie became editor, two years ago.
Pat" 1 Johnston had a brilliant career as Justice-of-the-Peace in
Kissimmee, after which hie migrated West and grew up with the country. He is now,\ a prominent lawyer in Butte with a rather
large practice.
Surrency is a favorite at the court of the Sultan of Sulu and has
lately been appointed poet laureate. As a side line he is Imperial
Councillor on International Lawv.
Craige Epperson gave up a successful law practice four years
ago to go as a missionary to the Eskimos. From all reports he is
doing a great work among these poor people.
Ira Soar is spieler for Barnum & Bailey's side show. I hear that
he is an unprecedented success and is drawing the largest salary of any
spieler in the business.
Douglas Perry and Charles Overman are construction engineers
and have lately completed a bridge across the Mississippi for the
Santa Fe Railroad, of which Mr. 0. W. Drane is president.
"Happy Wade was too good-natured and optimistic to make.
any great success, but hie is an honored and respected attorney in a
South Florida city.
Charles Rivers electrified the world with his eloquence and wvon
an easy way to fame. He will probably be the next Democratic nominee for president, and all indications are that that will almost
equal an election, for the Democrats are practically sure to wvin.
Harvard atmosphere seems to have given Joe Shands the
energy necessary for his ability to show itself. He is nowv attorney for several prominent corporations and a leader in the New York








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 5


"400." His prophecy that he would be married four times has a good chance of proving true, for he is only thirty-six now and has already gotten rid of three wives a la Reno.
"Judge" Carter went back on his nick-name and became a minister. That must have been his calling for he has proven a wonderful success as a reformer.
Jim Hunter took up Y. M. C. A. work and it has been mainly through his efforts that University whist has ceased to be so prominent as a college game. He married a stunningly beautiful young lady, member of the Newport elite and a noted suffragette.
Romeo Sealey has made a good record as an educator of our youth. He is now superintendent of schools in Atlanta. I saw him there several months ago and he is the same old Sealey only about fifteen pounds lighter than when he was in school.
Fred Frei was married on February 3d last, to Miss Ura Peach, of Helena, Mont. He is in some way connected with the mining operations in this part of the country, and has made a moderate success.
That is about the extent of my knowledge of my classmates; I only wish it was more, but what there is I trust may be of use to you in your work.
If in future I can be of any use to you or any others on the staff of the annual, please let me know, for it is always more than a pleasure to be of service to my Alma Mater.
Trusting that it may be my good fortune to be with you at the approaching Commencement, I remain Very truly yours, PHIL S. MAY.









52 THE SEMINOLE












THREE OF A KIND


First there is the lawyer, Who with his magic touch, Will not allow the doctor To charge poor folks too much.


Next there is the doc or; What office does he fill? Oh yes! to keep the man from fainting, When the lawyer hands the bill.


Then there is the preacher, Who points out the righteous pathSays when a bill is presented, Not to let it rouse your wrath.


And what about the business man?
Poor fellow, he's "hard up." He don't do much of anything, But keeps a coughing up."








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 53














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54 THE SEMINOLE



























































JUNIOR ACADEMIC CLASS.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 5


JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY

HEN evolution fails to evolve, and Freshmen cease to be
fresh, then vill class histories cease to be written. But until then, college annuals vill be filled with the wondrous achievements of the Freshmen as they see themselves; of the Sophomores as they imagine themselves, and of the Juniors as they really are. This is the only apology we have for this history. The ascendency of man is inevitable, and in acquiring this fame ve are not to be held responsible.
From the Everglades to the farthest boundaries of West Florida ve entered here in a very primitive and ignorant state-Freshmen.
One there waswho had been reared in among the "gators," His very aesthetic soul and vivid imagination had been acquired in his close association with these winsome beasts- Still we had hopes for hi m.
Another there was who, in his tadpole state, had come under the influence of a great and famous college. There be had gathered the belief that Greek and Latin were modern languages and spoken in the land of the Prodigal Son. He was ambitious and desired to probe into the mysteries of these wonderful languages from which he believed that all knowledge could be derived. But after a few months of this enlightened atmosphere he became disillusioned. He learned that the land of the Prodigal Son had passed into oblivion, and its language likewise; and that the course of the fatted calf lay in the other direction. He then decided to enlist among the forerunners of civilization and with transit and chain invade the vast wilderness and capture wealth asleep in her den. But from all dreams there is an awakening. He discovered that mathematics was a study only for the minds of the dull and tireless. He straightway decided that the only road to fame lay in the research of natural science. But the road was long and hedged on all sides by tile B. S. studies. Near the beginning was a narrow gate and above it was the inscription PHYSICS and guarding this gate was a ferocious monster with long limbs and bulging eyes who demanded a pass from every weary traveler. He saw this apparition and turned back in dread. In vain he looked for some way to turn, but found none. He sought the Good Book for consolation and the following words came to his relief: Dust thou art, and to dust thou shalt return." He immediately took up agriculture and as far as we know has found no more forbidding objects than his professors. He is now congratulating himself that he has unhitched his wagon from the stars and hooked up to a mule--Some have hopes for him yet.








56 THE SEMINOLE


We also have two who are given to seeing visions and dreaming
dreams. One sees himself the rising lawyer of the future generation, and so great will be his persuasive ability that he will be able to change a straight wire into a corkscrew by mere argument. The other sees himself the only "Simon Pure" performer of miracles, but what Freshmen would call a "Sky Pilot"-No not an aviator, for the profession is altogether too recent for one so profound.But the "Jimmies" follow their pleasant dreams. In vain they pursue the elusive Goddess of the forgotten languages. Yet these men have acquired great learning; from Latin they have come to realize the great importance and significance of the word "ego,"
and from Greek they have learned that French is the easier of the two.
We are noted also for our men of persistence. For four long
years one of us has chased the Bird that speaks all modern languages.
Sometimes he has come to believe that this Bird must be a Parrot.
But alas! when he is nearly upon him and has him almost entangled in the meshes of the net of his knowledge and the Bird flies away with a mocking Caw! Caw there is no doubtabout the color of his feathers.
There is yet another who has been with us for five years. He
stays because of his love for drill, and his hopes of getting a corporal's commission. But alas! the rules governing the appointment of corporals read thus:
"No man shall be appointed corporal (1) who has had previous
experience in any military company-he must be green. (2) Unless he is below the average in intelligence. (3) Unless he be conceited enough to believe that he only is the real article. (4) Unless by his appointment the number of students at the University will be increased-especially in the sub-fresh Department and the Pedagogical Course--and its political prestige in the State be furthered."
He has given up all hopes.
The rest of the Class have no besetting sins so may rest in peace.
Of the classes in school at the present the Seniors are noted for
their great learning-book-worms. The Subs got the highest number of points at the track-meet--one point for each man who entered. The Sophs and Fresh are out of the question, there was not even a class rush between them. The Sophs had cold feet-the
Fresh had cold feet.
But the Juniors hold all records for foot ball. In our Freshman
year there were eight of our men on the 'Varsity; in our Sophomore year we had six there, and this year only five Juniors tried for the team and five Juniors made the team. Five of the men on the AllFlorida foot ball team this year came from the fourteen men who
compose the junior Class at the University of Florida.






. .. .......... .U NIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 57






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UNIVERSITY OF FL.ORII)A 59



JUNIOR LAW CLASS HISTORY

HE Junior Law Class leaves this short sketch of their
hurried existence, in order for you to know, that the class of Nineteen-twvelve, left their "footprints on the sands of time." Perhaps the next freshet will erase these footprints, perhaps the Juniors of next year will so far overshadow us, as to cause us to be forgotten, but, nevertheless we will live happily with the consolation that we have no one to blame but ourselves.
We will not soon forget the pleasant hour,; we have spent with the Seniors, listening to their long discussions, on subjects, although beyond our comprehension, w\e knew were terrible in their magnificence. Nor, will it be easy for us to banish from our memory tilhe many and pleasant hours spent with the faculty.
Perhaps, you will think this history incomplete without personal mention of some of our most conspicious members, but, from our President, the genial Dick" to the lowest among us, it would be hard indeed to select anyone deserving especial praise without feeling that wve had overlooked a man equally meriting it.
Our class as a whole has maintained a high average in all its studies, and if it be true, that The boy is the father of the man," the class of Nineteen-twelve bids fair, to send forth some of the ablest legal talent of the next generation.
Although our task has been to follow and not to lead, to take counsel and not to give it, wve realize as we advance to take the place of the Seniors, that our duties will become more solemn, our task more difficult. And, \ve cannot help but feel, perhaps because of our deep friendship, that our task has been rendered easier, our burden has been lessened, for the reason that our Senior brothers have gone before us and blazed the trail.
All of our remembrances and pleasant recollections are stimulated and nurtured when we realize, that we still have another year at the University.
j. R. E.









60 THE SEMINOLE











THE NIGHT WIND


The night wind carne up at the noon of the night,
And lie sang in the tree top so gray and so bare,
A brave anthem for freedom for you and for me,
With the s"'irit of God riding forth on the air.


But I heard not the voice calling down from the sky,
For the rattle of the windows, the moan of the sea,
The groaning of tree tops, the swish of the rain,
Filled my mind with forebodings of evil to be.


Much my life has been like to the wind in the night,
It has promise of honor and freeborn to gain,
If I let but the tones of the anthem it sings
Take the place of the rattle and roar of the rain.


Pluck up courage, sad heart, when the rain is past by,
Corners the gentle voice as it came to the seer
In the mouth of the cave, when he covered his face
From the things of the earth, for his Lord to appear.
F. E. MACY.































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UNIVERSITY OF FLORI DA 61




















































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UNIVERSITY OF FLO RIDA 6 3


THE SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY
HE Class of 1913 commenced in the latter end of September 1909, when thirty green, uncouth Freshmen passed out from the Examination Conmittee. They were taken in charge by their elder brothers, the Class AV of 1912, and were shown the whys and wherefores of
University I fe.
The 1912 Class that evening put the 1913 Class through a stage of initiation, which although it did not prove very pleasant to the latter, yet proved very beneficial; for some of the so-called freshness was rapidly eliminated.
Within a short space of time, the class of 1913 showed its business capacity by organizing. ihey elected officers to steer them through the ensuing year. R. IL. Jarrell was elected president, and A. G. Shands was elected secretary and treasurer. These otffcers showed throughout the year that the confidence of the class in their ability had not been misplaced.
In athletic lines five men were on the foot ball team. ''hese were Tenney, Moody, Pile, XVaggener and Edgerton. Four represented the class on the base ball team. These were Tenney, Smith, Davis and Edgerton. The gymnasium representatives were five in all. These were A. G. Shands, E. G. Curry, 'Tfenney, Rowlette and McIntosh. The participants in track events for the class were l)avis, K. G. Curry, Tenney, Wilson, Rowlette, Brooks, Henry, Wager, Finney, Pile and Edgerton, eleven in all. 'T'hese men made a better average than any other class in the track events.
In oratory the class was represented in a Declamation contest at commencement against the class of 1912 by Jarrell, Henry, A. G. Hands and Treadwell. She lost the contest, but her men put forth a splendid display of speaking.
The history so far, goes to show that an important part in events of 1909 and 1910 the class of '13 played. The second era of the class of '13 was entered upon September, 1910. Again the class \vent before the Examination Committee, having lost some of its members, but received new faces in addition. Barely had the class become comfortably settled in the routine of another year at the U" niversity, when she organized. (). E. Barnes was elected president; R. B. Fuller, vice-president, and L. S. Lafitte secretary and treasurer.
In Athletic lines up to date this year, the foot ball team was represented by Davis, Edgerton, Rowlett, from the class of '13.
Having entered as green as grass was ever green, in 1909, the members of the class are now as fine a set of looking fellows as ever talked the face of the earth, showing the genuine type of University trained men.









64 THE SEMINOLE















THE DOG-FENNEL


Look kindly on the lowly weed, In the wayside gravel growing; It struggles on without our heed, It needeth not our sowing.


With leaves of green and crown of white, With golden center glowing, It hides the barren earth from sight, Its modest merits showing.


Thanks, thanks to thee, my humble friend, For the lesson thou art giving; For our lot here may be hard, Yet life is worth the living.
E:. EAACY.














UNIVERSITY op FLORIDA 65
........... -- - ------------



















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FUNSHINIAN CLASS.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 67


THE FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY
S EPTEMBER the 27th was a great day for the University,
for it witnessed not only the opening of the term, but also the birth of the class of '14. However, the University, with the exception of the Freshmen themselves, does not seem to realize this fact. There have been few bonfires and little or no rejoicing, yet the class is beginning to come to the front in College affairs. It will make itself felt if only as a thorn in the side of Sophomores. This class is made up of new students, mostly. These are becoming thoroughly initiated into the nev life, and are beginning to look forward to their next year in school, when they vill have a chance to teach the lowly freshmen the ways which every one must learn. Each member of this year's class has had the word rat stamped upon his brain. They have all indulged in cold shover baths, running gauntlets and other unusual things at all hours of the night for unexplained reasons. While they have become accustomed to be clumped, they object to striking the ceiling during the operation.. Another thing they would like to see omitted, is sleeping in dress uniforms. '1'o a person who is not naturally stiff as a ramrod, this is extremely uipleasant. The Sophs, Nvho are always joking with Freshmen, are going about the campus talking about a class fight. While the gentle natures of the Freshmen scorns such a thing as an exhibition of the animal nature of man, the day is soon to come when their patience will be exhausted. Then when the cry of mop up" is raised, the Sophomores will disappear, and their trails wvill lead to the tall timber. A careful search wvill then find them in the tops of said tall timber. The class of 1914 was represented on the foot ball team, and \x'ill be on the base ball team. However, the Freshmen have paid more attention to the things that are worth while, and have devoted more time to study than to athletics. As most of them are engineering students, descriptive geometry may have kept them from the gridiron and diamond; for it can take up any amount of time and energy. Still some went out "to be run int) and developed," as one of the Professors has put it. So this class will go on to graduation, large in numbers, merits and hearts. Its members call it the best in college,
"But there's so much good in the worst of us,
And so much bad in the best of us, That it hardly behooves any of us
To talk about the rest of us."
So instead of cheering for any individual class, first give nine "rahs" for Florida and nine for the Freshman class. May ve all outguess the Profs' and be Sophomores next year.









68 THE SEMINOLE









I knocked at the door of knowledge, And knowledge said, "come in." I left the street of ignorance, The street in which I'd been.


I wandered down the hall of thought On study's roughened floor, And found common sense and knowledge Knocking at Wisdom's door.
J. R. E.

























THE FAI01.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 69






















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SUB-FRESHNIAN CLASS.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 71



THE SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY

HE Sub-Freshman Class launched its bark on the stream of
education, September 27, 1910, with some thirty-five souls on board. The thermometer of aristoracy and self-importance stood at one hundred and five in the shade on starting, but before twenty hours had flown, the mercury in the tube stood at zero in the sun. Gradually the number has diminished, until at the close of the first semester, thirty were left, who now feel that as Paul said: "All things must be proved," for Things equal to the same thing are equal to each other," or that is what Mannig said, and he ought to know, since his intellect is sharpened by personal acquaintance with many among the fair of earth."
The Sub-Freshman Class is thoroughly organized. Who can ever forget that the shy, timed WV. H. \Wynn is President; that A. K. Harper, the man with the automobile, is Vice-President; and last, but by no means least, the sturdy Hancock of state wide foot ball fame, is Secretary and Treasurer?
In calling the roll of things accomplished, one is comforted by such names as Knowles, called Rat by the Sophomores, but known among the Sub-Freshmen as Mister Knowles. It is an exciting event when Mr. Knowles, in words of five or six syllables, explains his views on English. At such times the audience sleeps with more than ordinary joy. All feel that Mister KInowles is destined to become immortal. And Ricou and Freeman the Physics sharks," with what fluency they can explain gravity. It is a marvelous sight just to see them "shooting" the professor. The steely armed Hancock is the geometry shark. When he explains that the square of the Hippotamus is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides, there is scarcely a dry eye in the audience, even the professor looks far from sad. Mr. Wynn is the historical shark, and he led these classes for the first semester. "Keep it up you pigeon-toed rat," as the Sophs would remark. And what shall wve say of Rosborough, the dainty; and Feldman, the wise; Mershon, the soldier; Miller, the cheerful; Kilgore, the sad; Joyner, the eminent; McIntosh, the lazy; and McElya, the frank. It is hoped, when with tears in their eyes, Ward, Spencer, Wahnish, Parazine, Dupree, Dean, Bishop, and Armstrong, say to the beloved professors: Ve are indebted to you for all wve know," that they will not answer: Do not mention such a trifle, young men.








72 THE SEMINOLE





A SUB-FRESHMAN'S QUERY


If you had a 'ittle boy 'est like me
Would you make him wear his pants Up above the knee?
Er would you get him high-topped boots, So 'at they would meet,
Or would you leave a bare place 'Tween his knees and feet?


Would you buy him galluses, Some 'at he could stretch, And a pocket knife wif two blades Like Santa Claus'll fetch At Christmas time for all the boys 'At love their uncle Jim? If you do that for your boy, Den I wish I's him.
E. E. MACY.

















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98 rHF SEMINOLE
























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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDIA 99









GOD O'ER ALL


In the bleak and chilly autumnn,
When the leaves are turning brown, The bluebird wanders Southward
From the hedge-rows and the down.


The red-breast and the blue-jay
Have gone from out the wood; The squirrel shivers as he runs
And stores his winter food.


The Bob-\Vhite whirrs across the snlow
To distant fields of corn,
Where the slothful farmer left his crops
Which should be in the barn.


But, when the white robed winter
Has spread his shroud o'er all, The chick-a-dee still whistles
From the wood his plaintive call.


The God who makes the winter
With its shroud of pearly snow
Will temper still for his shorn lambs
The coldest winds that bl10w.









100 THE SEMINOLE























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Y. M. C. A C A I I INKT.








102 THE SEMINOLE


YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION

CABI NET
President, W. B. Hilton. Vice-President, G. J. Grace.
Secretary, F. J. Frei. Treasurer, T. D. Felton.
Dr. J. A. Thackston, Chairman Advisory Board.
U. R. Blount, Chairman Personal Workers' Group.
L A. Perkins, Chairman Bible Study Committee.
R. Rt Taylor, Chairman Religious Meetings Committee.
Fred Hock, Chairman Membership Committee.
S. Macintosh, Chairman Social Committee.
0. W. Drane, Chairman Special Work Committee.
Fred Mason, Chairman Prayer Band Groups.
0. F. Burger, Chairman Finance Committee.
Sidney Godwin, Business Manager Student Hand Book.
R. M. Sealey, Reporter Y. M. C. A. News.
J. A. Williams, Pianist.
A. E. Booth, Pianist.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Dr. Murphree. Dr. Thackston. Prof. Fawcett.
A branch of the college division of the Young Men's Christian
Association of Amnerica, has existed at the University of Florida since the opening of the institution, and has had upon its rolls a large per
cent. of the students and the faculty.
As its name denotes, the object of the Y. M. C. A. is, first of
all, to bring together the Christian students of the University into a definite organization Nvhich shall serve as a centre of religious life upon the campus and as a channel of communication with similar organizations through the college world. Thus banded together, they receive help and encouragement from each other in their struggle and temptations; and through concerted effort and under proper leadership, they are enabled more effectually to extend their
influence for good.
While as yet the Y. M. C. A. has no suitable headquarters
(though it is hoped that this may soon be remedied by Christian generosity throughout the State), its activity extends in several directions. A regular meeting is held every Sunday afternoon in the University Chapel Nvhere a talk from some student, member of the Faculty, or invited guest is accompanied by song, prayer and reading








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 103


of scripture. These talks are usually plain, practical discussions of the difficulties which beset the student trying to lead a Christian life. Bible classes under suitable leadership are also organized and a zealous and intelligent study of various aspects of the Scriptures is being pushed with enthusiasm. In addition, the Association gives annually a reception to welcome the newv students and through its various committees seeks to help the newv man over the initial difficulties and embarrassments incident to entering the Uniiversity. The work of the Association would be greatly facilitated and~ its usefulness extended if a suitable building could be provided by voluntary contributions from the Christian people of the State.
All students are eligible to membership, and the Association is desirous of including every young man attending the Uniiversity upon its rolls.
Only active members of evangelical churches can hold offices or cast a ballot, but all other privileges are cordially extended to the whole student body.
BIBLE STUDY
There are two great factors in a mian's development, neither of which can be neglected and at the same time give us a full, wel developed manhood.
These two are education and religion. Education gives inlsighlt while religion gives appreciation. The University and] Y. M. C. A. must stand for both to be true to their mission. The curriculum stands primarily for the first, while its many varied moral lessons and the study of The Book, the Bible, give the second. We must know the Bible, to be educated, and must adapt our lives to its teachings to be religious.
The Y. M. C. A., recognizing this, has been Conductin1g during most of the year twvo Bible study classes. One for the Juniiors, Seniors and Graduate students, the other for the lower classmen. The first is devoting its time to the study "'The Bible, Its Origin and Nature,'' by Dr. M~arcus Dods. In this class the fellows are brought to appreciate more and more the fact that the Bible should and can be accepted as a guide by college.
The lower classmen are studying the Life of Paul and are there getting ideals that can not fail to uplift.
We most earnestly ask all University fellows to come and join us.

















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FA 82M 40"Ow Iwo









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 105














THE YOCUM LITERARY SOCIETY

PRESI DENTS.
Phil S. May, B. G. Langston, L. A. Perkins.
MEMBERS.
Bird, T. B. Henderson, R. P. Mason, F. R.
Booth, A. E. Horton, H. W. McElya, N.
Bryant, T. W. Howard, G. L. McIntosh, S. F.
Butler, J. Howze, J. A. Mills, W.
Cox, H. R. Jarrell, R. L. Morgan, L. R.
Douglass, R. C. Johnson, L. F. Overman, C. H.
Embry, J. A. Knowles, G. B. Owens, F. E.
Felton, T. D. Knowles, H. P. Sealey, R. M.
Fuller, R. B. Lafitte, L. S. Storter, N. S.
Gist, J. F. LaRoche, C. C. Taylor, R. R.
Godwin, S. W. Leitner, S. Tenney, L. E.
Goulding, R. L. Macintosh, S. White, R. R.
Grace, J. T. Macy, E. E. Williams, J. A.








































































N1,kitslIALL SOCIVTY.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 107
















JOHN MARSHALL DEBATING SOCIETY

OFFICERS.
President ..... W. A. Surrency
Vice President .......... Cason
Attorney General .. ...... ..Walker Secretary and Treasurer . .. Moon MEMBERS.
Faculty :
Dean A. J. Farrah, Prof. Trussler, Prof. Kixmiller. Students:
L. E. Wade, T. S. Trantham, Devane, Mershon, Greene, Roland, Crocker, Stewart, Hathaway, Buie, King, Huffaker, Greene, Floyd; Johnston, Crews, Epperson, Randall, Keene, Keene, Ed.; Bullock, I-ester, Rivers, Bowers, Carter, Osborne, Mathis.









108 THE SEMINOLE








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'717 TRANSIT CLUB.








110 THE SEMINOLE


THE TRANSIT CLUB

N the spring of 1909, as the flowers and the trees were
bursting into blossom and bloom, the Civil Engineering students of this institution met, and under the able leadership of the loving Captain, perfected an organization, known as the The Transit Club. Our ship of state was guided over the storm seas of the year of 1909 by Hon.
W. Gric Gibbs. Following this year wve had as the Royal High 'l'ransit Man, Major R. Dennis Rader. Following Major Rader's term, in the year 1910-11, our ship was steered by none other than
the Right Reverend D. Starke Perry.
It is with tears in our eyes that w\ve note the loss to our department our friend, instructor and advisor and wvell-beloved Captain.
But as the fading sun was setting in the west, behold to the eastward arose another sun, more youthful and more sublime than that which had passed. Since his arrival and under his able leadership the Club has been able to make rapid progress towards that high and inevitable standard which w\ve, as engineers, are some day predestined to reach.
In him we have found a friend and tutor who was far beyond our expectations. We hope that the years which are to come will be as bright and profitable as those which have passed. With this w\ve bid
you all a fond adieu and close our tale of woe.
"THE TRIO."
D. Starke Perry, . . . . . .Royal High Transit Man
J. P. Hunter, . . .......... Royal High Levelman
C. Henry Overman, . Royal High Recorder and Keeper of the Seal T. I)avid Felton . . . . . . Ordinary Rodman
HONORARY MEMBERS
W. L. Seeley.
Major E. S. Walker. Professor A. J. Weichardt
Dr. J. R. Benton. Captain N. H. Cox.
NON-RESIDENT MEMBERS
W. W. Gibbs, Florida.
R. D. Rader, Phillippines. D. F. Thomas, Florida.
W. C. Taylor, Phillippines. H. L. Thompson, Florida.
MEMBERS
Blount. Hunter. Swanson.
Bouis. Overman. Tenney.
Felton. Perry. Thrasher.
Fuller. Rowlett. Treadwell.
Howze. Simpson White.
























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D)RD K E 1, VI N EN(;INEEItIN(; SOCI








112 THE SEMINOLE












T1HE LORD KELVIN ENGINEERING SOCIETY

Fred J. Firei. ............President
N. S. Stortet.. .. ........Vice-President
E~. R. Wager .. .. .....ecretary and Treasurer
S. Macintosh ... ............Reporter

T'he Lord Kelvin Engineering Society is formed by a group of
the students in these lines. Trhe society meets every alternate Thurs(lay for the purpose of social intercourse and improvement of general knowledge along Engineering lines. 'Discussions of the Engineering problems of the (lay are held by the members, wvho give their views on the question, and thus look at the problem from all sides.
Valuable information and statistics are gained from these talks. A member is selected every meeting to be prepared with a paper to be read at the next meeting. When the time comes around, hie is allowed thirty minutes for reading his work, and then it is left for
open (discussion.
TIhe Society will have a number of interesting lectures on the
subject of Engineering by members of the faculty. Some of these Will be illustrated by lantern slides. All agree that the work of the
Society is most successful and instructive.








































































TEAMIEHW CLUB.








114 THE SEMINOLE












THE TEACHERS' CLUB

O FF1 CERS.
R. M. Sealev ......President
E. E. Macv .. ...... Vice-President
F. R. Mason Secretary-Treasurer
Dr. J. A. Thackston ...... Critic
MEMBERS.
L. R. Bevis Walter B. Hilton
F. J. Bevis R. L. Joyner
P. D. Bullard G. B. Knowles
A. C. Crews T. C. Ray
R. Lee Goulding J. F. Russ
G. J. Grace C. S. Swilley
J. T. (;race J. Angus Williams
NON RESIDENT MEMBERS.
R. A. Dukes J. A. McKinney
W. C. Finney J. G. Malphurs
T. G. Futch L. J. Miller
R. L. Grace P. C. O'Haver
R. A. Greene L. A. Pinholster
J. M. Syfrett








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 115


THE TEACHERS' CLUB

HE Teachers' Club of the University of Florida is made
up of teachers, those who are preparing to teach, and others who are interested in the work. Most of the members are students in the Department of Education.
The Club was organized in 1910 and is now a permanent feature of our college life. Meetings are held weekly which are always interesting and profitable. From the great interest shown by the members it is reasonable to predict that the Club will gain in strength from year to year. The purposes of the Club are, to promote interest in the profession of teaching; to study and discuss questions of vital interest to the educational world; and to help us as teachers to know each other and our work better. We attribute much of our success as a Club to the untiring interest shown in our work and the constant aid given us by the Head of our Department, Dr. John A. Thackston.




















T1"H TI'IACIIERI, 1 X11. 'IU









116 THE SEMINOLE


































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(iLEI CLUB.








118 THE SEMINOLE
















THE GLEE CLUB

MEMBERS.
A. A. Murp)hree.
Becker, N. A. Mays, D. H.
Bevis, F. J. Perkins, L. A.
Blount, U. R. Poage, W. B.
Booth, A. E. Price, T. E.
Casler, E. T. Taylor, R. R.
Elliot, W. G. Trantham, T. S.
Farr, J. W. Wager, E. R.
Grace, G. J. Wahnish, S. A.
Grace, J. T. Ward, S. R.
Goulding, R. L. Webb, Q. C.
Jacobson, J. E. Williams, J. A.
































































i,..\,r s,rATI(,jS IMIJBIT HOON.L




































































NX P ER I M ENT STAT 1 N 1, 11 tl t A I t Y.














UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 121






























































































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A4MICULTUPAL CLUB.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORI DA 123







AGRICULTURAL CLUB

HE AGRICULTURAL CLUB is a student organization
for the benefit of those taking work in Agricultural courses. Much interest wvas shown in the many good talks that were given by members of the faculty, nemnbers of the Experiment Station staff, and by the students throughout the year. Relations have been established with the Association of Agricultural College Clubs. This vill be a great benefit to the Club in the future.
OFFICERS
R. P. Price ............... President
C. W. DeLong .. ...... .Vice-President
F. W. Hock ....... Secretary and Treasurer
MEMBERS OF EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF
Rolphs, P. H. Fawcett, H. S. Dickerson, Alfred
McQuarrie, C. K. Scott, J. M. Burger, 0. F.
Floyd, B. F. Schnaubel, John Loftin, U. C.
MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY
Vernon, J. J. Floyd, W. L.
Flint, E. R. Maltby, R. D.
STUDENT MEMBERS
Baker, A. A. Fryer, H. W. Manning, C. W.
Bourlay, F. H. Gist, J. F. Price, R. P.
Cochran, D. D. Grace, J. T. Soar, I. E.
Davis, C. E. Hock, F. W. Stokes, F. Y.
DeLong, C. W. King, R. L. Webb, Q. C.
Frei, F. J. Zetrouer, A. J.








124 THE SEMINOLE




































THE MASONIC CLUB

FRATIRES IN UNIVERSITATE W. B. Hilton E. E. Macy C. 0. Rivers
FRATRES IN FACULT'A'FE A. A. Murphree, M. A. LL. D. N. H. Cox, B. S.
A. J. Farrah, M. A., LL. M. J. M. Scott, B. S.
J. R. Benton, M. A., Ph. D. R. D). Malthy, B. S.
J. j. Vernon, B. Agr., M. S. A. G. E. Pile











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 125
























































GKIVIIAN